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Sample records for irradiated uranium-molybdenum alloy

  1. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-01-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm 3 were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm 3 showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  2. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1967-01-01

    A spectrographic method of analysis has been developed for uranium-molybdenum alloys containing up to 10 % Mo. The carrier distillation technique, with gallium oxide and graphite as carriers, is used for the semiquantitative determination of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Si, involving the conversion of the samples into oxides. As a consequence of the study of the influence of the molybdenum on the line intensities, it is useful to prepare only one set of standards with 0,6 % MoO 3 . Total burning excitation is used for calcium, employing two sets of standards with 0,6 and 7.5 MoO 3 . (Author) 5 refs

  3. Analysis of intergranular fission-gas bubble-size distributions in irradiated uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: jrest@anl.gov; Hofman, G.L.; Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    An analytical model for the nucleation and growth of intra and intergranular fission-gas bubbles is used to characterize fission-gas bubble development in low-enriched U-Mo alloy fuel irradiated in the advanced test reactor in Idaho as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Fuel burnup was limited to less than {approx}7.8 at.% U in order to capture the fuel-swelling stage prior to irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model couples the calculation of the time evolution of the average intergranular bubble radius and number density to the calculation of the intergranular bubble-size distribution based on differential growth rate and sputtering coalescence processes. Recent results on TEM analysis of intragranular bubbles in U-Mo were used to set the irradiation-induced diffusivity and re-solution rate in the bubble-swelling model. Using these values, good agreement was obtained for intergranular bubble distribution compared against measured post-irradiation examination (PIE) data using grain-boundary diffusion enhancement factors of 15-125, depending on the Mo concentration. This range of enhancement factors is consistent with values obtained in the literature.

  4. Analysis of intergranular fission-gas bubble-size distributions in irradiated uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rest, J.; Hofman, G. L.; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2009-04-01

    An analytical model for the nucleation and growth of intra and intergranular fission-gas bubbles is used to characterize fission-gas bubble development in low-enriched U-Mo alloy fuel irradiated in the advanced test reactor in Idaho as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Fuel burnup was limited to less than ˜7.8 at.% U in order to capture the fuel-swelling stage prior to irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model couples the calculation of the time evolution of the average intergranular bubble radius and number density to the calculation of the intergranular bubble-size distribution based on differential growth rate and sputtering coalescence processes. Recent results on TEM analysis of intragranular bubbles in U-Mo were used to set the irradiation-induced diffusivity and re-solution rate in the bubble-swelling model. Using these values, good agreement was obtained for intergranular bubble distribution compared against measured post-irradiation examination (PIE) data using grain-boundary diffusion enhancement factors of 15-125, depending on the Mo concentration. This range of enhancement factors is consistent with values obtained in the literature.

  5. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  6. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels; Desempenho sob irradiacao de elementos combustiveis do tipo U-Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-07-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm{sup 3} were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm{sup 3} showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  7. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-molybdenum alloys; Analisis espectrografico de aleaciones uranio-molibdeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M

    1967-07-01

    A spectrographic method of analysis has been developed for uranium-molybdenum alloys containing up to 10 % Mo. The carrier distillation technique, with gallium oxide and graphite as carriers, is used for the semiquantitative determination of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Si, involving the conversion of the samples into oxides. As a consequence of the study of the influence of the molybdenum on the line intensities, it is useful to prepare only one set of standards with 0,6 % MoO{sub 3}. Total burning excitation is used for calcium, employing two sets of standards with 0,6 and 7.5 MoO{sub 3}. (Author) 5 refs.

  8. Irradiation behavior of uranium-molybdenum dispersion fuel: Fuel performance data from RERTR-1 and RERTR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.K.; Clark, C.R.; Hayes, S.L.; Strain, R.V.; Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Park, J.M.; Kim, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents quantitative data on the irradiation behavior of uranium-molybdenum fuels from the low temperature RERTR-1 and -2 experiments. Fuel swelling measurements of U-Mo fuels at ∼40% and ∼70% burnup are presented. The rate of fuel-matrix interaction layer growth is estimated. Microstructures of fuel in the pre- and postirradiation condition were compared. Based on these data, a qualitative picture of the evolution of the U-Mo fuel microstructure during irradiation has been developed. Estimates of uranium-molybdenum fuel swelling and fuel-matrix interaction under high-power research reactor operating conditions are presented. (author)

  9. Progress in irradiation performance of experimental uranium - Molybdenum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.

    2002-01-01

    High-density dispersion fuel experiment, RERTR-4, was removed from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) after reaching a peak U-235 burnup of ∼80% and is presently undergoing postirradiation examination at the ANL alpha-gamma hot cells. This test consists of 32 mini fuel plates of which 27 were fabricated with nominally 6 and 8 g cm -3 atomized and machined uranium alloy powders containing 7 wt% and 10 wt% molybdenum. In addition, two miniplates containing solid U-10 wt% Mo foils and three containing 6 g cm -3 U 3 Si 2 are part of the test. The results of the postirradiation examination and analysis of RERTR-4 in conjunction with data from previous tests performed to lower burnup will be presented. (author)

  10. Properties of low content uranium-molybdenum alloys which may be used as nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.; Decours, J.

    1964-01-01

    Metallurgical properties are given in this report of uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 3 per cent of molybdenum. Since some of these alloys are used in EDF power reactors are given: briefly the operating conditions imposed on nuclear fuels: maximum temperature, temperature gradient and external pressure. In the first part are considered the structural properties of the alloys correlation with the phase transformation kinetics; a description is given of the effects of certain physico-metallurgical factors on the morphology and the crystalline structure of the materials: - solidification conditions and the heredity of the γ structure, - cooling rate at the transformation points, - whether or not the intermediate γ → β transformation is suppressed In the second part we show how a knowledge of the phase transformation processes has made it possible to define the optimum preparation conditions for these materials in the form of fuel tubes intended for the EDF reactors: casting conditions, controlled cooling treatments, weldability. In the third part we study the thermal, stability during the long duration high temperature treatments and the cycles in the two zones of the diagram α + γ; β + γ the effects of the morphology (in particular the two types of α pseudo-grains observed) and of the cooling rate during the transformation point transitions are described. In the fourth part are discussed the mechanical properties: resistance to a tractive force, resistance to creep, resilience. These properties can also be affected by the γ structure heredity and by the cooling rate to which the alloy has been subjected. In conclusion we discuss the reasons which led to the choice of some of these alloys for the first EDF reactors in particular the advantages of their high creep resistance between 450 and 600 deg C for use in the form of tubes subjected to an external pressure. (authors) [fr

  11. Basic design of a rotating disk centrifugal atomizer for uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzari, Silvio

    2001-01-01

    One of the most used techniques to produce metallic powders is the centrifugal atomization with a rotating disk. This process is employ to fabricate ductile metallic particles of uranium-molybdenum alloys (typically U- 7 % Mo, by weight) for nuclear fuel elements for research and testing reactors. These alloys exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (γ phase) which is stable above 700 C degrees and can be retained at room temperature. The rotating disk centrifugal atomization allows a rapid solidification of spherical metallic droplets of about 40 to 100 μm, considered adequate to manufacture nuclear fuel elements. Besides the thermo-physical properties of both the alloy and the cooling gas, the main parameters of the process are the radius of the disk (R), the diameter of the atomization chamber (D), the disk rotation speed (ω), the liquid volume flow rate (Q) and the superheating of the liquid (ΔT). In this work, they were applied approximate analytical models to estimate the optimal geometrical and operative parameters to obtain spherical metallic powder of U- 7 % Mo alloy. Three physical phenomena were considerate: the liquid metal flow along the surface of the disk, the fragmentation and spheroidization of the droplets and the cooling and solidification of the droplets. The principal results are the more suitable gas is helium; R ≅ 20 mm; D ≥ 1 m; ≅ 20,000 - 50,000 rpm; Q ≅ 4 - 10 cm 3 /s; ΔT ≅ 100 - 200 C degrees. By applying the relevant non-dimensional parameters governing the main physical phenomena, the conclusion is that the more appropriate non-radioactive metal to simulate the atomization of U- 7 % Mo is gold [es

  12. Obtention of uranium-molybdenum alloy ingots technique to avoid carbon contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Tercio A.; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Reis, Sergio C.; Brina, Jose Giovanni M.; Faeda, Kelly Cristina M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: tap@cdtn.b, E-mail: jbp@cdtn.b, E-mail: jgmb@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of high enriched uranium (U{sup 235} > 85 wt%) by low enriched uranium (U{sup 235} < 20wt%) nuclear fuels in research and test reactors is being implemented as an initiative of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, conceived in the USA since mid-70s, in order to avoid nuclear weapons proliferation. Such replacement implies in the use of compounds or alloys with higher uranium densities. Among the several uranium alloys investigated since then, U-Mo presents great application potential due to its physical properties and good behavior during irradiation, which makes it an important option as a nuclear fuel material for the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. The development of the plate-type nuclear fuel based on U-Mo alloy is being performed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) and also at IPEN. The carbon contamination of the alloy is one of the great concerns during the melting process. It was observed that U-Mo alloy is more critical considering carbon contamination when using graphite crucibles. Alternative melting technique was implemented at CDTN in order to avoid carbon contamination from graphite crucible using Yttria stabilized ZrO{sub 2} crucibles. Ingots with low carbon content and good internal quality were obtained. (author)

  13. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-01-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature, time and

  14. Obtention of uranium-molybdenum alloy ingots microstructure and phase characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Tercio A.; Braga, Daniel M.; Paula, Joao Bosco de; Brina, Jose Giovanni M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: tap@cdtn.b, E-mail: bragadm@cdtn.b, E-mail: jbp@cdtn.b, E-mail: jgmb@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of high enriched uranium (U-{sup 235} > 85 wt%) by low enriched uranium (U-{sup 235} < 20 wt%) nuclear fuels in research and test reactors is being implemented as an initiative of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, conceived in the USA since mid-70s, in order to avoid nuclear weapons proliferation. Such replacement implies in the use of compounds or alloys with higher uranium densities. Several uranium alloys that fill this requirement has been investigated since then. Among these alloys, U-Mo presents great application potential due to its physical properties and good behavior during irradiation, which makes it an important option as a nuclear fuel material for the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. The development of the plate-type nuclear fuel based on U-Mo alloys is being performed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) and also at the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research - IPEN. U-{sup 10}Mo ingots were melted in an induction furnace with protective argon atmosphere. The microstructure of the ingots were characterized through optical and scanning electronic microscopy in the as cast and heat treated conditions. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and X-Ray Diffraction were used as characterization techniques for elemental analysis and phases determination. It was confirmed the presence of metastable gamma-phase in the as cast condition, surrounded by hypereutectoid alpha-phase (uranium-rich phase), as well as a pearlite-like constituent, composed by alternated lamellas of U{sub 2}Mo compound and alpha-phase, in the heat treated condition. (author)

  15. Development, preparation and characterization of uranium molybdenum alloys for dispersion fuel application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.P.; Prasad, G.J.; Hegde, P.V.; Keswani, R.; Basak, C.B.; Pal, S.; Mishra, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Most of the research and test reactors worldwide have undergone core conversion from high enriched uranium base fuel to low enriched uranium base fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program, which was launched in the late 1970s to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. To realize this goal, high density uranium compounds and γ-stabilized uranium alloy powder were identified. In Metallic Fuels Division of BARC, R and D efforts are on to develop these high density uranium base alloys. This paper describes the preparation flow sheet for different compositions of Uranium and molybdenum alloys by an innovative powder processing route with uranium and molybdenum metal powders as starting materials. The same composition of U-Mo alloys were also fabricated by conventional method i.e. ingot metallurgy route. The U-Mo alloys prepared by both the methods were then characterized by XRD for phase analysis. The photomicrographs of alloys with different compositions prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes are also included in the paper. The paper also covers the comparison of properties of the alloys prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes

  16. Development, preparation and characterization of uranium molybdenum alloys for dispersion fuel application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, V.P. [Metallic Fuels Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: vedsinha@barc.gov.in; Prasad, G.J.; Hegde, P.V.; Keswani, R.; Basak, C.B.; Pal, S.; Mishra, G.P. [Metallic Fuels Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-04-03

    Most of the research and test reactors worldwide have undergone core conversion from high enriched uranium base fuel to low enriched uranium base fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program, which was launched in the late 1970s to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. To realize this goal, high density uranium compounds and {gamma}-stabilized uranium alloy powder were identified. In Metallic Fuels Division of BARC, R and D efforts are on to develop these high density uranium base alloys. This paper describes the preparation flow sheet for different compositions of Uranium and molybdenum alloys by an innovative powder processing route with uranium and molybdenum metal powders as starting materials. The same composition of U-Mo alloys were also fabricated by conventional method i.e. ingot metallurgy route. The U-Mo alloys prepared by both the methods were then characterized by XRD for phase analysis. The photomicrographs of alloys with different compositions prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes are also included in the paper. The paper also covers the comparison of properties of the alloys prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes.

  17. Uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 3 per cent by weight of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.

    1959-01-01

    The following properties have been determined in the new cast state of uranium alloys containing 0.5-1-1.8-2 and 3.5 per cent of molybdenum: micro-graphical aspect, crystalline structure, thermal expansion, the mechanical characteristics, behaviour when subjected to cyclic temperature variations, and heat treatment. The transformation curves have been established for continuous cooling at rates varying between 2.5 and 200 deg. C per minute, using a dilatation method for the alloys containing 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 per cent Mo. T.T.T. curves have been traced for 0.5 and 1.0 per cent Mo alloys and the Ms points determined for alloys containing 2.0 and 3.0 par cent Mo. In this way it has been possible to show the different results of transformation, brought about either by nucleation and diffusion or by shear - the alloy containing 1 per cent Mo, give two martensites α' and α'' and the alloys containing 2 and 3 per cent Mo give one martensite with a band structure. (author) [fr

  18. Thermal cycling behaviour and thermal stability of uranium-molybdenum alloys of low molybdenum content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, J.; Fabrique, B.; Peault, O.

    1963-01-01

    We have studied the behaviour during thermal cycling of as-cast U-Mo alloys whose molybdenum content varies from 0.5 to 3 per cent; results are given concerning grain stability during extended heat treatments and the effect of treatments combining protracted heating with thermal cycling. The thermal cycling treatments were carried out at 550, 575, 600 and 625 deg C for 1000 cycles; the protracted heating experiments were done at 550, 575, 600 and 625 deg C for 2000 hours (4000 hrs at 625 deg C). The 0.5 per cent alloy resists much better to the thermal cycling than does the non-alloyed uranium. This resistance is, however, much lower than that of alloys containing over l per cent, even at 550 deg C it improves after a heat treatment for grain-refining. Alloys of over 1.1 per cent have a very good resistance to a cycling treatment even at 625 deg C, and this behaviour improves with increasing concentrations up to 3 per cent. An increase in the temperature up to the γ-phase has few disadvantages provided that it is followed by rapid cooling (50 to 100 deg C/min). The α grain is fine, the γ-phase is of the modular form, and the behaviour during a thermal cycling treatment is satisfactory. If this cooling is slow (15 deg /hr) the α-grain is coarse and cycling treatment behaviour is identical to that of the 0.5 per cent alloy. The protracted heat treatments showed that the α-grain exhibits satisfactory stability after 2000 hours at 575, 600 and 625 deg C, and after 4000 hours at 625 deg C. A heat cycling treatment carried out after these tests affects only very little the behaviour of these alloys during cycling. (authors) [fr

  19. Qualification of uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel - conclusions of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Languille, A.

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-one participants representing 21 reactors, fuel developers, fuel fabricators, and fuel reprocessors in 11 countries discussed the requirements for qualification of U-Mo alloy fuel at a workshop held at Argonne National Laboratory on January 17-18, 2000. Consensus was reached that the qualification plans of the U.S. RERTR program and the French U-Mo fuel development program are valid. The items to be addressed during qualification are summarized in the paper. (author)

  20. Orientational relationships between phases in the γ→α transformations for uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, G.

    1966-04-01

    A crystallographic study has been made of the γ → α + γ transformation in the alloy containing 3 per cent by weight of molybdenum using electronic micro-diffraction; it has been possible to establish the orientational relationships governing the germination of the α phase in the γ phase. One finds: (111)γ // (100) α, (112-bar)γ // (010) α, (11-bar 0)γ // (001)α. By choosing a monoclinic lattice containing the same number of atoms as the orthorhombic lattice for defining the γ mother phase, the change in structure has been explained by adding a homogeneous (112-bar)γ [111]γ shearing deformation to a heterogeneous deformation brought about by slipping of the atoms which are not situated at the nodes of this lattice. The identity of the orientation relationships γ/α and γ/α''b and the loss of coherence γ /α as a function of temperature or of time lead to the conclusion that, in the range studied, the γ → α transformation begins with a martensitic process and continues by germination and growth. (author) [fr

  1. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaplace, J.

    1960-09-01

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the γ → β transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the β → α transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form β at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the β and γ regions. The β phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the α form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The β phase obtained by quenching from the β phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the γ region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the β phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The β → α transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct γ → α transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C/s. He has however observed the formation of several martensitic structures. (author) [fr

  2. Interdiffusion, Intrinsic Diffusion, Atomic Mobility, and Vacancy Wind Effect in γ(bcc) Uranium-Molybdenum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Keiser, Dennis D.; Sohn, Yongho

    2013-02-01

    U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment uranium fuels under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. In order to understand the fundamental diffusion behavior of this system, solid-to-solid pure U vs Mo diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 923 K, 973 K, 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (650 °C, 700 °C, 800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C) for various times. The interdiffusion microstructures and concentration profiles were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. As the Mo concentration increased from 2 to 26 at. pct, the interdiffusion coefficient decreased, while the activation energy increased. A Kirkendall marker plane was clearly identified in each diffusion couple and utilized to determine intrinsic diffusion coefficients. Uranium intrinsically diffused 5-10 times faster than Mo. Molar excess Gibbs free energy of U-Mo alloy was applied to calculate the thermodynamic factor using ideal, regular, and subregular solution models. Based on the intrinsic diffusion coefficients and thermodynamic factors, Manning's formalism was used to calculate the tracer diffusion coefficients, atomic mobilities, and vacancy wind parameters of U and Mo at the marker composition. The tracer diffusion coefficients and atomic mobilities of U were about five times larger than those of Mo, and the vacancy wind effect increased the intrinsic flux of U by approximately 30 pct.

  3. Properties of low content uranium-molybdenum alloys which may be used as nuclear fuels; Proprietes des alliages uranium-molybdene de faibles teneurs utilisables comme materiaux combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J; Decours, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Metallurgical properties are given in this report of uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 3 per cent of molybdenum. Since some of these alloys are used in EDF power reactors are given: briefly the operating conditions imposed on nuclear fuels: maximum temperature, temperature gradient and external pressure. In the first part are considered the structural properties of the alloys correlation with the phase transformation kinetics; a description is given of the effects of certain physico-metallurgical factors on the morphology and the crystalline structure of the materials: - solidification conditions and the heredity of the {gamma} structure, - cooling rate at the transformation points, - whether or not the intermediate {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation is suppressed In the second part we show how a knowledge of the phase transformation processes has made it possible to define the optimum preparation conditions for these materials in the form of fuel tubes intended for the EDF reactors: casting conditions, controlled cooling treatments, weldability. In the third part we study the thermal, stability during the long duration high temperature treatments and the cycles in the two zones of the diagram {alpha} + {gamma}; {beta} + {gamma} the effects of the morphology (in particular the two types of {alpha} pseudo-grains observed) and of the cooling rate during the transformation point transitions are described. In the fourth part are discussed the mechanical properties: resistance to a tractive force, resistance to creep, resilience. These properties can also be affected by the {gamma} structure heredity and by the cooling rate to which the alloy has been subjected. In conclusion we discuss the reasons which led to the choice of some of these alloys for the first EDF reactors in particular the advantages of their high creep resistance between 450 and 600 deg C for use in the form of tubes subjected to an external pressure. (authors) [French] Dans ce rapport

  4. Production of uranium-molybdenum particles by spark-erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabanillas, E.D.; Lopez, M.; Pasqualini, E.E.; Cirilo Lombardo, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    With the spark-erosion method we have produced spheroidal particles of an uranium-molybdenum alloy using pure water as dielectric. The particles were characterized by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Mostly spherical particles of UO 2 with a distinctive size distribution with peaks centered at 70 and 10 μm were obtained. The particles have central inclusions of U and Mo compounds

  5. Production of uranium-molybdenum particles by spark-erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanillas, E.D. E-mail: cabanill@cnea.gov.ar; Lopez, M.; Pasqualini, E.E.; Cirilo Lombardo, D.J

    2004-01-01

    With the spark-erosion method we have produced spheroidal particles of an uranium-molybdenum alloy using pure water as dielectric. The particles were characterized by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Mostly spherical particles of UO{sub 2} with a distinctive size distribution with peaks centered at 70 and 10 {mu}m were obtained. The particles have central inclusions of U and Mo compounds.

  6. Set up of Uranium-Molybdenum powder production (HMD process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Marisol; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Gonzalez, Alfredo G.

    2003-01-01

    Powder metallurgy offers different alternatives for the production of Uranium-Molybdenum (UMo) alloy powder in sizes smaller than 150 microns. This powder is intended to be used as a dispersion fuel in an aluminum matrix for research, testing and radioisotopes production reactors (MTR). A particular process of massive hydriding the UMo alloy in gamma phase has been developed. This work describes the final adjustments of process variables to obtain UMo powder by hydriding-milling-de hydriding (HMD) and its capability for industrial scaling up. (author)

  7. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures; Desenvolvimento de um combustivel de alta densidade a base das ligas uranio-molibdenio com alta compatibilidade em altas temperaturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-07-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature

  8. A study of phase transformations processes in 0,5 to 4% mo uranium-molybdenum alloys; Etude des processus des transformations dans les alliages uranium-molybdene de teneur 0,5 a 4% en poids de molybdene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-06-15

    Isothermal and continuous cooling transformations process have been established on uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 4 w% Mo. Transformations process of the {beta} and {gamma} solid solutions are described. These processes depend upon molybdenum concentration. Out of the {beta} solid solution phase appears an eutectoid decomposition of {beta} to ({alpha} + {gamma}) or the formation of a martensitic phase {alpha}''. The {gamma} solid solution shows a decomposition of {gamma} to ({alpha} + {gamma}) or ({alpha} + {gamma}'), or a formation of martensitic phases a' or a'{sub b}. The U-Mo equilibrium diagram is discussed, particularly in low concentrations zones. Limits between domains ({alpha} + {gamma}) and ({beta} + {gamma}), ({beta} + {gamma}) and {gamma}, ({beta} + {gamma}) and {beta}, have been determined. (author) [French] Les processus des transformations isothermes, et au cours de refroidissements continus ont ete etablis sur les alliages uranium-molybdene de 0,5 a 4 % en poids de Mo. Ceci a permis de mettre en evidence les processus des transformations de solutions solides {beta} et {gamma}, differents suivant la teneur en molybdene de l'alliage. Dans le premier cas il y a decomposition eutectoide de {beta} en ({alpha} + {gamma}) ou formations d'une phase martensitique {alpha}''. Dans le second cas il y a decomposition de {gamma} soit en ({alpha} + {gamma}) soit en ({alpha} + {gamma}') suivant la temperature, ou bien formation des phases martensitiques {alpha}' ou {alpha}'{sub b}. Le diagramme d'equilibre, uranium-molybdene est sujet a de nombreuses controverses, en particulier dans la zone des faibles concentrations. Les limites entre les domaines ({alpha} + {gamma}) et ({beta} + {gamma}), ({beta} + {gamma}) et {gamma}, ({beta} + {gamma}) et {beta}, ont ete determinees. (auteur)

  9. Low-enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Prokofiev, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    To examine the fabricability of low-enriched uranium-molybdenum powders, full-size 450 x 60 x 0.5-mm (17.7 x 2.4 x 0.020-in.) fuel zone test plates loaded to 6 g U/cm 3 were produced. U-10 wt.% Mo powders produced by two methods, centrifugal atomization and grinding, were tested. These powders were supplied at no cost to Argonne National Laboratory by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, respectively. Fuel homogeneity indicated that both of the powders produced acceptable fuel plates. Operator skill during loading of the powder into the compacting die and fuel powder morphology were found to be important when striving to achieve homogeneous fuel distribution. Smaller, 94 x 22 x 0.6-mm (3.7 x 0.87 x 0.025-in.) fuel zone, test plates were fabricated using U-10 wt.% Mo foil disks instead of a conventional powder metallurgy compact. Two fuel plates of this type are currently undergoing irradiation in the RERTR-4 high-density fuel experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor. (author)

  10. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  11. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaplace, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  12. CONCEPTUAL PROCESS DESCRIPTION FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM-MOLYBDENUM FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Curtis R. Clark; Randall J. Dunavant

    2008-02-01

    The National Nuclear Security Agency Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is tasked with minimizing the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) worldwide. A key component of that effort is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program, previously known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program was initiated in 1978 by the United States Department of Energy to develop the nuclear fuels necessary to enable these conversions. The program cooperates with the research reactors’ operators to achieve this goal of HEU to LEU conversion without reduction in reactor performance. The programmatic mandate is to complete the conversion of all civilian domestic research reactors by 2014. These reactors include the five domestic high-performance research reactors (HPRR), namely: the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory, the National Bureau of Standards Reactor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Missouri University Research Reactor at the University of Missouri–Columbia, and the MIT Reactor-II at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Characteristics for each of the HPRRs are given in Appendix A. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program is currently engaged in the development of a novel nuclear fuel that will enable these conversions. The fuel design is based on a monolithic fuel meat (made from a uranium-molybdenum alloy) clad in Al-6061 that has shown excellent performance in irradiation testing. The unique aspects of the fuel design, however, necessitate the development and implementation of new fabrication techniques and, thus, establishment of the infrastructure to ensure adequate fuel fabrication capability. A conceptual fabrication process description and rough estimates of the total facility throughput are described in this document as a basis for

  13. Alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Bellon, P.; Soisson, F.

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, some effort has been devoted to establishing a phenomenology for alloys under irradiation. Theoretically, the effects of the defect supersaturation, sustained defect fluxes and ballistic mixing on solid solubility under irradiation can now be formulated in a unified manner, at least for the most simple cases: coherent phase transformations and nearest-neighbor ballistic jumps. Even under such restrictive conditions, several intriguing features documented experimentally can be rationalized, sometimes in a quantitative manner and simple qualitative rules for alloy stability as a function of irradiation conditions can be formulated. A quasi-thermodynamic formalism can be proposed for alloys under irradiation. However, this point of view has limits illustrated by recent computer simulations. (orig.)

  14. Determination of U (Ⅵ) content in uranium molybdenum ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haisheng; Ding Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    Potentionmetric titration is established to determine U (Ⅵ) in uranium molybdenum ores. In the closed condition, U (Ⅵ) is leached by carbonate solution. U (Ⅵ) is reduced to U (Ⅳ) by ferrous sulfate in phosphoric acid. The exess ferrous sulfate is oxidized by sodium nitrite. urea decompose the exess sodium nitrite. U (Ⅳ) is titrated by ammonium metavanadate standard solution with potentionmetric titration. The precision is better than 5%, The recovery rate is 97.2%∼101.9%. (authors)

  15. The Problem of Storing Fission Products Arising from the Processing of Irradiated Uranium-Molybdenum Alloys; Probleme du Stockage des Produits de Fission en Provenance du Traitement des Alliages Uranium-Molybdene Irradies; 041f 0420 041e 0411 041b 0415 041c 0410 0425 0420 0410 041d 0415 041d 0418 042f 041e 0422 0425 041e 0414 041e 0412 041f 041e 0421 041b 0415 041f 0415 0420 0415 0420 0410 0411 041e 0422 041a 0418 041e 0411 041b 0423 0427 0415 041d 041d 041e 0413 041e 0421 041f 041b 0410 0412 0410 0423 0420 0410 041d - 041c 041e 041b 0418 0411 0414 0415 041d ; El Problema del Almacenamiento de los Productos de Fision Procedentes del Tratamiento de las Aleaciones Uranio-Molibdeno Irradiadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faugeras, P.; Kikindai, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France)

    1963-02-15

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are of value thanks to their in-pile behaviour but serious disadvantages arise in connection with the storing of fission products resulting from the processing of these alloys. Because of the insolubility of molybdenum it is impossible to concentrate a solution of fission products by evaporation, and for this reason we have directed our efforts towards the solubilization of molybdenum through the addition of reagents such as iron or phosphoric ions. In this way one can obtain final solutions of 60 g/l Mo with Fe 100 g/l Mo with PO{sub 4}H{sub 3}. The volumes to be stored are still considerable (especially with Fe) and the possibility of nitrate calcination in a fluidized bed was considered. The reaction takes place at about 400 Degree-Sign C. The behaviour of the ruthenium and the friability of the calcined solid (formation of considerable amounts of fine material) have led us to abandon this process in favour of the preparation of phosphate glasses. (author) [French] Les alliages U-Mo sont interessants par leur tenue en pile, mais ils presentent des inconvenients serieux quant au stockage des produits de fission resultant de leur traitement. L'insolubilite du molybdene interdit toute concentration par evaporation de la solution de produits de fission. C'est pourquoi les auteurs ont oriente leurs etudes vers la solubilisation du molybdene par addition de reactifs tels que le fer ou les ions phosphoriques. Ainsi, on peut obtenir les solutions finales a 60 g/l Mo avec Fe, 100 g/l Mo avec PO{sub 4}H{sub 3} Les volumes a stocker sont encore importants (surtout avec Fe) et la calcination des nitrates dans un lit fluidise a ete etudiee. La reaction a lieu vers 400 Degree-Sign C. Le comportement du ruthenium et la friabilite du solide calcine (formation importante de fines) a conduit a abandonner ce procede au profit de la confection de verres phosphates. (author) [Spanish] Las aleaciones U-Mo son interesantes por la forma en que se comportan en

  16. Procedure for Uranium-Molybdenum Density Measurements and Porosity Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for preparing uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) specimens, performing density measurements, and computing sample porosity. Typical specimens (solids) will be sheared to small rectangular foils, disks, or pieces of metal. A mass balance, solid density determination kit, and a liquid of known density will be used to determine the density of U-Mo specimens using the Archimedes principle. A standard test weight of known density would be used to verify proper operation of the system. By measuring the density of a U-Mo sample, it is possible to determine its porosity.

  17. Regularities of the vertical distribution of uranium-molybdenum mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, V.M.; Kazantsev, V.V.; Protasov, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    The geological structure of one of ore fields of the uranium-molybdenum formation pertaining to the northern framing of a large volcano-tectonic depression is studied. The main uranium deposits are related to necks formed by neck facies of brown liparites. Three zones are singled out within the limits of the ore field. In the upper one there are small ore bodies with a low uranium content represented by phenolite-chlorite, pitchblende 3-coffinite 3-jordizite and calcinite-sulphide associations, in the middle one - the main ore bodies formed by pitchblende 1-chlorite, molybdenite 2 (jordizite)-pitchblende 2-hydromica, coffinite 2-pyrite associations; in the lower one-thin veinlets formed by coffinite-molybdenite 1-chlorite, brannerite-pyrite and pitchblende 1-chlorite associations. Dimensions of the ore deposits depend on the neck sizes: in small necks the middle zone and, rarely, the lower one are of the industrial interest; in the large ones - the upper middle and, probably, lower ones. The regularities found can be extended to other deposits of the uranium-molybdenum formation [ru

  18. Thermal cycling behaviour and thermal stability of uranium-molybdenum alloys of low molybdenum content; Comportement au cyclage thermique et stabilite thermique des alliaces uranium-molybdene de faibles teneurs en molybdene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decours, J; Fabrique, B; Peault, O [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    We have studied the behaviour during thermal cycling of as-cast U-Mo alloys whose molybdenum content varies from 0.5 to 3 per cent; results are given concerning grain stability during extended heat treatments and the effect of treatments combining protracted heating with thermal cycling. The thermal cycling treatments were carried out at 550, 575, 600 and 625 deg C for 1000 cycles; the protracted heating experiments were done at 550, 575, 600 and 625 deg C for 2000 hours (4000 hrs at 625 deg C). The 0.5 per cent alloy resists much better to the thermal cycling than does the non-alloyed uranium. This resistance is, however, much lower than that of alloys containing over l per cent, even at 550 deg C it improves after a heat treatment for grain-refining. Alloys of over 1.1 per cent have a very good resistance to a cycling treatment even at 625 deg C, and this behaviour improves with increasing concentrations up to 3 per cent. An increase in the temperature up to the {gamma}-phase has few disadvantages provided that it is followed by rapid cooling (50 to 100 deg C/min). The {alpha} grain is fine, the {gamma}-phase is of the modular form, and the behaviour during a thermal cycling treatment is satisfactory. If this cooling is slow (15 deg /hr) the {alpha}-grain is coarse and cycling treatment behaviour is identical to that of the 0.5 per cent alloy. The protracted heat treatments showed that the {alpha}-grain exhibits satisfactory stability after 2000 hours at 575, 600 and 625 deg C, and after 4000 hours at 625 deg C. A heat cycling treatment carried out after these tests affects only very little the behaviour of these alloys during cycling. (authors) [French] Nous avons etudie le comportement au cyclage thermique des alliages U-Mo, brut de coulee, dont la teneur varie de 0,5 a 3 pour cent de molybdene, les resultats de stabilite du grain au cours de traitements thermiques de longue duree, ainsi que ceux des traitements combines de longue duree et de cyclage. Les

  19. Study of transformations by annealing of the body. Centred cubic {gamma} phase of uranium-molybdenum alloys; Etude des transformations par revenu de la phase {gamma} cubique centree des alliages uranium-molybdene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikailoff, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-06-15

    By annealing at different temperatures, we have studied the transformations of the body centred cubic {gamma} phase for two alloys containing 6 and 10 per cent molybdenum by weight respectively. There is a return to the equilibrium state by formation of the stable {alpha} orthorhombic and {epsilon} ordered tetragonal phases, following two types of reaction: - pearlite transformation by nucleation and growth from the grain boundaries, preponderant when the annealing takes place at temperature above 400 deg. C, and identical for the two types of alloys. This reaction has already been studied by numerous authors, who have constructed the corresponding TTT curves, - transformation inside the grains of the quenched solid solution when annealing takes place at 400 deg. C or below: 6 per cent alloy - precipitation of fine a phase particles, followed by progressive ordering of the solid solution enriched in molybdenum, 10 per cent alloy - formation of small ordered regions and then a fine a phase precipitate. In the course of this work we have paid particular attention to the study of intragranular reactions after low-temperature annealing, the reactions involved in this case not having been explained up to the present. The {gamma} phase transformation has been studied by means of three techniques: micrography - microhardness tests - X-ray diffraction. (author) [French] Nous avons etudie les transformations par revenu a differentes temperatures, de la phase {gamma} cubique centree des alliages U-Mo trempes, pour deux alliages a 6 et a 10 pour cent de molybdene en poids. Il y a retour a l'etat d'equilibre par formation des phases stables {alpha} orthorhombique et quadratique ordonnee, suivant deux types de reactions: - transformation perlitique par germination et croissance a partir des joints de grains, preponderante lorsque le recuit a lieu a temperature superieure a 400 deg. C, et identique pour les deux types d'alliages. Cette reaction a deja ete etudiee par de nombreux

  20. Orientational relationships between phases in the {gamma}{yields}{alpha} transformations for uranium-molybdenum alloys; Relations d'orientation entre phases dans les transformations {gamma}{yields}{alpha} des alliages uranium-molybdene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-04-01

    A crystallographic study has been made of the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation in the alloy containing 3 per cent by weight of molybdenum using electronic micro-diffraction; it has been possible to establish the orientational relationships governing the germination of the {alpha} phase in the {gamma} phase. One finds: (111){gamma} // (100) {alpha}, (112-bar){gamma} // (010) {alpha}, (11-bar 0){gamma} // (001){alpha}. By choosing a monoclinic lattice containing the same number of atoms as the orthorhombic lattice for defining the {gamma} mother phase, the change in structure has been explained by adding a homogeneous (112-bar){gamma} [111]{gamma} shearing deformation to a heterogeneous deformation brought about by slipping of the atoms which are not situated at the nodes of this lattice. The identity of the orientation relationships {gamma}/{alpha} and {gamma}/{alpha}''b and the loss of coherence {gamma} /{alpha} as a function of temperature or of time lead to the conclusion that, in the range studied, the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation begins with a martensitic process and continues by germination and growth. (author) [French] Une etude cristallographique de la transformation {gamma} {yields} {alpha} + {gamma} dans l'alliage {alpha} 3 pour cent en poids de Mo, effectuee par microdiffraction electronique a permis d'etablir les relations d'orientation regissant la germination de {alpha} dans {gamma}. On a: (111){gamma} // (100){alpha}, (112-bar){gamma} // (010){alpha}, (11-bar 0){gamma} // (001){alpha}. En choisissant pour decrire la phase mere {gamma} une maille monoclinique contenant le meme nombre d'atomes que la maille orthorhombique {alpha}, le changement de structure a ete explique en superposant a une deformation homogene par cisaillement (112-bar){gamma} [111]{gamma} une deformation heterogene par glissement des atomes non situes aux noeuds de cette maille. L identite des relations d'orientation {gamma}/{alpha} et {gamma} /{alpha

  1. FY16 Status Report for the Uranium-Molybdenum Fuel Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Wendy D.; Doherty, Ann L.; Henager, Charles H.; Lavender, Curt A.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Smith, Mark T.; Webster, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water Reactor industry with a melt-resistant, accident-tolerant fuel with improved safety response. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with extrusion development and performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of Uranium-Molybdenum fuel in both these areas. This report documents the results of the fiscal year 2016 effort to develop the Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel concept for light water reactors.

