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Sample records for irradiation induced damage

  1. DNA damage induced by radionuclide internal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Fengmei; Zhao Jingyong; Hong Chengjiao; Lao Qinhua; Wang Liuyi; Yang Shuqin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the DNA damage of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in rats exposed to radionuclide internal irradiation. Methods: The radionuclides were injected into the rats and single cell get electrophoresis (SCGE) was performed to detect the length of DNA migration in the rat PBMC. Results: DNA migration in the rat PBMC increased with accumulative dose or dose-rate. It showed good relationship of dose vs. response and of dose-rate vs. response, both relationship could be described as linear models. Conclusion: Radionuclide internal irradiation could cause DNA damage in rat PBMC. (authors)

  2. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  3. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  4. Damage induced in semiconductors by swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levalois, M.; Marie, P.

    1999-01-01

    The behaviour of semiconductors under swift heavy ion irradiation is different from that of metals or insulators: no spectacular effect induced by the inelastic energy loss has been reported in these materials. We present here a review of irradiation effects in the usual semiconductors (silicon, germanium and gallium arsenide). The damage is investigated by means of electrical measurements. The usual mechanisms of point defect creation can account for the experimental results. Besides, some results obtained on the wide gap semiconductor silicon carbide are reported. Concerning the irradiation effects induced by heavy ions in particle detectors, based on silicon substrate, we show that the deterioration of the detector performances can be explained from the knowledge of the substrate properties which are strongly perturbed after high doses of irradiation. Finally, some future ways of investigation are proposed. The silicon substrate is a good example to compare the irradiation effects with different particles such as electrons, neutrons and heavy ions. It is then necessary to use parameters which account for the local energy deposition, in order to describe the damage in the material

  5. Clustered DNA damage induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidkova, M.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K; Stepan, V.; Vysin, L.; Sihver, L.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces in DNA strand breaks, damaged bases and modified sugars, which accumulate with increasing density of ionizations in charged particle tracks. Compared to isolated DNA damage sites, the biological toxicity of damage clusters can be for living cells more severe. We investigated the clustered DNA damage induced by protons (30 MeV) and high LET radiation (C 290 MeV/u and Fe 500 MeV/u) in pBR322 plasmid DNA. To distinguish between direct and indirect pathways of radiation damage, the plasmid was irradiated in pure water or in aqueous solution of one of the three scavengers (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, dimethylsulfoxide, and glycylglycine). The goal of the contribution is the analysis of determined types of DNA damage in dependence on radiation quality and related contribution of direct and indirect radiation effects. The yield of double strand breaks (DSB) induced in the DNA plasmid-scavenger system by heavy ion radiation was found to decrease with increasing scavenging capacity due to reaction with hydroxyl radical, linearly with high correlation coefficients. The yield of non-DSB clusters was found to occur twice as much as the DSB. Their decrease with increasing scavenging capacity had lower linear correlation coefficients. This indicates that the yield of non-DSB clusters depends on more factors, which are likely connected to the chemical properties of individual scavengers. (authors)

  6. Correlation of simulated TEM images with irradiation induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Almeida, P. de; Almazouzi, A.; Victoria, M.

    2000-01-01

    Crystal damage induced by irradiation is investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled to molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The displacement cascades are simulated for energies ranging from 10 to 50 keV in Al, Ni and Cu and for times of up to a few tens of picoseconds. Samples are then used to perform simulations of the TEM images that one could observe experimentally. Diffraction contrast is simulated using a method based on the multislice technique. It appears that the cascade induced damage in Al imaged in weak beam exhibits little contrast, which is too low to be experimentally visible, while in Ni and Cu a good contrast is observed. The number of visible clusters is always lower than the actual one. Conversely, high resolution TEM (HRTEM) imaging allows most of the defects contained in the sample to be observed, although experimental difficulties arise due to the low contrast intensity of the smallest defects. Single point defects give rise in HTREM to a contrast that is similar to that of cavities. TEM imaging of the defects is discussed in relation to the actual size of the defects and to the number of clusters deduced from MD simulations

  7. Estimation of γ irradiation induced genetic damage by Ames test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, Eiko

    1999-01-01

    Mutation by 60 Co γ irradiation was studied in five different histidine-requiring auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium. The strains TA98 (sensitive to frameshift) and TA100 (sensitive to base-pair substitution) were irradiated (10-84 Gy and 45-317 Gy, respectively) and revertants were counted. TA98 exhibited radiation-induced revertants, 2.8 fold of spontaneous revertants, although no significant increase was detected in TA100. Then, three other frameshift-sensitive strains TA1537, TA1538 and TA94 were irradiated in a dose of 61-167 Gy. Only in TA94, revertants increased 3.5 fold. Since spontaneous revertants are known to be independent of cell density, a decrease of bacterial number by γ irradiation was confirmed not to affect the induced revertants by dilution test. Thus the standard Ames Salmonella assay identified γ irradiation was confirmed not to affect the induced revertants by dilution test. Thus the standard Ames Salmonella assay identified γ irradiation as a mutagenetic agent. The mutagenicity of dinitropyrene, a mutagen widely existing in food, and dismutagenicity of boiling water insoluble fraction of Hizikia fusiforme, edible marine alga, were tested on γ induced revertant formation in TA98 and TA94. Dinitropyrene synergistically increased γ induced revertants and Hizikia insoluble fraction reduced the synergistic effect of dinitropyrene dependently on the concentration. (author)

  8. Edaravone protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Liu, Yinghui; Dong, Liangliang; Chu, Xiaoxia

    2015-03-01

    Radiation-induced cellular injury is attributed primarily to the harmful effects of free radicals, which play a key role in irradiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective efficacy of edaravone, a licensed clinical drug and a powerful free radical scavenger that has been tested against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in studies of various diseases. Edaravone was pre-incubated with lymphocytes for 2 h prior to γ-irradiation. It was found that pretreatment with edaravone increased cell viability and inhibited generation of γ-radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lymphocytes exposed to 3 Gy γ-radiation. In addition, γ-radiation decreased antioxidant enzymatic activity, such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the level of reduced glutathione. Conversely, treatment with 100 μM edaravone prior to irradiation improved antioxidant enzyme activity and increased reduced glutathione levels in irradiated lymphocytes. Importantly, we also report that edaravone reduced γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis through downregulation of Bax, upregulation of Bcl-2, and consequent reduction of the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The current study shows edaravone to be an effective radioprotector against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in lymphocytes in vitro. Finally, edaravone pretreatment significantly reduced DNA damage in γ-irradiated lymphocytes, as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment) (p edaravone offers protection from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations.

  9. Effect of melatonin and time of administration on irradiation-induced damage to rat testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Take

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ionizing irradiation on testes and the protective effects of melatonin were investigated by immunohistochemical and electron microscopic methods. Eighty-two adult male Wistar rats were divided into 10 groups. The rats in the irradiated groups were exposed to a sublethal irradiation dose of 8 Gy, either to the total body or abdominopelvic region using a 60Co source at a focus of 80 cm away from the skin in the morning or evening together with vehicle (20% ethanol or melatonin administered 24 h before (10 mg/kg, immediately before (20 mg/kg and 24 h after irradiation (10 mg/kg, all ip. Caspace-3 immunoreactivity was increased in the irradiated group compared to control (P < 0.05. Melatonin-treated groups showed less apoptosis as indicated by a considerable decrease in caspace-3 immunoreactivity (P < 0.05. Electron microscopic examination showed that all spermatogenic cells, especially primary spermatocytes, displayed prominent degeneration in the groups submitted to total body and abdominopelvic irradiation. However, melatonin administration considerably inhibited these degenerative changes, especially in rats who received abdominopelvic irradiation. Total body and abdominopelvic irradiation induced identical apoptosis and testicular damage. Chronobiological assessment revealed that biologic rhythm does not alter the inductive effect of irradiation. These data indicate that melatonin protects against total body and abdominopelvic irradiation. Melatonin was more effective in the evening abdominopelvic irradiation and melatonin-treated group than in the total body irradiation and melatonin-treated group.

  10. Surgical management of irradiation-induced small bowel damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.T.; Seski, J.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Edwards, C.L.; Herson, J.

    1985-04-01

    Seventy-seven patients, presenting with radiation small bowel injuries at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1962 and 1978, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two categories: bowel bypass without resection, and resection of irradiated bowel. Each group was then analyzed for its short- and long-term complications. Ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis was the surgical procedure of choice in those people undergoing resection. There was no difference in short-term complications noted between the two groups. The long-term complications of fistula formation and continued small bowel necrosis could be prevented by resection, as a primary procedure. The surgical details of ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis are presented, along with an analysis of the complications encountered in both groups.

  11. Surgical management of irradiation-induced small bowel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.T.; Seski, J.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Edwards, C.L.; Herson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients, presenting with radiation small bowel injuries at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston between 1962 and 1978, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two categories: bowel bypass without resection, and resection of irradiated bowel. Each group was then analyzed for its short- and long-term complications. Ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis was the surgical procedure of choice in those people undergoing resection. There was no difference in short-term complications noted between the two groups. The long-term complications of fistula formation and continued small bowel necrosis could be prevented by resection, as a primary procedure. The surgical details of ileocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis are presented, along with an analysis of the complications encountered in both groups

  12. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Dong; Li Wenjian; Wu Xin; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Liu Qingfang; He Jinyu; Jing Xigang; Ding Nan; Dai Zhongying; Zhou Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20 Ne 10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  13. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong; Li, Wenjian; Wu, Xin; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Shuang; Liu, Qingfang; He, Jinyu; Jing, Xigang; Ding, Nan; Dai, Zhongying; Zhou, Jianping

    2010-12-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20Ne10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  14. The irradiation induced creep of graphite under accelerated damage produced by boron doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    The presence of boron enhances fast neutron irradiation damage in graphite by providing nucleation sites for interstitial loop formation. Doping with 11 B casues an increase in the irradiation induced macroscopic dimensional changes, which have been shown to result from an acceleration in the differential crystal growth rate for a given carbon atom displacement rate. Models of irradiation induced creep in graphite have centred around those in which creep is induced by internal stresses due to the anisotopic crystal growth, and those in which creep is activated by atomic displacements. A creep test on boron doped graphite has been performed in an attempt to establish which of these mechanisms is the determining factor. An isotropic nuclear graphite was doped to a 11 B concentration of 0.27 wt.%. The irradiation induced volume shrinkage rate at 750 0 C increased by a factor of 3 over that of the virgin graphite, in agreement with predictions from the earlier work, but the total creep strains were comparable in both doped and virgin samples. This observation supports the view that irradiation induced creep is dependent only on the carbon atom displacement rate and not on the internal stress level determined by the differential crystal growth rate. The implications of this result on the irradiation behaviour of graphite containing significant concentrations of boron are briefly discussed. (author)

  15. Evaluation of radio-protective effect of melatonin on whole body irradiation induced liver tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Alireza; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Ghobadi, Ghazale; Mohseni, Mehran; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation interacts with biological systems to induce excessive fluxes of free radicals that attack various cellular components. Melatonin has been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger and indirect antioxidant via its stimulatory actions on the antioxidant system.The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant role of melatonin against radiation-induced oxidative injury to the rat liver after whole body irradiation. In this experimental study,thirty-two rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 was the control group, group 2 only received melatonin (30 mg/kg on the first day and 30 mg/kg on the following days), group 3 only received whole body gamma irradiation of 10 Gy, and group 4 received 30 mg/kg melatonin 30 minutes prior to radiation plus whole body irradiation of 10 Gy plus 30 mg/kg melatonin daily through intraperitoneal (IP) injection for three days after irradiation. Three days after irradiation, all rats were sacrificed and their livers were excised to measure the biochemical parameters malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Each data point represents mean ± standard error on the mean (SEM) of at least eight animals per group. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare different groups, followed by Tukey's multiple comparison tests (p<0.05). The results demonstrated that whole body irradiation induced liver tissue damage by increasing MDA levels and decreasing GSH levels. Hepatic MDA levels in irradiated rats that were treated with melatonin (30 mg/kg) were significantly decreased, while GSH levels were significantly increased, when compared to either of the control groups or the melatonin only group. The data suggest that administration of melatonin before and after irradiation may reduce liver damage caused by gamma irradiation.

  16. Membrane damage induced in cultured human skin fibroblasts by UVA irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboriau, F.; Morliere, P.; Marquis, I.; Moysan, A.; Geze, M.; Dubertret, L.

    1993-01-01

    Irradiation of cultured human skin fibroblasts with ultraviolet light from 320 to 400 nm (UVA) leads to a decrease in the membrane fluidity exemplified by an enhanced fluorescence anisotropy of the lipophilic fluorescent probe 1-[4-trimethylamino)-phenyl]-6-phenylhexa-1,3,5-triene. This UVA-induced decrease in fluidity is associated with lactate dehydrogenase leakage in the supernatant. Vitamin E, an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, exerts a protective effect on both phenomena. Therefore, this UVA-induced damage in membrane properties may be related to lipid peroxidation processes. Moreover, exponentially growing cells are more sensitive to these UVA-induced alterations than confluent cells. (Author)

  17. Inhibiting the repair of DNA damage induced by gamma irradiation in rat thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, J.A.; Stark, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of 11 established and potential radiosensitizing agents to retard the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage with a view to enhancing the immunosuppressive effects of in vivo lymphoid irradiation. The capability of irradiated rat thymocytes to repair DNA damage was assessed by an adaptation of the fluorimetric unwinding method. Three compounds, 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), novobiocin and flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA), inhibited repair significantly. We also report the effect of low-dose irradiation combined with repair inhibitors on the relationship between DNA strand breaks, fragmentation, cell viability and use of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). DNA fragmentation was increased by 1 mM/l FAA, 1 mM/l novobiocin and 50 μM/l RS-61443 within 3 h of incubation. The latter two compounds also proved cytotoxic. All three drugs augmented the effect of ionizing radiation on the use of NAD. Of the agents investigated, FAA showed the most promise for augmenting the immunosuppressive action of irradiation at nontoxic, pharmacokinetically achievable concentrations. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. Estimation of irradiation-induced material damage measure of FCM fuel in LWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Chungchan; Park, Sang-Yoon; Cho, Jin-Young; Chang, Jonghwa; Lee, Won Jae

    2014-01-01

    An irradiation-induced material damage measure on tri-isotropic (TRISO) multi-coating layers of fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel to replace conventional uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel for existing light water reactors (LWRs) has been estimated using a displacement per atom (DPA) cross section for a FCM fuel performance analysis. The DPA cross sections in 47 and 190 energy groups for both silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite are generated based on the molecular dynamics simulation by SRIM/TRIM. For the selected FCM fuel assembly design with FeCrAl cladding, a core depletion analysis was carried out using the DeCART2D/MASTER code system with the prepared DPA cross sections to evaluate the irradiation effect in the Korean OPR-1000. The DPA of the SiC and IPyC coating layers is estimated by comparing the discharge burnup obtained from the MASTER calculation with the burnup-dependent DPA for each coating layer calculated using DeCART2D. The results show that low uranium loading and hardened neutron spectrum compared to that of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) result in high discharge burnup and high fast neutron fluence. In conclusion, it can be seen that the irradiation-induced material damage measure is noticeably increased under LWR operating conditions compared to HTGRs. (author)

  19. Mono and sequential ion irradiation induced damage formation and damage recovery in oxide glasses: Stopping power dependence of the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Toulemonde, M.; Bouffard, S.; Jegou, C.; Peuget, S.

    2016-01-01

    Simple and complex borosilicate glasses were irradiated with single and double ion beams of light and heavy ions over a broad fluence and stopping power range. As a result of the heavy ion irradiation (U, Kr, Au), the hardness was observed to diminish and saturate after a decrease by 35 ± 1%. Unlike slow and swift heavy ion irradiation, irradiation with light ions (He,O) induced a saturation hardness decrease of 18 ± 1% only. During double ion beam irradiation; where glasses were first irradiated with a heavy ion (gold) and then by a light ion (helium), the light ion irradiation induced partial damage recovery. As a consequence of the recovery effect, the hardness of the pre-irradiated glasses increased by 10–15% depending on the chemical composition. These results highlight that the nuclear energy loss and high electronic energy loss (≥4 keV/nm) result in significant and similar modifications whereas light ions with low electronic energy loss (≤1 keV/nm) result in only mild damage formation in virgin glasses and recovery in highly pre-damaged glasses. These results are important to understand the damage formation and recovery in actinide bearing minerals and in glasses subjected to self-irradiation by alpha decays. - Highlights: • Behavior of glasses strongly depends on the electronic energy loss (Se) of the ions. • High Se (≥4 keV/nm) induces large changes in comparison to lower Se values. • Apart from mild damage formation, low Se causes recovery of pre-existing damage. • Alpha induced partial recovery of the damage would occur in nuclear waste glasses.

  20. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zujun; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-01-01

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10 8 n/cm 2 s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10 11 , 5 × 10 11 , and 1 × 10 12 n/cm 2 , respectively. The mean dark signal (K D ), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V N ), saturation output signal voltage (V S ), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike

  1. Detection of some irradiated spices on the basis of radiation induced damage of starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Sharif, M.M.; Koncz, A.

    1990-01-01

    Untreated and irradiated samples of spices were suspended in water, alkalized, and after heat-gelatinization, the apparent viscosity was determined by a rotational viscometer. Several spices, i.e. white pepper, black pepper, nutmeg and ginger showed considerable loss of viscosity as a function of γ radiation dose in the dose range required for microbial decontamination of natural spices. Less promising results were obtained with spices such as allspice, garlic powder, and onion powder forming low-viscosity heat-treated suspensions even when unirradiated viscometric studies were also performed with a number of pepper samples of various origin to estimate the ''natural'' variation of rheological properties. Irradiation and storage studies were performed with ground black pepper samples of moisture contents in equilibrium with air of 25%, 50% and 75% R.H., respectively, either untreated or irradiated with 4, 8, 16 or 32 kGy, to study the effect of equilibrium relative humidity and storage time on detectability of radiation treatment. During the entire storage period of 100 days, statistically significant differences of the apparent viscosities of heat-gelatinized suspensions remained detectable between untreated samples and those irradiated with 8 kGy or higher doses. The apparent viscosity of high-moisture (75% E.R.H.) untreated samples was decreasing during long-term storage. Differences between viscosities of untreated and irradiated samples were enlarged when measured at elevated temperatures such as 50 0 C in the rotational viscometer, or in the boiling-water bath of a falling number apparatus. Other analytical indices such as onset and peak temperatures of gelatinization endotherms by DSC (damaged starch content), by colorimetry, reducing sugar content, alcohol-induced turbidity of hot water extracts of pepper samples, have been changed less dramatically by irradiation than the apparent viscosity of the gelatinized suspensions. (author)

  2. Effect of proton and electron-irradiation intensity on radiation-induced damages in silicon bioolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Yu.A.; Gorin, B.M.; Kozhevnikov, V.P.; Mikhnovich, V.V.; Gusev, L.I.

    1981-01-01

    The increase of radiation-induced damages of bipolar n-p-n transistors 8-12 times with the irradiation intensity decrease by protons from 4.07x1010 to 2.5x107 cm-2 x c-1 has been found experimentally. damages of p-n-p transistors vary in the opposite way - they are decreased 2-3 times with the irradiation intensity decrease within the same limits. the dependence of damages on intansity of proton irradiation occurs at the dose rate by three orders less than it has been observed for electron irradiation. the results obtained are explained by the dependence of radiation defectoformation reactions on charge state of defects with account for the role of formation of disordering regions upon proton irradiation [ru

  3. Irreversible thermodynamics models and constitutive equations of the irradiation induced deformation and damage accumulating processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassilew, C.

    1989-11-01

    This report gives an overall evaluation of several in-reactor deformation and creep-rupture experiments performed in BR-2, FFTF, and Rapsodie on pressurised tubes of the stabilized austenitic stainless steels 1.4970, 1.4981, 1.4988, and the nickel base alloy Hastelloy-X. The irradiation induced deformation processes observed in the components operating in a neutron environment can be divided into two main groups: 1. volume conserving creep and 2. volumetric swelling. Since the observed deformation as well as damage accumulating phenomena are caused by the same constrained generated and free disposable point defects and helium atoms, it is obvious and advisable to analyze, and to model simultaneously the ensemble of the elementary mechanisms and processes effective at the same time. Phenomenological models based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes have been developed, with the aim of: 1. grasping the partial relationships between the external variables and the response functions (creep, swelling, creep driven swelling, and time to rupture), 2. fathoming the rate-controlling mechanisms, 3. providing insight into the structural details and changes occurring during the deformation and the damage accumulating processes, 4. integrating the damage accumulating processes comprehensively, and 5. formulating the constitutive equations required to describe the elementary processes that generate plastic deformations as well as damage accumulation. (orig./MM)

  4. Effects of carotenoids on damage of biological lipids induced by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are considered to be involved in the radioresistant mechanisms of radioresistant bacteria. In these bacterial cells, carotenoids are present in biological lipids, and therefore may be related to the radiation-induced damage of lipids. However, only limited data are available for the role of carotenoids in such damage. In this study, we irradiated an α-linolenic acid–benzene solution with gamma rays and analyzed the resulting oxidative degradation and peroxidation damage in the presence or absence of two typical carotenoids: β-carotene and astaxanthin. The analyses revealed that oxidative degradation and peroxidation of α-linolenic acid, as evaluated by the amount of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene formed, respectively, increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 8.5×10 −3 M β-carotene inhibited gamma radiation-induced oxidative degradation of α-linolenic acid, whereas 5.0×10 −5 and 5.0×10 −6 M β-carotene, and 5.0×10 −7 and 5.0×10 −8 M astaxanthin promoted degradation. In contrast, neither β-carotene nor astaxanthin affected peroxidation of α-linolenic acid. These results suggest that an optimum concentration of carotenoids in radioresistant bacteria protects biological lipid structures from radiation-induced damage. - Highlights: • Gamma radiation dose-dependently increases degradation levels of α-linolenic acid. • Gamma radiation dose-dependently increases peroxidation levels of α-linolenic acid. • An optimum concentration of carotenoids inhibits degradation of α-linolenic acid. • Relatively low concentrations of carotenoids promote degradation of α-linolenic acid. • Carotenoids do not affect the peroxidation level of α-linolenic acid

  5. protective effect of combined administration of isoflavones genistein and daidzein against irradiation -induced damage in female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, O.M.

    2009-01-01

    The renewed interests in the search for plant-derived drugs in the field of alternative medicine necessitate further studies. the present work aimed to evaluate the efficacy of diet phyto estrogens such as diadzein and genistein on repairing oxidative damage and protecting calcium homeostatic system against radiation induced disorders in female rats. soybean isoflavones were orally administered in a dose of 9 mg/kg body wt/day for 21 and 26 days. irradiated animals received diadzein and genistein for 11 consecutive days before exposing female rats to 6 Gy gamma irradiation and continued to receive soybean isoflavones until sacrificed 10 and 15 days post irradiation . Irradiation induced significant decrease in white blood cells(WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), haemoglobin (HB), haematocrit (Ht %), glutathione (GSH), calcium (CA) and estradiol, while it induced significant elevation in serum malondialdehyde(MDA), inorganic phosphorus, thyroxine 3 (T 3 ) and thyroxine 4 (T 4 ), 10 and 15 days post -irradiation . diadzein and genistein treatment before and through irradiation accelerated the recovery of circulating WBCs and RBCs, elevated HB, Hct % GSH meanwhile hindered the depression in CA. Soy isoflavones depressed MDA and ameliorated the increase in T 3 , T 4 and elevated estradiol and phosphorus levels 10 and 15 days post irradiation. the results recommend combined treatment with genistein and daidzein to mitigate irradiation-induced damage and bon loss and suggest clinical application of these isoflavones in radiotherapy

  6. Post-irradiation dietary vitamin E does not affect the development of radiation-induced lung damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegman, Erwin M.; Gameren, Mieke M. van; Kampinga, Harm H.; Szabo, Ben G.; Coppes, Rob P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether application of post-irradiation vitamin E, an anti-oxidant, could prevent the development of radiation induced lung damage. Wistar rats were given vitamin E enriched or vitamin E deprived food starting from 4 weeks after 18 Gy single dose irradiation of the right thorax. Neither breathing frequencies nor CT density measurements revealed differences between the groups. It is concluded that post-irradiation vitamin E does not influence radiation-induced fibrosis to the lung

  7. Validation of software components for the prediction of irradiation-induced damage of RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, Frank; Birkenheuer, Uwe; Ulbricht, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    The modelling of irradiation-induced damage of RPV steels from primary cascades up to the change of mechanical properties bridging length scales from the atomic level up to the macro-scale and time scales up to years contributes essentially to an improved understanding of the phenomenon of neutron embrittlement. In future modelling may become a constituent of the procedure to evaluate RPV safety. The selected two-step approach is based upon the coupling of a rate-theory module aimed at simulating the evolution of the size distribution of defect-solute clusters with a hardening module aimed at predicting the yield stress increase. The scope of the investigation consists in the development and validation of corresponding numerical tools. In order to validate these tools, the output of representative simulations is compared with results from small-angle neutron scattering experiments and tensile tests performed for neutron-irradiated RPV steels. Using the developed rate-theory module it is possible to simulate the evolution of size, concentration and composition of mixed Cu-vacancy clusters over the relevant ranges of size up to 10.000 atoms and time up to tens of years. The connection between the rate-theory model and hardening is based upon both the mean spacing and the strength of obstacles for dislocation glide. As a result of the validation procedure of the numerical tools, we have found that essential trends of the irradiation-induced yield stress increase of Cu-bearing and low-Cu RPV steels are displayed correctly. First ideas on how to take into account the effect of Ni on both cluster evolution and hardening are worked out.

  8. Radiation damage to the normal monkey brain. Experimental study induced by interstitial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Nobuya; Tamiya, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kengo; Furuta, Tomohisa; Ohmoto, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage to normal brain tissue induced by interstitial irradiation with iridium-192 seeds was sequentially evaluated by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological examination. This study was carried out in 14 mature Japanese monkeys. The experimental area received more than 200-260 Gy of irradiation developed coagulative necrosis. Infiltration of macrophages to the periphery of the necrotic area was seen. In addition, neovascularization, hyalinization of vascular walls, and gliosis were found in the periphery of the area invaded by the macrophages. All sites at which the vascular walls were found to have acute stage fibrinoid necrosis eventually developed coagulative necrosis. The focus of necrosis was detected by MRI starting 1 week after the end of radiation treatment, and the size of the necrotic area did not change for 6 months. The peripheral areas showed clear ring enhancement with contrast material. Edema surrounding the lesions was the most significant 1 week after radiation and was reduced to a minimum level 1 month later. However, the edema then expanded once again and was sustained for as long as 6 months. CT did not provide as clear of a presentation as MRI, but it did reveal similar findings for the most part, and depicted calcification in the necrotic area. This experimental model is considered useful for conducting basic research on brachytherapy, as well as for achieving a better understanding of delayed radiation necrosis. (author)

  9. Post-irradiation dietary vitamin E does not affect the development of radiation-induced lung damage in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegman, EA; van Gameren, MA; Kampinga, HH; Szabo, BG; Coppes, RP

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether application of post-irradiation vitamin E, an anti-oxidant, could prevent the development of radiation induced lung damage. Wistar rats were given vitamin E enriched or vitamin E deprived food starting from 4 weeks after 18 Gy single dose

  10. Damage saturation effects on volume and resistivity changes induced by fission-fragment irradiation of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1981-01-01

    Damage production and saturation has been monitored in copper by simultaneous electrical resistivity- and length-change measurements. Damage was introduced by 235 U fission fragments at either 7 or 85 K. At both temperatures, the resistivity and length changes were linearly related to each other for resistivity changes less than 80% saturation resistivity. The linear relationship was the same for both irradiation temperatures and was the same as that observed previously for 10 B fission fragment irrations at 4 K. These results are interpreted to show that the resistivity change per defect is unaffected by irradiation under conditions which lead to interstitial clustering. (orig.)

  11. Behavior of high resistance to He{sup 2+} induced irradiation damage in metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Mei, Xianxiu, E-mail: xxmei@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Hou, Wenjing; Wang, Younian [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Zhiguang [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dong, Chuang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Highlights: •Metallic glasses and W were irradiated with 500 keV He{sup 2+} at different fluences. •Metallic glasses could maintain amorphous state at different irradiation fluences. •The resistance to He{sup 2+} irradiation of metallic glasses was superior to the one in W metal. •Cu- and Zr-based metallic glasses had better resistance to He{sup 2+} irradiation. -- Abstract: This study details the irradiation of various metallic glasses ((Cu{sub 47}Zr{sub 45}Al{sub 8}){sub 98.5}Y{sub 1.5}, Zr{sub 64}Cu{sub 17.8}Ni{sub 10.7}Al{sub 7.5}, Co{sub 61.2}B{sub 26.2}Si{sub 7.8}Ta{sub 4.8}) and metallic W using He{sup 2+} ions with an energy of 500 keV at irradiation fluences of 2 × 10{sup 17}, 1 × 10{sup 18} and 2 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} to investigate the radiation-resistant properties of these metallic glasses compared to the conventional irradiation-resistant material W. These three metallic glasses were able to maintain an amorphous state during these irradiation fluences. There was no significant irradiation damage at the low irradiation fluence. When the irradiation fluence was increased to 2 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, a damage layer appeared up to a distance corresponding to the range of the ions away from the surfaces of the Cu- and Zr-based metallic glasses without any visible damage on the surface. Significant surface stripping damage appeared in the Co-based metallic glass. Relatively speaking, surface layer peeling appeared in metallic W along the crystal boundary at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. When the fluence was increased to 2 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, multilayer peeling, stripping, etc. appeared. The roughness of the Cu- and Zr-based metallic glass showed further smoothing with increasing fluence, while the opposite occurred in the Co-based metallic glass. Within the wavelength range of 400–1700 nm, after irradiation of He{sup 2+} at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, the reflectance of the Cu-based and Co

  12. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine protects thyroid cells against DNA damage induced by external and internal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Tomomi; Shimamura, Mika; Nagayama, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and micronuclei (MN) induced by internal and external irradiation using a rat thyroid cell line PCCL3. In internal irradiation experiments, ROS and DSB levels increased immediately after 131 I addition and then gradually declined, resulting in very high levels of MN at 24 and 48 h. NAC administration both pre- and also post- 131 I addition suppressed ROS, DSB and MN. In external irradiation experiments with a low dose (0.5 Gy), ROS and DSB increased shortly and could be prevented by NAC administration pre-, but not post-irradiation. In contrast, external irradiation with a high dose (5 Gy) increased ROS and DSB in a bimodal way: ROS and DSB levels increased immediately after irradiation, quickly returned to the basal levels and gradually rose again after >24 h. The second phase was in parallel with an increase in 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. The number of MN induced by the second wave of ROS/DSB elevations was much higher than that by the first peak. In this situation, NAC administered pre- and post-irradiation comparably suppressed MN induced by a delayed ROS elevation. In conclusion, a prolonged ROS increase during internal irradiation and a delayed ROS increase after external irradiation with a high dose caused serious DNA damage, which were efficiently prevented by NAC. Thus, NAC administration even both after internal or external irradiation prevents ROS increase and eventual DNA damage.

  13. Assessment of DNA damage induced by terrestrial UV irradiation of dried bloodstains: forensic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ashley; Sims, Lynn M; Ballantyne, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Few publications have detailed the nature of DNA damage in contemporary (i.e. non-ancient) dried biological stains. The chief concern, from a forensic standpoint, is that the damage can inhibit polymerase-mediated primer extension, ultimately resulting in DNA typing failure. In the work described here, we analyzed the effects of UVA and UVB irradiation on cell-free solubilized DNA, cell-free dehydrated DNA and dehydrated cellular DNA (from bloodstains). After UV exposure ranging from 25 J cm(-2) to 1236 J cm(-2), we assayed for the presence of bipyrimidine photoproducts (BPPPs), oxidative lesions and strand breaks, correlating the damage with the inhibition of STR profiling. Subsequent to irradiation with either UVA and UVB, the incidence of BPPPs, oxidative products and strand breaks were observed in decreasing quantities as follows: cell-free solubilized DNA>cell-free dehydrated DNA>bloodstain DNA. UVA irradiation did not result in even the partial loss of a STR profile in any sample tested. Somewhat different results were observed after genetic analysis of UVB exposed samples, in that the ability to produce a complete STR profile was affected earliest in bloodstain DNA, next in cell-free solubilized DNA and not at all in cell-free dehydrated DNA. Therefore, it is likely that other types of damage contributed to allele-drop-out in these samples but remained undetected by our assays, whereby the endonucleases did not react with the lesions or the presence of the lesions was masked by strand breaks. Under the conditions of the study, strand breaks appeared to be the predominant types of damage that ultimately resulted in DNA typing failure from physiological stains, although some evidence suggested oxidative damage may have played a role as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative assessment of the ion-beam irradiation induced direct damage of nucleic acid bases through FTIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, Anhui (China); Su, Xi; Yao, Guohua; Lu, Yilin; Ke, Zhigang; Liu, Jinghua; Wu, Yuejin; Yu, Zengliang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2014-07-01

    Energetic particles exist ubiquitously in nature, and when they hit DNA molecules in organisms, they may induce critical biological effects such as mutation. It is however still a challenge to measure directly and quantitatively the damage imposed by the energetic ions on target DNA molecules. In this work we attempted to employ Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to assess the ion-induced direct damage of four nucleic acid bases, namely, thymine (T), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and adenine (A), which are the building blocks of DNA molecules. The samples were prepared as thin films, irradiated by argon ion-beams at raised ion fluences, and in the meantime measured by FTIR spectroscopy for the damage in a quasi-in-situ manner. It was found that the low-energy ion-beam induced radiosensitivity of the four bases shows the sequence G > T > C > A, wherein the possible mechanism was also discussed.

  15. Synchrotron microbeam irradiation induces neutrophil infiltration, thrombocyte attachment and selective vascular damage in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Br?nnimann, Daniel; Bouchet, Audrey; Schneider, Christoph; Potez, Marine; Serduc, Rapha?l; Br?uer-Krisch, Elke; Graber, Werner; von Gunten, Stephan; Laissue, Jean Albert; Djonov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Our goal was the visualizing the vascular damage and acute inflammatory response to micro-and minibeam irradiation in vivo. Microbeam (MRT) and minibeam radiation therapies (MBRT) are tumor treatment approaches of potential clinical relevance, both consisting of parallel X-ray beams and allowing the delivery of thousands of Grays within tumors. We compared the effects of microbeams (25– 100 μm wide) and minibeams (200–800 μm wide) on vasculature, inflammation and surro...

  16. Standardization of accelerator irradiation procedures for simulation of neutron induced damage in reactor structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lin; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Kim, Hyosim; Garner, Frank A.; Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2017-10-01

    Self-ion irradiation is widely used as a method to simulate neutron damage in reactor structural materials. Accelerator-based simulation of void swelling, however, introduces a number of neutron-atypical features which require careful data extraction and, in some cases, introduction of innovative irradiation techniques to alleviate these issues. We briefly summarize three such atypical features: defect imbalance effects, pulsed beam effects, and carbon contamination. The latter issue has just been recently recognized as being relevant to simulation of void swelling and is discussed here in greater detail. It is shown that carbon ions are entrained in the ion beam by Coulomb force drag and accelerated toward the target surface. Beam-contaminant interactions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. By applying a multiple beam deflection technique, carbon and other contaminants can be effectively filtered out, as demonstrated in an irradiation of HT-9 alloy by 3.5 MeV Fe ions.

  17. Correlations for damage in diffused-junction InP solar cells induced by electron and proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Takamoto, T.; Taylor, S.J.; Walters, R.J.; Summers, G.P.; Flood, D.J.; Ohmori, M.

    1997-01-01

    The damage to diffused-junction n + -p InP solar cells induced by electron and proton irradiations over a wide range of energy from 0.5 to 3 MeV and 0.015 to 20 MeV, respectively, has been examined. The experimental electron and proton damage coefficients have been analyzed in terms of displacement damage dose, which is the product of the particle fluence and the calculated nonionizing energy loss [G. P. Summers, E. A. Burke, R. Shapiro, S. R. Messenger, and R. J. Walters, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 40, 1300 (1993).] Degradation of InP cells due to irradiation with electrons and protons with energies of more than 0.5 MeV show a single curve as a function of displacement damage dose. Based on the deep-level transient spectroscopy analysis, damage equivalence between electron and proton irradiation is discussed. InP solar cells are confirmed to be substantially more radiation resistant than Si and GaAs-on-Ge cells. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Ion-irradiation-induced damage in nuclear materials: Case study of a-SiO2 and MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in Physics today is the development of a clean, sustainable, and efficient energy source that can satisfy the needs of the actual and future society producing the minimum impact on the environment. For this purpose, a huge international research effort is being devoted to the study of new systems of energy production; in particular, Generation IV fission reactors and nuclear fusion reactors are being developed. The materials used in these reactors will be subjected to high levels of radiation, making necessary the study of their behavior under irradiation to achieve a successful development of these new technologies. In this thesis two materials have been studied: amorphous silica (a-SiO 2 ) and magnesium oxide (MgO). Both materials are insulating oxides with applications in the nuclear energy industry. High-energy ion irradiations have been carried out at different accelerator facilities to induce the irradiation damage in these two materials; then, the mechanisms of damage have been characterized using principally Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques. One of the challenges of this thesis was to develop the Ion Beam Induced Luminescence or iono-luminescence (which is not a widely known IBA technique) and to apply it to the study of the mechanisms of irradiation damage in materials, proving the power of this technique. For this purpose, the iono-luminescence of three different types of silica (containing different amounts of OH groups) has been studied in detail and used to describe the creation and evolution of point defects under irradiation. In the case of MgO, the damage produced under 1.2 MeV Au + irradiation has been characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration and X-ray diffraction. Finally, the iono-luminescence of MgO under different irradiation conditions has also been studied.The results obtained in this thesis help to understand the irradiation-damage processes in materials

  19. Local heart irradiation of ApoE−/− mice induces microvascular and endocardial damage and accelerates coronary atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriels, Karen; Hoving, Saske; Seemann, Ingar; Visser, Nils L.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Pol, Jeffrey F.; Daemen, Mat J.; Stewart, Fiona A.; Heeneman, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest-wall tumors increases the long-term risk of radiation-induced heart disease, like a myocardial infarct. Cancer patients commonly have additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as hypercholesterolemia. The goal of this study is to define the interaction of irradiation with such cardiovascular risk factors in radiation-induced damage to the heart and coronary arteries. Material and methods: Hypercholesterolemic and atherosclerosis-prone ApoE −/− mice received local heart irradiation with a single dose of 0, 2, 8 or 16 Gy. Histopathological changes, microvascular damage and functional alterations were assessed after 20 and 40 weeks. Results: Inflammatory cells were significantly increased in the left ventricular myocardium at 20 and 40 weeks after 8 and 16 Gy. Microvascular density decreased at both follow-up time-points after 8 and 16 Gy. Remaining vessels had decreased alkaline phosphatase activity (2–16 Gy) and increased von Willebrand Factor expression (16 Gy), indicative of endothelial cell damage. The endocardium was extensively damaged after 16 Gy, with foam cell accumulations at 20 weeks, and fibrosis and protein leakage at 40 weeks. Despite an accelerated coronary atherosclerotic lesion development at 20 weeks after 16 Gy, gated SPECT and ultrasound measurements showed only minor changes in functional cardiac parameters at 20 weeks. Conclusions: The combination of hypercholesterolemia and local cardiac irradiation induced an inflammatory response, microvascular and endocardial damage, and accelerated the development of coronary atherosclerosis. Despite these pronounced effects, cardiac function of ApoE −/− mice was maintained.

  20. Neutron irradiation damage in transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hisayuki; Nesaki, Kouji; Kiritani, Michio

    1991-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the physical properties of light transition metal carbides, TiC x , VC x and NbC x , were examined, emphasizing the characterization of irradiation induced defects in the nonstoichiometric composition. TiC x irradiated with 14 MeV (fusion) neutrons showed higher damage rates with increasing C/Ti (x) ratio. A brief discussion is made on 'cascade damage' in TiC x irradiated with fusion neutrons. Two other carbides (VC x and NbC x ) were irradiated with fission reactor neutrons. The irradiation effects on VC x were not so simple, because of the complex irradiation behavior of 'ordered' phases. For instance, complete disordering was revealed in an ordered phase, 'V 8 C 7 ', after an irradiation dose of 10 25 n/m 2 . (orig.)

  1. Irradiation induced modest changes in murine cardiac function despite progressive structural damage to the myocardium and microvasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seemann, Ingar; Gabriels, Karen; Visser, Nils L.; Hoving, Saske; Poele, Johannes A. te; Pol, Jeffrey F.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Janssen, Ben J.; Leeuwen, Fijs W. van; Daemen, Mat J.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest wall tumors increases the long-term risk of cardiotoxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Methods: Single doses of 2, 8, or 16 Gy were delivered to the hearts of mice and damage was evaluated at 20, 40, and 60 weeks, relative to age matched controls. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and ultrasound were used to measure cardiac geometry and function, which was related to histo-morphology and microvascular damage. Results: Gated SPECT/CT and ultrasound demonstrated decreases in end diastolic and systolic volumes, while the ejection fraction was increased at 20 and 40 weeks after 2, 8, and 16 Gy. Cardiac blood volume was decreased at 20 and 60 weeks after irradiation. Histological examination revealed inflammatory changes at 20 and 40 weeks after 8 and 16 Gy. Microvascular density in the left ventricle was decreased at 40 and 60 weeks after 8 and 16 Gy, with functional damage to remaining microvasculature manifest as decreased alkaline phosphatase (2, 8, and 16 Gy), increased von Willebrand Factor and albumin leakage from vessels (8 and 16 Gy), and amyloidosis (16 Gy). 16 Gy lead to sudden death between 30 and 40 weeks in 38% of mice. Conclusions: Irradiation with 2 and 8 Gy induced modest changes in murine cardiac function within 20 weeks but this did not deteriorate further, despite progressive structural and microvascular damage. This indicates that heart function can compensate for significant structural damage, although higher doses, eventually lead to sudden death.

  2. Mild hyperthermia can induce adaptation to cytogenetic damage caused by subsequent X irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Lu.; Jiang, Jie.

    1995-01-01

    Many low-level environmental agents are able to induce an increased resistance to subsequent mutagenic effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper, an induced cytogenetic adaptation to radiation in human lymphocytes was studied with mild hyperthermia as the adaptive treatment and compared with that induced by low-dose radiation. We found that this adaptation could be induced not only in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes (at 14, 38 and 42 h after addition of PHA), but also in unstimulated G 0 -phase cells (before addition of PHA) by mild hyperthermia (41 degrees C for 1 h) as well as 50 mGy X rays. When the two adaptive treatments were combined, no additive effects on the magnitude of the adaptation induced were observed, suggesting that low-dose radiation and hyperthermia may share one mechanism of induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage. Some mechanisms which may be involved in the induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage by low-dose radiation are discussed and compared with the effects of mild hyperthermia in inducing thermotolerance and radioresistance. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Growth behavior of laser-induced damage on fused silica optics under UV, ns laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negres, Raluca A; Norton, Mary A; Cross, David A; Carr, Christopher W

    2010-09-13

    The growth behavior of laser-induced damage sites is affected by a large number of laser parameters as well as site morphology. Here we investigate the effects of pulse duration on the growth rate of damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Results demonstrate a significant dependence of the growth parameters on laser pulse duration at 351 nm from 1 ns to 15 ns, including the observation of a dominant exponential versus linear, multiple-shot growth behavior for long and short pulses, respectively. These salient behaviors are tied to the damage morphology and suggest a shift in the fundamental growth mechanisms for pulses in the 1-5 ns range.

  4. Possible Protective Effect of Kombucha Tea Ferment on Carbon Tetrachloride Induced Liver Damage in Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, O.A.; Fahim, Th.M.

    2008-01-01

    This study has shown that administration of kombucha ferment tea (KT) to rats improved the damage caused in livers of animals treated with toxic chemicals such as carbon tetrachloride (CCL 4 ) and/ or exposed to y-irradiation. This work was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effects of treatment with KT ferment in rat liver after a long-term treatment with CCL 4 alone and with subsequent y-irradiation. Hepatic pathological changes observed in the CCL 4 -treated rats included increased serum alanine transaminase (ALT) , aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) activities as well as concentration of bilirubin in addition to a decrease in the concentration of serum albumin and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Consistent with these changes, the increase in oxidative stress markers expressed as malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and depletion in glutathione (GSH) contents in liver was observed. 24 h after the last dose of KT administration in a group of animals treated with CCL 4 and/ or radiation exposure cessation, the pathological changes were recovered. These results demonstrate that most of the pathological alterations in the liver in response to CCL 4 and/ or radiation exposure intoxication are recoverable upon treatment with KT ferments

  5. γ irradiation with different dose rates induces different DNA damage responses in Petunia x hybrida cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, Mattia; Ventura, Lorenzo; Macovei, Anca; Confalonieri, Massimo; Savio, Monica; Giovannini, Annalisa; Carbonera, Daniela; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2013-05-15

    In plants, there is evidence that different dose rate exposures to gamma (γ) rays can cause different biological effects. The dynamics of DNA damage accumulation and molecular mechanisms that regulate recovery from radiation injury as a function of dose rate are poorly explored. To highlight dose-rate dependent differences in DNA damage, single cell gel electrophoresis was carried out on regenerating Petunia x hybrida leaf discs exposed to LDR (total dose 50 Gy, delivered at 0.33 Gy min(-1)) and HDR (total doses 50 and 100 Gy, delivered at 5.15 Gy min(-1)) γ-ray in the 0-24h time period after treatments. Significant fluctuations of double strand breaks and different repair capacities were observed between treatments in the 0-4h time period following irradiation. Dose-rate-dependent changes in the expression of the PhMT2 and PhAPX genes encoding a type 2 metallothionein and the cytosolic isoform of ascorbate peroxidase, respectively, were detected by Quantitative RealTime-Polymerase Chain Reaction. The PhMT2 and PhAPX genes were significantly up-regulated (3.0- and 0.7-fold) in response to HDR. The results are discussed in light of the potential practical applications of LDR-based treatments in mutation breeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevention Effect of Poly-Gamma-Glutamic Acid on Tissue Damage Induced by Gamma Irradiation as a Natural Cross-Linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaehun; Sung, Nakyun; Kim, Jeongsoo; Jo, Euri; Choi, Jongil; Park, Jongheum; Lee, Juwoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwangwon [Eulji Univ. Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jungkee [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taewoon [Jeonbuk Technopark, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    This study was to determine the prevention effect of poly-gamma-glutamic acid (PGA) on tissue damage induced by gamma irradiation for development of xenograft. PGA (MW 2000 kDa) extracted from permeated soy bean (natto) was used in this study as natural compound, and glutaraldehyde (GA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) were used as a control, chemical based cross-linking agents. GA, EDC and PGA treated porcine tendons were gamma-irradiated at the dose of 30 kGy. Prevention effects against tissue damage were measured as the result of tensile strength, hydroxyproline contents and tissue morphological analysis. Tensile of porcine tendon was remarkably decreased by gamma irradiation, but increased in PGA treated group. Morphological analysis showed that collagen structure was broken by gamma irradiation, but attenuated by PGA treatment. Base on the results, it demonstrated that gamma irradiation can induce severe alteration of porcine tendon, but PGA can effectively improve the tissue damage.

  7. Prevention Effect of Poly-Gamma-Glutamic Acid on Tissue Damage Induced by Gamma Irradiation as a Natural Cross-Linker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaehun; Sung, Nakyun; Kim, Jeongsoo; Jo, Euri; Choi, Jongil; Park, Jongheum; Lee, Juwoon; Lee, Kwangwon; Kwon, Jungkee; Kim, Taewoon

    2012-01-01

    This study was to determine the prevention effect of poly-gamma-glutamic acid (PGA) on tissue damage induced by gamma irradiation for development of xenograft. PGA (MW 2000 kDa) extracted from permeated soy bean (natto) was used in this study as natural compound, and glutaraldehyde (GA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) were used as a control, chemical based cross-linking agents. GA, EDC and PGA treated porcine tendons were gamma-irradiated at the dose of 30 kGy. Prevention effects against tissue damage were measured as the result of tensile strength, hydroxyproline contents and tissue morphological analysis. Tensile of porcine tendon was remarkably decreased by gamma irradiation, but increased in PGA treated group. Morphological analysis showed that collagen structure was broken by gamma irradiation, but attenuated by PGA treatment. Base on the results, it demonstrated that gamma irradiation can induce severe alteration of porcine tendon, but PGA can effectively improve the tissue damage

  8. Whole thorax irradiation of non-human primates induces persistent nuclear damage and gene expression changes in peripheral blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanaz A Ghandhi

    Full Text Available We investigated the cytogenetic and gene expression responses of peripheral blood cells of non-human primates (NHP, Macaca mulatta that were whole-thorax irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy. In this model, partial irradiation of NHPs in the thoracic region (Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation, WTLI allows the study of late radiation-induced lung injury, while avoiding acute radiation syndromes related to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injury. A transient drop in circulating lymphocytes and platelets was seen by 9 days, followed by elevations in respiratory rate, circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes at 60-100 days, corresponding to computed tomography (CT and histologic evidence of pneumonitis, and elective euthanasia of four animals. To evaluate long-term DNA damage in NHP peripheral blood lymphocytes after 10 Gy WTLI, we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN assay to measure chromosomal aberrations as post-mitotic micronuclei in blood samples collected up to 8 months after irradiation. Regression analysis showed significant induction of micronuclei in NHP blood cells that persisted with a gradual decline over the 8-month study period, suggesting long-term DNA damage in blood lymphocytes after WTLI. We also report transcriptomic changes in blood up to 30 days after WTLI. We isolated total RNA from peripheral blood at 3 days before and then at 2, 5 and 30 days after irradiation. We identified 1187 transcripts that were significantly changed across the 30-day time course. From changes in gene expression, we identified biological processes related to immune responses, which persisted across the 30-day study. Response to oxygen-containing compounds and bacteria were implicated by gene-expression changes at the earliest day 2 and latest, day 30 time-points. Gene expression changes suggest a persistent altered state of the immune system, specifically response to infection, for at least a month after WTLI.

  9. Whole thorax irradiation of non-human primates induces persistent nuclear damage and gene expression changes in peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandhi, Shanaz A; Turner, Helen C; Shuryak, Igor; Dugan, Gregory O; Bourland, J Daniel; Olson, John D; Tooze, Janet A; Morton, Shad R; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Cline, J Mark; Amundson, Sally A

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the cytogenetic and gene expression responses of peripheral blood cells of non-human primates (NHP, Macaca mulatta) that were whole-thorax irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy. In this model, partial irradiation of NHPs in the thoracic region (Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation, WTLI) allows the study of late radiation-induced lung injury, while avoiding acute radiation syndromes related to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injury. A transient drop in circulating lymphocytes and platelets was seen by 9 days, followed by elevations in respiratory rate, circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes at 60-100 days, corresponding to computed tomography (CT) and histologic evidence of pneumonitis, and elective euthanasia of four animals. To evaluate long-term DNA damage in NHP peripheral blood lymphocytes after 10 Gy WTLI, we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay to measure chromosomal aberrations as post-mitotic micronuclei in blood samples collected up to 8 months after irradiation. Regression analysis showed significant induction of micronuclei in NHP blood cells that persisted with a gradual decline over the 8-month study period, suggesting long-term DNA damage in blood lymphocytes after WTLI. We also report transcriptomic changes in blood up to 30 days after WTLI. We isolated total RNA from peripheral blood at 3 days before and then at 2, 5 and 30 days after irradiation. We identified 1187 transcripts that were significantly changed across the 30-day time course. From changes in gene expression, we identified biological processes related to immune responses, which persisted across the 30-day study. Response to oxygen-containing compounds and bacteria were implicated by gene-expression changes at the earliest day 2 and latest, day 30 time-points. Gene expression changes suggest a persistent altered state of the immune system, specifically response to infection, for at least a month after WTLI.