  2. FY16 Status Report for the Uranium-Molybdenum Fuel Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Wendy D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doherty, Ann L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Omberg, Ronald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Mark T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, Ryan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water Reactor industry with a melt-resistant, accident-tolerant fuel with improved safety response. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with extrusion development and performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of Uranium-Molybdenum fuel in both these areas. This report documents the results of the fiscal year 2016 effort to develop the Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel concept for light water reactors.

  3. Development and Validation of Capabilities to Measure Thermal Properties of Layered Monolithic U-Mo Alloy Plate-Type Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2014-07-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the thermal-conductivity behavior of the fuel system as a function of temperature and expected irradiation conditions. The purpose of this paper is to verify functionality of equipment installed in hot cells for eventual measurements on irradiated uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel specimens, refine procedures to operate the equipment, and validate models to extract the desired thermal properties. The results presented here demonstrate the adequacy of the equipment, procedures, and models that have been developed for this purpose based on measurements conducted on surrogate depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) alloy samples containing a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061). The results are in excellent agreement with thermal property data reported in the literature for similar U-Mo alloys as a function of temperature.

  4. Study of the transformation of uranium-niobium alloys with low niobium concentrations, tempered from the gamma and beta + gamma 1 regions and then annealed at different temperatures. Comparison with uranium-molybdenum alloys (1963); Etude des transformations des alliages uranium-niobium a faible teneur en niobium trempes depuis les domaines gamma et beta + gamma 1 puis revenus a differentes temperatures. Comparaison avec les alliages uranium-molybdene (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collot, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-09-15

    The author shows that uranium-niobium alloys, like uranium-molybdenum alloys, tempered from the gamma region, give a martensitic phase with a structure deriving from that of alpha uranium by a slight contraction parallel to the axis [001], The critical cooling rate allowing the formation of this martensite is 80 deg. C/s at 750 deg. C. Retention of the beta phase of uranium-niobium alloys is particularly difficult, the critical retention rate being 700 deg. C/s at 668 deg. C for an alloy containing 2.5 at. per cent of Nb. This beta phase is completely converted to the alpha phase at room temperature in about 6 hours. The TTT curves of this beta alloy are effectively reduced to the lower branch of the lower 'C'. The beta phase conversion law is expressed as: 1-x = exp. (kt){sup n} x being the degree of progression of the conversion, t the time, n an exponent no-varying with temperature and having approximately the value 2 for the alloy considered, k an increasing function of temperature. The activation energy of conversion is of the order of 14,600 cal/mole. Niobium is much less active than molybdenum as a stabiliser of beta uranium. (author) [French] Dans ce travail l'auteur montre que les alliages uranium-niobium, comme d'ailleurs les alliages uranium-molybdene, trempes depuis le domaine gamma, donnent une phase martensitique dont la structure derive de celle de l'uranium alpha par une legere contraction parallele de l'axe [001]. La vitesse critique de refroidissement permettant la formation de cette martensite est de 80 deg. C/s a 750 deg. C. La retention de la phase beta des alliages uranium-niobium est particulierement delicate car la vitesse critique de retention est de 700 deg. C/s a 668 deg. C pour l'alliage a 2,5 at. pour cent de Nb. Cette phase beta se transforme completement en phase alpha a la temperature ordinaire en 6 heures environ. Les courbes TTT de cet alliage de structure beta se reduisent pratiquement a la branche inferieure du 'C' inferieur. La

  5. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum from a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Genmao; Zeng Yijun; Tang Baobin; Meng Shu; Xu Guolong

    2014-01-01

    Based on the results of process mineralogical research of a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore, leaching behaviors of the uranium-molybdenum ore were studied by alkali agitation leaching, conventional alkali column leaching and alkali curing column leaching processes. The results showed that using the alkali curing column leaching process, the leaching rate of molybdenum increased to more than 90%, and the leaching rate of uranium was about 85%, Compared with the conventional alkali column leaching process, the leaching time of the alkali curing column leaching process decreased by 60 days. (authors)

  6. Mechanical and irradiation properties of zirconium alloys irradiated in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Oh Hyun; Eom, Kyong Bo; Kim, Jae Ik; Suh, Jung Min; Jeon, Kyeong Lak

    2011-01-01

    These experimental studies are carried out to build a database for analyzing fuel performance in nuclear power plants. In particular, this study focuses on the mechanical and irradiation properties of three kinds of zirconium alloy (Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) irradiated in the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor), one of the leading multipurpose research reactors in the world. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were measured to determine the mechanical properties before and after irradiation, while irradiation growth was measured for the irradiation properties. The samples for irradiation testing are classified by texture. For the irradiation condition, all samples were wrapped into the capsule (07M-13N) and irradiated in the HANARO for about 100 days (E > 1.0 MeV, 1.1 10 21 n/cm 2 ). These tests and results indicate that the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys are similar whether unirradiated or irradiated. Alloy B has shown the highest yield strength and tensile strength properties compared to other alloys in irradiated condition. Even though each of the zirconium alloys has a different alloying content, this content does not seem to affect the mechanical properties under an unirradiated condition and low fluence. And all the alloys have shown the tendency to increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Transverse specimens of each of the zirconium alloys have a slightly lower irradiation growth tendency than longitudinal specimens. However, for clear analysis of texture effects, further testing under higher irradiation conditions is needed

  7. Fundamental irradiation studies on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Garner, F.A.; Ermi, A.M.

    1985-05-01

    A joint experiment on the irradiation response of simple vanadium alloys has been initiated under the auspices of the DAFS and BES progams. Specimen fabrication is nearly complete and the alloys are expected to be irradiated in lithium in FFTF-MOTA Cycles 7 and 8

  8. Irradiation effects in magnesium and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure, mechanical properties and swelling of several magnesium and aluminium alloys were studied. The neutron fluences of 2-3 X 10 22 n/cm 2 , >0.2 MeV produced displacement doses of 20 to 45 displacements per atom (dpa). Ductility of the magnesium alloys was severely reduced by irradiation induced recrystallization and precipitation of various forms. Precipitation of transmuted silicon occurred in the aluminium alloys. However, the effect on ductility was much less than for the magnesium alloys. The magnesium and aluminium alloys had excellent resistance to swelling: The best magnesium alloy was Mg/3.0 wt% Al/0.19 wt% Ca; its density decreased by only 0.13%. The best aluminium alloy was 6063, with a density decrease of 0.22%. (Auth.)

  9. Swelling in neutron-irradiated titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.T.

    1982-04-01

    Immersion density measurements have been performed on a series of titanium alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a fluence of 5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 450 and 550 0 C. The materials irradiated were the near-alpha alloys Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S, the alpha-beta alloy Ti-64, and the beta alloy Ti-38644. Swelling was observed in all alloys with the greater swelling being observed at 550 0 C. Microstructural examination revealed the presence of voids in all alloys. Ti-38644 was found to be the most radiation resistant. Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S also displayed good radiation resistance, whereas considerable swelling and precipitation were observed in Ti-64 at 550 0 C

  10. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600 0 C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520 0 C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys

  11. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  12. Irradiation of copper alloys in FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Nine copper-base alloys in thirteen material conditions have been inserted into the MOTA-18 experiment for irradiation in FFTF at approx.450 0 C. The alloy Ni-1.9Be is also included in this experiment, which includes both TEM disks and miniature tensile specimens

  13. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al 2 O 3 , is very similar to the GlidCop trademark alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to ∼3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90 degrees C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of ±0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as ∼2 x 10 -9 s -1 . These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys

  14. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  15. Relationship between uranium-molybdenum, fluorite and gold deposits within provinces of continental volcanicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modnikov, I.S.; Skvortsova, K.V.; Chesnokov, L.V.

    1974-01-01

    The article gives a comparative description of and the age relationships between uranium-molybdenum, gold and fluorite mineralizations in the areas of development of adhesite-diorite and liparite-granite vulcanoplutonic formations, which are most fully and intensively manifest in the intra-anticlinal and median blocks of folded regions in the final stages of geosynclinal development or during the final stages of tectono-magmatic activation. These formations usually fill vulcano-tectonic depression structures - overlaid troughs and inherited delections. The geological and geochemical data are evidence of the close temporal link between the hydrothermal process of ore formation and the type and scale of manifestations of the vulcano-plutonic magmatism that is responsible for the general geochemical features of the ores of deposits of various types. The formation of gold, fluorite and uranium-molybdenum deposits occurred immediately after the completion of effusive and intrusive magmatism during a single metallogenic cycle. The spatial distribution of the ore fields and deposits depends chiefly on the peculiarities of the tectonic make-up of the depression structures, and also on the type and scale of the manifestations of vulcano-plutonic magmatism. (B.Ya.)

  16. Irradiation creep in simple binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakawa, J.; Sethi, V.K.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1981-07-01

    Creep enhancement during 21-MeV deuteron irradiation was examined at 350 0 C for two simple binary alloys with representative microstructures, i.e., solid-solution (Ni - 4 at. % Si) and precipitation-hardened (Ni - 12.8 at. % Al) alloys. Coherent precipitates were found to be very effective in suppressing irradiation-enhanced creep. Si solute atoms depressed irradiation creep moderately and caused irradiation hardening via radiation-induced segregation. The stress-dependence of irradiation creep in Ni - 4 at. % Si should a transition, which seems to reflect a change of mechanism from dislocation climb due to stress-induced preferential absorption (SIPA) to climb-controlled dislocation glide enhanced by irradiation

  17. Irradiation Tests Supporting LEU Conversion of Very High Power Research Reactors in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Cole, J. I.; Glagolenko, I.; Holdaway, K. K.; Housley, G. K.; Rabin, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    The US fuel development team is developing a high density uranium-molybdenum alloy monolithic fuel to enable conversion of five high-power research reactors. Previous irradiation tests have demonstrated promising behavior for this fuel design. A series of future irradiation tests will enable selection of final fuel fabrication process and provide data to qualify the fuel at moderately-high power conditions for use in three of these five reactors. The remaining two reactors, namely the Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor, require additional irradiation tests to develop and demonstrate the fuel’s performance with even higher power conditions, complex design features, and other unique conditions. This paper reviews the program’s current irradiation testing plans for these moderately-high irradiation conditions and presents conceptual testing strategies to illustrate how subsequent irradiation tests will build upon this initial data package to enable conversion of these two very-high power research reactors.

  18. Neutron resistant irradiation alloy and usage thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Osamu; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Kato, Takahiko.

    1997-01-01

    A neutron irradiation embrittlement-resistant alloy comprising a Ti alloy having an average grain size of 2μm or smaller and containing from 30 to 40wt% of Al is subjected to powder solidification and then to isothermal forging at a forging rate of from 50 to 80% at a temperature range of from 1150 to 1500K. Namely, since the Ti-Al type alloy comprises from 30 to 30wt% of Al, optionally, from 1 to 6% of Mn, from 0.1 to 0.5% of Si, from 4 to 16% of V and the balance of Ti, it has excellent specific strength, high durable temperature and excellent neutron irradiation resistance, and has ductility required as structural materials. Accordingly, if the Ti-Al type alloy excellent in embrittlement resistance to neutron irradiation dimensional stability of materials is applied to constitutional parts of a reactor core of a nuclear reactor and a thermonuclear reactor to be exposed under neutron irradiation, high reliability is provided and the amount of activated materials is reduced by improving the working life of the materials. (N.H.)

  19. Void formation in irradiated binary nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.A.; Ahmed, M.; Akhter, J.I.

    1994-01-01

    In this work a computer program has been used to compute void radius, void density and swelling parameter for nickel and binary nickel-carbon alloys irradiated with nickel ions of 100 keV. The aim is to compare the computed results with experimental results already reported

  20. Studies on neutron irradiation effects of iron alloys and nickel-base heat resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi

    1987-09-01

    The present paper describes the results of neutron irradiation effects on iron alloys and nickel-base heat resistant alloys. As for the iron alloys, irradiation hardening and embrittlement were investigated using internal friction measurement, electron microscopy and tensile testings. The role of alloying elements was also investigated to understand the irradiation behavior of iron alloys. The essential factors affecting irradiation hardening and embrittlement were thus clarified. On the other hand, postirradiation tensile and creep properties were measured of Hastelloy X alloy. Irradiation behavior at elevated temperatures is discussed. (author)

  1. The reprocessing of irradiated fuels improvement and extension of the solvent extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faugeras, P.; Chesne, A.

    1964-01-01

    Improvements made in the conventional tri-butylphosphate process are described, in particular. the concentration and the purification of plutonium by one extraction cycle using tri-butyl-phosphate with reflux; and the use of an apparatus working continuously for precipitating plutonium oxalate, for calcining the oxalate, and for fluorinating the oxide. The modifications proposed for the treatment of irradiated uranium - molybdenum alloys are described, in particular, the dissolution of the fuel, and the concentration of the fission product solutions. The solvent extraction treatment is used also for the plutonium fuels utilized for the fast breeder reactor (Rapsodie) An outline of the process is presented and discussed, as well as the first experimental results and the plans for a pilot plant having a capacity of 1 kg/day. The possible use of tn-lauryl-amine in the plutonium purification cycle is now under consideration for the processing plant at La Hague. The flowsheet for this process and its performance are presented. The possibility of vitrification is considered for the final treatment of the concentrated radioactive wastes from the Marcoule (irradiated uranium) and La Hague (irradiated uranium-molybdenum) Centers. Three possible processes are described and discussed, as well as the results obtained from the operation of the corresponding experimental units using tracers. (authors) [fr

  2. Accelerated irradiation growth of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Gilbert, R.W.; Fidleris, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how sponge zirconium and Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, Zircaloy, or Excel alloys all exhibit accelerated irradiation growth compared with high-purity crystal-bar zirconium for irradiation temperatures between 550 to 710 K and fluences between 0.1 to 10 x 10 25 n · m -2 (E > 1 MeV). There is generally an incubation period or fluence before the onset of accelerated or breakaway growth, which is dependent on the particular material being irradiated, its metallurgical condition before irradiation, and the irradiation temperature. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that there is a correlation between accelerated irradiation growth and the appearance of c-component vacancy loops on basal planes. Measurements in some specimens indicate that a significant fraction of the strain can be directly attributed to the loops themselves. There is considerable evidence to show that their formation is dependent both on the specimen purity and on the irradiation temperature. Materials that have a high interstitial-solute content contain c-component loops and exhibit high growth rates even at low fluences ( 2 :5 n · m -2 , E > 1 MeV). For sponge zirconium and the Zircaloys, c-component loop formation and the associated acceleration of growth (breakaway) during irradiation occurs because the intrinsic interstitial solute (mainly, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen) in the zirconium matrix is supplemented by interstitial iron, chromium, and nickel from the radiation-induced dissolution of precipitates. (author)

  3. Formation conditions for regenerated uranium blacks in uranium-molybdenum deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsova, K.V.; Sychev, I.V.; Modnikov, I.S.; Zhil'tsova, I.G.

    1980-01-01

    Formation conditions of regenerated uranium blacks in the zone of incomplete oxidation and cementation of uranium-molybdenum deposit have been studied. Mixed and regenerated blacks were differed from residual ones by the method of determining excess quantity of lead isotope (Pb 206 ) in ores. Determined were the most favourable conditions for formation of regenerated uranium blacks: sheets of brittle and permeable volcanic rocks characterized by heterogeneous structure of a section, by considerable development of gentle interlayer strippings and zones of hydrothermal alteration; predominance of reduction conditions in a media over oxidation ones under limited oxygen access and other oxidating agents; the composition of hypogenic ores characterized by optimum correlations of uranium minerals, sulfides and carbonates affecting violations of pH in oxidating solutions in the range of 5-6; the initial composition of ground water resulting from climatic conditions of the region and the composition of ore-bearing strata and others. Conditions unfavourable for the formation of regenerated uranium blacks are shown

  4. Neutron irradiation effect on thermomechanical properties of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.Ya.; Ionajtis, R.R.; Kotov, V.V.; Loguntsev, E.N.; Ushakov, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    Alloys of Ti-Ni, Ti-Ni-Pd, Fe-Mn-Si, Mn-Cu-Cr, Mn-Cu, Cu-Al-Mn, Cu-Al-Ni systems are investigated after irradiation in IVV-2M reactor at various temperatures with neutron fluence of 10 19 - 10 20 cm -2 . The degradation of shape memory effect in titanium nickelide base alloys is revealed after irradiation. Mn-Cu and Mn-Cu-Cr alloys show the best results. Trends in shape memory alloy behaviour depending on irradiation temperature are found. A consideration is given to the possibility of using these alloys for components of power reactor control and protection systems [ru

  5. Defect clustering in concentrated alloys during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Shigenaka, N.; Fuse, M.

    1992-01-01

    A rate theory based model is presented to investigate the kinetics of interstitial clustering processes in a face-centered cubic (fcc) binary alloy containing A- and B-atoms. Three types of interstitial dumbbells, AA-, BB- and AB-type dumbbells, are considered. Conversions between these interstitial dumbbells are explicitly introduced into the formulation, based on the consideration of dumbbell configurations and movements. A di- interstitial is assumed to be the nucleus of a dislocation loop. Reactions of point defect production by irradiation, mutual recombination of an interstitial and a vacancy, dislocation loop nucleation and their growth are included in the model. Parameter values are chosen based on the atom size of the alloy elements, and dislocation loop formation kinetics are investigated while varying alloy compositions. Two different types of kinetics are obtained in accordance with the dominant loop nucleus types. Conversions between interstitial dumbbells are important in the determination of the interstitial dumbbell concentration ratios, of the dominant nucleus types, and consequently, the loop formation kinetics. Dislocation loop concentration decreases with increasing undersized atom content, but dose rate and temperature dependence of loop concentration are insensitive to alloy compositions. (author)

  6. EDX microanalysis of neutron-irradiated alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.E.

    1981-09-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry of 50 nm thick specimens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides quantitative elemental analyses of selected regions as small as 20 nm in diameter. To analyze highly radioactive neutron-irradiated alloys it is necessary to reduce the high counting deadtimes caused by energetic γ-Compton scattering in the Si(Li) detector, and to account for spurious background contributions from γ-rays and characteristic x-ray emissions. Several simple methods for overcoming effects of specimen radioactivity are described, including use of a tungsten collimator to attenuate γ and x-rays coming from the thick edges of self-supporting disk specimens. These methods allow analyses of Fe-Cr-Ni based alloys with γ-activities up to 1000 μC/sub i/. Techniques used to maintain high spatial resolution and accuracy in quantitatve analysis are also described, and their use is illustrated

  7. Alloy development for irradiation performance: program strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Wiffen, F.W.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Reuther, T.C.; Gold, R.E.; Holmes, J.J.; Kummer, D.L.; Nolfi, F.V.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance Program is the development of structural materials for use in the first wall and blanket region of fusion reactors. The goal of the program is a material that will survive an exposure of 40 MWyr/m 2 at a temperature which will allow use of a liquid-H 2 O heat transport system. Although the ultimate aim of the program is development of materials for commercial reactors by the end of this century, activities are organized to provide materials data for the relatively low performance interim machines that will precede commercial reactors

  8. Irradiation growth in zirconium alloys: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidleris, V.

    1980-09-01

    The change in shape during irradiation without external stress, irradiation growth, was first discovered in uranium and later in graphite, zirconium and other core materials which exhibit anisotropic physical properties. The direction of maximum growth of metals invariably corresponds with the direction of minimum thermal expansion. In polycrystalline zirconium alloys growth is positive in the direction of maximum deformation during fabrication and in other directions it can be either positive or negative depending on the preferred orientation of grains (crystallographic texture). Growth increases gradually with temperature between 300 K and 620 K and rapidly with fluence up to about 1 x 10 25 n.m. -2 (Eμ1 MeV). At higher fluences the growth appears to saturate in annealed materials and reach a steady rate approximately proportional to dislocation density in cold-worked materials. Above 600 K both annealed and cold-worked materials have similar steady growth rates. Irradiation growth is caused by the segregation to different sinks of the vacancies and interstitials generated by irradiation, but the dominant types of sinks for each type of point defect and the mode of transport of the point defects to sinks cannot therefore be predicted theoretically. For the purpose of designing reactor core components empirical equations have been derived that can satisfactorily predict the steady state growth behaviour from texture and microstructure. (auth)

  9. Irradiation-induced microstructural changes in alloy X-750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenik, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Alloy X-750 is a nickel base alloy that is often used in nuclear power systems for it's excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The present study examines the microstructure and composition profiles in a heat of Alloy X-750 before and after neutron irradiation

  10. Self-irradiation study of plutonium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudot, B.

    2005-02-01

    The plutonium is unstable and produces α or β decays depending on the isotope. These decays generate americium, uranium, helium and different kinds of structural defects. The effects of self-irradiation damage are observed at macroscopic scale, the mechanism occurs from atomic scale. In order to improve our understanding of the self-irradiation effects in PuGa alloys, a technique sensitive to the vacancies and vacancies clusters has been developed: the Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS). The swelling has been characterized by XRD at a microscopic scale and by dilatometry at a macroscopic scale. Swelling starts just after melting and reaches a saturation between 6 and 36 months depending on the degree of gallium homogeneity in the alloy. Swelling at saturation increases with the gallium content, but the absolute change in the cell parameters is constant during time. PAS showed that vacancies clusters develop immediately. Their concentration increase with time. A part of these clusters is stabilized by helium atoms and leads to the creation of bubbles, which contribution to swelling is negligible. The vacancies and vacancies clusters which are not stabilized by helium contribute to the swelling increase by mechanisms known for other materials. These mechanisms are based on a 'dislocation bias'. The presence of these dislocations can furthermore explain the low mean life time value of positrons at the saturation point. (author)

  11. Fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The postirradiation fracture toughness responses of Types 316 and 304 stainless steel (SS) wrought products, cast CF8 SS and Type 308 SS weld deposit were characterized at 427 0 C using J/sub R/-curve techniques. Fast-neutron irradiation of these alloys caused an order of magnitude reduction in J/sub c/ and two orders of magnitude reduction in tearing modulus at neutron exposures above 10 dpa, where radiation-induced losses in toughness appeared to saturate. Saturation J/sub c/ values for the wrought materials ranged from 28 to 31 kJ/m 2 ; the weld exhibited a saturation level of 11 kJ/m 2 . Maximum allowable flaw sizes for highly irradiated stainless steel components stressed to 90% of the unirradiated yield strength are on the order of 3 cm for the wrought material and 1 cm for the weld. Electron fractographic examination revealed that irradiation displacement damage brought about a transition from ductile microvoid coalescence to channel fracture, associated with local separation along planar deformation bands. The lower saturation toughness value for the weld relative to that for the wrought products was attributed to local failure of ferrite particles ahead of the advancing crack which prematurely initiated channel fracture

  12. GRAIN-BOUNDARY PRECIPITATION UNDER IRRADIATION IN DILUTE BINARY ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H. Song; Z.X. Yuan; J. Liu; R.G.Faulkner

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation of solute atoms frequently bring about grain boundary precipitation of a second phase because of its making the solubility limit of the solute surpassed at grain boundaries. Until now the kinetic models for irradiation-induced grain boundary precipitation have been sparse. For this reason, we have theoretically treated grain boundary precipitation under irradiation in dilute binary alloys. Predictions ofγ'-Ni3Si precipitation at grain boundaries ave made for a dilute Ni-Si alloy subjected to irradiation. It is demonstrated that grain boundary silicon segregation under irradiation may lead to grain boundaryγ'-Ni3 Si precipitation over a certain temperature range.

  13. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking in HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water to determine the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct-aged Alloy 625. New data confirm previous results showing that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat variability correlates with boron content, with low boron heats showing improved IASCC properties. Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens. Microstructural, microchemical and deformation studies were performed to characterize the mechanisms responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750 and the lack of an effect in Alloy 625. The mechanisms under investigation are: boron transmutation effects, radiation-induced changes in microstructure and deformation characteristics, and radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation of Alloy X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss that was associated with the formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation levels did not cause significant segregation of alloying or trace elements in Alloy X-750. Irradiation of Alloy 625 resulted in the formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to the loops and precipitates was apparently offset by a partial dissolution of γ double-prime precipitates, as Alloy 625 showed no irradiation-induced strengthening or ductility loss. In the nonirradiated condition, an IASCC susceptible HTH heat containing 28 ppm B showed grain boundary segregation of boron, whereas a nonsusceptible HTH heat containing 2 ppm B and Alloy 625 with 20 ppm B did not show significant boron segregation. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in the superior IASCC resistance displayed by Alloy 625

  14. Proton irradiation studies on Al and Al5083 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P.; Gayathri, N.; Bhattacharya, M.; Gupta, A. Dutta; Sarkar, Apu; Dhar, S.; Mitra, M. K.; Mukherjee, P.

    2017-10-01

    The change in the microstructural parameters and microhardness values in 6.5 MeV proton irradiated pure Al and Al5083 alloy samples have been evaluated using different model based techniques of X-ray diffraction Line Profile Analysis (XRD) and microindendation techniques. The detailed line profile analysis of the XRD data showed that the domain size increases and saturates with irradiation dose both in the case of Al and Al5083 alloy. The corresponding microstrain values did not show any change with irradiation dose in the case of the pure Al but showed an increase at higher irradiation doses in the case of Al5083 alloy. The microindendation results showed that unirradiated Al5083 alloy has higher hardness value compared to that of unirradiated pure Al. The hardness increased marginally with irradiation dose in the case of Al5083, whereas for pure Al, there was no significant change with dose.

  15. ODS alloys for structures subjected to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlan, Y. de

    2010-01-01

    ODS (oxide-dispersion-strengthened) materials are considered for cladding purposes for the fourth-generation sodium-cooled fast reactors. ODS materials afford many benefits. Indeed, these high-performance materials combine, at the same time, remarkable mechanical strength, in hot conditions, and outstanding irradiation behavior. New ODS steel grades, exhibiting better performance levels than the last-generation austenitic steels, afford not only negligible swelling under irradiation, owing to their 'ferritic' body-centered cubic structure - by contrast to austenitic grades, which feature a face-centered cubic structure - but equally outstanding creep properties, owing to the nano-reinforcements present in the matrix. ODS materials are obtained by powder metallurgy, the first fabrication step involves co-grinding a metal powder together with yttrium oxide (Y 2 O 3 ) powder. At this stage, an iron oxide may also be added, or an yttrium-rich intermetallic compound in order to provide the amounts of yttrium, and oxygen required for the formation of nano-oxides. The metal powder consists of a powder pre-alloyed to the chemical composition of the desired material. Once the powder has been obtained, consolidation of the ODS materials is achieved either by hot extrusion, or by hot isostatic pressing. (A.C.)

  16. Corrosion characteristics of Hastelloy N alloy after He+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jianbo; Yu Xiaohan; Li Aiguo; He Shangming; Cao Xingzhong; Wang Baoyi; Li Zhuoxin

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the invalidation problem of irradiated Hastelloy N alloy under the condition of intense irradiation and severe corrosion, the corrosion behavior of the alloy after He + ion irradiation was investigated in molten fluoride salt at 700 °C for 500 h. The virgin samples were irradiated by 4.5 MeV He + ions at room temperature. First, the virgin and irradiated samples were studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) to analyze the influence of irradiation dose on the vacancies. The PALS results showed that He + ion irradiation changed the size and concentration of the vacancies which seriously affected the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Second, the corroded samples were analyzed using synchrotron radiation micro-focused X-ray fluorescence, which indicated that the corrosion was mainly due to the dealloying of alloying element Cr in the matrix. Results from weight-loss measurement showed that the corrosion generally correlated with the irradiation dose of the alloy. (author)

  17. Influence of silicon on void nucleation in irradiated alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailzadeh, B.; Kumar, A.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    The addition of silicon to pure nickel, Ni-Cr alloys and Fe-Ni-Cr alloys raises the diffusivity of each of the alloy components. The resultant increase in the effective vacancy diffusion coefficient causes large reductions in the nucleation rate of voids during irradiation. This extends the transient regime of swelling, which is controlled not only by the amount of silicon in solution but also by the precipitation kinetics of precipitates rich in nickel and silicon

  18. Analytical electron microscopy of neutron-irradiated reactor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to the high neutron fluxes and temperatures from 400 to 650 0 C in the core region of a fast breeder reactor profoundly alters the microstructure and properties of structural steels and superalloys. The development of irradiation-induced voids, dislocations and precipitates, as well as segregation of alloying elements on a microscopic scale has been related to macroscopic swelling, creep, hardening and embrittlement which occur during prolonged exposures in reactor. Microanalytical studies using TEM/STEM methods, primarily energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) microanalysis, have greatly aided understanding of alloy behavior under irradiation. The main uses of analytical electron microscopy in studying irradiated alloys have been the identification of irradiation-induced precipitates and determination of the changes in local composition due to irradiation-induced solute segregation

  19. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results from two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  20. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results form two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges. The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  1. Recovery of electron irradiated V-Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey, T.; Monge, M.; Pareja, R.; Hodgson, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    The recovery characteristics of electron-irradiated V-Ga alloys with 1.2 and 4.6 at.% Ga have been investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). It is found that vacancies created by electron irradiation become mobile in these alloys at ∼293 K. This temperature is noticeably lower than that in pure V and V-Ti alloys. The vacancies aggregate into microvoids in V-4.6Ga, but do not in V-1.2Ga. The results indicate that vacancies are bound to Ga-interstitial impurity pairs

  2. Irradiation of aluminium alloy materials with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Osamu; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi

    1982-01-01

    It is a theme with a room for discussion to employ the stainless steel composed of longer half-life materials for the vacuum system of accelerators, from the viewpoint of radiation exposure. Therefore, it is desirable to use aluminium of shorter half-life in place of stainless steel. As a result of investigation on the above theme in the 1.2 GeV electron linac project in Tohoku University, it has been concluded that aluminium alloy vacuum chambers can reduce exposure dose by about one or two figures as compared with stainless steel ones. Of course, aluminium alloy contains trace amounts of Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu and others. Therefore, four kinds of aluminium alloy considered to be usable have been examined for induced radioactivity by electron beam irradiation. Stainless steel SUS 304 has been also irradiated for comparison. Radiation energy has been 30 MeV and 200 MeV. When stainless steel and aluminium alloy were compared, aluminium alloy was very effective for reducing surface dose in low energy irradiation. In 200 MeV irradiation, the dose ratio of aluminium alloy to stainless steel became 1/30 to 1/100 after one week, though the dose difference between these two materials became smaller in 100 days or more after irradiation. If practical inspection and repair are implemented during the period from a few days to one week after shutdown, the aluminium alloy is preferable for exposure dose reduction even in high energy irradiation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  4. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  5. Irradiation enhanced diffusion and irradiation creep tests in stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loelgen, R.H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given of investigations on the rate of phase changes during neutron and electron irradiation in many different fcc alloys showing either precipitation or ordering. The diffusion rate was determined as a function of the irradiation flux, the irradiation temperature and the irradiation dose. It was found that the radiation enhanced diffusion in all the investigated alloys is nearly temperature independent and linearly dependent on the flux. From these results conclusions were drawn concerning the properties of point defects and diffusion mechanisms rate determining during irradiation, which appears to be of a common nature for fcc alloys having a similar structure to those investigated. It has been recognized that the same dependencies which are found for the diffusion rate were also observed for the irradiation creep rate in stainless steels, as reported in literature. On the basis of this obervation a combination of measurements is suggested, of radiation enhanced diffusion and radiation enhanced creep in stainless steel alloys. Measurements of radiation enhanced diffusion are less time consuming and expensive than irradiation creep tests and information on this property can be obtained rather quickly, prior to the selection of stainless steel alloys for creep tests. In order to investigate irradiation creep on many samples at a time two special rigs were developed which are distinguished only by the mode of stress applied to the steel specimens. Finally, a few uniaxial tensile creep tests will be performed in fully instrumented rigs. (Auth.)

  6. Irradiation Stability of Uranium Alloys at High Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Postirradiation examinations were begun of a series of unrestrained dilute uranium alloy specimens irradiated to exposures up to 13,000 MWD/T in NaK-containing stainless steel capsules. This test, part of a program of development of uranium metal fuels for desalination and power reactors sponsored by the Division of Reactor Development and Technology, has the objective of defining the temperature and exposure limits of swelling resistance of the alloyed uranium. This paper discusses those test results

  7. Property change of advanced tungsten alloys due to neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Hasegawa, Akira; Tanno, Takashi; Nogami, Shuhei; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of neutron irradiation on the functional properties of pure tungsten (W) and advanced tungsten alloys (e.g., lanthanum (La)-doped W, potassium (K)-doped W, and ultra-fine-grained (UFG) W–TiC alloys) tested in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) or experimental fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperature and damage were in the range 804–1073 K and 0.15–0.47 dpa, respectively. TEM images of all samples after 0.42 dpa irradiation at 1023 K showed voids, black dots, and dislocation loops, indicating that similar damage structures were formed in pure W, La-doped W, K-doped W, and UFG W–0.5 wt% TiC. The electrical resistivity of all specimens increased following neutron irradiation. Nearly identical electrical resistivity and irradiation hardening were observed in pure W, La-doped W, and K-doped W. The electrical resistivity of UFG W–TiC was higher than that of other specimens before and after irradiation, which may be attributed to its ultra-fine-grain structure, as well as the presence of impurities introduced during the alloying process. Compared to the other specimens, the UFG W–TiC was more resistant to irradiation hardening

  8. Moessbauer study of amorphous alloys irradiated with energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Spirov, I.N.

    1984-01-01

    The Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied to study radiation damages in amorphous alloys irradiated with 40 Ar (E=225 MeV) or 132 Xe (E=120 MeV) ions at room temperature. In the magnetically splitted Moessbauer spectra the dose-dependent decreases of the intensity of the 2nd and 5th lines as well as of the average hyperfine magnetic field were observed. The changes weAe also analysed using the hyperfine field distribution obtained from the spectra. The results are interpreted in terms of defect creation and structural changes of shortrange order of irradiated amorphoys alloys

  9. Irradiation induced surface segregation in concentrated alloys: a contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A new computer modelization of irradiation induced surface segregation is presented together with some experimental determinations in binary and ternary alloys. The model we propose handles the alloy thermodynamics and kinetics at the same level of sophistication. Diffusion is described at the atomistic level and proceeds vis the jumps of point defects (vacancies, dumb-bell interstitials): the various jump frequencies depend on the local composition in a manner consistent with the thermodynamics of the alloy. For application to specific alloys, we have chosen the simplest statistical approximation: pair interactions in the Bragg Williams approximation. For a system which exhibits the thermodynamics and kinetics features of Ni-Cu alloys, the model generates the behaviour parameters (flux and temperature) and of alloy composition. Quantitative agreement with the published experimental results (two compositions, three temperatures) is obtained with a single set of parameters. Modelling austenitic steels used in nuclear industry requires taking into account the contribution of dumbbells to mass transport. The effects of this latter contribution are studied on a model of Ni-Fe. Interstitial trapping on dilute impurities is shown to delay or even suppress the irradiation induced segregation. Such an effect is indeed observed in the experiments we report on Fe 50 Ni 50 and Fe 49 Ni 50 Hf 1 alloys. (author)

  10. Fracture characteristics of uranium alloys by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koger, J.W.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.

    1976-10-01

    The fracture characteristics of uranium alloys were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The fracture mode of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of uranium-7.5 weight percent niobium-2.5 weight percent zirconium (Mulberry) alloy, uranium--niobium alloys, and uranium--molybdenum alloys in aqueous chloride solutions is intergranular. The SCC fracture surface of the Mulberry alloy is characterized by very clean and smooth grain facets. The tensile-overload fracture surfaces of these alloys are characteristically ductile dimple. Hydrogen-embrittlement failures of the uranium alloys are brittle and the fracture mode is transgranular. Fracture surfaces of the uranium-0.75 weight percent titanium alloys are quasi cleavage

  11. Ductility behavior of irradiated path B alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.J.S.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the practicality of using five Path B alloys in their current form as structural materials in the Fusion First-Wall/Blanket by evaluating both their postirradiation ductility and the corresponding microstructures

  12. Irradiation-induced precipitation in Ni--Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbu, A.; Ardell, A.J.

    1975-07-01

    The microstructures of Ni + ion-irradiated Ni--Si solid-solution alloys, containing 2, 4, 6 and 8 at. percent Si were investigated as a function of dose, dose-rate, and temperature. Results of transmission electron microscopy and other data show the precipitation of γ' (Ni 3 Si) in all samples irradiated at 500 0 C. Characteristics of the precipitates are described and a mechanism for their formation is suggested. (U.S.)

  13. Specific Heat Capacity of Alloy 690 for Simulating Neutron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dae Gyu; Kim, Hee Moon; Song, Woong Sub; Baik, Seung Je; Joo, Young Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Park, Jin Seok; Lee, Won Jae; Ryu, Woo Seok

    2011-01-01

    The KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is developing new type of nuclear reactor, so called 'SMART'(System Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor) which has many features of small power and system integrated modular type. Alloy 690 was selected as the candidate material for the heat exchanger tube of the steam generator of SMART. The SMART R and D is now facing the stage of engineering verification and approval of standard design to apply to DEMO reactors. Therefore, the material performance under the relevant environment is required to be evaluated. The important material performance issues are mechanical properties i.e. (fracture toughness, tensile and hardness) and thermal properties i.e. (thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity) for which the engineering database is necessary to design a steam generator. However, the neutron post irradiation characteristics of the alloy 690 are barely known. As a result, PIE(Post Irradiation Examination) of thermal properties are planed and performed successfully. But specific heat capacity measurement is not performed because of not having proper test system for irradiated materials. Therefore in order to verify the effect of neutron irradiation for alloy 690, simulation method is adopted. In general, high energy neutron bombardment in material bring about lattice defects i.e. void, pore and dislocation. Dominant factor to impact to heat capacity is mainly dislocation in material. Therefore, simulation of neutron irradiation is devised by material rolling method in order to make artificial dislocation in alloy 690 as same effect of neutron irradiation. After preparing test specimens, heat capacity measurements are performed and results are compared with rolled materials and un-rolled materials to verify the effect of neutron irradiation simulation. Main interest of simulation is that heat capacity value is changed by neutron irradiation

  14. Evaluation of Ion Irradiation Behavior of ODS Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Chul; Hong, Jun Hwa; Han, Chang Hee; Chang, Young Mun; Bae, Chang Soo; Bae, Yoon Young; Chang, Moon Hee

    2006-08-15

    FM steel (Grade 92) and ODS alloy(MA956) specimens were ion irradiated with 122 MeV Ne ions. Irradiation temperatures were about 450 and 550 .deg. C and the peak dose was 1, 5, and 10 dpa. Cross-sectional TEM samples were prepared by the electrolytic Ni-plating after pre-treatment of the irradiated specimens. Irradiation cavities in FM steel and ODS alloy specimens were not much different in size; about 20 nm in diameter in both specimens irradiated at around 450 .deg. C. However, the size distribution of cavities in FM steel specimens was broader than that in ODS alloy specimen, indicating that the cavity growth probably via coalescence). It was noticeable that the location and the preferential growth of the cavities in FM steel specimens: cavities on the PAGB (prior austenite grain boundary) was significantly larger than those within the grains. This could be an important issue for the mechanical properties, especially high temperature creep, fracture toughness, and so on. The dependency of the dose threshold and swelling on the ratio of the inert gas concentration/dpa was analysed for the various irradiation source, including He, Ne, Fe/He, and fast neutron, and the empirical correlation was established.

  15. Evaluation of Ion Irradiation Behavior of ODS Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Chul; Hong, Jun Hwa; Han, Chang Hee; Chang, Young Mun; Bae, Chang Soo; Bae, Yoon Young; Chang, Moon Hee

    2006-08-01

    FM steel (Grade 92) and ODS alloy(MA956) specimens were ion irradiated with 122 MeV Ne ions. Irradiation temperatures were about 450 and 550 .deg. C and the peak dose was 1, 5, and 10 dpa. Cross-sectional TEM samples were prepared by the electrolytic Ni-plating after pre-treatment of the irradiated specimens. Irradiation cavities in FM steel and ODS alloy specimens were not much different in size; about 20 nm in diameter in both specimens irradiated at around 450 .deg. C. However, the size distribution of cavities in FM steel specimens was broader than that in ODS alloy specimen, indicating that the cavity growth probably via coalescence). It was noticeable that the location and the preferential growth of the cavities in FM steel specimens: cavities on the PAGB (prior austenite grain boundary) was significantly larger than those within the grains. This could be an important issue for the mechanical properties, especially high temperature creep, fracture toughness, and so on. The dependency of the dose threshold and swelling on the ratio of the inert gas concentration/dpa was analysed for the various irradiation source, including He, Ne, Fe/He, and fast neutron, and the empirical correlation was established

  16. Study of irradiation creep of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Thin-wall tubing was produced from the 832665 (500 kg) heat of V-4 wt.% Cr-4 wt.% Ti to study its irradiation creep behavior. The specimens, in the form of pressurized capsules, were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor experiments (ATR-A1 and HFIR RB-12J, respectively). The ATR-A1 irradiation has been completed and specimens from it will soon be available for postirradiation examination. The RB-12J irradiation is not yet complete.

  17. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water. New data confirms previous results that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Low boron heats show improved IASCC (irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking). Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC. Microstructural, microchemical, and deformation studies were carried out. Irradiation of X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss associated with formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation did not cause segregation in X-750. Irradiation of 625 resulted in formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to loops and precipitates was apparently offset in 625 by partial dissolution of γ precipitates. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in superior IASCC resistance in 625

  18. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Bajaj, R.; Kearns, J.J.; Hoffman, R.C.; Korinko, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded precracked compact tension specimens was performed in 360 degree C water to determine effect of irradiation on the SCC behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct aged Alloy 625. Out-of-flux and autoclave control specimens provided baseline data. Primary test variables were stress intensity factor, fluence, chemistry, processing history, prestrain. Results for the first series of experiments were presented at a previous conference. Data from two more recent experiments are compared with previous results; they confirm that high irradiation levels significantly reduce SCC resistance in HTH Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat differences in IASCC were related to differences in boron content, with low boron heats showing improved SCC resistance. The in-reactor SCC performance of Alloy 625 was superior to that for Alloy X-750, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens even though they were tested at very high K 1 and fluence levels. A preliminary SCC usage model developed for Alloy X-750 indicates that in-reactor creep processes, which relax stresses but also increase crack tip strain rates, and radiolysis effects accelerate SCC. Hence, in-reactor SCC damage under high flux conditions may be more severe than that associated with postirradiation tests. In addition, preliminary mechanism studies were performed to determine the cause of IASCC In Alloy X-750

  19. The irradiation hardening of Ni-Mo-Cr and Ni-W-Cr alloy under Xe26+ ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaican; Hai, Yang; Liu, Renduo; Jiang, Li; Ye, Xiang-xi; Li, Jianjian; Xue, Wandong; Wang, Wanxia; Tang, Ming; Yan, Long; Yin, Wen; Zhou, Xingtai

    2018-04-01

    The irradiation hardening of Ni-Mo-Cr and Ni-W-Cr alloy was investigated. 7 MeV Xe26+ ion irradiation was performed at room temperature and 650 °C with peak damage dose from 0.05 to 10 dpa. With the increase of damage dose, the hardness of Ni-Mo-Cr and Ni-W-Cr alloy increases, and reaches saturation at damage dose ≥1 dpa. Moreover, the damage dose dependence of hardness in both alloys can be described by the Makin and Minter's equation, where the effective critical volume of obstacles can be used to represent irradiation hardening resistance of the alloys. Our results also show that Ni-W-Cr alloy has better irradiation hardening resistance than Ni-Mo-Cr alloy. This is ascribed to the fact that the W, instead of Mo in the alloy, can suppress the formation of defects under ion irradiation.

  20. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  1. Neutron irradiation damage of a stress relieved TZM alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Masuyama, T.; Satou, M.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study defect microstructures and irradiation hardening in a stress relieved TZM alloy after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) using the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA). Disk specimens of the molybdenum alloy TZM that had been stress relieved at 1199 K (929 C) for 0.9 ks (15 min.) were irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA 1F at 679, 793 and 873 K (406, 520, and 600 C) to a fast fluence of ∼9.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . Microstructures were observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Dislocation structures consisted of isolated loops, aggregated loops (rafts) and elongated dislocations. The size of the loops increased with the irradiation temperature. Void swelling was about 1 and 2% at 793 and 873 K (520 and 600 C), respectively. A void lattice was developed in the body centered cubic (bcc) structure with a spacing of 26 - 28 nm. The fine grain size (0.5 - 2 μm) was retained following high temperature irradiation, indicating that the stress relief heat treatment may extend the material's resistance to radiation damage up to high fluence levels. Microhardness measurements indicated that irradiation hardening increased with irradiation temperature. The relationship between the microstructure and the observed hardening was determined

  2. low temperature irradiation effects in iron-alloys and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi; Abe, Hironobu; Tanaka, Minoru; Nishi, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Noriyuki.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation at 77K and neutron irradiation at 20K were carried out on Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and ZnO and graphite system ceramics, and by measuring positron annihilation lifetime, the micro-information about irradiation-introduced defects was obtained. The temperature of the movement of atomic vacancies in pure iron is about 200K, but it was clarified that by the addition of Cr, it was not much affected. However, in the case of high concentration Cr alloys, the number of atomic vacancies which take part in the formation of micro-voids decreased as compared with the case of pure iron. It is considered that among the irradiation defects of ZnO, O-vac. restored below 300degC. It is considered that in the samples without irradiation, the stage of restoration exists around 550degC, which copes with structural defects. By the measurement of graphite without irradiation, the positron annihilation lifetime corresponding with the interface of matrix and crystal grains, grain boundaries and internal surfaces was almost determined. The materials taken up most actively in the research and development of nuclear fusion reactor materials are austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, and their irradiation defects have been studied. (K.I.)

  3. Post-irradiation annealing of coarse-grained model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P H.N.; Wilson, C; McElroy, R J [AEA Reactor Services, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Thermal ageing and irradiation studies have been carried out on three model alloys (JPC, JPB, JPG) that have identical compositions except for different levels of phosphorus and/or copper. They have been irradiated in three conditions, as-received, heat treated to produce a coarse grained microstructure (similar to heat-affected-zone), and in this condition further aged at 450 C to produce a temper embrittled condition. One of the alloy have been subject to a post-irradiation anneal. The effect of these treatments on mechanical property changes has been characterized by Charpy testing and Vickers hardness measurements; the phosphorus segregation has been studied by a combination of STEM and Auger techniques.

  4. Irradiation enhanced diffusion and irradiation creep tests in stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loelgen, R.H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given of investigations on the rate of phase changes during neutron and electron irradiation in many different fcc alloys showing either precipitation or ordering. The diffusion rate was determined as a function of the irradiation flux, the irradiation temperature and the irradiation dose. It was found that the radiation enhanced diffusion in all the investigated alloys is nearly temperature independent and linearly dependent on the flux. From these results conclusions were drawn concerning the properties of point defects and diffusion mechanisms rate determining during irradiation, which appears to be of a common nature for fcc alloys having a similar structure to those investigated. It has been recognized that the same dependencies which are found for the diffusion rate were also observed for the irradiation creep rate in stainless steels, as reported in literature. On the basis of this observation a combination of measurements is suggested, of radiation enhanced diffusion and radiation enhanced creep in stainless steel alloys. The diffusion tests will be performed at the Euratom Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and the irradiation creep tests will be carried out in the High Flux Reactor /9/ of the Euratom Joint Research Centre in Petten, The Netherlands. In order to investigate irradiation creep on many samples at a time two special rigs were developed which are distinguished only by the mode of stress applied to the steel specimens. In the first type of rig about 50 samples can be tested uniaxially under tension with various combinations of irradiation temperature and stress. The second type of rig holds up to 70 samples which are tested in bending, again with various combinations of irradiation temperature and stress

  5. Swelling and tensile properties of neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1990-07-01

    Vanadium-base alloys are candidates for use as structural material in magnetic fusion reactors. In comparison to other candidate structural materials (e.g., Type 316 stainless and HT-9 ferritic steels), vanadium-base alloys such as V-15Cr-5Ti and V-20Ti have intrinsically lower long-term neutron activation, neutron irradiation after-heat, biological hazard potential, and neutron-induced helium and hydrogen transmutation rates. Moreover, vanadium-base alloys can withstand a higher surface-heat, flux than steels because of their lower thermal stress factor. In addition to having these favorable neutronic and physical properties, a candidate alloy for use as structural material in a fusion reactor must have dimensional stability, i.e., swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement during the reactor lifetime at a level of structural strength commensurate with the reactor operating temperature and structural loads. In this paper, we present experimental results on the swelling and tensile properties of several vanadium-base alloys after irradiation at 420, 520, and 600 degree C to neutron fluences ranging from 0.3 to 1.9 x 10 27 neutrons/m 2 (17 to 114 atom displacements per atom [dpa])

  6. Phases stability of shape memory alloys Cu based under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelaya, Maria Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on the relative phase stability of phases related by a martensitic transformation in copper based shape memory alloys were studied in this work.Different kind of particles and energies were employed in the irradiation experiments.The first kind of irradiation was performed with 2,6 MeV electrons, the second one with 170 keV and 300 keV Cu ions and the third one with swift heavy ions (Kr, Xe, Au) with energies between 200 and 600 MeV.Stabilization of the 18 R martensite in Cu-Zn-Al-Ni induced by electron irradiation was studied.The results were compared to those of the stabilization induced by quenching and ageing in the same alloy, and the ones obtained by irradiation in 18 R-Cu-Zn-Al alloys.The effects of Cu irradiation over b phase were analyzed with several electron microscopy techniques including: scanning electron microscopy (S E M), high resolution electron microscopy (H R E M), micro diffraction and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (E D S). Structural changes in Cu-Zn-Al b phase into a closed packed structure were induced by Cu ion implantation.The closed packed structures depend on the irradiation fluence.Based on these results, the interface between these structures (closed packed and b) and the stability of disordered phases were analyzed. It was also compared the evolution of long range order in the Cu-Zn-Al and in the Cu-Zn-Al-Ni b phase as a function of fluence.The evolution of the g phase was also compared. Both results were discussed in terms of the mobility of irradiation induced point defects.Finally, the effects induced by swift heavy ions in b phase and 18 R martensite were studied. The results of the irradiation in b phase were qualitatively similar to those produced by irradiation with lower energies. On the contrary, nano metric defects were found in the irradiated 18 R martensite.These defects were characterized by H R E M.The characteristic contrast of the defects was associated to a local change in the

  7. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  8. Irradiation induced precipitation in tungsten based, W-Re alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. K.; Wiffen, F. W.; Bentley, J.; Stiegler, J. O.

    1983-03-01

    Tungsten-base alloys containing 5, 11, and 25 pct Re were irradiated in the EBR-II reactor. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 600 to 1500 °C. All compositions were irradiated to fluences in the range 4.3 to 6.1 X 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), and three 25 pct Re samples were also irradiated to 3.7 X 1026 n/m2 at temperatures 700 to 900 °C. Postirradiation examination included measurement of electrical resistivity at room temperature and lower temperatures, X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, microprobe analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation induced resistivity decreases observed in most of the samples suggested second-phase precipitation. Complete results confirmed the precipitate formation in all samples, in disagreement with existing phase diagrams for the W-Re system. Electron diffraction showed the precipitates to be consistent with the cubic, Re-rich X-phase and inconsistent with the σ-phase. Large variations in precipitate morphology and distribution were observed between the different compositions and irradiation conditions. For the 5 and 11 pct Re-alloys, spherically symmetric strain fields surrounded the equiaxed precipitate particles, and were observed even where no particles were visible. These strain fields are believed to arise from local Re enrichment. Thermoelectric data show that the precipitation can lead to decalibration of W/Re thermocouples.

  9. Report on the Synchrotron Characterization of U-Mo and U-Zr Alloys and the Modeling Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuniewski, Maria A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Ganapathy, Varsha [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hamilton, Brenden [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cassutt, Paul [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Zhang, Fan [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Velaquez, Daniel [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Seibert, Rachel [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Terry, Jeff [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sprouster, David [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ecker, Lynne [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) and uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) are two promising fuel candidates for nuclear transmutation reactors which burn long-lived minor actinides and fission products within fast spectrum reactors. The objectives of this research are centered on understanding the early stages of fuel performance through the examination of the irradiation induced microstructural changes in U-Zr and U-Mo alloys subjected to low neutron fluences. Specimens that were analyzed include those that were previously irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL. This most recent work has focused on a sub-set of the irradiated specimens, specifically U-Zr and U-Mo alloys that were irradiated to 0.01 dpa at temperatures ranging from (150-800oC). These specimens were analyzed with two types of synchrotron techniques, including X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction. These techniques provide non-destructive microstructural analysis, including phase identification and quantitation, lattice parameters, crystallite sizes, as well as bonding, structure, and chemistry. Preliminary research has shown changes in the phase fractions, crystallite sizes, and lattice parameters as a function of irradiation and temperature. Future data analyses will continue to explore these microstructural changes.

  10. Swelling in neutron irradiated nickel-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Bell, W.L.

    1972-01-01

    Inconel 625, Incoloy 800 and Hastelloy X were neutron irradiated at 500 to 700 0 C. It was found that of the three alloys investigated, Inconel 625 offers the greatest swelling resistance. The superior swelling resistance of Inconel 625 relative to that of Hastelloy-X is probably related to differences in the concentrations of the minor rather than major alloy constituents, and can involve (a) enhanced recombination of defects in the Inconel 625 and (b) preferential attraction of vacancies to incoherent precipitates. (U.S.)

  11. A model for recovery of scrap monolithic uranium molybdenum fuel by electrorefining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kleeck, Melissa A.

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program (RERTR) is toreduce enrichment at research and test reactors, thereby decreasing proliferation risk at these facilities. A new fuel to accomplish this goal is being manufactured experimentally at the Y12 National Security Complex. This new fuel will require its own waste management procedure,namely for the recovery of scrap from its manufacture. The new fuel is a monolithic uraniummolybdenum alloy clad in zirconium. Feasibility tests were conducted in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner using scrap U-8Mo fuel alloy. These tests proved that a uranium product could be recovered free of molybdenum from this scrap fuel by electrorefining. Tests were also conducted using U-10Mo Zr clad fuel, which confirmed that product could be recovered from a clad version of this scrap fuel at an engineering scale, though analytical results are pending for the behavior of Zr in the electrorefiner. A model was constructed for the simulation of electrorefining the scrap material produced in the manufacture of this fuel. The model was implemented on two platforms, Microsoft Excel and MatLab. Correlations, used in the model, were developed experimentally, describing area specific resistance behavior at each electrode. Experiments validating the model were conducted using scrap of U-10Mo Zr clad fuel in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner. The results of model simulations on both platforms were compared to experimental results for the same fuel, salt and electrorefiner compositions and dimensions for two trials. In general, the model demonstrated behavior similar to experimental data but additional refinements are needed to improve its accuracy. These refinements consist of a function for surface area at anode and cathode based on charge passed. Several approximations were made in the model concerning areas of electrodes which should be replaced by a more accurate function describing these areas.

  12. Segregation of a copper-nickel alloy after electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    1979-09-01

    In the present work measurement of diffuse neutron scattering are used to determine short range segregation effects of the alloy Cu 0 sub(.) 414 Ni 0 sub(.) 586 after thermal annealing and 3 MeV electron irradiation in the temperature range between 370 K and 600 K. In addition neutron small angle scattering measurement are performed after irradiation to study possible long range segregation effects. Residual resistivity measurements are performed in parallel in order tp orientate the relatively expensive neutron scattering measurements with respect to the residual changes (orig./KBI) [de

  13. Fracture toughness of ferritic alloys irradiated at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1986-05-01

    Ferritic compact tension specimens loaded in the Material Open Test Assembly (MOTA) for irradiation during FFTF Cycle 4 were tested at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 428/degree/C. The electrical potential single specimen method was used to measure the fracture toughness of the specimens. Results showed that the fracture toughness of both HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo decreases with increasing test temperature and that the toughness of HT-9 was about 30% higher than that of 9Cr-1Mo. In addition, increasing irradiation temperature resulted in an increase in tearing modulus for both alloys. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Accelerated Irradiations for High Dose Microstructures in Fast Reactor Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhijie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the extent to which high dose rate, self-ion irradiation can be used as an accelerated irradiation tool to understand microstructure evolution at high doses and temperatures relevant to advanced fast reactors. We will accomplish the goal by evaluating phase stability and swelling of F-M alloys relevant to SFR systems at very high dose by combining experiment and modeling in an effort to obtain a quantitative description of the processes at high and low damage rates.

  15. Positron lifetime measurements on electron irradiated amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, P.; Hautojaervi, P.; Chamberod, A.; Yli-Kauppila, J.; Van Zurk, R.

    1981-08-01

    Great advance in understanding the nature of point defects in crystalline metals has been achieved by employing positron annihilation technique. Positrons detect vacancy-type defects and the lifetime value of trapped positrons gives information on the size of submicroscopic vacancy aglomerates and microvoids. In this paper it is shown that low-temperature electron irradiations can result in a considerable increase in the positron lifetimes in various amorphous alloys because of the formation of vacancy-like defects which, in addition of the pre-existing holes, are able to trap positrons. Studied amorphous alloys were Fe 80 B 20 , Pd 80 Si 20 , Cu 50 Ti 50 , and Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 . Electron irradiations were performed with 3 MeV electrons at 20 K to doses around 10 19 e - /cm 2 . After annealing positron lifetime spectra were measured at 77 K

  16. Irradiation testing of high density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.

    1997-10-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles have been designed, fabricated, and inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Irradiation of these experiments began in August 1997. These irradiation tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density dispersion fuels. Each of the two irradiation vehicles contains 32 microplates. Each microplate is aluminum clad, having an aluminum matrix phase and containing one of the following compositions as the fuel phase: U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru, U-10Mo-0.05Sn, U 2 Mo, or U 3 Si 2 . These experiments will be discharged at peak fuel burnups of 40% and 80%. Of particular interest is the fission gas retention/swelling characteristics of these new fuel alloys. This paper presents the design of the irradiation vehicles and the irradiation conditions

  17. Irradiation testing of high-density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles have been designed, fabricated, and inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Irradiation of these experiments began in August 1997. These irradiation tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density dispersion fuels. Each of the two irradiation vehicles contains 32 'microplates'. Each microplate is aluminum clad, having an aluminum matrix phase and containing one of the following compositions as the fuel phase: U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru, U10Mo-0.05Sn, U2Mo, or U 3 Si 2 . These experiments will be discharged at peak fuel burnups of approximately 40 and 80 at.% U 235 . Of particular interest are the extent of reaction of the fuel and matrix phases and the fission gas retention/swelling characteristics of these new fuel alloys. This paper presents the design of the irradiation vehicles and the irradiation conditions. (author)

  18. Microstructural examination of irradiated vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Microstructural examination results are reported for a V-5Cr-5Ti unirradiated control specimens of heat BL-63 following annealing at 1050{degrees}C, and V-4Cr-4Ti heat BL-47 irradiated in three conditions from the DHCE experiment: at 425{degrees}C to 31 dpa and 0.39 appm He/dpa, at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 0.54 appm He/dpa and at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 4.17 appm He/dpa.

  19. Enhanced low-temperature oxidation of zirconium alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.; Fidleris, V.

    1989-01-01

    The linear growth of relatively thick (>300 nm) interference-colored oxide films on zirconium alloy specimens exposed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) coolant at ≤55 o C was unexpected. Initial ideas were that this was a photoconduction effect. Experiments to study photoconduction in thin anodic zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) films in the laboratory were initiated to provide background data. It was found that, in the laboratory, provided a high electric field was maintained across the oxide during ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, enhanced growth of oxide occurred in the irradiated area. Similarly enhanced growth could be obtained on thin thermally formed oxide films that were immersed in an electrolyte with a high electric field superimposed. This enhanced growth was found to be caused by the development of porosity in the barrier oxide layer by an enhanced local dissolution and reprecipitation process during UV irradiation. Similar porosity was observed in the oxide films on the ATR specimens. Since it is not thought that a high electric field could have been present in this instance, localized dissolution of fast-neutron primary recoil tracks may be the operative mechanism. In all instances, the specimens attempt to maintain the normal barrier-layer oxide thickness, which causes the additional oxide growth. Similar mechanisms may have operated during the formation of thick loosely adherent, porous oxides in homogeneous reactor solutions under irradiation, and may be the cause of enhanced oxidation of zirconium alloys in high-temperature water-cooled reactors in some water chemistries. (author)

  20. Pre-irradiation tests on U-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.; Bell, L.G.

    1958-05-01

    Pre-irradiation tests of hardness, density, electrical resistivity, and corrosion resistance as well as metallographic and X-ray examinations were undertaken on U-Si core material, which had been co-extruded in Zr--2, in order that the effect of irradiation on alloys in the epsilon range could be assessed. In addition, a study of the epsilonization of arc-melted material was undertaken in order to rain familiarity with the epsilonization process and to obtain information on the corrosion behaviour of epsilonized material. Sheathed U-Si samples in the epsilonized and de-epsilonized conditions have been irradiated in the X-2 loop, with a water temperature of 275 o C. The samples have been examined after 250 MWD/Tonne and show no dimensional change. (author)

  1. Ordering of equiatomic Fe-Ni alloy under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penisson, J.M.; Bourret, A.

    1975-01-01

    The interpretations of many kinetic studies on the ordering of alloys by heat treatments use models based on chemical kinetic equations or statistical models. In these models it is assumed that ordering takes place by a hole process. When ordering occurs under irradiation a strong supersaturation in interstitials and holes exists and the question is to know what defects take part in the ordering process. Thus in the order-disorder transformation in Fe-Ni demonstrated after neutron irradiation it is assumed that only the holes participate in the ordering. To check this hypothesis the above transformation was observed during electron irradiation in an electron microscope at 1MeV. Owing to the strong flux available the ordering takes place fairly quickly ( [fr

  2. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, FABIO B.V. de

    2014-01-01

    Este trabalho tem como objetivo o desenvolvimento de um combustível nuclear de alta densidade e baixo enriquecimento com base na liga ?-UMo, para aplicações nas quais seja necessário desempenho satisfatório a altas temperaturas, considerando-se a sua utilização na forma de dispersão. Para tanto, partiu-se da análise dos resultados dos testes RERTR (sigla em inglês para \\"Reduced Enrichment of Research and Test Reactors\\") e de alguns trabalhos teóricos envolvendo a elaboração de ligas metaest...

  3. Influence of alloying elements on the irradiation hardening and environmental sensitivity of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Hallstadius, L.; Bergqvist, H.; Nylund, A.; Wikstroem, C.

    1992-01-01

    Ten different alloys of zirconium have been tested with regard to the effect of irradiation on their mechanical properties and their sensitivity to environmentally induced failure. Two different environments were used: iodine vapour and liquid cesium with an addition of 2% cadmium. The neutron dose was 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>1MeV) and the irradiation temperature was about 300 degrees C. All alloy additions increased the irradiation hardening. Especially notable was the large effect of titanium and tin on irradiation hardening. A limited amount of transmission electron microscopy was carried out in order to find an explanation to the effects. The testing in different environments showed that there is no clear correlation between environmental sensitivity and yield stress. For materials of similar yield stress an alloyed material tends to be more sensitive to environmental cracking than a material which only contains oxygen as an impurity. There also seems to be an effect of oxygen on the environmental cracking sensitivity. A material with 910 ppm oxygen was considerably more sensitive to cracking than a material with 470 ppm oxygen despite the fact that the yield stress values differed by only 90 MPa

  4. Fusion neutron irradiation of Ni(Si) alloys at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.S.; Guinan, M.W.; Hahn, P.A.

    1987-09-01

    Two Ni-4% Si alloys, with different cold work levels, are irradiated with 14 MeV fusion neutrons at 623 K, and their Curie temperatures are monitored during irradiation. The results are compared to those of an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. The results show that increasing dislocation density increases the Curie temperature change rate. At the same damage rate, the Curie temperature change rate for the alloy irradiated by 14 MeV fusion neutrons is only 6 to 7% of that for an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. It is well known that the migration of radiation induced defects contributes to segregation of silicon atoms at sinks in this alloy, causing the Curie temperature changes. The current results imply that the relative free defect production efficiency decreases from one for the electron irradiated sample to 6 to 7% for the fusion neutron irradiated sample. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Fusion neutron irradiation of Ni(Si) alloys at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.S.; Guinan, M.W.; Hahn, P.A.

    1987-09-01

    Two Ni-4% Si alloys, with different cold work levels, are irradiated with 14 MeV fusion neutrons at 623 K, and their Curie temperatures are monitored during irradiation. The results are compared to those of an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. The results show that increasing dislocation density increases the Curie temperature change rate. At the same damage rate, the Curie temperature change rate for the alloy irradiated by 14 MeV fusion neutrons is only 6 to 7% of that for an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. It is well known that the migration of radiation induced defects contributes to segregation of silicon atoms at sinks in this alloy, causing the Curie temperature changes. The current results imply that the relative free defect production efficiency decreases from one for the electron irradiated sample to 6 to 7% for the fusion neutron irradiated sample. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Fusion neutron irradiation of Ni-Si alloys at high temperature*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. S.; Guinan, M. W.; Hahn, P. A.

    1988-07-01

    Two Ni-4% Si alloys, with different cold work levels, have been irradiated with 14-MeV fusion neutrons at 623 K, and their Curie temperatures have been monitored during irradiation. The results are compared to those of an identical alloy irradiated by 2-MeV electrons. The results show that increasing dislocation density increases the Curie temperature change rate. At the same damage rate, the Curie temperature change rate for the alloy irradiated by 14-MeV fusion neutrons is only 6-7% of that for an identical alloy irradiated by 2-MeV electrons. It is well known that the migration of radiation induced defects contributes to segregation of silicon atoms at sinks in this alloy, causing the Curie temperature changes. The current results imply that the relative free defect production efficiency decreases from one for the electron irradiated sample to 6-7% for the fusion neutron irradiated sample.

  7. Low temperature irradiation effects on iron boron based amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouard, A.

    1982-09-01

    Three Fe-B amorphous alloys (Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 27 Mo 2 B 20 and Fe 75 B 25 ) and the crystallized Fe 3 B alloy have been irradiated at the temperature of liquid hydrogen. Electron irradiation and irradiation by 10 B fission fragments induce point defects in amorphous alloys. These defects are characterized by an intrinsic resistivity and a formation volume. The threshold energy for the displacement of iron atoms has also been calculated. Irradiation by 235 U fission fragments induces some important structural modifications in the amorphous alloys [fr

  8. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  9. Recovery characteristics of neutron-irradiated V-Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey, T.; Pareja, R.