  10. An extract of Polygonum multiflorum protects against free radical damage induced by ultraviolet B irradiation of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K. Hwang

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, the incidence of ultraviolet B (UVB-related skin problems has been increasing. Damages induced by UVB radiation are related to mutations that occur as a result of direct DNA damage and/or the production of reactive oxygen species. We investigated the anti-oxidant effects of a Polygonum multiflorum thumb extract against skin damage induced by UVB irradiation. Female SKH-1 hairless mice were divided into three groups: control (N = 7, distilled water- (N = 10, and P. multiflorum extract-treated (PM, N = 10 groups. The PM (10 g was extracted with 100 mL distilled water, cryo-dried and 9.8 g was obtained. The animals received a topical application of 500 µL distilled water or PM extract (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16%, w/v, dissolved in distilled water for 30 min after UVB irradiation (wavelength 280-320 nm, 300 mJ/cm²; 3 min of the dorsal kin for 14 days, and skin immunohistochemistry and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 activity were determined. SOD1 immunoreactivity, its protein levels and activities in the skin were significantly reduced by 70% in the distilled water-treated group after UVB irradiation compared to control. However, in the PM extract-treated groups, SOD1 immunoreactivity and its protein and activity levels increased in a dose-dependent manner (1-16%, w/v, PM extract compared to the distilled water-treated group. SOD1 protein levels and activities in the groups treated with 8 and 16%, w/v, PM extract recovered to 80-90% of the control group levels after UVB. These results suggest that PM extract strongly inhibits the destruction of SOD1 by UV radiation and probably contains anti-skin photoaging agents.

  11. Melatonin and sesamol protects spleenocytes against 60Co γ-irradiation induced damages in male C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Shahanshah; Rizvi, Moshahid; Kumar, Arun; Kalra, Nmita; Adhikari, Jawahar; Chaudhury, Nabo; Khan, Shahanshah

    2013-01-01

    Natural antioxidants have strong potential for development of radioprotectors. In earlier studies we have shown radioprotective efficacy of melatonin/sesamol (100 mg/kg body weight) in recovery of whole-body γ-irradiated (7.5 Gy) induced damages in gastrointestinal tract and germ cells. In the present study, we report detailed studies on spleenocytes. Therefore, the first objectives of these studies, to determine the antioxidant capacity of spleen induced by melatonin/sesamol. Second, to investigate the radioprotective effect of melatonin/sesamol in spleenocytes of whole-body γ-irradiated male C57BL/6 mice. Animals (8-9 week-old) were divided into six groups e.g., control, melatonin/sesamol (100 mg/kg body weight through intra-peritoneal), radiation (7.5 Gy, 1 Gy/minute, whole-body using 60 Co Tele-therapy unit), melatonin/sesamol+radiation (100 mg/kg body weight 30 minute prior to 7.5 Gy). Mice were sacrificed at 30 minutes and their spleen homogenates (10% w/v in PBS) were used for ABTS and DPPH assays.Those mice sacrificed on 4th, 7th, 15th, 21st and 30th day post-irradiation were used for immunological investigations (Annexin-V, CD4/CD8, Cell Cycle) by flow cytometry. Relative spleen mass was determined by dividing spleen mass(mg) with body mass(gm). ABTS and DPPH assays in spleen showed higher level of antioxidant capacity in melatonin/sesamol treated groups (p<0.009) from control group at 30 minute. Melatonin/sesamol+radiation treated groups significantly reduce apoptosis (p<0.026) and recover CD4+ and CD8+ T cells populations (p<0.022) as well as their ratio onwards 4th day post-irradiation in spleen as compared to radiation group. Melatonin/sesamol+radiation treated groups also showed recovery in radiation induced cell cycle perturbation and relative spleen mass from 7th day post-irradiation as compared to radiation group. Therefore, it is concluded that a single dose of 100 mg/kg body weight of melatonin/sesamol prior to 30 minute increase the capacity

  12. Irradiation damage in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Most superconductors are quite sensitive to irradiation defects. Critical temperatures may be depressed, critical currents may be increased, by irradiation, but other behaviours may be encountered. In compounds, the sublattice in which defects are created is of significant importance. 24 refs

  13. Effects of wearing bio-active material coated fabric against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damaged in Sprague-Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jung Ae; Kim, Hye Rim; Yoon, Sun Hye; Nam, Sang Hyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Beom Su; Go, Kyung Chan; Yang, Gwang Wung; Rho, Young Hwan; Park, Hyo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes cellular damage and death through the direct damage and/or indirectly the production of ROS, which induces oxidative stress. This study was designed to evaluate the in vivo radioprotective effects of a bio-active material coated fabric (BMCF) against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Healthy male SD rats wore bio-active material coated (concentrations in 10% and 30%) fabric for 7 days after 3 Gy of γ-irradiation. Radioprotective effects were evaluated by performing various biochemical assays including spleen and thymus index, WBC count, hepatic damage marker enzymes [aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] in plasma, liver antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial activity in muscle. Exposure to γ-irradiation resulted in hepatocellular and immune systemic damage. Gamma-irradiation induced decreases in antioxidant enzymes. However, wearing the BMCF-30% decreased significantly AST and ALT activities in plasma. Furthermore, wearing the BMCF-30% increased SOD (superoxide dismutase) and mitochondrial activity. These results suggest that wearing BMCF offers effective radioprotection against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in SD rats

  14. Effects of wearing bio-active material coated fabric against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damaged in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Ae; Kim, Hye Rim; Yoon, Sun Hye; Nam, Sang Hyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Beom Su [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Go, Kyung Chan; Yang, Gwang Wung; Rho, Young Hwan; Park, Hyo Suk [Research and Development Center, VENTEX Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes cellular damage and death through the direct damage and/or indirectly the production of ROS, which induces oxidative stress. This study was designed to evaluate the in vivo radioprotective effects of a bio-active material coated fabric (BMCF) against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Healthy male SD rats wore bio-active material coated (concentrations in 10% and 30%) fabric for 7 days after 3 Gy of γ-irradiation. Radioprotective effects were evaluated by performing various biochemical assays including spleen and thymus index, WBC count, hepatic damage marker enzymes [aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] in plasma, liver antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial activity in muscle. Exposure to γ-irradiation resulted in hepatocellular and immune systemic damage. Gamma-irradiation induced decreases in antioxidant enzymes. However, wearing the BMCF-30% decreased significantly AST and ALT activities in plasma. Furthermore, wearing the BMCF-30% increased SOD (superoxide dismutase) and mitochondrial activity. These results suggest that wearing BMCF offers effective radioprotection against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in SD rats.

  15. RhNRG-1β Protects the Myocardium against Irradiation-Induced Damage via the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anxin Gu

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD, which is a serious side effect of the radiotherapy applied for various tumors due to the inevitable irradiation of the heart, cannot be treated effectively using current clinical therapies. Here, we demonstrated that rhNRG-1β, an epidermal growth factor (EGF-like protein, protects myocardium tissue against irradiation-induced damage and preserves cardiac function. rhNRG-1β effectively ameliorated irradiation-induced myocardial nuclear damage in both cultured adult rat-derived cardiomyocytes and rat myocardium tissue via NRG/ErbB2 signaling. By activating ErbB2, rhNRG-1β maintained mitochondrial integrity, ATP production, respiratory chain function and the Krebs cycle status in irradiated cardiomyocytes. Moreover, the protection of irradiated cardiomyocytes and myocardium tissue by rhNRG-1β was at least partly mediated by the activation of the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 signaling pathway. Long-term observations further showed that rhNRG-1β administered in the peri-irradiation period exerts continuous protective effects on cardiac pump function, the myocardial energy metabolism, cardiomyocyte volume and interstitial fibrosis in the rats receiving radiation via NRG/ErbB2 signaling. Our findings indicate that rhNRG-1β can protect the myocardium against irradiation-induced damage and preserve cardiac function via the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 signaling pathway.

  16. Radiation-induced damage and recovery effects in GG17 glass irradiated by 1 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingyan; Zhang Zhonghua; Geng Hongbin; Sun Chengyue; Yang Dezhuang; He Shiyu; Hu Zhaochu

    2012-01-01

    The optical properties and microstructural damage of GG17 glasses, as well as their recovery during annealing at room temperature, are investigated after exposure to 1 MeV electrons with various fluences. Experimental results show that the electrons lead to severe optical degradation in the GG17 glass, and induce the formation of paramagnetic defects which can be mainly attributed to the boron–oxygen hole centers. With increasing annealing time at room temperature their decay serves as long-lived defects following first order kinetics. Except for the strong absorption bands located at 334–352 nm and 480 nm that corresponds to the boron–oxygen hole centers, weaker absorption bands appear at 780 nm or 794.6 nm after irradiation, inducing a decrease in transmittance by approximately 17% for a fluence of 1 × 10 16 cm −2 . It is shown that electron irradiation could cause a harmful effect on rubidium lamps when GG17 glass is used as the lamp envelope material.

  17. Evaluation of damage induced by high irradiation levels on α-Ni-Ni3Si eutectic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho Olguin, Carlos Alberto; Garcia-Borquez, Arturo; González-Rodríguez, Carlos Alberto; Loran-Juanico, Jose Antonio; Cruz-Mejía, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Diluted alloys of the binary system Ni-Si have been used as target of beam of ions, electrons, neutrons and so on because in this kind of alloy occurs transformations order-disorder, when the temperature is raised. This fact has permitted to evaluate the phenomena associated with the damage induced by irradiation (DII). The results of these works have been employed to understand the behavior under irradiation of complex alloys and to evaluate the reliability of the results of mathematical simulation of the evolution of the DII. The interest in the alloy system Ni-Si has been reborn due to the necessity of developing materials, which have better resistance against the corrosion on more aggressive environments such as those generated on the nuclear power plants or those that exist out of the Earth's atmosphere. Now, a growing interest to use concentrated alloys of this binary system on diverse fields of the materials science has been taking place because up to determined concentration of silicon, a regular eutectic is formed, and this fact opens the possibility to develop lamellar composite material by directional solidification. However, nowadays, there is a lack of fundamental knowledge about the behavior of this type of lamellar structure under aggressive environments, like those mentioned before. Hence, the task of this work is to evaluate the effect that has the irradiation over the microstructure of the concentrated alloy Ni22at%Si. The dendritic region of the hypereutectic alloy consists of an intermetallic phase Ni3Si, whereas the interdendritic region is formed by the alternation of lamellas of solid solution α-Ni and intermetallic phase Ni3Si. Such kind of microstructure has the advantage to get information of the DII over different phases individually, and at the same time, about of the microstructure influence over the global damage in the alloy. The hypereutectic Ni22at%Si alloy was irradiated perpendicularly to its surface, with 3.66 MeV - Ni ions up

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of damage and amorphization induced by swift-ion irradiation in LiNbO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.; Agullo-Lopez, F.; Olivares-Villegas, J.; Garcia-Navarro, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tool which is applied to describe the ion beam induced damage generated by electronic excitation in LiNbO 3 . Based on a previously published thermal spike based analytical model, the MC technique allows for a more flexible and accurate treatment of the problem. A main advantage of this approach with respect to the analytical one is the possibility of studying the role of statistical fluctuations, relevant at low fluences. The paper recalls the main features of the physical model, describes the MC algorithm, and compares simulation results to experimental data (irradiations of LiNbO 3 using silicon ions at 5 and 7.5 MeV and oxygen ions at 5 MeV)

  19. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Shungite against Ultraviolet B Irradiation-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Easter Joy Sajo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As fullerene-based compound applications have been rapidly increasing in the health industry, the need of biomedical research is urgently in demand. While shungite is regarded as a natural source of fullerene, it remains poorly documented. Here, we explored the in vivo effects of shungite against ultraviolet B- (UVB- induced skin damage by investigating the physiological skin parameters, immune-redox profiling, and oxidative stress molecular signaling. Toward this, mice were UVB-irradiated with 0.75 mW/cm2 for two consecutive days. Consecutively, shungite was topically applied on the dorsal side of the mice for 7 days. First, we found significant improvements in the skin parameters of the shungite-treated groups revealed by the reduction in roughness, pigmentation, and wrinkle measurement. Second, the immunokine profiling in mouse serum and skin lysates showed a reduction in the proinflammatory response in the shungite-treated groups. Accordingly, the redox profile of shungite-treated groups showed counterbalance of ROS/RNS and superoxide levels in serum and skin lysates. Last, we have confirmed the involvement of Nrf2- and MAPK-mediated oxidative stress pathways in the antioxidant mechanism of shungite. Collectively, the results clearly show that shungite has an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action against UVB-induced skin damage in hairless mice.

  20. Improvement effect of gamma-irradiated complex leaf extract of date plum, persimmon and mulberry on UVB-induced skin damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Won; Cho, Byoung Ok; Che, Denis Nchang; Shin, Jae Young; Fang, Chong Zhou; Jang, Seon Il [Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the improvement effect of gamma-irradiated complex leaf extract of Date Plum, Persimmon and Mulberry (γ-DPME) on UVB induced skin damage. The samples were gamma irradiated at doses of 10 kGy. γ-DPME treatment tended to decrease UVB-induced immune cell infiltration and erthyderma index than the groups treated with non-gamma-irradiated DPME (n-DPME) and L-ascobic acid (AA). In addition, γ-DPME treatment significantly decreased skin thickness, melanin index and mast cell infiltration in UVB-irradiated skin. Moreover, γ-DPME treatment significantly decreased the compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior and immune cell infiltration than n-DPME group. These results show that gamma irradiation can be used to increase the physiological activities of DPME.

  1. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. The gaps may represent single-strand breaks. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or beta-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G2 phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G2 phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives

  2. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G 2 phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or #betta#-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G 2 phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, which destroys H 2 O 2 , or mannitol, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G 2 phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives

  3. Early life hormetic treatments decrease irradiation-induced oxidative damage, increase longevity, and enhance sexual performance during old age in the Caribbean fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Martínez, Giancarlo; Hahn, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Early life events can have dramatic consequences on performance later in life. Exposure to stressors at a young age affects development, the rate of aging, risk of disease, and overall lifespan. In spite of this, mild stress exposure early in life can have beneficial effects on performance later in life. These positive effects of mild stress are referred to as physiological conditioning hormesis. In our current study we used anoxia conditioning hormesis as a pretreatment to reduce oxidative stress and improve organismal performance, lifespan, and healthspan of Caribbean fruit flies. We used gamma irradiation to induce mild oxidative damage in a low-dose experiment, and massive oxidative damage in a separate high-dose experiment, in pharate adult fruit flies just prior to adult emergence. Irradiation-induced oxidative stress leads to reduced adult emergence, flight ability, mating performance, and lifespan. We used a hormetic approach, one hour of exposure to anoxia plus irradiation in anoxia, to lower post-irradiation oxidative damage. We have previously shown that this anoxic-conditioning treatment elevates total antioxidant capacity and lowers post-irradiation oxidative damage to lipids and proteins. In this study, conditioned flies had lower mortality rates and longer lifespan compared to those irradiated without hormetic conditioning. As a metric of healthspan, we tracked mating both at a young age (10 d) and old age (30 d). We found that anoxia-conditioned male flies were more competitive at young ages when compared to unconditioned irradiation stressed male flies, and that the positive effects of anoxic conditioning hormesis on mating success were even more pronounced in older males. Our data shows that physiological conditioning hormesis at a young age, not only improves immediate metrics of organismal performance (emergence, flight, mating), but the beneficial effects also carry into old age by reducing late life oxidative damage and improving lifespan and

  4. Damage induced by helium ion irradiation in Fe-based metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Mei, Xianxiu, E-mail: xxmei@dlut.edu.cn; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xiaona; Qiang, Jianbing; Wang, Younian

    2017-07-15

    The changes in structure and surface morphology of metallic glasses Fe{sub 80}Si{sub 7.43}B{sub 12.57} and Fe{sub 68}Zr{sub 7}B{sub 25} before and after the irradiation of He ions with the energy of 300 keV were investigated, and were compared with that of the tungsten. The results show that after the He{sup 2+} irradiation, metallic glass Fe{sub 68}Zr{sub 7}B{sub 25} still maintained amorphous. While a small amount of metastable β-Mn type phase nanocrystals formed in metallic glass Fe{sub 80}Si{sub 7.43}B{sub 12.57} at the fluence of 4.0 × 10{sup 17}ions/cm{sup 2} (19dpa). The nanocrystals transformed into α-Fe phase and tetragonal Fe{sub 2}B phase as the fluence increased to 1.0 × 10{sup 18}ions/cm{sup 2} (47dpa). Then the new orthogonal Fe{sub 3}B phase and β-Mn type phase nanocrystals appeared when the fluence increased further, and the quantities of nanocrystals increased. Blisters and cracks appeared on the surface of tungsten under the irradiation fluence of 1.0 × 10{sup 18}ions/cm{sup 2}, however only when the fluence was up to 1.6 × 10{sup 18}ions/cm{sup 2}, could cracks and spalling appear on the surfaces of metallic glasses. - Highlights: •Metallic glass Fe{sub 68}Zr{sub 7}B{sub 25} could maintain amorphous state after the irradiation. •A series of crystallization behaviors occurred in metallic glass Fe{sub 80}Si{sub 7.43}B{sub 12.57}. •The surface of tungsten appeared blisters at the fluence of 1.0 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. •Surfaces of Fe-based metallic glasses cracked at the fluence of 1.6 × 10{sup 18}ions/cm{sup 2}.

  5. Systemic transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the regeneration of irradiation-induced salivary gland damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yol Lim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cell-based therapy has been reported to repair or restore damaged salivary gland (SG tissue after irradiation. This study was aimed at determining whether systemic administration of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs can ameliorate radiation-induced SG damage. METHODS: hAdMSCs (1 × 10(6 were administered through a tail vein of C3H mice immediately after local irradiation, and then this infusion was repeated once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. At 12 weeks after irradiation, functional evaluations were conducted by measuring salivary flow rates (SFRs and salivation lag times, and histopathologic and immunofluorescence histochemistry studies were performed to assay microstructural changes, apoptosis, and proliferation indices. The engraftment and in vivo differentiation of infused hAdMSCs were also investigated, and the transdifferentiation of hAdMSCs into amylase-producing SG epithelial cells (SGCs was observed in vitro using a co-culture system. RESULTS: The systemic administration of hAdMSCs exhibited improved SFRs at 12 weeks after irradiation. hAdMSC-transplanted SGs showed fewer damaged and atrophied acinar cells and higher mucin and amylase production levels than untreated irradiated SGs. Immunofluorescence TUNEL assays revealed fewer apoptotic cells in the hAdMSC group than in the untreated group. Infused hAdMSCs were detected in transplanted SGs at 4 weeks after irradiation and some cells were found to have differentiated into SGCs. In vitro, a low number of co-cultured hAdMSCs (13%-18% were observed to transdifferentiate into SGCs. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that hAdMSCs have the potential to protect against irradiation-induced cell loss and to transdifferentiate into SGCs, and suggest that hAdMSC administration should be viewed as a candidate therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced SG damage.

  6. Radiation induced bystander signals are independent of DNA damage and DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashino, Genro [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom); Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji [Division of Radiation Biology, Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Matsuda, Naoki [Division of Radiation Biology and Protection, Center for Frontier Life Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8102 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Radiation Research Center, Frontier Science Innovation Center, Organization for University-Industry-Government Cooperation, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Ono, Koji [Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Division of Radiation Life Science, Department of Radiation Life Science and Radiation Medical Science, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Prise, Kevin M [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom) and Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7AB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: prise@gci.ac.uk

    2007-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce signals, which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population. Here, we analysed the mechanism for bystander signal arising in wild-type CHO cells and repair deficient varients, focussing on the relationship between DNA repair capacity and bystander signal arising in irradiated cells. In order to investigate the bystander effect, we carried out medium transfer experiments after X-irradiation where micronuclei were scored in non-targeted DSB repair deficient xrs5 cells. When conditioned medium from irradiated cells was transferred to unirradiated xrs5 cells, the level of induction was independent of whether the medium came from irradiated wild-type, ssb or dsb repair deficient cells. This result suggests that the activation of a bystander signal is independent of the DNA repair capacity of the irradiated cells. Also, pre-treatment of the irradiated cells with 0.5% DMSO, which suppresses micronuclei induction in CHO but not in xrs5 cells, suppressed bystander effects completely in both conditioned media, suggesting that DMSO is effective for suppression of bystander signal arising independently of DNA damage in irradiated cells. Overall the work presented here adds to the understanding that it is the repair phenotype of the cells receiving bystander signals, which determines overall response rather than that of the cell producing the bystander signal.

  7. Cellular irradiation during phase S: a study of induced chromosomic damage and its transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The author examines the effects of ionizing radiation on the chromosomes during phase S (synthesis) in which DNA progressively duplicates itself. He analyses disturbances in the cellular cycle of human lymphocytes caused by the type and number of radiologically induced lesions on the chromosomes [fr

  8. Evaluation of Radio-Protective Effect of Melatonin on Whole Body Irradiation Induced Liver Tissue Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shirazi, Alireza; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Mohseni, Mehran; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Ionizing radiation interacts with biological systems to induce excessive fluxes of free radicals that attack various cellular components. Melatonin has been shown to be a direct free radical scavenger and indirect antioxidant via its stimulatory actions on the antioxidant system. The aim

  9. Protective role of lycopene against damage induced in liver, lung and vertebrae of gamma irradiated rat fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, N.H.; Ramadan, F.L.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of lycopene (0.9 mg/100 g/day) orally given pre and post gamma irradiation on the histological changes in the liver, lung and vertebrae of fetuses. Four groups of pregnant female rats were irradiated as follows: first group represented control (C), second group treated with lycopene (L), third group exposed to radiation (R) and fourth group exposed to radiation and treated with lycopene (R+L). Pregnant female rats of group 3 and 4 were exposed to gamma irradiation at a dose level of 1.5 Gy at day 5 and 1.5 Gy at day 10 of gestation. All groups were sacrificed on day 20 of gestation. Histological results showed serious injury in the liver after exposure to gamma irradiation, where hemo siderosis was noted surrounding the dilated central vein and hepatocytes were atrophied with depression in the hemopoiesis process. Lung sections of fetuses maternally subjected to 1.5 Gy at day 5 and at day 10 of gestation and inspected on day 20 of gestation exhibited dilated and atrophied air alveoli with flattened lining epithelium. Vertebrae of these fetuses showed reductions in number of mitoses and disorderly maturation followed by the asymptomatic degeneration and necrosis of less mature element and bleeding in the periosteum of vertebra. Oral administration of lycopene pre and post gamma irradiation markedly reduced the radiation injury and showed marked protection against the liver and lung damaging effects of irradiation. On the other hand, the vertebrae sections showed no protective role of lycopene from the irradiation damage. Therefore, it may be suggested that lycopene, a potent antioxidant, can attenuate radiation injuries in certain organ

  10. Comparative proteomics reveals key proteins recruited at the nucleoid of Deinococcus after irradiation-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Passot, Fanny Marie; Toueille, Magali; Servant, Pascale; Sommer, Suzanne; Mirabella, Boris; Blanchard, Laurence; Groot, Arjan de; Guerin, Philippe; Armengaud, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoids of radiation-resistant Deinococcus species show a high degree of compaction maintained after ionizing irradiation. We identified proteins recruited after irradiation in nucleoids of Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus deserti by means of comparative proteomics. Proteins in nucleoid-enriched fractions from unirradiated and irradiated Deinococcus were identified and semi quantified by shotgun proteomics. The ssDNA-binding protein SSB, DNA gyrase subunits GyrA and GyrB, DNA topoisomerase I, RecA recombinase, UvrA excinuclease, RecQ helicase, DdrA, DdrB, and DdrD proteins were found in significantly higher amounts in irradiated nucleoids of both Deinococcus species. We observed, by immunofluorescence microscopy, the subcellular localization of these proteins in D. radiodurans, showing for the first time the recruitment of the DdrD protein into the D. radiodurans nucleoid. We specifically followed the kinetics of recruitment of RecA, DdrA, and DdrD to the nucleoid after irradiation. Remarkably, RecA proteins formed irregular filament-like structures 1 h after irradiation, before being redistributed throughout the cells by 3 h post-irradiation. Comparable dynamics of DdrD localization were observed, suggesting a possible functional interaction between RecA and DdrD. Several proteins involved in nucleotide synthesis were also seen in higher quantities in the nucleoids of irradiated cells, indicative of the existence of a mechanism for orchestrating the presence of proteins involved in DNA metabolism in nucleoids in response to massive DNA damage. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD00196. (authors)

  11. Protective effects of the fermented milk Kefir on X-ray irradiation-induced intestinal damage in B6C3F1 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teruya, Kiichiro; Nakamichi, Noboru; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Myojin-Maekawa, Yuki; Shimamoto, Fumio; Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Tokumaru, Koichiro; Tokumaru, Sennosuke

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal damage associated with radiation therapy is currently an inevitable outcome. The protective effect of Kefir was assessed for its usefulness against radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage. A Kefir supernatant was diluted by 2- or 10-fold and administered for 1 week prior to 8 Gray (Gy) X-ray irradiation at a dose rate of 2 Gy/min, with an additional 15d of administration post-irradiation. The survival rate of control mice with normal drinking water dropped to 70% on days 4 through 9 post-irradiation. On the other hand, 100% of mice in the 10- and 2-fold-diluted Kefir groups survived up to day 9 post-irradiation (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Examinations for crypt regeneration against 8, 10 and 12 Gy irradiation at a dose rate of 4 Gy/min revealed that the crypt number was significantly increased in the mice administered both diluted Kefir solutions (p<0.01 for each). Histological and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that the diluted Kefir solutions protected the crypts from radiation, and promoted crypt regeneration. In addition, lyophilized Kefir powder was found to significantly recover the testis weights (p<0.05), but had no effects on the body and spleen weights, after 8 Gy irradiation. These findings suggest that Kefir could be a promising candidate as a radiation-protective agent. (author)

  12. Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Yoshihisa; Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by γ-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10 Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment

  13. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  14. Hepatocytes, rather than leukocytes reverse DNA damage in vivo induced by whole body y-irradiation of mice, as shown by the alkaline comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUANA PINCHEIRA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage repair was assessed in quiescent (G0 leukocytes and in hepatocytes of mice, after 1 and 2 hours recovery from a single whole body y-irradiation with 0.5, 1 or 2 Gy. Evaluation of single-strand breaks (SSB and alkali-labile sites together were carried out by a single-cell electrophoresis at pH>13.0 (alkaline comet assay. In non-irradiated (control mice, the constitutive, endogenous DNA damage (basal was around 1.5 times higher in leukocytes than in hepatocytes. Irradiation immediately increased SSB frequency in both cell types, in a dose-dependent manner. Two sequential phases took place during the in vivo repair of the radio-induced DNA lesions. The earliest one, present in both hepatocytes and leukocytes, further increased the SSB frequency, making evident the processing of some primary lesions in DNA bases into the SSB repair intermediates. In a second phase, SSB frequency decreased because of their removal. In hepatocytes, such a frequency regressed to the constitutive basal level after 2 hours recovery from either 0.5 orí Gy. On the other hand, the SSB repair phase was specifically abrogated in leukocytes, at the doses and recovery times analyzed. Thus, the efficiency of in vivo repair of radio-induced DNA damage in dormant cells (lymphocytes is quite different from that in hepatocytes whose low proliferation activity accounts only for cell renewal.

  15. Measurement and protection of the oxidative damage induced by heavy-ion irradiation in human glioblastoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Nose, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the oxidative damage of DNA caused by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation by measuring the level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Relationship between the 8-OHdG level and the LET value was assessed, and the anti-oxidative effect of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (edaravone) on DNA was evaluated as well. Solution containing salmon sperm DNA at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml was irradiated with 10 Gy of x-ray or 290 MeV/u carbon beams with an LET range of 20-80 keV/μm. The 8-OHdG level in the DNA solution was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an electrochemical detector (ECD) after each irradiation. Edaravone was added to the DNA solution in final concentrations from 10 μM to 1 mM and 8-OHdG level was measured by the same method after irradiation. The level of 8-OHdG increased dose-dependently after x-rays irradiation, and it was significantly suppressed by the presence of edaravone. The yield of 8-OHdG decreased as LET value increased, and the protection efficiency by edaravone decreased as LET value increased. (author)

  16. Measurement and protection of the oxidative damage induced by heavy-ion irradiation in human glioblastoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Anzai, Kazunori; Ikota, Nobuo; Ando, Koichi; Ozawa, Toshihiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the oxidative damage of DNA caused by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation by measuring the level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Relationship between the 8-OHdG level and the LET value was assessed, and the anti-oxidative effect of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (edaravone) on DNA was evaluated as well. Solution containing salmon sperm DNA at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml was irradiated with 10 Gy of x-ray or 290 MeV/u carbon beams with an LET range of 20-80 keV/{mu}m. The 8-OHdG level in the DNA solution was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an electrochemical detector (ECD) after each irradiation. Edaravone was added to the DNA solution in final concentrations from 10 {mu}M to 1 mM and 8-OHdG level was measured by the same method after irradiation. The level of 8-OHdG increased dose-dependently after x-rays irradiation, and it was significantly suppressed by the presence of edaravone. The yield of 8-OHdG decreased as LET value increased, and the protection efficiency by edaravone decreased as LET value increased. (author)

  17. Surface damages of polycrystalline W and La2O3-doped W induced by high-flux He plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Li, Shouzhe; Liu, Dongping; Benstetter, Günther; Zhang, Yang; Hong, Yi; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Wu, Yunfeng; Bi, Zhenhua

    2018-04-01

    In this study, polycrystalline tungsten (W) and three oxide dispersed strengthened W with 0.1 vol %, 1.0 vol % and 5.0 vol % lanthanum trioxide (La2O3) were irradiated with low-energy (200 eV) and high-flux (5.8 × 1021 or 1.4 × 1022 ions/m2ṡs) He+ ions at elevated temperature. After He+ irradiation at a fluence of 3.0 × 1025/m2, their surface damages were observed by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction, and conductive atomic force microscopy. Micron-sized holes were formed on the surface of W alloys after He+ irradiation at 1100 K. Analysis shows that the La2O3 grains doped in W were sputtered preferentially by the high-flux He+ ions when compared with the W grains. For irradiation at 1550 K, W nano-fuzz was formed at the surfaces of both polycrystalline W and La2O3-doped W. The thickness of the fuzz layers formed at the surface of La2O3-doped W is 40% lower than the one of polycrystalline W. The presence of La2O3 could suppress the diffusion and coalescence of He atoms inside W, which plays an important role in the growth of nanostructures fuzz.

  18. Damage induced by hydroxyl radicals generated in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated frozen aqueous solution of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hideki; Matsuda, Akira; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Iida, Yoshiharu.

    1996-01-01

    Aqueous DNA solutions with or without the spin trap α-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) were exposed to γ-rays at 77 K. After thawing the solutions, three experiments were carried out to confirm the generation of OH radicals in the hydration layer of DNA and to examine whether they act as an inducer of DNA strand breaks and base alterations. Observation with the EZR-spin tapping method showed ESR signals from PBN-OH adducts in the solution containing PBN and DNA, but there were few signals in the solution containing PBN alone, suggesting that reactive OH radicals were produced in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated DNA and were effectively scavenged by PBN, and that unreactive OH radicals were produced in the free water layer of γ-irradiated DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA proved that PBN had no effect on the formation of strand breaks, whereas examination with the high-performance liquid chromatography-eloctrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) method showed that PBN suppressed the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). From these results it was concluded that OH radicals generated in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated DNA did not induce DNA strand breaks but induced base alterations. (author)

  19. Protective effect of lycopene on whole body irradiation induced liver damage of Swiss albino mice: pathological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Menon, Venugopal Padmanabhan

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy of lycopene, a naturally occurring dietary carotenoid on whole body radiation-induced liver damage of Swiss albino mice. The first phase of the study was carried out to fix the effective concentration of Iycopene by performing a 30 days survival studies using different graded doses (10, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg body weight) of lycopene administered orally to mice via intragastric intubations for seven consecutive days prior to exposure of whole body radiation (10 Gy). Based on the results of survival studies, the effective dose of Iycopene was fixed which was then administered to mice orally via intragastric intubations for seven consecutive days prior to exposure of whole body radiation (4 Gy) to evaluate its radioprotective efficacy by performing various biochemical assays in the liver of Swiss albino mice. The results indicated that radiation-induced decrease in the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and increase in lipid peroxidative index, DNA damage and comet assays were altered by pre-administration with the effective dose of Iycopene (20 mg/kg body weight) which restored the antioxidant status to near normal and decreased the levels of lipid peroxidative index, DNA damage and comet assays.These results were further confirmed by histopathological examinations which indicated that pre-administration with the effective dose of Iycopene reduced the hepatic damage induced by radiation. (author)

  20. Radioprotective effects of hesperidin on oxidative damages and histopathological changes induced by X-irradiation in rats heart tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhasan Rezaeyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate radioprotective effects of hesperidin (HES administration before the irradiation on the cardiac oxidative stress and histopathological changes in an experimental rat model. The cardiovascular complications of radiation exposure cause morbidity and mortality in patients who received radiotherapy. HES, an antioxidant flavonoid found in citrus fruits, suggests the protection against the tissue damage. Fifty-eight rats were divided into four groups: Group 1 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS and sham radiation; Group 2, HES and sham radiation; Group 3, PBS and radiation; and Group 4, HES and radiation. The rats were exposed to single dose of 18 Gy of 6 MV X-ray. One hundred milligrams per kilogram doses of HES was administered for 7 days before irradiation. The estimation of superoxide dismutase (SOD, malondialdehyde (MDA, and histopathological analyses was performed at 24 h and 8 weeks after radiation exposure. The irradiation of chest area resulted in an elevated MDA level and decreased SOD activity. Moreover, long-term pathological lesions of radiation were inflammation, fibrosis, the increased number of mast cells and macrophages, and development of plaque, vascular leakage, myocardial degeneration, and myocyte necrosis. Although the administration of HES decreases inflammation, fibrosis, mast cell and macrophage numbers, and myocyte necrosis, it did not result in reduced thrombus, myocardium degeneration, and vascular leakage. In conclusion, these results suggest that HES can perform a radioprotection action. The protective effect of HES may be attributable to its immunomodulatory effects and free radical-scavenging properties.

  1. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shozo

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs

  2. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs.

  3. Effects of a turmeric extract (Curcuma longa) on chronic ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin damage in melanin-possessing hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2009-12-01

    Turmeric (the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L., Zingiberacease) is widely used as a dietary pigment and spice, and has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation, skin wounds and hepatic disorders in Ayurvedic, Unani and Chinese medicine. Although the topical application or oral administration of turmeric is used to improve skin trouble, there is no evidence to support this effect. The aim of this study was to clarify whether turmeric prevents chronic ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated skin damage. We examined the effects of a turmeric extract on skin damage including changes in skin thickness and elasticity, pigmentation and wrinkling caused by long-term, low-dose ultraviolet B irradiation in melanin-possessing hairless mice. The extract (at 300 or 1000 mg/kg, twice daily) prevented an increase in skin thickness and a reduction in skin elasticity induced by chronic UVB exposure. It also prevented the formation of wrinkles and melanin (at 1000 mg/kg, twice daily) as well as increases in the diameter and length of skin blood vessels and in the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Prevention of UVB-induced skin aging by turmeric may be due to the inhibition of increases in MMP-2 expression caused by chronic irradiation.

  4. Recruitment of Gr1(+)CD11b (+)F4/80 (+) population in the bone marrow and spleen by irradiation-induced pulmonary damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanasegaran, Suganya; Ito, Sachiko; Nishio, Naomi; Uddin, Mohammad Nizam; Sun, Yang; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury is a kind of sterile inflammation, which may lead to morbidity and mortality. The mechanism by which ionizing radiation activate the immune system is not well understood. In the present study, we have investigated the immunological responses induced by local irradiation-induced damage in mouse lung. The left lungs of C57BL/6 mice were irradiated at a high dose of 100 Gy. The histology of the lungs and spleen showed evidences of alveolar inflammation and congestion at 2 weeks after X-ray treatment. Also, prominent increase in cells expressing the cell surface markers, Gr(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) and Ly6C(+) Ly6G(+) were observed 2 weeks after X-ray treatment (100 Gy). Gr1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cell depletion by clodronate treatment reversed the histological effects and also failed to recruit Gr(+)CD11b(+) cells or F4/80(+) cells caused by irradiation. The origin of recruited Gr1(+)CD11b(+) cells was found to be a mixed resident and recruited phenotype.

  5. Damage nucleation in Si during ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; Fathy, D.; Narayan, J.

    1984-01-01

    Damage nucleation in single crystals of silicon during ion irradiation is investigated. Experimental results and mechanisms for damage nucleation during both room and liquid nitrogen temperature irradiation with different mass ions are discussed. It is shown that the accumulation of damage during room temperature irradiation depends on the rate of implantation. These dose rate effects are found to decrease in magnitude as the mass of the ions is increased. The significance of dose rate effects and their mass dependence on nucleation mechanisms is discussed

  6. Protection of vanillin derivative VND3207 on genome damage and apoptosis of human lymphoblastoid cells induced by γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Rui; Huang Bo; He Xingpeng; Xu Qinzhi; Wang Yu; Zhou Pingkun

    2009-01-01

    To determine the protective effect of vanillin derivative VND3207 on the genome damage and apoptosis of human lymphoblastoid AHH-1 cells induced by γ-ray irradiation, the techniques of single-cell gel electrophoresis, micronucleus test, Annexin V-FACS assay, and the double-fluorescein staining and fluorescent microscope observation were used. Neutral single-cell gel electrophoresis showed that the initial DNA double-strand breaks caused by 2 Gy 60 Co γ-ray was significantly decreased by VND3207 in the range of 540 μmol/L. This significant phenomenonwas demonstrated by the fact that the comet tail-moment was significantly shortened and the DNA content in the comet tail was reduced when the cells were protected with VND3207, and the radio-protective effect increases along with the increasing of drug concentration. Similarly, the yield of micronucleus was reduced by 540 μmol/L of VND3207 in a concentration-dependency in AHH-1 cells irradiated with 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy and 2.0 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. 40 μmol/L VND3207 resulted in 40% reduction in the yield of micronucleus induced by 2.0 Gy. The occurrence of apoptosis enhanced along with the time from 8 h to 48 h post 4 Gy irradiation, and 40 μmol/L of VND3207 significantly decreased the induction of apoptosis. This work has further demonstrated a good protection of VND3207 on γ-ray-induced cell genome damage and apoptosis. (authors)

  7. Aluminium and Gamma Irradiation Induced Oxidative Damage in Brain Tissue of Male Rats - Protective Role of Ferulic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, S.Z.; Hanafi, N.; Noaman, E.

    2011-01-01

    The current study was carried out to investigate the potential role of ferulic acid (FA) against Aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 ), γ- radiation either alone or combination induced oxidative stress in brain tissue of Wistar rats. The period of the experiment was eight weeks. Animals were administrated by aluminium chloride at a dose of 8.5 mg/kg/day and exposed to a single dose (4 Gy) of γ-radiation. FA was administered orally (50 mg/Kg body weight)/day. Histopathological observations and myeloid protein distribution were recorded in brain tissue. Induction of oxidative stress was recorded after all exposures. Brain tissue of AlCl 3 and γ- irradiation treatments either alone or combined revealed many altered changes and myeloid protein distribution. Also a decrease in serotonin concentration was recorded. An increase in Malonaldialdahyde (MDA) and acetylcholinesterase activity and percentage of saturated fatty acids in plasma and brain tissue was recorded. Reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) in blood and brain showed a significant decrease. Treatment of AlCl 3 loaded animals by FA showed simple atrophy as shrunken morphology saw in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a decrease in myeloid protein deposition. FA treatment of AlCl 3 loaded or irradiated animals represented a significant increase in serotonin concentration and ameliorated affects on oxidative stress markers, acetylcholinesterase activity and percentage of saturated fatty acids in plasma and brain tissue. In conclusion FA has a role in reducing the oxidative stress of AlCl 3 and γ- irradiation on brain tissue of rats

  8. Non-Fourier thermal transport induced structural hierarchy and damage to collagen ultrastructure subjected to laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Nilamani; Narasimhan, Arunn; Dhar, Purbarun; Das, Sarit K

    2018-05-01

    Comprehending the mechanism of thermal transport through biological tissues is an important factor for optimal ablation of cancerous tissues and minimising collateral tissue damage. The present study reports detailed mapping of the rise in internal temperature within the tissue mimics due to NIR (1064 nm) laser irradiation, both for bare mimics and with gold nanostructures infused. Gold nanostructures such as mesoflowers and nanospheres have been synthesised and used as photothermal converters to enhance the temperature rise, resulting in achieving the desired degradation of malignant tissue in targeted region. Thermal history was observed experimentally and simulated considering non-Fourier dual phase lag (DPL) model incorporated Pennes bio-heat transfer equation using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The gross deviation in temperature i.e. rise from the classical Fourier model for bio-heat conduction suggests additional effects of temperature rise on the secondary structures and morphological and physico-chemical changes to the collagen ultrastructures building the tissue mass. The observed thermal denaturation in the collagen fibril morphologies have been explained based on the physico-chemical structure of collagen and its response to thermal radiation. The large shift in frequency of amides A and B is pronounced at a depth of maximum temperature rise compared with other positions in tissue phantom. Observations for change in band of amide I, amide II, and amide III are found to be responsible for damage to collagen ultra-structure. Variation in the concentration of gold nanostructures shows the potentiality of localised hyperthermia treatment subjected to NIR radiation through a proposed free radical mechanism.

  9. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  10. Cytometric analysis of irradiation damaged chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, M.E.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of cells in interphase results in dose-dependent damage to DNA which is discernable by flow-cytometric analysis of chromosomes. The quantity (and possibly the quality) of chromosomal changes is different in survival-matched doses of x and α irradiation. It may, therefore, be possible to use these methods for analysis of dose and type of exposure in unknown cases

  11. Irradiation damage to the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennessy, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    While some degree of injury to normal, non-tumor-bearing, intrathoracic structures always occurs following irradiation for cure or palliation of neoplastic disease, clinical expression of this injury is uncommon. However, under certain circumstances, clinical manifestations may be severe and life threatening. Acute radiographic manifestations of pulmonary injury usually appear either synchronous with or, more typically, seven to ten days after the onset of the clinical syndrome. The acute signs of edema and slight volume loss within the irradiated zone are nonspecific except for their temporal and spatial relationship to the irradiation of the patient. Resolution of the acute changes is followed by pulmonary cicatrization, which is almost always stable within one year after completion of therapy. Change in postirradiation scarring following stabilization of the reaction must always be assumed to be due to some other process. While the radiograph primarily reveals pulmonary injury, all tissues, including the heart and major vessels, are susceptible, and the radiologist must recognize that any change within the thorax of a patient who has undergone thoracic irradiation may be a complication of that treatment. Differentiation of irradiation injury from residual or recurrent tumor, drug reaction, or opportunistic infection may be difficult and at times impossible

  12. DNA damage caused by UV- and near UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Much work with mutants deficient in DNA repair has been performed concerning UV-induced DNA damage under the condition where there is no artificial stimulation. In an attempt to infer the effects of solar wavelengths, the outcome of the work is discussed in terms of cellular radiation sensitivity, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and mutation induction, leading to the conclusion that some DNA damage occurs even by irradiation of the shorter wavelength light (270 - 315 nm) and is repaired by excision repair. It has been thought to date that pyrimidine dimer (PD) plays the most important role in UV-induced DNA damage, followed by (6 - 4) photoproducts. As for DNA damage induced by near UV irradiation, the yield of DNA single-strand breaks and of DNA-protein crosslinking, other than PD, is considered. The DNA-protein crosslinking has proved to be induced by irradiation at any wavelength of UV ranging from 260 to 425 nm. Near UV irradiation causes the inhibition of cell proliferation to take place. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Damage of lymphocytes by ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, H.; Moldenhauer, H.; Kehrberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    After a short review, how lymphocytes of the peripheral blood are influenced by radiotherapy, the damage of lymphocytes by whole-body irradiation is pointed out in animal experiments and after in vitro irradiation. The special sensibility of B-cells and their homogeneity in fields of radiobiology are opposed to the heterogeneity of T-cells. The radiosensibility of cytotoxic lymphocytes, suppressor cells, and helper cells are discussed. It appears, that within these functional criteria, there is a different radiosensibility, too. (author)

  14. Possible genetic damage from diagnostic x irradiation. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withrow, T.J.; Andersen, F.A.; Yao, K.T.S.; Stratmeyer, M.E.

    1980-08-01

    Although it is known that x irradiation is capable of producing mutations and chromosomal abnormalities in experimental systems, there is little or no direct evidence of such phenomena in humans. This report reviews some human genetic diseases and chromosomal abnormalities as well as the evidence for x-ray induced mutations and chromosomal abnormalities in experimental systems. The examination of these areas reveals that spontaneous chromosomal abnormalities and genetic diseases are associated with the same type of DNA damage that x irradiation produces in experimental systems. Therefore, it is concluded that genetic radiation damage in humans may mainfest itself as an increase in the spontaneous genetic diseases rather than as any unique disease

  15. Interferon synthesis in mouse peritoneal cells damaged by x irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolgay, E; T' alas, M

    1976-01-01

    NDV-induced interferon of peritoneal cells of irradiated (x-rays, 400 R) and control mice was investigated in vitro. Irradiation or treatment with hydroxyurea (10(-5) M) and mitomycin C (25 microng/ml) did not change interferon synthesis in spite of an 80 to 90% inhibition of 3H-thymidine incorporation. Increased doses of mitomycin C and treatment with actinomycin D and puromycin blocked interferon production. De novo interferon synthesis occurred in cells with damaged replicative activity of DNA caused by irradiation or by treatment with antimetabolites.

  16. Protective effect of diallyl disulfide against the irradiation damage in mice induced by "1"2C"6"+ ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shuai; Ma Xiaofei; Zhang Hong; Liu Yang

    2013-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Diallyl disulfide (DADS) on "1"2C"6"+ ion irradiation was studied. Pretreated with DADS of different concentration, male Kung-Ming mice were exposed to whole body irradiation with dosage of 4 Gy "1"2C"6"+ ion. The animals were sacrificed after irradiation. Then the bone marrow cells micronucleus rate, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, content of protein carbonylation, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity were measured. As compared with those in irradiated group, the ratio of micronucleus cells in marrow and the hepatic ALT activity in the pretreatment group with low dose DADS decreased significantly (p < O.OOl). Similarly, the content of protein carbonylation and the levels of MDA dropped dramatically in the group with middle dose DADS treatment (p < 0.05). On the contrary, the hepatic T-AOC increased markedly in the group of pretreatment with low dose DADS (p < 0.05). The results showed that DADS protect lipoid, protein and genetic material from "1"2C"6"+ ion irradiation by right of resisting oxidative stress. (authors)

  17. Multispecimen dual-beam irradiation damage chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packan, N.H.; Buhl, R.A.

    1980-06-01

    An irradiation damage chamber that can be used to rapidly simulate fast neutron damage in fission or fusion materials has been designed and constructed. The chamber operates in conjunction with dual Van de Graaff accelerators at ORNL to simulate a wide range of irradiation conditions, including pulsed irradiation. Up to six experiments, each with up to nine 3-mm disk specimens, can be loaded into the ultrahigh vacuum chamber. Specimen holders are heated with individual electron guns, and the temperature of each specimen can be monitored during bombardment by an infrared pyrometer. Three different dose levels may be obtained during any single bombardment, and the heavy-ion flux on each of the nine specimens can be measured independently with only a brief interruption of the beam. The chamber has been in service for nearly three years, during which time approximately 250 bombardments have been successfully carried out. An appendix contains detailed procedures for operating the chamber

  18. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Epithelial Damage by the TLR5 Agonist Entolimod in a Mouse Model of Fractionated Head and Neck Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshkov, Ilia A; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Mett, Vadim L; Hutson, Alan D; Singh, Anurag K; Gudkov, Andrei V; Burdelya, Lyudmila G

    2017-05-01

    Radiation treatment of head and neck cancer frequently causes severe collateral damage to normal tissues including mouth mucosa, salivary glands and skin. This toxicity limits the radiation dose that can be delivered and affects the patient's quality of life. Previous studies in mice and nonhuman primates showed that entolimod, a toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist derived from bacterial flagellin, effectively reduced radiation damage to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues in both total-body and local irradiation scenarios, with no protection of tumors. Here, using a mouse model, we analyzed the efficacy of entolimod administered before or after irradiation in reducing damage to normal tissues. Animals received local fractionated radiation to the head and neck area, thus modeling radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Tissue damage was evaluated through histomorphological examination of samples collected at different time points up to four weeks, mice were exposed locally to five daily fractions of 5, 6 or 7 Gy. A semiquantitative scoring system was used to assess the severity of observed pathomorphological changes. In this model, radiation damage was most severe in the lips, tongue and skin, moderate in the upper esophagus and minor in salivary glands. The kinetics of injury appearance and recovery of normal morphology varied among tissues, with maximal damage to the tongue, esophagus and salivary glands developing at earlier times (days 8-11 postirradiation) relative to that of lip and skin mucosa (days 11-15 postirradiation). While both tested regimens of entolimod significantly reduced the extent of radiation damage and accelerated restoration of normal structure in all tissues analyzed, administration of entolimod 1 h after each irradiation was more effective than treatment 30 min before irradiation. These results support the potential clinical use of entolimod as an adjuvant for improving the therapeutic index of head and neck cancer radiotherapy by

  19. Advanced Microscopy Techniques Used for Comparison of UVA- and gamma-Irradiation-Induced DNA Damage in the Cell Nucleus and Nucleolus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stixová, Lenka; Hrušková, Tereza; Sehnalová, Petra; Legartová, Soňa; Svidenská, S.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 76-84 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : UVA * gamma-irradiation * DNA damage response Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  20. Radiation-induced liver damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, V.A.; Santiago-Delpin, E.A.; Lanaro, A.E.; Castro-Vita, H.; Arroyo, G.; Moscol, J.A.; Gomez, C.; Velazquez, J.; Prado, K.

    1977-01-01

    Due to the recent increase in the use of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer with or without chemotherapy, the risk of liver radiation damage has become a significant concern for the radiotherapist when the treated tumour is located in the upper abdomen or lower thorax. Clinically evident radiation liver damage may result in significant mortality, but at times patients recover without sequelae. The dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks to the entire liver with 5 fractions per week of 200 rads each, seems to be tolerated well clinically by adult humans. Lower doses may lead to damage when used in children, when chemotherapy is added, as in recent hepatectomy cases, and in the presence of pre-existent liver damage. Reduced fractionation may lead to increased damage. Increased fractionation, limitation of the dose delivered to the entire liver, and restriction of the high dose irradiation volume may afford protection. With the aim of studying the problems of hepatic radiation injury in humans, a project of liver irradiation in the dog is being conducted. Mongrel dogs are being conditioned, submitted to pre-irradiation studies (haemogram, blood chemistry, liver scan and biopsy), irradiated under conditions resembling human cancer therapy, and submitted to post-irradiation evaluation of the liver. Twenty-two dogs have been entered in the study but only four qualify for the evaluation of all the study parameters. It has been found that dogs are susceptible to liver irradiation damage similar to humans. The initial mortality has been high mainly due to non-radiation factors which are being kept under control at the present phase of the study. After the initial experiences, the study will involve variations in total dose and fractionation, and the addition of anticoagulant therapy for possible prevention of radiation liver injury. (author)

  1. Local heart irradiation of ApoE(-/-) mice induces microvascular and endocardial damage and accelerates coronary atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriels, Karen; Hoving, Saske; Seemann, Ingar; Visser, Nils L.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Pol, Jeffrey F.; Daemen, Mat J.; Stewart, Fiona A.; Heeneman, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy of thoracic and chest-wall tumors increases the long-term risk of radiation-induced heart disease, like a myocardial infarct. Cancer patients commonly have additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as hypercholesterolemia. The goal of this study is to define the

  2. Simulation study of radiation damage induced by energetic helium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Dac Luc; Vo Tuong Hanh; Hoang Dac Dat

    2003-01-01

    High energy alpha particles produced by neutron-induced nuclear reactions can damage severely reactor materials. Simulation of this process is described using theoretical calculation and ion irradiation experiments at different displacement doses and Helium doses. (author)

  3. Simulation study of radiation damage induced by energetic helium nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang Dac Luc; Hoang Dac Dat

    2003-01-01

    High energy alpha particles produced by neutron-induced nuclear reactions can damage severely reactor materials. Simulation of this process is described using theoretical calculation and ion irradiation experiments at different displacement doses and Helium doses.