    2000-01-01

    The recovery characteristics of neutron-irradiated pure V and V-Ti alloys with 1.0 and 4.5 at.% Ti have been investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. Microvoid formation during irradiation at 320 K is produced in pure V and V-1Ti but not in V-4.5Ti. The results are consistent with a model of swelling inhibition induced by vacancy trapping by solute Ti during irradiation. The temperature dependencies of the parameter S in the range 8-300 K indicate a large dislocation bias for vacancies and solute Ti. This dislocation bias prevents the microvoid nucleation in V-4.5Ti, and the microvoid growth in V-1Ti, when vacancies become mobile during post-irradiation annealing treatments. A characteristic increase of the positron lifetime is found during recovery induced by isochronal annealing. It is attributed to a vacancy accumulation into the lattice of Ti oxides precipitated during cooling down, or at their matrix/precipitate interfaces. These precipitates could be produced by the decomposition of metastable phases of Ti oxides formed during post-irradiation annealing above 1000 K

  10. Microstructural development for copper alloys irradiated in RTNS-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Microscopy and microhardness measurements were performed on pure Cu and Cu alloyed with 5% of either Al, Ni, or Mn, all irradiated in RTNS-II up to 7.5 x 10 17 n/cm 2 . Results show that a substantial fraction of the defects are below the microscope's resolution limit and account for a large amount of the radiation hardening. The solute Al appears to lead to substantial differences in clustering of point defects within the cascade and thus affect the visibility of the clusters. The fraction of defects surviving the original cascade event is at least 9%

  11. Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking in austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austentic alloys is a complicated phenomenon that poses a difficult problem for designers and operators of nuclear plants. Because IASCC accelerates the deterioration of various reactor components, it is imperative that it be understood and modeled to maintain reactor safety. Unfortunately, the costs and dangers of gathering data on radiation effects are high, and the phenomenon itself is so complex that it is difficult to enumerate all of the causes. This article reviews current knowledge of IASCC and describes the goals of ongoing work

  12. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650 0 C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys

  13. The reprocessing of irradiated fuels improvement and extension of the solvent extraction process; Le traitement des combustibles irradies amelioration et extension du procede utilisant les solvants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faugeras, P; Chesne, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Improvements made in the conventional tri-butylphosphate process are described, in particular. the concentration and the purification of plutonium by one extraction cycle using tri-butyl-phosphate with reflux; and the use of an apparatus working continuously for precipitating plutonium oxalate, for calcining the oxalate, and for fluorinating the oxide. The modifications proposed for the treatment of irradiated uranium - molybdenum alloys are described, in particular, the dissolution of the fuel, and the concentration of the fission product solutions. The solvent extraction treatment is used also for the plutonium fuels utilized for the fast breeder reactor (Rapsodie) An outline of the process is presented and discussed, as well as the first experimental results and the plans for a pilot plant having a capacity of 1 kg/day. The possible use of tn-lauryl-amine in the plutonium purification cycle is now under consideration for the processing plant at La Hague. The flowsheet for this process and its performance are presented. The possibility of vitrification is considered for the final treatment of the concentrated radioactive wastes from the Marcoule (irradiated uranium) and La Hague (irradiated uranium-molybdenum) Centers. Three possible processes are described and discussed, as well as the results obtained from the operation of the corresponding experimental units using tracers. (authors) [French] On decrit les ameliorations apportees au procede classique utilisant le phosphate tributylique, et notamment la concentration et la purification du plutonium par un cycle d'extraction au tributylphosphate avec reflux, l'utilisation d'un appareillage continu de precipitation d'oxalate de plutonium, de calcination de l'oxalate, et de fluoration de l'oxyde. On presente les modifications envisagees pour le traitement des alliages uranium-molybdene irradies, principalement en ce qui concerne la dissolution du combustible et la concentration des solutions de produits de fission

  14. Nucleation of dislocation loops during irradiation in binary FCC alloys with different alloy compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Shigenaka, N.; Fuse, M.

    1992-01-01

    Dislocation loop nucleation is analyzed using a rate theory based model for face-centered cubic (fcc) binary alloys containing A- and B-atoms. In order to calculate the nucleation process in concentrated alloys, the model considers three types of interstitial dumbbells composed of A- and B-atoms, AA-, BB-, and AB-type dumbbells. Conversions between these interstitial dumbbells are newly introduced in the formulation in consideration of dumbbell configurations and movements. The model also includes reactions, such as point defect production by irradiation, mutual recombination of an interstitial and a vacancy, and dislocation loop nucleation and growth. Parameter values are chosen based on the atom size of the alloy component elements, and dislocation loop nucleation kinetics are investigated while varying alloy compositions. Two different types of kinetics are obtained in accordance with the dominant loop nucleus type. The migration energy difference of AA- and BB-type interstitial dumbbells is important in the determination of the dominant loop nucleus type. The present model predicts that the dislocation loop concentration decrease with increasing under sized atoms content, but defect production rate and temperature dependences of loop concentration are insensitive to alloy compositions. (author)

  15. Irradiation-induced segregation in multi-component alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I.W.

    1983-01-01

    A unified analysis of irradiation-induced segregation in multi-component alloys is developed using the formulation of irreversible thermodynamics. Three distinct mechanisms for segregation, namely the inverse Kirkendall effect, the vacancy-wind effect, and the solute drag of interstitials, are identified. In particular, the inverse Kirkendall effect due to interstitials arises only if a solute-interstitial interaction or a mutual conversion among interstitials via lattice atom intermediaries operates simultaneously. In the limit of fast conversion a para-equilibrium state may be reached between interstitials and lattice atoms, and the interstitial mechanism becomes formally analogous to the vacancy mechanism. Although the past treatment of rate phenomena in this field was apparently limited to the latter case, the importance of the consideration of separate chemical potentials for interstitials of different species, in segregation and other irradiation effects, is emphasized. (orig.)

  16. Precipitate resolution in an electron irradiated ni-si alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.; Kitajima, K.

    1988-09-01

    Precipitate resolution processes in a Ni-12.6 at% Si alloy under electron irradiation have been observed by means of HVEM. Above 400°C, growth and resolution of Ni 3Si precipitates were observed simultaneously. The detail stereoscopic observation showed that the precipitates close to free surfaces grew, while those in the middle of a specimen dissolved. The critical dose when the precipitates start to shrink increases with increasing the depth. This depth dependence of the precipitate behavior under irradiation has a close relation with the formation of surface precipitates and the growth of solute depleted zone beneath them. The temperature and dose dependence of the resolution rate showed that the precipitates in the solute depleted zone dissolved by the interface controlled process of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  17. Fracture mechanics behaviour of neutron irradiated Alloy A-286

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    The effect of fast-neutron irradiation on the fatigue-crack propagation and fracture toughness behaviour of Alloy A-286 was characterized using fracture mechanics techniques. The fracture toughness was found to decrease continuously with increasing irradiation damage at both 24 deg. C and 427 deg. C. In the unirradiated and low fluence conditions, specimens displayed appreciable plasticity prior to fracture, and equivalent Ksub(Ic) values were determined from Jsub(Ic) fracture toughness results. At high irradiation exposure levels, specimens exhibited a brittle Ksub(Ic) fracture mode. The 427 deg. C fracture toughness fell from 129 MPa√m in the unirradiated condition to 35 MPa√m at an exposure of 16.2 dpa (total fluence of 5.2x10 22 n/cm 2 ). Room temperature fracture toughness values were consistently 40 to 60 percent higher than the 427 deg. C values. Electron fractography revealed that the reduction in fracture resistance was attributed to a fracture mechanism transition from ductile microvoid coalescence to channel fracture. Fatigue-crack propagation tests were conducted at 427 deg. C on specimens irradiated at 2.4 dpa and 16.2 dpa. Crack growth rates at the lower exposure level were comparable to those in unirradiated material, while those at the higher exposure were slightly higher than in unirradiated material. (author)

  18. Irradiation-induced patterning in dilute Cu–Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumphy, B.; Chee, S.W.; Vo, N.Q.; Averback, R.S.; Bellon, P.; Ghafari, M.

    2014-01-01

    Compositional patterning in dilute Cu 1−x Fe x (x ≈ 12%) induced by 1.8 MeV Kr + irradiation was studied as a function of temperature using atom probe tomography. Irradiation near room temperature led to homogenization of the sample, whereas irradiation at 300 °C and above led to precipitation and macroscopic coarsening. Between these two temperatures the irradiated alloys formed steady state patterns of composition where precipitates grew to a fixed size. The size in this regime increased somewhat with temperature. It was also observed that the steady state concentrations of Fe in Cu matrix and Cu in the Fe precipitates both greatly exceeded their equilibrium solubilities, with the degree of supersaturation in each phase decreasing with increasing temperature. In the macroscopic coarsening regime, the Fe-rich precipitates showed indications of a “cherry-pit” structure, with Cu precipitates forming within the Fe precipitates. In the patterning regime, interfaces between Fe-rich precipitates and the Cu-rich matrix were irregular and diffuse

  19. Irradiation response of rapidly solidified Path A type prime candidate alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imeson, E.; Tong, C.; Lee, M.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Harling, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present a first assessment of the microstructural response to neutron irradiation shown by Path A alloys prepared by rapid solidification processing. To more fully demonstrate the potential of the method, alloys with increased titanium and carbon content have been used in addition to the Path A prime candidate alloy

  20. Dislocation Climb Sources Activated by 1 MeV Electron Irradiation of Copper-Nickel Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, P.; Leffers, Torben

    1977-01-01

    Climb sources emitting dislocation loops are observed in Cu-Ni alloys during irradiation with 1 MeV electrons in a high voltage electron microscope. High source densities are found in alloys containing 5, 10 and 20% Ni, but sources are also observed in alloys containing 1 and 2% Ni. The range of ...

  1. Neutron irradiation effects on magnetic properties of some Heusler alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Hideya; Shinohara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hisao; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The neutron irradiation effects were studied with measurements of temperature dependence of magnetization in ordered and disordered Heusler alloys. The irradiation was carried out in JMTR with a total flux of fast neutrons of 10 20 nvt. Fully ordered Cu 2 MnIn, partially ordered Cu 2 MnAl and completely disordered Cu 2 MnSn were prepared with various temperature treatments. The magnetization-temperature curves of each specimen were measured before and after irradiation. In the irradiated Cu 2 MnIn, the disordering by the irradiation gave rise to a decrease of magnetization, and the temperature dependence of magnetization showed that the disordered region contained various regions with different degrees of disorder. For the distribution of the disordered region, the calculation based on the theory of temperature spike by Seitz and Koekler gave a feasible result that a disordered region comprised a central core with a radius of 5.4 A which was completely disordered and a periphery of 3.3 A thickness which was partially disordered. From the magnetization-temperature curves of Cu 2 MnAl, it was considered that the disordered regions induced by the irradiation had different properties from those induced by the heat treatment. The former were the localized and comprised regions corresponding to various degrees of disorder, while the latter spread spatially in a wide range with a certain degree of disorder. The ordering by enhanced diffusion occurred simultaneously to an extent comparable to the disordering, and so it played an important role in the magnetization in the partially disordered Cu 2 MnAl. In the disordered Cu 2 MnSn, however, the ordering effect was very small. It is supposed to be difficult for the A2 structure to transform into the L2 1 structure by the enhanced diffusion. (auth.)

  2. Low temperature irradiation effects on iron-boron based amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouard, Alain.

    1983-01-01

    Three iron-boron amorphous alloys and the crystalline Fe 3 B alloy have been irradiated at liquid hydrogen temperature. 2,4 MeV electron irradiation induces the creation of point defects in the amorphous alloys as well as in the crystalline Fe 3 B alloy. These point defects can be assimilated to iron ''Frenkel pairs''. They have been characterized by determining their intrinsic electrical resistivity and their formation volume. The displacement threshold energy of iron atoms has also been determined. 10 B fission fragments induce, in these amorphous alloys, displacement cascades which lead to stable vacancy rich zones. This irradiation also leads to a structural disorder in relation with the presence of defects. 235 U fission fragments irradiation modifies drastically the structure of the amorphous alloys. The results have been interpreted on the basis of the coexistence of two opposite processes which induce local disorder and crystallisation respectively [fr

  3. Alloys of nickel-iron and nickel-silicon do not swell under fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre, G.; Silvent, A.; Regnard, C.; Sainfort, G.

    1975-01-01

    This research is concerned with the effect of fast-neutron irradiation on the swelling of nickel and nickel alloys. Ni-Fe (0-60at%Fe) and Ni-Si (0-8at%Si) were studied, and the fluences were in the range 10 20 -4.3x10 22 n/cm 2 . In dilute alloys, the added elements are dissolved and reduce swelling, silicon being particularly effective. In more concentrated alloys, irradiation of Ni-Fe and Ni-Si alloys brings about the formation of plate-shaped precipitates of Ni 3 X and these alloys do not swell. (Auth.)

  4. Mechanisms of irradiation growth of alpha-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental observations in the last few years have shown that the range of irradiation growth behaviour of alpha-zirconium alloys is more varied, that a wider variety of sinks must be considered, and that there are more potential sources of anisotropy than was previously recognized. The important new experimental observations which influence our preception of the growth phenomenon in zirconium alloys include the growth of single crystals, accelerating growth in annealed material with the coincident appearance of vacancy loops on the basal planes, the occurrence of 'negative' growth, i.e., contractions along prism directions, the absence of a pronounced effect of grain size on the long term growth rate at low temperatures, and the presence of intergranular constraints prior to irradiation. With the greater complexity of behaviour now being observed, it is necessary to apply new theoretical concepts to assist in understanding growth, e.g., the potential role of anisotropic diffusion in segregation point defects to different sinks and 'growth' caused by the anisotropic relaxation of intergranular constrains. These can be combined with earlier ideas to predict a variety of growth behaviours, including 'negative growth'. Because the most important physical information required for theoretical treatments of growth, i.e, the characteristics of vacancies and self interstitial atoms, are still poorly understood, it is almost impossible to test rigorously any particular theoretical concept and a complete picture of growth has yet to emerge. (orig./MM)

  5. Mechanical properties examined by nanoindentation for selected phases relevant to the development of monolithic uranium-molybdenum metallic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, Ryan; Park, Youngjoo; Mehta, Abhishek [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 32826 (United States); Keiser, Dennis [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402 (United States); Sohn, Yongho, E-mail: Yongho.Sohn@ucf.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 32826 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Nanomechanical properties, specifically the reduced modulus and hardness of several intermetallic and solid solution phases are reported to assist the development of the U-10 wt% Mo (U-10Mo) monolithic fuel system for research and test reactors. Findings from this study and reported values of mechanical properties provide data critical for understanding and predicting the structural behavior of the fuel system during fabrication and irradiation. The phases examined are products of interdiffusion and reaction between (1) the AA6061 cladding and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely (Al,Si){sub 3}Zr and Al{sub 3}Zr, (2) the U-10Mo fuel and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely UZr{sub 2}, Mo{sub 2}Zr, and α-U, and (3) the U (or U-10Mo) and Mo, namely a mixture gradient of α- and γ-phases. The UC inclusions observed within the fuel alloy were also examined. Only phases present in thick or continuous microstructure on cross-sectioned fuel plates and diffusion couples were investigated for reduced modulus and hardness. Concentration-dependence of room-temperature reduced modulus in U solid solution with 0–10 wt% Mo was semi-quantitatively modeled based on mixture of α- and γ-phases and solid solutioning within the γ-phase.

  6. Mechanical properties examined by nanoindentation for selected phases relevant to the development of monolithic uranium-molybdenum metallic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ryan; Park, Youngjoo; Mehta, Abhishek; Keiser, Dennis; Sohn, Yongho

    2017-04-01

    Nanomechanical properties, specifically the reduced modulus and hardness of several intermetallic and solid solution phases are reported to assist the development of the U-10 wt% Mo (U-10Mo) monolithic fuel system for research and test reactors. Findings from this study and reported values of mechanical properties provide data critical for understanding and predicting the structural behavior of the fuel system during fabrication and irradiation. The phases examined are products of interdiffusion and reaction between (1) the AA6061 cladding and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely (Al,Si)3Zr and Al3Zr, (2) the U-10Mo fuel and the Zr diffusion barrier, namely UZr2, Mo2Zr, and α-U, and (3) the U (or U-10Mo) and Mo, namely a mixture gradient of α- and γ-phases. The UC inclusions observed within the fuel alloy were also examined. Only phases present in thick or continuous microstructure on cross-sectioned fuel plates and diffusion couples were investigated for reduced modulus and hardness. Concentration-dependence of room-temperature reduced modulus in U solid solution with 0-10 wt% Mo was semi-quantitatively modeled based on mixture of α- and γ-phases and solid solutioning within the γ-phase.

  7. Deuterium ion irradiation induced precipitation in Fe–Cr alloy: Characterization and effects on irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.P.; Yu, R.; Zhu, Y.M.; Zhao, M.Z.; Bai, J.W.; Wan, F.R.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new phase precipitated in Fe–Cr alloy after deuterium ion irradiation at 773 K. • B2 structure was proposed for the Cr-rich new phase. • Strain fields around the precipitate have been measured by GPA. • The precipitate decrease growth rate of dislocation loop under electron irradiation. - Abstract: A new phase was found to precipitate in a Fe–Cr model alloy after 58 keV deuterium ion irradiation at 773 K. The nanoscale radiation-induced precipitate was studied systematically using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), image simulation and in-situ ultrahigh voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVEM). B2 structure is proposed for the new Cr-rich phase, which adopts a cube-on-cube orientation relationship with regard to the Fe matrix. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) was employed to measure the strain fields around the precipitate and this was used to explain its characteristic 1-dimensional elongation along the 〈1 0 0〉 Fe direction. The precipitate was stable under subsequent electron irradiation at different temperatures. We suggest that the precipitate with a high interface-to-volume ratio enhances the radiation resistance of the material. The reason for this is the presence of a large number of interfaces between the precipitate and the matrix, which may greatly reduce the concentration of point defects around the dislocation loops. This leads to a significant decrease in the growth rate

  8. Microstructural and microchemical evolution in vanadium alloys by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Kakiuchi, Hironori; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Iwai, Takeo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Microstructural and microchemical evolution in vanadium alloys were investigated using heavy ion irradiation. No cavities were observed in V-5Cr-5Ti alloys irradiated to 30 dpa at 520 and 600degC. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses showed that Ti peaks around grain boundaries. Segregation of Cr atoms was not clearly detected. Co-implanted helium was also found to enhance dislocation evolution in V-5Cr-5Ti. High density of matrix cavities were observed in V-5Fe alloys irradiated with dual ions, whereas cavities were formed only around grain boundaries in single ion irradiated V-5Fe. (author)

  9. Investigation of the uranium-molybdenum diffusion in body centered {gamma} solid solutions; Etude de la diffusion uranium-molybdene dans la solution solide {gamma} cubique centree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adda, Y; Mairy, C; Bouchet, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Philibert, J [IRSID, 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1958-07-01

    The body centered {gamma} phase uranium-molybdenum intermetallic diffusion has been studied by different technical methods: micrography, electronic microanalyser, microhardness. The values of several numbers of penetration coefficients are given, and their physical significations has been discussed. The diffusion coefficients, the frequency factor and activation energies has been determined for each concentration. After determination of the Kirkendall effect in this system, we calculated the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of uranium and molybdenum. (author) [French] La dilution intermetallique uranium-molybdene, en phase {gamma} cubique centree, a ete etudiee au moyen de differentes techniques: micrographie, microsonde electronique, microdurete. Les valeurs d'un certain nombre de coefficients de penetration sont donnees et leur signification physique discutee. Les coefficients de diffusion, les facteurs de frequence et les energies d'activation ont ete determines pour chaque concentration. Apres avoir mis en evidence un effet Kirkendall dans ce systeme, on a calcule les coefficients de diffusion intrinseques de l'uranium et du molybdene. (auteur)

  10. A review of the effect of neutron irradiation on the deformation behaviour of copper and copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, H.R.

    1976-08-01

    The basic mechanisms of irradiation hardening are described. The effects of neutron dose, alloying and pre-irradiation deformation on the deformation behaviour of neutron-irradiatied copper and its alloys are considered. The discrepancy in the reported data is discussed. Substitutional and interstitial additions are found to influence the rate of irradiation hardening, while pre-irradiation deformation has no influence. The deformation behaviour of copper is found to alter as a result of irradiation and alloying. (author)

  11. Reactor irradiation and helium-3 effects on mechanical properties of alpha-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebus, V.N.; Alekseev, Eh.F.; Golikov, I.V.

    1990-01-01

    Dependence of α-titanium alloy mechanical properties on test temperature and neutron fluence is investigated. Irradiation is shown to result in material hardening and in their plasticity reduction, but residual plasticity remains rather high. Additional reduction of plasticity results in helium-3 introduced in materials under irradiation. Restoration of properties is observed at test temperature higher 500 deg C. Irradiation by fast neutrons up to high fluences (1.4·10 23 cm -2 ) results in essential alloy softening

  12. Structure and properties of UV-irradiated LLDPE and alloy of PA66 and the irradiated LLDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Qianping; Zou Hua; Wu Shishan; Shen Jian

    2006-01-01

    Some oxygen-containing groups such as C=O, C-O and -OH were introduced onto linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) chains by UV irradiation in air. Their concentration increased with the irradiation time. Crystal shape of the irradiated LLDPE remained an orthorhombic structure, while space of the crystalline plane kept unchanged. The melting temperature and crystallinity decreased due to the LLDPE chain scission into small molecules compound and crystalline defects caused by UV irradiation. Compared with pristine LLDPE, hydrophilicity of the irradiated LLDPE increased due to the introduction of polar oxygen-containing groups, but the tensile strength decreased due to the LLDPE chain degradation and reduction of crystallinity. The temperature of initial weight loss of the irradiated LLDPE was lower than that of pristine LLDPE. An alloy of PA66 and the irradiated LLDPE (irradiated PA66/LLDPE) was prepared by melting blend at 260-270 degree C. Compared to non-irradiated PA66/LLDPE alloy, dispersion of LLDPE particles in the irradiated PA66/LLDPE alloy and interfacial interactions between the components were markedly improved. Therefore, tensile strength and impact strength of the irradiated PA66/ LLDPE were higher than those of the control. (authors)

  13. Unirradiated UO2 in irradiated zirconium alloy sheathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Hardy, D.G.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Scoberg, J.A.

    1979-07-01

    Zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel elements have defected in power reactors when element power outputs were raised significantly after a long irradiation at low power. We have irradiated fuel elements fabricated from fresh UO 2 pellets and zirconium alloy sheaths previously irradiated without fuel. This gave a fuel element with radiation-damaged low-ductility sheathing but with no fission products in the fuel. The elements were power boosted in-reactor to linear power outputs up to 84 kW/m for two five-day periods. No elements defected despite sheath strains of 0.82 percent at circumferential ridge postions. Half of these elements were subsequently soaked at low power to build up the fission product inventory in the fuel and then power boosted to 63 kW/m for a third time. Two elements defected on this final boost. We conclude that these defects were caused by fission product induced stress-corrosion cracking and that this mechanism plays an importent role in power reactor fuel defects. (auth)

  14. Effects of irradiation on ferritic alloys and implications for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-07-01

    This paper reviews the ADIP irradiation effects data base on ferritic (martensitic) alloys to provide reactor teams with an understanding of how such alloys will behave for fusion reactor first wall applications. Irradiation affects dimensional stability, strength and toughness. Dimensional stability is altered by precipitation and void swelling. Swelling as high as 25% may occur in some ferritic alloys at 500 dpa. Irradiation alters strength both during and following irradiation. Irradiation at low temperatures leads to hardening whereas at higher temperatures and high exposures, precipitate coarsening can result in softening. Toughness can also be adversely affected by irradiation. Failure can occur in ferritic in a brittle manner and irradiation induced hardening causes brittle failure at higher temperatures. Even at high test temperatures, toughness is reduced due to reduced failure initiation stresses. 39 refs

  15. Relationship of microstructure and tensile properties for neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The microstructures in V-15Cr-5Ti, V-10Cr-5RTi, V-3Ti-1Si, V-15Ti-7.5Cr, and V-20Ti alloys were examined by transmission electron microscopy after neutron irradiation at 600 degree C to 21--84 atom displacements per atom in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility. The microstructures in these irradiated alloys were analyzed to determine the radiation-produced dislocation density, precipitate number density and size, and void number density and size. The results of these analyses were used to compute increases in yield stress and swelling of the irradiated alloys. The computed increase in yield stress was compared with the increase in yield stress determined from tensile tests on these irradiated alloys. This comparison made it possible to evaluate the influence of alloy composition on the evolution of radiation-damaged microstructures and the resulting tensile properties. 11 refs

  16. Mechanical property and conductivity changes in several copper alloys after 13.5 dpa neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, M.; Kohse, G.; Lee, T.S.; Grant, N.J.; Harling, O.K.

    1986-01-01

    A scoping experiment in which 25 different copper materials of 17 alloy compositions were irradiated to approx.13.5 dpa approx.400 0 C in a fast reactor is described. The materials include rapidly solidified (RS) alloys, with and without oxide dispersion strengthening, as well as conventionally processed alloys. Immersion density (swelling), electrical conductivity (which can be related to thermal conductivity), and yield stress and ductility by miniature disk bend testing have been measured before and after irradiation. It was found, in general, that the Rs alloys are stable under irradiation to 13.5 dpa, showing small conductivity changes and little or no swelling. Reduction of strength and ductility, in post-irradiation tests at the irradiation temperature, are not generally observed. Some conventionally processed alloys also performed well, although irradiation softening and swelling of several percent were observed in some cases, and pure copper swelled in excess of 5%. It is concluded that a number of copper alloys should receive further study, and that higher dose irradiations will be required to establish the limits of swelling suppression in these alloys

  17. Neutron irradiation effect on the strength of jointed Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro; Miya, Naoyuki

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate applicability of Ti alloy to large scaled structural material for fusion reactors, irradiation effect on the mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy and its TIG welded material was investigated after neutron irradiation (temperature: 746-788K, fluence: 2.8 x 10 23 n/m 2 (>0.18 MeV). The following results were obtained. (1) Irradiated Ti alloy shows about 20-30% increase of its tensile strength and large degradation of fracture elongation, comparing with those of unirradiated Ti alloy. (2) TIG welded material behaves as Ti alloy in its tensile test, however, shows 30% increase of area reduction in 373-473K, whereas 1/2 degradation of area reduction over 600K. (3) Irradiated TIG welded material behaves heavier embrittlement than that of irradiated Ti alloy. (4) Charpy impact properties of un- and irradiated Ti alloys shift to ductile from brittle fracture and transition temperature shift, ΔT was estimated as about 100K. (5) Remarkable increase of hardness was found, especially in HAZ of TIG welded material after irradiation. (author)

  18. Effect of irradiation on the tensile properties of niobium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Heestand, R.L.; Atkin, S.D.

    1986-11-01

    The alloys Nb-1Zr and PWC-11 (Nb-1Zr-0.1C) were selected as prime candidate alloys for the SP-100 reactor. Since the mechanical properties of niobium alloys irradiated to end-of-life exposure levels of about 2 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures above 1300 K were not available, an irradiation experiment (B-350) in EBR-II was conducted. Irradiation creep, impact properties, bending fatigue, and tensile properties were investigated; however, only tensile properties will be reported in this paper. The tensile properties were studied since they easily reveal the common irradiation phenomena of hardening and embrittlement. Most attention was directed to testing at the irradiation temperature. Further testing was conducted at lower temperatures in order to scope the behavior of the alloys in cooldown conditions

  19. Microstructural characteristics of DU-xMo alloys with x = 7-12 wt%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Hartmann, Thomas; Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Jue, J.-F.

    2009-01-01

    Microstructural, phase, and impurity analyses of six depleted uranium-molybdenum alloys were obtained using optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and carbon/nitrogen/oxygen determination. Uranium-molybdenum alloy foils are currently under investigation for the conversion of high-power research reactors using high-enriched uranium fuel to accommodate the use of low-enriched uranium fuel. Understanding basic microstructural behavior of these foils is an important consideration in determining the impact of fabrication processes and in anticipating performance of the foils in a reactor. Average grain diameter decreased with increasing molybdenum content. Lattice parameter decreased with increasing molybdenum content, and no significant degree of phase decomposition or crystallographic ordering was caused by processing and post-processing conditions employed in this study. Impurity concentration, specifically carbon, inhibited the degree of microstructural recrystallization but did not appear to impact other microstructural traits, such as γ-phase retention or lattice parameter.

  20. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure in experimental and commercial ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Thomas, L.E.

    1983-05-01

    A series of microstructural studies have been undertaken on fast-reactor-irradiated specimens of experimental ferritic alloys and ferritic/martensitic commercial alloys covering a broad range of compositions and starting microstructures. It is found that voids do indeed form in ferritic alloys and that dislocation loops and tangles are created during irradiation at temperatures below 500 0 C. Swelling rates as high as 0.25% per 10 22 n/cm 2 have been measured. However, the major effect of irradiation is precipitation and precipitation can suppress void swelling completely and/or be responsible for degradation of mechanical properties

  1. Damage structures in fission-neutron irradiated Ni-based alloys at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, K.; Shimomura, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The defects formed in Ni based (Ni-Si, Ni-Cu and Ni-Fe) alloys which were irradiated with fission-neutrons were examined by electron microscopy. Irradiations were carried out at 473 K and 573 K. In the 473 K irradiated specimens, a high density of large interstitial loops and small vacancy clusters with stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) were observed. The number densities of these two types of defects did not strongly depend on the amount of solute atoms in each alloy. The density of the loops in Ni-Si alloys was much higher than those in Ni-Cu and Ni-Fe alloys, while the density of SFT only slightly depended on the kind of solute. Also, the size of the loops depended on the kinds and amounts of solute. In 573 K irradiated Ni-Cu specimens, a high density of dislocation lines developed during the growth of interstitial loops. In Ni-Si alloys, the number density and size of the interstitial loops changed as a function of the amount of solute. Voids were formed in Ni-Cu alloys but scarcely formed in Ni-Si alloys. The number density of voids was one hundredth of that of SFT observed in 473 K irradiated Ni-Cu alloys. Possible formation processes of interstitial loops, SFT dislocation lines and voids are discussed.

  2. Damage structures in fission-neutron irradiated Ni-based alloys at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakawa, K.; Shimomura, Y. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-01-01

    The defects formed in Ni based (Ni-Si, Ni-Cu and Ni-Fe) alloys which were irradiated with fission-neutrons were examined by electron microscopy. Irradiations were carried out at 473 K and 573 K. In the 473 K irradiated specimens, a high density of large interstitial loops and small vacancy clusters with stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) were observed. The number densities of these two types of defects did not strongly depend on the amount of solute atoms in each alloy. The density of the loops in Ni-Si alloys was much higher than those in Ni-Cu and Ni-Fe alloys, while the density of SFT only slightly depended on the kind of solute. Also, the size of the loops depended on the kinds and amounts of solute. In 573 K irradiated Ni-Cu specimens, a high density of dislocation lines developed during the growth of interstitial loops. In Ni-Si alloys, the number density and size of the interstitial loops changed as a function of the amount of solute. Voids were formed in Ni-Cu alloys but scarcely formed in Ni-Si alloys. The number density of voids was one hundredth of that of SFT observed in 473 K irradiated Ni-Cu alloys. Possible formation processes of interstitial loops, SFT, dislocation lines and voids are discussed. (orig.) 8 refs.

  3. Kr ion irradiation study of the depleted-uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Kirk, M. A.; Rest, J.; Allen, T. R.; Wachs, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fuel development for the reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel-cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted-uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel-cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Al, Si) 3, (U, Mo)(Al, Si) 3, UMo 2Al 20, U 6Mo 4Al 43 and UAl 4. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200 °C to ion doses up to 2.5 × 10 19 ions/m 2 (˜10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 10 16 ions/m 2/s (˜4.0 × 10 -3 dpa/s). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Kr ion irradiation study of the depleted-uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, J., E-mail: Jian.Gan@inl.go [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Keiser, D.D. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Miller, B.D. [University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kirk, M.A.; Rest, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Allen, T.R. [University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Fuel development for the reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel-cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted-uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel-cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Al, Si){sub 3}, (U, Mo)(Al, Si){sub 3}, UMo{sub 2}Al{sub 20}, U{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}Al{sub 43} and UAl{sub 4}. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200 {sup o}C to ion doses up to 2.5 x 10{sup 19} ions/m{sup 2} ({approx}10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}/s ({approx}4.0 x 10{sup -3} dpa/s). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Powder production of U-Mo alloy, HMD process (Hydriding- Milling- Dehydriding)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, E. E.; Garcia, J.H.; Lopez, M.; Cabanillas, E.; Adelfang, P. [Dept. Combustibles Nucleares. Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys can be hydrided massively in metastable {gamma} (gamma) phase. The brittle hydride can be milled and dehydrided to acquire the desired size distributions needed for dispersion nuclear fuels. The developments of the different steps of this process called hydriding-milling- dehydriding (HMD Process) are described. Powder production scales for industrial fabrication is easily achieved with conventional equipment, small man-power and low investment. (author)

  6. Powder production of U-Mo alloy, HMD process (Hydriding- Milling- Dehydriding)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasqualini, E. E.; Garcia, J.H.; Lopez, M.; Cabanillas, E.; Adelfang, P.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys can be hydrided massively in metastable γ (gamma) phase. The brittle hydride can be milled and dehydrided to acquire the desired size distributions needed for dispersion nuclear fuels. The developments of the different steps of this process called hydriding-milling- dehydriding (HMD Process) are described. Powder production scales for industrial fabrication is easily achieved with conventional equipment, small man-power and low investment. (author)

  7. Interdiffusion between U-Mo alloys and Al or Al alloys at 340 deg. C. Irradiation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.; Mirandou, M.; Ortiz, M.; Balart, S.; Denis, A.; Moglioni, A.; Cabot, P.

    2005-01-01

    Out of reactor interdiffusion experiments between U-Mo alloys and Al alloys made close to fuel operation temperature are needed to validate the results obtained above 500 deg. C. A study of interdiffusion between U-Mo and Al or Al alloys, out and in reactor, has been initiated. The objective is to characterize the interdiffusion layer around 250 deg. C and study the influence of neutron irradiation. Irradiation experiments will be performed in the Argentine RA3 reactor and chemical diffusion couples will be fabricated by Friction Stir Welding (FSW) technique. In this work out-of-pile diffusion experiments performed at 340 deg. C are presented. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was used to fabricate some of the samples. One of the results is the presence of Si, in the interaction layer, coming from the Al alloy. This is promising in the sense that the absence of Al rich phases may also be expected at low temperature. (author)

  8. Observations of defect structure evolution in proton and Ni ion irradiated Ni-Cr binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Samuel A., E-mail: sabriggs2@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Barr, Christopher M. [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); SKC-CEN Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Mamivand, Mahmood [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Morgan, Dane D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Taheri, Mitra [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Two binary Ni-Cr model alloys with 5 wt% Cr and 18 wt% Cr were irradiated using 2 MeV protons at 400 and 500 °C and 20 MeV Ni{sup 4+} ions at 500 °C to investigate microstructural evolution as a function of composition, irradiation temperature, and irradiating ion species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was applied to study irradiation-induced void and faulted Frank loops microstructures. Irradiations at 500 °C were shown to generate decreased densities of larger defects, likely due to increased barriers to defect nucleation as compared to 400 °C irradiations. Heavy ion irradiation resulted in a larger density of smaller voids when compared to proton irradiations, indicating in-cascade clustering of point defects. Cluster dynamics simulations were in good agreement with the experimental findings, suggesting that increases in Cr content lead to an increase in interstitial binding energy, leading to higher densities of smaller dislocation loops in the Ni-18Cr alloy as compared to the Ni-5Cr alloy. - Highlights: • Binary Ni-Cr alloys were irradiated with protons or Ni ions at 400 and 500 °C. • Higher irradiation temperatures yield increased size, decreased density of defects. • Hypothesize that varying Cr content affects interstitial binding energy. • Fitting CD models for loop nucleation to data supports this hypothesis.

  9. Positron annihilation in hydrogenated and electron-irradiated titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukashev, K.M.; Zaikin, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    that material properties were not completely recovered, probably due to residual point defects of radiation origin. It is obvious that the temperature of 600 deg. C was not sufficient for hydrogen extraction from titanium. These results are confirmed by data of previous studies where niobium and nickel hydrogenated after electron irradiation were studied. These data show that the shift in the recovery start exceeded 130 deg. C. Thus, interaction of vacancy-type defects with previously introduced hydrogen surrounding causes alterations in the efficient size of positron localization centers and shifts the first recovery stage to the region of higher temperature values. Generally, the results of this study demonstrate a significant role of hydrogen in alterations of the electron structure of damaged materials. They show the increasing hydrogen interaction with materials in presence of structural imperfections of deformational and radiation origin. Both hydrogen behavior in irradiated titanium alloys and the observed alterations in positron annihilation characteristics cannot be described in frames of a simple model based on the concept of proton interaction with a vacancy. Variety of radiation defects, such as complexes of point defects, dislocations, cracks, etc., should be taken into account. Application of positron annihilation methods provides important information on hydrogen interaction with lattice imperfections that can be a useful approach to the problem of hydrogen embrittlement of structural materials in the fields of ionizing radiation

  10. An overview of microstructural and experimental factors that affect the irradiation growth behavior of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidleris, V.; Tucker, R.P.; Adamson, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of factors affecting irradiation growth of zirconium alloys. Recent data obtained from irradiation programs in EBR-II, ATR, and NRU reactors are used to illustrate the effects of various microstructural and experimental factors on the growth of Zircaloy, zirconium, and zirconium-biobium alloys irradiated to fluences up to 2 X 10 26 nm -2 (E > 1 MeV) over the temperature range 330 to 720 K. Open literature results are also used to confirm or illustrate various effects. Important factors are texture, grain boundary parameters, residual stresses, original dislocation density, microstructure evolution, temperature during irradiation, solute effects, and fluence

  11. Neutron irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of thorium and thorium--carbon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.C.P.

    1978-04-01

    The effects of neutron exposure to 3.0 x 10 18 neutrons/cm 2 on the mechanical properties of thorium and thorium-carbon alloy are described. Tensile measurements were done at six different test temperatures from 4 0 K to 503 0 K and at two strain rates. Thorium and thorium-carbon alloy are shown to display typical radiation hardening like other face-centered cubic metals. The yield drop phenomenon of the thorium-carbon alloy is unchanged after irradiation. The variation of shear stress and effective shear stress with test temperature was fitted to Seeger's and Fleischer's equations for irradiated and unirradiated thorium and thorium-carbon alloy. Neutron irradiation apparently contributes an athermal component to the yield strength. However, some thermal component is detected in the low temperature range. Strain-rate parameter is increased and activation volume is decreased slightly for both kinds of metal after irradiation

  12. Irradiation performance of oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloys to 150 dpa at 415 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.J.; Kumar, A.S.; Anderson, K.R.; Stubbins, J.F.; Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1991-11-01

    Results have been obtained on the post-irradiation properties of various oxide dispersion strengthened copper alloys irradiated from 34 to 150 dpa at 415 degrees C in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The GlidCop alloys strengthened by Al 2 O 3 continue to outperform other alloys with respect to swelling resistance, and retention of both electrical conductivity and yield strength. Several castable ODS alloys and a Cr 2 O 3 -strengthened alloy show increasingly poor resistance to radiation, especially in their swelling behavior. A HfO 2 -strengthened alloy retains most of its strength and its electrical conductivity reaches a constant level after 50 dpa, but it exhibits a higher residual radioactivity

  13. RERTR-12 Insertion 1 Irradiation Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, D.M.; Lillo, M.A.; Chang, G.S.; Woolstenhulme, N.E.; Roth, G.A.; Wachs, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-12 was designed to provide comprehensive information on the performance of uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) based monolithic fuels for research reactor applications. RERTR-12 insertion 1 includes the capsules irradiated during the first two irradiation cycles. These capsules include Z, X1, X2 and X3 capsules. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-12 insertion 1 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  14. RERTR-12 Insertion 2 Irradiation Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, D.M.; Chang, G.S.; Wachs, D.M.; Roth, G.A.; Woolstenhulme, N.E.

    2012-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-12 was designed to provide comprehensive information on the performance of uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) based monolithic fuels for research reactor applications.1 RERTR-12 insertion 2 includes the capsules irradiated during the last three irradiation cycles. These capsules include Z, Y1, Y2 and Y3 type capsules. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-12 insertion 2 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  15. Correlative Microscopy of Alpha Prime Precipitation in Neutron-Irradiated Fe-Cr-Al Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Samuel A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Fe-Cr-Al alloys are currently being considered for accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding applications due to their superior high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance compared to Zr-based alloys. This work represents the current state-of-the-art on both techniques for analysis of α' precipitate microstructures and the processes and mechanisms governing its formation in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr-Al alloys.

  16. Mechanistic understanding of irradiation corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants: stimuli, status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.; Ishigure, K.; Johnson, A.B.; Lemalgnan, J.C.; Nechaev, A.F.; Petrik, N.G.; Reznichenko, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive information about the corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys under irradiation is presented. Review of the existing models of radiation corrosion is given. An accent is made on a necessity in conducting basic investigations to overcome contradictions in interpreting the experimental data available. Importance of solving the problem of zirconium alloy corrosion for safe NPP operation is underlined. 34 refs.; 6 figs.; 4 tabs

  17. Amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation by neutron irradiation of the alloy Fe83B17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weis, J.; Gabris, F.; Cerven, I.; Sitek, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to investigate the structural changes of amorphous Fe 83 B 17 alloy after irradiation with fast neutrons ( > 1 MeV) and to compare with the crystallization behaviour of the amorphous Fe 83 B 17 alloy after annealing. The structural changes were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction with the usual Fourier analysis. (author)

  18. Solute segregation and void formation in ion-irradiated vanadium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation-induced segregation of solute atoms in the V-15Cr-5Ti alloys was determined after either single- dual-, or helium implantation followed by single-ion irradiation at 725 0 C to radiation damage levels ranging from 103 to 169 dpa. Also, the effect of irradiation temperature (600-750 0 C) on the microstructure in the V-15Cr-5Ti alloy was determined after single-ion irradiation to 200 and 300 dpa. The solute segregation results for the single- and dual-ion irradiated alloy showed that the simultaneous production of irradiation damage and deposition of helium resulted in enhanced depletion of Cr solute and enrichment of Ti, C and S solute in the near-surface layers of irradiated specimens. The observations of the irradiation-damaged microstructures in V-15Cr-5Ti specimens showed an absence of voids for irradiations of the alloy at 600-750 0 C to 200 dpa and at 725 0 C to 300 dpa. The principle effect on the microstructure of these irradiations was to induce the formation of a high density of disc-like precipitates in the vicinity of grain boundaries and intrinsic precipitates and on the dislocation structure. 8 references, 4 figures

  19. Effect of neutron irradiation on the cellular stage of Ni-Be alloy decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larikov, L.N.; Borimskaya, S.T.

    1981-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the cellular stage of decomposition are investigated in deformed supersaturated solid solution Ni-1.92%Be by the X-ray structural and metallographic analyses. Radiation-initiated stimulation of the recovery properties in the deformed alloy and a lower rate of the cellular decomposition in irradiated samples are discovered [ru

  20. Neutron irradiation test of copper alloy/stainless steel joint materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As a study about the joint technology of copper alloy and stainless steel for utilization as cooling piping in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Al 2 O 3 -dispersed strengthened copper or CuCrZr was jointed to stainless steel by three kinds of joint methods (casting joint, brazing joint and friction welding method) for the evaluation of the neutron irradiation effect on joints. A neutron irradiation test was performed to three types of joints and each copper alloy. The average value of fast neutron fluence in this irradiation test was about 2 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV), and the irradiation temperature was about 130degC. As post-irradiation examinations, tensile tests, hardness tests and observation of fracture surface after the tensile tests were performed. All type joints changed to be brittle by the neutron irradiation effect like each copper alloy material, and no particular neutron irradiation effect due to the effect of joint process was observed. On the casting and friction welding, hardness of copper alloy near the joint boundary changed to be lower than that of each copper alloy by the effect of joint procedure. However, tensile strength of joints was almost the same as that of each copper alloy before/after neutron irradiation. On the other hand, tensile strength of joints by brazing changed to be much lower than CuAl-25 base material by the effect of joint process before/after neutron irradiation. Results in this study showed that the friction welding method and the casting would be able to apply to the joint method of piping in ITER. This report is based on the final report of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA). (author)

  1. On the recovery of neutron irradiation defects of some metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.G.; Matta, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the recovery of mechanical properties of neutron irradiated material to the pre-irradiating values. Rate of migration of defects responsible for radiation hardening and those inducing radiation embrittlement is analyzed. Role of crystalline structure is also studied. Materials of FCC crystal structure used in these investigations are pure Cu, Cu-5 at. % , Al, Cu-5 at. % Si, some Ni base binary alloys and some austenitic stainless steels mainly of AISI types 304 and 316. Among materials of BCC crystalline structure Fe-6 wt % Cr alloy is used. Alloys with CPH structure used in the present investigations are Zr-l wt. % Nb and Mg - 4.8 wt % Li alloys. History of material is studied such as cold worked state and annealed condition. Character of alloying elements and their amounts were of interest in this study. The result showed that the higher the percentage radiation hardening, the slower is the migration of radiation defects. Irradiated pure metals recovered at a higher temperature than alloys. Cold work accelerated the migration of radiation defects. The amount of alloying elements had little effect on the recovery temperatures. Character of solute alloying elements (substitutional or interstitial) revealed sensitive effect on the migration of radiation defects. Rate of migration of defects causing hardening can be different from those causing embrittlement. (author)

  2. Evolution of precipitate in nickel-base alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Shuoxue; Luo, Fengfeng; Ma, Shuli; Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Tang, Rui; Guo, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Alloy 718 is a nickel-base superalloy whose strength derives from γ′(Ni 3 (Al,Ti)) and γ″(Ni 3 Nb) precipitates. The evolution of the precipitates in alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature were examined via transmission electron microscopy. Selected-area electron diffraction indicated superlattice spots disappeared after argon ion irradiation, which showing that the ordered structure of the γ′ and γ″ precipitates became disordered. The size of the precipitates became smaller with the irradiation dose increasing at 290 °C

  3. Effects of post-irradiation annealing on the transformation behavior of Ti-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, A.; Tsuruga, H.; Morimura, T.; Misawa, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    1993-01-01

    Recovery processes of martensitic transformation of neutron irradiated Ti-50.0, 50.5 and 51.0 at.%Ni alloys during post-irradiation annealing were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile tests and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. Neutron irradiation up to a fluence of 1.2x10 24 n/cm 2 at 333 K suppressed the martensitic transformation as well as the stress-induced martensitic transformation of these alloys above 150 K. The TEM observations revealed that the disordered zones containing small defect clusters in high density were formed in the neutron irradiated Ti-Ni alloys. The DSC measurements also showed that the post-irradiation annealing caused recovery of the transformation of which the progress depended on the annealing temperature and period. A significant retardation of the recovery was recognized in the Ti-51.0 at.%Ni alloy in comparison with the Ti-50.0 at.%Ni alloy. From the shifts in the transformation temperature upon isothermal annealing at various annealing temperatures, the activation energies of the recovery process of the transformation in the neutron irradiated Ti-50.0 and 51.0 at.%Ni alloys were evaluated by a cross-cut method to be 1.2 eV and 1.5 eV, respectively. The recovery of the transformation was ascribed to the re-ordering resulting from decomposition of vacancy clusters, and those obtained values of the activation energy were considered to be the sum of the migration energy of vacancy and the binding energy of vacancy-vacancy cluster. The retardation of the recovery in the Ti-51.0 at%Ni alloy was interpreted in terms of large binding energy in this alloy due to the off-stoichiometry. (author)

  4. Fatigue performance of copper and copper alloys before and after irradiation with fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Stubbins, J.F.

    1997-05-01

    The fatigue performance of pure copper of the oxygen free, high conductivity (OFHC) grade and two copper alloys (CuCrZr and CuAl-25) was investigated. Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis were carried out to establish the fatigue life of these materials in the unirradiated and irradiated states. The present report provides the first information on the ability of these copper alloys to perform under cyclic loading conditions when they have undergone significant irradiation exposure. Fatigue specimens of OFHC-Cu, CuCrZr and CuAl-25 were irradiated with fission neutrons in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe with a flux of ∼2.5 x 10 17 n/m 2 s (E > 1 MeV) to fluence levels of 1.5 - 2.5 x 10 24 n/m 2 s (E > 1 MeV) at ∼47 and 100 deg. C. Specimens irradiated at 47 deg. C were fatigue tested at 22 deg. C, whereas those irradiated at 100 deg. C were tested at the irradiation temperature. The major conclusion of the present work is that although irradiation causes significant hardening of copper and copper alloys, it does not appear to be a problem for the fatigue life of these materials. In fact, the present experimental results clearly demonstrate that the fatigue performance of the irradiated CuAl-25 alloy is considerably better in the irradiated than that in the unirradiated state tested both at 22 and 100 deg. C. This improvement, however, is not so significant in the case of the irradiated OFHC-copper and CuCrZr alloy tested at 22 deg. C. These conclusions are supported by the microstructural observations and cyclic hardening experiments. (au) 4 tabs., 26 ills., 10 refs

  5. Hydrogen release from irradiated vanadium alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepikov, A.Kh. E-mail: klepikov@ietp.alma-ata.su; Romanenko, O.G.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Longhurst, G.R. E-mail: gxl@inel.gov

    2000-11-01

    The present work is an attempt to obtain data concerning the influence of neutron and {gamma} irradiation upon hydrogen retention in V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy. The experiments on in-pile loading of vanadium alloy specimens at the neutron flux density 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} s, hydrogen pressure of 80 Pa, and temperatures of 563, 613 and 773 K were carried out using the IVG.1M reactor of the Kazakhstan National Nuclear Center. A preliminary set of loading/degassing experiments with non-irradiated material has been carried out to obtain data on hydrogen interaction with vanadium alloy. The, data presented in this work are related both to non-irradiated and irradiated samples.

  6. Hydrogen release from irradiated vanadium alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepikov, A.Kh.; Romanenko, O.G.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Longhurst, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to obtain data concerning the influence of neutron and γ irradiation upon hydrogen retention in V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy. The experiments on in-pile loading of vanadium alloy specimens at the neutron flux density 10 14 n/cm 2 s, hydrogen pressure of 80 Pa, and temperatures of 563, 613 and 773 K were carried out using the IVG.1M reactor of the Kazakhstan National Nuclear Center. A preliminary set of loading/degassing experiments with non-irradiated material has been carried out to obtain data on hydrogen interaction with vanadium alloy. The, data presented in this work are related both to non-irradiated and irradiated samples

  7. Irradiation-induced precipitation and solute segregation in alloys. Fourth annual progress report, February 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardell, A.J.

    1982-04-01

    The studies of irradiation-induced solute segregation (IISS) and irradiation-induced precipitation (IIP) in Ni-Si and Pd-Fe alloys have been completed. Progress is reported for several other projects: irradiation damage in binary Pd-Cr, -Mn and -V alloys (15 at. %); IIP in Pd-Mo and Pd-W alloys; IIP in Pd-25 at. % Cr alloy; and irradiation damage effects in proton-bombarded metallic glasses (Ni-65 Zr, 40 Fe 40 Ni 14 P6B). 27 figures

  8. Corrosion behaviour of E110- and E635- type zirconium alloys under PWR irradiation simulating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, V.A.; Novikov, V.V.; Kon'kov, V.F.; Tselishchev, A.V.; Dologov, A.B.; Zmitko, M.; Maserik, V.; Kocik, J.

    2008-01-01

    As structural materials for VVER 1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components use is made of zirconium alloys E110 (Zr 1Nb) and E635 (Zr 1.2Sn 1Nb 0.35Fe) that meet the design parameters of operation. Nonetheless, the work is in progress to perfect those alloys to reach higher corrosion and shape change resistance. At VNIINM updated E110M and E635M alloys have been developed on E110 and E635 bases. To assess the corrosion behaviour of the updated alloys in comparison to the base alloys their cladding samples were tested in RVS 3 loop of LWR 15 reactor (NRI, Rez) in PWR water chemistry with coolant surface and volume boiling. The data are presented on the influence effected by in pile irradiation for up to 324 days on oxide coat thickness and microstructure of fuel claddings produced from the four tested alloys. It has been revealed that E110 alloy its updated version E110M and E635M alloy compared to E635 have higher corrosion resistances. The paper discusses th+e results on the in pile corrosion of cladding samples from the alloys under study in comparison to the results acquired for similar samples tested in LWR 15 inactive channel and under autoclave conditions. Using methods of TEM, EDX analyses of extraction replicas dislocation structure and phase composition changes were studied in samples of all four alloy claddings LWR 15 reactor irradiated to the material damage dose of 1.5 dpa. The interrelation is discussed between irradiation effected strengthening and corrosion of fuel claddings made of E110 and E635 type zirconium alloys and the evolution of their structure and phase states

  9. Ion irradiation-induced swelling and hardening effect of Hastelloy N alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro-and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, D.H.; Chen, H.C.; Lei, G.H.; Huang, H.F.; Zhang, W.; Wang, C.B. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yan, L., E-mail: yanlong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Fu, D.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro-and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Tang, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The volumetric swelling and hardening effect of irradiated Hastelloy N alloy were investigated in this paper. 7 MeV and 1 MeV Xe ions irradiations were performed at room temperature (RT) with irradiation dose ranging from 0.5 to 27 dpa. The volumetric swelling increases with increasing irradiation dose, and reaches up to 3.2% at 27 dpa. And the irradiation induced lattice expansion is also observed. The irradiation induced hardening initiates at low ion dose (≤1dpa) then saturates with higher ion dose. The irradiation induced volumetric swelling may be ascribed to excess atomic volume of defects. The irradiation induced hardening may be explained by the pinning effect where the defects can act as obstacles for the free movement of dislocation lines. And the evolution of the defects' size and number density could be responsible for the saturation of hardness. - Highlights: •Irradiation Swelling: The irradiation induced volumetric swelling increases with ion dose. •Irradiation Hardening: The irradiation hardening initiates below 1 dpa, then saturates with higher ion dose (1–10 dpa). •Irradiation Mechanism: The irradiation phenomena are ascribed to the microstructural evolution of the irradiation defects.

  10. Study of neutron irradiation on F82H alloys by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S.S., E-mail: h.shaosong@ht8.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kitao, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.; Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Seto, M.

    2015-01-15

    The effects of neutron irradiation on F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel and its model alloys were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The microstructural damage mechanisms of these alloys, during the void incubation period were interpreted using the short range order (SRO) parameters. Results show that within Fe–8Cr alloy, the atoms in the nearest neighbor (NN) of the Fe nuclei were inhomogeneous, prior to irradiation. A configuration trapping model of Cr supported the negative average SRO observed for the NN shells in our Fe–Cr alloys. We found that irradiation also accelerated the SRO in Fe–8Cr through a diffusion mechanism, where Cr atom repulsion was concentration dependent. Finally, comparative studies were conducted on F82H model alloys using the present Mössbauer measurements and our previously reported work on positron annihilation spectroscopy, which further established that irradiation of the alloys promoted the growth of a M{sub 23}C{sub 6} complex.

  11. Compositional redistribution in alloy films under high-voltage electron microscope irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nghi Q.; Leaf, O. K.; Minkoff, M.

    1983-10-01

    The problem of nonequilibrium segregation in alloy films under high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) irradiation at elevated temperatures is re-examined in the present work, taking into account the damage-rate gradients caused by radial variation in the electron flux. Axial and radial compositional redistributions in model solid solutions, representative of concentrated Ni-Cu, Ni-Al and Ni-Si alloys, were calculated as a function of time, temperature, and film thickness, using a kinetic theory of segregation in binary alloys. The numerical results were achieved by means of a new software package (DISPL2) for solving convection-diffusion-kinetics problems with general orthogonal geometries. It was found that HVEM irradiation-induced segregation in thin films consists of two stages. Initially, due to the proximity of the film surfaces as sinks for point defects, the usual axial segregation (to surfaces) occurs at relatively short irradiation times, and rapidly attains quasi-steady state. Then, radial segregation becomes more and more competitive, gradually affecting the kinetics of axial segregation. At a given temperature, the buildup time to steady state is much longer in the present situation than in the simple case of one-dimensional segregation with uniform defect production. Changes in the alloy composition occur in a much larger zone than the irradiated volume. As a result, the average alloy composition within the irradiated region can differ greatly from that of the unirradiated alloy. The present calculations may be useful in the interpretation of the kinetics of certain HVEM irradiation-induced processes in alloys.

  12. Effects of neutron irradiation to 63 dpa on the properties of various commercial copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.

    1985-04-01

    High purity copper and six commercial copper alloys were neutron irradiated to 47 and 63 dpa at about 450 0 C in the FFTF. Immersion density measurements showed a wide range of swelling behavior after irradiation to 63 dpa. At one extreme was CuBe in the aged and tempered (AT) condition which had densified slightly. At the other extreme was 20% CW Cu-0.1% Ag which swelled over 45%. Electrical resistivity measurements followed trends similar to previously published results for the same alloys irradiated to 16 dpa: a continued change in conductivity with fluence which appears to relate to void formation, transmutation products and coarsening of second phase precipitates. These results were compared with electrical conductivity of unirradiated alloys examined after aging for 10,000 hours. The most irradiation resistant high-conductivity copper alloys examined after 63 dpa are A125 and MZC. Cu-2.0Be, only a moderate-conductivity alloy, exhibits very consistent irradiation resistant properties

  13. Microstructure and damage behavior of W-Cr alloy under He irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Luo, Lai-Ma; Zan, Xiang; Xu, Qiu; Liu, Dong-Guang; Zhu, Xiao-Yong; Cheng, Ji-Gui; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a large-power inductively coupled plasma source was designed to perform the continuous helium ion irradiations of W-Cr binary alloy (W-20 wt%Cr) under relevant conditions of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Surface damages and microstructures of irradiated W-20Cr were observed by using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The addition of Cr dramatically enhanced the micro-hardness of the obtained bulk materials, and the interface between the W matrix and the second phase Cr-O is a semi-coherent interface. After irradiation, the doping of Cr element effectively reduces the damage of the W matrix during the irradiation process. The semi-coherent interface between the second phase and the W matrix improves the anti-irradiation performance of the W-20Cr alloy.

  14. Deformation and Fracture Properties in Neutron Irradiated Pure Mo and Mo Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, T.S.; Snead, L.; Li, M.; Cockeram, B.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The evolution in microstructural and mechanical properties was investigated for molybdenum and molybdenum alloys after high temperature neutron irradiation. Test materials include oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloy, molybdenum- 0.5% titanium-0.1% zirconium (TZM) alloy, and low carbon arc-cast (LCAC) molybdenum. Tensile specimens were irradiated in high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at temperatures in the range ∼300 - 1000 deg. C to neutron fluences of 2.28 - 24.7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) or 1.2-13.1 dpa. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures ranging from -150 deg. C to 1000 deg. C. To evaluate irradiation effects, true stress parameters (yield stress, plastic instability stress, and true fracture stress) and ductility parameters (uniform strain, fracture strain, and reduction area) were compared for both irradiated and non-irradiated materials. Fracture toughness was also evaluated from the fracture stress and fracture strain data using a fracture strain model. The fracture strain was used to determine the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Results indicate that irradiation in the temperature range of 600 - 800 deg. C hardened the materials by up to 70%, while the irradiation hardening outside this temperature range was much lower (<40%). The plastic instability stress was strongly dependent on test temperature; however, it was nearly independent of irradiation dose and temperature. It was also found that the true fracture stress was dependent on test temperature. The true fracture stress was not significantly influenced by irradiation at elevated and high test temperatures; however, it was decreased significantly at sub-zero temperatures after irradiation due to material embrittlement. The DBTT for 600 deg. C irradiated ODS molybdenum alloy was found to be about room temperature or lower, and among the test materials the ODS alloy showed the highest resistance to irradiation embrittlement

  15. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, A.; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2015-04-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni-Si and Al-Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation.

  16. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo, A; Bellon, P; Averback, R S

    2015-01-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni–Si and Al–Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation. (paper)

  17. Gamma stability and powder formation of UMo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F.B.V.; Andrade, D.A.; Angelo, G.; Belchior Junior, A.; Torres, W.M.; Umbehaun, P.E., E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelo, E., E-mail: eangelo@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Grupo de Simulacao Numerica (GSN)

    2015-07-01

    A study of the hydrogen embrittlement as well as a research on the relation between gamma decomposition and powder formation of uranium molybdenum alloys were previously presented. In this study a comparison regarding the hypo-eutectoid and hyper-eutectoid molybdenum additions is presented. Gamma uranium molybdenum alloys have been considered as the fuel phase in plate type fuel elements for material and test reactors (MTR). Regarding their usage as a dispersion phase in aluminum matrix, it is necessary to convert the as cast structure into powder, and one of the techniques considered for this purpose is the hydration-dehydration (HDH). This paper shows that, under specific conditions of heating and cooling, γ-UMo fragmentation may occur with non-reactive or reactive mechanisms. Following the production of the alloys by induction melting, samples of the alloys were thermally treated under a constant flow of hydrogen. It was observed that, even without a massive hydration-dehydration process, the alloys fragmented under specific conditions of thermal treatment, during the thermal shock phase of the experiments. Also, there is a relation between absorption and the rate of gamma decomposition or the gamma phase stability of the alloy and this phenomenon can be related to the eutectoid transformation temperature. This study was carried out to search for a new method for the production of powders and for the evaluation of important physical parameter such as the eutectoid transformation temperature, as an alternative to the existing ones. (author)

  18. Concentration dependence of solute atoms on vacancy cluster formation in neutron irradiated Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Itoh, D.; Yoshiie, T.; Xu, Q.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: One dimensional (1-D) motion of interstitial clusters is important for the microstructural evolution in metals. The movement of interstitial clusters was often observed in neutron irradiated metals by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Alloying elements are expected to affect the motion of interstitial clusters. Yoshiie et al. have studied the effect of alloying elements in Ni. For example, in neutron irradiated pure Ni, well-developed dislocation networks and voids were observed at 573 K at a dose of 0.026 dpa by TEM. After the addition of 2at.%Si (-5.81% volume size factor to Ni) and Sn (74.08% volume size factor), no voids were detected by TEM observation and positron lifetime measurement. Alloying elements of Si and Sn were expected to prevent the 1-D motion of the interstitial clusters. In this study, the concentration dependence of alloying elements on the 1-D motion of the interstitial clusters was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements, and the microstructural evolution was discussed. Specimens irradiated were 99.99 pure Ni (Johnson Matthey) and Ni based binary alloys, which contain Si, Cu, Ge and Sn as solute atoms. The concentration of solute atoms was 0.05at.%o, 0.3at.% and 2at.%. Neutron irradiation was performed with the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and Japan materials testing reactor (JMTR) at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Neutron dose was 6x10 -5 -1x10 -2 dpa at KUR, and 8x10 -3 -0.3 dpa at JMTR. Irradiation temperature was 573 K at KUR and 563 K at JMTR. After the neutron irradiation, positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed at room temperature. Microvoids were detected in pure Ni, Ni-0.05%Si, Ni-0.05%Sn, Ni-Cu and Ni-Ge alloys. In Ni-Si and Ni-Sn alloys, the size of microvoids decreased as the concentration of solute atoms increased. This is because the frequency of 1-D motion of the interstitial clusters depends on the alloy concentration. High concentration of alloying

  19. Concentration dependence of solute atoms on vacancy cluster formation in neutron irradiated Ni alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Itoh, D.; Yoshiie, T.; Xu, Q. [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: One dimensional (1-D) motion of interstitial clusters is important for the microstructural evolution in metals. The movement of interstitial clusters was often observed in neutron irradiated metals by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Alloying elements are expected to affect the motion of interstitial clusters. Yoshiie et al. have studied the effect of alloying elements in Ni. For example, in neutron irradiated pure Ni, well-developed dislocation networks and voids were observed at 573 K at a dose of 0.026 dpa by TEM. After the addition of 2at.%Si (-5.81% volume size factor to Ni) and Sn (74.08% volume size factor), no voids were detected by TEM observation and positron lifetime measurement. Alloying elements of Si and Sn were expected to prevent the 1-D motion of the interstitial clusters. In this study, the concentration dependence of alloying elements on the 1-D motion of the interstitial clusters was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements, and the microstructural evolution was discussed. Specimens irradiated were 99.99 pure Ni (Johnson Matthey) and Ni based binary alloys, which contain Si, Cu, Ge and Sn as solute atoms. The concentration of solute atoms was 0.05at.%o, 0.3at.% and 2at.%. Neutron irradiation was performed with the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and Japan materials testing reactor (JMTR) at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Neutron dose was 6x10{sup -5}-1x10{sup -2} dpa at KUR, and 8x10{sup -3} -0.3 dpa at JMTR. Irradiation temperature was 573 K at KUR and 563 K at JMTR. After the neutron irradiation, positron annihilation lifetime measurements were performed at room temperature. Microvoids were detected in pure Ni, Ni-0.05%Si, Ni-0.05%Sn, Ni-Cu and Ni-Ge alloys. In Ni-Si and Ni-Sn alloys, the size of microvoids decreased as the concentration of solute atoms increased. This is because the frequency of 1-D motion of the interstitial clusters depends on the alloy concentration. High

  20. Swelling of U-7Mo/Al-Si dispersion fuel plates under irradiation – Non-destructive analysis of the AFIP-1 fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachs, D.M., E-mail: daniel.wachs@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Robinson, A.B.; Rice, F.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Characterization and Advanced PIE Division, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Kraft, N.C.; Taylor, S.C. [Idaho National Laboratory, Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Lillo, M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Nuclear Systems Design and Analysis Division, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Woolstenhulme, N.; Roth, G.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Extensive fuel-matrix interactions leading to plate pillowing have proven to be a significant impediment to the development of a suitable high density low-enriched uranium molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) based dispersion fuel for high power applications in research reactors. The addition of silicon to the aluminum matrix was previously demonstrated to reduce interaction layer growth in mini-plate experiments. The AFIP-1 project involved the irradiation, in-canal examination, and post-irradiation examination of two fuel plates. The irradiation of two distinct full size, flat fuel plates (one using an Al-2wt%Si matrix and the other an Al-4043 (∼4.8 wt% Si) matrix) was performed in the INL ATR reactor in 2008–2009. The irradiation conditions were: ∼250 W/cm{sup 2} peak Beginning Of Life (BOL) power, with a ∼3.5e21 f/cm{sup 3} peak burnup. The plates were successfully irradiated and did not show any pillowing at the end of the irradiation. This paper reports the results and interpretation of the in-canal and post-irradiation non-destructive examinations that were performed on these fuel plates. It further compares additional PIE results obtained on fuel plates irradiated in contemporary campaigns in order to allow a complete comparison with all results obtained under similar conditions. Except for a brief indication of accelerated swelling early in the irradiation of the Al-2Si plate, the fuel swelling is shown to evolve linearly with the fission density through the maximum burnup.

  1. The effect of alloying elements on the vacancy defect evolution in electron-irradiated austenitic Fe-Ni alloys studied by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druzhkov, A.P. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch RAS, 18 Kovalevskaya St., 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: druzhkov@imp.uran.ru; Perminov, D.A.; Davletshin, A.E. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch RAS, 18 Kovalevskaya St., 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-31

    The vacancy defect evolution under electron irradiation in austenitic Fe-34.2 wt% Ni alloys containing oversized (aluminum) and undersized (silicon) alloying elements was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy at temperatures between 300 and 573 K. It is found that the accumulation of vacancy defects is considerably suppressed in the silicon-doped alloy. This effect is observed at all the irradiation temperatures. The obtained results provide evidence that the silicon-doped alloy forms stable low-mobility clusters involving several Si and interstitial atoms, which are centers of the enhanced recombination of migrating vacancies. The clusters of Si-interstitial atoms also modify the annealing of vacancy defects in the Fe-Ni-Si alloy. The interaction between small vacancy agglomerates and solute Al atoms is observed in the Fe-Ni-Al alloy under irradiation at 300-423 K.

  2. Void formation in NiTi shape memory alloys by medium-voltage electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossmacher, P.; Stober, T.

    1995-01-01

    In-situ electron irradiation experiments of NiTi shape memory alloys, using high-voltage transmission electron microscopes, result in amorphization of the intermetallic compound. In all of these experiments high-voltages more than 1.0 MeV had to be applied in order to induce the crystalline-to-amorphous transformation. To their knowledge no irradiation effects of medium-voltage electrons of e.g. 0.5 MeV have been reported in the literature. In this contribution, the authors describe void formation in two different NiTi shape memory alloys, resulting from in-situ electron irradiation, using a 300 kV electron beam in a transmission electron microscope. First evidence is presented that void formation is correlated with the total oxygen content of the alloys

  3. Microstructures of neutron-irradiated Fe-12Cr-XMn (X=15-30) ternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, K.; Hosoi, Y.; Garner, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine the factors which control the stability of irradiated alloys proposed for reduced activation applications. The Fe-Cr-Mn alloy system is being studied as an alternative to the Fe-Cr-Ni system because of the need to reduce long-term radioactivation in fusion-power devices. In this study, four Fe-12Cr-XMn (X =15, 20, 25, 30 wt%) alloys were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility to 20 dpa at 643K and 40 dpa at 679, 793, and 873K to investigate the influence of manganese content on void swelling and phase stability. The results confirm and expand the results of earlier studies that indicate that the Fe-Cr-Mn system is relatively unstable compared to that of the Fe-Cr-Ni system, with alpha and sigma phases forming as a consequence of thermal aging or high temperature irradiation

  4. Effect of helium on swelling and microstructural evolution in ion-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Kestel, B.J.; Gerber, S.B.; Ayrault, G.

    1986-03-01

    An investigation was made on the effects of implanted helium on the swelling and microstructural evolution that results from energetic single- and dual-ion irradiation of the V-15Cr-5Ti alloy. Single-ion irradiations were utilized for a simulated production of the irradiation damage that might be expected from neutron irradiation of the alloy in a reactor with a fast neutron energy spectrum (E > 0.1 MeV). Dual-ion irradiations were utilized for a simulated production of the simultaneous creation of helium atoms and irradiation damage in the alloy in the MFR environment. Experimental results are also presented on the radiation-induced segregation of the constituent atoms in the single- and dual-ion irradiated alloy

  5. Mechanical properties of Mo and TZM alloy neutron-irradiated at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazukiyo; Satou, Manabu; Hasegawa, Akira; Abe, Katsunori

    1997-01-01

    This work reports the mechanical properties of irradiated molybdenum (Mo) and its alloy, TZM. Recrystallized and stress-relieved specimens were irradiated at five temperatures between 373 and 800degC in FFTF/MOTA to fluence levels of 6.8 to 34 dpa. Irradiation embrittlement and hardening were evaluated by three-point bend test and Vickers hardness test, respectively. Stress-relieved materials showed the enough ductility even after high fluence irradiation. The role of layered structure of stress-relieved specimen was discussed. (author)

  6. Statistical thermodynamics and mean-field theory for the alloy under irradiation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamyshendo, V.

    1993-01-01

    A generalization of statistical thermodynamics to the open systems case, is discussed, using as an example the alloy-under-irradiation model. The statistical properties of stationary states are described with the use of generalized thermodynamic potentials and 'quasi-interactions' determined from the master equation for micro-configuration probabilities. Methods for resolving this equation are illustrated by the mean-field type calculations of correlators, thermodynamic potentials and phase diagrams for disordered alloys

  7. Effects of irradiation on properties of refractory alloys with emphasis on space power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The probable effects of irradiation on niobium and tungsten alloys in use as components of thermionic convertors in a space reactor were reviewed by the author in 1971. While considerably more data on refractory metals have been generated since that time, the data have not been reviewed with respect to space reactor applications. This paper attempts such a review. The approach used is to work from the most recently available review of irradiation effects for each alloy system (where such a review is available) and to discuss that review and more recent data judged to be the most useful in establishing likely behavior in high-temperature reactor service. 28 figures, 6 tables

  8. Microstructure and phase transformations in the ODS alloys irradiated by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlotski, S.V.; Anishchik, V.M; Skuratov, V.A.; O’Connell, J.; Neethling, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructure of KP4 ODS alloy irradiated with 700 MeV bismuth ions at 300 K has been studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. No latent tracks have been observed in Y 4 Al 2 O 9 particles in KP4 irradiated with Bi ions. Small oxides (~ 5 nm) in KP4 alloy remain crystalline at Bi ion fluence 1.5*10 13 cm -2 , while subsurface regions in large (~ 20 nm) particles faced to the beam entrance became amorphous. (authors)

  9. Defect microstructure in copper alloys irradiated with 750 MeV protons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Horsewell, A.; Singh, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks of pure copper and solid solution copper alloys containing 5 at% of Al, Mn, or Ni were irradiated with 750 MeV protons to damage levels between 0.4 and 2 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperatures between 60 and 200 degrees C. The defect...... significant effect on the total density of small defect clusters, but they did cause a significant decrease in the fraction of defect clusters resolvable as SFT to similar to 20 to 25%. In addition, the dislocation loop density (> 5 nm diameter) was more than an order of magnitude higher in the alloys...