  4. Spectroscopic analyses on sonocatalytic damage to bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced by ZnO/hydroxylapatite (ZnO/HA) composite under ultrasonic irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiu; Li, Ying; Wang, Jun; Zou, Mingming; Gao, Jingqun; Kong, Yumei; Li, Kai; Han, Guangxi

    ZnO/hydroxylapatite (ZnO/HA) composite with HA molar content of 6.0% was prepared by the method of precipitation and heat-treated at 500 °C for 40 min and was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The sonocatalytic activities of ZnO/HA composite was carried out through the damage of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the effects of several factors on the damage of BSA molecules were evaluated by means of UV-vis and fluorescence spectra. Experimental results indicated that the damage degree of BSA aggravated with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, irradiation power and ZnO/HA addition amount, but weakened with the increase of solution acidity and ionic strength. In addition, the damage site to BSA was also studied by synchronous fluorescence technology and the damage site was mainly at tryptophan (Trp) residue. This paper provides a valuable reference for driving sonocatalytic method to treat tumor in clinic application.

  5. Ion-irradiation studies of cascade damage in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.

    1982-03-01

    Ion-irradiation studies of the fundamental aspects of cascade damage in metals are reviewed. The emphasis of these studies has been the determination of the primary state of damage (i.e. the arrangement of atoms in the cascade region prior to thermal migration of defects). Progress has been made towards understanding the damage function (i.e. the number of Frenkel pairs produced as a function of primary recoil atom energy), the spatial configuration of vacancies and interstitials in the cascade and the cascade-induced mixing of atoms. It is concluded for these studies that the agitation of the lattice in the vicinity of energetic displacement cascades stimulates the defect motion and that such thermal spike motion induces recombination and clustering of Frenkel defects. 9 figures

  6. Experiments on the proof of the repair of the DNA-damage in human fibroblasts in vitro, induced by PUVA-conditions and after UVC-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silla, R.

    1979-01-01

    Within the frame of the present study we tried to investigate in vitro the course of repair of DNA-damage which had been provoked by UV C-irradiation and by PUVA-conditions. In a preliminary test series the suppression of the semiconservative DNA-replication by hydroxyurea was investigated. It resulted that there is a four-fold suppression of the programmed DNA-synthesis. In the standard experiments 5 groups with 8-MOP plus various UV A-irradiation energies were compared with the not irradiated control groups, with the groups with 8-MOP, with UV A in two different doses, and with the UV C group. The test samples were marked with /sup 3/H-thymidine, whilst hydroxurea was added after a certain period of time (0, 1, 2, 4 hours). In each case the uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine into the DNS - as expression of repair activity - was measured after one hour by the liquid scintigraphic method. These experiments proved an obvious repair activity of the groups, which had received UV C-irradiation, and of those under PUVA-conditions with low UV A-irradiation energies. The maximum values were found after one hour or after two hours respectively. The /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake is blocked by PUVA-conditions with increasing UV A-irradiation energies. Apparently this is also valid for 8-MOP only and for high UV A-doses only.

  7. Enhanced granulocyte growth on peritoneal cell-coated membranes following irradiation: a dual effect of humoral stimulation and repair of x ray-induced damage to the microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.R.; Pfrimmer, W.J.; Boggs, D.R.; Carpe, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental model of the hematopoietic microenvironment was created by allowing a peritoneal cell coating to form on a disk of cellulose acetate placed in the peritoneal cavity of mice. An effective microenvironment capable of supporting colony growth, primarily granulocytic, was established if the cellulose acetate disk was in the peritoneum for 3 to 5 days. Its effectiveness was hampered by transferring it to another mouse or by exposure to toxic agents such as a propylene glycol-ethanol mixture or irradiation. An exponential dose-related decrease in colony formation was seen with increasing doses or irradiation of the microenvironment before colonization. After a low dose of irradiation, recovery of colony support capacity occurred over a 6-day period. Enhancement of colony growth was seen when cell injection was delayed for 2 to 3 days after irradiation. The effects of irradiation on the cellular stroma were separated from the systemic changes in the host by transferring an established hematopoietic microenvironment to a secondary host. It was shown that there are two distinct effects of irradiation on granulocytic colony growth; one was a short-lived period, 2 to 3 days of stimulation, presumably humoral, and the other was dose-dependent reversible microenvironment damage

  8. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yuanqin [Cancer Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Yao, Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY (United States); Gao, Ning [Department of Pharmacognos, College of Pharmacy, 3rd Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  9. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries

  10. A Study on Recovery from Potentially Lethal Damage induced by γ-Irradiation in Plateau-phase Vero Cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Han; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il; Cha, Chang Yong

    1988-01-01

    Recovery from potentially lethal damage (PLDR) after irradiation was studied in plateau-phase culture of Vero cells in vitro. Unfed plateau-phase cells were irradiated with dose of 1 to 9 Gy using Cs-137 irradiator. Cells then were incubated again and left in situ for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 24 hours and then were trypsinized, explanted, and subcultured in fresh RPMI-1640 media containing 0.33% agar. Cell survival was measured by colony forming ability. An adequate number of heavily irradiated Vero cells were added as feeder cells to make the total cell number constant in every culture dish. As the postirradiation in situ incubation time increased, surviving fraction increased saturation level at 2 to 4 hours after in situ incubation. As the radiation dose increased, the rate of PLDR also increased. In analysis of cell survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model, the linear inactivation coefficient (a) decreased largely and reached nearly to zero but the quadratic inactivation coefficient (b) increased minimally by increment of postirradiation in situ incubation time. So PLDR mainly affected the damage expressed as a. In the multitarget model, significant change was not obtained in D0 but in Dq. Therefore, shoulder region in cell survival curve was mainly affected by PLDR and terminal slope was not influenced at all. And dose-modifying factor by PLDR was relatively higher in shoulder region, that is, in low dose area below 3 Gy

  11. DNA damages induced by Ar F laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapel, C.; Rose, S.; Chevrier, L.; Cordier, E.; Courant, D. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie

    2006-07-01

    The photo ablation process used in corneal refractive surgery by the Argon Fluoride (Ar F) laser emitting in ultraviolet C at 193 nm, exposes viable cells round the irradiated zone to sub ablative doses (< 400 joules.m -2). Despite that DNA absorption is higher at 193 nm than 254 nm, cytotoxicity of 193 nm laser radiation is lower than radiation emitted by 254 nm UV-C lamps. In situ, DNA could be protected of laser radiation by cellular components. Consequently, some authors consider that this radiation does not induce genotoxic effect whereas others suspect it to be mutagenic. These lasers are used for fifteen years but many questions remain concerning the long term effects on adjacent cells to irradiated area. The purpose of this study is to describe the effect of 193 nm laser radiation on DNA of stromal keratocytes which are responsible of the corneal structure. The 193 nm laser irradiation induces directly DNA breakage in keratocytes as it has been shown by the comet assay under alkaline conditions. Two hours post irradiation, damages caused by the highest exposure (150 J.m-2) are not repaired as it has been measured with the Olive Tail Moment (product of tail length and tail DNA content). They give partly evidence of induction of an apoptotic process in cells where DNA could be too damaged. In order to characterize specifically double strand breaks, a comparative analysis by immunofluorescence of the H2 Ax histone phosphorylation (H2 Ax) has been performed on irradiated keratocytes and unirradiated keratocytes. Results show a dose dependent increase of the number of H2 Ax positive cells. Consequences of unrepaired DNA lesions could be observed by the generation of micronuclei in cells. Results show again an increase of micronuclei in laser irradiated cells. Chromosomal aberrations have been pointed out by cytogenetic methods 30 mn after irradiation. These aberrations are dose dependent (from 10 to 150 J.m-2). The number of breakage decreases in the long run

  12. Damage studies on tungsten due to helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, N.J.; Buzarbaruah, N.; Mohanty, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Used plasma focus helium ion source to study radiation induced damage on tungsten. • Surface analyses confirm formation of micro-crack, bubbles, blisters, pinholes, etc. • XRD patterns confirm development of compressive stress due to thermal load. • Reduction in hardness value is observed in the case of exposed sample. - Abstract: Energetic and high fluence helium ions emitted in a plasma focus device have been used successfully to study the radiation induced damage on tungsten. The reference and irradiated samples were characterized by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by hardness testers. The micrographs of the irradiated samples at lower magnification show uniform mesh of cracks of micrometer width. However at higher magnification, various types of crystalline defects such as voids, pinholes, bubbles, blisters and microcracks are distinctly noticed. The prominent peaks in X-ray diffraction spectrum of irradiated samples are seen shifted toward higher Bragg angles, thus indicating accumulation of compressive stress due to the heat load delivered by helium ions. A marginal reduction in hardness of the irradiated sample is also noticed

  13. E2F1 induces p19INK4d, a protein involved in the DNA damage response, following UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcagno, Abel L; Giono, Luciana E; Marazita, Mariela C; Castillo, Daniela S; Pregi, Nicolás; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2012-07-01

    Central to the maintenance of genomic integrity is the cellular DNA damage response. Depending on the type of genotoxic stress and through the activation of multiple signaling cascades, it can lead to cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence, and apoptosis. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, plays a dual role in the DNA damage response, inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting DNA repair. Consistently, p19INK4d has been reported to become upregulated in response to UV irradiation and a great variety of genotoxic agents. Here, this induction is shown to result from a transcriptional stimulatory mechanism that can occur at every phase of the cell cycle except during mitosis. Moreover, evidence is presented that demonstrates that E2F1 is involved in the induction of p19INK4d following UV treatment, as it is prevented by E2F1 protein ablation and DNA-binding inhibition. Specific inhibition of this regulation using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that target the E2F response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter also block p19INK4d upregulation and sensitize cells to DNA damage. These results constitute the first description of a mechanism for the induction of p19INK4d in response to UV irradiation and demonstrate the physiological relevance of this regulation following DNA damage.

  14. Neutron induced radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1977-01-01

    We derive a general expression for the number of displaced atoms of type j caused by a primary knock-on of type i. The Kinchin-Pease model is used, but considerably generalised to allow for realistic atomic potentials. Two cases are considered in detail: the single particle problem causing a cascade and the neutron initiated problem which leads to multiple subcascades. Numerical results have been obtained for a variety of scattering laws. An important conclusion is that neutron initiated damage is much more severe than atom-initiated damage and leads to the number of displaced atoms being a factor of (A+1) 2 /4A larger than the single primary knock-on theory predicts. A is the ratio of the atomic mass to the neutron mass. The importance of this result to the theory of neutron sputtering is explained. (orig.) [de

  15. Effect of hydration on the annealing of chemical radiation damage in gamma-irradiated strontium bromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; Sahish, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Rehydration of γ-irradiated anhydrous strontium bromate induces direct recovery of damage. The recovery process is unimolecular and the rehydrated salt is susceptible to thermal annealing. (author) 11 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Bowthruster-induced damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokking, L.A.; Janssen, P.C.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    The stability of stones in propeller-induced jet wash is still difficult to predict. Especially the trend of bowthrusters increasing in size and power in sea going ships (especially ferries) over the last years may be a reason for concern when dealing with the protection of slopes and beds. But also

  17. Photobiomodulation for Cobalt Chloride-Induced Hypoxic Damage of RF/6A Cells by 670 nm Light-Emitting Diode Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of 670 nm light-emitting diode (LED irradiation on the diabetic retinopathy (DR using hypoxic rhesus monkey choroid-retinal (RF/6A cells as the model system. Background Data. Treatment with light in the spectrum from red to near-infrared region has beneficial effect on tissue injury and 670 nm LED is currently under clinical investigation for retinoprotective therapy. Methods. Studies were conducted in the cultured cells under hypoxia treated by cobalt chloride (CoCl2. After irradiation by 670 nm LED with different power densities, cell viability, cytochrome C oxidase activity, and ATP concentration were measured. Results. The irradiation of 670 nm LED significantly improved cell viability, cytochrome C oxidase activity, and ATP concentration in the hypoxia RF/6A cells. Conclusion. 670 nm LED irradiation could recover the hypoxia damage caused by CoCl2. Photobiomodulation of 670 nm LED plays a potential role for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Splitting diffraction peak in different thickness LL-interferometer and determination of thickness of damaged layer induced by electron irradiation of plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truni, K.G.; Sedrakyan, A.G.; Papoyan, A.A.; Bezirganyan, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Amplitude of twice reflected beam is calculated analytically, oscillatory dependence of peak intensity in the centre of diffraction image on the small variations in thickness is shown. The expression, clearly binding the splitting value of diffraction peak with variation in thickness of the interferometer plates, is received. The effect of variation in thickness on the splitting value of focal line is studied experimentally in case of irradiation of the equal-arm Π-shaped interferometer blocks by fast electron flow, thickness of the originated damaged layers are determined

  19. Laser induced damage threshold on metallic surfaces during laser cleaning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available laser paint removal. Laser induced damage on 316L stainless steel was studied, with the target subjected to single and multiple pulse irradiations using a Q-switched Nd:YAG, with fluences between 0.15 and 11.8 J/cm2. Several different damage morphologies...

  20. CEREBRAL CORTEX DAMAGE INDUCED BY ACUTE ORAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... This study examines alcohol-induced cerebral cortex damage and the association with oxidative ... alcohol has profound effects on the function ... Chronic use of ..... Alcohol induced brain damage and liver damage in young.

  1. Carboxylated nanodiamonds inhibit γ-irradiation damage of human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K; Silva-Campa, E; Melendrez-Amavizca, R; Teran Arce, F; Mata-Haro, V; Landon, P B; Zhang, C; Pedroza-Montero, M; Lal, R

    2016-04-07

    Nanodiamonds when carboxylated (cNDs) act as reducing agents and hence could limit oxidative damage in biological systems. Gamma (γ)-irradiation of whole blood or its components is required in immunocompetent patients to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). However, γ-irradiation of blood also deoxygenates red blood cells (RBCs) and induces oxidative damage, including abnormalities in cellular membranes and hemolysis. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we examined the effect of cNDs on γ-irradiation mediated deoxygenation and morphological damage of RBCs. γ-Radiation induced several morphological phenotypes, including stomatocytes, codocytes and echinocytes. While stomatocytes and codocytes are reversibly damaged RBCs, echinocytes are irreversibly damaged. AFM images show significantly fewer echinocytes among cND-treated γ-irradiated RBCs. The Raman spectra of γ-irradiated RBCs had more oxygenated hemoglobin patterns when cND-treated, resembling those of normal, non-irradiated RBCs, compared to the non-cND-treated RBCs. cND inhibited hemoglobin deoxygenation and morphological damage, possibly by neutralizing the free radicals generated during γ-irradiation. Thus cNDs have the therapeutic potential to preserve the quality of stored blood following γ-irradiation.

  2. Measurement and protection of the oxidative damage induced by high-LET carbon-ion irradiation in salmon sperm DNA solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritake, T.; Nose, T.; Tsuboi, K.; Anzai, K.; Ikota, N.; Ozawa, T.; Ando, K.

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study are to quantify the yield of hydroxyl radicals (OH) , and to evaluate the oxidative damage on DNA after high-linear energy transfer (LET) carbon-ion beams and x-rays. For this purpose, the relationship between the radiolytic yield of OH in aqueous solution and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) level in DNA solution were assessed after radiation. In addition, the anti-oxidative effect of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazonline-5-one (edaravone) on DNA was evaluated. Culture medium containing 200 mM 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was irradiated with doses of 0 to 20 Gy with an LET of 20 to 90 keV/μm, and the yields of OH were measured using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. Salmon sperm DNA solution at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml was irradiated with 10 Gy of x-rays or 290 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beams with an LET range of 20-80 keV/μm. 8-OHdG levels in the DNA solution were measured by HPLC with an electrochemical detector (ECD) after each irradiation. Edaravone was added to the DNA solution in final concentrations of 10 μM to 1 mM and 8-OHdG levels were measured by the same method after irradiation. The yield of OH by carbon-ion radiolysis increased in proportion to the absorbed dose over the range of 0 to 20 Gy, and the yield of OH decreased as LET increased logarithmically from 20 to 90 keV/μm. The level of 8-OHdG increased dose-dependently after x-ray irradiation, and it was significantly suppressed by edaravone. Furthermore, the yield of 8-OHdG and the protection efficiency by edaravone decreased as LET value increased. These unique findings provide further understanding of the indirect effect of high-LET radiation, and chemical protection of oxidative damage on DNA is important for clinical application of high-LET radiation

  3. Measurement and protection of the oxidative damage induced by high-LET carbon-ion irradiation in salmon sperm DNA solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritake, T; Nose, T [University of Tsukuba, (Japan); Tsuboi, K [Institute of Clinical Medical Center, (Japan); Anzai, K; Ikota, N [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, (Japan); Ozawa, T [Redox Regulation Research Group, (Japan); Ando, K [Research Center of Charged Particle Therapy, (Japan). National Institution

    2003-07-01

    The aims of this study are to quantify the yield of hydroxyl radicals (OH) , and to evaluate the oxidative damage on DNA after high-linear energy transfer (LET) carbon-ion beams and x-rays. For this purpose, the relationship between the radiolytic yield of OH in aqueous solution and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) level in DNA solution were assessed after radiation. In addition, the anti-oxidative effect of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazonline-5-one (edaravone) on DNA was evaluated. Culture medium containing 200 mM 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was irradiated with doses of 0 to 20 Gy with an LET of 20 to 90 keV/{mu}m, and the yields of OH were measured using an electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. Salmon sperm DNA solution at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml was irradiated with 10 Gy of x-rays or 290 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beams with an LET range of 20-80 keV/{mu}m. 8-OHdG levels in the DNA solution were measured by HPLC with an electrochemical detector (ECD) after each irradiation. Edaravone was added to the DNA solution in final concentrations of 10 {mu}M to 1 mM and 8-OHdG levels were measured by the same method after irradiation. The yield of OH by carbon-ion radiolysis increased in proportion to the absorbed dose over the range of 0 to 20 Gy, and the yield of OH decreased as LET increased logarithmically from 20 to 90 keV/{mu}m. The level of 8-OHdG increased dose-dependently after x-ray irradiation, and it was significantly suppressed by edaravone. Furthermore, the yield of 8-OHdG and the protection efficiency by edaravone decreased as LET value increased. These unique findings provide further understanding of the indirect effect of high-LET radiation, and chemical protection of oxidative damage on DNA is important for clinical application of high-LET radiation.

  4. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  5. Laser-Induced Damage with Femtosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.

    The strong electric fields of focused femtosecond laser pulses lead to non-equilibrium dynamics in materials, which, beyond a threshold intensity, causes laser-induced damage (LID). Such a strongly non-linear and non-perturbative process renders important LID observables like fluence and intensity thresholds and damage morphology (crater) extremely difficult to predict quantitatively. However, femtosecond LID carries a high degree of precision, which has been exploited in various micro/nano-machining and surface engineering applications, such as human eye surgery and super-hydrophobic surfaces. This dissertation presents an array of experimental studies which have measured the damage behavior of various materials under femtosecond irradiation. Precision experiments were performed to produce extreme spatio-temporal confinement of the femtosecond laser-solid damage interaction on monocrystalline Cu, which made possible the first successful direct-benchmarking of LID simulation with realistic damage craters. A technique was developed to produce laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) in a single pulse (typically a multi-pulse phenomenon), and was used to perform a pump-probe study which revealed asynchronous LIPSS formation on copper. Combined with 1-D calculations, this new experimental result suggests more drastic electron heating than expected. Few-cycle pulses were used to study the LID performance and morphology of commercial ultra-broadband optics, which had not been systematically studied before. With extensive surface analysis, various morphologies were observed, including LIPSS, swelling (blisters), simple craters, and even ring-shaped structures, which varied depending on the coating design, number of pulses, and air/vacuum test environment. Mechanisms leading to these morphologies are discussed, many of which are ultrafast in nature. The applied damage behavior of multi-layer dielectric mirrors was measured and compared between long pulse (150 ps

  6. Lattice damage caused by the irradiation of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, B; Mainwood, A; Newton, M; Davies, G

    2002-01-01

    Diamond is perceived to be radiation-hard, but the damage caused to the diamond is not well understood. The intrinsic defects (vacancies and interstitials) which are created by radiation damage are immobile at room temperature in diamond, unlike in silicon. Therefore, once the mechanisms of damage are understood for one type and energy of the particle, the dose and energy dependence of irradiation by other particles at a range of energies can be extrapolated. When a crystal is irradiated, the generation rates of vacancies and self-interstitials are generally determined by optical or electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy experiments carried out after the irradiation has stopped. However, as the irradiation proceeds some of the carbon atoms displaced from their lattice sites may relax back into the vacant site, and the damage event will not be observed in the later measurement. In this paper, the mechanisms for radiation damage by charged particles in particular electrons and photons are investigat...

  7. Radiation damage of pixelated photon detector by neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Isamu [KEK, 1-1 Oho Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)], E-mail: isamu.nakamura@kek.jp

    2009-10-21

    Radiation Damage of Pixelated Photon Detector by neutron irradiation is reported. MPPC, one of PPD or Geiger-mode APD, developed by Hamamatsu Photonics, is planned to be used in many high energy physics experiments. In such experiments radiation damage is a serious issue. A series of neutron irradiation tests is performed at the Reactor YAYOI of the University of Tokyo. MPPCs were irradiated at the reactor up to 10{sup 12}neutron/cm{sup 2}. In this paper, the effect of neutron irradiation on the basic characteristics of PPD including gain, noise rate, photon detection efficiency is presented.

  8. Radiation damage of uranium-thorium oxide, irradiated in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloem, P.J.C.; Nagel, W.; Plas, T. van der; Kema, N.V.

    1977-01-01

    A suspension in water of spherical particles of UO 2 -ThO 2 with diameter 5μm has been considered as the working fluid in an aqueous, homogeneous, thermal nuclear reactor. Irradiation experiments have shown that these particles suffer a gradual breakdown when irradiated in water. This behaviour is markedly different from that shown on irradiation in absence of water. As damage was defined the amount of solid dissolved by an etching liquid. Electron microscopic pictures showed that at higher irradiation temperatures in water the actual damage was larger than the etching values indicated. (orig.) [de

  9. Un-repairable DNA damage in cell due to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Giichi

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced cell reproductive deactivation is caused by damage to DNA. In a cell, cellular DNA radical reacts with diffusion controlled rate and generates DNA peroxide radical. The chemical repair of DNA radical with hydrogen donation by thiol competes with the reaction of oxygen with same radicals in the DNA molecules. From the point reaction rates, the prolongation of radical life time is not as great as expected from the reduction in the glutathione content of the cell. This indicates that further reducting compounds (protein bound thiol) are present in the cell. The residual radicals are altered to strand breaks, base damages and so on. The effective lesions for a number of endpoints is un-repaired double strand break, which has been discovered in a cluster. This event gives risk to high LET radiation or to a track end of X-rays. For X- or electron irradiations the strand breaks are frequently induced by the interactions between sublesions on two strands in DNA. A single strand break followed by radical action may be unstable excited state, because of remaining sugar radical action and of having negative charged phosphates, in which strands breaks will be rejoined in a short time to stable state. On the same time, a break in the double helix will be immediately produced if two breaks are on either or approximately opposite locations. The formation of a double strand break in the helix depends on the ion strength of the cell. The potassium ions are largely released from polyanionic strand during irradiation, which results in the induction of denatured region. Double strand break with the denatured region seems to be un-repairable DNA damage. (author)

  10. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid)

    CERN Document Server

    Kantoglu, O

    2002-01-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature (T sub g) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units (G(-u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  11. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  12. Radiation induced genetic damage in Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which ionizing radiation induces genetic damage in haploid and diploid conidia of Aspergillus nidulans was investigated. Although the linear dose-response curves obtained following low LET irradiation implied a 'single-hit' action of radiation, high LET radiations were much more efficient than low LET radiations, which suggests the involvement of a multiple target system. It was found that the RBE values for non-disjunction and mitotic crossing-over were very different. Unlike mitotic crossing-over, the RBE values for non-disjunction were much greater than for cell killing. This suggests that non-disjunction is a particularly sensitive genetical endpoint that is brought about by damage to a small, probably non-DNA target. Radiosensitisers were used to study whether radiation acts at the level of the DNA or some other cellular component. The sensitisation to electrons and/or X-rays by oxygen, and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole and misonidazole) was examined for radiation induced non-disjunction, mitotic crossing-over, gene conversion, point mutation and cell killing. It was found that these compounds sensitised the cells considerably more to genetic damage than to cell killing. (author)

  13. Protective effects of vitamin C against gamma-ray induced wholly damage and genetic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Chunling; Jiang Weiwei; Zhang Ping; Chen Xiang; Zhu Shengtao

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Protective effects of supplemental vitamin C against 60 Co-gamma-ray induced wholly damage and genetic damage was investigated in mice. Method: Mice were divided into normal control group, irradiation control group and vitamin C experimental group 1,2,3 (which were orally given vitamin C 15, 30, 45 mg/kg.bw for 10 successive days respectively prior to gamma-ray irradiation). Micronuclei in the bone marrow polychromatophilic erythrocytes in each group of mice were examined and the 30 day survival rate of mice following whole-body 5.0 Gy γ irradiation were also determined. Results: Supplemental vitamin C prior to gamma-rays irradiation can significantly decrease bone marrow PECMN rate of mice and increase 30 day survival rate and prolong average survival time. The protection factor is 2.09. Conclusion: Vitamin C has potent protective effects against gamma irradiation induced damage in mice. In certain dose range, vitamin C can absolutely suppress the gamma-rays induced genetic damage in vivo

  14. Experimental investigations on chronic irradiation damage of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauk, S.

    1984-02-01

    Irradiation of rat hearts induced the following clinical phenomena: increasingly severe dyspnea, associated flank respiration and deterioration of the general condition bordering on a prefinal syndrome. Dissection of the sick animals and thoracal x-rays taken regularly revealed extensive pesicardial and pleural effusions. The tissue of the pericardium was thickened and edematous. The most striking histological finding consisted in a focal degeneration and destruction of the myocardium without an increase in collagenous fibres. This damage to the heart muscle was quite severe and seen in all dose groups from 15 to 40 Gy. At the same time there was a reduction of the capillary density as a function of the radiation dose. Clinical symptoms were also observed in animals irradiated with 10 Gy only. All animals irradiated with at least 20 Gy, attained a state where death was imminent. Consequently, the LD-50 must be lower than 20 Gy. The latency period was over a year at 15 Gy but decreased considerably as the dose increased. (orig.) [de

  15. Effect of low energy electron irradiation on DNA damage by Cu{sup 2+} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Ah; Cho, Hyuck [Dept. of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeun Soo [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The combined effect of the low energy electron (LEE) irradiation and Cu{sup 2+} ion on DNA damage was investigated. Lyophilized pBR322 plasmid DNA films with various concentrations (1–15 mM) of Cu{sup 2+} ion were independently irradiated by monochromatic LEEs with 5 eV. The types of DNA damage, single strand break (SSB) and double strand break (DSB), were separated and quantified by gel electrophoresis. Without electron irradiation, DNA damage was slightly increased with increasing Cu ion concentration via Fenton reaction. LEE-induced DNA damage, with no Cu ion, was only 6.6% via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process. However, DNA damage was significantly increased through the combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion, except around 9 mM Cu ion. The possible pathways of DNA damage for each of these different cases were suggested. The combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion is likely to cause increasing dissociation after elevated transient negative ion state, resulting in the enhanced DNA damage. For the decrease of DNA damage at around 9-mM Cu ion, it is assumed to be related to the structural stabilization due to DNA inter- and intra-crosslinks via Cu ion.

  16. Pharmacology of post-irradiation damage of blood capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, J.; Pouckova, P.

    1979-01-01

    Available literature data are summed up on the effect of a number of substances on irradiation damage to blood capillaries. The substances include vitamins, bioflavonoids, serotonine, histamine, bradykinin, ACTH, adrenal hormones, vasopressin, estrogens, prostaglandins, escin 1-butanol, diisopropylfluorophosphate, phenoxybenzamine, 1,4-dihydroxybenzenesulphonic acid derivatives, and xi-aminohexanoic acid. The data include the effects of the substances administered before and after irradiation on blood capillary damage and on mortality. (Ha)

  17. Damages to gladiolu corm caused by fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiwei; Wang Dan; Zhang Dongxue; Zheng Chun

    2007-01-01

    Gladiolus corms were irradiated to 100-500kGy by fast neutrons in the CFBR-II pulsed reactor, Scanning electron microscope images of the irradiated samples revealed significant radiation damages to the gladiolus corms, and the mutagenic effects were studied by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Within the dose range, radiation damage to the corm increased with the dose, with corm epidermis of the samples irradiated in vertical incidence being more serious than those irradiated in side-incidence to the same dose. Biological characters were investigated via field experiments, and the bands of protein subunit were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The results showed that the fast neutrons irradiation inhibited growth of M1 generation seedling significantly. Protein expression was obviously inhibited by the irradiation. The study indicates that fast neutron induction is an effective way for gladiolus breeding. And the results may lay a foundation for studies on fast neutron mutation breeding. (authors)

  18. An evaluation of the effects of epidermal growth factor on irradiation lip mucosa damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan

    1994-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on lip mucosa damage by irradiation was explored in mice. EGF was administered in doses of 100 μg/kg/day using different schedules. Mucosal damage was assessed. The metaphase arrest method with vinblastine was used to evaluate the diurnal rhythm of mitosis. EGF in regimens employed did not protect the mouse lip epithelial cells from irradiation induced damage, but it has a demonstrable stimulatory effect on cell proliferation in lip mucosa which is dependent on the schedules of administration. The reasons and mechanisms are discussed

  19. UV-induced skin damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihashi, M.; Ueda, M.; Budiyanto, A.; Bito, T.; Oka, M.; Fukunaga, M.; Tsuru, K.; Horikawa, T.

    2003-01-01

    Solar radiation induces acute and chronic reactions in human and animal skin. Chronic repeated exposures are the primary cause of benign and malignant skin tumors, including malignant melanoma. Among types of solar radiation, ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) radiation is highly mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal experiments compared to ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) radiation. Epidemiological studies suggest that solar UV radiation is responsible for skin tumor development via gene mutations and immunosuppression, and possibly for photoaging. In this review, recent understanding of DNA damage caused by direct UV radiation and by indirect stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA repair mechanisms, particularly nucleotide excision repair of human cells, are discussed. In addition, mutations induced by solar UV radiation in p53, ras and patched genes of non-melanoma skin cancer cells, and the role of ROS as both a promoter in UV-carcinogenesis and an inducer of UV-apoptosis, are described based primarily on the findings reported during the last decade. Furthermore, the effect of UV on immunological reaction in the skin is discussed. Finally, possible prevention of UV-induced skin cancer by feeding or topical use of antioxidants, such as polyphenols, vitamin C, and vitamin E, is discussed

  20. Radiation damage in heavy irradiated aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Fukuoka, Noboru; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo.

    1996-01-01

    AlN, one of candidate for ceramic materials used in nuclear fusion reactor, was irradiated by fast and thermal neutrons. The high concentration of irradiated defects and the nuclear transformation elements were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. The exposure of fast neutron and thermal neutron were 1.2x10 20 n/cm 2 and 1.2x10 21 n/cm 2 , respectively. The spreads of ESR spectra of ultra hyperfine structure depending on interaction between 27 Al nuclear spin and electron trapped in tetrahedron consisted of Al atoms was found in the spectra of heavy irradiated AlN. F type defects was estimated 10 19 n/cm 3 . Photoelectrons from 2s and 2p in 28 Si which produced in process of β-decay of 27 Al(n,γ) 28 Al were observed in XPS spectra of irradiated samples. (S.Y.)

  1. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk; Jeong, Jong Ryul; Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo

    2016-01-01

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10"-"5 dpa.

  2. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jong Ryul [Chungnam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10{sup -5} dpa.

  3. Facilities for studying radiation damage in nonmetals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.

    1984-08-01

    Two facilities have been developed for making optical absorption, luminescence and other measurements on a single sample before, during and after irradiation. One facility uses 60 Co gamma rays and the other 0.5 to 3 MeV electrons from an accelerator. Optical relays function as spectrophotometers, luminescenc detectors, etc. All radiation sensitive components are outside of walk-in irradiation chambers; all measurement control and data recording is computerized. Irradiations are made at controlled temperatures between 5K and 900 0 C. The materials studied include glasses, quartz, alkali halides (especially natural rock salt), organic crystals, etc. As determined from color center measurements the damage formation rate in all materials studied at 25 0 C or above is strongly temperature dependent. The defect concentration during irradiation is usually much greater than that measured after irradiation. The fraction of defects annealing after irradiation and the annealing rate usually increases as the irradiation temperature increases. The completed studies demonstrate that, in most cases, the extent of maximum damage and the damage formation and annealing kinetics can be determined only by making measurements during irradiation

  4. Leydig cell damage after testicular irradiation for lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalet, S.M.; Horner, A.; Ahmed, S.R.; Morris-Jones, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of testicular irradiation on Leydig cell function has been studied in a group of boys irradiated between 1 and 5 years earlier for a testicular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Six of the seven boys irradiated during prepubertal life had an absent testosterone response to HCG stimulation. Two of the four boys irradiated during puberty had an appropriate basal testosterone level, but the testosterone response to HCG stimulation was subnormal in three of the four. Abnormalities in gonadotropin secretion consistent with testicular damage were noted in nine of the 11 boys. Evidence of severe Leydig cell damage was present irrespective of whether the boys were studied within 1 year or between 3 and 5 years after irradiation, suggesting that recovery is unlikely. Androgen replacement therapy has been started in four boys and will be required by the majority of the remainder to undergo normal pubertal development

  5. Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

    2012-04-01

    This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

  6. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  7. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to −80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use. - Highlights: ► A study is performed to quantify low temperature irradiation effects on polymer materials and BIs. ► Low temperature irradiation alters the balance of cross-linking and chain scissoning in polymers. ► Low temperatures provide radioprotection for BIs. ► Benefits of low temperatures are application specific and must be considered when dose setting.

  8. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet-irradiation damage in Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkins, B. Jr.; Allen, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    This study reports the capacity of Staphylococcus aureus strain 7 - 8 to undergo photoenzymatic repair of UV-irradiation induced damage and compares it to the photoreactivation (PR) response of Escherichia coli strain B. Staphylococcus aureaus showed greater inhibition by UV irradiation than E. coli, consistent with its higher adenine and thymine content of DNA. Staphylococcus aureus showed an enhanced rate of photoreactivation with no lag in initiation of the PR response at low PR doses compared to E. coli. Maximum PR capacity of both cultures was about equal and occurred in cultures incubated at 23 - 25 0 . The PR responses at 11 - 12 and 35 - 37 0 for S. aureus and E. coli differed although both were capable of PR at each of these temperatures. The PR response of E. coli was directly related to the dosage of PR light (J/m 2 ); however, the photoenzymatic capacity of S. aureus was not directly responsive to continued decrease in light intensity. The capacity of S. aureus to undergo liquid holding recovery (LHR) occurred at 23 - 25 0 (not at 11 - 12 0 or 35 - 37 0 ), whereas E. coli underwent LHR at 11 - 12 0 and 23 - 25 0 but not at 35 - 37 0 . The LHR response of S. aureus was somewhat more effective than E. coli and did not show the direct response to increased liquid-holding period as did E. coli. (author)

  9. Radiation damage in heavy irradiated aluminum nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Fukuoka, Noboru [Naruto Univ. of education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo

    1996-04-01

    AlN, one of candidate for ceramic materials used in nuclear fusion reactor, was irradiated by fast and thermal neutrons. The high concentration of irradiated defects and the nuclear transformation elements were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. The exposure of fast neutron and thermal neutron were 1.2x10{sup 20}n/cm{sup 2} and 1.2x10{sup 21}n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The spreads of ESR spectra of ultra hyperfine structure depending on interaction between {sup 27}Al nuclear spin and electron trapped in tetrahedron consisted of Al atoms was found in the spectra of heavy irradiated AlN. F type defects was estimated 10{sup 19}n/cm{sup 3}. Photoelectrons from 2s and 2p in {sup 28}Si which produced in process of {beta}-decay of {sup 27}Al(n,{gamma}){sup 28}Al were observed in XPS spectra of irradiated samples. (S.Y.)

  10. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  11. Immunologic proof of DNS irradiation damages and their repair in stationary yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, H.

    1980-08-01

    In rabbits an antiserum was produced by injecting UV-irradiated denaturated calf-thymus DNS; after inhibiting unspecific bindings, a specific serological reaction with UV-induced irradiation damages could be taken as present in this antiserum. By the ammonium sulphate precipitation as immunologic method of detection, after UV-irradiation the genesis of damages at certain sites in the DNS of different yeast lineages and their repair was observed. The elemination of UV-induced DNS damages was observed after an incubation in a nutrien medium, after photo-reactivation and after combining both therapeutic treatments. The following results were obtained: the detected DNS damage (number of induced dimeres/yeast genomes) had the same degree in the four yeast lineages. Apart from the excision-negative mutante 2094 for all yeast lineages a repair efficiency of 60% could be detected. All yeast lineages presented themselves as photographically to be reactivated; however, in all cases a DNS damage of 40 to 50% remained. The examinations for the specificity of antiserum against roentgenologically irradiated DNS led to the conclusion that the antibody population of the serum consisted mainly of immunoglobulines against unchanged DNS areas. A specific immunological reaction of only about 10% could be achieved. (orig./MG) [de

  12. The influence of non-equilibrium fluctuations on radiation damage and recovery of metals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinko, V.I.; Klepikov, V.F.

    2007-01-01

    In the conventional theory of radiation damage, it is assumed that the main effect of irradiation is due to formation of Frenkel pairs of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and their clusters. The difference in absorption of vacancies and SIAs by primary or radiation-induced extended defects (EDs) is thought to be the main reason of microstructural evolution under irradiation. On the other hand, the recovery of radiation damage is thought to be driven exclusively by thermal fluctuations resulting in the vacancy evaporation from voids (void annealing) or dislocations (thermal creep) and in the fluctuation-driven overcoming of obstacles by gliding dislocations (plastic strain). However, these recovery mechanisms can be efficient only at sufficiently high temperatures. At lower irradiation temperatures, the main driving force of the recovery processes may be due to nonequilibrium fluctuations of energy states of the atoms surrounding EDs arising as a result of scattering of radiation-induced excitations of atomic and electronic structure at EDs. In the present paper, the mechanisms of nonequilibrium fluctuations that result in such phenomena as the void shrinkage under irradiation at low temperatures (or high dose rates), irradiation creep and irradiation-induced increase of plasticity under sub-threshold irradiation was considered

  13. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosome damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 2. The frequency of aberrations in the first-fifth post-irradiation mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Pokrovskaya, V.N.; Nugis, V.Yu.

    1982-01-01

    The number of chromosome aberrations in 1.-5. mitoses cultivated from lymphocyte PHA of peripheric man blood after gamma irradiation in vitro in 1e5; 3 and 6 Gy has been determined. For all the doses, as the cells passed 1. and successive postradiation divisiops, observed was the decrease in the number of aberrant metaphases and all the aberrations of the chromosomal typee at that their elimination rate increases with the dose increase. No considerable differences in the frequency of pair fragments in 1.-4. mitosis after irradiation in 1,5 Gy dose, in 1.-3. mitoses after irradiation in 3 Gy dose and in 1.-2. mitoses after irradiation in 6 Gy dose were found. In lymphocyte cultures irradiated in 3 and 6 Gy doses the number of dicentries in 2. mitosis was approximately 2 times smaller than in 1. mitosis and in 3. mitosis two times smaller than in 2. mitosis. In 1. mitosis almost all the dicentrics have accompanying pair fragments in 2. and 3. mitoses a share of the dicentrics without fragments constituted about 30-70 %, and in 4.-5. mitoses amounted to 95-100 %. The reduction of the number of irregular chromosomes in the process of cell passing of 1. and successive postradiation mitosis was noted only during lymphocyte investigation irradiated in 6 Gy. At 1,5 and 3 Gy doses these aberration frequency in 1.-5. and 1.-4. mitoses were nearly the same

  14. Study of damages by neutron irradiation in lithium aluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios G, O.

    1999-01-01

    Lithium aluminates proposed to the production of tritium in fusion nuclear reactors, due to the thermal stability that they present as well as the behavior of the aluminium to the irradiation. As a neutron flux with profile (≅ 14 Mev) of a fusion reactor is not available. A irradiation experiment was designed in order to know the micro and nano structure damages produced by fast and thermal neutrons in two irradiation positions of the fusion nuclear reactor Triga Mark III: CT (Thermal Column) and SIFCA (System of Irradiation Fixed of Capsules). In this work samples of lithium aluminate were characterized by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Two samples were prepared by two methods: a) coalition method and b) peroxide method. This characterization comprised original and irradiated samples. The irradiated sample amounted to 4 in total: one for each preparation method and one for each irradiation position. The object of this analysis was to correlate with the received neutron dose the damages suffered by the samples with the neutron irradiation during long periods (440 H), in their micro and nano structure aspects; in order to understand the changes as a function of the irradiation zone (with thermal and fast neutron flux) and the preparation methods of the samples and having as an antecedent the irradiation in SIFCA position by short times (2h). The obtained results are referred to the stability of γ -aluminate phase, under given conditions of irradiation and defined nano structure arrangement. They also refer to the proposals of growth mechanism and nucleation of new phases. The error associated with the measurement of neutron dose is also discussed. (Author)

  15. DNA damage-inducible transcripts in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Alamo, I. Jr.; Hollander, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Hybridization subtraction at low ratios of RNA to cDNA was used to enrich for the cDNA of transcripts increased in Chinese hamster cells after UV irradiation. Forty-nine different cDNA clones were isolated. Most coded for nonabundant transcripts rapidly induced 2- to 10-fold after UV irradiation. Only 2 of the 20 cDNA clones sequenced matched known sequences (metallothionein I and II). The predicted amino acid sequence of one cDNA had two localized areas of homology with the rat helix-destabilizing protein. These areas of homology were at the two DNA-binding sites of this nucleic acid single-strand-binding protein. The induced transcripts were separated into two general classes. Class I transcripts were induced by UV radiation and not by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. Class II transcripts were induced by UV radiation and by methyl methanesulfonate. Many class II transcripts were induced also by H2O2 and various alkylating agents but not by heat shock, phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate, or DNA-damaging agents which do not produce high levels of base damage. Since many of the cDNA clones coded for transcripts which were induced rapidly and only by certain types of DNA-damaging agents, their induction is likely a specific response to such damage rather than a general response to cell injury

  16. Functional and morphologic damage in the neonatally irradiated canine kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peneyra, R.S.; Jaenke, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Perinatal irradiation of the developing kidney results in progressive glomerulosclerosis (PGS) and renal failure. This syndrome may result from direct radiation damage to mature deep cortical nephrons and/or nephron functional adaptations resulting from outer cortical nephron ablation. Beagle dogs received single, whole-body exposures (330 R) to 60 Co gamma radiation at 4 days of age (IR4) to study the combined effects of direct radiation damage and nephron loss, or at 30 days of age (IR30) to study the effects of renal irradiation alone. To study the effects of nephron loss alone, dogs underwent unilateral nephrectomy (UN4) or superficial hyperthermic renal ablation (HY4) at 4 days of age. Nephron loss due to irradiation (IR4) and partial renal ablation (UN4 and HY4) was associated with compensatory nephron hypertrophy and increased single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR), while irradiation at 30 days resulted in transitory decreased SNGFR. Similar degrees of PGS occurred in IR4 dogs which experienced both irradiation and loss of nephrons and UN4 and HY4 dogs which experienced only loss of nephrons. PGS of lesser severity also occurred in IR30 dogs. These findings indicate that PGS associated with perinatal renal irradiation results from direct radiation damage to deep cortical nephrons and compensatory functional changes occurring in response to loss of renal mass

  17. Krypton irradiation damage in Nd-doped zirconolite and perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoisne, C.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.; Lee, W.E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the effect of radiation damage and noble gas accommodation in potential ceramic hosts for plutonium disposition is necessary to evaluate their long-term behaviour during geological disposal. Polycrystalline samples of Nd-doped zirconolite and Nd-doped perovskite were irradiated ex situ with 2 MeV Kr + at a dose of 5 x 10 15 ions cm -2 to simulate recoil of Pu nuclei during alpha decay. The feasibility of thin section preparation of both pristine and irradiated samples by Focused Ion Beam sectioning was demonstrated. After irradiation, the Nd-doped zirconolite revealed a well defined amorphous region separated from the pristine material by a thin (40-60 nm) damaged interface. The zirconolite lattice was lost in the damaged interface, but the fluorite sublattice was retained. The Nd-doped perovskite contained a defined irradiated layer composed of an amorphous region surrounded by damaged but still crystalline layers. The structural evolution of the damaged regions is consistent with a change from orthorhombic to cubic symmetry. In addition in Nd-doped perovskite, the amorphisation dose depended on crystallographic orientation and possibly sample configuration (thin section or bulk). Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy revealed Ti remained in the 4+ oxidation state but there was a change in Ti coordination in both Nd-doped perovskite and Nd-doped zirconolite associated with the crystalline to amorphous transition.

  18. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  19. Radiation-induced cell damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, W.D.; Schneiderman, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    The addition of irradiated crystals of galactose to Chinese hamster ovary cells resulted in mitotic delay, whereas exposure to nonirradiated crystals resulted in no detectable delay. The inference from this preliminary data is that free radicals or other transient irradiation products have reacted with external cellular components

  20. Blood vessel damage correlated with irradiance for in vivo vascular targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinde; Tan, Zou; Niu, Xiangyu; Lin, Linsheng; Lin, Huiyun; Li, Buhong

    2016-10-01

    Vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) has been widely utilized for the prevention or treatment of vascular-related diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, port-wine stains and prostate cancer. In order to quantitative assessment the blood vessel damage during V-PDT, nude mice were implanted with Titanium dorsal skin window chambers for in vivo V-PDT studies. For treatments, various irradiances including 50, 75, 100 and 200 mW/cm2 provided by a 532 nm semiconductor laser were performed with the same total light dose of 30 J/cm2 after the mice were intravenously injection of Rose Bengal for 25 mg/Kg body weight. Laser speckle imaging and microscope were used to monitor blood flow dynamics and vessel constriction during and after V-PDT, respectively. The V-PDT induced vessel damages between different groups were compared. The results show that significant difference in blood vessel damage was found between the lower irradiances (50, 75 and 100 mW/cm2) and higher irradiance (200 mW/cm2), and the blood vessel damage induced by V-PDT is positively correlated with irradiance. This study implies that the optimization of irradiance is required for enhancing V-PDT therapeutic efficiency.

  1. Irradiation induced effects in zirconium (A review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, P.K.

    1975-06-01

    Irradiation creep in zirconium and its alloys is comprehensively discussed. The main theories are outlined and the gaps between them and the observed creep behaviour, indicated. Although irradiation induced point defects play an important role, effects due to irradiation induced dislocation loops seem insignificant. The experimental results suggest that microstructural variations due to prior cold-working or hydrogen injection perturb the irradiation growth and the irradiation creep of zircaloy. Further investigations into these areas are required. One disadvantage of creep experiments lies in their duration. The possibility of accelerated experiments using ion implantation or electron irradiation is examined in the final section, and its possible advantages and disadvantages are outlined. (author)

  2. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. I. Trap mediated interstitial cluster diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2300 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The microstructure that develops under low temperature irradiation in ferritic alloys is dominated by a high density of small (2–5 nm) defects. These defects have been widely observed to move via occasional discrete hops during in situ thin film irradiation experiments. Cluster dynamics models are used to describe the formation of these defects as an aggregation process of smaller clusters created as primary damage. Multiple assumptions regarding the mobility of these damage features are tested in the models, both with and without explicit consideration of such irradiation induced hops. Comparison with experimental data regarding the density of these defects demonstrates the importance of including such motions in a valid model. In particular, discrete hops inform the limited dependence of defect density on irradiation temperature observed in experiments, which the model was otherwise incapable of producing.

  3. Irradiation damage of SiC semiconductor device (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju

    2000-09-01

    This report reviewed the irradiation damage of SiC semiconductor devices and examined a irradiation behavior of SiC single crystal as a pre-examination for evaluation of irradiation behavior of SiC semiconductor devices. The SiC single was crystal irradiated by gamma-beam, N+ ion and electron beam. Annealing examinations of the irradiated specimens also were performed at 500 deg C. N-type 6H-SiC dopped with N+ ion was used and irradiation doses of gamma-beam, N+ion and electron beam were up to 200 Mrad, 1x10 16 N + ions/cm 2 and 3.6 x 10 17 e/cm 2 and 1.08 x 10 18 e/cm 2 , respectively. Irradiation damages were analyzed by the EPR method. Additionally, properties of SiC, information about commercial SiC single crystals and the list of web sites with related to the SiC device were described in the appendix

  4. Irradiation damage of SiC semiconductor device (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju

    2000-09-01

    This report reviewed the irradiation damage of SiC semiconductor devices and examined a irradiation behavior of SiC single crystal as a pre-examination for evaluation of irradiation behavior of SiC semiconductor devices. The SiC single was crystal irradiated by gamma-beam, N+ ion and electron beam. Annealing examinations of the irradiated specimens also were performed at 500 deg C. N-type 6H-SiC dopped with N+ ion was used and irradiation doses of gamma-beam, N+ion and electron beam were up to 200 Mrad, 1x10{sup 16} N{sup +} ions/cm{sup 2} and 3.6 x 10{sup 17} e/cm{sup 2} and 1.08 x 10{sup 18} e/cm{sup 2} , respectively. Irradiation damages were analyzed by the EPR method. Additionally, properties of SiC, information about commercial SiC single crystals and the list of web sites with related to the SiC device were described in the appendix.

  5. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  6. Damage and repair of irradiated mammalian brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, K.; Lo, E.; Phillips, M.; Fabrikant, J.; Brennan, K.; Valk, P.; Poljak, A.; Delapaz, R.; Woodruff, K.