  10. α′ precipitation in neutron-irradiated Fe–Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachhav, Mukesh; Robert Odette, G.; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- A series of model Fe–Cr alloys containing 3–18 at.% Cr was neutron irradiated at a nominal temperature of 563 K to 1.82 dpa. Solute distributions were analyzed by atom probe tomography, which revealed α′ precipitation for alloys containing more than 9 at.% Cr. Both the Cr concentration dependence of α′ precipitation and the measured matrix compositions are in agreement with the recently published Fe–Cr phase diagrams. An irradiation-accelerated precipitation process is strongly suggested

  11. Nanocluster irradiation evolution in Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of dose rate and cascade morphology on nanocluster evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and the commercial ferritic/martensitic (F/M) alloys HCM12A and HT9. We present a large, systematic data set spanning the three alloys, three irradiating particle types, four orders of magnitude in dose rate, and doses ranging 1-100 displacements per atom over 400-500 °C. Nanoclusters are characterized using atom probe tomography. ODS oxide nanoclusters experience partial dissolution after irradiation due to inverse Ostwald ripening, while F/M nanoclusters undergo Ostwald ripening. Damage cascade morphology is indicative of nanocluster number density evolution. Finally, the effects of dose rate on nanocluster morphology provide evidence for a temperature dilation theory, which purports that a negative temperature shift is necessary for higher dose rate irradiations to emulate nanocluster evolution in lower dose rate irradiations.

  12. Characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Akamatsu, M.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of the iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons have been studied. The characterization has been carried out mainly thanks to small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. Both techniques lead to the conclusion that clusters develop with irradiations. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex. Solute atoms like Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ''clouds'' more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Dose dependence of microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated copper and copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B N; Edwards, D J; Horsewell, A; Toft, P

    1995-09-01

    The present investigation of the effects of neutron irradiation on microstructures and mechanical properties of copper alloys is a part of the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) programme. Tensile specimens of the candidate alloys Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuCrZr and CuNiBe were irradiated with fission neutrons in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe with a flux of 2.5 x 10{sup 17} n/m{sup 2}s (E > 1 MeV, i.e. a dose rate of {approx}5 x 10{sup -8} dpa/s) to fluences of 5 x 10{sup 22}, 5 x 10{sup 23} and 1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV, i.e. displacement doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 dpa) at 47 deg. C. The Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (CuA125) specimens, were irradiated in the as-cold worked state. Tensile properties and Vickers hardness of both irradiated and unirradiated specimens were determined at 22 deg. C. Pre- and post-deformation microstructures of irradiated as well as unirradiated specimens were examined using a transmission electron microscope. The fractured surfaces of tensile tested specimens were investigated in a scanning electron microscope. The results show the following general trend: (a) that the CuNiBe alloy is stronger than CuCrZr as well as Cu Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (b) that even relatively low dose irradiations cause significant increase in the yield strength, but rather drastic decreases in the uniform elongation of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys and that the low dose irradiation of the cold-worked Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy causes a decrease in the yield strength and an increase in the uniform elongation, at higher doses irradiation hardening occurs. The SEM examinations of the fractured surfaces demonstrate that both unirradiated and irradiated specimens fracture in a ductile manner. The lack of uniform elongation in the irradiated copper alloys may be understood in terms of difficulty in dislocation generation due to pinning of grown-in dislocation by defect clusters (loops) at or around them. (EG) 5 tabs., 18 ills., 13 refs.

  14. Dose dependence of microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated copper and copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Edwards, D.J.; Horsewell, A.; Toft, P.

    1995-09-01

    The present investigation of the effects of neutron irradiation on microstructures and mechanical properties of copper alloys is a part of the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) programme. Tensile specimens of the candidate alloys Cu-Al 2 O 3 , CuCrZr and CuNiBe were irradiated with fission neutrons in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe with a flux of 2.5 x 10 17 n/m 2 s (E > 1 MeV, i.e. a dose rate of ∼5 x 10 -8 dpa/s) to fluences of 5 x 10 22 , 5 x 10 23 and 1 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E > 1 MeV, i.e. displacement doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 dpa) at 47 deg. C. The Cu-Al 2 O 3 (CuA125) specimens, were irradiated in the as-cold worked state. Tensile properties and Vickers hardness of both irradiated and unirradiated specimens were determined at 22 deg. C. Pre- and post-deformation microstructures of irradiated as well as unirradiated specimens were examined using a transmission electron microscope. The fractured surfaces of tensile tested specimens were investigated in a scanning electron microscope. The results show the following general trend: (a) that the CuNiBe alloy is stronger than CuCrZr as well as Cu Al 2 O 3 , (b) that even relatively low dose irradiations cause significant increase in the yield strength, but rather drastic decreases in the uniform elongation of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys and that the low dose irradiation of the cold-worked Cu-Al 2 O 3 alloy causes a decrease in the yield strength and an increase in the uniform elongation, at higher doses irradiation hardening occurs. The SEM examinations of the fractured surfaces demonstrate that both unirradiated and irradiated specimens fracture in a ductile manner. The lack of uniform elongation in the irradiated copper alloys may be understood in terms of difficulty in dislocation generation due to pinning of grown-in dislocation by defect clusters (loops) at or around them. (EG) 5 tabs., 18 ills., 13 refs

  15. Observation on the irradiation behavior of U-Mo alloy dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Park, Jong-Man

    2000-01-01

    Initial results from the postirradiation examination of high-density dispersion fuel test RERTR-3 are discussed. The U-Mo alloy fuels in this test were irradiated to 40% U-235 burnup at temperature ranging from 140 0 C to 240 0 C. Temperature has a significant effect on overall swelling of the test plates. The magnitude of the swelling appears acceptable and no unstable irradiation behavior is evident. (author)

  16. Relation between the punctual defects dynamics and irradiation growth in Zr and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarce, A.; Monti, A.M.; Smetniansky-De Grande, N.

    1990-01-01

    The knowledge of the static properties punctual defects and their interaction with the drains present in the material, such as dislocations and grain borders, is of fundamental importance for the correct prediction of the reactor's components behaviour under irradiation. This work calculates the Zr alloys growth under irradiation and results are compared with the stretching values of the cooling channels measured at the Atucha I nuclear power plant. (Author) [es

  17. Short-range order of amorphous FeNiB alloy after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierini, M.; Sitek, J.; Baluch, S.; Cirak, J.; Lipka, J.

    1990-01-01

    Transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study irradiation-induced changes in the short-range order of an amorphous Fe 80-x Ni x B 20 alloy. Neutron irradiation led to an increase of the width of a hyperfine field distribution implying atomic rearrangement towards disordering. Changes in a mean value of a HFD and Moessbauer line areas can be associated with a reorientation of spins due to radiation damage. (orig.)

  18. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-01-01

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang

  19. The amorphous phase transition in irradiated NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Kissinger, H.E.; Pelton, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Observed supralinear dose dependence for the amorphous transformation during irradiation of NiTi is compatible with a cascade overlap model for heavy ion (2.5 MeV Ni + , 6 MeV Ta +++ ) irradiations. A model based on total defect build-up, however, is necessary to explain the amorphous transition induced by electron irradiation and can also be applied to heavy ion irradiation. The cascade effects in this latter model are manifested by non-uniform defect distribution in the lattice. The defect build-up model requires a high activation energy for interstitial migration which is not incompatible with recent findings. The form of the temperature dependence can also be rationalized using a defect build-up model (amorphous phase transition, heavy-ion irradiation, electron irradiation, NiTi, defect build-up, cascade overlap). (author)

  20. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  1. Effect of irradiation on the critical currents of alloy and compound superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekula, S.T.

    1977-06-01

    The effects of energetic-particle irradiation on the critical-current density J/sub c/(H) of several superconducting compounds and Nb-Ti alloys have been examined by a number of workers. The irradiations used in the investigations include electrons, fast neutrons, ions, and fission fragments. The results of these studies are reviewed and summarized. In the alloys, changes in J/sub c/(H) on irradiation depend on the metallurgical history of the material and indicate that radiation defects modify the strength of the interaction between the fluxoid array and the sample microstructure. Radiation defects in alloys can also affect J/sub c/(H) through small decreases in T/sub c/, the transition temperature and rho, the normal-state resistivity. Irradiations of A15 compounds up to moderate fluences (dependent on the type and energy of irradiating particle) lead to decreases in T/sub c/ of approximately 1 0 K and increases in J/sub c/(H) with dose for most of the samples investigated. This result can be qualitatively understood as resulting from radiation-induced changes in rho and the pinning force acting on the fluxoids. At higher dose levels, significant depressions of T/sub c/ and possibly gamma, the electronic specific heat coefficient, lead to drastic reductions in J/sub c/(H). The effect of various energetic particles and irradiation temperature on changes in J/sub c/(H) are discussed

  2. Laser irradiation effects on the surface, structural and mechanical properties of Al-Cu alloy 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Daniel; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; kalsoom, Umm-i.-; Ali, Nisar

    2014-02-01

    Laser irradiation effects on surface, structural and mechanical properties of Al-Cu-Mg alloy (Al-Cu alloy 2024) have been investigated. The specimens were irradiated for various fluences ranging from 3.8 to 5.5 J/cm2 using an Excimer (KrF) laser (248 nm, 18 ns, 30 Hz) under vacuum environment. The surface and structural modifications of the irradiated targets have been investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), respectively. SEM analysis reveals the formation of micro-sized craters along the growth of periodic surface structures (ripples) at their peripheries. The size of the craters initially increases and then decreases by increasing the laser fluence. XRD analysis shows an anomalous trend in the peak intensity and crystallite size of the specimen irradiated for various fluences. A universal tensile testing machine and Vickers microhardness tester were employed in order to investigate the mechanical properties of the irradiated targets. The changes in yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and microhardness were found to be anomalous with increasing laser fluences. The changes in the surface and structural properties of Al-Cu alloy 2024 after laser irradiation have been associated with the changes in mechanical properties.

  3. Study of microstructural evolutions of the 6061-T6 aluminium alloy under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, Camille

    2015-01-01

    The 6061-T6 Aluminium alloy, whose microstructure contains Al(Fe,Mn,Cr)Si dispersoids and hardening needle-shaped β'' precipitates (Mg, Si), has been chosen as the structural material for the core vessel of the Material Testing Jules Horowitz Nuclear Reactor. Because it will be submitted to high neutron flux at a temperature around 50 C, it is necessary to study microstructural evolutions induced by irradiation and especially the stability of the second phase particles. In this work, an analytical study by in-situ and ex-situ electron and ion irradiations has been performed, as well as a study under neutron irradiation. The precipitate characterization by Transmission Electron Microscopy demonstrates that Al(Fe,Mn,Cr)Si dispersoids are driven under irradiation towards their equilibrium configuration, consisting of a core/shell structure, enhanced by irradiation, with a (Fe, Mn) enriched core surrounded by a Cr-enriched shell. In contrast, the (Mg,Si) β'' precipitates are destabilized by irradiation. They dissolve under ion irradiation in favor of a new precipitation of (Mg,Si,Cu,Cr,Al) rich clusters resulting in an increase of the alloy's hardness. β'' precipitates tend towards a transformation to cubic precipitates under neutron irradiation. (author) [fr

  4. TEM characterization of irradiated microstructure of Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of irradiation dose and dose rate on defect cluster (i.e. dislocation loops and voids) evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and commercial ferritic-martensitic steels HCM12A and HT9. Complimentary irradiations using Fe2+ ions, protons, or neutrons to doses ranging from 1 to 100 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 °C are conducted on each alloy. The irradiated microstructures are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dislocation loops exhibit limited growth after 1 dpa upon Fe2+ and proton irradiation, while any voids observed are small and sparse. The average size and number density of loops are statistically invariant between Fe2+, proton, and neutron irradiated specimens at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions of ∼3 dpa, 500 °C. Therefore, we conclude that higher dose rate charged particle irradiations can reproduce the neutron irradiated loop microstructure with temperature shift governed by the invariance theory; this temperature shift is ∼0 °C for the high sink strength alloys studied herein.

  5. Effect of irradiation damage and helium on the swelling and structure of vanadium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    Swelling behavior and microstructural evolution of V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti, and V-Ti-Si alloys were investigated after irradiation at 420--600C up to 114 dpa. The alloys exhibited swelling maxima between 30 and 80 dpa and swelling decreased on irradiation to higher dpa. This is in contrast to the monotonically increasing swelling of binary alloys that contain Fe, Ni, Cr, Mo, W, and Si. Precipitation of dense Ti 5 Si 3 promotes good resistance to swelling of the Ti-containing alloys and it was concluded that Ti of >3 wt.% and 400--1000 wppm Si are necessary to effectively suppress swelling. Swelling was minimal in V-4Cr-4Ti, identified as the most promising alloy based on good mechanical properties and superior resistance to irradiation embrittlement. V-20Ti doped with B exhibited somewhat higher swelling because of He generation. Lithium atoms, generated from transmutation of 10 B, formed γ-LiV 2 O 5 precipitates and did not seem to produce undesirable effects on mechanical properties

  6. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALLOY 690 AT LOW NEUTRON FLUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOO SEOG RYU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alloy 690 has been selected as a steam generator tubing material for SMART owing to a near immunity to primary water stress corrosion cracking. The steam generators of SMART are faced with a neutron flux due to the integrated arrangement inside a reactor vessel, and thus it is important to know the irradiation effects of the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690. Alloy 690 was irradiated at HANARO to fluences of (0.7−28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV at 250°C, and its thermal conductivity was measured using the laser-flash equipment in the IMEF. The thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 was dependent on temperature, and it was a good fit to the Smith-Palmer equation, which modified the Wiedemann-Franz law. The irradiation at 250°C did not degrade the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690, and even showed a small increase (1% at fluences of (0.7∼28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV.

  7. Zirconium hydrides and Fe redistribution in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy under ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrees, Y.; Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Cui, J.; Shek, G.K. [Kinetrics, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Daymond, M.R., E-mail: daymond@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    Zr-2.5%Nb alloy is used to fabricate the pressure tubes of the CANDU reactor. The pressure tube is the primary pressure boundary for coolant in the CANDU design and is susceptible to delayed hydride cracking, reduction in fracture toughness upon hydride precipitation and potentially hydride blister formation. The morphology and nature of hydrides in Zr-2.5%Nb with 100 wppm hydrogen has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The effect of hydrides on heavy ion irradiation induced decomposition of the β phase has been reported. STEM-EDX mapping was employed to investigate the distribution of alloying elements. The results show that hydrides are present in the form of stacks of different sizes, with length scales from nano- to micro-meters. Heavy ion irradiation experiments at 250 °C on as-received and hydrided Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, show interesting effects of hydrogen on the irradiation induced redistribution of Fe. It was found that Fe is widely redistributed from the β phase into the α phase in the as-received material, however, the loss of Fe from the β phase and subsequent precipitation is retarded in the hydrided material. This preliminary work will further the current understanding of microstructural evolution of Zr based alloys in the presence of hydrogen. - Graphical abstract: STEM HAADF micrographs at low magnification showing the hydride structure in Zr-2.5Nb alloy.

  8. Work hardening characteristics of gamma-ray irradiated Al-5356 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, G.; Fayek, S.A.; Fawzy, A.; Soliman, H.N.; Nassr, E.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of γ-irradiation and deformation temperatures on the hardening behavior of Al-5356 alloy have been investigated by means of stress–strain measurements. Wire samples irradiated with different doses (ranging from 500 to 2000 kGy) were strained at different deformation temperatures T w (ranging from 303 to 523 K) and a constant strain rate of 1.5×10 −3 s −1 . The effect of γ-irradiation on the work-hardening parameters (WHP): yield stress σ y , fracture stress σ f , total strain ε T and work-hardening coefficient χ p of the given alloy was studied at the applied deformation temperature range. The obtained results showed that γ-irradiation exhibited an increase in the WHP of the given alloy while the increase in its deformation temperature showed a reverse effect. The mean activation energy of the deformation process was calculated using an Arrhenius-type relation, and was found to be ∼80 kJ/mole, which is close to that of grain boundary diffusion in aluminum alloys

  9. Effect of solute atom concentration on vacancy cluster formation in neutron-irradiated Ni alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koichi; Itoh, Daiki; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Xu, Qiu; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Toyama, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The dependence of microstructural evolution on solute atom concentration in Ni alloys was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. The positron annihilation lifetimes in pure Ni, Ni-0.05 at.%Si, Ni-0.05 at.%Sn, Ni-Cu, and Ni-Ge alloys were about 400 ps even at a low irradiation dose of 3 × 10 -4 dpa, indicating the presence of microvoids in these alloys. The size of vacancy clusters in Ni-Si and Ni-Sn alloys decreased with an increase in the solute atom concentration at irradiation doses less than 0.1 dpa; vacancy clusters started to grow at an irradiation dose of about 0.1 dpa. In Ni-2 at.%Si, irradiation-induced segregation was detected by positron annihilation coincidence Doppler broadening measurements. This segregation suppressed one-dimensional (1-D) motion of the interstitial clusters and promoted mutual annihilation of point defects. The frequency and mean free path of the 1-D motion depended on the solute atom concentration and the amount of segregation.

  10. Neutronic irradiation effect in FeNi alloys, observed by magnetic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciani, V.; Lucki, G.

    1986-01-01

    In this work some aspects of radiation damage are analysed through the influence of neutron irradiation on magnetic properties of FeNi alloys. The main points emphasized are: radiation enhanced diffusion, determination of the activation energy for diffusion process and vacancies supersaturation, which is an important parameter from technological point of view and a necessary condition for the void formation. (Author) [pt

  11. Postirradiation tensile properties of Mo and Mo alloys irradiated with 600 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.V.; Gavillet, D.; Victoria, M.; Martin, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Tensile specimens of pure Mo and Mo-5 Re, Mo-41 Re and TZM alloys have been irradiated with 600 MeV protons in the PIREX facility at 300 and 660 K to 0.5 dpa. Results of the postirradiation tensile testing show a strong radiation hardening and a severe loss of ductility for all the materials tested at room temperature. ((orig.))

  12. Irradiation effects in Fe-30%Ni alloy during Ar ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukieh, Mohamad; Al-Mohamad, Ali

    1993-12-01

    The use of metallic thin films for studying the processes which take place during ion irradiation has recently increased. For example, ion implantation is widely used to study the structural defects in transition metallic thin films such as (Fe, Ni, Co), because it can simulate the effects occurring in nuclear reactors during neutron irradiation especially the swelling of reactor materials. The swelling of metals and alloys is strongly related to the material structure and to the irradiation conditions. The general feature of formation of structural defects as a function of irradiation dosage and annealing temperature is well known. However, the detailed mechanisms are still not well understood. For example, the swelling of iron alloy with 30-35% nickel is very small in comparison with other Ni concentrations, and there is no clear information on the possibility of phase transitions in fe-Ni alloys during irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the phase-structural changes in Fe-30% Ni implanted by high dose of argon ions. The effect of irradiation with low energy argon ions (40 KeV, and fluences of 10.E15 to 10.E17 ions/cm) on the deposited thin films of Fe-30% Ni alloy was investigated using RBS and TEM techniques. The thicknesses of these films were about 65+-10 nm deposited on ceramic, KBr, and Be fiols substrates. Gas bubble formation and profile distribution of the implanted argon ions were investigated. Formation of an ordered phase Fe 3 Ni during irradiation appears to inhibit gas bubble formations in the film structure. (author). 17 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Database on Performance of Neutron Irradiated FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Briggs, Samuel A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Littrell, Ken [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the database on radiation tolerance for Generation I, Generation II, and commercial FeCrAl alloys. This database has been built upon mechanical testing and microstructural characterization on selected alloys irradiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) up to doses of 13.8 dpa at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 550°C. The structure and performance of these irradiated alloys were characterized using advanced microstructural characterization techniques and mechanical testing. The primary objective of developing this database is to enhance the rapid development of a mechanistic understanding on the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys, thereby enabling informed decisions on the optimization of composition and microstructure of FeCrAl alloys for application as an accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding. This report is structured to provide a brief summary of critical results related to the database on radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys.

  14. Effects of solute elements on irradiation hardening and microstructural evolution in low alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Katsuhiko, E-mail: fujiik@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama 919-1205 (Japan); Ohkubo, Tadakatsu, E-mail: OHKUBO.Tadakatsu@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Fukuya, Koji, E-mail: fukuya@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama 919-1205 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    The effects of the elements Mn, Ni, Si and Cu on irradiation hardening and microstructural evolution in low alloy steels were investigated in ion irradiation experiments using five kinds of alloys prepared by removing Mn, Ni and Si from, and adding 0.05 wt.%Cu to, the base alloy (Fe-1.5Mn-0.5Ni-0.25Si). The alloy without Mn showed less hardening and the alloys without Ni or Si showed more hardening. The addition of Cu had hardly any influence on hardening. These facts indicated that Mn enhanced hardening and that Ni and Si had some synergetic effects. The formation of solute clusters was not confirmed by atom probe (AP) analysis, whereas small dislocation loops were identified by TEM observation. The difference in hardening between the alloys with and without Mn was qualitatively consistent with loop formation. However, microstructural components that were not detected by the AP and TEM were assumed to explain the hardening level quantitatively.

  15. Nonequilibrium self-organization in alloys under irradiation leading to the formation of nano composites

    CERN Document Server

    Enrique, R A; Averback, R S; Bellon, P

    2003-01-01

    Alloys under irradiation are continuously driven away from equilibrium: Every time an external particle interacts with the atoms in the solid, a perturbation very localized in space and time is produced. Under this external forcing, phase and microstructural evolution depends ultimately on the dynamical interaction between the external perturbation and the internal recovery kinetics of the alloy. We consider the nonequilibrium steady state of an immiscible binary alloy subject to mixing by heavy-ion irradiation. It has been found that the range of the forced atomic relocations taking place during collision cascades plays an important role on the final microstructure: when this range is large enough, it can lead to the spontaneous formation of compositional patterns at the nanometer scale. These results were rationalized in the framework of a continuum model solved by deriving a nonequilibrium thermodynamic potential. Here we derive the nonequilibrium structure factor by including the role of fluctuations. In ...

  16. Correlation between intrinsic hardness and defect structures of ion irradiated Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, C.; Jin, H. H.; Kwon, J.

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of micro structures and mechanical properties during an in-service irradiation is one of the key issues to be addressed in nuclear materials. Ion irradiation is an effective method to study these irradiation effects thanks to an ease in handling post-irradiated specimens. But the characteristics of an ion irradiation pose a certain difficulty in evaluating irradiation effects. For example, ion irradiated region extends only a few hundred nano-meters from the surface of a sample and the depth profile of an irradiation damage level is quite heterogeneous. Thus it requires special care to quantify the changes in properties after an ion irradiation. We measured changes in a hardness by using a nano-indentation combined with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM technique. Although the SM technique allows for a continuous measurement of hardness along penetration depth of an indenter; it is difficult to obtain an intrinsic hardness of an irradiation hardened region because one is measuring hardness of a hard layer located on a soft matrix. Thus we modeled the nano-indentation test by using a finite element method. We can extract the intrinsic hardness and the yield stress of an irradiation hardened region by using a so-called inverse method. We investigated the irradiation effects on Fe-Cr binary alloy by using the methods mentioned above. TEM analysis revealed that an irradiation forms dislocation loops with Burgers vector of and 1/2 . These loops varied in size and density with the Cr content and dose level. We discuss in detail a correlation between the measured irradiation-induced changes in the surface hardness and an irradiation induced defect. (authors)

  17. U.S. Contribution 1994 Summary Report Task T12: Compatibility and irradiation testing of vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Vanadium alloys exhibit important advantages as a candidate structural material for fusion first wall/blanket applications. These advantages include fabricability, favorable safety and environmental features, high temperature and high wall load capability, and long lifetime under irradiation. Vanadium alloys with (3-5)% chromium and (3-5)% titanium appear to offer the best combination of properties for first wall/blanket applications. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is recommended as the reference composition for the ITER application. This report provides a summary of the R ampersand D conducted during 1994 in support of the ITER Engineering Design Activity. Progress is reported for Vanadium Alloy Production, Welding, Physical Properties, Baseline Mechanical Properties, Corrosion/Compatibility, Neutron Irradiation Effects, Helium Transmutation Effects on Irradiated Alloys, and the Status of Irradiation Experiments. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports from this publication

  18. U.S. Contribution 1994 Summary Report Task T12: Compatibility and irradiation testing of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L. [comp.

    1995-03-01

    Vanadium alloys exhibit important advantages as a candidate structural material for fusion first wall/blanket applications. These advantages include fabricability, favorable safety and environmental features, high temperature and high wall load capability, and long lifetime under irradiation. Vanadium alloys with (3-5)% chromium and (3-5)% titanium appear to offer the best combination of properties for first wall/blanket applications. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is recommended as the reference composition for the ITER application. This report provides a summary of the R&D conducted during 1994 in support of the ITER Engineering Design Activity. Progress is reported for Vanadium Alloy Production, Welding, Physical Properties, Baseline Mechanical Properties, Corrosion/Compatibility, Neutron Irradiation Effects, Helium Transmutation Effects on Irradiated Alloys, and the Status of Irradiation Experiments. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports from this publication.

  19. Tensile properties of vanadium alloys irradiated at 390{degrees}C in EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Tsai, H.C.; Nowicki, L.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Vanadium alloys were irradiated in Li-bonded stainless steel capsules to {approx}390{degrees}C in the EBR-II X-530 experiment. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of two large-scale (100 and 500 kg) heats of V-4Cr-Ti and laboratory (15-30 kg) heats of boron-doped V-4Cr-4Ti, V-8Cr-6Ti, V-5Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys. Tensile specimens, divided into two groups, were irradiated in two different capsules under nominally similar conditions. The 500-kg heat (No. 832665) and the 100-kg heat (VX-8) of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in one of the subcapsules exhibited complete loss of work-hardening capability, which was manifested by very low uniform plastic strain. In contrast, the 100-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in another subcapsule exhibited good tensile properties (uniform plastic strain 2.8-4.0%). A laboratory heat of V-3Ti-1Si irradiated in the latter subcapsule also exhibited good tensile properties. These results indicate that work-hardening capability at low irradiation temperatures varies significantly from heat to heat and is influenced by nominally small differences in irradiation conditions.

  20. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the mechanical behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimus, F.

    2003-12-01

    Zirconium alloys cladding tubes containing nuclear fuel of the Pressurized Water Reactors constitute the first safety barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. Thus, it is essential to predict the mechanical behavior of the material in-reactor conditions. This study aims, on the one hand, to identify and characterize the mechanisms of the plastic deformation of irradiated zirconium alloys and, on the other hand, to propose a micro-mechanical modeling based on these mechanisms. The experimental analysis shows that, for the irradiated material, the plastic deformation occurs by dislocation channeling. For transverse tensile test and internal pressure test this channeling occurs in the basal planes. However, for axial tensile test, the study revealed that the plastic deformation also occurs by channeling but in the prismatic and pyramidal planes. In addition, the study of the macroscopic mechanical behavior, compared to the deformation mechanisms observed by TEM, suggested that the internal stress is higher in the case of irradiated material than in the case of non-irradiated material, because of the very heterogeneous character of the plastic deformation. This analysis led to a coherent interpretation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated materials, in terms of deformation mechanisms. The mechanical behavior of irradiated materials was finally modeled by applying homogenization methods for heterogeneous materials. This model is able to reproduce adequately the mechanical behavior of the irradiated material, in agreement with the TEM observations. (author)

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim

    2008-01-01

    High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

  2. Post irradiation fracture properties of precipitation-strengthened alloy D21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1986-03-01

    The precipitation strengthened alloys have the potential for use in fuel cladding and duct applications for liquid metal reactors due to their high strength and low swelling rate. Unfortunately, these high strength alloys tend to exhibit poor fracture toughness, and the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture properties of the material are of concern. Compact tension specimens of alloy D21 were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II to a fluence of 2.7 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 425, 500, 550 and 600 0 C. Fracture toughness tests on these specimens wre performed using electric potential techniques at temperatures ranging from 205 to 425 C. The material exhibited low postirradiation fracture toughness which increased with either increasing test or irradiation temperature. The tearing modulus, however, increased with increasing irradiation temperature but decreased with increasing test temperature. Results wre analyzed using the J-integral approach. The fracture toughness of irradiated D21 was evaluated essentially following the procedure recommended in ASTM Test Method E813. It was found that the data elimination limits illustrated in E813 were too large for the specimens tested, although the thickness criterion was satisfied. The precautions needed to determine J/sub 1c/ based on a reduced data qualification range were disussed

  3. Accumulation of dislocation loops in the α phase of Zr Excel alloy under heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbing; Yao, Zhongwen; Idrees, Yasir; Zhang, He K.; Kirk, Mark A.; Daymond, Mark R.

    2017-08-01

    In-situ heavy ion irradiations were performed on the high Sn content Zr alloy 'Excel', measuring type dislocation loop accumulation up to irradiation damage doses of 10 dpa at a range of temperatures. The high content of Sn, which diffuses slowly, and the thin foil geometry of the sample provide a unique opportunity to study an extreme case where displacement cascades dominate the loop formation and evolution. The dynamic observation of dislocation loop evolution under irradiation at 200 °C reveals that type dislocation loops can form at very low dose (0.0025 dpa). The size of the dislocation loops increases slightly with irradiation damage dose. The mechanism controlling loop growth in this study is different from that in neutron irradiation; in this study, larger dislocation loops can condense directly from the interaction of displacement cascades and the high concentration of point defects in the matrix. The size of the dislocation loop is dependent on the point defect concentration in the matrix. A negative correlation between the irradiation temperature and the dislocation loop size was observed. A comparison between cascade dominated loop evolution (this study), diffusion dominated loop evolution (electron irradiation) and neutron irradiation suggests that heavy ion irradiation alone may not be enough to accurately reproduce neutron irradiation induced loop structures. An alternative method is proposed in this paper. The effects of Sn on the displacement cascades, defect yield, and the diffusion behavior of point defects are established.

  4. Internal friction in Al alloys after neutron irradiation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Kobiyama, M.

    1985-01-01

    Internal friction and elastic modulus of dilute Al alloys have been measured after fast neutron irradiation at about 5 K. The internal friction spectra in Al-Pb, Al-Si, Al-Zn, Al-Ag, Al-Sn and Al-In are very similar. This result suggests that the configuration of the interstitial-solute atom complex in these alloys is very similar. In Al-Mg, the main complexes have the configuration with nearly symmetry, but its internal friction spectrum is different from that of the above-mentioned alloys. The internal friction spectra and their annealing behavior in Al-Be, Al-Mn, Al-Fe and Al-Cu demonstrate that the configuration of their interstitial-solute atom complex seems to be different from each other and the main complex in these alloys is immobile until stage III. (author)

  5. Tensile properties of vanadium alloys irradiated at 200{degrees}C in the HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Vanadium alloys were irradiated in a helium environment to {approx}10 dpa at {approx}200{degrees}C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of laboratory heats of V-(1-18)Ti, V-4Cr-4Ti, V-8Cr-6Ti, V-9Cr-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si, and V-3Ti-0.1C alloys. Because of significant loss of work-hardening capability, all alloys except V-18Ti exhibited a very low uniform plastic strain <1%. For V-Ti. The mechanism of the loss of work-hardening capability in the other alloys is not understood.

  6. Microstructural characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Akamatsu, M.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions, and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons, have been studied through small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex; solute atoms such as Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ''clouds'' more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Ductility and microstructure of precipitation-strengthened alloys irradiated in HFIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.J.S.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1983-08-01

    Six γ' and γ'/γ'' strengthened Ni-base alloys have shown near-zero ductility after irradiation at 300 to 600 0 C in HFIR to a peak exposure of 9 dpa. Microstructural examination of the irradiated specimens showed that the loss of ductility in these alloys arises from the simultaneous existence of a strong matrix and weak grain boundaries. The strong matrix is attributed to the irradiation-induced γ' and γ'/γ'' precipitates, the faulted loops and a high density of fine helium bubbles. The weak grain boundaries are attributed to the formation of an unfavorable precipitate, such as eta-plates, recrystallized grains, a thin layer of γ' and helium bubbles

  8. Effect of γ-IRRADIATION on the Mechanical Properties of Al-Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Elsoud, M.; Ismail, H.; Sobhy, Maged S.

    SEM observations and Vickers hardness tests were performed to identify the irradiation effects. γ-irradiation effect during the aging hardening process can be explained depending on the composition of the alloy and is used to derive quantitative information on the kinetics of the transformation precipitates. Increasing the Cu content of an Al-Cu alloy can improve the aging hardness. The present results of the hardness behavior, with SEM observations of surveillance specimens at different doses, suggest that the radiation-induced defects are probably complex valence-solute clusters. These clusters act as nuclei for the precipitation of θ-Al2Cu type. This can be effectively utilized to study the systematics of nucleation of precipitates at vacancy-type defects. γ-irradiation probably plays the key role in defects responsible for material strengthening and embrittlement.

  9. Surface Properties of a Nanocrystalline Fe-Ni-Nb-B Alloy After Neutron Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavùk, Milan; Sitek, Jozef; Sedlačková, Katarína

    2014-09-01

    The effect of neutron radiation on the surface properties of the nanocrystalline (Fe0.25Ni0.75)81Nb7B12 alloy was studied. Firstly, amorphous (Fe0.25Ni0.75)81Nb7B12 ribbon was brought by controlled annealing to the nanocrystalline state. After annealing, the samples of the nanocrystalline ribbon were irradiated in a nuclear reactor with neutron fluences of 1×1016cm-2 and 1 × 1017cm-2 . By utilizing the magnetic force microscopy (MFM), topography and a magnetic domain structure were recorded at the surface of the ribbon-shaped samples before and after irradiation with neutrons. The results indicate that in terms of surface the nanocrystalline (Fe0.25Ni0.75)81Nb7B12 alloy is radiation-resistant up to a neutron fluence of 1 × 1017cm-2 . The changes in topography observed for both irradiated samples are discussed

  10. Minaturized disk bend tests of neutron-irradiated path A type alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Sohn, D.S.; Grant, N.J.; Harling, O.K.

    1983-01-01

    Path A Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) has been rapidly solidified and consoliated by extrusion. Twenty percent CW samples, precision TEM disks, 3 phi x 0.254 mm, were irradiated in the mixed flux of the Oak Ridge HFIR reactor up to approx. 8.5 dpa (360 appm He) and approx. 34 dpa (3100 appm He) at 300, 400, 500 and 600 0 C. Similar samples of conventionally processed PCA were also irradiated for comparison. Mechanical properties were characterized using a minaturized disk bend test (MDBT) developed at MIT. These tests indicate major decreases in strength and ductility especially for the 500 and 600 0 C irradiations. No major differences were found between this first version of a rapidly solidified and extruded PCA type alloy and conventionally processed PCA

  11. Microstructural characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, P; Pareige, P [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France); Akamatsu, M; Van Duysen, J C [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Ecuelles (France)

    1994-12-31

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions, and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons, have been studied through small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex; solute atoms such as Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ``clouds`` more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Influence of composition, heat treatment and neutron irradiation on the electrical conductivity of copper alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1998-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of three different types of copper alloys, viz. CuNiBe, CuCrZr and Cu-Al(2)O(3) as well as of pure copper are reported. The alloys have undergone different pre-irradiation heat treatments and have been fission-neutron irradiated up to 0.3 dpa. In some cases post......-irradiation annealing has been carried out. The results are discussed with reference to equivalent Transmission Electron Microscopy results on the microstructure of the materials. The CuNiBe has the lowest conductivity (less than or equal to 55% of that of pure Cu), and Cu-Al(2)O(3) the highest (75-90% of pure Cu). (C...

  13. Influence of composition, heat treatment and neutron irradiation on the electrical conductivity of copper alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldrup, M.; Singh, B. N.

    1998-10-01

    The electrical conductivity of three different types of copper alloys, viz. CuNiBe, CuCrZr and Cu-Al 2O 3 as well as of pure copper are reported. The alloys have undergone different pre-irradiation heat treatments and have been fission-neutron irradiated up to 0.3 dpa. In some cases post-irradiation annealing has been carried out. The results are discussed with reference to equivalent Transmission Electron Microscopy results on the microstructure of the materials. The CuNiBe has the lowest conductivity (⩽55% of that of pure Cu), and Cu-Al 2O 3 the highest (75-90% of pure Cu).

  14. Microstructure and tensile properties of neutron-irradiated (FE061Ni039)3V ordered alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    Small tensile specimens of the (Fe 0 61 Ni 0 39 ) 3 V long-range-ordered alloy were irradiated in the ORR to 4 dpa at 523, 623, and 823 K and subsequently tested at the same respective temperatueres. The alloy remained ordered after irradiation at all three temperatures. Irradiation at 523 and 623 K increased the yield strength of the material by producing Frank loops in the microstructure and reduced the total elongation. The low strain hardening observed was attributed to planar slip and the absence of cross slip. Irradiation at 823 K embrittled the alloy. Premature failure was apparently initiated by helium bubbles on sigma phase boundaries which grew rapidly during the test to form microcracks. Fracture occurred after a microcrack propagated across grain boundaries that were weakened by helium and possible sulfur. New LRO alloys without sigma phase should perform better under neutron irradiation

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of FeCrAl alloys under heavy ion irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, E.; Weaver, J. S.; Maloy, S. A.; El-Atwani, O.; Wang, Y. Q.; Mara, N. A.

    2018-05-01

    FeCrAl ferritic alloys are excellent cladding candidates for accident tolerant fuel systems due to their high resistance to oxidation as a result of formation of a protective Al2O3 scale at high temperatures in steam. In this study, we report the irradiation response of the 10Cr and 13Cr FeCrAl cladding tubes under Fe2+ ion irradiation up to ∼16 dpa at 300 °C. Dislocation loop size, density and characteristics were determined using both two-beam bright field transmission electron microscopy and on-zone scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques. 10Cr (C06M2) tube has a lower dislocation density, larger grain size and a slightly weaker texture compared to the 13Cr (C36M3) tube before irradiation. After irradiation to 0.7 dpa and 16 dpa, the fraction of type sessile dislocations decreases with increasing Cr amount in the alloys. It has been found that there is neither void formation nor α‧ precipitation as a result of ion irradiations in either alloy. Therefore, dislocation loops were determined to be the only irradiation induced defects contributing to the hardening. Nanoindentation testing before the irradiation revealed that the average nanohardness of the C36M3 tube is higher than that of the C06M2 tube. The average nanohardness of irradiated tube samples saturated at 1.6-2.0 GPa hardening for both tubes between ∼3.4 dpa and ∼16 dpa. The hardening calculated based on transmission electron microscopy was found to be consistent with nanohardness measurements.

  16. The response of dispersion-strengthened copper alloys to high fluence neutron irradiation at 415 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.J.; Newkirk, J.W.; Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Nadkarni, A.; Samal, P.

    1993-01-01

    Various oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloys have been irradiated to 150 dpa at 415 degrees C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The Al 2 O 3 -strengthened GlidCop TM alloys, followed closely by a HfO 2 -strengthened alloy, displayed the best swelling resistance, electrical conductivity, and tensile properties. The conductivity of the HfO 2 -strengthened alloy reached a plateau at the higher levels of irradiation, instead of exhibiting the steady decrease in conductivity observed in the other alloys. A high initial oxygen content results in significantly higher swelling for a series of castable oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloys, while a Cr 2 O 3 -strengthened alloy showed poor resistance to radiation

  17. Highlighting micrographic structures of uranium alloys containing 0.5 to 10 per cent wt molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laniesse, J.; Bouleau, M.

    1959-02-01

    The authors report a study which aimed at determining for different uranium molybdenum alloys and with respect to their molybdenum content a polishing method which allows a relatively simple grain examination in the as-cast condition, an as perfect as possible resolution of eutectic decompositions, and the appropriate conditions to highlight structures (beta-alpha and gamma-alpha martensite transformations, beta phase retention and decomposition, transient structures, eutectoid decomposition, and so on). Alloys differ by their molybdenum content: from 0.5 to 1 per cent wt, 1.5 to 3 per cent wt, 5 to 10 per cent wt

  18. Extra spots in the electron diffraction patterns of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, P.K.

    1977-01-01

    Specimens of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys were examined in the transmission electron microscope. Groups of extra spots, often exhibiting four-fold symmetry, were observed in thin foil electron diffraction patterns of these specimens. The 'extra-spot' structure, like the expected black-dot/small scale dislocation loop neutron irradiated damage, is approximately 100 A in size. Its nature is uncertain. It may be related to irradiation damage or to some artefact introduced during specimen preparation. If it is the latter, then published irradiation damage defect size distributions and determined irradiation growth strains of other investigators, may require modification. The present inconclusive results indicate that extra-spot structure is likely to consist of oxide particles, but may correspond to hydride precipitation or decoration effects, or even, to electron beam effects. (author)

  19. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E., E-mail: Douglas.Burkes@pnnl.gov; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed. - Highlights: •Complementary fission gas release events are reported for U-Mo fuel with and without cladding. •Exothermic reaction between Zr diffusion layer and cladding influences fission gas release. •Mechanisms responsible for fission gas release are similar, but with varying timing and magnitude. •Behavior of samples is similar after 800 °C signaling the onset of superlattice destabilization.

  20. Tensile properties of vanadium alloys irradiated at <430{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Recent attention to vanadium alloys has focused on significant susceptibility to loss of work-hardening capability in irradiation experiments at <430{degrees}C. An evaluation of this phenomenon was conducted on V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti, and V-Ti-Si alloys irradiated in several conventional and helium-charging irradiation experiments in the FFTF-MOTA, HFIR, and EBR-II. Work hardening capability and uniform tensile elongation appear to vary strongly from alloy and heat to heat. A strong heat-to-heat variation has been observed in V-4Cr-4Ti alloys tested, i.e., a 500-kg heat (No. 832665), a 100-kg heat (VX-8), and a 30-kg heat (BL-47). The significant differences in susceptibility to loss of work-hardening capability from one heat to another are estimated to correspond to a difference of {approx}100{degrees}C or more in minimum allowable operating temperature (e.g., 450 versus 350{degrees}C).

  1. Effect of minor elements on microstructure evolution in Ni alloys irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.

    2001-01-01

    The minor elements, Si (-5.81%), Cu (7.18%), Ge (14.76%) and Sn (74.08%) were chosen to investigate the effects of volume size factor as shown in the parentheses on void swelling in neutron irradiated Ni alloys. Neutron irradiation temperature and dose were changed widely from 473 K to 703 K, and 0.001 dpa to 1 dpa, respectively. Voids were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in Ni even after a very small irradiation dose of 0.026 dpa at 573 K. With increasing dose, the number density of voids was nearly constant while void size increased. The microstructure evolution in Ni-2 at%Cu and Ni-2 at%Ge alloys was similar to that in Ni. However, in Ni-2 at%Si and Ni-2 at%Sn alloys, no voids were observed by TEM even at 703 K to 1 dpa. The minor elements, Si and Sn, play an important role for the suppression of vacancy clusters. Vacancies are annihilated by mutual recombination with interstitials in Si and Sn added alloys. (orig.)

  2. Irradiation damage behavior of low alloy steel wrought and weld materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stofanak, R.J.; Poskie, T.J.; Li, Y.Y.; Wire, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the irradiation damage response of several different types of low alloy steel: vintage type ASTM A302 Grade B (A302B) plates and welds containing different Ni and Cu concentrations, 3.5% Ni steels similar to ASTM A508 Class 4, welds containing about 1% Ni (similar to type 105S), and 3.5% Ni steels with ''superclean'' composition. All materials were irradiated at several different irradiation damage levels ranging from 0.0003 to 0.06 dpa at 232C (450F). Complete Charpy V-notch impact energy transition temperature curves were generated for all materials before and after irradiation to determine transition temperature at 4IJ (30 ft-lb) or 47J (35 ft-lb) and the upper shelf energy. Irradiation damage behavior was measured by shift in Charpy 41J or 47J transition temperature (ΔTT4 41J or ΔTT 47J ) and lowering of upper shelf Charpy energy at a given irradiation damage level. It was found that chemical composition greatly influenced irradiation damage behavior; highest irradiation damage (greatest ΔTT) was found in an A302B type weld containing 1.28% Ni and 0.20% Cu while the least damage was found in 3.5% Ni, 0.05% Cu, superclean wrought materials. Combination of Ni and Cu was found to affect irradiation damage behavior at higher irradiation damage levels in the A302B welds where the 1.28% Ni, 0.20% Cu weld showed more damage than a 0.60% Ni, 0.31% Cu weld. For the 3.5% Ni steels, fabrication influenced irradiation behavior in that a silicon (Si) killed material showed greater irradiation damage than a low silicon material. In general, the 3.5% Ni materials with low copper showed less irradiation damage than the A302B materials

  3. Semiquantitative activation analysis in metallic alloys submitted to irregular irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veissid, N.; Lucki, G.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic semiquantitative method using neutron activation was developed to determine the impurities and verify the composition of metallic alloys. By the radioactive transformation law, the number of atoms of each element present in the sample is determined measuring the activity in a multichannel. Two samples were analysed: a) Sample of nominal compositions FeNiCr (49,95-49,95 - 0,1% at). b) Sample of nominal composition NiCr (80,20% at). (Author) [pt

  4. Microstructure analysis of magnesium alloy melted by laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.Y.; Hu, J.D.; Yang, Y.; Guo, Z.X.; Wang, H.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of laser surface melting (LSM) on microstructure of magnesium alloy containing Al8.57%, Zn 0.68%, Mn0.15%, Ce0.52% were investigated. In the present work, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to melt and rapidly solidify the surface of the magnesium alloy with the objective of changing microstructure and improving the corrosion resistance. The results indicate that laser-melted layer contains the finer dendrites and behaviors good resistance corrosion compared with the untreated layer. Furthermore, the absorption coefficient of the magnesium alloy has been estimated according to the numeral simulation of the thermal conditions. The formation process of fine microstructure in melted layers was investigated based on the experimental observation and the theoretical analysis. Some simulation results such as the re-solidification velocities are obtained. The phase constitutions of the melted layers determined by X-ray diffraction were β-Mg 17 Al 12 and α-Mg as well as some phases unidentified

  5. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Modifications in Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Advanced Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Hosemann, Peter; Liu, Xiang

    2018-04-24

    This final technical report summarizes the research performed during October 2014 and December 2017, with a focus on investigating the radiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property modifications in optimized advanced alloys for sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) structural applications. To accomplish these objectives, the radiation responses of several different advanced alloys, including austenitic steel Alloy 709 (A709) and 316H, and ferritic/ martensitic Fe–9Cr steels T91 and G92, were investigated using a combination of microstructure characterizations and nanoindentation measurements. Different types of irradiation, including ex situ bulk ion irradiation and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) ion irradiation, were employed in this study. Radiation-induced dislocations, precipitates, and voids were characterized by TEM. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and/or atom probe tomography (APT) were used to study radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. Nanoindentation was used for hardness measurements to study irradiation hardening. Austenitic A709 and 316H was bulk-irradiated by 3.5 MeV Fe++ ions to up to 150 peak dpa at 400, 500, and 600°. Compared to neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) 316, the Frank loop density of ion-irradiated A709 shows similar dose dependence at 400°, but very different temperature dependence. Due to the noticeable difference in the initial microstructure of A709 and 316H, no systematic comparison on the Frank loops in A709 vs 316H was made. It would be helpful that future ion irradiation study on 316 stainless steel could be conducted to directly compare the temperature dependence of Frank loop density in ion-irradiated 316 SS with that in neutron-irradiated 316 SS. In addition, future neutron irradiation on A709 at 400–600° at relative high dose (>10 dpa) can be carried out to compare with ion-irradiated A709. The radiation

  6. Neutron irradiation effects of iron alloys and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi; Takenaka, Minoru; Hasegawa, Masayuki.

    1991-01-01

    Positron annihilation angular correlation measurements have been performed for the neutron irradiated various metals and ceramics in order to obtain the information of the microvoids and positronium formation in them. Positronium (Ps) formation was observed in Nb containing a small amount of oxygen and Fe-15%Cr-16%Ni-0.006%B 10 . In practical steels such as JPCA and JFMS no Ps formation was observed. High temperature deformation might induce microvoids into metals, but the positron annihilation angular correlation measurements could not confirm this. In non-metallic materials neutron irradiated no Ps formation has so far been observed. (author)

  7. Helium effects on irradiation dmage in V alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doraiswamy, N.; Alexander, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Preliminary investigations were performed on V-4Cr-4Ti samples to observe the effects of He on the irradiation induced microstructural changes by subjecting 3 mm electropolished V-4Cr-4Ti TEM disks, with and without prior He implantation, to 200 keV He irradiation at room temperature and monitoring, in-situ, the microstructural evolution as a function of total dose with an intermediate voltage electron microscope directly connected to an ion implanter. A high density of black dot defects were formed at very low doses in both He pre-implanted and unimplanted samples.

  8. APFIM investigation of clustering in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cu alloys and pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Blavette, D.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in PWRs are known to be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are commonly supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and copper-rich precipitates. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced damage, in these particularly low copper steels (>0,1 wt%), has not been clearly identify yet. A new experimental work has been carried out thanks to atom probe and field ion microscopy (APFIM) facilities and, more particularly with a new generation of atom probe recently developed, namely the tomographic atom probe (TAP), in order to improve: the understanding of the complex behavior of copper precipitation which occurs when low-alloyed Fe-Cu model alloys are irradiated with neutrons; the microstructural characterization of the pressure vessel steel of the CHOOZ A reactor under various fluences (French Surveillance Programme). The investigations clearly reveal the precipitation of copper-rich clusters in irradiated Fe-Cu alloys while more complicated Si, Ni, Mn and Cu-solute 'clouds' were observed to develop in the low-copper ferritic solid solution of the pressure vessel steel. (authors)

  9. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C and to a maximum fluence of 17.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400 0 C to 14.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6 C, Mo 2 C, Chi, Laves, M 23 C 6 , α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation

  10. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo , H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650°C and to a maximum fluence of 1.76 × 10 23 n/cm 2 (E >0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400°C to 1.40 × 10 23 n/cm 2. A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6C, Mo 2C, Chi, Laves, M 23C 6, α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation.

  11. Swelling and tensile properties of EBR-II-irradiated tantalum alloys for space reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The tantalum alloys T-111, ASTAR-811C, Ta-10 W, and unalloyed tantalum were examined following EBR-II irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 650 to 950 K. Swelling was found to be negligible for all alloys; only tantalum was found to exhibit swelling, 0.36%. Tensile testing revealed that irradiated T-111 and Ta-10 W are susceptible to plastic instability, but ASTAR-811C and tantalum were not. The tensile properties of ASTAR-811C appeared adequate for current SP-100 space nuclear reactor designs. Irradiated, oxygen-doped T-111 exhibited no plastic deformation, and the abrupt failure was intergranular in nature. The absence of plastic instability in ASTAR-811C is encouraging for alloys containing carbide precipitates. These fine precipitates might prevent dislocation channeling, which leads to plastic instability in many bcc metals after irradiation. 10 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashdown, B.G. (comp.)

    1980-06-01

    This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 9 review activities on analysis and evaluation, test methods development, status of irradiation experiments, and corrosion testing and hydrogen permeation studies, respectively. These activities relate to each of the alloy development paths. Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 present the ongoing work on each alloy development path. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader.

  13. Effects of irradiation on low-activation ferritic alloys to 45 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1986-06-01

    Nine low activation ferritic alloys covering the range 2 to 12Cr with alloying additions of tungsten and/or vanadium have been irradiated to intermediate fluences of 30 to 45 dpa and tensile tested or examined by transmission electron microscopy in order to determine the effect of increasing neutron dose on properties and microstructure. Changes in properties and microstructure are for the most part completed within 10 dpa but swelling and dislocation evolution continue with increasing dose at 420/degree/C and subgrain coarsening occurs at 600/degree/C. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 9 review activities on analysis and evaluation, test methods development, status of irradiation experiments, and corrosion testing and hydrogen permeation studies, respectively. These activities relate to each of the alloy development paths. Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 present the ongoing work on each alloy development path. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader

  15. Power ultrasound irradiation during the alkaline etching process of the 2024 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutarlier, V.; Viennet, R.; Rolet, J.; Gigandet, M. P.; Hihn, J. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Prior to any surface treatment on an aluminum alloy, a surface preparation is necessary. This commonly consists in performing an alkaline etching followed by acid deoxidizing. In this work, the use of power ultrasound irradiation during the etching step on the 2024 aluminum alloy was studied. The etching rate was estimated by weight loss, and the alkaline film formed during the etching step was characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The benefit of power ultrasound during the etching step was confirmed by pitting potential measurement in NaCl solution after a post-treatment (anodizing).

  16. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 9 review activities on analysis and evaluation, test methods development, status of irradiation experiments, and corrosion testing and hydrogen permeation studies, respectively. These activities relate to each of the alloy development paths. Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 present the ongoing work on each alloy development path. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader

  17. Influence of irradiation and radiolysis on the corrosion rates and mechanisms of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO 2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO 2 pellets + cladding). To optimize core management and to extend the lifetime of the fuel rods in reactor, new alloys based on zirconium-niobium (M5) have been developed. However, the corrosion mechanisms of these are not completely understood because of the complexity of these materials, corrosion environment and the presence of radiation from the nuclear fuel. Therefore, this thesis specifically addresses the effects of radiolysis and defects induced by irradiation with ions in the matrix metal and the oxide layer on the corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 and M5. The goal is to separate the influence of radiation damage to the metal, that relating to defects created in the oxide and that linked to radiolysis of the primary medium on the oxidation rate of zirconium alloys in reactor. 1) Regarding effect of irradiation of the metal on the oxidation rate: type dislocation loops appear and increase the oxidation rate of the two alloys. For M5, in addition to the first effect, a precipitation of fines needles of niobium reduced the solid solution of niobium concentration in the metal and ultimately in the oxide, which strongly reduces the oxidation rate of the alloy. 2) Regarding the effect of irradiation of the oxide layer on the oxidation rate: defects generated by the nuclear cascades in the oxide increase the oxidation rate of the two materials. For M5, germination of niobium enriched zones in irradiated oxide also causes a decrease of the niobium concentration in solid solution

  18. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  19. Deformation mechanisms and irradiation effects in zirconium alloys. A multi-scale study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimus, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys have been used for more than 30 years in the nuclear industry as structural materials for the fuel assemblies of pressurized water reactors. In particular, the cladding tube, made of zirconium alloys, constitutes the first barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. It is therefore essential to have a good understanding and prediction of the mechanical behavior of these materials in various conditions. The work presented in this dissertation deals with an experimental study and numerical simulations, at several length scales, of the deformation mechanisms and the mechanical behavior of zirconium alloys before irradiation, but also after irradiation and under irradiation. The mechanical behavior of zirconium single crystal has been determined, during an original study, using tensile test specimens containing large grains. Based on this study, crystal plasticity constitutive laws have been proposed. A polycrystalline model has also been developed to simulate the behavior of unirradiated zirconium alloys. A thorough Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) study has been able to clarify the deformation mechanisms of zirconium alloys occurring after irradiation. The clearing of loops by gliding dislocations leading to the dislocation channeling mechanism has been studied in details. This phenomenon has also been simulated using a dislocation dynamics code. The macroscopic consequences of this process have also been analyzed. A polycrystalline model taking into account the specificity of this mechanism has eventually been proposed. This approach has then been extended to the post-irradiation creep behavior. The recovery of radiation defects during creep tests has been characterized by TEM and modeled using cluster dynamics method. Deformation modes during creep have also been studied and a simple model for the creep behavior has eventually been proposed. Finally, the mechanism responsible for the acceleration of irradiation growth that

  20. The compositional dependence of irradiation creep of austenitic alloys irradiated in PFR at 420{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Munro, B. [AEA Technology, Dounreay (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation creep data are expensive and often difficult to obtain, especially when compared to swelling data. This requires that maximum use be made of available data sources in order to elucidate the parametric dependencies of irradiation creep for application to new alloys and to new environments such as those of proposed fusion environments. One previously untapped source of creep data is that of a joint U.S./U.K. experiment conducted in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) in Dounreay, Scotland. In this experiment, five austenitic steels were irradiated in a variety of starting conditions. In particular, these steels spanned a large range (15-40%) of nickel contents, and contained strong variations in Mo, Ti, Al, and Nb. Some alloys were solution-strengthened and some were precipitation-strengthened. Several were cold-worked. These previously unanalyzed data show that at 420{degrees}C all austenitic steels have a creep compliance that is roughly independent of the composition of the steel at 2{+-}1 x 10{sup {minus}6}MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}. The variation within this range may arise from the inability to completely separate the non-creep strains arising from precipitation reactions and the stress-enhancement of swelling. Each of these can be very sensitive to the composition and starting treatment of a steel.

  1. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, C.M., E-mail: parishcm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Unocic, K.A.; Tan, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kondo, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan); Snead, L.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hoelzer, D.T.; Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    We irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ∼50 dpa, ∼15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ∼8 nm, ∼10{sup 21} m{sup −3} (CNA), and of ∼3 nm, 10{sup 23} m{sup −3} (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ∼50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  2. Radiation damage and deuterium trapping in deuterium-ion-irradiated Fe–9Cr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakir, Hirotomo, E-mail: iwakiri@edu.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Faculty and Graduate School of Education, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Tani, Munechika [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyusyu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoaki [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Thermal desorption of deuterium (D{sub 2}) from deuterium-ion (D{sub 2}{sup +})-irradiated Fe–9Cr was correlated with the microstructural evolution of the alloy during irradiation with 8-keV D{sub 2}{sup +} ions following annealing to determine the retention and desorption behavior of the implanted deuterium and to identify effective traps for them, particularly at high temperature. After irradiation at 573 K, a new desorption stage formed between 650 and 1100 K at higher fluences, and cavities were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The total amount of trapped deuterium following irradiation with a fluence of 3.0 × 10{sup 22} ions/m{sup 2} was 6.8 × 10{sup 17} D{sub 2}/m{sup 2}, or approximately 0.007%. These results indicate that the deuterium atoms recombined to form D{sub 2} molecules at the surfaces of the cavities.

  3. Contribution to the understanding of zirconium alloy deformation under irradiation at high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharbi, Nesrine

    2015-01-01

    The growth of zirconium alloy tubes of PWR fuel assemblies is the result of two phenomena: axial irradiation creep and stress 'free' growth which is correlated to the formation of c-loops at high irradiation doses. This PhD work aims at investigating the coupling between these two phenomena through a fine Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis of the effect of a macroscopic applied stress on the c-loop microstructure. 600 keV Zr + ion irradiations were performed at 300 C on two recrystallized zirconium alloys: Zircaloy-4 and M5. Thanks to a device specifically designed, different tensile or compressive stress levels were applied under ion irradiation. The microstructural observations have shown that the c-loop density reduces in grains oriented with the c-axis close to the direction of the applied tensile stress or far from the direction of the applied compressive stress, which is in good agreement with the SIPA mechanism. Nevertheless, the examination of a large number of grains has revealed dispersion from grain to grain. This dispersion, which could be explained by the intergranular heterogeneities, reduces the magnitude of the stress effect on c-loop microstructure. In parallel to this experimental study, a cluster dynamics model has been able to describe the evolution under irradiation of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 microstructure and to assess the effect of stress on c-loop microstructure. On the macroscopic scale, a physical model was also developed to predict the irradiation growth and creep behaviour of zirconium alloy tubes. (author) [fr

  4. A brief review of cavity swelling and hardening in irradiated copper and copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The literature on radiation-induced swelling and hardening in copper and its alloy is reviewed. Void formation does not occur during irradiation of copper unless suitable impurity atoms such as oxygen or helium are present. Void formation occurs for neutron irradiation temperatures of 180 to 550 degree C, with peak swelling occurring at ∼320 degree C for irradiation at a damage rate of 2 x 10 -7 dpa/s. The post-transient swelling rate has been measured to be ∼0.5%/dpa at temperatures near 400 degree C. Dispersion-strengthened copper has been found to be very resistant to void swelling due to the high sink density associated with the dispersion-stabilized dislocation structure. Irradiation of copper at temperatures below 400 degree C generally causes an increase in strength due to the formation of defect clusters which inhibit dislocation motion. The radiation hardening can be adequately described by Seeger's dispersed barrier model, with a barrier strength for small defect clusters of α ∼ 0.2. The radiation hardening apparently saturates for fluences greater than ∼10 24 n/m 2 during irradiation at room temperature due to a saturation of the defect cluster density. Grain boundaries can modify the hardening behavior by blocking the transmission of dislocation slip bands, leading to a radiation- modified Hall-Petch relation between yield strength and grain size. Radiation-enhanced recrystallization can lead to softening of cold-worked copper alloys at temperatures above 300 degree C

  5. Ultrasonic irradiation and its application for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Minqi; Wang, Chao; Zhong, Qingdong; Wei, Yinyin; Wang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, ultrasonic irradiation was utilized for improving the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings on aluminum alloys. The chemical composition and morphology of the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the corrosion resistance of phosphate coatings was investigated by polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Various effects of the addition of Nd(2)O(3) in phosphating bath on the performance of the coatings were also investigated. Results show that the composition of phosphate coating were Zn(3)(PO(4))(2).4H(2)O(hopeite) and Zn crystals. The phosphate coatings became denser with fewer microscopic holes by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment. The addition of Nd(2)O(3) reduced the crystallinity of the coatings, with the additional result that the crystallites were increasingly nubby and spherical. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was also significantly improved by ultrasonic irradiation treatment; both the anodic and cathodic processes of corrosion taking place on the aluminum alloy substrate were suppressed consequently. In addition, the electrochemical impedance of the coatings was also increased by utilizing ultrasonic irradiation treatment compared with traditional treatment.

  6. Internal friction study of neutron-irradiation effects on an amorphous Cu40Ti60 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y.; Wu, G.; Xiao, K.; Li, X.; He, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the structure of an amorphous Cu 40 Ti 60 alloy have been studied by internal friction measurements. After irradiation, the position of the first internal friction peak remains almost unchanged and the shoulder position shifts towards a higher temperature by about 5 K, which indicates that the Cu 40 Ti 60 glass becomes more stable. These results are finally discussed based on the concept of changes of chemical short-range ordering and geometrical short-range ordering due to radiation damage

  7. Subthreshold displacement damage in copper--aluminum alloys during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosd, R.; Kosel, T.; Washburn, J.

    1976-12-01

    During electron irradiation at low energies which results in a negligible damage rate in a pure material, lighter solute atoms are displaced, which may in turn indirectly displace solvent atoms by a focussed replacement collision or an interstitial diffusion jump. The extent to which lighter solute atoms contribute to the subthreshold damage rate has been examined by irradiating copper--aluminum alloys at high temperatures in a high voltage electron microscope. The damage rate, as measured by monitoring the growth rate of dislocation loops, at 300 kV was found to increase linearly with the aluminum concentration

  8. Application of constrained equilibrium thermodynamics to irradiated alloy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, James Paul; Stubbins, James F.

    1984-05-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamics are applied to systems with an excess of point defects to calculate the relative stability of phases. It is possible to model systems with supersaturation levels of vacancies and interstitials, such as those found under irradiation. The calculations reveal the extent to which phase compositional boundaries could shift when one phase or both in a two phase system contain an excess of point defects. Phase boundary shifts in the Ni-Si, Fe-Ni, Ni-Cr, and Fe-Cr systems are examined as a function of the number of excess defects in each phase. It is also found that the critical temperature of the sigma phase in the Fe-Cr system and the fcc-bcc transition in the Fe-Ni are sensitive to excess defect concentrations. These results may apply to local irradiation-induced phase transformations in the presence of solute segregation.

  9. Forming a structure of the CoNiFe alloys by X-ray irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Natalia; Kasperovich, Andrey; Koltunowicz, Tomasz N.

    The experimental data of electrodeposition kinetics researches and structure formation of ternary CoNiFe alloys deposited onto low-carbon steel 08kp in the presence of X-rays are presented. Relations of deposit rate, current efficiencies, element and phase compositions of CoNiFe coatings formed from sulfate baths with respect to cathode current densities (0.5-3A/dm2), electrolyte composition and irradiation were obtained. It is shown that, the CoNiFe coatings deposited by the electrochemical method involving exposure of the X-rays are characterized by more perfect morphology surfaces with less developed surface geometry than reference coatings. The effect of the X-ray irradiation on the electrodeposition of CoNiFe coatings promotes formatting of alloys with increased electropositive component and modified phase composition.

  10. Low Temperature Diffusion Transformations in Fe-Ni-Ti Alloys During Deformation and Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaradze, Victor; Shabashov, Valery; Kataeva, Natalya; Kozlov, Kirill; Arbuzov, Vadim; Danilov, Sergey; Ustyugov, Yury

    2018-03-01

    The deformation-induced dissolution of Ni3Ti intermetallics in the matrix of austenitic alloys of Fe-36Ni-3Ti type was revealed in the course of their cascade-forming neutron irradiation and cold deformation at low temperatures via employment of Mössbauer method. The anomalous deformation-related dissolution of the intermetallics has been explained by the migration of deformation-induced interstitial atoms from the particles into a matrix in the stress field of moving dislocations. When rising the deformation temperature, this process is substituted for by the intermetallics precipitation accelerated by point defects. A calculation of diffusion processes has shown the possibility of the realization of the low-temperature diffusion of interstitial atoms in configurations of the crowdions and dumbbell pairs at 77-173 K. The existence of interstitial atoms in the Fe-36Ni alloy irradiated by electrons or deformed at 77 K was substantiated in the experiments of the electrical resistivity measurements.

  11. Preirradiation microstructrual development designed to minimize properties degradation during irradiation in austentic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Roche, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    The first-generation Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) for the austenitic stainless steel class of alloys for application as a Magnet Fusion Energy (MFE) first-wall material is a 14 Cr-16 Ni-0.25 Ti modification of Type 316 stainless steel. A key parameter for material performance is wall lifetime. The ability of the material to resist swelling and resist embrittlement during irradiation is important to longer wall lifetimes. The microstructure that evolves during irradiation is primarily responsible for both the swelling and embrittlement responses, and helium plays a central role in this microstructural evolution. This paper indicated how preirradiation microstructures that employ control of MC precipitation and dislocation density are designed and produced for fusion application of PCA

  12. Phase stability and microstructures of high entropy alloys ion irradiated to high doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Songqin [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Gao, Michael C. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, 1450 Queen Ave SW, Albany, OR, 97321 (United States); AECOM, P.O. Box 1959, Albany, OR, 97321 (United States); Yang, Tengfei [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 37996 (United States); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: drzhangy@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The microstructures of Al{sub x}CoCrFeNi (x = 0.1, 0.75 and 1.5 in molar ratio) high entropy alloys (HEAs) irradiated at room temperature with 3 MeV Au ions at the highest fluence of 105, 91, and 81 displacement per atom, respectively, were studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) analyses show that the initial microstructures and phase composition of all three alloys are retained after ion irradiation and no phase decomposition is observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the disordered face-centered cubic (FCC) and disordered body-centered cubic (BCC) phases show much less defect cluster formation and structural damage than the NiAl-type ordered B2 phase. This effect is explained by higher entropy of mixing, higher defect formation/migration energies, substantially lower thermal conductivity, and higher atomic level stress in the disordered phases.

  13. Swelling behavior detection of irradiated U-10Zr alloy fuel using indirect neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yong; Huo, He-yong; Wu, Yang [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Li, Jiangbo [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Zhou, Wei; Guo, Hai-bing [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Li, Hang, E-mail: lihang32@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Cao, Chao; Yin, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Bin; Feng, Qi-jie; Tang, Bin [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2016-11-21

    It is hopeful that fusion-fission hybrid energy system will become an effective approach to achieve long-term sustainable development of fission energy. U-10Zr alloy (which means the mass ratio of Zr is 10%) fuel is the key material of subcritical blanket for fusion-fission hybrid energy system which the irradiation performance need to be considered. Indirect neutron radiography is used to detect the irradiated U-10Zr alloy because of the high residual dose in this paper. Different burnup samples (0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5% and 0.7%) have been tested with a special indirect neutron radiography device at CMRR (China Mianyang Research Reactor). The resolution of the device is better than 50 µm and the quantitative analysis of swelling behaviors was carried out. The results show that the swelling behaviors relate well to burnup character which can be detected accurately by indirect neutron radiography.

  14. A novel way to estimate the nanoindentation hardness of only-irradiated layer and its application to ion irradiated Fe-12Cr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hoon-Seop; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Seok, Moo-Young; Zhao, Yakai; Kim, Woo-Jin [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Dongil [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Hyung-Ha, E-mail: hhajin2@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Junhyun [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jae-il, E-mail: jijang@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    While nanoindentation is a very useful tool to examine the mechanical properties of ion irradiated materials, there are some issues that should be considered in evaluating the properties of irradiated layer. In this study, in order to properly extract the hardness of only-irradiated layer from nanoindentation data, a new procedure is suggested in consideration of the geometry of indentation-induced plastic zone. By applying the procedure to an ion irradiated Fe-12Cr alloy, the reasonable results were obtained, validating its usefulness in the investigation of practical effect of irradiation on the mechanical behavior of future nuclear materials.