    1989-07-01

    We have demonstrated that focal charged particle irradiation of the rabbit brain can create well-defined lesions which are observable by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. These are similar, in terms of location and characteristic NMR and PET features, to those that occur in the brain of about 10% of clinical research human subjects, who have been treated for intracranial vascular malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery. These lesions have been described radiologically as ''vasogenic edema of the deep white matter,'' and the injury is of variable intensity and temporal duration, can recede or progress to serious neurologic sequelae, and persist for a considerable period of time, frequently 18 mon to 3 yr. 8 refs., 6 figs

  7. Damage and repair of irradiated mammalian brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, K.; Lo, E.; Phillips, M.; Fabrikant, J.; Brennan, K.; Valk, P.; Poljak, A.; Delapaz, R.; Woodruff, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Medical Center; Brookside Hospital, San Pablo, CA (USA))

    1989-07-01

    We have demonstrated that focal charged particle irradiation of the rabbit brain can create well-defined lesions which are observable by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. These are similar, in terms of location and characteristic NMR and PET features, to those that occur in the brain of about 10% of clinical research human subjects, who have been treated for intracranial vascular malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery. These lesions have been described radiologically as vasogenic edema of the deep white matter,'' and the injury is of variable intensity and temporal duration, can recede or progress to serious neurologic sequelae, and persist for a considerable period of time, frequently 18 mon to 3 yr. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  8. DNA damage by ethylbenzenehydroperoxide formed from carcinogenic ethylbenzene by sunlight irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Chitose; Uchida, Takafumi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Murata, Mariko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Ueda, Koji; Kojima, Nakao; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2003-01-01

    Ethylbenzene, widely used in human life, is a non-mutagenic carcinogen. Sunlight-irradiated ethylbenzene caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu 2+ , but unirradiated ethylbenzene did not. A Cu + -specific chelator bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage and catalase showed a little inhibitory effect. The scopoletin assay revealed that peroxides and H 2 O 2 were formed in ethylbenzene exposed to sunlight. These results suggest that Cu + and alkoxyl radical mainly participate in DNA damage, and H 2 O 2 partially does. When catalase was added, DNA damage at thymine and cytosine was inhibited. Ethylbenzenehydroperoxide, identified by GC/MS analysis, induced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 ' -deoxyguanosine and caused DNA damage at consecutive guanines, as observed with cumenehydroperoxide. Equimolar concentrations of H 2 O 2 and acetophenone were produced by the sunlight-irradiation of 1-phenylethanol, a further degraded product of ethylbenzene. These results indicate a novel pathway that oxidative DNA damage induced by the peroxide and H 2 O 2 derived from sunlight-irradiated ethylbenzene may lead to expression of the carcinogenicity

  9. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, B.N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Lathika, K.M. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, K.P. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: kpm@magnum.barc.ernet.in

    2006-03-15

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after {gamma}-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  10. Radiation Damage in Silicon Detectors Caused by Hadronic and Electromagnetic Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fretwurst, E.; Stahl, J.; Pintilie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The report contains various aspects of radiation damage in silicon detectors subjected to high intensity hadron and electromagnetic irradiation. It focuses on improvements for the foreseen LHC applications, employing oxygenation of silicon wafers during detector processing (result from CERN-RD48). An updated survey on hadron induced damage is given in the first article. Several improvements are outlined especially with respect to antiannealing problems associated with detector storage during LHC maintenance periods. Open questions are outlined in the final section, among which are a full understanding of differences found between proton and neutron induced damage, process related effects changing the radiation tolerance in addition to the oxygen content and the lack of understanding the changed detector properties on the basis of damage induced point and cluster defects. In addition to float zone silicon, so far entirely used for detector fabrication,Czochralski silicon was also studied and first promising re...

  11. DNA Damage Induction and Repair Evaluated in Human Lymphocytes Irradiated with X-Rays an Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzwiedz, W.; Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the kinetic of the DNA damage induction and their subsequent repair in human lymphocytes exposed to various types of radiation. PBLs cells were isolated from the whole blood of two young healthy male subjects and one skin cancer patient, and than exposed to various doses of low LET X-rays and high LET neutrons from 252 Cf source. To evaluate the DNA damage we have applied the single cell get electrophoresis technique (SCGE) also known as the comet assay. In order to estimate the repair efficiency, cells, which had been irradiated with a certain dose, were incubated at 37 o C for various periods of time (0 to 60 min). The kinetic of DNA damage recovery was investigated by an estimation of residual DNA damage persisted at cells after various times of post-irradiation incubation (5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min). We observed an increase of the DNA damage (reported as a Tail DNA and Tail moment parameters) in linear and linear-quadratic manner, with increasing doses of X-rays and 252 Cf neutrons, respectively. Moreover, for skin cancer patient (Code 3) at whole studied dose ranges the higher level of the DNA damage was observed comparing to health subjects (Code 1 and 2), however statistically insignificant (for Tail DNA p=0.056; for Tail moment p=0.065). In case of the efficiency of the DNA damage repair it was observed that after 1 h of post-irradiation incubation the DNA damage induced with both, neutrons and X-rays had been significantly reduced (from 65% to 100 %). Furthermore, in case of skin cancer patient we observed lover repair efficiency of X-rays induced DNA damage. After irradiation with neutrons within first 30 min, the Tail DNA and Tail moment decreased of about 50%. One hour after irradiation, almost 70% of residual and new formed DNA damage was still observed. In this case, the level of unrepaired DNA damage may represent the fraction of the double strand breaks as well as more complex DNA damage (i.e.-DNA or DNA

  12. Irradiation damage 'displacement zone'; Dommages sous irradiation zone de deplacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genthon, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    It is well known that a charged particle (ion, primary atom, etc...) moving in a solid slows down and can cause a cascade of displacements of the atoms in the solid. A study is made here of the extent to which the cascade is made up, or not, of independent collisions, as a function of the energy of the initial charged particle. When the distance between the collisions is small, these latter are no longer independent; the cascade, which then has to be considered as a whole, perturbs and locates, in the irradiated solid , a zone which has been named a 'displacement zone'. It is shown that the proportion of displacement zones increases with increasing atom size (high atomic number Z), with decreasing atomic distance D in the substance considered and with decreasing energy of the ion undergoing the slowing down process (although always remaining above a few hundred eV). The proportions obtained are higher than those corresponding to the calculations of J. A. Brinkman [3]. An interatomic potential required for this work has also been determined. (author) [French] On sait qu'une particule chargee (ions, atomes primaires, etc...) en mouvement dans un solide se ralentit, avec eventuellement deplacement en cascade d'atomes du solide. On etudie ici dans quelle proportion, en fonction de l'energie de la particule chargee initiale, la cascade est constituee, ou non, de 'chocs independants'. Lorsque la distance entre chocs est petite, ceux-ci ne sont plus independants; la cascade, qui doit alors etre consideree dans son ensemble, perturbe et definit dans le solide irradie, une zone qu'on a appele zone de deplacements. On montre que la proportion de zones de deplacements est d'autant plus grande que les atomes sont gros (nombre atomique Z grand), que la distance interatomique D est petite dans le corps considere, et que l'energie de l'ion en ralentissement est petite (tout en restant superieure a quelques centaines d'eV). Les proportions obtenues sont superieures a celles qui

  13. Locomotor damage in rats after x-irradiation in Utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullenix, P.; Norton, S.; Culver, B.

    1975-01-01

    Alterations in gait were found in rats after whole-body irradiation with 125 R on day 14, 15, and 16 of gestation. No effects on locomotion were detected after irradiation on day 17 with 125 R or after irradiation on day 14 with 50 R. A technique was set up for quantitative evaluation of locomotion based on a modification of other methods. Walking patterns of irradiated rats were recorded, when they were adults, by requiring them to walk up a 10 0 incline through a corridor after their feet had been dipped in ink. Rats irradiated on gestational day 14 had an in-phase, hopping gait with the sine of the angle between the hind feet and the direction of progression over 0.9. Rats irradiated on gestational days 15 and 16 had an alternating, waddling gait with wider stance and broader angle than control rats. Histologic examination of serial sections of the brains of these rats showed that the 14-day rats lacked all telencephalic commissures except for a few fibers which crossed in some rats. There was a progressive improvement in the condition of the anterior and ventral hippocampal commissures up to day 17, but the corpus callosum and doral hippocampal commissure were lacking or markedly reduced in all day 17 rats. No animals showed damage to the mesencephalic posterior commissure. Since rats which used the in-phase mode of locomotion were never observed to use alternating gait, the possible causal relationship of the commissural damage to the altered locomotor patterns was considered. In view of the restricted period of damage found for the anterior and ventral hippocampal commissures and the restriction of altered locomotion to damage in the same period, primary involvement of the corpus callosum and dorsal hippocampal commissure could be excluded, but a possible role for the other telencephalic commissures remained

  14. Protective Effect of HSP25 on Radiation Induced Tissue Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kwon, Hee-Choong; Bae, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Sung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Control of cancer by irradiation therapy alone or in conjunction with combination chemotherapy is often limited by organ specific toxicity. Ionizing irradiation toxicity is initiated by damage to normal tissue near the tumor target and within the transit volume of radiotherapy beams. Irradiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ damage is mediated by acute effects, which can be dose limiting. A latent period follows recovery from the acute reaction, then chronic irradiation fibrosis (late effects) pose a second cause of organ failure. HSP25/27 has been suggested to protect cells against apoptotic cell death triggered by hyperthermia, ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, Fas ligand, and cytotoxic drugs. And several mechanisms have been proposed to account for HSP27-mediated apoptotic protection. However radioprotective effect of HSP25/27 in vivo system has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of exogenous HSP25 expression, as delivered by adenoviral vectors, to protect animal from radiation induced tissue damage

  15. Ion-induced damage and amorphization in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; White, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Ion-induced damage growth in high-energy, self-ion irradiated Si was studied using electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The results show that there is a marked variation in the rate of damage growth, as well as the damage morphology, along the path of the ion. Near the ion end-of-range (eor), damage increases monotonically with ion fluence until a buried amorphous layer is formed, while damage growth saturates at a low level in the region ahead. The morphology of the damage in the saturated region is shown to consist predominantly of simple defect clusters such as the divacancy. Damage growth remains saturated ahead of the eor until expansion of the buried amorphous layer encroaches into the region. A homogeneous growth model is presented which accounts for damage saturation, and accurately predicts the dose-rate dependence of the saturation level. Modifications of the model are discussed which are needed to account for the rapid growth in the eor region and near the interface of the buried amorphous layer. Two important factors contributing to rapid damage growth are identified. Spatial separation of the Frenkel defect pairs (i.e. interstitials and vacancies) due to the momentum of the interstitials is shown to greatly impact damage growth near the eor, while uniaxial strain in the interfacial region of the amorphous layer is identified as an important factor contributing to growth at that location. 20 refs., 10 figs

  16. Investigation of radiation damage effects in neutron irradiated CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, James E.; Igonkina, Olga; Potter, Chris T.; Sinev, Nikolai B.

    2005-01-01

    A Charge Coupled Devices (CCD)-based vertex detector is a leading option for vertex detection at the future linear collider. A major issue for this application is the radiation hardness of such devices. Tests of radiation hardness of CCDs used in the SLD vertex detector, VXD3, have been reported earlier. The first measurements of 1998 involved a spare VXD3 CCD that was irradiated with neutrons from a radioactive source (Pu-Be), and from a nuclear reactor. In 2003, we had the opportunity to disassemble the VXD3 detector and study the nature of the radiation damage it incurred during 3 years of operation at SLC. In the preparation for this study, additional experiments with the spare VXD3 CCD were performed. These included measurements of trapping times in neutron irradiated CCDs. Results, reported here, will help us better understand the mechanism of radiation damage effects and develop techniques to minimize performance degradation due to radiation damage

  17. Radiation damage and materials performance in irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.

    2009-01-01

    Collisions of energetic projectile particles with host atoms produce atomic displacements in the target materials. Subsequently, some of these displacements are transformed into lattice defects and survive in the form of single defects and of defect clusters. Depending on the ambient temperature, these defects and their clusters diffuse, interact, annihilate, segregate and accumulate in various forms and are responsible for the evolution of the irradiation-induced microstructure. Naturally, both physical and mechanical properties and thereby the performance and lifetime of target materials are likely to be determined by the nature and the magnitude of the accumulated defects and their spatial dispositions. The defect accumulation, microstructural evolution and the resulting materials response gets very complicated particularly under the reactor operational conditions. The complication arises from the fact that the materials used in the structural components will experience concurrently generation of defects produced by the flux of neutrons and generation of dislocations due to plastic deformation. In other words, the defect accumulation will have to be considered under the conditions of two interactive reaction kinetics operating simultaneously. Both materials and experimental variables are likely to affect the damage accumulation and thereby the materials performance. Experimental and theoretical results pertaining to effects of major materials and experimental variables on materials performance will be briefly examined. (au)

  18. Characterization of matrix damage in ion-irradiated reactor vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Katsuhiko; Fukuya, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Exact nature of the matrix damage, that is one of radiation-induced nano-scale microstructural features causing radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel, in irradiated commercial steels has not been clarified yet by direct characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We designed a new preparation method of TEM observation samples and applied it to the direct TEM observation of the matrix damage in the commercial steel samples irradiated by ions. The simulation irradiation was carried out by 3 MeV Ni 2+ ion to a dose of 1 dpa at 290degC. Thin foil specimens for TEM observation were prepared using the modified focused ion beam method. A weak-beam TEM study was carried out for the observation of matrix damage in the samples. Results of this first detailed observation of the matrix damage in the irradiated commercial steel show that it is consisted of small dislocation loops. The observed and analyzed dislocation loops have Burgers vectors b = a , and a mean image size and the number density are 2.5 nm and about 1 x 10 22 m -3 , respectively. In this experiment, all of the observed dislocation loops were too small to determine the vacancy or interstitial nature of the dislocation loops directly. Although it is an indirect method, post-irradiation annealing was used to infer the loop nature. Most of dislocation loops were stable after the annealing at 400degC for 30 min. This result suggests that their nature is interstitial. (author)

  19. Neutron irradiation damage of a stress relieved TZM alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Masuyama, T.; Satou, M.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study defect microstructures and irradiation hardening in a stress relieved TZM alloy after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) using the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA). Disk specimens of the molybdenum alloy TZM that had been stress relieved at 1199 K (929 C) for 0.9 ks (15 min.) were irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA 1F at 679, 793 and 873 K (406, 520, and 600 C) to a fast fluence of ∼9.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . Microstructures were observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Dislocation structures consisted of isolated loops, aggregated loops (rafts) and elongated dislocations. The size of the loops increased with the irradiation temperature. Void swelling was about 1 and 2% at 793 and 873 K (520 and 600 C), respectively. A void lattice was developed in the body centered cubic (bcc) structure with a spacing of 26 - 28 nm. The fine grain size (0.5 - 2 μm) was retained following high temperature irradiation, indicating that the stress relief heat treatment may extend the material's resistance to radiation damage up to high fluence levels. Microhardness measurements indicated that irradiation hardening increased with irradiation temperature. The relationship between the microstructure and the observed hardening was determined

  20. Assessment of electron beam-induced abnormal development and DNA damage in Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Seung- Hwan; Lee, Seon-Woo; Koo, Hyun-Na; Kim, Gil- Hah

    2014-01-01

    The armyworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) is a polyphagous and important agricultural pest worldwide. In this study, we examined the effect of electron beam irradiation on developmental stages, reproduction, and DNA damage of S. litura. Eggs (0–24 h old), larvae (3rd instar), pupae (3 days old after pupation), and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with electron beam irradiation of six levels between 30 and 250 Gy. When eggs were irradiated with 100 Gy, egg hatching was completely inhibited. When the larvae were irradiated, the larval period was significantly delayed, depending on the doses applied. At 150 Gy, the fecundity of adults that developed from irradiated pupae was entirely inhibited. However, electron beam irradiation did not induce the instantaneous death of S. litura adults. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated moths demonstrated that females were more radiosensitive than males. We also conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over the following 5 days period. Severe DNA fragmentation in S. litura cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. However, at more than 100 Gy, DNA damage was not fully recovered. - Highlights: • Electron beam irradiation induced abnormal development of the cutworm. • Electron beam irradiation induced the sterility of the cutworm. • Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. • DNA damage by high irradiation exposure was not completely repaired

  1. Role of isolated and clustered DNA damage and the post-irradiating repair process in the effects of heavy ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuyama, Yuka; Terato, Hiroaki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi; Yasui, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a specific type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Any type of ionizing radiation traverses the target DNA molecule as a beam, inducing damage along its track. Our previous study showed that clustered DNA damage yields decreased with increased linear energy transfer (LET), leading us to investigate the importance of clustered DNA damage in the biological effects of heavy ion beam radiation. In this study, we analyzed the yield of clustered base damage (comprising multiple base lesions) in cultured cells irradiated with various heavy ion beams, and investigated isolated base damage and the repair process in post-irradiation cultured cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were irradiated by carbon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams with LETs of 13, 55, 90 and 200 keV µm -1 , respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis of the cells with enzymatic treatments indicated that clustered base damage yields decreased as the LET increased. The aldehyde reactive probe procedure showed that isolated base damage yields in the irradiated cells followed the same pattern. To analyze the cellular base damage process, clustered DNA damage repair was investigated using DNA repair mutant cells. DNA double-strand breaks accumulated in CHO mutant cells lacking Xrcc1 after irradiation, and the cell viability decreased. On the other hand, mouse embryonic fibroblast (Mef) cells lacking both Nth1 and Ogg1 became more resistant than the wild type Mef. Thus, clustered base damage seems to be involved in the expression of heavy ion beam biological effects via the repair process. (author)

  2. Ionization versus displacement damage effects in proton irradiated CMOS sensors manufactured in deep submicron process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Saint-Pe, O.; Bernard, F.; Rolland, G.

    2009-01-01

    Proton irradiation effects have been studied on CMOS image sensors manufactured in a 0.18μm technology dedicated to imaging. The ionizing dose and displacement damage effects were discriminated and localized thanks to 60 Co irradiations and large photodiode reverse current measurements. The only degradation observed was a photodiode dark current increase. It was found that ionizing dose effects dominate this rise by inducing generation centers at the interface between shallow trench isolations and depleted silicon regions. Displacement damages are is responsible for a large degradation of dark current non-uniformity. This work suggests that designing a photodiode tolerant to ionizing radiation can mitigate an important part of proton irradiation effects.

  3. Genotoxic damage in non-irradiated cells: contribution from the bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pherson, G.; Suzuki, M.; Waldren, C.A.; Hei, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    It has always been accepted dogma that the deleterious effects of ionising radiation such as mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are due mainly to direct damage to DNA. Using the Columbia University charged-particle microbeam and the highly sensitive A L cell mutagenic assay, it is shown here that non-irradiated cells acquire the mutagenic phenotype through direct contact with cells whose nuclei are traversed with 2 alpha particles each. Pre-treatment of cells with lindane, a gap junction inhibitor, significantly decreased the mutant yield. Furthermore, when irradiated cells were mixed with control cells in a similar ration as the in situ studies, no enhancement in bystander mutagenesis was detected. Our studies provide clear evidence that genotoxic damage can be induced in non-irradiated cells, and that gap junction mediated cell-cell communication plays a critical role in the bystander phenomenon. (author)

  4. Prediction of irradiation damage effects by multi-scale modelling: EURATOM 3 Framework integrated project perfect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud, J.P.; Bugat, St.; Marini, B.; Lidbury, D.; Van Dyck, St.; Debarberis, L.

    2008-01-01

    numerical tools simulating the effect of irradiation respectively on reactor pressure vessel fracture toughness and on internal structure irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking with different degrees of accuracy and uncertainty in their application according to the available state of knowledge of involved mechanisms. Specific modules and database complement each of these tools. These resulting numerical tools are being integrated in a software integration platform. The development, in the different scientific sub-projects, of models and modules, dealing with damage production, microstructure evolution and mechanical phenomena induced by irradiation allowed to build the first prototypes of RPV-2 and toughness modules. Although basic, these prototypes will have their definitive operating schemes. But in a first step they will not account for the whole complexity of the real steels and operating conditions. Nevertheless their modular structure will allow for future improvement when more advanced models will be available. (authors)

  5. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  6. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite under cryogenic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar 2+ . Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with 2 MeV He + ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 x 10 15 Ar 2+ cm -2 , considerable near-surface He + ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 mm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO 3 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides

  7. Pion-induced damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, S; Glaser, M; Lemeilleur, F; León-Florián, E; Gössling, C; Kaiser, B; Rolf, A; Wunstorf, R; Feick, H; Fretwurst, E; Lindström, G; Moll, Michael; Taylor, G; Chilingarov, A G

    1995-01-01

    The damage induced by pions in silicon detectors is studied for positive and negative pions for fluence up to 10(14)cm-2 and 10(13) cm-2 respectively. Results on the energy dependence of the damage in the region of 65-330 MeV near to the  resonance are presented. The change in detector characteristics such as leakage current, charge collection efficiency and effective impurity concentration including long-term annealing effects have been studied. Comparisons to neutron and proton-induced damage are presented and discussed.

  8. Damage-induced tensile instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a unified description of ductile and brittle rupture phenomena in structural components under tensile loading with particular emphasis on creep rupture. Two structural elements are analyzed in detail: 1) the uniform tensile bar subject to a Heaviside history of tensile force and superimposed such loadings, i.e. staircase histories, and 2) the thinwalled spherical pressure vessel subject to a Heaviside history of internal pressure. For both these structures the conditions for instantaneous as well as delayed rupture are analysed. It is shown that a state of mechanical instability will be reached at a certain load or after a certain time. The cases of purely ductile rupture and purely brittle fracture are identified as two limiting cases of this general instability phenomenon. The Kachanov-Rabotnov damage law implies that a structural component will fail in tension only when it has reached a state of complete damage, i.e. zero load carrying capacity. The extended law predicts failure at an earlier stage of the deterioration process and is therefore more compatible with experimental observation. Further experimental support is offered by predictions for staircase loading histories, both step-up and step-down type. The presented damage theory here predicts strain histories which are in closer agreement with test data than predictions based on other phenomenological theories

  9. Damage-induced DNA repair processes in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slezarikova, V.

    1986-01-01

    The existing knowledge is summed up of the response of Escherichia coli cells to DNA damage due to various factors including ultraviolet radiation. So far, three inducible mechanisms caused by DNA damage are known, viz., SOS induction, adaptation and thermal shock induction. Greatest attention is devoted to SOS induction. Its mechanism is described and the importance of the lexA recA proteins is shown. In addition, direct or indirect role is played by other proteins, such as the ssb protein binding the single-strand DNA sections. The results are reported of a study of induced repair processes in Escherichia coli cells repeatedly irradiated with UV radiation. A model of induction by repeated cell irradiation discovered a new role of induced proteins, i.e., the elimination of alkali-labile points in the daughter DNA synthetized on a damaged model. The nature of the alkali-labile points has so far been unclear. In the adaptation process, regulation proteins are synthetized whose production is induced by the presence of alkylation agents. In the thermal shock induction, new proteins synthetize in cells, whose function has not yet been clarified. (E.S.)

  10. Bean grain hysteresis with induced mechanical damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of mechanical damage on the hysteresis of beans with induced mechanical damage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. harvested manually with 35% water content (w.b. were used. Part of this product was subjected to induced mechanical damage by Stein Breakage Tester and controlled drying (damaged and control sample, for sorption processes. The sorption isotherms of water were analyzed for different temperature conditions: 20, 30, 40 and 50 oC; and relative humidity: 0.3; 0.4; 0.5; 0.7 and 0.9 (decimal. Equilibrium moisture content data were correlated with six mathematical models, and the Modified Oswin model was the one that best fitted to the experimental data. According to the above mentioned isotherms, it was possible to observe the phenomenon of hysteresis of damaged and control samples, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in control ones.

  11. Self-irradiation damage in 4H-SiC by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Miaomiao; Wang Qingyu; Li Taosheng; Li Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    The development of nuclear technology is closely and inseparably related to the improvements of materials irradiation performance. The irradiation damage of nuclear materials is an important issue of characteristics and difficulties. Because of the excellent features, SiC becomes one of the candidate materials for the cladding material and structure material in fast neutron reactor and fusion reactor. As one of the polytypes, 4H-SiC has prospective important applications in a strong irradiation environment. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to study the irradiation-induced cascade damage in single-crystalline 4H-SiC to get the microscopic evolution during the irradiation, in the aim of getting access to the detail that we cannot get from experiments. The software LAMMPS was used to simulate the damage formation process and the recovery process. The results showed that the initial project direction, the temperature and PKA energy exerted significant effects on the number and morphology of defects. (authors)

  12. Effect of ATM heterozygosity on heritable DNA damage in mice following paternal F0 germline irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, Janet E.; Li, M.-W.; Raabe, Otto G.

    2007-01-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product maintains genome integrity and initiates cellular DNA repair pathways following exposures to genotoxic agents. ATM also plays a significant role in meiotic recombination during spermatogenesis. Fertilization with sperm carrying damaged DNA could lead to adverse effects in offspring including developmental defects or increased cancer susceptibility. Currently, there is little information regarding the effect of ATM heterozygosity on germline DNA repair and heritable effects of paternal germline-ionizing irradiation. We used neutral pH comet assays to evaluate spermatozoa 45 days after acute whole-body irradiation of male mice (0.1 Gy, attenuated 137 Cs γ rays) to determine the effect of ATM heterozygosity on delayed DNA damage effects of Type A/B spermatogonial irradiation. Using the neutral pH sperm comet assay, significant irradiation-related differences were found in comet tail length, percent tail DNA and tail extent moment, but there were no observed differences in effect between wild-type and ATM +/- mice. However, evaluation of spermatozoa from third generation descendants of irradiated male mice for heritable chromatin effects revealed significant differences in DNA electrophoretic mobility in the F 3 descendants that were based upon the irradiated F 0 sire's genotype. In this study, radiation-induced chromatin alterations to Type A/B spermatogonia, detected in mature sperm 45 days post-irradiation, led to chromatin effects in mature sperm three generations later. The early cellular response to and repair of DNA damage is critical and appears to be affected by ATM zygosity. Our results indicate that there is potential for heritable genetic or epigenetic changes following Type A/B spermatogonial irradiation and that ATM heterozygosity increases this effect

  13. Role of endothelium in radiation-induced normal tissue damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliat, F.

    2007-05-01

    More than half of cancers are treated with radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver enough ionising radiation to destroy cancer cells without exceeding the level that the surrounding healthy cells can tolerate. Unfortunately, radiation-induced normal tissue injury is still a dose limiting factor in the treatment of cancer with radiotherapy. The knowledge of normal tissue radiobiology is needed to determine molecular mechanisms involved in normal tissue pathogenic pathways in order to identify therapeutic targets and develop strategies to prevent and /or reduce side effects of radiation therapy. The endothelium is known to play a critical role in radiation-induced injury. Our work shows that endothelial cells promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and fibro-genic phenotype after irradiation. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time the importance of PAI-1 in radiation-induced normal tissue damage suggesting that PAI-1 may represent a molecular target to limit injury following radiotherapy. We describe a new role for the TGF-b/Smad pathway in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced damages. TGF-b/Smad pathway is involved in the fibro-genic phenotype of VSMC induced by irradiated EC as well as in the radiation-induced PAI-1 expression in endothelial cells. (author)

  14. Irradiation damage in boron carbide: point defects, clusters and helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1986-06-01

    Boron carbide is a refractory hard and light material of interest in nuclear technology (fission and also fusion). Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the properties of radiation induced damage. Firstly, the production of point defects and their clustering was studied in samples irradiated by 1 MeV electron in a high voltage electron microscope at selected temperatures from 12 K to 1000 K. Secondly, conventional transmission electron microscopy was used to understand the production of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated boron carbide and their role in the generation of microcracks. Finally, the interaction between point defects and bubbles was also examined

  15. [Protective Effect of S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine against DNA Damage in Irradiated Mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi-sheng; Yu, Guang-yun; He, Xin; Jiang, Ming; Chu, Xiao-fei; Zhao, Shu-yi; Fan, Sai-jun; Liu, Pei-xun

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine,a new cysteine derivative,on DNA damage induced by radiation by using acute radiation injury animal models. Forty ICR mice were randomly divided into five groups:the control group,1.0Gy gamma irradiation group,1.0Gy gamma irradiation combined with S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine group,7.2Gy gamma irradiation group,and 7.2Gy gamma irradiation combined with S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine group,with 8 mice in each group.The comet assay and bone marrow polychromatic micronucleus experiments were performed to evaluate the double-strand DNA breaks in ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray, respectively. The tail DNA percentage,tail length,tail moment,and olive tail moment of peripheral blood lymphocytes in 7.2Gy gamma irradiation group were significantly higher than that of the control group (PL-cysteine group was significantly less than that of 7.2Gy gamma irradiation group (PL-cysteine before irradiation,the micronucleus rate of ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray decreased from (39.5000 ± 3.3141)‰ to (28.1667±4.1345)‰ (P=0.033) and from (76.5000 ± 4.6242)‰ to (22.8333 ± 3.6553)‰(P=0.000),respectively. The bone marrow polychromatic micronucleus experiment indicated that the value of polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE)/normochromatic erythrocyte(NCE) of ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray was less than the control group(PL-cysteine before irradiation was significantly higher than the corresponding groups (PL-cysteine has a good protective effect against DNA damage induced by radiation.

  16. Curcumin Attenuates Gamma Radiation Induced Intestinal Damage in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Tahawy, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Small Intestine exhibits numerous morphological and functional alterations during radiation exposure. Oxidative stress, a factor implicated in the intestinal injury may contribute towards some of these alterations. The present work was designed to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin, a yellow pigment of turmeric on y-radiation-induced oxidative damage in the small intestine by measuring alterations in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TSARS), serotonin metabolism, catecholamine levels, and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in parallel to changes in the architecture of intestinal tissues. In addition, monoamine level, MAO activity and TSARS level were determined in the serum. Curcumin was supplemented orally via gavages, to rats at a dose of (45 mg/ Kg body wt/ day) for 2 weeks pre-irradiation and the last supplementation was 30 min pre exposure to 6.5 Gy gamma radiations (applied as one shot dose). Animals were sacrificed on the 7th day after irradiation. The results demonstrated that, whole body exposure of rats to ionizing radiation has induced oxidative damage in small intestine obvious by significant increases of TSARS content, MAO activity and 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and by significant decreases of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) levels. In parallel histopathological studies of the small intestine of irradiated rats through light microscopic showed significant decrease in the number of villi, villus height, mixed sub mucosa layer with more fibres and fibroblasts. Intestinal damage was in parallel to significant alterations of serum MAO activity, TBARS, 5-HT, DA, NE and EPI levels. Administration of curcumin before irradiation has significantly improved the levels of monoamines in small intestine and serum of irradiated rats, which was associated with significant amelioration in MAO activity and TBARS contents

  17. Effects of piracetam supplementation on cochlear damage occuring in guinea pigs exposed to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altas, E.; Ertekin, M.V.; Kuduban, O.; Gundogdu, C.; Demirci, E.; Sutbeyaz, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In this study we aimed to determine the role of piracetam (PIR) in preventing radiation induced cochlear damage after total-cranium irradiation (radiotherapy; RT). Male albino guinea pigs used in the study were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (Control group) (n=11) received neither PIR nor irradiation, but received saline solution intraperitoneally (i.p.) and received sham irradiation. Group 2 (RT group) (n=32) was exposed to total cranium irradiation of 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy/d for five successive days, with a calculated (α/β=3.5) biological effective dose of fractionated irradiation equal to 60 Gy conventional fractionation, then received saline solution for five successive days i.p. Group 3 (PIR+RT group) (n=33) received total cranium irradiation, plus 350 mg/kg per day PIR for five successive days i.p. After the last dose of RT, the guinea pigs were all sacrificed at the 4th, 24th and 96th hours, respectively. Their cochleas were enucleated for histopathologic examination. It was observed that total cranium irradiation (RT group) promoted degeneration in stria vascularis (SV), spiral ganglion cells (SG), outer hair cells (OHC) and inner hair cell (IHC) of cochleas at these times (p 0.05) and IHC at 4th, 24th hours (p>0.05), there was a significant difference on radiation-induced cochlear degeneration in SV and OHC at 24th and 96th hours (p<0.05), IHC at 96th hour (p<0.05) and SG at 4th, 24th and 96th hours (p<0.05). There was no any cochlear degeneration in the control group. Piracetam might reduce radiation-induced cochlear damage in the guinea pig. These results are pioneer to studies that will be performed with PIR for radiation toxicity protection. (author)

  18. A paradigm study for assessment of phenylalanine's damage under arc-discharge irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke Zhigang [Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Huang Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.c [Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Su Xi; Jiang Jiang; Wang Xiangqin; Yu Zengliang [Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Energetic ions induce important biological effects and the research into radiolysis of amino acids can help to clarify radiolysis of proteins. For this purpose, arc-discharge induced radiolysis of the benzyl-containing aromatic amino acid phenylalanine in aqueous solution was studied and the damage was assessed quantitatively. The energetic ions were produced by arc-discharge in nitrogen and argon atmosphere. The arc-discharge induced chemical reactions of the biomolecule in aqueous solution were detected and analyzed by means of UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Based on the multiple spectroscopic approach, the damage can be evaluated in a more reliable and convenient way. The fluorescence analysis in this case appears to be a more direct indicator for the assessment of damage, where it reveals that the damage increases with the irradiation time exponentially. On the contrary, the 'plateau region' or 'saddle-shape' apparently shown both in our rough absorption analysis and ninhydrin reaction test, similar to the previously reported feature of the dose effect for low-energy-ion induced damage, may be just a consequence with varied reactions and processes involved at different stages. This work thus demonstrated that application of appropriate combination of spectroscopic tools can effectively dissect the diversity of the radiolysis reaction system and assess the biomolecular damage properly.

  19. Gamma-H2Ax quantification of low dose irradiation-induced DNA damage in patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy (IRMT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivabalasingham, S.; Short, S.; Worku, M.; Marks, G.; Guerrero-Urbano, T.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. Purpose/Objective: IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) offers greater target dose compliance yet may produce a comparative higher whole body dose. The aim of this study is to quantify γH2Ax foci in lymphocytes (an established marker of DNA double strand breaks) in patients undergoing IMRT. Material/Methods: Radical inverse planned IMRT was delivered to patients with brain tumours. Peripheral blood samples were collected from each patient at the following time points: baseline; weekly- prior to and 30 minutes after one treatment fraction; 2 and 6 weeks following completion of treatment. Whole blood was centrifuged to separate lymphocytes, which were fixed and stained for fluorescent immunocytochemistry. 150 cells per sample were visualized. γH2Ax foci were identified and counted using confocal microscopy. Results A low basal level of foci was present in all samples prior to any radiation exposure (0.233, SD 0.028). There was a significant increase in mean foci per cell in post radiotherapy treatment samples(0.367 foci per cell pre-treatment and 0.612 foci per cell post treatment, p=0.000) and no significant difference between post-treatment foci numbers at different times during treatment(for example, 0.518 foci per cell at week 1 and 0.760 at week 6, p=0.279). Mean foci numbers returned to background levels at 6 weeks following completion of radiotherapy (0.239 foci per cell at baseline and 0.219 foci per cell at 6 weeks, p=0.529). Comparison between patients treated with different delivery methods is ongoing. Conclusion: γH2Ax is a feasible marker of DNA damage in lymphocytes during IMRT. These data demonstrate a reproducible level of foci induction in patients undergoing IMRT for tumour targets in brain. There is no significant accumulation of foci during treatment and foci numbers return to baseline post treatment. This assay may be useful to assess differences in whole body dose when different delivery methods

  20. Study on DNA damages induced by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Hong Van; Dinh Ba Tuan; Tran Tuan Anh; Nguyen Thuy Ngan; Ta Bich Thuan; Vo Thi Thuong Lan; Tran Minh Quynh; Nguyen Thi Thom

    2015-01-01

    DNA damages in Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to UV radiation have been investigated. After 30 min of exposure to UV radiation of 5 mJ/cm"2, the growth of E. coli in LB broth medium was about only 10% in compared with non-irradiated one. This results suggested that the UV radiation caused the damages for E. coli genome resulted in reduction in its growth and survival, and those lesions can be somewhat recovered. For both solutions of plasmid DNAs and E. coli cells containing plasmid DNA, this dose also caused the breakage on single and double strands of DNA, shifted the morphology of DNA plasmid from supercoiled to circular and linear forms. The formation of pyrimidine dimers upon UV radiation significantly reduced when the DNA was irradiated in the presence of Ganoderma lucidum extract. Thus, studies on UV-induced DNA damage at molecular level are very essential to determine the UV radiation doses corresponding to the DNA damages, especially for creation and selection of useful radiation-induced mutants, as well as elucidation the protective effects of the specific compounds against UV light. (author)

  1. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    1993-01-01

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocik, J; Keilova, E [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding) to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Quantitative measurement of ultraviolet-induced damage in cellular DNA by an enzyme immunodot assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakizaka, A.; Nishizawa, Y.; Aiba, N.; Okuhara, E.; Takahashi, S.

    1989-01-01

    A simple enzyme immunoassay procedure was developed for the quantitative determination of 254-nm uv-induced DNA damage in cells. With the use of specific antibodies to uv-irradiated DNA and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody to rabbit IgG, the extent of damaged DNA in uv-irradiated rat spleen mononuclear cells was quantitatively measurable. Through the use of this method, the amount of damaged DNA present in 2 X 10(5) cells irradiated at a dose of 75 J/m2 was estimated to be 7 ng equivalents of the standard uv-irradiated DNA. In addition, when the cells, irradiated at 750 J/m2, were incubated for 1 h, the antigenic activity of DNA decreased by 40%, suggesting that a repair of the damaged sites in DNA had proceeded to some extent in the cells

  4. Repair of membrane damage in X-irradiated E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, N.E.; Ratnajothi, N.H.; Hewamanna, R.; Obioha, F.I.

    1984-01-01

    When E. coli B/r or E. coli K12 AB1157 were X-irradiated in the presence of oxygen and incubated immediately after irradiation in broth containing penicillin in concentration that on its own was not lethal to unirradiated bacteria, substantial additional killing was caused. When treatment with penicillin was delayed for increasing times after irradiation the additional killing became progressively less. These results were interpreted as demonstrating the repair or removal of oxygen-dependent radiation-induced lesions in the bacterial membranes. Removal of these lesions was inhibited by incubation of the irradiated bacteria at low temperature before treatment with penicillin or by exposing the cells to a non-lethal concentration of toluene before irradiation. These observations suggest that an enzymatic repair process may be involved in the removal of the membrane lesions. The fatty acid mutant E. coli K 1060 proved exceptional in that some additional killing by penicillin was detectable after anaerobic as well as aerobic irradiation. This points to the importance of membrane composition in the development of those radiation lesions that are brought to light by penicillin treatment. (author)

  5. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  6. Gastroprotective effect of kefir on ulcer induced in irradiated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Hanan A; Ismail, Amel F M

    2015-03-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the protective effect of kefir milk on ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in γ-irradiated rats. The results of the present study revealed that treatment with γ-irradiation and/or ethanol showed a significant increase in ulcers number, total acidity, peptic, H(+)K(+)ATPase, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and MDA level, which were accompanied by a significant decrease in the mucus content, the stomach GSH level, the GSH-Px activity and DNA damage. Pre-treatment with kefir milk exert significant improvement in all the tested parameters. Kefir milk exerts comparable effect to that of the antiulcer drug ranitidine. In conclusion, the present study revealed that oral administration of kefir milk prevents ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in γ-irradiated rats that could attribute to its antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and radio-protective activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation-induced brain damage in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Kokunai, Takashi; Ijichi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Raimondi, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and sequence of the radiation-induced changes in the brain were studied postmortem in 34 children with glioma, 22 of whom underwent central nervous system radiation therapy. Twenty received whole-brain or whole-neuroaxis radiation at a total mean dosage of 4063 cGy. Brain tissue alternations were analyzed histologically by means of various staining methods, including immunohistochemical techniques. The histological features of irradiated brains were compared with those of non-irradiated brains. Microscopic findings included demyelination (seven cases), focal necrosis (six cases), cortical atrophy (four cases), endothelial proliferation (four cases), and telangiectatic vascular proliferation with vascular thickening and oozing of a thick fluid (one case). Such findings were rare in non-irradiated patients. Demyelination was observed earliest in a patient who died 5 months after radiation therapy and was more common after 9 months. Focal necrosis was first observed 9 months post-irradiation but was more advanced and extensive after 1 year. Calcified foci were found only after 60 months. Various vascular changes such as vascular thickening and thrombosis suggested ischemic insult to the brain as a late effect of radiation injury. The results of this study suggest that the immature brain may be more sensitive to radiation than is the adult brain, and that the manifestations of radiation-induced injury depend on the time elapsed after irradiation. (author)

  8. Irradiation damage in U{sub 3}Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacEwan, J R; Bethune, B

    1969-04-15

    The ordered body-centered tetragonal structure of U{sub 3}S1 transforms allotropically or by irradiation damage to ordered and disordered face -centered cubic structures respectively. An exposure of about 6 x 10{sup 16} fissions/cm{sup 3} at 100{sup o}C produced X-ray diffraction patterns of the cubic form with a 0.6% decrease in X-ray density. However, immersion density measurements showed a volume increase of 2.3% at a similar exposure. Further irradiation removed all but two peaks from the diffraction pattern indicating a trend to an amorphous structure. Electrical resistivity measurements showed that U{sub 3}Si is an electronic conductor with a large positive temperature coefficient. Measurements made below the irradiation temperature of 100{sup o}C showed that the temperature coefficient decreased with irradiation and approached zero at high exposure, Amorphous materials have a negligible temperature coefficient, so the result confirms the trend observed by X-ray analyses. (author)

  9. Radiation damage in stainless steel under varying temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Naoaki [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1998-03-01

    Microstructural evolution of model alloys of 316SS was examined by neutron irradiation at JMTR under cyclic temperature varying condition. In the case of Fe-16Cr-17Ni, formation of interstitial loops and voids are strongly suppressed by varying the temperature from 473K to 673K. By adding Ti as miner element (0.25wt%), however, abnormal accumulation of vacancies (void swelling of 11%dpa at 0.1dpa) was observed. Theoretical analysis standing on the rate theory of defect clustering and simulation irradiation experiments with heavy ions indicates that the vacancy-rich condition which appears temporally during and after changing the temperature from low to high brings these results. It was also shown that only 1 dpa pre-irradiation at low temperature changes swelling behavior at high temperature above several 10 dpa. The understanding of non-steady-state defect processes under temperature varying irradiation is very important to estimate the radiation damage under fusion environment where short-term and long-term temperature variation is expected. (author)

  10. UVA Irradiation of Dysplastic Keratinocytes: Oxidative Damage versus Antioxidant Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechifor, Marina T.; Niculiţe, Cristina M.; Urs, Andreea O.; Regalia, Teodor; Mocanu, Mihaela; Popescu, Alexandra; Manda, Gina; Dinu, Diana; Leabu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    UVA affects epidermal cell physiology in a complex manner, but the harmful effects have been studied mainly in terms of DNA damage, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. We investigated UVA effects on membrane integrity and antioxidant defense of dysplastic keratinocytes after one and two hours of irradiation, both immediately after exposure, and 24 h post-irradiation. To determine the UVA oxidative stress on cell membrane, lipid peroxidation was correlated with changes in fatty acid levels. Membrane permeability and integrity were assessed by propidium iodide staining and lactate dehydrogenase release. The effects on keratinocyte antioxidant protection were investigated in terms of catalase activity and expression. Lipid peroxidation increased in an exposure time-dependent manner. UVA exposure decreased the level of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which gradually returned to its initial value. Lactate dehydrogenase release showed a dramatic loss in membrane integrity after 2 h minimum of exposure. The cell ability to restore membrane permeability was noted at 24 h post-irradiation (for one hour exposure). Catalase activity decreased in an exposure time-dependent manner. UVA-irradiated dysplastic keratinocytes developed mechanisms leading to cell protection and survival, following a non-lethal exposure. The surviving cells gained an increased resistance to apoptosis, suggesting that their pre-malignant status harbors an abnormal ability to control their fate. PMID:23222638

  11. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Zengliang; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is ...

  12. Laser-Induced Damage Growth on Larger-Aperture Fused Silica Optical Components at 351 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan-Qing, Huang; Wei, Han; Fang, Wang; Yong, Xiang; Fu-Quan, Li; Bin, Feng; Feng, Jing; Xiao-Feng, Wei; Wan-Guo, Zheng; Xiao-Min, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Laser-induced damage is a key lifetime limiter for optics in high-power laser facility. Damage initiation and growth under 351 nm high-fluence laser irradiation are observed on larger-aperture fused silica optics. The input surface of one fused silica component is damaged most severely and an explanation is presented. Obscurations and the area of a scratch on it are found to grow exponentially with the shot number. The area of damage site grows linearly. Micrographs of damage sites support the micro-explosion damage model which could be used to qualitatively explain the phenomena

  13. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-01

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10 14 cm -2 and 10 16 cm -2 was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with α-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  14. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-15

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 {mu}m, 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with {alpha}-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  15. Cerenkov light and the production of photoreactivatable damage in X-irradiated E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Zabilansky, E.; Morgan, T.; Ward, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Survival curve data for oxygenated E. coli AB2480 irradiated with 6 MVp photons in the absence and presence of DNA are presented for bacteria which have or have not received photoreactivation treatment following x-ray exposure. At the concentration of DNA used (OD = 4.4 at 260 nm) partial protection against induction of photoreactivatable damage was attained. Following photoreactivation the survival curves had the same slope, irrespective of the presence or absence of DNA. Survival data for oxygenated E.coli AB2480 irradiated with 50 Gy of 6 MVp photons in the presence of DNA at varying concentrations (OD range 0.5 to 12) and then processed with or without exposure to photoreactivating light are also presented. Survival increased with DNA concentration in the absence, but not in the presence, of photoreactivation. It is concluded that theoretical considerations and experimental data are consistent with Cerenkov light being responsible for the production of a major part of the photoreactivatable damage induced in E.coli DNA by high energy X-,γ- or electron irradiation, but that the data obtained with low energy X-rays (300 kVp) and with high energy X-rays (6 MVp) plus DNA as a 'scavenger' of Cerenkov light, are indicative of a component of the photoreactivatable damage being induced by a mechanism not involving Cerenkov light. (U.K.)

  16. Cerenkov light and the production of photoreactivatable damage in X-irradiated E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redpath, J L; Zabilansky, E; Morgan, T [California Univ., Irvine (USA). Dept. of Radiological Sciences; Ward, J F [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla (USA). Dept. of Radiology

    1981-05-01

    Survival curve data for oxygenated E. coli AB2480 irradiated with 6 MVp photons in the absence and presence of DNA are presented for bacteria which have or have not received photoreactivation treatment following x-ray exposure. At the concentration of DNA used (OD = 4.4 at 260 nm) partial protection against induction of photoreactivatable damage was attained. Following photoreactivation the survival curves had the same slope, irrespective of the presence or absence of DNA. Survival data for oxygenated E.coli AB2480 irradiated with 50 Gy of 6 MVp photons in the presence of DNA at varying concentrations (OD range 0.5 to 12) and then processed with or without exposure to photoreactivating light are also presented. Survival increased with DNA concentration in the absence, but not in the presence, of photoreactivation. It is concluded that theoretical considerations and experimental data are consistent with Cerenkov light being responsible for the production of a major part of the photoreactivatable damage induced in E. coli DNA by high energy X-, ..gamma..- or electron irradiation, but that the data obtained with low energy X-rays (300 kVp) and with high energy X-rays (6 MVp) plus DNA as a scavenger of Cerenkov light, are indicative of a component of the photoreactivatable damage being induced by a mechanism not involving Cerenkov light.

  17. Absence of storage effects on radiation damage after thermal neutron irradiation of dry rice seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowyama, Y. [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan); Saito, M.; Kawase, T.

    1987-09-15

    Storage effects on dry rice seeds equilibrated to 6.8% moisture content were examined after irradiation with X-rays of 5, 10, 20 and 40 kR and with thermal neutrons of 2.1, 4.2, 6.3 and 8.4×10{sup 13}N{sub th}/cm{sup 2}. Reduction in root growth was estimated from dose response curves after storage periods of 1 hr to 21 days. The longer the storage period, the greater enhancement of radiation damages in X-irradiated seeds. There were two components in the storage effect, i. e., a rapid increase of radiosensitivity within the first 24 hr and a slow increase up to 21 days. An almost complete absence of a storage effect was observed after thermal neutron exposure, in spite of considerably high radioactivities of the induced nuclides, {sup 56}Mn, {sup 42}K and {sup 24}Na, which were detected from gamma-ray spectrometry of the irradiated seeds. The present results suggest that the contributions of gamma-rays from the activated nuclides and of inherent contaminating gamma-rays are little or negligible against the neutron-induced damage, and that the main radiobiological effects of thermal neutrons are ascribed to in situ radiations, i, e., heavy particles resulting from neutron-capture reaction of atom. A mechanism underlying the absence of storage effect after thermal neutron irradiation was briefly discussed on the basis of radical formation and decay. (author)

  18. Visualization of DNA clustered damage induced by heavy ion exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, M.; Yatagai, F.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most lethal damage induced by ionizing radiations. Accelerated heavy-ions have been shown to induce DNA clustered damage, which is two or more DNA lesions induced within a few helical turns. Higher biological effectiveness of heavy-ions could be provided predominantly by induction of complex DNA clustered damage, which leads to non-repairable DSBs. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is composed of catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA-binding heterodimer (Ku70 and Ku86). DNA-PK acts as a sensor of DSB during non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), since DNA-PK is activated to bind to the ends of double-stranded DNA. On the other hand, NBS1 and histone H2AX are essential for DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) in higher vertebrate cells. Here we report that phosphorylated H2AX at Ser139 (named γ-H2AX) and NBS1 form large undissolvable foci after exposure to accelerated Fe ions, while DNA-PKcs does not recognize DNA clustered damage. NBS1 and γ-H2AX colocalized with forming discrete foci after exposure to X-rays. At 0.5 h after Fe ion irradiation, NBS1 and γ-H2AX also formed discrete foci. However, at 3-8 h after Fe ion irradiation, highly localized large foci turned up, while small discrete foci disappeared. Large NBS1 and γ-H2AX foci were remained even 16 h after irradiation. DNA-PKcs recognized Ku-binding DSB and formed foci shortly after exposure to X-rays. DNA-PKcs foci were observed 0.5 h after 5 Gy of Fe ion irradiation and were almost completely disappeared up to 8 h. These results suggest that NBS1 and γ-H2AX can be utilized as molecular marker of DNA clustered damage, while DNA-PK selectively recognizes repairable DSBs by NHEJ

  19. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  20. Alleviation of acute radiation damages by post-irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, A.; Ono, T.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages in mice were tried to alleviate experimentally by post-treatment. Combined treatment of OK-432 and aztreonam clearly prevented the radiation induced sepsis and elevated the survival rate in mice; the survival was 80% in the OK-432 plus aztreonam group while it was 55% in the group treated with OK-432 alone and 0% with saline. Irsogladine maleate, an anti-ulcer drug, increased the survival rate of jejunal crypt stem cells with a clear dose-related trend. The D 0 for irsogladine maleate was 2.8 Gy although it was 2.3 Gy for saline, These findings suggest that some conventional drugs are effective for radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages and the possibility that they can be applied for people exposed to radiation accidentally. (author)

  1. Modelling of settlement induced building damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardina, G.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the modelling of settlement induced damage to masonry buildings. In densely populated areas, the need for new space is nowadays producing a rapid increment of underground excavations. Due to the construction of new metro lines, tunnelling activity in urban areas is growing.

  2. Krypton and helium irradiation damage in neodymium-zirconolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, M.; Davoisne, C.; Stennett, M.; Hyatt, N.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.; Lee, W.E.

    2011-01-01

    A leading candidate for the immobilisation of actinides, zirconolite's suitability as a potential ceramic host for plutonium disposition, both in storage and geological disposal, has been the subject of much research. One key aim of this study is to understand the effects of radiation damage and noble gas accommodation within the zirconolite material. To this end, a series of ex situ irradiations have been performed on polycrystalline (Ca 0.8 Nd 0.2 )Zr(Ti 1.8 Al 0.2 )O 7 zirconolite samples. Zirconolite samples, doped with Nd 3+ (as a Pu surrogate) on the Ca-site and charge-balanced by substituting Al 3+ onto the Ti-site, were irradiated with 36 Kr + (2 MeV) ions at fluences of 1 x 10 14 and 5 x 10 15 cm -2 and 4 He + (200 keV) ions at fluences of 1 x 10 14 , 5 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 17 cm -2 to simulate the impact of alpha decay on the microstructure. Microstructural analysis revealed no damage present at the lower Kr + fluence, but that the higher 36 Kr + fluence rendered the zirconolite completely amorphous. Similarly, evidence of helium accumulation was only seen at the highest 4 He + fluence (1 x 10 17 cm -2 ). Monte Carlo simulations using the TRIM code predict the highest concentration of helium accumulating at a depth of 720 nm, in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite at 100 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ) was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar 2+ . Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with MeV He + ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 x 10 15 Ar 2+ cm -2 , considerable near-surface He + ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 nm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO 3 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides

  4. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite at 100 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.; Nord, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite (FeTiO3) was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar2+. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with 2 MeV He+ ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 ?? 1015 Ar2+/cm2, considerable near-surface He+ ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 nm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO3) and spinel (MgAl2O4) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides.

  5. Systematic analysis of DNA damage induction and DNA repair pathway activation by continuous wave visible light laser micro-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Muster

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser micro-irradiation can be used to induce DNA damage with high spatial and temporal resolution, representing a powerful tool to analyze DNA repair in vivo in the context of chromatin. However, most lasers induce a mixture of DNA damage leading to the activation of multiple DNA repair pathways and making it impossible to study individual repair processes. Hence, we aimed to establish and validate micro-irradiation conditions together with inhibition of several key proteins to discriminate different types of DNA damage and repair pathways using lasers commonly available in confocal microscopes. Using time-lapse analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged repair proteins and also validation of the DNA damage generated by micro-irradiation using several key damage markers, we show that irradiation with a 405 nm continuous wave laser lead to the activation of all repair pathways even in the absence of exogenous sensitization. In contrast, we found that irradiation with 488 nm laser lead to the selective activation of non-processive short-patch base excision and single strand break repair, which were further validated by PARP inhibition and metoxyamine treatment. We conclude that these low energy conditions discriminated against processive long-patch base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair as well as double strand break repair pathways.

  6. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in rat epidermis as a function of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, E.V.; Burns, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in proliferating rat epidermal cells diminished progressively with increasing age of the animal. The dorsal skin was irradiated with 1200 rad of 0.8 MeV electrons at various ages, and the amount of DNA damage was determined as a function of time after irradiation by the method of alkaline unwinding followed by S 1 nuclease digestion. The amount of DNA damage immediately after irradiation was not age dependent, while the rate of damage removal from the DNA decreased with increasing age. By fitting an exponential function to the relative amount of undamaged DNA as a function of time after irradiation, DNA repair halftimes of 20, 27, 69, and 107 min were obtained for 28, 100-, 200-, and 400-day-old animals, respectively

  7. ALK1 heterozygosity delays development of late normal tissue damage in the irradiated mouse kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Floot, Ben; Korlaar, Regina; Russell, Nicola S.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor, which is mainly expressed in endothelial cells regulating proliferation and migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Endothelial cells also express the co-receptor endoglin, which modulates ALK1 effects on endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that mice with reduced endoglin levels develop less irradiation-induced vascular damage and fibrosis, caused by an impaired inflammatory response. This study was aimed at investigating the role of ALK1 in late radiation toxicity. Material and Methods: Kidneys of ALK +/+ and ALK1 +/- mice were irradiated with 14 Gy. Mice were sacrificed at 10, 20, and 30 weeks after irradiation and gene expression and protein levels were analyzed. Results: Compared to wild type littermates, ALK1 +/- mice developed less inflammation and fibrosis at 20 weeks after irradiation, but displayed an increase in pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic gene expression at 30 weeks. In addition, ALK1 +/- mice showed superior vascular integrity at 10 and 20 weeks after irradiation which deteriorated at 30 weeks coinciding with changes in the VEGF pathway. Conclusions: ALK1 +/- mice develop a delayed normal tissue response by modulating the inflammatory response and growth factor expression after irradiation.

  8. Flow cytometric determination of radiation-induced chromosome damage and its correlation with cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welleweerd, J.; Wilder, M.E.; Carpenter, S.G.; Raju, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster M3-1 cells were irradiated with several doses of x rays or α particles from 238 Pu. Propidium iodide-stained chromosome suspensions were prepared at different times after irradiation; cells were also assayed for survival. The DNA histograms of these chromosomes showed increased background counts with increased doses of radiation. This increase in background was cell-cycle dependent and was correlated with cell survival. The correlation between radiation-induced chromosome damage and cell survival was the same for X rays and α particles. Data are presented which indicate that flow cytometric analysis of chromosomes of irradiated cell populations can be a useful adjunct to classical cytogenic analysis of irradiation-induced chromosomal damage by virtue of its ability to express and measure chromosomal damage not seen by classical cytogenic methods

  9. Irradiation damage behavior of low alloy steel wrought and weld materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stofanak, R.J.; Poskie, T.J.; Li, Y.Y.; Wire, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the irradiation damage response of several different types of low alloy steel: vintage type ASTM A302 Grade B (A302B) plates and welds containing different Ni and Cu concentrations, 3.5% Ni steels similar to ASTM A508 Class 4, welds containing about 1% Ni (similar to type 105S), and 3.5% Ni steels with ''superclean'' composition. All materials were irradiated at several different irradiation damage levels ranging from 0.0003 to 0.06 dpa at 232C (450F). Complete Charpy V-notch impact energy transition temperature curves were generated for all materials before and after irradiation to determine transition temperature at 4IJ (30 ft-lb) or 47J (35 ft-lb) and the upper shelf energy. Irradiation damage behavior was measured by shift in Charpy 41J or 47J transition temperature (ΔTT4 41J or ΔTT 47J ) and lowering of upper shelf Charpy energy at a given irradiation damage level. It was found that chemical composition greatly influenced irradiation damage behavior; highest irradiation damage (greatest ΔTT) was found in an A302B type weld containing 1.28% Ni and 0.20% Cu while the least damage was found in 3.5% Ni, 0.05% Cu, superclean wrought materials. Combination of Ni and Cu was found to affect irradiation damage behavior at higher irradiation damage levels in the A302B welds where the 1.28% Ni, 0.20% Cu weld showed more damage than a 0.60% Ni, 0.31% Cu weld. For the 3.5% Ni steels, fabrication influenced irradiation behavior in that a silicon (Si) killed material showed greater irradiation damage than a low silicon material. In general, the 3.5% Ni materials with low copper showed less irradiation damage than the A302B materials

  10. DNA damage focus analysis in blood samples of minipigs reveals acute partial body irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamkowski

    Full Text Available Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated γH2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI with 49 Gy (± 6% Co-60 γ-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1-8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly γ-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-γH2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using γH2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-γH2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available

  11. Elemental process of amorphization induced by electron irradiation in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Jun; Takeda, Seiji; Tsuda, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    We recently found that amorphization is induced in Si by electron irradiation. Examining the amorphization systematically, we have established the diagram of steady states under electron irradiation, either amorphous Si (a-Si) or crystalline Si (c-Si) as a function of incident electron energy, electron dose, and irradiation temperature. Utilizing transmission electron microscopy, electron energy filtered diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we have characterized the atomic structure, the electronic structure, and the thermal stability of a-Si induced by electron irradiation. Based on the experimental data, we have also concluded that the amorphization is caused by the accumulation of not point defects but small cascade damages. Analyzing the change in the intensity of halo diffraction rings during amorphization, we have clarified that the smallest cascade damage that contributes to amorphization includes only about four Si atoms. This presumably supports the amorphization mechanism that four self-interstitial atoms form the quasistable structure I4 in c-Si and it becomes an amorphous embryo

  12. Involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase in radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Chang-Won; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Suwan; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Young-Mee; Pyo, Hongryull; Lee, Sunyoung

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To understand the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced vascular dysfunction, we employed two models. First, we examined the effect of X-ray irradiation on vasodilation in rabbit carotid arteries. Carotid arterial rings were irradiated with 8 or 16 Gy using in vivo and ex vivo methods. We measured the effect of acetylcholine-induced relaxation after phenylephrine-induced contraction on the rings. In irradiated carotid arteries, vasodilation was significantly attenuated by both irradiation methods. The relaxation response was completely blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a potent inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Residual relaxation persisted after treatment with L-N ω -nitroarginine (L-NA), a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), but disappeared following the addition of aminoguanidine (AG), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS). The relaxation response was also affected by tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor activity. In the second model, we investigated the biochemical events of nitrosative stress in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We measured iNOS and nitrotyrosine expression in HUVECs exposed to a dose of 4 Gy. The expression of iNOS and nitrotyrosine was greater in irradiated HUVECs than in untreated controls. Pretreatment with AG, L-N 6 -(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (a selective inhibitor of iNOS), and L-NA attenuated nitrosative stress. While a selective target of radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage was not definitely determined, these results suggest that NO generated from iNOS could contribute to vasorelaxation. These studies highlight a potential role of iNOS inhibitors in ameliorating radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage. (author)

  13. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G.; Castiglione, F.; Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced

  14. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced

  15. Free radicals induced archive paper by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutrubinis, M.; Moise, I.V.; Negut, C.D.; Georgescu, R.; Suvaila, R.; Virgolici, M.; Manea, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Irradiation of archive paper (document archives of institutions, companies etc. and library or museum collections of books and documents) can solve the problems related to the bio-deterioration and bio-contamination of paper and sometimes save valuable cultural heritage paper items. For valuable paper items care should be taken to the degradation induced instantly by the ionising radiation to the cellulosic support and also to the long term post-irradiation effects. The free radicals formed due to the irradiation treatment could contribute to instant degradation of paper. Part of them are also trapped for months and years after irradiation and they could be related to the post-irradiation effects in paper items. In this study, different sorts of cellulosic support samples (soft wood and hard wood cellulose, contemporary paper, paper from archives and from collections etc.) have been irradiated with dosis up to 100 kGy and the radiation induced free radicals have been measured by ESR spectrometry. The ESR signals have shown the type and quantity of radiation induced free radicals. Their study can be used for a realistic estimation of the degradative effect of the ionising radiation treatment of archive paper.

  16. Analysis of radicals induced in irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, Keigo; Kaimori, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Shoei; Sakamoto, Yuhki; Nakamura, Hideo; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    By electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we revealed free radicals in γ-ray irradiated foods; black pepper, green coffee bean and ginseng. We also analyzed the decay behavior of radiation induced free radicals during storage of irradiated foods. The ESR spectrum of experimental irradiated foods consists of a sextet signal centered at g=2.0 and a singlet signal at the same g-value position and a singlet signal at g=4.0. The singlet signal at g=2.0 is originated from organic free radicals and its peak intensity showed the dependence of γ-ray irradiation dose levels. The signal intensity was decreased during storage. Only after 3 hours of radiation treatment the peak intensity was decreased fast and after that the intensity was decreased slowly. The relaxation times, T 1 and T 2 , of radiation induced free radicals showed the variations before and after irradiation. During long time storage period it was shown that T 1 was increased and T 2 was decreased. By analysis of decay process using the simulation methods based on the theory of reaction speed, it is considered that at least two kinds of radicals were induced in irradiated foods during long time storage. (author)

  17. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  18. Modeling DNA?damage-induced pneumopathy in mice: insight from danger signaling cascades

    OpenAIRE

    Wirsd?rfer, Florian; Jendrossek, Verena

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced pneumonitis and fibrosis represent severe and dose-limiting side effects in the radiotherapy of thorax-associated neoplasms leading to decreased quality of life or - as a consequence of treatment with suboptimal radiation doses - to fatal outcomes by local recurrence or metastatic disease. It is assumed that the initial radiation-induced damage to the resident cells triggers a multifaceted damage-signalling cascade in irradiated normal tissues including a multifactorial secr...

  19. LYCOPENE EFFICIENCY IN THE MODULATION OF OXIDATIVE DAMAGE IN DIFFERENT TISSUES OF GAMMA IRRADIATED RATS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-TAHAWY, N.A.; NADA, A.S.; REZK, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces oxidative stress that has been recognized as an important etiological factor in the causation of several chronic diseases. Lycopene, a carotenoid almost exclusively present in tomatoes and tomatoes products, is a lipid soluble antioxidant claimed to possess cardio protective and anticancer properties. The present study was designed to determine the possible modulator effects of lycopene on radiation-induced oxidative damage to liver, spleen and lung tissues. Animals were supplemented with lycopene (5 mg/kg body weight/ day) by gavages for two weeks before whole body exposure to gamma rays and within the period of irradiation (3 successive doses, each of 3 Gy at 72 hours intervals). Animals were sacrificed on the 3 r d day post the last irradiation session.The results obtained in the present study showed that whole body gamma irradiation produced oxidative stress manifested by significant elevation in lipid peroxides levels measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) associated with significant decrease of nitric oxide (NO) content. Non-significant change in total cupper (Cu) in the three tissues was recorded while significant increase of total iron (Fe) was observed in liver and spleen tissues only. Liver tissue of irradiated rats showed significant decrease in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). In spleen tissues, there was a significant increase of SOD and significant decrease of CAT activities while in lung tissues, both SOD and CAT activities showed significant increase.Histological observations of photomicrograph of liver sections showed that radiation-induced sever damage obvious by dilated portal vein, ruptured hepatocytes, necrotic, pyknotic, karyolitic nuclei and vacuolated cytoplasm. In spleen tissue, radiation was induced degeneration of lymphatic nodules, dilation follicular artery and marked hemorrhage. In lung tissue, radiation- induces ill

  20. Surface damage in the small intestine of the mouse after X - or neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.E.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1981-01-01

    Damage after X-irradiation includes lateral villous collapse, progressing after 3 - 5 days to villi which sometimes show signs of vertical collapse. After neutron irradiation vertical villous collapse is established earlier, with less swelling of villous tips. It seems, therefore, that at radiobiologically equivalent doses, neutron and X-irradiation produce different levels of surface damage, with neutron irradiation being the more destructive. Early villous tip damage may perhaps be due to disruption of susceptible cells already at the extrusion zone, or to stromal damage

  1. Reductive effects of poria cocos on radiation-induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Heon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2002-01-01

    In order to screen a radioprotective material from nontoxic natural products, the effects of Poria cocos (PC), known as a blood tonic of traditional Oriental herbs, were investigated in HL-60 cells and ICR mice. The water extract of PC was administrated to mice and then the mice were irradiated with - rays. The jejunal crypt survival, endogenous spleen colony formation and apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells were investigated in mice irradiated with 12 Gy, 6.5 Gy, 2 Gy of -rays, respectively. The administration of the PC extract protected the jejunal crypts (p<0.005) and decreased the apoptosis frequency (p<0.05). The formation of endogenous spleen colony was increased but not significantly. The micronuclei (MN) formation and the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay) were investigated in HL- 60 cells irradiated 2 Gy of -rays. The frequency of MN was decreased (p<0.001) and the tail movement, which was a marker of DNA strand breaks in the SCGE, was decreased in groups treated with PC extract (p<0.01) before exposure to-irradiation. These results indicated that PC protects stem cells and reduces DNA damage induced by -rays. Therefore, Poria cocos might be a useful radioprotector, especially since it is a relatively nontoxic product

  2. SHI induced damage in electrical properties of silicon NPN BJTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M. Vinay, E-mail: vkm288@gmail.com; Krishnaveni, S. [Department of studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore (India); Kumar, Santhosh [Department of Physics, Regional Institute of Education, Mysore (India); Yashoda, T. [Department of Physics, AVK College for Women, Hassan (India)

    2016-05-23

    The investigation of radiation damage in Si microelectronic circuitry and devices are being carried out by various research groups globally. In particular the Si Bipolar junction transistors are very sensitive to high energetic radiation. In the present study, radiation response of NPN Bipolar junction transistor (2N3773) has been examined for 60 MeV B{sup 4+} ion. Key electrical properties like Gummel, dc current gain and capacitance – voltage (C-V) characteristics of 60 MeV B{sup 4+} ion irradiated transistor were studied before and after irradiation. Ion irradiation and subsequent electrical characterizations were performed at room temperature. Current voltage (I-V) measurements showed the increase in collector current for V{sub BE} ≤ 0.4 V as a function of fluence, which is due to B{sup 4+} ion induced surface leakage currents. Base current is observed to be more sensitive than collector current and gain appears to be degraded with ion fluence. Also, C-V measurements shows that both built in potential and doping concentration increased significantly after irradiation.

  3. Parvovirus infection-induced DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses are a group of small DNA viruses with ssDNA genomes flanked by two inverted terminal structures. Due to a limited genetic resource they require host cellular factors and sometimes a helper virus for efficient viral replication. Recent studies have shown that parvoviruses interact with the DNA damage machinery, which has a significant impact on the life cycle of the virus as well as the fate of infected cells. In addition, due to special DNA structures of the viral genomes, parvoviruses are useful tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection-induced DNA damage response (DDR). This review aims to summarize recent advances in parvovirus-induced DDR, with a focus on the diverse DDR pathways triggered by different parvoviruses and the consequences of DDR on the viral life cycle as well as the fate of infected cells. PMID:25429305

  4. Restoring the secretory function of irradiation-damaged salivary gland by administrating deferoxamine in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junye Zhang

    Full Text Available One of the major side effects of radiotherapy for treatments of the head and neck cancer is the radiation-induced dysfunction of salivary glands. The aim of the present study is to investigate the efficacy of deferoxamine (DFO to restore the secretory function of radiation-damaged salivary glands in mice.DFO (50 mg/kg/d was administered intraperitoneally in C57BL/6 mice for 3 days before and/or after point-fixed irradiation (18 Gy of submandibular glands. The total 55 mice were randomly divided into: (1 Normal group: mice received no treatment (n = 5; (2 Irradiation group (IR: mice only received irradiation (n = 5; (3 Pre-DFO group (D+IR (n = 10; (4 Pre+Post DFO group (D+IR+D (n = 10; (5 Post-DFO group (IR+D (n = 10; (6 For each DFO-treated group, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml sterilized water alone (by which DFO was dissolved for 3 days before and/or after irradiation, and served as control. Sham1: Pre-sterilized water group (n = 5; sham2: Pre+Post sterilized water group (n = 5; sham3: Post-sterilized water group (n = 5. The salivary flow rate (SFR was assessed at 30th, 60th and 90th day after irradiation, respectively. After 90 days, all mice were sacrificed and their submandibular glands were removed for further examinations.The salivary glands showed remarkable dysfunction and tissue damage after irradiation. DFO restored SFR in the irradiated glands to a level comparable to that in normal glands and angiogenesis in damaged tissue was greatly increased. DFO also increased the expression levels of HIF-1α and VEGF while reduced apoptotic cells. Furthermore, Sca-1+cells were preserved in the salivary glands treated with DFO before IR.Our results indicate DFO could prevent the radiation-induced dysfunction of salivary glands in mice. The mechanism of this protective effect may involve increased angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis of acinar cells and more preserved stem cells.

  5. Ex vivo irradiation of human blood to determine DNA damage using molecular techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Angel; Agapito, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is the assessment of absorbed dose in individuals exposed to ionizing radiation from blood samples based on the radiation induced damage in cellular DNA. The aim of this study was to determine the damage in the DNA through the assessment of an experimental ex vivo assay using irradiated samples of human blood cells. For this purpose, blood samples were irradiated at low doses (<100 mGy) considering the following parameters: blood volume (3mL), temperature (37 °C) and incubation time (0.5, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h). Dose values were: 0, 12.5, 25 and 50 mGy using Cesium -137 gamma rays at 662 keV and a dose rate of 38.46 mGy/h. The qualitative damage in the genomic DNA was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the p53 gene in a sequence of 133 pb of exon 7, related to the protein that acts in the cell repair process. The results of the qualitative analysis showed no degradation of genomic DNA; also an increase in the DNA concentration was observed up to the fourth hour of incubation, finding maximum values for all doses in the two samples. As a conclusion, the effects of ionizing radiation at doses used in this experiment do not generate a detectable damage, by means of molecular techniques such as those used in the present study. (authors).

  6. Human lymphocyte damage and phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM induced by γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Mei; Pan Yan; Liu Jianxiang; Ruan Jianlei; Su Xu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate 60 Co γ-ray induced damage in lymphocytes and the relationship between doses of 60 Co γ-ray irradiation and the levels of phosphorylated H2AX and ATM. Methods: Cells were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays in the range of 0-8 Gy. The levels of phosphorylated H2AX and ATM were detected by Western blot and FACScan,respectively. The micronucleus(MN)was analyzed by CB method to evaluate DNA damage. Results: FACScan results showed the dose-effect relationship of γ-H2AX expression were linear.square at 0.5 h post-irradiation to different doses, and the fitting curve was shown as Y=3.96+11.29D-0.45D 2 . The level of phosphorylated ATM (p-ATM) was not changed significantly by using the same method. Western blot showed that p-ATM protein expression was significantly increased after irradiation compared with sham, irradiated group. The MN assay which represented DNA damage was sensitive to different doses. Conclusions: γ-ray irradiation could induce the phosphorylation of H2AX and ATM, which may play an important role in indicating DNA damage. Both of H2AX and ATM have the potential as sensitive biomarker and biodosimeter for radiation damage. (authors)

  7. Neutron induced permanent damage in Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.P.; Rosen, M.

    1982-01-01

    14 MeV neutron induced permanent changes in the critical current density of Josephson junctions due to displacement damage in the junction barrier are estimated using a worst case model and the binary collision simulation code MARLOWE. No likelihood of single event hard upsets is found in this model. It is estimated that a fluence of 10 18 -10 19 neutrons/cm 2 are required to change the critical current density by 5%

  8. Radiation effect and response of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes induced by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yujie; Su Liaoyuan; Zou Huawei; Kong Xiangrong

    1999-01-01

    The ability of DNA synthesis in lymphocytes were measured by using 3 H-TdR incorporation method. This method was used to observe the damage of lymphocytes irradiated by several challenge doses (0.5-0.8 Gy) and adaptive response induced by previous low dose irradiation. The results show that DNA synthesis was inhibited by challenge dose of radiation and was adapted by previous 0.048 Gy irradiation

  9. Relationship between X-ray irradiation and chromosomal damage in bone marrow tissue of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaubey, R.C.; George, K.P.; Sundaram, K.

    1976-01-01

    X-ray induced chromosomal damage in bone-marrow tissue of male mice was studied using micronucleus technique. Dose response relationship was evaluated. Male Swiss mice received whole body x-ray irradiation at different doses from 25-1000 rads. Animals were sacrificed at the end of 24 hours, bone-marrow smears were made and stained in May-Grunwald-Giemsa. The preparatians were scored for the following types of aberrations: micronuclei in young erythocytes-polychromatic cells and in the mature erythrocytes-normechromatic cells. A dose dependent increase in the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic cells up to a dose of 100 rads was observed. In addition the effect of post-irradiation duration on the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic and normochromatic cells were studied. Male Swiss mice were exposed to 200 rads x-rays and were then sacrificed at different time intervals after irradiation and bone-marrow preparations were made and scored. Maximum polychromatic cells with micronuclei were observed in 24 hours post-irradiated animals, thereafter a decrease in the frequency of polychromatic cells with micronuclei was observed in 40 hours post irradiated animals. (author

  10. Modulator Effect of Turmeric on Oxidative Damage in Whole Body Gamma Irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, H.H.; Abdou, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its penetrating power and its ability to travel great distances, gamma rays are considered the primary hazard to the population during most radiological emergencies. So, there is a need to develop medical countermeasures to protect the first responders and remediation workers from biomedical effect of ionizing radiation. Turmeric has been reported to have many beneficial health effects, including a strong anti-oxidant effect, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, turmeric was investigated as a therapeutic agent against hazards induced by ionizing radiation on kidney, liver, urinary and serum calcium levels and blood counts. A daily dose of 0.5 g/kg body weight was used in whole body gamma irradiated female rats with 3 Gy. Radiation effects were followed up for four weeks post irradiation. The results revealed that the administration of turmeric post-irradiation resulted in a significant inhibition in the frequency of radiation induced oxidative damage. It could be concluded that definite turmeric dose exerts a vital modulator role against gamma irradiation hazard

  11. Radiation-induced neuropathies: collateral damage of improved cancer prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Maisonobe, Thierry; Psimaras, Dimitri; Lenglet, Timothee; Porcher, Raphael; Lefaix, J.L.; Delenian, S.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the improvement of cancer prognosis, long-term damages of treatments become a medical and public health problem. Among the iatrogenic complications, neurological impairment is crucial to consider since motor disability and pain have a considerable impact on quality of life of long cancer survivors. However, radiation-induced neuropathies have not been the focus of great attention. The objective of this paper is to provide an updated review about the radiation-induced lesions of the peripheral nerve system. Radiation-induced neuropathies are characterized by their heterogeneity in both symptoms and disease course. Signs and symptoms depend on the affected structures of the peripheral nerve system (nerve roots, nerve plexus or nerve trunks). Early-onset complications are often transient and late complications are usually progressive and associated with a poor prognosis. The most frequent and well known is delayed radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, which may follow breast cancer irradiation. Radiation-induced lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy is characterized by pure or predominant lower motor neuron signs. They can be misdiagnosed, confused with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or with leptomeningeal metastases since nodular MRI enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina and increased cerebrospinal fluid protein content can be observed. In the absence of specific markers of the link with radiotherapy, the diagnosis of post-radiation neuropathy may be difficult. Recently, a posteriori conformal radiotherapy with 3D dosimetric reconstitution has been developed to link a precise anatomical site to unexpected excess irradiation. The importance of early diagnosis of radiation-induced neuropathies is underscored by the emergence of new disease-modifying treatments. Although the pathophysiology is not fully understood, it is already possible to target radiation-induced fibrosis but also associated factors such as ischemia, oxidative stress and

  12. Dentinal temperature transients caused by exposure to CO2 laser irradiation and possible pulpal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, I W; Lawrenson, B; Saunders, E M; Longbottom, C

    1990-02-01

    An investigation is described that attempts to establish, in vitro, the characteristics of heat transference following laser irradiation of bovine dentinal tissue and the relationship with the periodicity of radiation. The results of this study appear to indicate that at depths of overlying dentine of up to 3 mm, laser-induced thermal injury to the pulp is a definite possibility. Fail-safe facilities to prevent build up of heat must be incorporated into the design of dental lasers to allow their beneficial effects to be utilized without the risk of iatrogenic damage.

  13. Radiation effects and damage formation in semiconductors due to high-energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamarou, A.

    2006-11-07

    The object of this thesis was the study of ion-beam induced damage formation and annealing in crystalline and conventionally predamaged Ge, GaAs, and InP. The samples were irradiated either at {approx}80 K or at room temperature with Kr, Xe, or Au ions with specific energy of about 0.3 MeV/u to 3 MeV/u. Thereafter the samples were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Radiation effects and damage formation in semiconductors due to high-energy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarou, A.

    2006-01-01

    The object of this thesis was the study of ion-beam induced damage formation and annealing in crystalline and conventionally predamaged Ge, GaAs, and InP. The samples were irradiated either at ∼80 K or at room temperature with Kr, Xe, or Au ions with specific energy of about 0.3 MeV/u to 3 MeV/u. Thereafter the samples were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy

  15. Impact of helium implantation and ion-induced damage on reflectivity of molybdenum mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Carrasco, A., E-mail: alvarogc@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Petersson, P.; Hallén, A. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Grzonka, J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska Str., 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Gilbert, M.R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fortuna-Zalesna, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Rubel, M. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    Molybdenum mirrors were irradiated with Mo and He ions to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on diagnostic first mirrors in next-generation fusion devices. Up to 30 dpa were produced under molybdenum irradiation leading to a slight decrease of reflectivity in the near infrared range. After 3 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} of helium irradiation, reflectivity decreased by up to 20%. Combined irradiation by helium and molybdenum led to similar effects on reflectivity as irradiation with helium alone. Ion beam analysis showed that only 7% of the implanted helium was retained in the first 40 nm layer of the mirror. The structure of the near-surface layer after irradiation was studied with scanning transmission electron microscopy and the extent and size distribution of helium bubbles was documented. The consequences of ion-induced damage on the performance of diagnostic components are discussed.

  16. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    The RBE of protons has been assumed to be equivalent to that of photons. The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced DNA and chromosome damage, apoptosis, cell killing and cell cycling in organized epithelial cells was influenced by radiation quality. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-dependent Fischer rat thyroid cells, established as follicles, were exposed to gamma rays or proton beams delivered acutely over a range of physical doses. Gamma-irradiated cells were able to repair DNA damage relatively rapidly so that by 1 h postirradiation they had approximately 20% fewer exposed 3' ends than their counterparts that had been irradiated with proton beams. The persistence of free ends of DNA in the samples irradiated with the proton beam implies that either more initial breaks or a quantitatively different type of damage had occurred. These results were further supported by an increased frequency of chromosomal damage as measured by the presence of micronuclei. Proton-beam irradiation induced micronuclei at a rate of 2.4% per gray, which at 12 Gy translated to 40% more micronuclei than in comparable gamma-irradiated cultures. The higher rate of micronucleus formation and the presence of larger micronuclei in proton-irradiated cells was further evidence that a qualitatively more severe class of damage had been induced than was induced by gamma rays. Differences in the type of damage produced were detected in the apoptosis assay, wherein a significant lag in the induction of apoptosis occurred after gamma irradiation that did not occur with protons. The more immediate expression of apoptotic cells in the cultures irradiated with the proton beam suggests that the damage inflicted was more severe. Alternatively, the cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms required for recovery from such damage might not have been invoked. Differences based on radiation quality were also evident in the alpha components of cell survival curves (0.05 Gy(-1) for gamma rays, 0

  17. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  18. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A.N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite exhibits

  19. A direct view by immunofluorescent comet assay (IFCA) of DNA damage induced by nicking and cutting enzymes, ionizing (137)Cs radiation, UV-A laser microbeam irradiation and the radiomimetic drug bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigaravicius, Paulius; Rapp, Alexander; Greulich, Karl Otto

    2009-03-01

    In DNA repair research, DNA damage is induced by different agents, depending on the technical facilities of the investigating researchers. A quantitative comparison of different investigations is therefore often difficult. By using a modified variant of the neutral comet assay, where the histone H1 is detected by immunofluorescence [immunofluorescent comet assay (IFCA)], we achieve previously unprecedented resolution in the detection of fragmented chromatin and show that trillions of ultraviolet A photons (of a few eV), billions of bleomycin (BLM) molecules and thousands of gamma quanta (of 662 keV) generate, in first order, similar damage in the chromatin of HeLa cells. A somewhat more detailed inspection shows that the damage caused by 20 Gy ionizing radiation and by a single laser pulse of 10 microJ are comparable, while the damage caused by 12 microg/ml BLM depends highly on the individual cell. Taken together, this work provides a detailed view of DNA fragmentation induced by different treatments and allows comparing them to some extent, especially with respect to the neutral comet assay.

  20. Damage-induced ectopic recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupiec, M; Steinlauf, R

    1997-06-09

    Mitotic recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is induced when cells are irradiated with UV or X-rays, reflecting the efficient repair of damage by recombinational repair mechanisms. We have used multiply marked haploid strains that allow the simultaneous detection of several types of ectopic recombination events. We show that inter-chromosomal ectopic conversion of lys2 heteroalleles and, to a lesser extent, direct repeat recombination (DRR) between non-tandem repeats, are increased by DNA-damaging agents; in contrast, ectopic recombination of the naturally occurring Ty element is not induced. We have tested several hypotheses that could explain the preferential lack of induction of Ty recombination by DNA-damaging agents. We have found that the lack of induction cannot be explained by a cell cycle control or by an effect of the mating-type genes. We also found no role for the flanking long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the Ty in preventing the induction. Ectopic conversion, DRR, and forward mutation of artificial repeats show different kinetics of induction at various positions of the cell cycle, reflecting different mechanisms of recombination. We discuss the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of these results.

  1. Characterization of damaging in apatitic materials irradiated with heavy ions and thermally annealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisserand, R.

    2004-12-01

    Some minerals belonging to the family of apatite are seen to be potential candidates for use as conditioning matrices or transmutation targets for high level nuclear waste management. Indeed, studies of natural nuclear reactors (Oklo) highlighted the strong ability of these minerals to anneal irradiation damage. In order to determine the global behaviour of these materials, we performed a fundamental study on the evolution of irradiation damage induced by various heavy ions in two apatites: a natural phospho-calcic fluor-apatite from Durango and a synthetic sintered mono-silicated fluor-apatite, called britholite. The damage in these materials was measured by using channelling R.B.S. and X-ray diffraction respectively and by determining an amorphization effective radius Re. The results revealed a similar behaviour for both apatites according to the electronic energy deposit at the entrance of the material. In addition, the effect of an isothermal annealing at 300 C was quantified on a mono-silicated britholite previously irradiated with Kr ions. We highlighted in this case the return of the lattice parameters to their initial values, followed by a partial and slow rebuilding of the crystalline lattice versus the annealing time. Finally, we followed the changes in the morphology of etch pits in the Durango fluor-apatite after acid dissolution as a function of the energy deposit by the ions. We showed that the influence of crystallography leads quickly to opening angles close to 30 degrees. The calculation of etching velocities within the irradiated material highlighted that there is a range of deposit energy where the velocity ratio increases strongly before becoming constant. (author)

  2. Characterization of damage in γ-irradiated and OsO4-treated DNA using methoxyamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liuzzi, M.; Talpaert-Borle, M.

    1988-01-01

    Unlabelled and radiolabelled methoxyamine have been used to characterize DNA damage caused by γ-rays or by the chemical reagent osmium tetroxide (OsO 4 ). Both treatments introduce in DNA a number of methoxyamine-binding sites proportional to the dose. Whereas the number of these sites remains constant after the OsO 4 treatment it increases during postirradiation incubation; the postirradiation appearance of methoxyamine-binding sites is enhanced by the presence of methoxyamine. OsO 4 treatment and γ-irradiation also induce the formation of alkali-labile sites in DNA. Whereas the number of these sites remains constant after OsO 4 treatment, it increases during postirradiation incubation and an alkaline medium accelerates their formation. A fraction of the alkali-labile sites found in γ-irradiated DNA is methoxyamine-labile; by contrast, the OsO 4 -treated DNA is stable in the presence of methoxyamine. (author)

  3. Effect of low dose pre-irradiation on DNA damage and genetic material damage caused by high dosage of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Zhu Jingjuan; Shang Qingjun; Wang Zhuomin; Cui Fuxian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose γ-rays pre-irradiation on the induction of DNA damage and genetic material damage in peripheral lymphocytes by high dosage of cyclophosphamide (CTX). Methods: Male Kunming strain mice were randomly divided into five groups: control group, sham-irradiated group, low dose irradiated group(LDR group), cyclophosphamide chemotherapy group(CTX group) and low dose irradiation combined with chemotherapy group(LDR + CTX group). After being feeded for one week, all the mice were implanted subcutaneously with S180 cells in the left groin (control group excluded). On days 8 and 11, groups of LDR and LDR + CTX were administered with 75 mGy of whole-body irradiation, 30 h later groups CTX and LDR + CTX were injected intraperitoneally 3.0 mg cyclophosphamide. All the mice were sacrificed on day 13. DNA damage of the peripheral lymphocytes was analyzed using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Genetic material damage was analyzed using micronucleus frequency(MNF) of polychromatoerythrocytes(PCE) in bone marrow. Results: (1) Compared with control group and sham-irradiated group, the DNA damage of peripheral lymphocytes in CTX group were increased significantly (P 0.05). Conclusions: (1) High- dosage of CTX chemotherapy can cause DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes. 75 mGy y-irradiation before chemotherapy may have certain protective effect on DNA damage. (2) CTX has potent mutagenic effect, giving remarkable rise to MNF of PCE. 75 mGy γ-ray pre-irradiation has not obvious protection against genetic toxicity of high-dose CTX chemotherapy. (authors)

  4. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  5. Protective effects of nelumbo nucifera against {gamma}-irradiation-induced lipid peroxidation in mice urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Il Yun; Park, Yong Dae; Jin, Caang Hyun; Choi, Dae Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Jung [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The radioprotective effect of isoquercitrin-abundant fraction (IAF) of N. nucifera Gaertn. Ieaf extract against {gamma}-irradiation-induced oxidative stress was evaluated by the lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes (LPDAs) as a marker for oxidative risk in mice urine, and the DNA damage using comet assay in RAW 264.7 cells. Mice that were treated with IAF (50 mg/kg) and {gamma}-irradiation showed considerably decreased LPDA levels relative to those that had received {gamma}-irradiation alone. Furthermore, pretreatment with IAF resulted in a significant decrease in the amount of DNA damage in cells. It is demonstrated that pretreatment with IAF of N. nucifera Gaertn. gives protection against irradiation-induced cellular damage.

  6. Application of pulsed multi-ion irradiations in radiation damage research: A stochastic cluster dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan L.; Nazarov, Roman; Kang, Changwoo; Fan, Jiangyuan

    2018-07-01

    Under the multi-ion irradiation conditions present in accelerated material-testing facilities or fission/fusion nuclear reactors, the combined effects of atomic displacements with radiation products may induce complex synergies in the structural materials. However, limited access to multi-ion irradiation facilities and the lack of computational models capable of simulating the evolution of complex defects and their synergies make it difficult to understand the actual physical processes taking place in the materials under these extreme conditions. In this paper, we propose the application of pulsed single/dual-beam irradiation as replacements for the expensive steady triple-beam irradiation to study radiation damages in materials under multi-ion irradiation.

  7. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. II. Effects of reaction dimensionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2300 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The black dot damage features which develop in iron at low temperatures exhibit significant mobility during in situ irradiation experiments via a series of discrete, intermittent, long range hops. By incorporating this mobility into cluster dynamics models, the temperature dependence of such damage structures can be explained with a surprising degree of accuracy. Such motion, however, is one dimensional in nature. This aspect of the physics has not been fully considered in prior models. This article describes one dimensional reaction kinetics in the context of cluster dynamics and applies them to the black dot problem. This allows both a more detailed description of the mechanisms by which defects execute irradiation-induced hops while allowing a full examination of the importance of kinetic assumptions in accurately assessing the development of this irradiation microstructure. Results are presented to demonstrate whether one dimensional diffusion alters the dependence of the defect population on factors such as temperature and defect hop length. Finally, the size of interstitial loops that develop is shown to depend on the extent of the reaction volumes between interstitial clusters, as well as the dimensionality of these interactions.

  8. Effect of irradiation on unscheduled DNA synthesis induced by 4-nitroquinoline in tracheal epithelium of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, F.F.; Kennedy, R.; Brooks, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was determined in rat epithelium by autoradiographic techniques to determine the influence of prior irradiation on the ability of the cells to repair mutagenic damage induced by 4-nitroquionoline (4NQO). UDS was stimulated by in vitro exposure to 4NPO. However, prior whole-body irradiation of rats with either 50 or 300 rad did not alter the UDS induced by 4NQO. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that irradiation can induce DNA repair enzymes in respiratory tract epithelium. 5 references, 3 figures

  9. Therapeutic effect of recombinant human interleukin-11 and curcumin on jejunal damage in mice after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Gongmin; Peng Ruiyun; Gao Yabing; Wang Shuiming; Li Yang; Xu Xinping; Wang Lifeng; Dong Ji; Zhao Li

    2010-01-01

    irradiation group (F=0.015-0.035, all P<0.05) but without significant differences between them. Conclusions: Jejunal damage in mice could be induced after 3 Gy neutron irradiation. rhIL-11 and curcumin might reduce the damage and promote the regeneration and repair of the intestinal epithelium. (authors)

  10. In vitro studies of cellular response to DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, M.; Pontiggia, O.; Carpano, M.; Thomasz, L.; Thorp, S.; Pozzi, E.; Simian, M.; Kahl, S.; Juvenal, G.; Pisarev, M.; Dagrosa, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these studies was to evaluate the mechanisms of cellular response to DNA damage induced by BNCT. Thyroid carcinoma cells were incubated with 10 BPA or 10 BOPP and irradiated with thermal neutrons. The surviving fraction, the cell cycle distribution and the expression of p53 and Ku70 were analyzed. Different cellular responses were observed for each irradiated group. The decrease of Ku70 in the neutrons +BOPP group could play a role in the increase of sensitization to radiation.

  11. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Sejal; Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Pandey, Badri N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy

  12. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  13. Unscheduled DNA synthesis and elimination of DNA damage in liver cells of. gamma. -irradiated senescent mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Malakhova, L.V. (AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki)

    1982-10-01

    The level of 'spontaneous' and ..gamma..-radiation-induced DNA synthesis which is not inhibited with hydroxyurea (unscheduled synthesis) is considerably lower in hepatocytes of 18-22-month-old mice than that of 1.5-2-month-old mice. The dose-dependent increase (10-300 Gy) of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in hepatocytes of senescent mice is higher than in young animals. The elimination of damage in DNA of ..gamma..-irradiated hepatocytes (100 Gy) was examined by using an enzyme system (M. luteus extract and DNA-polymerase I of E. coli). It was found that the rate of elimination of the DNA damage in hepatocytes of 20-month-old mice is lower than that of 2-month-old mice although the activities of DNA-polymerase ..beta.. and apurinic endonuclease remain equal in the liver of both senescent and young mice. However, the nucleoids from ..gamma..-irradiated liver nuclei of 2-month-old mice are relaxed to a greater extent (as judged by the criterion of ethidium-binding capacity) than those of 20-month-old mice. The results suggest that there are limitations in the functioning of repair enzymes and in their access to damaged DNA sites in the chromatin of senescent mouse liver cells.

  14. Irradiation damage and recovery in shoot apices of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saamin, S.; Thompson, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Dormant scions of 'Bing' were exposed to fractionated 6kR gamma rays and then grafted. Irradiated and unirradiated main buds were sampled at 3 day intervals for one month. Buds were fixed in FAA, longitudinally sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin. Both random and localised cell damage was observed in irradiated apices. There was evidence of radiosensitivity gradient in the shoot apex. Recovery from irradiation damage was via flank meristem, central meristem, or leaf primordia and axillary meristems. (author)

  15. Void nucleation at elevated temperatures under cascade-damage irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, A.A.; Woo, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    The effects on void nucleation of fluctuations respectively due to the randomness of point-defect migratory jumps, the random generation of free point defects in discrete packages, and the fluctuating rate of vacancy emission from voids are considered. It was found that effects of the cascade-induced fluctuations are significant only at sufficiently high total sink strength. At lower sink strengths and elevated temperatures, the fluctuation in the rate of vacancy emission is the dominant factor. Application of the present theory to the void nucleation in annealed pure copper neutron-irradiated at elevated temperatures with doses of 10 -4 -10 -2 NRT dpa showed reasonable agreement between theory and experiment. This application also predicts correctly the temporal development of large-scale spatial heterogeneous microstructure during the void nucleation stage. Comparison between calculated and experimental void nucleation rates in neutron-irradiated molybdenum at temperatures where vacancy emission from voids is negligible showed reasonable agreement as well. It was clearly demonstrated that the athermal shrinkage of relatively large voids experimentally observable in molybdenum at such temperatures may be easily explained in the framework of the present theory

  16. Studies of cellular damage induced by X-rays and visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Kinn, G.; Reitan, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    DNA-damage in cells has been studied by use of spectrophotometry and fluorometry. The method is based on the differential fluorescence quantum yield of the fluorochrome Hoechst 33258 when bound to single and double stranded DNA, respectively. DNA-damage by doses of X-rays below 2 Gy was clearly detectable. Blue light from phototherapy lamps induced DNA-damage in human TMG-1 glioblastoma, but no significant effect could be observed after irradiation with green lamps. In the presence of bilirubin the amount of DNA-damage was increased, notably at high bilirubin concentration and by blue light. 9 refs; 12 figs

  17. Functional analysis of molecular mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis, that are not mediated by DNA damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angermeier, Marita; Moertl, Simone

    2012-01-01

    The effects of low-dose irradiation pose new challenges on the radiation protection efforts. Enhanced cellular radiation sensitivity is displayed by disturbed cellular reactions and resulting damage like cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. Apoptosis serves as genetically determinate parameter for the individual radiation sensitivity. In the frame of the project the radiation-induced apoptosis was mechanistically investigated. Since ionizing radiation induced direct DNA damage and generates a reactive oxygen species, the main focus of the research was the differentiation and weighting of DNA damage mediated apoptosis and apoptosis caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  18. Protective Role Of Fresh Pomegranate Against Oxidative Damage In Whole Body Gamma Irradiated Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassab, F.M.A.; Taha, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty four male albino rats, body weight 100-130 g, were used to evaluate the protective role of fresh pomegranate fruit intake for 30 days on the damage induced by single dose of 6 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. The rats were randomly and equally divided into four groups: group (1): control, group (2): irradiated with 6 Gy, group (3): pomegranate for 30 days and group (4): pomegranate for 30 days followed by 6 Gy whole body irradiation. At the end of the experiment, all rats were sacrificed after 12 hours fasting then sera were separated for the determination of sugar, total antioxidant, lipid profile and liver and kidney functions. Results showed that gamma radiation caused significant decline (P<0.05) in serum total antioxidant, total protein, albumin, HDL-C and blood glucose with significant elevation (P<0.05) in other hepato-renal markers in addition to serum total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-C. These changes were significantly attenuated in irradiated animals pre-treated with whole fresh pomegranate fruit leading to the conclusion that pre-intake of pomegranate fruit had a radio- protective effect. This protection of this whole fruit may be due to the increased total antioxidant level leading to free radical scavenging

  19. A constitutive damage specific DNA-binding protein is synthesized at higher levels in UV-irradiated primate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, S.; Levine, A.S.; Ozato, K.; Protic, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using a DNA band shift assay, we have identified a DNA-binding protein complex in primate cells which is present constitutively and has a high affinity for UV-irradiated, double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex, suggesting that the signal for induction can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. Physiochemical modifications of the DNA and competition analysis with defined substrates suggest that the most probable target site for the damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is a 6-4'-(pyrimidine-2'-one)-pyrimidine dimer: specific binding could not be detected with probes which contain -TT- cyclobutane dimers, and damage-specific DNA binding did not decrease after photoreactivation of UV-irradiated DNA. This damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is the first such inducible protein complex identified in primate cells. Cells from patients with the sun-sensitive cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (group E), are lacking both the constitutive and the induced damage-specific DNA-binding activities. These findings suggest a possible role for this DNA-binding protein complex in lesion recognition and DNA repair of UV-light-induced photoproducts

  20. Effects of ion beam irradiation on size of mutant sector and genetic damage in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, Yoshihiro, E-mail: hase.yoshihiro@qst.go.jp [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nozawa, Shigeki [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Narumi, Issay [Faculty of Life Sciences, Toyo University, 1-1-1 Izumino, Itakura, Gunma 374-0193 (Japan); Oono, Yutaka [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    Size of mutant sector and genetic damage were evaluated in Arabidopsis to further our understanding of effective ion beam use in plant mutation breeding. Arabidopsis seeds, heterozygous for the GLABRA1 (GL1) gene (GL1/gl1-1), were irradiated with 15.8 MeV/u neon ions (mean linear energy transfer (LET): 352 keV/μm), 17.3 MeV/u carbon ions (113 keV/μm), or {sup 60}Co gamma rays. The frequency and size of glabrous sectors generated because of inactivation of the GL1 allele were examined. The frequency and overall size of large deletions were evaluated based on the loss of heterozygosity of DNA markers using DNA isolated from glabrous tissue. Irrespective of the radiation properties, plants with mutant sectors were obtained at similar frequencies at the same effective dosage necessary for survival reduction. Ion beams tended to induce larger mutant sectors than gamma rays. The frequency of large deletions (>several kbp) increased as the LET value increased, with chromosome regions larger than 100 kbp lost in most large deletions. The distorted segregation ratio of glabrous plants in the progenies of irradiated GL1/gl1-1 plants suggested frequent occurrence of chromosome rearrangement, especially those subjected to neon ions. Exposure to ion beams with moderate LET values (30–110 keV/μm) is thought effective for inducing mutant sectors without causing extensive genetic damage.

  1. Genetic Damage Induced by Accidental Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pérez-Cadahía

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum is one of the main energy sources worldwide. Its transport is performed by big tankers following some established marine routes. In the last 50 years a total amount of 37 oil tankers have given rise to great spills in different parts of the world, Prestige being the last one. After the accident, a big human mobilisation took place in order to clean beaches, rocks and fauna, trying to reduce the environmental consequences of this serious catastrophe. These people were exposed to the complex mixture of compounds contained in the oil. This study aimed at determine the level of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC, and the possible damage induced on the population involved in the different cleaning tasks by applying the genotoxicity tests sister chromatid exchanges (SCE, micronucleus (MN test, and comet assay. Four groups of individuals were included: volunteers (V, hired manual workers (MW, hired high-pressure cleaner workers (HPW and controls. The higher VOC levels were associated with V environment, followed by MW and lastly by HPW, probably due to the use of high-pressure cleaners. Oil exposure during the cleaning tasks has caused an increase in the genotoxic damage in individuals, the comet assay being the most sensitive biomarker to detect it. Sex, age and tobacco consumption have shown to influence the level of genetic damage, while the effect of using protective devices was less noticeable than expected, perhaps because the kind used was not the most adequate.

  2. Pathology of radiation induced lung damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yoshinori; Murata, Yoshihiko; Ogata, Hideo; Katagiri, Shiro; Sugita, Hironobu; Iwai, Kazuo; Sakurai, Isamu.

    1985-01-01

    We examined pathological findings of radiation induced lung damage. Twenty-three cases are chosen from our hospital autopsy cases for 9 years, which fulfil strict criteria of radiation lung damage. Lung damage could be classified into 3 groups : 1) interstitial pneumonia type (9 cases), 2) intermediate pneumonia type (8 cases), and 3) alveolar pneumonia type (6 cases), according to the degree of intra-luminal exudation. These classification is well correlated with clinical findings. Pathological alveolar pneumonia type corresponds to symptomatic, radiologic ground glass pneumonic shadow. And pathologic interstitial type corresponds to clinical asymptomatic, radiologic reticulo-nodular shadow. From the clinico-pathological view point these classification is reasonable one. Radiation affects many lung structures and showed characteristic feature of repair. Elastofibrosis of the alveolar wall is observed in every cases, obstructive bronchiolitis are observed in 5 cases, and obstructive bronchiolitis in 9 cases. They are remarkable additional findings. Thickening of the interlobular septum, broncho-vascular connective tissue, and pleural layer are observed in every cases together with vascular lesions. (author)

  3. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  4. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  5. Generation and development of damage in double forged tungsten in different combined regimes of irradiation with extreme heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paju, Jana; Väli, Berit; Laas, Tõnu; Shirokova, Veroonika; Laas, Katrin; Paduch, Marian; Gribkov, Vladimir A.; Demina, Elena V.; Prusakova, Marina D.; Pimenov, Valeri N.; Makhlaj, Vadym A.; Antonov, Maksim

    2017-11-01

    Armour materials in fusion devices, especially in the region of divertor, are exposed to a continuous heat and particle load. In addition, several off-normal events can reach the material during a work session. Calculations show that the effects of plasma and heat during such events can lead to cracking, erosion and detachment of the armour material. On the other hand, mutual and combined influences of different kinds of heat and particle loads can lead to the amplification of defects or vice versa, to the mitigation of damages. Therefore, the purpose of the study is to investigate the plasma induced damages on samples of double forged tungsten, which is considered a potential candidate for armour material of future tokamak's divertor. The combined effect of different kinds of plasma induced damages was investigated and analysed in this research. The study was conducted by irradiating the samples in various irradiation regimes twice, to observe the accumulation of the damages. Afterwards the analysis of micro-topography, scanning electron microscopy images and electrical conductivity measurements was used. Results indicate that double-forging improved the tungsten's durability to irradiation. Nevertheless, powerful pulses lead to significant damage of the sample, which will lead to further deterioration in the bulk. Although the average micro-roughness on the sample's surface does not change, the overall height/depth ratios can change.

  6. Caspase-3 activation and DNA damage in pig skin organ culture after solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacqueville, Daniel; Mavon, Alain

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a convenient and easy-to-handle skin organ culture was developed from domestic pig ears using polycarbonate Transwell culture inserts in 12-well plate. This alternative model was then tested for its suitability in analyzing the short-term effects of a single solar radiation dose (from 55 to 275 kJ.m(-2)). Differentiation of the pig skin was maintained for up to 48 h in culture, and its morphology was similar to that of fresh human skin. Solar irradiation induced a significant release of the cytosolic enzymes lactate dehydrogenase and extracellular signal-related kinase 2 protein in the culture medium 24 h after exposure. These photocytotoxic effects were associated with the formation of sunburn cells, thymine dimers and DNA strand breaks in both the epidermis and dermis. Interestingly, cell death was dose dependent and associated with p53 protein upregulation and strong caspase-3 activation in the basal epidermis. None of these cellular responses was observed in non-irradiated skin. Finally, topical application of a broad-spectrum UVB + A sunfilter formulation afforded efficient photoprotection in irradiated explants. Thus, the ex vivo pig ear skin culture may be a useful tool in the assessment of solar radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and for evaluating the efficacy of sunscreen formulations.

  7. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface.......In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...

  8. Chemical reactions induced by fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Here, several studies on fast neutron irradiation effects carried out at the reactor 'YAYOI' are presented. Some indicate a significant difference in the effect from those by γ-ray irradiation but others do not, and the difference changes from subject to subject which we observed. In general, chemical reactions induced by fast neutron irradiation expand in space and time, and there are many aspects. In the time region just after the deposition of neutron energy in the system, intermediates are formed densely and locally reflecting high LET of fast neutrons and, with time, successive reactions proceed parallel to dissipation of localized energy and to diffusion of the intermediates. Finally the reactions are completed in longer time region. If we pick up the effects which reserve the locality of the initial processes, a significant different effect between in fast neutron radiolysis and in γ-ray radiolysis would be derived. If we observe the products generated after dissipation and diffusion in longer time region, a clear difference would not be observed. Therefore, in order to understand the fast neutron irradiation effects, it is necessary to know the fundamental processes of the reactions induced by radiations. (author)

  9. Damage-induced DNA replication stalling relies on MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köpper, Frederik; Bierwirth, Cathrin; Schön, Margarete

    2013-01-01

    knockdown of the MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a kinase currently implicated in p38 stress signaling and G2 arrest. Depletion or inhibition of MK2 also protected cells from DNA damage-induced cell death, and mice deficient for MK2 displayed decreased apoptosis in the skin upon UV irradiation...

  10. Antagonist Effects of Veratric Acid against UVB-Induced Cell Damages

    OpenAIRE

    Deokhoon Park; Jong-Kyung Youm; Kyung-Eun Lee; Seungbeom Kim; Eunsun Jung; Seoung Woo Shin

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammatory processes in human epidermis, resulting in inflammation, photoaging, and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of skin against the harmful effect of UV irradiation is essential. In recent years naturally occurring herbal compounds such as phenolic acids, flavonoids, and high molecular weight polyphenols have gained considerable attention as beneficial protective agents. The simple phenolic veratric acid (VA, ...

  11. Repair of radiation damage of Micrococcus radioproteolyticus due to gamma and UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryznar, L.; Drasil, V.

    1982-01-01

    Cells were irradiated in dry state with gamma radiation and UV radiation. The post-irradiation warming of freeze dried cells (2 hours to 60deg or to 80deg) influenced the ability to repair sublethal damage. Heating to 80deg caused a mild reduction in survival. The repair of irradiated and heated cells required more time than that of cells which had only been irradiated. (M.D.)

  12. Irradiation-induced precipitation and solute segregation in alloys. Fourth annual progress report, February 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardell, A.J.

    1982-04-01

    The studies of irradiation-induced solute segregation (IISS) and irradiation-induced precipitation (IIP) in Ni-Si and Pd-Fe alloys have been completed. Progress is reported for several other projects: irradiation damage in binary Pd-Cr, -Mn and -V alloys (15 at. %); IIP in Pd-Mo and Pd-W alloys; IIP in Pd-25 at. % Cr alloy; and irradiation damage effects in proton-bombarded metallic glasses (Ni-65 Zr, 40 Fe 40 Ni 14 P6B). 27 figures

  13. Damage growth in Si during self-ion irradiation: A study of ion effects over an extended energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; El-Ghor, M.K.; White, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Damage nucleation/growth in single-crystal Si during ion irradiation is discussed. For MeV ions, the rate of growth as well as the damage morphology are shown to vary widely along the track of the ion. This is attributed to a change in the dominant, defect-related reactions as the ion penetrates the crystal. The nature of these reactions were elucidated by studying the interaction of MeV ions with different types of defects. The defects were introduced into the Si crystal prior to high-energy irradiation by self-ion implantation at a medium energy (100 keV). Varied damage morphologies were produced by implanting different ion fluences. Electron microscopy and ion-channeling measurements, in conjunction with annealing studies, were used to characterize the damage. Subtle changes in the predamage morphology are shown to result in markedly different responses to the high-energy irradiation, ranging from complete annealing of the damage to rapid growth. These divergent responses occur over a narrow range of dose (2--3 times 10 14 cm -2 ) of the medium-energy ions; this range also marks a transition in the growth behavior of the damage during the predamage implantation. A model is proposed which accounts for these observations and provides insight into ion-induced growth of amorphous layers in Si and the role of the amorphous/crystalline interface in this process. 15 refs, 9 figs

  14. The influence of image sensor irradiation damage on the tracking and pointing accuracy of optical communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoliang; Luo, Lei; Li, Pengwei; Yu, Qingkui

    2018-03-01

    The image sensor in satellite optical communication system may generate noise due to space irradiation damage, leading to deviation for the determination of the light spot centroid. Based on the irradiation test data of CMOS devices, simulated defect spots in different sizes have been used for calculating the centroid deviation value by grey-level centroid algorithm. The impact on tracking & pointing accuracy of the system has been analyzed. The results show that both the amount and the position of irradiation-induced defect pixels contribute to spot centroid deviation. And the larger spot has less deviation. At last, considering the space radiation damage, suggestions are made for the constraints of spot size selection.

  15. Testicular damage in rats fed on irradiated diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwaha, A.K.S.; Hasan, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Feeding effect of irradiated diets was studied on the pups born to mother fed either on irradiated normal diet or irradiated low protein diet. The study indicated that pups born to mother fed on the irradiated low protein diet had fewer spermatogonial cells in the testes than those given irradiated normal diet and unirradiated low protein diet. Similarly, pups maintained on the irradiated low protein diet showed marked decrease in alkaline phosphatase and cholesterol contents in the testes rather than in the pups fed irradiated normal as well as unirradiated low protein diets. The irradiated low protein diet fed pups showed increased depletion and vacuolization of adrenocortical and medullary cells. 13 refs., 15 figures. (author)

  16. Testicular damage in rats fed on irradiated diets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, A K.S.; Hasan, S S

    1986-12-01

    Feeding effect of irradiated diets was studied on the pups born to mother fed either on irradiated normal diet or irradiated low protein diet. The study indicated that pups born to mother fed on the irradiated low protein diet had fewer spermatogonial cells in the testes than those given irradiated normal diet and unirradiated low protein diet. Similarly, pups maintained on the irradiated low protein diet showed marked decrease in alkaline phosphatase and cholesterol contents in the testes rather than in the pups fed irradiated normal as well as unirradiated low protein diets. The irradiated low protein diet fed pups showed increased depletion and vacuolization of adrenocortical and medullary cells. 13 refs., 15 figures.

  17. Damage evolution in Xe-ion irradiated rutile (TiO2) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.; Sickafus, K.E.; Evans, C.R.; Nastasi, M.

    1999-01-01

    Rutile (TiO 2 ) single crystals with (110) orientation were irradiated with 360 keV Xe 2+ ions at 300 K to fluences ranging from 2 x 10 19 to 1 x 10 20 Xe/m 2 . Irradiated samples were analyzed using: (1) Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy combined with ion channeling analysis (RBS/C); and (2) cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Upon irradiation to a fluence of 2 x 10 19 Xe/m 2 , the sample thickness penetrated by the implanted ions was observed to consist of three distinct layers: (1) a defect-free layer at the surface (thickness about 12 nm) exhibiting good crystallinity; (2) a second layer with a low density of relatively large-sized defects; and (3) a third layer consisting of a high concentration of small defects. After the fluence was increased to 7 x 10 19 Xe/m 2 , a buried amorphous layer was visible by XTEM. The thickness of the amorphous layer was found to increase with increasing Xe ion fluence. The location of this buried amorphous layer was found to coincide with the measured peak in the Xe concentration (measured by RBS/C), rather than with the theoretical maximum in the displacement damage profile. This observation suggests the implanted Xe ions may serve as nucleation sites for the amorphization transformation. The total thickness of the damaged microstructure due to ion irradiation was always found to be much greater than the projected range of the Xe ions. This is likely due to point defect migration under the high stresses induced by ion implantation

  18. Radition-induced genetic damage in plutella xylostella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail bin Bahari; Mahani binti Mohamad

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in progenies of irradiated Plutella xylostella was determined in a F1 sterility study. A total of 4 types of crosses (irradiated males against unirradiated females, irradiated females against unirradiated males, both parents irradiated and normal) were made following gamma irradiation at the pupal stage. Testes squash preparations made from F1 male larvae revealed 3 main types of chromosomal abberations induced by doses of 100, 150 and 200 Gy. Results obtained indicate the possibility of using chromosome translocations as the genetic marker

  19. Damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.X.; He, Sh.Y.; Xu, Zh.; Wei, Q.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed on the damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation with 150 keV energy to space-grade methyl silicone rubber. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrum, mass spectrum and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrum (PYGC-MS) indicated that, under lower fluence, the proton radiation would induce cross-linking effect, resulting in an increase in tensile strengths and hardness of the methyl silicon rubber. However, under higher proton fluence, the radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strengths and hardness, became a dominant effect. A macromolecular-network destruction model for the silicone rubber radiated with the protons was proposed

  20. Electron-irradiation-induced phase transformation in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.; Arakawa, K.; Lee, J.-G.; Mori, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, electron-irradiation-induced phase transformations between alumina polymorphs were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the electron-irradiation-induced α → κ' phase transformation occurred in the alumina under 100 keV electron irradiation. It is likely that the knock-on collision between incident electrons and Al 3+ cations is responsible for the occurrence of electron-irradiation-induced phase transformation from α-alumina to κ'-alumina.

  1. Stress relaxation damage in K9 glass plate irradiated by 1.06μm CW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Fu; Sun Chengwei

    2001-01-01

    Based on the stress relaxation model in 1D planar geometry and the visco-elastic constitutive equation, the temperature and stress histories in the K9 glass samples irradiated by CW laser beams (λ = 1.06 μm) have been calculated. The results indicate that the residual tensile stress due to the stress relaxation effect during cooling after the laser radiation may be greater than the tensile fracture strength of samples, while the maximum compression stress during the laser heating is less than the requirement for compression damage. For a K9 glass window of 3 mm thickness, its damage due to the stress relaxation may be induced by a laser radiation of 0.946 MW/cm 2 for 0.2s . Therefore, the stress relaxation should be regarded as the main mechanism of damage in K9 glass windows while a CW laser beam (λ = 1.06 μm) irradiates it with large spot

  2. 5-AED Enhances Survival of Irradiated Mice in a G-CSF-Dependent Manner, Stimulates Innate Immune Cell Function, Reduces Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Induces Genes that Modulate Cell Cycle Progression and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-22

    modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. INTRODUCTION Because of the increasing threat posed by nuclear weapons [1], there is a pressing need for both...Detection System ( Bio -Rad Laboratories, Hercules CA) on 96-well microtiter plates with optical caps. Reactions were performed in a total volume of 50 µL... antigen -induced arthritis by dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Inflamm Res 2004;53:189–98. 56. Auci D, Nicoletti F, Mangano K et al. Anti-inflammatory and

  3. Protective role of Hippopahe leaves against kidney damage in total body 60Co-gamma-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Manu; Prasad, Jagdish; Bala, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides has diverse therapeutic applications in Indian, Chinese and Tibetan medicine. Our earlier studies have shown that pretreatment with Hippophae leaf extract rendered >90% survival in mice population. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of our herbal preparation from Hippophae leaf against radiation induced kidney damage. The study was conducted with Strain 'A' male mice weighing approximately 28 ±2 g. The mice were administered Hippophae leaf extract, 30 minutes prior to 60 cobalt-gamma irradiation. The weight of kidneys and histological changes in kidney tissues at the light microscopic level were examined at 2, 5, 7, 10 and 15 days after treatment. The results showed that no significant change was observed in kidney weight after 60 cobalt-gamma irradiation. The glomerular damage in the form of glomerular sclerosis and percentage of damaged glomeruli; tubular damage in form of tubular dilations; apoptosis, and interstitial hemorrhages in renal cortex was also observed after radiation treatment. The pretreatment with Hippophae leaf extract countered most of the histological alterations induced by radiation. In comparison to radiation alone group, there was a significant decrease (p 60 cobalt gamma radiation induced damage. (author)

  4. Carcinogen-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, B.; Altamirano, M.; Bose, K.; Sklar, R.; Tatsumi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Human cells respond to carcinogen-induced damage in their DNA in at least two ways. The first response, excision repair, proceeds by at least three variations, depending on the nature of the damage. Nucleotide excision results in relatively large repair patches but few free DNA breaks, since the endonuclease step is limiting. Apurinic repair is characterized by the appearance of numerous breaks in the DNA and by short repair patches. The pathways behave as though they function independently. Lymphoic cells derived from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C patient are deficient in their ability to perform nucleotide excision and also to excise 6 methoxyguanine adducts, but they are apurinic repair competent. Organisms may bypass damage in their DNA. Lymphoblastoid cells, including those derived from xeroderma pigmentosum treated with 3 H-anti-BPDE, can replicate their DNA at low doses of carcinogen. Unexcised 3 H is found in the light or parental strand of the resulting hybrid DNA when replication occurs in medium with BrdUrd. This observation indicates a bypass reaction occurring by a mechanism involving branch migration at DNA growing points. Branch migration in DNA preparations have been observed, but the evidence is that most occurs in BrdUrd-containing DNA during cell lysis. The measurement of the bifilarly substituted DNA resulting from branch migration is a convenient method of estimating the proportion of new synthesis remaining in the vicinity of the DNA growing point. Treatment with carcinogens or caffeine results in accumulation of DNA growing points accompanied by the synthesis of shortened pieces of daughter DNA

  5. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K; Chen, Y J; Ohira, C; Nojima, K; Ando, S; Kobayashi, N; Ohbuchi, T; Shimizu, W [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S; Kanai, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  6. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W.; Koike, S.; Kanai, T.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  7. Thermal damage produced by high-irradiance continuous wave CO2 laser cutting of tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomacker, K T; Walsh, J T; Flotte, T J; Deutsch, T F

    1990-01-01

    Thermal damage produced by continuous wave (cw) CO2 laser ablation of tissue in vitro was measured for irradiances ranging from 360 W/cm2 to 740 kW/cm2 in order to investigate the extent to which ablative cooling can limit tissue damage. Damage zones thinner than 100 microns were readily produced using single pulses to cut guinea pig skin as well as bovine cornea, aorta, and myocardium. Multiple pulses can lead to increased damage. However, a systematic decrease in damage with irradiance, predicted theoretically by an evaporation model of ablation, was not observed. The damage-zone thickness was approximately constant around the periphery of the cut, consistent with the existence of a liquid layer which stores heat and leads to tissue damage, and with a model of damage and ablation recently proposed by Zweig et al.

  8. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  9. Reduced repair of potentially lethal radiation damage in glutathione synthetase-deficient human fibroblasts after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midander, J.; Revesz, L.; Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Using a human fibroblast strain deficient in glutathione synthetase and a related proficient control strain, the role of glutathione (GSH) in repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) has been investigated in determining survival by plating cells immediately or 24 h after irradiation. After oxic or hypoxic irradiation, both cell strains repair radiation-induced damage. However, under hypoxic conditions, the proficient cells repair PLD as well as under oxic conditions while the deficient cells repair less PLD after irradiation under hypoxic than under oxic conditions. Therefore, the oxygen enhancement ratio (o.e.r.) for proficient cells is similar whether the cells are plated immediately or 24 h later (2.0 and 2.13, respectively). In contrast, the o.e.r. for deficient cells is lower when the cells are plated 24 h after irradiation than when they are plated immediately thereafter (1.16 as compared to 1.55). The results indicate that GSH is involved in PLD repair and, in particular, in the repair of damage induced by radiation delivered under hypoxic conditions. (author)

  10. Repair of skin damage during fractionated irradiation with gamma rays and low-LET carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Uzawa, Akiko; Takai, Nobuhiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Aoki, Mizuho; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-01-01

    In clinical use of carbon-ion beams, a deep-seated tumor is irradiated with a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) with a high-linear energy transfer (LET) feature, whereas surface skin is irradiated with an entrance plateau, the LET of which is lower than that of the peak. The repair kinetics of murine skin damage caused by an entrance plateau of carbon ions was compared with that caused by photons using a scheme of daily fractionated doses followed by a top-up dose. Right hind legs received local irradiations with either 20 keV/μm carbon ions or γ rays. The skin reaction of the irradiated legs was scored every other day up to Day 35 using a scoring scale that consisted of 10 steps, ranging from 0.5 to 5.0. An isoeffect dose to produce a skin reaction score of 3.0 was used to obtain a total dose and a top-up dose for each fractionation. Dependence on a preceding dose and on the time interval of a top-up dose was examined using γ rays. For fractionated γ rays, the total dose linearly increased while the top-up dose linearly decreased with an increase in the number of fractions. The magnitude of damage repair depended on the size of dose per fraction, and was larger for 5.2 Gy than 12.5 Gy. The total dose of carbon ions with 5.2 Gy per fraction did not change till 2 fractions, but abruptly increased at the 3rd fraction. Factors such as rapid repopulation, induced repair and cell cycle synchronization are possible explanations for the abrupt increase. As an abrupt increase/decrease of normal tissue damage could be caused by changing the number of fractions in carbon-ion radiotherapy, we conclude that, unlike photon therapy, skin damage should be carefully studied when the number of fractions is changed in new clinical trials. (author)

  11. Investigations of antioxidant-mediated protection and mitigation of radiation-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in murine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelveh, Salomeh; Kaspler, Pavel; Bhogal, Nirmal; Mahmood, Javed; Lindsay, Patricia E; Okunieff, Paul; Doctrow, Susan R; Bristow, Robert G; Hill, Richard P

    2013-08-01

    Radioprotection and mitigation effects of the antioxidants, Eukarion (EUK)-207, curcumin, and the curcumin analogs D12 and D68, on radiation-induced DNA damage or lipid peroxidation in murine skin were investigated. These antioxidants were studied because they have been previously reported to protect or mitigate against radiation-induced skin reactions. DNA damage was assessed using two different assays. A cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (MN) assay was performed on primary skin fibroblasts harvested from the skin of C3H/HeJ male mice 1 day, 1 week and 4 weeks after 5 Gy or 10 Gy irradiation. Local skin or whole body irradiation (100 kVp X-rays or caesium (Cs)-137 γ-rays respectively) was performed. DNA damage was further quantified in keratinocytes by immunofluorescence staining of γ-histone 2AX (γ-H2AX) foci in formalin-fixed skin harvested 1 hour or 1 day post-whole body irradiation. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the skin was investigated at the same time points as the MN assay by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) with a Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. None of the studied antioxidants showed significant mitigation of skin DNA damage induced by local irradiation. However, when EUK-207 or curcumin were delivered before irradiation they provided some protection against DNA damage. In contrast, all the studied antioxidants demonstrated significant mitigating and protecting effects on radiation-induced lipid peroxidation at one or more of the three time points after local skin irradiation. Our results show no evidence for mitigation of DNA damage by the antioxidants studied in contrast to mitigation of lipid peroxidation. Since these agents have been reported to mitigate skin reactions following irradiation, the data suggest that changes in lipid peroxidation levels in skin may reflect developing skin reactions better than residual post-irradiation DNA damage in skin cells. Further direct comparison studies are required to confirm

  12. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, G.; Sil, K.; Das, J.

    1981-01-01

    Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in a highly pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, has been examined. All three strains of V. cholerae belonging to two serotypes, Inaba and Ogawa, are very sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, having inactivation cross-sections ranging from 0.18 to 0.24 m 2 /J. Although these cells are proficient in repairing the DNA damage by a photoreactivation mechanism, they do not possess efficient dark repair systems. The mild toxinogenic strain 154 of classical Vibrios presumably lacks any excision repair mechanism and studies of irradiated cell DNA indicate that the ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers may not be excised. Ultraviolet-irradiated cells after saturation of dark repair can be further photoreactivated. (Auth.)

  13. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  14. Poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in X-irradiated Chinese hamster cells: its relation to repair of potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) is the substrate used by cells in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. X-irradiation of log-phase Chinese hamster cells caused a rapid decrease in NAD + levels which was linearly dependent on radiation dose. The activity of ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT) also increased linearly with radiation dose. The decrease of NAD + was slower, and the increase in ADPRT activity was less pronounced, in a radiation sensitive line, V79-AL162/S-10. An inhibitor of ADPRT, m-aminobenzamide, largely prevented the depletion of cellular NAD + and reduced the rate at which ADPRT activity disappeared during post-irradiation incubation. Post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic buffer or with medium containing D 2 O-which inhibit repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage-enhanced the depletion of NAD + and prevented the reduction in ADPRT activity following irradiation. The characteristics of the effects of treatment with hypertonic buffer on NAD + metabolism were qualitatively similar to the effects that such treatment has on radiation-induced cell killing. These results suggest that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis after irradiation plays a role in the repair of potentially lethal damage. (author)

  15. Protective effects of melatonin on damage of thymocytes in mice induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuan; Wang Zhenqi; Liu Yang; Gong Shouliang; Zhang Ming; Liu Shuzheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of melatonin (MLT) on the damage of mouse thymocytes in vivo induced by ionizing radiation and its mechanism. Methods: The exogenous MLT was given to Kunming mice to establish the animal models of single and successive administration of MLT through intraperitoneal injection before whole-body irradiation with 1 Gy X-rays. For single administration of MLT, the apoptotic body percentage (ABP) and DNA lytic rate (DLR) in the thymocytes were determined with flow cytometry and fluorospectrophotometry, respectively, 12 h after irradiation. For successive administration of MLT, 3 H-TdR incorporative rate (HTIR ) was determined 24 h after irradiation. Results: The number of thymocytes in single administration group was significantly lower than that in the sham-irradiation group 12 h after irradiation with 1 Gy X-rays (P -1 MLT group was significantly higher, while the ABP and DLR were significantly lower than those in 0 mg·kg -1 MLT group (simple irradiation, P -1 MLT were significantly higher than that in 0 mg·kg -1 MLT group (P -1 MLT group was also significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusion: The administration of exogenous MLT before irradiation can decrease the damage of mouse thymocytes induced by ionizing radiation, and has the protective effect on immune functions in mice. (authors)

  16. In-situ observation system for dual ion irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuno, Shigemi; Hojou, Kiichi; Otsu, Hitoshi; Sasaki, T.A.; Izui, Kazuhiko; Tukamoto, Tetsuo; Hata, Takao.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed an in-situ observation and analysis system during dual ion beam irradiation in an electron microscope. This system consists of an analytical electron microscope of JEM-4000FX type equipped with a parallel EELS and an EDS attachments and linked with two sets of ion accelerators of 40 kV. Hydrogen and helium dual-ion beam irradiation experiments were performed for SiC crystals. The result of dual-ion beam irradiation was compared with those of helium and hydrogen single ion irradiations. It is clearly seen that the dual-ion irradiation has the effect of suppressing bubble formation and growth in comparison with the case of single helium ion irradiation. (author)

  17. Peripheral neuronal damage after operation and irradiation of patients with mastocarcinoma. Periphere Nervenschaeden nach Operation und Bestrahlung wegen Mammakarzinom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, H J

    1982-01-01

    Three hundred seventy-eight women uniformly operated on for pre-metastatic-spread mammary carcinoma and given, for the major part, uniform irradiation treatment were investigated. 34 women had suffered peripheral neuronal damage in the area of the shoulder and arm of the operated and irradiated side consisting in 20 cases in a lesion of the plexus brachialis, in 13 in an isolated lesion of the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm and in one case in an isolated lesion of the nerve to the serratus anterior muscle. The lesion of the plexus brachialis is generally supposed to have been caused by the irradiation, in individual cases a metastasis or tumor infiltration into the plexus or surgical damage is also considered. The isolated lesions of individual arm nerves are attributed to surgical damage or to tensile and pressure-type stress caused by inappropriate position during surgery. Moreover there was a concomitant lesion of the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm in 4, and of the nerve to the serratus anterior muscle in 8 cases. In these cases radiation-induced damage in the plexus area cannot be excluded. In 7 cases slight atrophy noted at the upper edge of the trapezius muscle led to suspect direct radiation damage of the muscle, the actual frequency of which could, however, not safely be determined because of the common subcutaneous induration at the shoulder contour.

  18. Peripheral neuronal damage after operation and irradiation of patients with mastocarcinoma. Periphere Nervenschaeden nach Operation und Bestrahlung wegen Mammakarzinom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, H J

    1982-01-01

    378 women uniformly operated on for pre-metastatic-spread mammary carcinoma and given, for the major part, uniform irradiation treatment were investigated. 34 women had suffered peripheral neuronal damage in the area of the shoulder and arm of the operated and irradiated side consisting in 20 cases in a lesion of the plexus brachialis, in 13 in an isolated lesion of the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm and in one case in an isolated lesion of the nerve to the serratus anterior muscle. The lesion of the plexus brachialis is generally supposed to have been caused by the irradiation, in individual cases a metastasis or tumor infiltration into the plexus or surgical damage is also considered. The isolated lesions of individual arm nerves are attributed to surgical damage or to tensile and pressure-type stress caused by inappropriate position during surgery. Moreover there was a concomitant lesion of the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm in 4, and of the nerve to the serratus anterior muscle in 8 cases. In these cases radiation-induced damage in the plexus area cannot be excluded. In 7 cases slight atrophy noted at the upper edge of the trapezius muscle led to suspect direct radiation damage of the muscle, the actual frequency of which could, however, not safely be determined because of the common subcutaneous induration at the shoulder contour.

  19. Radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of DNA hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, S.G.; Miao, L.; Wheeler, K.T.; Sevilla, M.D.; Becker, D.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is produced from the sum of the radicals generated by the direct ionization of the DNA (direct effect) and by the reactions of the DNA with free radicals formed in the surrounding environment (indirect effect). The indirect effect has been believed to be the predominant contributor to radiation-induced intracellular DNA damage, mainly as the result of reactions of bulk water radicals (e.g., OH·) with DNA. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage, derived from the irradiation of water molecules that are tightly bound in the hydration layer, may occur as the result of the transfer of electron-loss centers (e.g. holes) and electrons from these water molecules to the DNA. Since this mechanism for damaging DNA more closely parallels that of the direct effect, the irradiation of these tightly bound water molecules may contribute to a quasi-direct effect. These water molecules comprise a large fraction of the water surrounding intracellular DNA and could account for a significant proportion of intracellular radiation-induced DNA damage. Consequently, the authors have attempted to characterize this quasi-direct effect to determine: (1) the extent of the DNA hydration layer that is involved with this effect, and (2) what influence this effect has on the types and quantities of radiation-induced DNA damage

  20. Scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced damage and lethality in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Nitisha; Joshi, Jayadev; Ghosh, Subhajit; Dimri, Manali; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Sehgal, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    In view of the strategic importance radiation countermeasures hold, the present study was undertaken to screen a collection of small molecule clinical compounds for possible radioprotective action using zebrafish as a model system. Preliminary screening in developing zebrafish embryos (24 hour post fertilization, (hpf)) using damage manifestations and survival as end point identified scopolamine methylbromide (SMB), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, as a potential radiomitigator. It was found to be optimal (60% survival advantage after 6 th post irradiation day) at a dose of 80 μM when added 3 h post 20 Gy exposure. Mechanistic studies suggested that SMB though exhibited no significant antioxidant potential, but was found to limit radiation induced apoptosis (pre G1 population) quantified through flow cytometry (6 and 5% reduction after 8 or 24 h after treatments) and annexin V staining (8% reduction). Further, quantitative analysis, using caspase 3 assay, revealed a 2.46 fold increase in apoptosis in irradiated group and treatment of irradiated zebrafish embryos with SMB led to a significant reduction in global apoptosis (1.7 fold; p<0.05) when compared to irradiated group. In silico studies based on structural and functional similarity with known radioprotectors suggested similarities with atropine, a known anti-inflammatory agent with muscarinic antagonism and radioprotective potential. In view of this SMB was tested, in silico, for possible anti-inflammatory action. Molecular docking studies revealed that SMB interacts (B.E-8.0 Kcal/mole) with cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2). In lieu of this, anti-inflammation activity was assessed through ChIN (chemically induced inflammation) method in 3 dpf (days post fertilization) embryos and SMB was found to significantly inhibit inflammation at all doses studied from 20-200 μM at 3 and 6 hpi (hours post inflammation). Overall the result suggests that scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced injury and lethality in

  1. Defense mechanisms against radiation induced teratogenic damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Nomoto, S.; Norimura, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies with mice have established that fetuses at midgestational stage are highly susceptible to malformation at high, but not low, doses of radiation. When DNA damage is produced by a small amount of radiation, it is efficiently eliminated by DNA repair. However, DNA repair is not perfect. There must be defense mechanisms other than DNA repair. In order to elucidate the essential role of p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations and deaths (deaths after day 10) in wild-type p53 (+/+) mice and null p53 (-/-) mice. For p53 (+/+) mice, an X-ray dose of 2 Gy given at a high dose-rate (450 mGy/min) to fetuses at 9.5 days of gestation was highly lethal and considerably teratogenic whereas it was only slightly lethal but highly teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to malformations and deaths supports the notion that fetal tissues have a p53 -dependent idguardianln of the tissue that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. When an equal dose of 2 Gy given at a 400-fold lower dose-rate (1.2 mGy/min), this dose became not teratogenic for p53 (+/+) fetuses exhibiting p53 -dependent apoptosis, whereas this dose remained teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses unable to carry out apoptosis. Furthermore, when the dose was divided into two equal dose fractions (1+1 Gy) at high dose rate, separated by 24 hours, the incidences of malformations were equal with control level for p53 (+/+), but higher for p53 (-/-) mice. Hence, complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires a concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair

  2. Spontaneous perseverative turning in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Nemeth, T.J.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Alderks, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    This study found a new behavioral correlate of lesions specific to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus: spontaneous perseverative turning. Irradiation of a portion of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres produced hypoplasia of the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus while sparing the rest of the brain. Radiation-induced damage to the hippocampal formation caused rats placed in bowls to spontaneously turn in long, slow bouts without reversals. Irradiated subjects also exhibited other behaviors characteristic of hippocampal damage (e.g., perseveration in spontaneous exploration of the arms of a T-maze, retarded acquisition of a passive avoidance task, and increased horizontal locomotion). These data extend previously reported behavioral correlates of fascia dentata lesions and suggest the usefulness of a bout analysis of spontaneous bowl turning as a measure of nondiscrete-trial spontaneous alternation and a sensitive additional indicator of radiation-induced hippocampal damage

  3. HeLa DNA damage response induced by 12C6+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jidong; Li Ning; Zhang Hong; Wu Zhenhua

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the DNA damage response of HeLa irradiated by 12 C 6+ beam and the mechanism of the p53 activation change in this response.In our present study, double strands break(DSB)of HeLa cells irradiated with 12 C 6+ beam were detected through neutral single cell gel electrophoresis, and AO/EB staining was used to detect the apoptosis of irradiated HeLa in 24h irradiation. Moreover, HeLa was pre-treated with caffeine (ATM and ATR inhibiting) or wormannin with certain concentrations (20 μmol/L, ATM and DNA-PK inhibiting) and irradiated with 1Gy of 12 C 6+ beam,and the expression of p53 was detected with Western blot analysis. The results show that DSB of HeLa caused by 12 C 6+ beam increases with absorbed doses and decreases with the time after irradiation. The apoptosis percentage of irradiated HeLa increases with absorbed doses. It has been found that the p53 expression increases after irradiation, but has not significant increment with caffeine or wortmannin pre-treatment in cells.It can be deduced that the p53 activation is ATM-dependent, but not ATR and DNA-PK-dependent in HeLa DNA damage response induced by 12 C 6+ beam. (authors)

  4. Resistance to He{sup 2+} induced irradiation damage in metallic glass Zr{sub 64}Cu{sub 17.8}Ni{sub 10.7}Al{sub 7.5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Mei, Xianxiu, E-mail: xxmei@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Hongran; Hou, Wenjing; Wang, Younian [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Zhiguang [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dong, Chuang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: This paper used TEM for the analysis of the microstructure, helium bubble distribution and helium bubble growth process of Zr-based metallic glass after the irradiation at maximum fluence. Fig. a shows the cross-sectional TEM sample morphology image of Zr-based metallic glass. It could be observed that a large number of helium bubbles were distributed on the topmost surface of Zr-based metallic glass (Zone A in Fig.a). The helium bubbles on the surface were mostly round, except for a small number of irregular-shape bubbles, with the sizes ranging from several nanometers to several tens of nanometers. The helium bubble diameter became gradually smaller downwardly from Zone A. As shown in Fig.a, the helium bubble size was small within the range of 0.3–1.2 μm below the surface (Zone B), and a large number of helium bubbles with a diameter of several nanometers were uniformly distributed in the area close to Zone A and Zone C; as shown in Fig.b, a helium bubble layer appeared within the range of 1.2–1.5 μm (Zone C) away from the surface, and it was found that the helium bubble size was larger in the vicinity of 1.3 μm away from the surface. Fig.b shows the atom vacancy distribution curves in Zr-based metallic glass before and after the helium ion irradiation obtained through SRIM program simulation. It could be observed that vacancy concentration peaks appeared at the ion range of 1.2 μm, and a large number of vacancies were concentrated at the end of the range. The vacancies of the sample were very easy to capture helium atoms and were conducive to the formation and growth of helium bubbles. -- Highlights: • Metallic glass could maintain amorphous state at different irradiation fluences. • A damage layer appeared in Zr{sub 64}Cu{sub 17.8}Ni{sub 10.7}Al{sub 7.5} at a fluence of 2 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. • Peeling and delamination appeared numerously in W at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. • Lots of helium bubbles

  5. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizen, Teruhiko; Asano, Yoshihiro; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Seike, Takamitsu; Aoki, Tsuyoshi; Fukami, Kenji; Hosoda, Naoyasu; Yonehara, Hiroto; Takagi, Tetsuya; Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd 2 Fe 14 B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small

  6. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizen, Teruhiko [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)]. E-mail: bizen@spring8.or.jp; Asano, Yoshihiro [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Marechal, Xavier-Marie [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Seike, Takamitsu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Aoki, Tsuyoshi [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, Kenji [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hosoda, Naoyasu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yonehara, Hiroto [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takagi, Tetsuya [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hara, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kitamura, Hideo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-05-11

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small.

  7. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in cholera bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, B.N.; Das, G.; Das, J.

    1983-01-01

    DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae were used to examine host cell reactivation, Weigle reactivation and photoreactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera bacteriophages. U.v. light-induced DNA damage in phages of different morphological and serological groups could be efficiently photoreactivated. Host cell reactivation of irradiated phages of different groups was different on the same indicator host. Phage phi149 was the most sensitive, and phi138 the most resistant to u.v. irradiation. While phi138 showed appreciable host cell reactivation, this was minimal for phi149. Attempts to demonstrate Weigle reactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera phages were not successful, although u.v.-induced filamentation of host cells was observed. (author)

  8. Lattice damage assessment and optical waveguide properties in LaAlO3 single crystal irradiated with swift Si ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Crespillo, M. L.; Huang, Q.; Wang, T. J.; Liu, P.; Wang, X. L.

    2017-02-01

    As one of the representative ABO3 perovskite-structured oxides, lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) crystal has emerged as one of the most valuable functional-materials, and has attracted plenty of fundamental research and promising applications in recent years. Electronic, magnetic, optical and other properties of LaAlO3 strongly depend on its crystal structure, which could be strongly modified owing to the nuclear or electronic energy loss deposited in an ion irradiation environment and, therefore, significantly affecting the performance of LaAlO3-based devices. In this work, utilizing swift (tens of MeV) Si-ion irradiation, the damage behavior of LaAlO3 crystal induced by nuclear or electronic energy loss has been studied in detail utilizing complementary characterization techniques. Differing from other perovskite-structured crystals in which the electronic energy loss could lead to the formation of an amorphous region based on the thermal spike mechanism, in this case, intense electronic energy loss in LaAlO3 will not induce any obvious structural damage. The effects of ion irradiation on the mechanical properties, including hardness increase and elastic modulus decrease, have been confirmed. On the other hand, considering the potential applications of LaAlO3 in the field of integrated optoelectronics, the optical-waveguide properties of the irradiation region have been studied. The significant correspondence (symmetrical inversion) between the iWKB-reconstructed refractive-index profile and SRIM-simulated dpa profile further proves the effects (irradiation-damage production and refractive-index decrease) of nuclear energy loss during the swift-ion penetration process in LaAlO3 crystal. In the case of the rather-thick damage layer produced by swift-ion irradiation, obtaining a damage profile will be constrained owing to the analysis-depth limitation of the characterization techniques (RBS/channeling), and our analysis process (optical guided-mode measurement and

  9. Lattice damage assessment and optical waveguide properties in LaAlO3 single crystal irradiated with swift Si ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y; Wang, T J; Liu, P; Wang, X L; Crespillo, M L; Huang, Q

    2017-01-01

    As one of the representative ABO 3 perovskite-structured oxides, lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO 3 ) crystal has emerged as one of the most valuable functional-materials, and has attracted plenty of fundamental research and promising applications in recent years. Electronic, magnetic, optical and other properties of LaAlO 3 strongly depend on its crystal structure, which could be strongly modified owing to the nuclear or electronic energy loss deposited in an ion irradiation environment and, therefore, significantly affecting the performance of LaAlO 3 -based devices. In this work, utilizing swift (tens of MeV) Si-ion irradiation, the damage behavior of LaAlO 3 crystal induced by nuclear or electronic energy loss has been studied in detail utilizing complementary characterization techniques. Differing from other perovskite-structured crystals in which the electronic energy loss could lead to the formation of an amorphous region based on the thermal spike mechanism, in this case, intense electronic energy loss in LaAlO 3 will not induce any obvious structural damage. The effects of ion irradiation on the mechanical properties, including hardness increase and elastic modulus decrease, have been confirmed. On the other hand, considering the potential applications of LaAlO 3 in the field of integrated optoelectronics, the optical-waveguide properties of the irradiation region have been studied. The significant correspondence (symmetrical inversion) between the iWKB-reconstructed refractive-index profile and SRIM-simulated dpa profile further proves the effects (irradiation-damage production and refractive-index decrease) of nuclear energy loss during the swift-ion penetration process in LaAlO 3 crystal. In the case of the rather-thick damage layer produced by swift-ion irradiation, obtaining a damage profile will be constrained owing to the analysis-depth limitation of the characterization techniques (RBS/channeling), and our analysis process (optical guided

  10. Whole body proton irradiation causes acute damage to bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to proton irradiation during missions in deep space can lead to bone marrow injury. The acute effects of proton irradiation on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells remain undefined and thus were investigated. We exposed male C57BL/6 mice to 0.5 and 1.0 Gy proton total body irradiation (proton-TBI, 150 MeV) and examined changes in peripheral blood cells and bone marrow (BM) progenitors and LSK cells 2 weeks after exposure. 1.0 Gy proton-TBI significantly reduced the numbers of peripheral blood cells compared to 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated animals, while the numbers of peripheral blood cell counts were comparable between 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated mice. The frequencies and numbers of LSK cells and CMPs in BM of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy irradiated mice were decreased in comparison to those of normal controls. LSK cells and CMPs and their progeny exhibited a radiation-induced impairment in clonogenic function. Exposure to 1.0 Gy increased cellular apoptosis but not the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CMPs two weeks after irradiation. LSK cells from irradiated mice exhibited an increase in ROS production and apoptosis. Exposure to proton-TBI can induce acute damage to BM progenitors and LSK cells.

  11. DNA damage and mutagenesis of lambda phage induced by gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Lambda phage DNA was gamma irradiated in aqueous solution and strand breakage determined. Twice as much minor structural damage per lethal hit was found in this DNA compared with DNA from irradiated phage suspensions. The in vitro irradiated DNA was repackaged into infectious particles. Induction of mutations in the cI or cII cistron was scored using SOS-induced host cells. In vitro prepared particles were found to have second-order kinetics for mutagenesis induced by gamma rays indicating two pre-mutational events were necessary to produce a mutation, but bacteria-free phage suspensions ('lys-phage') showed single hit kinetics for mutagenesis after irradiation. Increase in the mutation rate in the phage particles was mainly due to minor lesions, i.e. ssb, als and unidentified base damage. In lys-phage, mutagenesis might be enhanced by clustered DNA damage - configuration not existing in pack-phage. Loss of infectivity was analysed in comparison with structural damage. All lesions contributed to biological inactivation. Minor lesions were tolerated by lambda phage to a limited extent. Major lesions (e.g. dsb) contributed most to infectivity loss and were considered lethal events. (U.K.)

  12. Gamma Irradiation Induced Degradation of Orange Peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Saucedo Luna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, gamma irradiation induced degradation of orange peels (OP was investigated. The lignocellulosic biomass degradation was carried out at doses of 0 (control, 600, 1800 and 3500 kGy using a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The samples were tested for total and reducing sugars. The concentrations of total sugars ranged from 0.530 g∙g−1 in control sample to 0.382 g∙g−1 of dry weight in the sample which received the highest radiation dose. The reducing sugars content varying from 0.018 to 0.184 g∙g−1 of dry weight with the largest rise occurring in the sample irradiated at 3500 kGy. The concentrations of sucrose, glucose and fructose were determined. The changes generated in physico-chemical properties were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and termogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG. The results show that OP was affected, but not significantly, which suggests that lignocellulose and sugars profiles were partially degraded after gamma irradiation.

  13. Irradiation induced precipitation: a thermodynamical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, J.-L.; Martin, Georges.

    1979-02-01

    A binary alloy (A, B) under steady state irradiation is considered as a ternary alloy (A, B, defects) in constrained equilibrium (the constraint represented by the irradiation consists in maintaining a given supersaturation of point defects). All possible two-body interactions (attractive, repulsive) have been checked between the solvent A, the solute B, and the defects C. The conditions of an irradiation corresponds to a low point-defect concentration; the only cases of interest are those where such a low concentration makes new phases precipitate, which are richer in solute than the initial solid-solution. Radiation induced precipitation is expected to occur under the following necessary conditions: - when the binary alloy (A, B) shows ordering or is ideal, a necessary condition is that the binary solute-defects must show ordering. - when the binary alloy (A, B) shows clustering, a necessary condition is that the temperature must be close to the critical mixing temperature Tsub(AB)sup(D). The physical significance of these conditions is discussed [fr

  14. Effect of Bifidobacterium breve B-3 on skin photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, T; Murata, M; Iwabuchi, N; Odamaki, T; Wakabayashi, H; Yamauchi, K; Abe, F; Xiao, J Z

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have been shown to have a preventative effect on skin photoaging induced by short term UV irradiation, however, the underlying mechanisms and the effect of probiotics on skin photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of Bifidobacterium breve B-3 on skin photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation in hairless mice. Mice were irradiated with UVB three times weekly and orally administered B. breve B-3 (2×10(9) cfu/mouse /day) for 7 weeks. Nonirradiated mice and UVB-irradiated mice without probiotic treatment were used as controls. B. breve B-3 significantly suppressed the changes of transepidermal water loss, skin hydration, epidermal thickening and attenuated the damage to the tight junction structure and basement membrane induced by chronic UVB irradiation. Administration of B. breve B-3 tended to suppress the UV-induced interleukin-1β production in skin (P=0.09). These results suggest that B. breve B-3 could potentially be used to prevent photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation.

  15. CR-39 as induced track detector in reactor: irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylberberg, H.

    1989-07-01

    A systematic study about reactor's neutrons radiation effect and gamma radiation effect on the properties of CR-39 that are significant for its use as induced fission track detector is showed. The following studies deserved attention: kinetics of the fission track chemical development; efficiency to register and to develop fission track; losses of developable tracks; variation in the number of developable tracks and variation in the visible and ultraviolet radiation spectrum. The dissertation is organized in seven specific chapters: solid state nuclear tracks (SSNT); CR-39 as SSNT; objectives and problems presentation; preparation and characterization of CR-39 as SSNT; gamma irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT; reactor neutron irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT and, results discussions and conclusions. The main work contributions are the use of CR-39 in the determination of fissionable nuclide as thorium and uranium in solid and liquid samples; gamma radiation damage on CR-39 as well as the reactor's neutron damage on CR-39. (B.C.A.) 62 refs, 53 figs, 21 tabs

  16. Comparison of damage induced by mercury chloride and ionizing radiation in the susceptible rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyang; Yoon, Yong Dal; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2003-01-01

    Mercury (Hg), one of the most diffused and hazardous organ-specific environmental contaminants, exists in a wide variety of physical and chemical states. Although the reports indicate that mercury induces a deleterious damage, little has been reported from the investigations of mercury effects in living things. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of mercury chloride and ionizing radiation. Prepubertal male F-344 rats were administered mercury chloride in drinking water throughout the experimental period. Two weeks after whole body irradiation, organs were collected for measuring the induced injury. Serum levels of GOT, GPT, ALP, and LDH were checked in the experimental groups and the hematological analysis was accomplished in plasma. In conclusion, the target organ of mercury chloride seems to be urinary organs and the pattern of damage induced by mercury differs from that of the irradiated group

  17. Irradiation damages in Ti3SiC2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nappe, J.C.; Grosseau, Ph.; Guilhot, B.; Audubert, F.; Beauvy, M.

    2007-01-01

    Carbides, by their remarkable properties, are considered as possible materials (fuel cans) in reactor of generation IV. Among those studied, Ti 3 SiC 2 is particularly considered because it joins both the ceramics and metals properties. Nevertheless, its behaviour under irradiation is not known. Characterizations have been carried out on samples irradiated at 75 MeV krypton ions. They have revealed that TiO 2 (formed at the surface of Ti 3 SiC 2 ) is pulverized by the irradiation and that the crystal lattice of Ti 3 SiC 2 dilates with c. (O.M.)

  18. Temperature dependence on plasma-induced damage and chemical reactions in GaN etching processes using chlorine plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zecheng; Ishikawa, Kenji; Imamura, Masato; Tsutsumi, Takayoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2018-06-01

    Plasma-induced damage (PID) on GaN was optimally reduced by high-temperature chlorine plasma etching. Energetic ion bombardments primarily induced PID involving stoichiometry, surface roughness, and photoluminescence (PL) degradation. Chemical reactions under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and chlorine radical exposure at temperatures higher than 400 °C can be controlled by taking into account the synergism of simultaneous photon and radical irradiations to effectively reduce PID.

  19. The protective effect of DNA on the rat cell membrane damage induced by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shouxiang; Zhong Jinyan

    1988-01-01

    The protective effect of DNA on the cell membrane damage induced by ultra-violet radiation was studied. Rat erythrocytes were used as experimental materials. Blood samples were taken from the rat, and centrifuged to separate the plasma. The cells were washed twice with isotonic saline, resuspended in normal saline solution and then irradiated by ultra-violet radiation. The DNA was added before or after irradiation. THe cell suspensions were kept at 5 deg C for 20 hours after irradiation, and then centrifuged. The supernatants were used for hemoglobin determination. The main results obtained may summarized as follows: the cell suspension of erythrocytes were irradiated for 5, 10 and 20 min. The amount of hemolysis induced by irradiation dosage revealed a direct proportional relationship. If DNA (20-40μg/ml) was applied before irradiation, the amount of hemolysis induced apparently decreased. The differences between the control and DNA treated were statistically significant, P<0.01, but insignificant for DNA added after irradiation

  20. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H. E-mail: yhiroya@nias.affrc.go.jp; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  1. Primary radiation damage characterization of α-iron under irradiation temperature for various PKA energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahi, Qurat-ul-ain; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2018-04-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced microstructural defects in body-centered cubic (BCC) iron is of major interest to those using advanced steel under extreme conditions in nuclear reactors. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were implemented to examine the primary radiation damage in BCC iron with displacement cascades of energy 1, 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV at temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 K. Statistical analysis of eight MD simulations of collision cascades were carried out along each [110], [112], [111] and a high index [135] direction and the temperature dependence of the surviving number of point defects and the in-cascade clustering of vacancies and interstitials were studied. The peak time and the corresponding number of defects increase with increasing irradiation temperature and primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy. However, the final number of surviving point defects decreases with increasing lattice temperature. This is associated with the increase of thermal spike at high PKA energy and its long timespan at higher temperatures. Defect production efficiency (i.e., surviving MD defects, per Norgett-Robinson-Torrens displacements) also showed a continuous decrease with the increasing irradiation temperature and PKA energy. The number of interstitial clusters increases with both irradiation temperature and PKA energy. However, the increase in the number of vacancy clusters with PKA energy is minimal-to-constant and decreases as the irradiation temperature increases. Similarly, the probability and cluster size distribution for larger interstitials increase with temperature, whereas only smaller size vacancy clusters were observed at higher temperatures.

  2. Intensification of ultraviolet-induced dermal damage by infrared radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligman, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the role of IR in actinic damage to the dermis, albino guinea pigs were irradiated for 45 weeks with UV-B and UV-A, with and without IR. Control animals received IR only or no irradiation at all. Unirradiated dermis contains small amounts of elastic fibers in the upper dermis with greater depositions around follicles and sebaceous glands. After irradiation with UV, the fibers became more numerous, thicker, and more twisted; IR alone producd many fine, feathery fibers. The addition of IR to UV resulted in dense matlike elastic fiber depositions that exceeded what was observed with either irradiation alone. In combination or alone UV and IR radiation produced a large increase in ground substance, a finding also seen in actinically damaged human skin. Infrared radiation, in the physiologic range, though pleasant is not innocuous. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Radiation-induced epigenetic alterations after low and high LET irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET X-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. We demonstrate that miRNA expression levels can be altered after X-ray irradiation and that these miRNA are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. A higher incidence of epigenetic changes was observed after exposure to X-rays than Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This distinction is apparent at miRNA analyses at which only three miRNA involved in two major pathways were altered after high LET irradiations while six miRNA involved in five major pathways were altered after low LET irradiations. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise in the

  4. Radiation-induced epigenetic alterations after low and high LET irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut, E-mail: uaypa001@umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Morgan, William F. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Baulch, Janet E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-02-10

    Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET X-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. We demonstrate that miRNA expression levels can be altered after X-ray irradiation and that these miRNA are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. A higher incidence of epigenetic changes was observed after exposure to X-rays than Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This distinction is apparent at miRNA analyses at which only three miRNA involved in two major pathways were altered after high LET irradiations while six miRNA involved in five major pathways were altered after low LET irradiations. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise

  5. Processing of radiation-induced clustered DNA damage generates DSB in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulston, M.K.; De Lara, C.M.; Davis, E.L.; Jenner, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Clustered DNA damage sites, in which two or more lesions are formed within a few helical turns of the DNA after passage of a single radiation track, are signatures of DNA modifications induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cell. With 60 Co-radiation, the abundance of clustered DNA damage induced in CHO cells is ∼4x that of prompt double strand breaks (DSB) determined by PFGE. Less is known about the processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage induced in cells. To optimize observation of any additional DSB formed during processing of DNA damage at 37 deg C, xrs-5 cells deficient in non-homologous end joining were used. Surprisingly, ∼30% of the DSB induced by irradiation at 37 deg C are rejoined within 4 minutes in both mutant and wild type cells. No significant mis-repair of these apparent DSB was observed. It is suggested that a class of non-DSB clustered DNA damage is formed which repair correctly within 4 min but, if 'trapped' prior to repair, are converted into DSB during the lysis procedure of PFGE. However at longer times, a proportion of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites induced by γ-radiation are converted into DSB within ∼30 min following post-irradiation incubation at 37 deg C. The corresponding formation of additional DSB was not apparent in wild type CHO cells. From these observations, it is estimated that only ∼10% of the total yield of non DSB clustered DNA damage sites are converted into DSB through cellular processing. The biological consequences that the majority of non-DSB clustered DNA damage sites are not converted into DSBs may be significant even at low doses, since a finite chance exists of these clusters being formed in a cell by a single radiation track

  6. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Seung Hun; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not

  7. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Seung Hoon; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not.

  8. Protection of vanillin derivative VND3207 on plasmid DNA damage induced by different LET ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Huihui; Wang Li; Sui Li; Guan Hua; Wang Yu; Liu Xiaodan; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; Wang Xiao; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radioprotective effect of vanillin derivative VND3207 on DNA damage induced by different LET ionizing radiation. Methods: The plasmid DNA in liquid was irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays, proton or 7 Li heavy ion with or without VND3207. The conformation changes of plasmid DNA were assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis and the quantification was done using gel imaging system. Results: The DNA damage induced by proton and 7 Li heavy ion was much more serious as compared with that by 60 Co γ-rays, and the vanillin derivative VND3207 could efficiently decrease the DNA damage induced by all three types of irradiation sources, which was expressed as a significantly reduced ratio of open circular form (OC) of plasmid DNA. The radioprotective effect of VND3207 increased with the increasing of drug concentration. The protective efficiencies of 200 μmol/L VND3207 were 85.3% (t =3.70, P=0.033), 73.3% (t=10.58, P=0.017) and 80.4% (t=8.57, P=0.008) on DNA damage induction by 50 Gy of γ-rays, proton and 7 Li heavy ion, respectively. It seemed that the radioprotection of VND3207 was more effective on DNA damage induced by high LET heavy ion than that by proton. Conclusions: VND3207 has a protective effect against the genotoxicity of different LET ionizing radiation, especially for γ-rays and 7 Li heavy ion. (authors)

  9. Irradiation damage of alkali halide crystals during positron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefiev, K.P.; Arefiev, V.P.; Vorobiev, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    The bleaching effect of positron irradiation of KCl and KBr single crystals previously coloured with electrons or protons was investigated. Positrons injection in the coloured alkali halide samples reduced the F-centres concentration considerably. For KCl crystals thicker than the positrons range the appearance of additional bands in the absorption spectra is noticeable. The experimental data show that the bleaching phenomenon should be observed merely throughout the positron exposure both for irradiated and non-irradiated regions of the sample. Irradiation effects, due to positron source, on the peak counting rate of (γ-γ) angular correlation in KCl crystals under applied magnetic field were also investigated. The growth of peak counting rate shows the increase of positronium-like states formation near defects of cation sublattice. (author)

  10. DNA damage responses in human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Momcilovic

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have the capability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation into all somatic cell types. Since they can be produced through somatic cell reprogramming, which uses a defined set of transcription factors, iPS cells represent important sources of patient-specific cells for clinical applications. However, before these cells can be used in therapeutic designs, it is essential to understand their genetic stability.Here, we describe DNA damage responses in human iPS cells. We observe hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents resulting in rapid induction of apoptosis after γ-irradiation. Expression of pluripotency factors does not appear to be diminished after irradiation in iPS cells. Following irradiation, iPS cells activate checkpoint signaling, evidenced by phosphorylation of ATM, NBS1, CHEK2, and TP53, localization of ATM to the double strand breaks (DSB, and localization of TP53 to the nucleus of NANOG-positive cells. We demonstrate that iPS cells temporary arrest cell cycle progression in the G(2 phase of the cell cycle, displaying a lack of the G(1/S cell cycle arrest similar to human embryonic stem (ES cells. Furthermore, both cell types remove DSB within six hours of γ-irradiation, form RAD51 foci and exhibit sister chromatid exchanges suggesting homologous recombination repair. Finally, we report elevated expression of genes involved in DNA damage signaling, checkpoint function, and repair of various types of DNA lesions in ES and iPS cells relative to their differentiated counterparts.High degrees of similarity in DNA damage responses between ES and iPS cells were found. Even though reprogramming did not alter checkpoint signaling following DNA damage, dramatic changes in cell cycle structure, including a high percentage of cells in the S phase, increased radiosensitivity and loss of DNA damage-induced G(1/S cell cycle arrest, were observed in stem cells generated by induced pluripotency.

  11. Displacement damage analysis and modified electrical equivalent circuit for electron and photon-irradiated silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjhangmehr, Afshin; Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2014-10-01

    Solar modules and arrays are the conventional energy resources of space satellites. Outside the earth's atmosphere, solar panels experience abnormal radiation environments and because of incident particles, photovoltaic (PV) parameters degrade. This article tries to analyze the electrical performance of electron and photon-irradiated mono-crystalline silicon (mono-Si) solar cells. PV cells are irradiated by mono-energetic electrons and poly-energetic photons and immediately characterized after the irradiation. The mean degradation of the maximum power (Pmax) of silicon solar cells is presented and correlated using the displacement damage dose (Dd) methodology. This method simplifies evaluation of cell performance in space radiation environments and produces a single characteristic curve for Pmax degradation. Furthermore, complete analysis of the results revealed that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and the filling factor of mono-Si cells did not significantly change during the irradiation and were independent of the radiation type and fluence. Moreover, a new technique is developed that adapts the irradiation-induced effects in a single-cell equivalent electrical circuit and adjusts its elements. The "modified circuit" is capable of modeling the "radiation damage" in the electrical behavior of mono-Si solar cells and simplifies the designing of the compensation circuits.

  12. Detection of irradiation induced modifications in foodstuff DNA using 32p post-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, B.M.; Swallow, A.J.; Margison, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    DNA post-labelling has been used successfully to detect damage to DNA caused by a range of damaging agents. The assay results in a fingerprint of changes induced in DNA which might, in principle, be useful as a test for the detection of the irradiation of foods. The authors present their DNA extraction and 32 p post-labelling methods from chicken or cooked prawn samples and their analysis method (High Performance liquid chromatography). It's hoped that these results could form the basis of a test to detect if foods have been irradiated

  13. Screening of large panel of gastrointestinal peptide plasma levels is not adapted for the evaluation of digestive damage following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublineau, I.; Dudoignon, N.; Monti, P.; Combes, O.; Wysocki, J.; Grison, S.; Baudelin, C.; Griffiths, N.M.; Scanff, P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of gastrointestinal peptide plasma levels as biomarkers of radiation-induced digestive tract damage. To this end, plasma levels of substance P, GRP, motilin, PYY, somatostatin-28, gastrin, and neurotensin were followed for up to 5 days in pigs after a 16-Gy whole-body X-irradiation, completed by a histopathological study performed at 5 days. Each peptide gave a specific response to irradiation. The plasma levels of GRP and substance P were not modified by irradiation exposure; neither were those of motilin and PYY. Concerning gastrin, a 2-3-fold increase of plasma concentration was observed in pig, which presented the most important histological alterations of the stomach. The plasma levels of somatostatin, unchanged from 1 to 4 days after irradiation, was also increased by 130% at 5 days. In contrast, a diminution of neurotensin plasma levels was noted, firstly at 1 day (-88%), and from 3 days after exposure (-50%). The present study suggested that changes in gastrin and neurotensin plasma levels were associated with structural alterations of the stomach and ileum, respectively, indicating that they may be relevant biological indicators of radiation-induced digestive damage to these segments. (author)

  14. Blood-induced joint damage: novel targets for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meegeren, M.E.R.

    2012-01-01

    -induced joint damage can occur due to a trauma but also during surgery when blood leaks into the joint cavity. Besides that, it is one of the major causes of morbidity amongst haemophilia patients. The aims of this thesis were to further unravel the pathogenesis of blood-induced joint damage and to

  15. Theoretical research of multi-pulses laser induced damage in dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Jin; Liu Zhichao; Chen Songlin; Ma Ping

    2013-01-01

    The pulse width is different, the mechanism of the laser-matter interaction is different. Damage results from plasma formation and ablation forτ≤10 ps and from heat depositing and conventional melting for τ>100 ps. Two theoretical models of transparent dielectrics irradiated by multi-pulses laser are respectively developed based on the above-mentioned different mechanism. One is the dielectric breakdown model based on electron density evolution equation for femtosecond multi-pluses laser, the other is the dielectric heat-damage model based on Fourier's heat exchange equation for nanosecond multi-pluses laser. Using these models, the effects of laser parameters and material parameters on the laser-induced damage threshold of dielectrics are analyzed. The analysis results show that different parameters have different influence on the damage threshold. The effect of parameters on the multi -pulses damage threshold is not entirely the same to the single-pulse damage threshold. The multi-pulses damage mechanism of dielectrics is discussed in detail, considering the effect of different parameters. The discussion provides more information for understanding its damage process and more knowledge to improve its damage thresholds. And the relationship between damage threshold and pulse number is illustrated, it is in good agreement with experimental results. The illustration can help us to predict the multi-pulses damage threshold and the lifetime of optical components. (authors)

  16. Irradiation damages of semiconductor devices and their improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwatoko, Yoshiya [Saitama Univ., Urawa (Japan); Ohyama, Hidenori; Hayama, Kiyoteru; Hakata, Tetsuya; Kudou, Tomohiro

    1998-01-01

    In this study, effect of radiation on semiconductor devices was evaluated at both sides of electrical and crystalline properties for two years from 1995 fiscal years. And, damage of Si(sub 1-x)Ge(sub x) device was considered at viewpoints of Ge content and sprung-out atomic number and non ionization energy loss of constituting atom formed by radiation on its radiation source dependency of damage. This paper was a report on proton beam damage of the Si(sub 1-x)Ge(sub x) device, neutron damage of InGaAs photodiode, and effect of Ga content and kinds of beam on their damages. (G.K.)

  17. Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, Claudia; Lubatschofski, Annelie; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Kotzerke, Joerg; Buchmann, Inga; Reske, Sven N.

    2003-01-01

    Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for high-risk leukaemia and lymphoma. In bone marrow-selective radioimmunotherapy, beta-irradiation is applied using iodine-131, yttrium-90 or rhenium-188 labelled radioimmunoconjugates. However, the mechanisms by which beta-irradiation induces cell death are not understood at the molecular level. Here, we report that beta-irradiation induced apoptosis and activated apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells depending on doses, time points and dose rates. After beta-irradiation, upregulation of CD95 ligand and CD95 receptor was detected and activation of caspases resulting in apoptosis was found. These effects were completely blocked by the broad-range caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. In addition, irradiation-mediated mitochondrial damage resulted in perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-9 activation and cytochrome c release. Bax, a death-promoting protein, was upregulated and Bcl-x L , a death-inhibiting protein, was downregulated. We also found higher apoptosis rates and earlier activation of apoptosis pathways after gamma-irradiation in comparison to beta-irradiation at the same dose rate. Furthermore, irradiation-resistant cells were cross-resistant to CD95 and CD95-resistant cells were cross-resistant to irradiation, indicating that CD95 and irradiation used, at least in part, identical effector pathways. These findings demonstrate that beta-irradiation induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells using both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. Understanding the timing, sequence and molecular pathways of beta-irradiation-mediated apoptosis may allow rational adjustment of chemo- and radiotherapeutic strategies. (orig.)

  18. Subthreshold displacement damage in copper--aluminum alloys during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosd, R.; Kosel, T.; Washburn, J.

    1976-12-01

    During electron irradiation at low energies which results in a negligible damage rate in a pure material, lighter solute atoms are displaced, which may in turn indirectly displace solvent atoms by a focussed replacement collision or an interstitial diffusion jump. The extent to which lighter solute atoms contribute to the subthreshold damage rate has been examined by irradiating copper--aluminum alloys at high temperatures in a high voltage electron microscope. The damage rate, as measured by monitoring the growth rate of dislocation loops, at 300 kV was found to increase linearly with the aluminum concentration

  19. Analytical studies into radiation-induced starch damage in black and white peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, M.M.; Farkas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the apparent viscosity of heat-generalized suspensions of untreated and irradiated pepper samples has been investigated. There was a close linear correlation between the logarithm of ''fluidity'' (reciprocal of the apparent viscosity) and the reciprocal absolute temperature of the measurement. The slope of the regression line (the temperature dependence of fluidity) increased with the radiation dose. Gelatinization thermograms of aqueous suspensions of ground pepper samples were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature characteristics of heat-gelatinization endotherms showed no significant differences between untreated and irradiated samples. A calorimetric method for damaged starch, the estimation of reducing power, and the alcohol-induced turbidity of aqueous extracts showed statistically significant increases of starch damage at doses higher than 4 kGy. These indices of starch-depolymerization have been changed less dramatically by irradiation than the apparent viscosity of the heat-gelatinized suspensions. (author)

  20. 90Y/90 Sr electron induced damages in an essential eucalyptus oil related to the absorbed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia Cardona, J.A.; Diaz Rizo, O.; Martinez Luzardo, F.; Quert, R.

    2007-01-01

    A good irradiation geometry was achieved in order to carry out the irradiation of an essential eucalyptus oil with a 90 Y/ 90 Sr electron source. The Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP-4C was employed to determine the absorbed doses in this particular experimental configuration. It also helped us to understand which electrons (from an energetic point of view) were responsible for the damages. In order to identify the induced damages, the irradiated samples were studied by mass spectrometry. The obtained results were related to the absorbed doses determined by the computational simulation

  1. Modification of radiation-induced oxic and anoxic damage by caffeine and potassium permanganate in barley seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.; Dodd, N.J.F.

    1976-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that both the immediate and post-irradiation oxygen effects in barley seeds decrease in magnitude in the presence of potassium permanganate and caffeine. This implied that these two types of oxygen effect have features in common. With the removal of the radiation-induced oxygen-sensitive sites, by anoxic hydration, caffeine potentiated the oxygen-independent component of damage, in seeds irradiated in a dry or pre-soaked state. Potassium permanganate, on the other hand, enhanced the anoxic radiation damage only in seeds irradiated in a dry state. The possible mode of action of KMnO 4 and caffeine in barley seeds is discussed. (author)

  2. Primary Displacement Damage Calculation Induced by Neutron and Ion Using Binary Collision Approximation Techniques (Marlowe Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, F.; Ortiz, C. J.; Vila, R.

    2012-01-01

    Irradiation Experimental Area of TechnoFusion will emulate the extreme irradiation fusion conditions in materials by means of three ion accelerators: one used for self-implanting heavy ions (Fe, Si, C,...) to emulate the displacement damage induced by fusion neutrons and the other two for light ions (H and He) to emulate the transmutation induced by fusion neutrons. This Laboratory will play an essential role in the selection of functional materials for DEMO reactor since it will allow reproducing the effects of neutron radiation on fusion materials. Ion irradiation produces little or no residual radioactivity, allowing handling of samples without the need for special precautions. Currently, two different methods are used to calculate the primary displacement damage by neutron irradiation or by ion irradiation. On one hand, the displacement damage doses induced by neutrons are calculated considering the NRT model based on the electronic screening theory of Linhard. This methodology is commonly used since 1975. On the other hand, for experimental research community the SRIM code is commonly used to calculate the primary displacement damage dose induced by ion irradiation. Therefore, both methodologies of primary displacement damage calculation have nothing in common. However, if we want to design ion irradiation experiments capable to emulate the neutron fusion effect in materials, it is necessary to develop comparable methodologies of damage calculation for both kinds of radiation. It would allow us to define better the ion irradiation parameters (Ion, current, Ion energy, dose, etc) required to emulate a specific neutron irradiation environment. Therefore, our main objective was to find the way to calculate the primary displacement damage induced by neutron irradiation and by ion irradiation starting from the same point, that is, the PKA spectrum. In order to emulate the neutron irradiation that would prevail under fusion conditions, two approaches are contemplated: a) on

  3. Microstructure and damage behavior of W-Cr alloy under He irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Luo, Lai-Ma; Zan, Xiang; Xu, Qiu; Liu, Dong-Guang; Zhu, Xiao-Yong; Cheng, Ji-Gui; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a large-power inductively coupled plasma source was designed to perform the continuous helium ion irradiations of W-Cr binary alloy (W-20 wt%Cr) under relevant conditions of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Surface damages and microstructures of irradiated W-20Cr were observed by using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The addition of Cr dramatically enhanced the micro-hardness of the obtained bulk materials, and the interface between the W matrix and the second phase Cr-O is a semi-coherent interface. After irradiation, the doping of Cr element effectively reduces the damage of the W matrix during the irradiation process. The semi-coherent interface between the second phase and the W matrix improves the anti-irradiation performance of the W-20Cr alloy.

  4. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A. I., E-mail: aibelyaeva@mail.ru; Savchenko, A. A. [National Technical University “Kharkov Politechnical Institute”, Kharkov, 61002 (Ukraine); Galuza, A. A.; Kolenov, I. V. [Institute of Electrophysics and Radiation Technologies, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kharkov, 61024 (Ukraine)

    2014-07-15

    Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20 MeV energy. Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600 eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  5. DNA damage in synchronized hela cells irradiated with ultraviolet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, C.S.; Collins, A.R.S.; Johnson, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    The lethal effect of uv radiation on HeLa cells is least in mitosis and greatest in late G 1 -early S. Photochemical damage to HeLa DNA, as measured by thymine-containing dimer formation and by alkaline sucrose sedimentation, also increases from mitosis towards early S phase. Computer simulations of uv absorption by an idealized HeLa cell at different stages of the cell cycle indicate that changes in damage could be due solely to changes in chromatin geometry. But survival is not exclusively a function of damage

  6. DAMAGE IN MOLYBDENUM ASSOCIATED WITH NEUTRON IRRADIATION AND SUBSEQUENT POST-IRRADIATION ANNEALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastel, B.

    1963-07-23

    Molybdemum containing carbon was studied in an attempt to establish the combined effect of impurity content and neutron irradiation on the properties and structure of specific metals. Molybdenum foils were punched into discs and heat treated in vacuum. They were then slow-cooled and irradiated. After irradiation and subsequent decay of radioactivity to a low level the foils were subjected to x-ray diffraction measurements. Cold-worked foils with less than 10 ppm carbon showed no change in microstructure due to irradiation. Molybdenum foils that were annealed prior to irradiation showed spot defects. In foils containing up to 500 ppm carbon, it was concluded that the small loops present after irradiation are due to the clustering of point defects at interstitial carbon atoms, followed by collapse to form a dislocation loop. The amount of lattice expansion after irradiation was strongly dependent on impurity content. Neutron irradiation was found to reduce the number of active slip systems. (M.C.G.)

  7. Induced effect of irradiated exogenous DNA on wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhongjie; Sun Guangzu; Wang Guangjin

    1996-01-01

    Irradiated exogenous DNA introduced into wheat can give rise to break of DNA-chain and damage of part of alkali radicals. Introducing exogenous DNA irradiated by γ rays could increase Do fructification rate and decrease seed size and plumpness. These tendencies became obvious with dose increase. In comparison with control DNA, introducing DNA irradiated could raise evidently mutagenic effect of pollen tube pathway technique

  8. Experimental setup and first measurement of DNA damage induced along and around an antiproton beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavanagh, J. N.; Currell, F. J.; Timson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    a further enhancement due to their annihilation at the end of the path. The work presented here aimed to establish and validate an experimental procedure for the quantification of plasmid and genomic DNA damage resulting from antiproton exposure. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess DNA damage in directly......Radiotherapy employs ionizing radiation to induce lethal DNA lesions in cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. Due to their pattern of energy deposition, better therapeutic outcomes can, in theory, be achieved with ions compared to photons. Antiprotons have been proposed to offer...... and indirectly exposed human fibroblasts irradiated in both plateau and Bragg peak regions of a 126 MeV antiproton beam at CERN. Cells were stained post irradiation with an anti-γ-H2AX antibody. Quantification of the γ-H2AX foci-dose relationship is consistent with a linear increase in the Bragg peak region...

  9. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same...... mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation...... and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity...

  10. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  11. Pathomorphologic observation on treatment of radiation-induced lung damage in rats with

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Jiangfeng; Qi Haowen; Zhao Feng; Fan Fengyun; Shi Mei; Zhao Yiling; Meng Yulin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To inquire into the means of preventing lung damage induced by thoracic irradiation. Methods: SD rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: normal control, irradiated control (Group IC) and irradiated and fluvastatin (Flu)-treated group (Group F). The later two groups of rats were irradiated with X-rays at a dose of 20 Gy thoracically. Beginning from the seventh day before irradiation the rats in the Group F were treated with Flu at a dose of 20 mg per day by garaging until the end of the experiment. Animals from each group were sacrificed on days 5, 15, 30, 60 respectively after irradiation. Sections of lung were examined with light microscopy, electron microscopy and morphometry. Results: The rats in the Group IC suffered from typical radiation pneumonitis (P<0.01). Electron microscopy indicated type II pneumonocytes and capillary endothelial cells were injured in rats of Group IC on days 30, 60. There were increase of collagen and a great quantity of mast cells in irradiated control rats. In rats of the Group F there was slight reaction in the lung. Conclusion: Fluvastatin could reduce radiation pneumonitis and inhibit increase of collagen. The treatment and prevention of radiation-induced lung injury in rats with fluvastatin is effective

  12. Wheat Germ Oil Attenuates Gamma Radiation- Induced Skeletal Muscles Damage in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, U.Z.; Saada, H.N.; Shedid, Sh.M.; Mahdy, E.M.E.; Shousha, W.Gh.

    2008-01-01

    Muscular strength is important in sport as well as in daily activities. Exposure to ionizing radiation is thought to increase oxidative stress and damage muscle tissue. Wheat germ oil is a natural unrefined vegetable oil. It is an excellent source of vitamin E, octacosanol, linoleic and linolenic essential fatty acids, which may be beneficial in neutralizing the free oxygen radicals. The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of wheat germ oil, on radiation-induced oxidative damage in rats skeletal muscle. Wheat germ oil was supplemented orally via gavages to rats at a dose of 54 mg/ kg body weight/day for 14 successive days pre- and 7 post-exposure to 5 Gy (one shot dose) of whole body gamma irradiation. Animals were sacrificed 7, 14 and 21 days post radiation exposure. The results revealed that whole body gamma-irradiation of rats induces oxidative stress in skeletal muscles obvious by significant elevation in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) associated with significant decreases in the content of reduced glutathione (GSE1), as well as decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. Irradiated rats showed, also, significant decreases in creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) activities. Furthermore, total iron, total copper and total calcium levels were significantly increased in skeletal muscles of irradiated rats group compared to control group. Wheat germ oil treated-irradiated rats showed significantly less sever damage and remarkable improvement in all the measured parameters, compared to irradiated rats. It could be concluded that wheat germ oil by attenuating radiation induced oxidative stress might play a role in maintaining skeletal muscle integrity

  13. X-irradiation-induced emesis in Suncus murinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Yoshifumi; Saito, Hiroshi; Matsuki, Norio; Shikita, Mikio.

    1993-01-01

    X-irradiation-induced emesis was investigated in Suncus murinus, a house musk shrew. Whole body X-irradiation caused emesis, and the calculated ED 50 value that induced emesis in 50% of animals was 429 cGy. At the irradiation dose of 800 cGy all the animals vomited 10.0±2.4 times with a latency of 20.0±2.9 min. The emetogenic effect of X-irradiation was dependent on the part of the body exposed. Abdominal X-irradiation at 1000 cGy caused emesis in all animals studied, whereas the same dose to the head had no emetogenic effect. We investigated several prophylactic methods against X-irradiation-induced emesis. Surgical vagotomy completely inhibited the emesis induced by 800 cGy X-irradiation. Emesis was also prevented by the subcutaneous administration of tropisetron (ICS 205-930, a selective serotonergic 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist) with an ID 50 value of 29 μg/kg. These results suggest that (1) suncus is a useful experimental animal for the study of radiation-induced emesis and the development of prophylactic drugs, (2) serotonin plays an important role in X-irradiation-induced emesis, and (3) X-irradiation-induced emesis is very similar to that caused by cancer chemotherapeutic agents. (author)

  14. Application of EPR, thermoluminescence as well as DNA damage examination methods and sprout inhibition for identification of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malec-Czechowska, K.; Stachowicz, W.; Dancewicz, A.M.; Szot, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation of food with doses up to 10 kGy of gamma, X-rays or electron beam is a relatively new technology improving hygienic quality of food, diminishing morbidity due to food pathogens and reducing losses during food storage. Application of this technology increases constantly in the world; more and more irradiated food appears on the market in various countries. In Europe it is agreed notion that detection of irradiated foods should be obligatory procedure included into administrative control system of foodstuffs. For this purpose the reliable methods are needed by which detection of irradiation fact will be possible. Such methods are not easy to be worked out because irradiation induces changes which are to small to be detected by methods commonly applied for food control. Working out the methods suitable for identification of irradiated food has been carried out in many countries in the world and during the last decade within several local and/or international programmes including the intercomparison of results obtained in different laboratories. In our institute such investigations began already in the 80-ties using EPR spectrometry and thermoluminescence measurements. Applications of these methods were approved in 1996 as European Community Standards. Other methods are still under investigation. They include the analyses of DNA damage in irradiated foodstuffs of animal or plant origin and measurements of germination effectiveness of irradiated grains and fruits. In this communication we present some results obtained upon application of forementioned methods to detection of different kinds of food irradiated with gamma rays or electron beam. (author)

  15. Reduction of radiation-induced early skin damage (mouse foot) by 0-(β-hydroxyaethyl)-rutoside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz-Niggli, H.; Froehlich, E.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a bioflavonoid, 0-(β-hydroxyethyl)-rutoside (HR) on early radiation-induced skin damage was examined, using the mouse foot system; the response to radiation is not species specific and comparison with the clinical situation is therefore possible. The aim was to see whether HR, which is highly effective in protecting against late damage, is also able to reduce early effects. Early reactions were considered to be erythema, swelling and ulceration and occurring up to 30 days after irradiation. It was found that HR significantly reduces early damage, both after a single dose and after fractionated irradiation with low doses. A single pre-treatment dose of HR and pre-treatment together with 30 days post-treatment administration were both found to be effective. The protective effect became more marked with increasing radiation dose (single irradiation). Reduction of late effects is produced iptimally by an interval of 0.25 hours between application of HR and irradiation, and this is also true for early skin damage. The early effects are partly reversible, but there is possibly an interesting correlation between these and irreversible late effects (such as loss of toes); a similar mechanism, presumably affecting the vascular system, may therefore be postulated. The protective action of this well tolesated, highly effective substance, which apparently protects normal tissues from early and late injury, is discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Stem cell therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapel, A.; Benderitter, M.; Gourmelon, P.; Lataillade, J.J.; Gorin, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy may induce irreversible damage on healthy tissues surrounding the tumour. In Europe, per year, 1.5 million patients undergo external radiotherapy. Acute adverse effect concern 80% of patients. The late adverse effect of radiotherapy concern 5 to 10% of them, which could be life threatening. Eradication of these manifestations is crucial. The French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) contribute to understand effect of radiation on healthy tissue. IRSN is strongly implicated in the field of regeneration of healthy tissue after radiotherapy or radiological accident and in the clinical use of cell therapy in the treatment of irradiated patients. Our first success in cell therapy was the correction of deficient hematopoiesis in two patients. The intravenous injection of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) has restored bone marrow micro-environment after total body irradiation necessary to sustain hematopoiesis. Cutaneous radiation reactions play an important role in radiation accidents, but also as a limitation in radiotherapy and radio-oncology. We have evidenced for the first time, the efficiency of MSC therapy in the context of acute cutaneous and muscle damage following irradiation in five patients. Concerning the medical management of gastrointestinal disorder after irradiation, we have demonstrated the promising approach of the MSC treatment. We have shown that MSC migrate to damaged tissues and restore gut functions after radiation damage. The evaluation of stem cell therapy combining different sources of adult stem cells is under investigation

  17. Comparison of initial damage rates using neutron and electron irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstone, J.A.R.

    1978-08-01

    The purpose of this experiment was twofold: (1) The number of interstitials that pin dislocations was studied as a function of neutron energy. (2) By comparison with electron irradiations on the sample, a correlation between the predicted and measured numbers of defects was found. All irradiations were performed on the same high purity copper sample. The sample was machined in the form of a cantilever beam with a flexural resonant frequency of 770 Hz. Changes in Young's modulus at constant strain amplitude were monitored continuously through changes in the resonant frequency of the sample. These changes in the modulus can be related to the number of pinning points added to dislocation lines, which are in turn related to the number of free interstitials produced. Neutron energy dependence experiments were done from 2 to 24 MeV on the copper sample and at 14 MeV on a gold sample. By equating pinning rates from electron and neutron irradiations and using the free interstitial production rate obtained from electron irradiations, an estimate of the free interstitial production cross section for neutrons of 2 to 24 MeV was made

  18. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V.P. E-mail: fae@niiar.ru; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B. E-mail: vniinm.400@g23.relkom.ru

    2001-11-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10{sup 22} and 8.0x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket.

  19. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10 22 and 8.0x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket

  20. Analytical studies into radiation-induced starch damage in black and white peppers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Sharif, M.M.; Barabassy, S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to develop detection methods of radiation treatment, ground black pepper samples equilibrated to water activity levels of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 a w , respectively, were irradiated with gamma radiation doses of 0, 4, 8, 16 or 32 kGy, and their damaged starch content, reduced sugar content and alcohol induced turbidity of their aqueous extracts were investigated. The colorimetric method and the alcohol-induced turbidity showed statistically significant increase of starch damage at 4 kGy or higher dose levels. However, all investigated analytical indices of starch radio-depolymerization were changed less dramatically by irradiation than the apparent viscosity of the gelatinized suspensions of spices reported previously. (author) 15 refs.; 4 tabs

  1. Apoptosis-promoted tumorigenesis: γ-irradiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis requires Puma-driven leukocyte death

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Ewa M.; Vandenberg, Cassandra J.; Delbridge, Alex R.D.; Wu, Li; Scott, Clare L.; Adams, Jerry M.; Strasser, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Although tumor development requires impaired apoptosis, we describe a novel paradigm of apoptosis-dependent tumorigenesis. Because DNA damage triggers apoptosis through p53-mediated induction of BH3-only proteins Puma and Noxa, we explored their roles in γ-radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis. Surprisingly, whereas Noxa loss accelerated it, Puma loss ablated tumorigenesis. Tumor suppression by Puma deficiency reflected its protection of leukocytes from γ-irradiation-induced death, because...

  2. Irradiation creep due to SIPA-induced growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    An additional contribution to irradiation creep resulting from the stress-induced preferred adsorption (SIPA) effect is described - SIPA-induced growth (SIG). The mechanism of SIG is discussed and an expression for its contribution to irradiation creep developed. It is shown that SIG is very significant in comparison with SIPA. Enhancement of creep by swelling may also occur. (U.K.)

  3. External gamma irradiation-induced effects in early-life stages of zebrafish, Danio rerio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnaire, B.; Cavalié, I.; Pereira, S.; Floriani, M.; Dubourg, N.; Camilleri, V.; Adam-Guillermin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma rays on zebrafish larvae. • Different techniques were used: gene expression, biochemistry, microscopy and macroscopical observations. • The results showed that gamma irradiation can alter embryo-larval development at several levels of organization. - Abstract: In the general context of validation of tools useful for the characterization of ecological risk linked to ionizing radiation, the effects of an external gamma irradiation were studied in zebrafish larvae irradiated for 96 h with two dose rates: 0.8 mGy/d, which is close to the level recommended to protect ecosystems from adverse effects of ionizing radiation (0.24 mGy/d) and a higher dose rate of 570 mGy/d. Several endpoints were investigated, such as mortality, hatching, and some parameters of embryo-larval development, immunotoxicity, apoptosis, genotoxicity, neurotoxicity and histological alterations. Results showed that an exposure to gamma rays induced an acceleration of hatching for both doses and a decrease of yolk bag diameter for the highest dose, which could indicate an increase of global metabolism. AChE activity decreased with the low dose rate of gamma irradiation and alterations were also shown in muscles of irradiated larvae. These results suggest that gamma irradiation can induce damages on larval neurotransmission, which could have repercussions on locomotion. DNA damages, basal ROS production and apoptosis were also induced by irradiation, while ROS stimulation index and EROD biotransformation activity were decreased and gene expression of acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, cytochrome p450 and myeloperoxidase increased. These results showed that ionizing radiation induced an oxidative stress conducting to DNA damages. This study characterized further the modes of action of ionizing radiation in fish.

  4. External gamma irradiation-induced effects in early-life stages of zebrafish, Danio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnaire, B., E-mail: beatrice.gagnaire@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Cavalié, I. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Pereira, S. [Neolys Diagnostics, Lyon 69373 (France); Floriani, M.; Dubourg, N.; Camilleri, V.; Adam-Guillermin, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma rays on zebrafish larvae. • Different techniques were used: gene expression, biochemistry, microscopy and macroscopical observations. • The results showed that gamma irradiation can alter embryo-larval development at several levels of organization. - Abstract: In the general context of validation of tools useful for the characterization of ecological risk linked to ionizing radiation, the effects of an external gamma irradiation were studied in zebrafish larvae irradiated for 96 h with two dose rates: 0.8 mGy/d, which is close to the level recommended to protect ecosystems from adverse effects of ionizing radiation (0.24 mGy/d) and a higher dose rate of 570 mGy/d. Several endpoints were investigated, such as mortality, hatching, and some parameters of embryo-larval development, immunotoxicity, apoptosis, genotoxicity, neurotoxicity and histological alterations. Results showed that an exposure to gamma rays induced an acceleration of hatching for both doses and a decrease of yolk bag diameter for the highest dose, which could indicate an increase of global metabolism. AChE activity decreased with the low dose rate of gamma irradiation and alterations were also shown in muscles of irradiated larvae. These results suggest that gamma irradiation can induce damages on larval neurotransmission, which could have repercussions on locomotion. DNA damages, basal ROS production and apoptosis were also induced by irradiation, while ROS stimulation index and EROD biotransformation activity were decreased and gene expression of acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, cytochrome p450 and myeloperoxidase increased. These results showed that ionizing radiation induced an oxidative stress conducting to DNA damages. This study characterized further the modes of action of ionizing radiation in fish.

  5. Electron irradiation-induced destruction of carbon nanotubes in electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molhave, Kristian; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Horsewell, Andy; Boggild, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Observations of carbon nanotubes under exposure to electron beam irradiation in standard transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems show that such treatment in some cases can cause severe damage of the nanotube structure, even at electron energies far below the approximate 100 keV threshold for knock-on damage displacing carbon atoms in the graphene structure. We find that the damage we observe in one TEM can be avoided by use of a cold finger. This and the morphology of the damage imply that water vapour, which is present as a background gas in many vacuum chambers, can damage the nanotube structure through electron beam-induced chemical reactions. Though, the dependence on the background gas makes these observations specific for the presently used systems, the results demonstrate the importance of careful assessment of the level of subtle structural damage that the individual electron microscope system can do to nanostructures during standard use

  6. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gil-Hah, E-mail: khkim@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii. - Highlights: > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal development of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal reproduction of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. > Electron beam irradiation induced p53 stability.

  7. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, H., E-mail: hniu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chang, H.C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Cho, I.C. [Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University and Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.S. [Cancer Center of Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, W.T. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages, and these complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. • In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in particle irradiated HeLa cells. • The HeLa cells were irradiated by 400 keV alpha-particles in four different dosages. • The result shows that a good linear relationship can be observed between foci number and radiation dose. • The data shows that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agree with the two components DNA repairing model, and it was decreasing as the radiation dose increased. • These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair. - Abstract: In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA

  8. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  9. The effect of dithiothreitol on radiation-induced genetic damage in Arabidopsis thaliana (L) Heynh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellaert, L.M.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made on the effect of dithiothreitol (DTT; present during irradiation) on M 1 ovule sterility, M 2 embryonic lethals, M 2 chlorophyll mutants and M 2 viable mutants induced with fast neutrons or X-rays in Arabidopsis thaliana. DTT provides considerable protection against both fast-neutron and X-ray induced genetic damage. However, a higher protection was observed against M 1 ovule sterility, than against embryonic lethals, chlorophylls and viable mutants. This implies a significant DTT-induced spectral shift (0.01 < p < 0.05), i.e. a shift in the relative frequencies of the different genetic parameters. This spectral shift is explained on the basis of a specific DTT protection against radiation-induced strand breaks, and by differences in the ratio strand breaks/base damage for the genetic parameters concerned, i.e. a higher ratio for ovule sterility than for the other parameters. The induction of the genetic damage by ionizing radiation, either with or without DTT, is described by a mathematical model, which includes both strand breaks and base damage. The model shows that the resolving power of a test for a 'mutation'spectral shift depends on the relative values of the strandbreak reduction factor of -SH compounds and on the ratio strand breaks/base damage of the genetic parameters. For each genetic parameter the DTT damage reduction factor (DRF) is calculated per irradiation dose, and in addition the average (over-all doses) ratio strand breaks/base damage. (orig.)

  10. Study of damaged depth profiles of ion-irradiated PEEK

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Červená, Jarmila; Apel, P. Yu.; Posta, S.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 201, 19-20 (2007), s. 8370-8372 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK2/05; GA MŠk 1P04LA213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Oxygen irradiation * Poly-aryl-ether-ether ketone * Thermal neutron depth profiling (TNDP) Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.678, year: 2007

  11. Damage of the forest tree layer exposed to the acute gamma- irradiation in different phenophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaban', R.T.; Mishenkov, N.N.; Spirin, D.A.; Prister, B.S.; Aleksakhin, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A programme of radioecological investigations using a specially designed powerful accurate source of gamma radiation (32 kCi 137 Cs) has been initiated in our country to study the consequences of the acute forest irradiation. The irradiation has been carried out twice - in autumn (September, 1973) and in spring (May, 1977). Pine and birch sections of the forest 26-30 years old have been subjected to irradiation. Exposures during autumn and spring irradiation constitute 16 and 8 days, respectively. Forest irradiation has been carried out so as to form isodose sections of considerable square to have a sufficient amount of tress in every isodose section. Pine-trees that perished due to the effect of ionizing radiation have been counted. Presented are the data on pine trees that perished depending on the dose absorbed and new pine shoots one year old (shoots of 1978) depending on the dose in the second year after spring irradiation. The data on the damage of shoots and buds used as the indices of pine radiation damage have been used to forecast that LD 100 for the period of acute effects (4-5 years) in the case of spring irradiation is approximately 1.5-2 krad, i.e. the spring effect on pine trees is 2-2.7 times more radiosensitive, than in autumn. The supposition is made that doses absorbed (about 1-2 krad) are minimum lethal doses for coniferous forests when irradiating them in most radiosensitive phases

  12. Ion Irradiation Damage in Zirconate and Titanate Ceramics for Pu Disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Martin W.; Begg, Bruce D.; Finnie, K.; Colella, Michael; Li, H.; McLeod, Terry; Smith, Katherine L.; Zhang, Zhaoming; Weber, William J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the effect of ion irradiation on pyrochlore-rich titanate and defect-fluorite zirconate ceramics designed for plutonium immobilization. Samples, with Ce as an analogue for Pu, were made via oxide routes and consolidated by cold-pressing and sintering. Ion irradiation damage was carried out with 2 MeV Au2+ ions to a fluence of 5 ions nm-2 in the accelerator facilities within the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were examined by x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Samples underwent accelerated leach testing at pH 1.75 (nitric acid) at 90 C for 28 days. The zirconate samples were more ion-irradiation damage resistant than the titanate samples, showing little change after ion-irradiation whereas the titanate samples formed an amorphous surface layer ∼ 500 nm thick. While all samples had high aqueous durability, the titanate leach rate was ∼ 5 times that of the zirconate. The ion-irradiation increased the leach rate of the titanate without impurities by ∼ 5 times. The difference in the leach rates between irradiated and unirradiated zirconate samples is small. However, the zirconates were less able to incorporate impurities than the titanate ceramics and required higher sintering temperatures, ∼ 1500 C compared to 1350 C for the titanates.

  13. Role of charged particle irradiations in the study of radiation damage correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, S.; Sekimura, N.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particle irradiations were originally expected to provide means to simulate the effect of neutron irradiations. However, it has been recognized that quantitative and sometimes even qualitative simulation of neutron radiation damage is difficult and the role of the charged particle irradiations has shifted to establishing fission-fusion correlation based on fundamental understanding of the radiation damage phenomena. The authors have been studying radiation effects in fusion materials using energetic ions from the latter standpoint. In this paper, the authors review recent results using a heavy-ion/electron microscope link facility together with sets of small heavy ion and light ion accelerators on cascade damage produced by energetic primary recoils and on the effect of helium on microstructural and microchemical evolution. Some of the other applications of the ion accelerators will also be mentioned. (orig.)

  14. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong; Zeng, Jing; Wang, Hong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury. (orig.)

  15. Sestrin2 protects the myocardium against radiation-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yue-Can; Chi, Feng; Xing, Rui; Gao, Song; Chen, Jia-Jia; Duan, Qiong-Yu; Sun, Yu-Nan; Niu, Nan; Tang, Mei-Yue; Wu, Rong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center, Shenyang (China); Zeng, Jing [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Wang, Hong-Mei [Nanfang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Sestrin2 in response to radiation-induced injury to the heart and on the cardiomyopathy development in the mouse. Mice with genetic deletion of the Sestrin2 (Sestrin2 knockout mice [Sestrin2 KO]) and treatment with irradiation (22 or 15 Gy) were used as independent approaches to determine the role of Sestrin2. Echocardiography (before and after isoproterenol challenge) and left ventricular (LV) catheterization were performed to evaluate changes in LV dimensions and function. Masson's trichrome was used to assess myocardial fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the capillary density. After 22 or 15 Gy irradiation, the LV ejection fraction (EF) was impaired in wt mice at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation when compared with sham irradiation. Compared to wt mice, Sestrin2 KO mice had significant reduction in reduced LVEF at 1 week and 4 months after irradiation. A significant increase in LV end-diastolic pressure and myocardial fibrosis and a significant decrease in capillary density were observed in irradiation-wt mice, as well as in irradiation-Sestrin2 KO mice. Sestrin2 involved in the regulation of cardiomyopathy (such as myocardial fibrosis) after irradiation. Overexpression of Sestrin2 might be useful in limiting radiation-induced myocardial injury. (orig.)

  16. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures

  17. Damage accumulation in MgO irradiated with MeV Au ions at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachiller-Perea, Diana, E-mail: dianabachillerperea@gmail.com [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Debelle, Aurélien, E-mail: aurelien.debelle@u-psud.fr [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Thomé, Lionel [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P. 15051, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The damage accumulation process in MgO single crystals under medium-energy heavy ion irradiation (1.2 MeV Au) at fluences up to 4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} has been studied at three different temperatures: 573, 773, and 1073 K. Disorder depth profiles have been determined through the use of the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling configuration (RBS/C). The analysis of the RBS/C data reveals two steps in the MgO damage process, irrespective of the temperature. However, we find that for increasing irradiation temperature, the damage level decreases and the fluence at which the second step takes place increases. A shift of the damage peak at increasing fluence is observed for the three temperatures, although the position of the peak depends on the temperature. These results can be explained by an enhanced defect mobility which facilitates defect migration and may favor defect annealing. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps confirm the results obtained with the RBS/C technique. - Highlights: • High-temperature MeV-ion irradiated MgO exhibits a two-step damage process. • The occurrence of the second step is delayed with increasing temperature. • The damage level decreases with increasing temperature. • A shift of the damage peak is observed with increasing fluence. • A high defect mobility at high temperatures in MgO is clearly evidenced.

  18. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Mizuki; Tajika, Yuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  19. Progressive damage to rat skin induced by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, Beatriz L.; Saint-Martin, Maria L.G.; Bernaola, Omar A.; Duran, Hebe; Policastro, Lucia L.; O'Connor, Silvia E.; Palmieri, Monica; Davidson, Miguel; Davidson, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Wistar rats were locally irradiated with proton beams. Dorsal portions of the skin were irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy employing a plastic wedge as a variable thickness energy degrader. The animals were sacrificed 2,5,6,7,and 9 days post-irradiation. The doses were monitored with a transmission camera. Solid track detectors (Makrofold E) were placed on the area to be irradiated to determine spatial correlation with the dose. Tissue reactions were clearly observed and were quantitatively assessed as a function of dose. Track detectors proved to be valuable to determine the correlation between the dose and tissue damage . This biological experimental model proved useful to analyze the response of tissues to a gradient of doses yielded by a proton beam. (author)

  20. Effect of quercetin on paracetamole-induced liver disjunction in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayat, I.S.

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, increasing attention has been given to the role of free radicals generated through oxidation stress. Persons subjected to radiation, such as radiotherapy, consuming analgesic drugs such as paracetamole which accumulates at relatively high concentration in liver, are in need to be investigated to explore the synergetic effects of these stresses. Many radical scavengers, interestingly naturally occurring antioxidants, have been found to be effective in inhibiting the oxidative damage Quercetin, the well known phenolic compound widely present in the plant kingdom, has been investigated for its possible protection effect against gamma irradiation and paracetamole-induced hepatic damage. Data revealed serious effects of oral administration of sublethal dose of paracetamole (500 mg/kg) and/or exposure to 6 Gy whole body gamma irradiation on liver. This damage is reflected by increased hepatic levels of MDA, carbonyl content and ALT activity, associated by decrease in hepatic SOD, catalase and GSH when compared with respective control values. The combination of quercetin with paracetamole and/or gamma irradiation have clearly reduced liver damage. It was noticed that the restoration of peroxides and carbonyls rates has occurred. Quercetin seems to act by activation of the turnover of SOD, catalase and GSH and permitting the capitation of reactive metabolites of paracetamole as well as its ability in quenching free radicals induced by exposure of rats to gamma irradiation, thus improving regeneration in the biological tissues

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on laser-induced damage in SiO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soileau, M J; Mansour, N; Canto, E; Griscom, D L

    1988-05-01

    The effects of radiation damage on bulk laser-induced damage in SiO/sub 2/ were investigated. Samples studied included Spectrasil A, B, and WF (water free). Measurements of laser-induced breakdown were conducted with 532 and 1064 nm laser pulses of approximately 20 ns duration. Reductions of up to 40% in the laser-induced breakdown threshold were observed at 532 nm for samples exposed to 10/sup 8/ rad of ..gamma..-radiation. The decrease in breakdown threshold for irradiated SiO/sub 2/ samples at 532 nm was found to be proportional to the linear absorption of the specimen at 266 nm. These results are in good agreement with a proposed model which suggests that two-photon absorption initiated avalanche process is responsible for laser-induced breakdown for these materials.

  2. Sub-micron indent induced plastic deformation in copper and irradiated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Ch.

    1998-09-01

    In this work we aim to study the indent induced plastic deformation. For this purpose, we have developed a new approach, whereby the indentation curves provides the mechanical behaviour, while the deformation mechanisms are observed thanks to Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In order to better understand how an indent induced dislocation microstructure forms, numerical modeling of the indentation process at the scale of discrete dislocations has been worked out as well. Validation of this modeling has been performed through direct comparison of the computed microstructures with TEM micrographs of actual indents in pure Cu [001]. Irradiation induced modifications of mechanical behaviour of ion irradiated 316L have been investigated, thanks to the mentioned approach. An important hardening effect was reported from indentation data (about 50%), on helium irradiated 316L steel. TEM observations of the damage zone clearly show that this behaviour is associated with the presence of He bubbles. TEM observations of the indent induced plastic zone also showed that the extent of the plastic zone is strongly correlated with hardness, that is to say: harder materials gets a smaller plastic zone. These results thus clearly established that the selected procedure can reveal any irradiation induced hardening in sub-micron thick ion irradiated layers. The behaviour of krypton irradiated 316L steel is somewhat more puzzling. In one hand indeed, a strong correlation between the defect cluster size and densities on the irradiation temperature is observed in the 350 deg C -600 deg C range, thanks to TEM observations of the damage zone. On the other hand, irradiation induced hardening reported from indentation data is relatively small (about 10%) and shows no dependence upon the irradiation temperature (within the mentioned range). In addition, it has been shown that the reported hardening vanishes following appropriate post-irradiation annealing, although most of the TEM

  3. Kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa during fractionated irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.K.; Xu, F.X.; Landuyt, W.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa have been investigated. To assess the rate of repair 2 and 5 irradiations have been given with intervals ranging from 1 to 24 hours. It was found that the sublethal damage induced by a dose of approximately 10 Gy was fully recovered in approximately 4 hr. After a dose of 5-6 Gy, cellular repair was completed within 3 hr. The half time of repair (T1/2) was estimated to be approximately 72 min for 10 Gy and approximately 54 min for 5-6 Gy. Although these results suggest that the rate of repair is dependent on the fraction size, the possible influence of the amount of repair of sublethal radiation damage with the various fraction sizes used can not be ruled out. To evaluate the capacity of repair, a single dose, 2, 4 and 10 fractions have been given in a maximal overall time of 3 days in order to minimize the influence of repopulation. The slope of the isoeffective curve was 0.32 and the alpha/beta ratio was 8.5 Gy. This indicates that the capacity of cellular repair of lip mucosa is similar to those of other rapidly proliferating tissues but smaller than those of late responding tissues. The results of the present and other studies demonstrate that there are considerable differences in the repair characteristics between acutely and late responding tissues. These features have to be dealt with when fractionation schedules are markedly altered

  4. Radiation-induced Pulmonary Damage in Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Su Mi; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Mi Mun; Kim, In Ah; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the incidence of radiation induced lung damage after the radiation therapy for the patients with carcinoma of the lung. Method and Materials: Sixty-six patients with lung cancer (squamous cell carcinoma 27, adenocarcinoma 14, large cell carcinoma 2, small cell carcinoma 13, unknown 10) were treated with definitive, postoperative or palliative radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy between July 1987 and December 1991. There were 50 males and 16 females with median age of 63 years(range: 33-80 years). Total lung doses ranged from 500 to 6,660 cGy (median 3960 cGy) given in 2 to 38 fractions (median 20) over a range of 2 to 150 days (median 40 days) using 6 MV or 15 MV linear accelerator. To represent different fractionation schedules of equivalent biological effect, the estimated single dose(ED) model, ED=D·N-0.377·T-0.058 was used in which D was the lung dose in cGy, N was the number of fractions, and T was the overall treatment time in days. The range of ED was 370 to 1357. The endpoint was a visible increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on chest X-ray as observed independently by three diagnostic radiologists. Patients were grouped according to ED, treatment duration, treatment modality and age, and the percent incidence of pulmonary damage for each group was determined. Result: In 40 of 66 patients, radiation induced change was seen on chest radiographs between 11 days and 314 days after initiation of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was increased according to increased ED, which was statistically significant (p=0.001). Roentgenographic charges consistent with radiation pneumonitis were seen in 100% of patients receiving radiotherapy after lobectomy or pneumonectomy, which was not statistically significant. In 32 patients who also received chemotherapy, there was no difference in the incidence of radiation induced charge between the group with radiation

  5. Renal effects of renal x irradiation and induced autoallergic glomerulonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappaport, D.S.; Casarett, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine what influence a single large x-ray exposure of kidney has on the development and course of an experimental autoallergic glomerulonephritis (EAG) in rats. EAG was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by immunization with Bordetella pertussis vaccine and homogenate of homologous kidney tissue and Freund's complete adjuvant. Progressive arteriolonephrosclerosis (ANS) was observed in right (irradiated) kidneys following unilateral renal irradiation (1500 rad). Rats were either immunized, sham-immunized, irradiated, sham-irradiated, or both immunized and irradiated. Light and immunofluorescent microscopic observation, urine protein content, and kidney weights were evaluated. In immunized-irradiated animals the effects of irradiation and immunization were largely additive. Immunization did not considerably influence the development and course of ANS and irradiation did not considerably influence the development and course of EAG

  6. Depth distribution of displacement damage in α-iron under triple beam ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, L.L.; Bentley, J.; Jesser, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The depth dependence of the defect structures was determined for iron irradiated at 850 0 K with 4 MeV Fe 2+ and energetic helium and deuteron ions to 10 dpa and fusion levels of helium and deuterium. From the damage profiles, a sectioning depth of 0.9 μm was selected for studies of iron and bcc iron alloys, such as ferritic steels, utilizing similar irradiation parameters. A comparison of the experimental damage profile to the deposited energy and deposited ion profiles calculated by E-DEP-1 indicated a possible overestimate of the LSS stopping power of at least 22%

  7. Relationship between peel damage and the accumulation of limonene in four varieties of irradiated oranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli-Donini, M.L.; Baraldi, D.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of radiation with regard to damage in Citrus fruits are studied in relation to the concentration of limonene, the main component of the oil glands. Control samples of four orange varieties showed no exocarp damage during storage, whereas the irrdiated samples showed varying degrees of browning depending of variety, exposure (100 to 200 krads), storage temperature (5 and 20 0 C) and the ripening stage at which the oranges were irradiated. A correlation has been shown to exist between peel browning during storage and both extracted and volatile limonene content. Irradiation appeared to increase the permeability of the epidermal tissues and the synthesis of limonene. (author)

  8. Comparison of ion irradiation damage in three grades of unalloyed molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, E.R.

    1976-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to characterize the ion irradiation damage in three grades of unalloyed molybdenum. The materials were irradiated with 5 MeV Ni 2+ ions at temperatures of 900 and 1000 0 C. Major differences exist in both the void and dislocation components of the damage and are attributed to differences in the carbon content of the three materials. A model, whereby carbon atoms segregate to small loops and decrease the bias for self interstitials, is used to qualitatively explain the observed variations in microstructure

  9. Direct round window membrane application of dexamethasone in the protection of the guinea pigs'cochlea against irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Guo GuangWei; Su Jiping

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of dexamethasone applied to round window membrane (RWM) against radiation-induced inner ear damage in guinea pigs, in order to provide the evidence for preventing and treating radiation-induced inner ear damage. Methods: 130 guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups. (1) Dexamethasone group( n = 45): The guinea pigs were injected with dexamethasone through an intact RWM on right ear for one time after being treated with 70 Gy 60 Co γ irradiation. (2) Irradiation group(n = 45) : The guinea pigs were treated with 70 Gy 60 Co γ irradiation. (3) Saline group (n = 30): Applying of normal saline through an intact RWM on right ear for one time after being treated with 70 Gy 60 Co γ irradiation. (4) Control group(n =45) : Auditory brainstem response (ABR) was tested before the 3 rd day, the second week and the second month after irradiation (treatment) in the first three groups. The animals were sacrificed right after the ABR test and the middle ear mucosa was observed simultaneously. The hair cells were observed by surface preparation of the basilar membrane and scanning electron microscope ( SEM). Results: The normal ABR threshold is (8.2 ± 2.8) dB. The ABR thresholds increased in those of the three groups treated with irradiation and were rising with time. At the 3rd day, the second week and the second month, ABR thresholds of the dexamethasone group were (24.0 ± 14.1), (27.1 ± 9.9) and (38.0 ± 15.1) dB, respectively, while the irradiation group were (24.5 ± 13.5), (39.5 ± 15.4) and (57.2 ± 18.4) dB. The saline group were (27.0 ± 14.6) and (42.8 ± 13.5) dB, respectively. ABR thresholds of the dexamethasone group at the second week and the second month both decreased compared with those of the irradiation group and saline group ( P < 0.05) . In the control group, the outer hair cell lost by 8.0 ± 2.7 and inner hair cell by 3.7 ± 1.2. The lost quantities of the inner hair cells and outer hair cells

  10. Preventing Ultraviolet Light-Induced Damage: The Benefits of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of fruit peels contain antioxidants that protect the bacterium "Escherichia coli" against damage induced by ultraviolet light. Antioxidants neutralise free radicals, thus preventing oxidative damage to cells and deoxyribonucleic acid. A high survival rate of UV-exposed cells was observed when grapefruit or grape peel extract was…

  11. Cytogenetic damage, oncogenic transformation and p53 induction in human epithelial cells in response to irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Mark

    Ionizing radiation can have several different effects on cells, some are almost instantaneous such as the generation of DNA damage, other cellular responses take a matter of minutes or hours - DNA repair protein induction/activation, and others may take months or even years to be manifested - carcinogenesis. Human epithelial cell lines derived from both normal, non-neoplastic tissues and from a malignant source were cultured in order to examine several effects of ionizing radiation on such cell types. Cells not from a malignant source were previously immortalized by viral infection or by transfection with viral sequences. Simian virus 40 immortalised uroepithelial cells (SV-HUC) were found to be approximately a factor of two fold more radioresistant than cells of malignant origin (T24) in terms of unrepaired clastogenic damage i.e. assessment of micronuclei levels following irradiation. SV-HUC lines unlike T24 cells are non-tumourigenic when inoculated into nude athymic mice. SV-HUC lines proved very resistant to full oncogenic transformation using radiation and chemical carcinogens. However, morphological alterations and decreased anchorage dependant growth was observed in post carcinogen treated cells after appropriate cell culture conditions were utilized. The progression from this phenotype to a fully tumourigenic one was not recorded in this study. The ability of ionizing radiation to induce increased levels of the nuclear phosphoprotein p53 was also assessed using several different cell lines. SV- HUC and T24 cell lines failed to exhibit any increased p53 stabilization following irradiation. One cell line, a human papilloma virus transformed line (HPV) did show an approximate two fold increase of the wild type p53 protein after treatment with radiation. Only the cell line HPV showed any cell cycle delay, resulting in accumulation of cells in the G2/M compartment in post irradiation cell cycle analysis. The status of p53 was also assessed i.e. wild type or

  12. Remarks on the mathematical description of materials damage by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, E.

    1987-01-01

    In describing radiation damage processes in materials, the chemical rate theory proves to be the most effective mathematical method. The applicability, and even the validity, of this theory, which has been successfully applied in many other scientific fields, have been questioned by some authors. After rigorous mathematical analysis of the relevant rate equations and the corresponding self-consistent calculation of sink strengths, the main criticisms on this subject can be disproved

  13. An ESR study of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Hussain, Mohammed S.; Morishita, Norio; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Ukai, Mitsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2009-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study was performed on the radicals induced irradiated fresh mangoes. Fresh Philippine mangoes were irradiated by the γ-rays, lyophilized and powdered. The ESR spectrum of the dry specimen showed a strong main peak at g=2.004 and a pair of peaks at both magnetic fields of the main peak. The main peak detected from flesh and skin specimens faded away in a few days after the irradiation. On the other hand, the side peaks showed a well-defined dose response even 9 days after the irradiation. The side-peak is a useful mean to define the irradiation on fresh mangoes. (author)

  14. Density of oxidation-induced stacking faults in damaged silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, F.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Verwey, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    A model for the relation between density and length of oxidation-induced stacking faults on damaged silicon surfaces is proposed, based on interactions of stacking faults with dislocations and neighboring stacking faults. The model agrees with experiments.

  15. Induction and repair of DNA base damage studied in X-irradiated CHO cells using the M. luteus extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehe, C.; Dikomey, E.

    1994-01-01

    DNA base damage was measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells X-irradiated under aerobic conditions using an extract of the bacterium Micrococcus luteus. The glycosylases and endonucleases present in this extract recognize damaged bases and convert them into strand breaks (termed endonuclease-sensitive sites, enss). Strand breaks were detected by the alkaline unwinding technique. The induction of enss was measured for X-ray doses ranging up to 45 Gy. The relative frequency of all enss related to all radiation induced strand breaks was 1.7 ± 0.4. Repair of enss was studied for a radiation dose of 45 Gy. The number of enss was found to decrease exponentially with time after irradiation with a half-time of τ enss = 37 ± 8 min. The repair kinetics that were also measured for all X-ray-induced DNA strand breaks were found to consist of three phases: fast, intermediate and slow. The intermediate phase was fitted under the assumption that this phase results from the information and repair of secondary single-strand breaks generated by enzymatic incision at the sites of base damage repair. (author)

  16. Effects of cavitation on damage calculations in ion-irradiated P7 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Farrens, S.N.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of voids on the depth-dependent damage energy in ion-irradiated metals. Corrections to the dose at the swelling peak will be used to obtain the swelling rate of ion-irradiated 316-type stainless steels. Samples of the P7 alloy were ion-irradiated to four fluence levels up to a peak dose level of 100 dpa at 650 0 C. The depth-dependent void parameters extracted in cross section were used to model the effect of voids on the depth-dependent damage produced during 14 MeV nickel ion irradiation. An increase in the range of damage produced from the original foil surface for the target containing voids was modeled as a first-order correction to the damage profile. A second-order effect, void straggling, was shown to cause a time-dependent decrease in the damage rate at the peak swelling depth. Corrections applied to the dose at the peak swelling depth yield swelling rates approaching 0.7%/dpa

  17. The morphology of radiation damage in copper irradiated with neutrons at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemm, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis is an investigation of the radiation damage morphology of high purity copper crystals irradiated with fast neutrons at temperatures in the range of 250 to 400 degrees C. At these high temperatures neutron damage is found to accumulate into large 3-dimensional rafts up to 100 μm in size, and the well known homogeneous distribution of black dot damage which is characteristic of irradiations at low temperatures is not observed. The characteristics and composition of the rafts of damage at different temperatures in the range 250 to 400 degrees C have been compared and found to differ to a large extent. It has also been shown that the background areas between rafts contain a rather low density of damage at all temperatures studied. It is therefore concluded that many of the interstitial atoms formed during irradiation migrate over large distances through the crystal lattice to precipitate at the sites of the dislocations forming the large rafts, and so denuded inter-rafts areas are left behind. It is proposed that these large rafts originate from grown-in dislocations present in the crystal before irradiation

  18. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-09-29

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model.Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells.

  19. Impact of environmental contamination on laser induced damage of silica optics in Laser MegaJoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bien-Aime, K.

    2009-11-01

    Laser induced damage impact of molecular contamination on fused polished silica samples in a context of high power laser fusion facility, such as Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) has been studied. One of the possible causes of laser induced degradation of optical component is the adsorption of molecular or particular contamination on optical surfaces. In the peculiar case of LMJ, laser irradiation conditions are a fluence of 10 J/cm 2 , a wavelength of 351 nm, a pulse duration of 3 ns for a single shot/days frequency. Critical compounds have been identified thanks to environmental measurements, analysis of material outgassing, and identification of surface contamination in the critical environments. Experiments of controlled contamination involving these compounds have been conducted in order to understand and model mechanisms of laser damage. Various hypotheses are proposed to explain the damage mechanism. (author)

  20. Change in the dibenzyldimethylammonium accumulation by irradiated Streptococcus cells caused by radiation damage modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Leont'eva, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Anoxia, concentrated cell suspension, glutathione (10 -4 -10 -2 M) or low concentrations of cysteine (10 -4 -10 -3 M) exerted a radioprotective effect and suppressed the accumulation of dibenzyldimethylammonium chloride (DDA + ) by γ-irradiated (40 krad) S. faecalis cells. Dilution of the cell suspensions and higher cysteine concentrations (>10 -3 M) increased the effects of irradiation on bacterial accumulation of DDA + and decreased the cell survival. The lethal action of irradiation apparently involves damage to the mechanisms which maintain a normal membrane potential

  1. The Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis against Excessive Light-Induced Cell Damage in Retina and Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Murase

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the effects of Brazilian green propolis and its constituents against white light- or UVA-induced cell damage in mouse retinal cone-cell line 661W or human skin-derived fibroblast cells (NB1-RGB. Methods. Cell damage was induced by 3,000lx white light for 24 h or 4/10 J/cm2 UVA exposure. Cell viability was assessed by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining or by tetrazolium salt (WST-8 cell viability assay. The radical scavenging activity of propolis induced by UVA irradiation in NB1-RGB cells was measured using a reactive-oxygen-species- (ROS- sensitive probe CM-H2DCFDA. Moreover, the effects of propolis on the UVA-induced activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK were examined by immunoblotting. Results. Treatment with propolis and two dicaffeoylquinic acids significantly inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by white light in 661W. Propolis and its constituents inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by UVA in NB1-RGB. Moreover, propolis suppressed the intracellular ROS production by UVA irradiation. Propolis also inhibited the levels of phosphorylated-p38 and ERK by UVA irradiation. Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis may become a major therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AMD and skin damage induced by UV irradiation.

  2. TEM study of damage recovery in SiC by swift Xe ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratov, V.A., E-mail: skuratov@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); O’Connell, J. [Centre for HRTEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Sohatsky, A.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Neethling, J. [Centre for HRTEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    The microstructure of 4H–SiC samples subsequently irradiated with low energy He (10 keV), Ti (220 keV) and high energy (167 MeV) Xe ions has been studied using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. It was found that xenon ions with fluences above 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} restore crystallinity in a heavily damaged partially amorphous zone. No, or negligible damage recovery is observed in fully amorphized layers of silicon carbide.

  3. TEM study of damage recovery in SiC by swift Xe ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuratov, V.A.; O’Connell, J.; Sohatsky, A.S.; Neethling, J.

    2014-01-01

    The microstructure of 4H–SiC samples subsequently irradiated with low energy He (10 keV), Ti (220 keV) and high energy (167 MeV) Xe ions has been studied using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. It was found that xenon ions with fluences above 10 13 cm −2 restore crystallinity in a heavily damaged partially amorphous zone. No, or negligible damage recovery is observed in fully amorphized layers of silicon carbide

  4. Deuterium ion irradiation damage and deuterium trapping mechanism in candidate stainless steel material (JPCA2) for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizuka, Norihiro; Kurita, Takaaki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Muroga, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    An improved austenitic stainless steel (JPCA), a candidate material for fusion reactor, is irradiated at room temperature with deuterium ion beams. Desorption spectra of deuterium gas is measured at various increased temperatures and defects formed under irradiation are observed by transmission electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of the thermal release of deuteriums and the characteristics of irradiation-induced defects involved in the process. In the deuterium deportion spectra observed, five release stages are found to exist at 90 deg C, 160 deg C, 220 deg C, 300 deg C and 400 deg C, referred to as Stage I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Stage I is interpreted as representing the release of deuteriums trapped in point defects (presumably vacancies) formed under irradiation. The energy of desorption from the trapping sites is estimated at 0.8 eV. Stage II is concluded to be associated with the release of deuteriums trapped in a certain kind of existing defects. Stage III involves the release of deuteriums that are trapped in dislocations, dislocation loops or dislocated portions of stacking fault tetrahedra. This release occurs significantly in processed materials and other materials irradiated with high energy ion beams that may cause cascade damage. Stage IV is interpreted in terms of thermal decomposition of small deuterium clusters. Stage V is associated with the decomposition of rather large deuterium clusters grown on the {111} plane. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Electrical resistivity and dechanneling study of radiation defects in iron by 235U fission fragments (F.F.). I - Study of damage induced by F.F. Irradiation at 20K. II - Recovery of radiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, Nicole.

    1979-09-01

    The irradiation by 235 U fission fragments (F.F.) of two iron samples of different purities (the essential impurity being C) have been studied. Comparative measurements of electrical resistivity and dechanneling of 5 MeV α-particles have been made during irradiation and subsequent recovery. The production curves provide, from their slopes at the origin, the following informations: 14000 Frenkel pairs by F.F. (from electrical resistivity); aggregate's rate: 5 per mille (from dechanneling). These curves do not follow a simple law: it seems that one observes the superposition of two saturation mechanisms with very different kinetics. During recovery, the same stages that after electrons or neutrons irradiation are observed, but with very different proportions. Dechanneling puts in evidence: -great modifications in cementite precipitation of an Fe-C alloy, by irradiation; - the recovery stage of loops starting from 800 K and with an activation energy approximately 1 eV; - the preponderant effect of clustering during stages Isub(D), Isub(E), IIsub(C) and IIsub(D) [fr

  6. SPECTER-ANL, Neutron Damage for Material Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SPECTER calculates spectral- averaged displacements, recoil spectra, gas production, and total damage energy (Kerma) for 41 pure elements using ENDF/B-V derived cross sections. The user need only specify a neutron energy spectrum. Because SPECTER does not handle compounds, SPECOMP was developed to determine displacement damage for alloys, insulators, and breeder materials. 2 - Method of solution: In SPECTER elastic scattering is treated exactly including angular distributions from ENDF/B-V. Inelastic scattering calculations consider both discrete and continuous nuclear level distributions. Multiple (n,xn) reactions use a Monte Carlo technique to derive the recoil distributions. The (n,d) and (n,t) reactions are treated as (n,p) and (n, 3 He) as (n, 4 He). The neutron-gamma reaction and subsequent beta-decay are also included, using a new treatment of gamma-gamma coincidences, angular correlations, beta-neutrino correlations and the incident neutron energy. The Lindhard model was used to compute the energy available for nuclear displacement at each recoil energy. SPECOMP reads the required files from SPECTER, computes secondary displacement functions for each combination of recoil and matrix atom, and then integrates over recoil energy to find the net displacement cross section at each neutron energy. Damage due to neutron, gamma-ray and beta decay events is then added in and the results are summed to obtain the total dpa cross section. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The DISCS computer code was used to process ENDF/B-V data for 41 pure elements for use with SPECTER-ANL. SPECOMP can use any combination of four elements in a single run

  7. Photorefractive response and optical damage of LiNbO3 optical waveguides produced by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, J.; Carrascosa, M.; García-Cabañes, A.; Caballero-Calero, O.; Crespillo, M.; Olivares, J.

    2009-06-01

    The photorefractive behaviour of a novel type of optical waveguides fabricated in LiNbO3 by swift heavy ion irradiation is investigated. First, the electro-optic coefficient r 33 of these guides that is crucial in the photorefractive effect is measured. Second, two complementary aspects of the photorefractive response are studied: (i) recording and light-induced and dark erasure of holographic gratings; (ii) optical beam degradation in single-beam configuration. The main photorefractive parameters, recording and erasing time constants, maximum refractive-index change and optical damage thresholds are determined.

  8. Self-ion Irradiation Damage of F/M and ODS steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young-Bum; Noh, Sanghoon; Jang, Jinsung; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are potential high-temperature materials that are stabilized by dispersed particles at elevated temperatures. These dispersed particles improve the tensile strength and creep rupture strength, they are expected to increase the operation temperature up to approximately 650 .deg. C and also enhance the energy efficiency of the fusion reactor. Some reports described that the nano-clusters are strongly resistant to coarsening by annealing up to 1000 .deg. C, and nanoclusters do not change after ion irradiation up to 0.7 dpa at 300 .deg. C. ODS steels will be inevitably exposed to neutron irradiation condition; the irradiation damages, creep and swelling are always great concern. The dispersed oxide particles are believed to determine the performance of the steel, even the radiation resistance. In this study, F/M and ODS model alloys of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) were irradiated by Fe 3+ self-ion to emulate the neutron irradiation effect. In this study, Fe 3+ self-ion irradiation is used as means of introducing radiation damage in F/M steel and ODS steel. The ion accelerator named DuET (in Kyoto University, Japan) was used for irradiation of Fe 3+ ion by 6.4 MeV at 300 .deg. C. The maximum damage rate in F/M and ODS steels were estimated roughly 6 dpa. After radiation, point or line defects were dominantly observed in F/M steel, on the other hands, small circular cavities were typically observed in ODS steel. Nanoindentation is a useful tool to determine the irradiationinduced hardness change in the damage layer of ionirradiated iron base alloys

  9. Free radical scavenging and the expression of potentially lethal damage in X-irradiated repair-deficient Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1987-01-01

    When cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, they suffer lethal damage (LD), potentially lethal damage (PLD), and sublethal damage (SLD). All three forms of damage may be caused by direct or indirect radiation action or by the interaction of indirect radiation products with direct DNA damage. In this report I examine the expression of LD and PLD caused by the indirect action of X rays in isogenic, repair-deficient Escherichia coli. The radiosensitivity of a recA mutant, deficient both in pre- and post replication recombination repair and SOS induction (inducible error-prone repair), was compared to that of a recB mutant which is recombination deficient but SOS proficient and to a previously studied DNA polymerase 1-deficient mutant (polA) which lacks the excision repair pathway. Indirect damage by water radicals (primarily OH radicals) was circumvented by the presence of 2 M glycerol during irradiation. Indirect X-ray damage by water radicals accounts for at least 85% of the PLD found in exposed repair-deficient cells. The DNA polymerase 1-deficient mutant is most sensitive to indirect damage with the order of sensitivity polA1 greater than recB greater than or equal to recA greater than wild type. For the direct effects of X rays the order of sensitivity is recA greater than recB greater than polA1 greater than wild type. The significance of the various repair pathways in mitigating PLD by direct and indirect damage is discussed

  10. Dependency of irradiation damage density on tritium migration behaviors in Li2TiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Toda, Kensuke; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Tritium migration behaviors in Li 2 TiO 3 with the increase of irradiation damage density were investigated by means of electron spin resonance and thermal desorption spectroscopy. The irradiation damages of F + -centers and O − -centers were formed by neutron irradiation, and their damage densities were increased with increasing neutron fluence. Tritium release temperature was clearly shifted toward higher temperature side with increasing neutron fluence, i.e. increasing damage density. The rate determining process for tritium release was also clearly changed depending on the damage density. Tritium release was mainly controlled by tritium diffusion process in crystalline grain of Li 2 TiO 3 at lower neutron fluence. The apparent tritium diffusivity was reduced as the damage density in Li 2 TiO 3 increased due to the introduction of tritium trapping/detrapping sites for diffusing tritium. Then, tritium trapping/detrapping processes began to control the overall tritium release with further damage introductions as the amount of tritium trapping sites increased enough to trap most of tritium in Li 2 TiO 3 . The effects of water vapor in purge gas on tritium release behaviors were also investigated. It was considered that hydrogen isotopes in purge gas would be dissociated and adsorbed on the surface of Li 2 TiO 3 . Then, hydrogen isotopes diffused inward Li 2 TiO 3 would occupy the tritium trapping sites before diffusing tritium reaches to these sites, promoting apparent tritium diffusion consequently. Kinetics analysis of tritium release for highly damaged Li 2 TiO 3 showed that the rate determining process of tritium release was the detrapping process of tritium formed as hydroxyl groups. The rate of tritium detrapping as hydroxyl groups was determined by the kinetic analysis, and was comparable to tritium release kinetics for Li 2 O, LiOH and Li 4 TiO 4 . The dangling oxygen atoms (O − -centers) formed by neutron irradiation would contribute strongly on the

  11. Elastoplastic simulation coupled to the induced anisotropic damage for argilites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarelli, A.S.; Shao, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    A constitutive model coupling plastic deformation and induced damage is proposed to describe the mechanical behaviour of a shale rock, the argilites of East. The plastic behaviour is produced by a typical cohesive-frictional model. The material damage is represented by a second rank symmetric tensor. The damage criterion and evolution rate is related to tensile strains. The damage effect on plastic flow is also considered by an anisotropic transformation. The model formulation and a simple procedure for the determination of model parameters from standards tests is proposed. The validity of the model is checked against experimental data in various loading conditions. (author)

  12. Photoexcited riboflavin induces oxidative damage to human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Yoshioka, Takuto

    2015-08-01

    Photoexcited riboflavin induced damage of human serum albumin (HSA), a water soluble protein, resulting in the diminishment of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue. Because riboflavin hardly photosensitized singlet oxygen generation and sodium azide, a singlet oxygen quencher, did not inhibit protein damage, electron transfer-mediated oxidation of HSA was speculated. Fluorescence lifetime of riboflavin was not affected by HSA, suggesting that the excited triplet state of riboflavin is responsible for protein damage through electron transfer. In addition, the preventive effect of xanthone derivatives, triplet quenchers, on photosensitized protein damage could be evaluated using this photosensitized reaction system of riboflavin and HSA.

  13. Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations after Low and High LET Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding the delayed, non-targeted effects of radiation including radiationinduced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET x-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. MiRNA shown to be altered in expression level after x-ray irradiation are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Different and higher incidence of epigenetic changes were observed after exposure to low LET x-rays than high LET Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes even though they are chromosomally stable suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise in the cell without initiating RIGI.

  14. Effects of ozone oxidative preconditioning on radiation-induced organ damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Guven, Berrak; Tasdoven, Ilhan; Bektas, Sibel; Can, Murat; Comert, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Because radiation-induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to harmful effects of free radicals, molecules with direct free radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radioprotectors. It has been demonstrated that controlled ozone administration may promote an adaptation to oxidative stress, preventing the damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Thus, we hypothesized that ozone would ameliorate oxidative damage caused by total body irradiation (TBI) with a single dose of 6 Gy in rat liver and ileum tissues. Rats were randomly divided into groups as follows: control group; saline-treated and irradiated (IR) groups; and ozone oxidative preconditioning (OOP) and IR groups. Animals were exposed to TBI after a 5-day intraperitoneal pretreatment with either saline or ozone (1 mg/kg/day). They were decapitated at either 6 h or 72 h after TBI. Plasma, liver and ileum samples were obtained. Serum AST, ALT and TNF-α levels were elevated in the IR groups compared with the control group and were decreased after treatment with OOP. TBI resulted in a significant increase in the levels of MDA in the liver and ileal tissues and a decrease of SOD activities. The results demonstrated that the levels of MDA liver and ileal tissues in irradiated rats that were pretreated with ozone were significantly decreased, while SOD activities were significantly increased. OOP reversed all histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicated that ozone could increase the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism in rats and there by protect the animals from radiation-induced organ toxicity. (author)

  15. Laser Induced Optical Damage in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    the full angle subtended by the object. 1 The sun, which subtends 20 = 0.54’, can be concentrated about 46,000 times. Using nonimaging techniques...cone, these nonimaging techniques can concentrate sunlight to intensities as high as -108 W/m 2, (or 104 W/cm 2 as is more often reported when dealing...REFERENCES 1. P. Gleckman. J. O’Gallagher, and R. Winston , "Approaching the Irradiance of the Sun Through Norimaging Optics ," Optics News 15:33, May 1989

  16. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    conference organization. As many of you have experienced, the printed proceedings of these Laser Damage Symposia in our personal libraries are...responsible person or agency. I look forward to our continued relationship. Finally, let me thank the organizers of this Symposium. They have done a...the professional operation of the Symposium and Ms. Susie Rivera and Ms. Sheila Aaker for their part in the preparation and publication of the

  17. Quinacrine pretreatment reduces microwave-induced neuronal damage by stabilizing the cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xue-feng; Wu, Yan; Qu, Wen-rui; Fan, Ming; Zhao, Yong-qi

    2018-01-01

    Quinacrine, widely used to treat parasitic diseases, binds to cell membranes. We previously found that quinacrine pretreatment reduced microwave radiation damage in rat hippocampal neurons, but the molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Considering the thermal effects of microwave radiation and the protective effects of quinacrine on heat damage in cells, we hypothesized that quinacrine would prevent microwave radiation damage to cells in a mechanism associated with cell membrane stability. To test this, we used retinoic acid to induce PC12 cells to differentiate into neuron-like cells. We then pretreated the neurons with quinacrine (20 and 40 mM) and irradiated them with 50 mW/cm2 microwaves for 3 or 6 hours. Flow cytometry, atomic force microscopy and western blot assays revealed that irradiated cells pretreated with quinacrine showed markedly less apoptosis, necrosis, and membrane damage, and greater expression of heat shock protein 70, than cells exposed to microwave irradiation alone. These results suggest that quinacrine stabilizes the neuronal membrane structure by upregulating the expression of heat shock protein 70, thus reducing neuronal injury caused by microwave radiation. PMID:29623929

  18. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  19. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (pextract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (pextract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  20. The Possible Protective Role of Curcumin against Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damages in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.R.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of curcumin on radiation induced damages in albino male mice. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg body weight curcumin 30 minutes prior to whole body gamma-irradiation (4Gy). Animals were sacrificed after 1, 3 and 7 days of the irradiation. The possible radioprotective effect of curcumin on bone marrow chromosomes, DNA fragmentation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, total free radicals in spleen, and peripheral blood differential count was examined at the different time intervals of the experiment. Radiation exposure resulted in a statistically significant elevation in the percentage of the aberrant metaphases, total amount of chromosomal damage, percentage of the DNA fragmentation, (MDA) level, decline in the activities of (SOD) and (GSH) contents, at 1, 3 and 7 days post-irradiation, elevation in the total free radicals one day post-irradiation and percentage of the total number of normal and abnormal white blood cells after 1, 3 days of irradiation specially the abnormal lymphocytes and neutrophils. Curcumin showed a clastogenic effect that it caused elevation of the total number of aberrant cells, structural and numerical aberrant cells after 1 and 3 days of the experiment. Moreover, curcumin caused a decline in the liver (GSH) content after 1, 3 and 7 days of the experiment. On the other hand, intraperitoneal injection of curcumin before irradiation didn‘t show any protective effect on the total aberrant cells and structural aberrant cells induced by irradiation, liver (GSH) content and the percentage of the DNA fragmentation, liver (MDA) level and number of abnormal leukocytes. In contrast, it showed potentiating effect on the numerical type aberrations especially endomitosis after one day post-irradiation. In addition, elevation in the percentage of the total free radicals induced by curcumin 3 and 7 days post-irradiation

  1. Protective effects of E838 on hematopoietic damage induced by radiaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yueying; Liu, Qiang; Li, Deguan; Meng, Aimin; Wu, Hongying; Lu, Lu; Wang, Yong; Wang, Ruqin; Zhang, Liangan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose E838 was a new Ethinyl estradiol derivative with radioprotective property which could significantly elevate the irradiated mice survival rate of 30d. E838 also showed prevention and therapeutical effect in the leucopenia caused by radio-chemotherapy, but exhibit little estrogenic-like effects. In this study, we examined the protective effects of E838 on DNA damage and hematopoietic injury induced by irradiation in IRM-2 mice. Methods: IRM-2 mice were randomized into six groups: control, E838 5 mg/kg, E838 7.5 mg/kg, E838 10 mg/kg, ethinyl estradiol and nilestriol. After intraperitoneal injection 3 consecutive days, mice were exposed 1 Gy whole body γ-irradiation. Then the peripheral blood lymphocyte was collected to observe DNA double-strand breaks by neutral single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Comet images were analyzed by CASP software. Two indexes were choiced, i.e. amount of DNA in the comet tail (tDNA %), Olive Tail Moment (OTM ). In the another experiment, treatment regimen same to the above experiment but the mice were exposed to 7.5 Gy whole body γ-irradiation. Bone marrow nucleated cell (BMC) per femur and endogenous spleen colony (CFU-S) were determined to evaluate the hematopoietic function at 9 days after irradiation. Results: tDNA % in different dose E838 (5, 7.5, 10 mg/kg) treated mice were decreased 67.6 %, 82.7 %, 74.9 % compared to the radiation control, respectively(P<0.001). The tDNA % reduction in 7.5mg/kg group were greater than those in ethinyl' estradiol (66.7 %) and nilestriol (66.7 %) treated mice significantly(P<0.01). OTM in E838 (5, 7.5, 10 mg/kg) treated irradiated mice were decreased 88.1 %, 95.3 %, 92.5 %(P<0.01), the OTM reduction in 5, 7.5mg/kg group were greater than those in ethinyl estradiol (86.3 %) and nilestriol(87.5 %) treated irradiated mice (P<0.01). BMC and CFU-S in E838 treated irradiated mice were 40 %∼60% higher than those in irradiated control mice (P<0.05∼0.01). Conclusion: The results

  2. Consequences of PAI-1 specific deletion in endothelium on radiation-induced intestinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced injury to healthy tissues is a real public health problem, since they are one of the most limiting factors that restrict efficiency of radiation therapy. This problematic is also part of the French Cancer Plan 2014-2017, and involves clinical research. Concepts surrounding the development of radiation-induced damage have gradually evolved into a contemporary and integrated view of the pathogenesis, involving all compartments of target tissue. Among them, endothelium seems to be central in the sequence of interrelated events that lead to the development of radiation-induced damage, although there are rare concrete elements that support this concept. By using new transgenic mouse models, this PhD project provides a direct demonstration of an endothelium-dependent continuum in evolution of radiation-induced intestinal damage. Indeed, changes in the endothelial phenotype through targeted deletion of the gene SERPINE1, chosen because of its key role in the development of radiation enteritis, influences various parameters of the development of the disease. Thus, lack of PAI-1 secretion by endothelial cells significantly improves survival of the animals, and limits severity of early and late tissue damage after a localized small bowel irradiation. Furthermore, these mice partially KO for PAI-1 showed a decrease in the number of apoptotic intestinal stem cells in the hours following irradiation, a decrease in the macrophages infiltrate density one week after irradiation, and a change in the polarization of macrophages throughout the pathophysiological process. In an effort to protect healthy tissues from radiation therapy side effects, without hindering the cancer treatment, PAI-1 seems to be an obvious therapeutic target. Conceptually, this work represents the direct demonstration of the link between endothelium phenotype and radiation enteritis pathogenesis. (author)

  3. Radiation induced damage to the lipid contents of bacteria and cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholipour Khalili, K.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, exponentially growing phase of E. Coli. K12-N167 and cultured mouse leukemic L5178Y were used to study the effect of gamma irradiation on phospholipid contents. Following irradiation, both bacteria and cultured cells were incubated with either 14 C or 32 P labelled precursors for periods of cell division time. Phospholipid composition and their contents were detected in both the bacteria and cultured cells by using liquid scintillation counting and autoradiography methods. In contrast, as radiation dose increased, the Phospholipid contents were decreased in the both bacteria and cultured cells. It was concluded that the changes of phospholipid contents may result to altered activities of phospholipid pathway enzymes damaged by a radiation dose. The results of this investigation would be helpful in control of induced radiation damages in cell killings in radiation workers and radiation treatment of human cancer in the clinics. (author). 35 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  4. Irradiation-enhanced and-induced mass transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation can be used to enhance diffusion, that is, to increase the rate at which equilibrium is attained, as well as to induce nonequilibrium changes. The main factors influencing whether irradiation will drive a material toward or away from equilibrium are the initial specimen microstructure and geometry, irradiation temperature, and primary recoil spectrum. This paper summarizes known effects of irradiation temperature and primary recoil spectrum on mass transport during irradiation. In comparison to either electron or heavy-ion irradiation, it is concluded that relatively low-energy, light-ion bombardment at intermediate temperatures offers the greatest potential to enhance the rate at which equilibrium is attained. The greatest departures from equilibrium can be expected from irradiation with similar particles at very low temperatures

  5. Irradiation creep induced anisotropy in a/2 dislocation populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1984-05-01

    The contribution of anisotropy in Burgers vector distribution to irradiation creep behavior has been largely ignored in irradiation creep models. However, findings on Frank loops suggest that it may be very important. Procedures are defined to identify the orientations of a/2 Burgers vectors for dislocations in face-centered cubic crystals. By means of these procedures the anisotropy in Burgers vector populations was determined for three Nimonic PE16 pressurized tube specimens irradiated under stress. Considerable anisotropy in Burgers vector population develops during irradiation creep. It is inferred that dislocation motion during irradiation creep is restricted primarily to a climb of a/2 dislocations on 100 planes. Effect of these results on irradiation creep modeling and deformation induced irradiation growth is considered

  6. Slow elimination of DNA damaged bases in the liver of old gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A I; Malakhova, L V; Fomenko, L A [AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki

    1981-01-01

    Elimination of the DNA damaged bases in the liver of old and young mice after their gamma-irradiation is studied. It is established that the incision rate of DNA gamma-damaged bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of the young ones. It is supposed to be connected with the decrease of the activity of DNA reparation ferments or with the presence of limitations in chromatin for the access of these ferments to the damaged parts of DNA in the cells of old animals.

  7. Photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balgavy, P.

    1976-01-01

    The photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in Escherichia coli Bsub(s-1), Escherichia coli B/r Hcr - and Escherichia coli B/r Hcr + cells after ultraviolet irradiation at 254 nm is 0.823 +- 0.004, 0.70 +- 0.01 and 0.53 +- 0.06, respectively, at 99% confidence limits. For the low values of the photoreactivable sector in the B/r Hcr - and B/r Hcr + strains are likely to be responsible dark repair processes which eliminate lethal damage, brought about by pyrimidine dimers, preferably in comparison with lethal damage caused by photoproducts of another type. (author)

  8. Impacts of damage production and accumulation on materials performance in irradiation environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.

    1998-01-01

    and needs to be extended to temperatures below stage V and to materials of practical interests. This requires, however, that the information regarding the effects of alloying elements and impurity atoms on the nature of the primary damage state are available from molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo...... the damage accumulation, irradiation hardening and the loss of ductility. The recently developed production bias model together with one-dimensional glide of interstitial clusters produced in the cascades has been shown to describe the damage accumulation at temperatures above stage V for pure metals...... type of simulations. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  9. Modelling low velocity impact induced damage in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents recent progress on modelling low velocity impact induced damage in fibre reinforced composite laminates. It is important to understand the mechanisms of barely visible impact damage (BVID) and how it affects structural performance. To reduce labour intensive testing, the development of finite element (FE) techniques for simulating impact damage becomes essential and recent effort by the composites research community is reviewed in this work. The FE predicted damage initiation and propagation can be validated by Non Destructive Techniques (NDT) that gives confidence to the developed numerical damage models. A reliable damage simulation can assist the design process to optimise laminate configurations, reduce weight and improve performance of components and structures used in aircraft construction.

  10. Responses and damages during long-term continuous irradiation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshito

    2011-01-01

    Effects of long-term continuous irradiation are relevant to studies in radiation ecotoxicology. To investigate plants biological responses to continuous irradiation, we performed metabolome and transcriptome analysis in a model plant, arabidopsis. Comprehensive analysis of primary metabolites using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry revealed extensive metabolic changes at early onset of growth inhibition in plants exposed to gamma rays at the dose rate of 20 Gy/day. The changes included elevated levels of B vitamins and second metabolites, commonly responsive to many abiotic and biotic stresses. Responses at early onset of growth inhibition were also observed in the transcriptome analysis using microarray, which showed up-regulation of 55 genes in plants exposed to gamma rays at 20 Gy/day. Although about a half of the up-regulated genes were also responsive just after acute irradiation, the other half was responsive only during long-term continuous irradiation. Database analyses showed that the specifically up-regulated genes to long-term continuous irradiation included genes relating to general stress responses and protein metabolism. The results of these analyses appear to reflect plants responses to progressive radiation damages, from radiation-specific responses, which repair primary DNA damage, to more general stress responses, which maintain homoeostasis against secondary damages. (author)

  11. Electron Beam Irradiation Dose Dependently Damages the Bacillus Spore Coat and Spore Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Fiester

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of spore-forming bacilli begs suitable physical or chemical methods. While many spore inactivation techniques have been proven effective, electron beam (EB irradiation has been frequently chosen to eradicate Bacillus spores. Despite its widespread use, there are limited data evaluating the effects of EB irradiation on Bacillus spores. To study this, B. atrophaeus spores were purified, suspended in sterile, distilled water, and irradiated with EB (up to 20 kGy. Irradiated spores were found (1 to contain structural damage as observed by electron microscopy, (2 to have spilled cytoplasmic contents as measured by spectroscopy, (3 to have reduced membrane integrity as determined by fluorescence cytometry, and (4 to have fragmented genomic DNA as measured by gel electrophoresis, all in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cytometry data reveal decreased spore size, increased surface alterations, and increased uptake of propidium iodide, with increasing EB dose, suggesting spore coat alterations with membrane damage, prior to loss of spore viability. The present study suggests that EB irradiation of spores in water results in substantial structural damage of the spore coat and inner membrane, and that, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent spore inactivation.

  12. Low damage electrical modification of 4H-SiC via ultrafast laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minhyung; Cahyadi, Rico; Wendorf, Joseph; Bowen, Willie; Torralva, Ben; Yalisove, Steven; Phillips, Jamie

    2018-04-01

    The electrical properties of 4H-SiC under ultrafast laser irradiation in the low fluence regime (engineering spatially localized structural and electronic modification of wide bandgap materials such as 4H-SiC with relatively low surface damage via low temperature processing.

  13. The co-evolution of microstructure features in self-ion irradiated HT9 at very high damage levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getto, E., E-mail: getto@usna.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, 21402 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Vancoevering, G.; Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Understanding the void swelling and phase evolution of reactor structural materials at very high damage levels is essential to maintaining safety and longevity of components in Gen IV fast reactors. A combination of ion irradiation and modeling was utilized to understand the microstructure evolution of ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 at high dpa. Self-ion irradiation experiments were performed on alloy HT9 to determine the co-evolution of voids, dislocations and precipitates up to 650 dpa at 460 °C. Modeling of microstructure evolution was conducted using the modified Radiation Induced Microstructure Evolution (RIME) model, which utilizes a mean field rate theory approach with grouped cluster dynamics. Irradiations were performed with 5 MeV raster-scanned Fe{sup 2+} ions on samples pre-implanted with 10 atom parts per million He. The swelling, dislocation and precipitate evolution at very high dpa was determined using Analytical Electron Microscopy in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) mode. Experimental results were then interpreted using the RIME model. A microstructure consisting only of dislocations and voids is insufficient to account for the swelling evolution observed experimentally at high damage levels in a complicated microstructure such as irradiated alloy HT9. G phase was found to have a minimal effect on either void or dislocation evolution. M{sub 2}X played two roles; a variable biased sink for defects, and as a vehicle for removal of carbon from solution, thus promoting void growth. When accounting for all microstructure interactions, swelling at high damage levels is a dynamic process that continues to respond to other changes in the microstructure as long as they occur.

  14. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  15. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  16. Hypochlorite-induced damage to nucleosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    HOCl damage to DNA bases. We show that reaction of HOCl with the exocyclic -NH(2) groups of cytidine, adenosine, and guanosine, and the ring NH groups of all bases, yields chloramines (RNHCl/RR'NCl). These are the major initial products. Chloramine decay can be accelerated by UV light and metal ions...... for radical formation is cytidine > adenosine = guanosine > uridine = thymidine. These data are inconsistent with the selectivity of HOCl attack and the stability of the resulting chloramines, but can be rationalized if chlorine transfer between bases is rapid and yields the most stable chloramine...

  17. Dose effects on damage of thymidylic acid and its components irradiated by A N+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Yu Zengliang

    1996-08-01

    Research into damage of DNA components is an important field in mechanism study to the low energy ion beam irradiation. It was found that the UV difference spectra of irradiated thymine (T) had two positive peaks caused by the changes of π electron conjugation of the pyrimidine ring, and that the residual activity of T sample irradiated by a N + ion beam was not influenced by treatments of acid and alkali as well as heat. In addition, the residual activities of irradiated thymidine (dTR) and thymidine 5'-phosphate (5'-dTMP) with and without treating of strong acid and strong alkali were also measured. With UV absorption spectrophotometry, the yield of T released from the irradiated samples of dTR and 5'-dTMP and the residual concentration of these target molecules were deduced, and it was found that the yield of T increased when the solution of the irradiated dTR sample was treated by heat but decreased when this solution was treated by acid and alkali for these treatments splitting T-S or T-S-P. On the other hand, the yield of inorganic phosphate released from the irradiated 5'-dTMP was investigated and found that it was increased by the treatment of alkali and that the increase degree was depended on the time scale of the treatment. Moreover, G(Pi) of the irradiated 5'-dTMP non-linearly decreased with increasing dose. (10 figs.)

  18. Analysis of WWER-440 and PWR RPV welds surveillance data to compare irradiation damage evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debarberis, L. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: luigi.debarberis@cec.eu.int; Acosta, B. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: beatriz.acosta-iborra@jrc.nl; Zeman, A. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sevini, F. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Ballesteros, A. [Tecnatom, Avd. Montes de Oca 1, San Sebasitan de los Reyes, E-28709 Madrid (Spain); Kryukov, A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gillemot, F. [AEKI Atomic Research Institute, Konkoly Thege M. ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Brumovsky, M. [NRI, Nuclear Research Institute, Husinec-Rez 130, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2006-04-15

    It is known that for Russian-type and Western water reactor pressure vessel steels there is a similar degradation in mechanical properties during equivalent neutron irradiation. Available surveillance results from WWER and PWR vessels are used in this article to compare irradiation damage evolution for the different reactor pressure vessel welds. The analysis is done through the semi-mechanistic model for radiation embrittlement developed by JRC-IE. Consistency analysis with BWR vessel materials and model alloys has also been performed within this study. Globally the two families of studied materials follow similar trends regarding the evolution of irradiation damage. Moreover in the high fluence range typical of operation of WWER the radiation stability of these vessels is greater than the foreseen one for PWR.

  19. Laser-induced damage to thin film dielectric coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    The laser-induced damage thresholds of dielectric thin film coatings have been found to be more than an order of magnitude lower than the bulk material damage thresholds. Prior damage studies have been inconclusive in determining the damage mechanism which is operative in thin films. A program was conducted in which thin film damage thresholds were measured as a function of laser wavelength (1.06 μm, 0.53 μm, 0.35 μm and 0.26 μm), laser pulse length (5 and 15 nanoseconds), film materials and film thickness. The large matrix of data was compared to predictions given by avalanche ionization, multiphoton ionization and impurity theories of laser damage. When Mie absorption cross-sections and the exact thermal equations were included into the impurity theory excellent agreement with the data was found. The avalanche and multiphoton damage theories could not account for most parametric variations in the data. For example, the damage thresholds for most films increased as the film thickness decreased and only the impurity theory could account for this behavior. Other observed changes in damage threshold with changes in laser wavelength, pulse length and film material could only be adequately explained by the impurity theory. The conclusion which results from this study is that laser damage in thin film coatings results from absorbing impurities included during the deposition process

  20. Grape Seed Oil Extract Protects Against Radiation-Induced Oxidative Damage in Rats Eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the beneficial effects of grape seed oil on radiation-induced oxidative stress in the irradiated rat eyes. The rats were divided into three groups; control group that received distilled water, irradiated group (R) that exposed to gamma radiation as a single dose of 6.4 Gy and irradiated + grape seed oil group (R+GSO) that administered grape seed oil for seven consecutive days then exposed to the same single gamma radiation dose followed by grape seed oil for seven additional days. Histopathological results revealed protective effect of grape seed oil on the eye tissues of rat. The results lead to the conclusion that administration of GSO prior to radiation exposure may be a promising attempt in attenuating the extent of oxidative damage accompanying radiotherapy

  1. Improvement effect of corn silk, perilla leaf and grape stem extract mixture against UVB-induced skin damage and compound 48/80-induced pruritus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byoung Ok; Shin, Jae Young; Che, Denis Nchang; Hwang, Young Min; Lee, Hyun Seo; Choi, Ji Won; Jang, Seon Il; Ryu, Cheol

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the synergistic protective effects of mixtures of corn silk, perilla leaf and grape stem extract (CPG mixture) against UVB-induced skin damage and compound 48/80-induced pruritus in mice. The results showed that treatment with CPG mixture exhibited much stronger suppressive effect on erythema and melanin index as well as melanin formation than treatment with ascorbic acid (AA) in UVB-irradiated mice. Moreover, the treatment with CPG mixture showed ameliorative effect on immune cell infiltration and collagen fiber destruction in UV-irradiated mice. The treatment with CPG mixture inhibited glutathione (GSH) depletion, lipid peroxidation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in UVB-irradiated mice. Furthermore, the treatment with CPG mixture inhibited compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior and histological changes in mice. Taken together, these results indicated that CPG mixture has potentials as functional and therapeutic materials against skin damage and itch-related skin diseases

  2. Improvement effect of corn silk, perilla leaf and grape stem extract mixture against UVB-induced skin damage and compound 48/80-induced pruritus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Byoung Ok; Shin, Jae Young; Che, Denis Nchang; Hwang, Young Min; Lee, Hyun Seo; Choi, Ji Won; Jang, Seon Il [Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Cheol [Hyangmiwon Corporation, Gimje (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the synergistic protective effects of mixtures of corn silk, perilla leaf and grape stem extract (CPG mixture) against UVB-induced skin damage and compound 48/80-induced pruritus in mice. The results showed that treatment with CPG mixture exhibited much stronger suppressive effect on erythema and melanin index as well as melanin formation than treatment with ascorbic acid (AA) in UVB-irradiated mice. Moreover, the treatment with CPG mixture showed ameliorative effect on immune cell infiltration and collagen fiber destruction in UV-irradiated mice. The treatment with CPG mixture inhibited glutathione (GSH) depletion, lipid peroxidation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in UVB-irradiated mice. Furthermore, the treatment with CPG mixture inhibited compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior and histological changes in mice. Taken together, these results indicated that CPG mixture has potentials as functional and therapeutic materials against skin damage and itch-related skin diseases.

  3. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B{sub 4}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor, G., E-mail: g.victor@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA-DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Djourelov, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko chaussee blvd, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, 30 Reactorului Str, MG-6 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Miro, S. [CEA-DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baillet, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A. [SPCTS, UMR CNRS 7315, Centre Européen de la céramique, University of Limoges (France); Gosset, D. [CEA, Saclay, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B{sub 4}C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (S{sub e} ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B{sub 4}C structure under irradiation.

  4. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, G.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Djourelov, N.; Miro, S.; Baillet, J.; Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A.; Gosset, D.

    2015-12-01

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B4C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B4C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (Se ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B4C structure under irradiation.

  5. Biological significance of the focus on DNA damage checkpoint factors remained after irradiation of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews recent reports on the focus formation and participation to checkpoint of (such phosphorylated (P-d) as below) ATM and H2AX, MDC1, 53BP1 and NBS1, and discusses their role in DNA damage checkpoint induction mainly around authors' studies. When the cell is irradiated by ionizing radiation, the subtype histone like H2AX is P-d and the formed focus', seen in the nucleus on immuno-fluorographic observation, represents the P-d H2AX at the damaged site of DNA. The role of P-d ATM (the product of causative gene of ataxia-telangiectasia mutation, a protein kinase) has been first shown by laser beam irradiation. Described are discussions on the roles and functions after irradiation in focus formation and DNA damage checkpoint of P-d H2AX (a specific histone product by the radiation like γ-ray as above), P-d ATM, MDC1 (a mediator of DNA damage check point protein 1), 53BP1, (a p53 binding protein) and NBS1 (the product of the causative gene of Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome). Authors have come to point out the remained focal size increase as implications of the efficient repair of damaged DNA, and the second cycled p53 accumulation, of tumor suppression. Thus evaluation of biological significance of these aspects, scarcely noted hitherto, is concluded important. (S.I.)

  6. Radiation damage measurements on nonmetals made during irradiation with 1 to 3 MeV electrons. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the fundamental processes producing radiation damage in nonmetals a unique facility has been developed for making optical absorption, luminescence and other measurements during irradiation with 1 to 3 MeV electrons. Measurements are made with a 13 meter long double beam spectrometer arranged so that all sensitive components, e.g., phototubes, are outside of the irradiation chamber. A computer provdies automatic control and data recording. A 256 point absorption and a 256 point luminescence spectra are recorded as often as every 40 seconds in either the 200-400 or 400-800 mm wavelength range. Samples are irradiated, at temperatures between 20 and 900 C, in an electronically controlled chamber containing He exchange gas and equipped with th