  15. Previsions of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation by numerical atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngayam Happy, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have improved a diffusion model for point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials) by introducing hetero-interstitials. The model has been used to simulate by Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters that are observed experimentally in irradiated ferritic model alloys of type Fe - CuMnNiSiP - C.Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between self-interstitials and all solute atoms, and also carbon. P interacts with vacancies and strongly with self-interstitials. Mn also interacts with self-interstitials to form mixed dumbbells. C, with occupies octahedral sites, interacts strongly with vacancies and less with self-interstitials. Binding and migration energies, as well as others atomic scale properties, obtained by ab initio calculations, have been used as parameters for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimized over isochronal annealing experiments, in the literature, of binary alloys that have been electron-irradiated. Isochronal annealing simulations, by reproducing experimental results, have allowed us to link each mechanism to a single evolution of the resistivity during annealing. Moreover, solubility limits of all the elements have been determined by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Secondly, we have simulated the evolution at 300 C of the microstructure under irradiation of different alloys of increasing complexity: pure Fe, binary alloys, ternaries, quaternaries, and finally complex alloys which compositions are close to those of pressure vessel steels. The results show that the model globally reproduces all the experimental tendencies, what has led us to propose mechanisms to explain the behaviours observed. (author)

  16. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This report is the twenty-second in a series of Technical Progress Reports on ''Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance'' (ADIP), which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of energy. This report is organized along topical lines with Chapters 3 through 8 devoted to the various alloy classes that are currently under investigation. Thus the work of a given laboratory may appear at several different places in the report. The materials compatibility and environmental effects work on all alloy classes is collected together in Chapter 9. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader

  17. Comparison of the irradiation effects on swelling and microstructure in commercial alloy A-286 and a simple Fe--25 Ni--15Cr gamma prime hardened alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chickering, R.W.; Bajaj, R.; Lally, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The irradiation behaviors of alloy A-286 as well as experimental gamma prime hardened alloys are being studied in the National Alloy Development Program for application of gamma prime hardened alloys in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The principal direction of the studies concerns the high temperature strength and swelling resistance of the alloys. Minor element compositions may affect the phase stability and void swelling. A high Ti to Al ratio indicates a tendency for the gamma prime Ni 3 (Ti,Al) to transform into eta phase (Ni 3 Ti) after long term thermal aging and irradiation enhances the tendency for transformation. Another minor element, Si, as a constituent of G-phase, and irradiation may enhance G-phase formation. The Ti, Al, and Si contents affect the swelling of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. The swelling resistance generally increases with increasing amounts of these three elements in the matrix. In the study the effects of Ti to Al ratio, Ti content, Al content, and Si content on swelling and phase stability were analyzed after Ni-ion irradiation

  18. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  19. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa and at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa than after irradiation at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa

  20. Impact of β- radiolysis and transient products on irradiation-enhanced corrosion of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaignan, C.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis has been undertaken of the various cases of local enhancement of the corrosion rate of zirconium alloys under irradiation. It is observed that in most cases a strong emission of energetic β - is present leading to a local energy desorption rate higher than the core average. This suggests that the local transient radiolytic oxidising species produced in the coolant by the β - particles could contribute to corrosion enhancement, by increasing the local corrosion potential. This process is applicable to the local enhanced corrosion found in front of stainless steels structural parts, due to the contribution of Mn, in front of Pt inserts and Cu-rich cruds. It explains also the irradiation corrosion enhancement of Cu-rich Zr alloys. Enhanced corrosion around neutron absorbing material is explained similarly by pair production from conversion of high energy capture photons in the cladding, leading to energetic electrons. The same process was found to be active with other highly ionising species like α in Ni-rich alloys and fission products in homogeneous reactors. This mechanism, applicable for an explanation of localised irradiation-enhanced corrosion, is proposed to be extended to the reactor core, where the general enhancement of Zr-alloy corrosion under irradiation would be due to the general radiolysis. It suggests that care should be taken to avoid any source of β - emission or other ionising species in the reactor core that could give an increase of energy deposition rate for radiolysis. Also the corrosion testing conditions for the materials to be used in reactors have to be relevant to the radiolytic environments found in the reactor cores. (orig.)

  1. Irradiation-induced softening of Ni3P and (Ni, Fe, Cr)3P alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, G.; Miekeley, W.; Wahi, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Production of amorphous alloys by solid state reactions (SSR) has attracted much interest during the last few years. One of the methods to induce such a reaction is the irradiation of suitable crystalline alloys by fast particles. Examination of this kind of SSR in M 3 P type of brazing alloys (M: Metal) is attractive because of the following reason: In brazed joints of candidate structural materials like 316L stainless steel for applications in fusion reactors, crystalline intermetallic phases have been detected which are unstable relative to the amorphous state when irradiated at moderate temperatures with fast particles. It is expected that the transition to the amorphous state is accompanied by changes of the mechanical properties, which are of fundamental interest in this context. Until now, only a few studies on the evolution of mechanical properties during amorphization have been performed. Measurements of microhardness of the crystalline and the corresponding amorphous phase do not exist to the authors knowledge. In this communication, the authors present results on changes of microhardness, due to amorphization by fast ions. The measurements have been performed on a model alloy Ni 3 P and on the brazed joint of stainless steel 316L, containing M 3 P (M: Ni, Fe, Cr) as one of the phases. Though microhardness is not a fundamental property of materials, it is a manifestation of several related properties, such as yield stress, ductility, work-hardening, elastic modulus and residual stress states. It represents a resistance for indentation and is, therefore, appropriate for comparative purposes

  2. Numerical atomic scale simulations of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.

    2006-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a model of point defect (vacancies and interstitials) diffusion whose aim is to simulate by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters observed experimentally in irradiated FeCuNiMnSi model alloys and in pressure vessel steels. Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between point defects and the different solute atoms. Each of these solute atoms establishes an attractive bond with the vacancy. As for Mn, which is the element which has the weakest bond with the vacancy, it establishes more favourable bonds with interstitials. Binding energies, migration energies as well as other atomic scale properties, determined by ab initio calculations, have led to a parameter set for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimised on thermal ageing experiments realised on the FeCu binary alloy and on complex alloys, described in the literature. The vacancy diffusion thermal annealing simulations show that when a vacancy is available, all the solutes migrate and form clusters, in agreement with the observed experimental tendencies. Secondly, to simulate the microstructural evolution under irradiation, we have introduced interstitials in the KMC code. Their presence leads to a more efficient transport of Mn. The first simulations of electron and neutron irradiations show that the model results are globally qualitatively coherent with the experimentally observed tendencies. (author)

  3. Effect of solute elements in Ni alloys on blistering under He + and D + ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, E.; Ezawa, T.; Takenaka, T.; Imamura, J.; Tanabe, T.; Oshima, R.

    2007-08-01

    Effects of solute atoms on microstructural evolution and blister formation have been investigated using Ni alloys under 25 keV He + and 20 keV D + irradiation at 500 °C to a dose of about 4 × 10 21 ions/m 2. The specimens used were pure Ni, Ni-Si, Ni-Co, Ni-Cu, Ni-Mn and Ni-Pd alloys. The volume size factors of solute elements for the Ni alloys range from -5.8% to +63.6%. The formations of blisters were observed in the helium-irradiated specimens, but not in the deuteron-irradiated specimens. The areal number densities of blisters increased with volume size difference of solute atoms. The dependence of volume size on the areal number densities of blisters was very similar to that of the number densities of bubbles on solute atoms. The size of the blisters inversely decreased with increasing size of solute atoms. The formation of blisters was intimately related to the bubble growth, and the gas pressure model for the formation of blisters was supported by this study.

  4. Radiation-induced segregation and void formation in C+ ion-irradiated vanadium-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, T.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Sato, Y.; Mochizuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    To clarify the effect of interstitial elements on radiation-induced segregation and void formation in V and V-C alloys irradiated by 200 keV C + ions to a dose of 48 dpa at 973 K, the microstructural observation and the measurement of C segregation to the surfaces were carried out by TEM and XPS. Voids, dislocations and precipitates were produced in all of the specimens during irradiation. The addition of C in V led to a reduction of void size and to increase in void number density, consequently the void swelling was suppressed strongly. Radiation-induced segregation of C was observed clearly on and near the irradiated surfaces of V-C alloys and as a result of the enrichment of C atoms, carbides precipitated on the surfaces. It is the first evidence of the radiation-induced segregation of interstitial elements on the surfaces. Also, quasi-carbides were observed on the (210) habit plaints near large voids and dislocations in V. The phenomena show that C atoms, which was insolved and/or implanted, interact strongly with vacancies rather than self-interstitial atoms and migrate with vacancies toward defect sinks, such as surfaces, voids, and dislocations. The segregated zones of C reduced the sink efficiency of the defects, and showed the effect of the suppression on void in V-C alloys. (author)

  5. Contribution to the study of remedy solutions to uranium(molybdenum)/aluminium interactions: role of silicon addition to aluminium, study of coupled effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allenou, J.

    2011-01-01

    In the project development and qualification program of a nuclear fuel with Low Enriched Uranium for Materials Testing Reactors, the dispersed U(Mo)/Al fuel is being developed due to its excellent stability during irradiation. However, in pile experiments showed that depending on the irradiation conditions (e.g. high burnup or high heat flux), an extensive interaction occurs between the fissile element U(Mo) and the Al based matrix resulting in swelling, which could eventually lead to a fuel plate failure. Among the ways to improve the behavior of the dispersed U(Mo) fuel, the solution now seen as the reference remedy by the entire scientific community is the addition of silicon into the aluminum matrix. In order to provide some understanding and optimizing the solution 'Si additions into Al matrix' under neutron irradiation, an out of pile study is performed on (i) the interaction mechanisms involved in the U(Mo)/Al (Si) system and (ii) the impact of the Si additions into the Al matrix on alternative solutions to the U(Mo)/Al interactions, namely the modification of the γ-U(Mo) fissile compound by adding a third element and/or modifying the interface between the γ-U(Mo) fissile compound and the matrix. This document provides a mechanistic description of the U(7Mo)/Al(Si) interaction for a range of Si content in Al between 2 and 10 wt.%, based on the multi-scale characterization of diffusion couples. The location of the Mo and its role in the reaction mechanisms are demonstrated. The influence of elements X = Y, Cu, Zr, Ti, Cr, on the U (Mo)/Al and U (Mo)/Al (Si) interactions mechanisms was then studied. It is shown that adding a third element to the U(Mo) alloy acts on the second order on diffusion kinetics and (micro)structure of the interaction layer compared to the addition of Si into Al. Finally, an alumina coating which shows a potential interest to improve the performance of the fuel has been developed. (author) [fr

  6. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on thermodynamically equilibrium Zr-Excel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbing; Liang, Jianlie; Yao, Zhongwen; Kirk, Mark A.; Daymond, Mark R.

    2017-05-01

    The thermodynamically equilibrium state was achieved in a Zr-Sn-Nb-Mo alloy by long-term annealing at an intermediate temperature. The fcc intermetallic Zr(Mo, Nb)2 enriched with Fe was observed at the equilibrium state. In-situ 1 MeV Kr2+ heavy ion irradiation was performed in a TEM to study the stability of the intermetallic particles under irradiation and the effects of the intermetallic particle on the evolution of type dislocation loops at different temperatures from 80 to 550 °C. Chemi-STEM elemental maps were made at the same particles before and after irradiation up to 10 dpa. It was found that no elemental redistribution occurs at 200 °C and below. Selective depletion of Fe was observed from some precipitates under irradiation at higher temperatures. No change in the morphology of particles and no evidence showing a crystalline to amorphous transformation were observed at all irradiation temperatures. The formation of type dislocation loops was observed under irradiation at 80 and 200 °C, but not at 450 and 550 °C. The loops were non-uniformly distributed; a localized high density of type dislocation loops were observed near the second phase particles; we suggest that loop nucleation is favored as a result of the stress induced by the particles, rather than by elemental redistribution. The stability of the second phase particles and the formation of the type loops under heavy ion irradiation are discussed.

  7. Fabrication and characterisation of uranium, molybdenum, chromium, niobium and aluminium; Dobijanje i karakterizacija legura uranijuma sa molibdenom, hromom, niobijumom i aluminijumom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofrenovic, R; Isailovic, M; Kotur, Z [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This paper describes fabrication of binary uranium alloys by melting and casting. The following alloys with nominal composition were obtained by melting in the vacuum furnace: uranium with niobium contents from 0.5%- 4.0% and uranium with molybdenum contents from 0.4% - 1.2%. Uranium alloys with chromium content from 0.4% - 1.2% and uranium alloy with 0.12% of aluminium were obtained by vacuum induction furnace (electric arc melting)

  8. Corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys out or under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazet, J.; Billot, P.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes and compares the results obtained after studies carried out in autoclaves, in loops and in reactor in power on the behaviour of some products. Inversions of behaviour are observed between results of studies in autoclaves and after irradiation. On the contrary, a study in loop under thermal flux reproduces the classifying of tested products without however ensure a reliable quantification. Studies in autoclave are nevertheless useful for a first analysis of effects of modifications of manufacturing range. Nevertheless, a deep analysis of involved phenomena requires a better knowledge of corrosion mechanisms. (O.M.)

  9. Alternative Zr alloys with irradiation resistant precipitates for high burnup BWR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzarolli, F.; Ruhmann, H.; Van Swan, L.

    2002-01-01

    In the core of BWRs, the second-phase particles (SPP) of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4, the Zr(FeCr) 2 and the Zr 2 (FeNi) phase, release Fe and dissolve. The degree of dissolution depends on initial size and fluence. These SPP, however, are important for the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy. Zircaloy shows an increase of corrosion at a certain burnup, depending on the initial SPP size and fast neutron fluence. Only Zr alloys with irradiation resistant SPP avoid this type of increased corrosion completely. Two types of irradiation resistant materials were considered. One is a Zr-Sn-Fe alloy containing the Zr 3 Fe phase, which is irradiation resistant under BWR conditions. The other material is a Zr-Sn-Nb alloy containing the irradiation resistant β-Nb phase. In-BWR tests have shown that a Sn content of >0.8% is mandatory to minimize the nodular corrosion. Two prototypes of irradiation resistant alloys, Zr1.3Sn0.25-0.3 Fe and Zr1Sn2-3Nb, were irradiated in a BWR for 1372 days to a fast fluence of 9 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). These irradiation tests showed that Zr1.3Sn0.25-0.3 Fe has a little lower resistance against nodular corrosion than optimized LTP (Low Temperature Process) Zircaloy-2/4 and revealed that Zr1Sn2-3Nb is superior to LTP Zircaloy-2/4 with respect to nodular and shadow corrosion resistance. The BWR corrosion resistance of Zr1Sn2-3Nb depends on heat treatment. The lowest corrosion was observed with material fabricated completely in the α-range, but also material manufactured in the lower (α+β)-range exhibits low corrosion. Material fabricated in the upper (α+β)-range showed a somewhat higher corrosion, a corrosion behavior similar to LTP Zircaloy-2/4. As far as final annealing is concerned, a long time annealing at 540 deg C is superior to a standard recrystallization treatment (e.g., at 580 deg C), which still leads to a corrosion behavior that is better than stress relieved Zr1Sn2-3Nb. Zr1Sn2-3Nb is resistant to shadow corrosion, when fabricated

  10. Vacancy enhancement of diffusion after quenching and during irradiation in silver-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuele, W.

    1980-01-01

    Quenching and annealing experiments were performed on silver-zinc alloys with 8.14 and 30 at %Zn. From the changes of the electrical resistivity due to an increase of the degree of short-range order, the activation energy of self-diffusion was determined to be Qsub(SD) = 1.60 and Qsub(SD) = 1.38 eV for both alloys, respectively. For the migration energy of vacancies, a value Esub(V)sup(M) = 0.64 eV was found for the alloy with 8.14 at %Zn. Evidence is given that the vacancy migration energy Esub(V)sup(M) of the alloys with 30 at %Zn is smaller than 0.60 eV in agreement with data given by Berry and Orehotsky. The results of measurements of radiation-enhanced diffusion obtained by a Russian and a French group, are reinterpreted. It follows that the increase of the degree of order during irradiation is obtained only be vacancy enhancement of diffusion and that the migration activation energy of self-interstitials is Esub(I)sup(M) approximately 0.46 eV and Esub(I)sup(M) approximately 0.41 eV for the alloys with 8.14 and 30 at %Zn, respectively. (author)

  11. Diffuse x-ray scattering studies of defect reactions in electron-irradiated dilute nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Ehrhart, P.

    1984-01-01

    Huang diffuse scattering was employed to study defect properties in dilute Ni-Si alloys. Ni alloys containing 1 at.% and 0.05 at.% Si were irradiated with electrons at 4.2 K and were subsequently isochronally annealed. It was found that, prior to annealing, the Frenkel-pair resistivities and self-interstitial atom configurations were the same in the alloys as in pure Ni. The independence of the Frenkel-pair resistivity to Si concentration indicates that the resistivities arising from Frenkel pairs and Si solute are linearly additive in Ni. After annealing through stage I to 85 K, the defect cluster size grew to 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 interstitial atoms for the 1 at.% Si, 0.05 at.% Si and pure Ni specimens, respectively. These results demonstrate that self-interstitial atoms are not immobilised by single Si atoms in Ni, but rather complexes involving several Si atoms and/or two interstitial atoms are the stable defects at the end of annealing stage I. It was also observed that Si solute in Ni strongly suppresses the growth of interstitial clusters in stage II. In the 1 at.% Si alloys di-interstitials were immobilised up to temperatures between 200 and 300 K. There was no indication that Si solute reduced vacancy mobility in annealing stage III. The consequences of these results for the understanding of high-temperature radiation effects in alloys are discussed. (author)

  12. Damage rates in neutron irradiated FeCo and FeCo2V ordered and disordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, J.P.; Dinhut, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Ordered and disordered samples of FeCo and FeCo2V alloys have been irradiated at liquid hydrogen temperature with fission neutrons up to an integrated dose of about 7.2 x 10 17 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). During the irradiation, the resistivity increases continuously due to point defect production. (author)

  13. Investigation of irradiation strengthening of b.c.c. metals and their alloys. Progress report, January 1976--October 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Research on irradiation of bcc metals and alloys is reported. Data and information are presented in appendixes on low temperature neutron irradiation of Nb, effects of tritium on the yield stress of Nb, multiple dislocation motion, dislocation group motion, dislocation kinetics, and computer simulation of dislocation motion

  14. Study of irradiated F82H steel and its model Fe-Cr alloy by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.S.; Kitao, S.; Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Moessbauer spectroscopy which is a super-precision tool was conducted on F82H and its model Fe-Cr alloys before and after irradiation to take a further look on the interaction between carbides and point defects and Cr effect on microstructural evolution during irradiation in void incubation period. (J.P.N.)

  15. Impact of He and Cr on defect accumulation in ion-irradiated ultrahigh-purity Fe(Cr) alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhodtseva, A.; Décamps, B.; Ramar, Amuthan

    2013-01-01

    The effect of He on the primary damage induced by irradiation in ultrahigh-purity (UHP) Fe and Fe(Cr) alloys was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Materials were irradiated at room temperature in situ by TEM in a microscope coupled to two ion accelerators, simultaneously pro...

  16. Self-diffusion and solute diffusion in alloys under irradiation: Influence of ballistic jumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, Jean-Marc; Bellon, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the influence of ballistic jumps on thermal and total diffusion of solvent and solute atoms in dilute fcc alloys under irradiation. For the diffusion components that result from vacancy migration, we introduce generalized five-frequency models, and show that ballistic jumps produce decorrelation effects that have a moderate impact on self-diffusion but that can enhance or suppress solute diffusion by several orders of magnitude. These could lead to new irradiation-induced transformations, especially in the case of subthreshold irradiation conditions. We also show that the mutual influence of thermal and ballistic jumps results in a nonadditivity of partial diffusion coefficients: the total diffusion coefficient under irradiation may be less than the sum of the thermal and ballistic diffusion coefficients. These predictions are confirmed by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, it is shown that the method introduced here can be extended to take into account the effect of ballistic jumps on the diffusion of dumbbell interstitials in dilute alloys

  17. Influence of irradiation on mechanical properties of Si-Ge alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichinava, Avtandil; Bokuchava, Guram; Chubinidze, Giorgi; Archuadze, Giorgi [Ilia Vekua Sukhumi Institute of Physics and Technology, Tbilisi (Georgia); Gapishvili, Nodar [Ilia Vekua Sukhumi Institute of Physics and Technology, Tbilisi (Georgia); Georgian Technical University, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2017-07-15

    Impact of various irradiation (Ar and He ions, high energy electrons) on microhardness and indentation of monocrystalline Si{sub 0,98}Ge{sub 0,02} alloy is studied. Samples of Si and SiGe alloy are obtained by Czochralski (CZ) method in the [111] direction in the atmosphere of high purity Ar. High energy electron irradiation with fluence of ∝10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} is conducted at the Clinac 2100iX. Ar and He ion implantation is performed on modernized ''VEZUVI-3M'' plant. It is shown that for all types of irradiation the microhardness and indentation modulus versus load are characterized by reverse indentation size effect (ISE). With the increase of fluences of Ar and He ions, the maximum value of the effect increases. At high values of loading force impact on the indenter the mechanical characteristics slowly decrease. Impact of isochronous thermal annealing on mechanical properties of high energy electron irradiated samples is studied. Non-monotonic changes of microhardness and indentation modulus are revealed in the temperature range of 200-260 C. It is proposed that such changes are caused by radiation defects transformation. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Study of irradiation induced defects and phase instability in β phase of Zr Excel alloy with in-situ heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.; Yao, Z.; Kirk, M.A.; Daymond, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    In situ heavy ion irradiation with 1 MeV Kr"2"+ was carried out to study irradiation induced phase change and atomic lattice defects in theβ phase of Zr Excel alloy. No decomposition of β-Zr was observed under irradiation at either 200 "oC or 450 "oC. However, ω-Zr particles experienced shape change and shrinkage associated enrichment of Fe in the β/ω interface at 200 "oC irradiation but not at 450 "oC. The defect evolution in the β-phase was examined with single phase Zr-20Nb alloy. It was found that dislocation loops with Burgers vector 1/2 and both present in β-Zr under room temperature irradiation. (author)

  19. Study of irradiation induced defects and phase instability in β phase of Zr Excel alloy with in-situ heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.; Yao, Z., E-mail: 12hy1@queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Kirk, M.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Daymond, M.R. [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    In situ heavy ion irradiation with 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} was carried out to study irradiation induced phase change and atomic lattice defects in theβ phase of Zr Excel alloy. No decomposition of β-Zr was observed under irradiation at either 200 {sup o}C or 450 {sup o}C. However, ω-Zr particles experienced shape change and shrinkage associated enrichment of Fe in the β/ω interface at 200 {sup o}C irradiation but not at 450 {sup o}C. The defect evolution in the β-phase was examined with single phase Zr-20Nb alloy. It was found that dislocation loops with Burgers vector 1/2<111> and <001> both present in β-Zr under room temperature irradiation. (author)

  20. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bonding strength between Co-Cr alloy and citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2014-02-01

    Novel techniques for creating a strong bond between polymeric matrices and biometals are required. We immobilized polymeric matrices on the surface of biometal for drug-eluting stents through covalent bond. We performed to improve the bonding strength between a cobalt-chromium alloy and a citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix by ultraviolet irradiation on the surface of cobalt-chromium alloy. The ultraviolet irradiation effectively generated hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alloy. The bonding strength between the gelatin matrix and the alloy before ultraviolet irradiation was 0.38 ± 0.02 MPa, whereas it increased to 0.48 ± 0.02 MPa after ultraviolet irradiation. Surface analysis showed that the citric acid derivatives occurred on the surface of the cobalt-chromium alloy through ester bond. Therefore, ester bond formation between the citric acid derivatives active esters and the hydroxyl groups on the cobalt-chromium alloy contributed to the enhanced bonding strength. Ultraviolet irradiation and subsequent immobilization of a gelatin matrix using citric acid derivatives is thus an effective way to functionalize biometal surfaces.

  1. Atomic rearrangements in ordered fcc alloys during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three sets of experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory over the past few years are described. These experiments deal with atomic rearrangements in the ordered alloys Ni 3 Mn and Cu 3 Au during fast and thermal neutron bombardment. The unique magnetic properties of ordered Ni 3 Mn are utilized to investigate radiation damage production mechanisms at low temperature (5 K) where defect migration is not possible and only disordering is observed. In the case of thermal neutron bombardment, the average recoil energy is about 450 eV and significant disordering due to [110] replacement collision sequences is observed. For fast neutron bombardment where typical recoil energies are 20 keV, significant random disordering is observed but no evidence for sizable replacement sequences is found. The bombardment of ordered Cu 3 Au by fast and thermal neutrons at higher temperature (approx. 150 0 C) is studied by electrical resistance techniques. Both ordering and disordering are observed and related to the number of migrating vacancies escaping from the high energy collision cascade

  2. Fundamental aspects of the evolution of, and phase changes in, metals and alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Georges; Bocquet, J.-L.; Barbu, Alain; Adda, Yves.

    1977-01-01

    The quantitative prediction and the simulation of irradiation damage present a considerable interest for the technology of fast neutron and fusion reactors. However, at present time, even qualitative predictions are not always possible when the dose rate varies over a relatively large range; for example the formation of vacancy loops takes place instead of that of voids, precipitation occurs in under-saturated solid solutions etc... Therefore, in addition to a microscopic description of the phenomena, it seems important to elaborate an irradiation damage phenomenology. The results of a systematic experimental study of dose rate effects for radiation induced precipitation in Ni Si solid solution alloys are reported. The existence of dose rate thresholds for this phenomenon is clearly established. The composition dependence of this thresholds permits the definition of a solubility limit under irradiation which is both temperature and dose rate dependent. Finally, the various theoretical approaches to radiation induced precipitation are discussed

  3. Effects of heat treatments and neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of copper alloys at 100 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1998-05-01

    The final irradiation experiment in a series of screening experiments aimed at investigating the effects of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on irradiated copper alloys is described herein. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment. Additional specimens were reaged and given a reactor bakeout treatment at 350 deg. C for 100 h. GlidCop TM CuAl-15 (previously referred to as CuAl-25) was given a heat treatment corresponding to a bonding thermal cycle only. Specimens were neutron irradiated at 100 deg. C to a dose level of ∼0.3 dpa. Post-irradiation tensile tests at (100 deg. C), electrical resistivity measurements (at 23 deg. C), and microstructural examinations were performed. The post-irradiation tests at 100 deg. C revealed that the greatest loss of ductility occurred in the CuCrZr alloys irradiated at 100 deg. C, irrespective of the pre-irradiation heat treatment, with the uniform elongation dropping to levels of less than 1.5%. The yield and ultimate strengths for all of the individual heat treated samples increased substantially after irradiation. The same trend was observed for the CuNiBe alloys, which exhibited much higher uniform elongation and strength after irradiation than that observed in the case of CuCrZr alloys. In both alloys irradiation-induced precipitation lead to a large increase in the strength of the solution annealed specimens with a noticeable decrease in uniform elongation. The CuAl-25 alloy also experienced an increase in the overall strength of the alloy after irradiation, accompanied by approximately a 50% decrease in the uniform and total elongation. The additional bakeout treatments given to the CuCrZr and CuNiBe before irradiation served to increase the strength, but in terms of the ductility no improvement or degradation resulted from the additional thermal exposure

  4. The irradiation behavior of atomized U-Mo alloy fuels at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Man; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Strain, R. V.

    2001-04-01

    Post-irradiation examinations of atomized U-10Mo, U-6Mo, and U-6Mo-1.7Os dispersion fuels from the RERTR-3 experiment irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were carried out in order to investigate the fuel behavior of high uranium loading (8 gU/cc) at a high temperature (higher than 200°C). It was observed after about 40 at% BU that the U-Mo alloy fuels at a high temperature showed similar irradiation bubble morphologies compared to those at a lower temperature found in the RERTR-1 irradiation result, but there was a thick reaction layer with the aluminum matrix which was found to be greatly affected by the irradiation temperature and to a lesser degree by the fuel composition. In addition, the chemical analysis for the irradiated U-Mo fuels using the Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) method were conducted to investigate the compositional changes during the formation of the reaction product.

  5. TEM in situ micropillar compression tests of ion irradiated oxide dispersion strengthened alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, K.H., E-mail: kaylayano@u.boisestate.edu [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Swenson, M.J. [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Wu, Y. [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID, 83401 (United States); Wharry, J.P. [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The growing role of charged particle irradiation in the evaluation of nuclear reactor candidate materials requires the development of novel methods to assess mechanical properties in near-surface irradiation damage layers just a few micrometers thick. In situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) mechanical testing is one such promising method. In this work, microcompression pillars are fabricated from a Fe{sup 2+} ion irradiated bulk specimen of a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy. Yield strengths measured directly from TEM in situ compression tests are within expected values, and are consistent with predictions based on the irradiated microstructure. Measured elastic modulus values, once adjusted for the amount of deformation and deflection in the base material, are also within the expected range. A pillar size effect is only observed in samples with minimum dimension ≤100 nm due to the low inter-obstacle spacing in the as received and irradiated material. TEM in situ micropillar compression tests hold great promise for quantitatively determining mechanical properties of shallow ion-irradiated layers.

  6. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the creep behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribis, J.

    2007-12-01

    The fuel rod cladding, strongly affected by microstructural changes due to irradiation such as high density of dislocation loops, is strained by the end-of-life fuel rod internal pressure and the potential release of fission gases and helium during dry storage. Within the temperature range that is expected during dry interim storage, cladding undergoes long term creep under over-pressure. So, in order to have a predictive approach of the behavior of zirconium alloys cladding in dry storage conditions it is essential to take into account: initial dislocation loops, thermal annealing of loops and creep straining due to over pressure. Specific experiments and modelling for irradiated samples have been developed to improve our knowledge in that field. A Zr-1%Nb-O alloy was studied using fine microstructural investigations and mechanical testing. The observations conducted by transmission electron microscopy show that the high density of loops disappears during a heat treatment. The loop size becomes higher and higher while their density falls. The microhardness tests reveal that the fall of loop density leads to the softening of the irradiated material. During a creep test, both temperature and applied stress are responsible of the disappearance of loops. The loops could be swept by the activation of the basal slip system while the prism slip system is inhibited. Once deprived of loops, the creep properties of the irradiated materials are closed to the non irradiated state, a result whose consequence is a sudden acceleration of the creep rate. Finally, a micro-mechanical modeling based on microscopic deformation mechanisms taking into account experimental dislocation loop analyses and creep test, was used for a predictive approach by constructing a deformation mechanism map of the creep behavior of the irradiated material. (author)

  7. Influence of alloying elements on the dislocation loops created by Zr+ ion irradiation in alpha-zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellio, C.; Novion, C.H. de; Boulanger, L.

    1987-01-01

    Pure zirconium and four (annealed) α - zirconium based alloys (Zr-1760 ppm weight 0, Zr - 1% Nb - 430 ppm 0, Zr-1% Nb-1800 ppm 0, zircaloy 4) have been studied by transmission electron microscopy after 500 keV Zr + ion or 1 MeV electron irradiation performed at high temperature. Type of burgers vectors of the dislocation loops are given; in the case of electron irradiated Zr-1760 ppm 0, the larger loops were found of interstitial type. Alloying elements increase the loop density. The kinetic of loop growth was observed in-situ during 1 MeV electron irradiation between 400 and 700 0 C: oxygen was found to reduce considerably the growth speed of loops. In-situ annealing at 450 or 500 0 C after ion irradiation led to a large coalescence of loops in the case of pure zirconium, but modified only slightly the defect structure of the alloys

  8. Irradiation creep and swelling of various austenitic alloys irradiated in PFR and FFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In order to use data from surrogate neutron spectra for fusion applications, it is necessary to analyze the impact of environmental differences on property development. This is of particular importance in the study of irradiation creep and its interactions with void swelling, especially with respect to the difficulty of separation of creep strains from various non-creep strains. As part of an on-going creep data rescue and analysis effort, the current study focuses on comparative irradiations conducted on identical gas-pressurized tubes produced and constructed in the United States from austenitic steels (20% CW 316 and 20% CW D9), but irradiated in either the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) in the United Kingdom or the Fast Flux Test Facility in the United States. In PFR, Demountable Subassemblies (DMSA) serving as heat pipes were used without active temperature control. In FFTF the specimens were irradiated with active ({+-}{degrees}5C) temperature control. Whereas the FFTF irradiations involved a series of successive side-by-side irradiation, measurement and reinsertion of the same series of tubes, the PFR experiment utilized simultaneous irradiation at two axial positions in the heat pipe to achieve different fluences at different flux levels. The smaller size of the DMSA also necessitated a separation of the tubes at a given flux level into two groups (low-stress and high-stress) at slightly different axial positions, where the flux between the two groups varied {le}10%. Of particular interest in this study was the potential impact of the two types of separation on the derivation of creep coefficients.

  9. Properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H. M.; Loomis, B. A.; Smith, D. L.

    1996-10-01

    One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use a fusion reactor structural materials, is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage. In the present Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of ≈ 0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600°C in Li-filled capsules in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. This paper presents results of postirradiation examination and tests of microstructure and mechanical properties of V5Ti, V3Ti1Si, V8Cr6Ti, and V4Cr4Ti (the latter alloy has been identified as the most promising candidate vanadium alloy). Effects of helium on tensile strength and ductility were insignificant after irradiation and testing at > 420°C. However, postirradiation ductilities at irradiation. Ductile—brittle transition behavior of the DHCE specimens was also determined from bend tests and fracture appearance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks and broken tensile specimens. No brittle behavior was observed at temperatures > - 150°C in DHCE specimens. Predominantly brittle-cleavage fracture morphologies were observed only at - 196°C in some specimens that were irradiated to 31 dpa at 425°C during the DHCE. For the helium generation rates in this experiment (≈ 0.4-4.2 appm He/dpa), grain-boundary coalescence of helium microcavities was negligible and intergranular fracture was not observed.

  10. The influence of microstructure on blistering and bubble formation by He ion irradiation in Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, S.R.; Tolley, A.; Sánchez, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of microstructure and composition on the effects of ion irradiation in Al alloys was studied combining Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For this purpose, irradiation experiments with 20 keV He + ions at room temperature were carried out in Al, an Al–4Cu (wt%) supersaturated solid solution, and an Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge (wt.%) alloy with a very high density of precipitates, and the results were compared. In Al and Al–4Cu, He bubbles were found with an average size in between 1 nm and 2 nm that was independent of fluence. The critical fluence for bubble formation was higher in Al–4Cu than in Al. He bubbles were also observed below the critical fluence after post irradiation annealing in Al–4Cu. The incoherent interfaces between the equilibrium θ phase and the Al matrix were found to be favorable sites for the formation of He bubbles. Instead, no bubbles were observed in the precipitate rich Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy. In all alloys, blistering was observed, leading to surface erosion by exfoliation. The blistering effects were more severe in the Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge alloy, and they were enhanced by increasing the fluence rate. - Highlights: • In Al and Al–4Cu, He bubbles were formed, but no bubbles were observed in Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge. • Bubble formation was enhanced at incoherent matrix/precipitate interfaces in Al–4Cu. • The bubble size was insensitive to displacement rate in pure Al. • In Al and Al-5.6Cu-0.5Si-0.5Ge blistering was observed, which was more severe in the alloy. • Blistering effects were enhanced by increasing the displacement rate in Al and Al–4Cu.

  11. Surface morphology, microstructure and properties of as-cast AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xuesong [State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); The Fourth Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Gang [Sino-Russia Joint Lab for High Energy Beam, Shenyang Ligong University, Shenyang 110159 (China); Wang, Guotian [School of Automobile and Traffic Engineering, Heilongjiang Institute of Technology, Harbin 150050 (China); Zhu, Guoliang, E-mail: glzhu1983@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, 200240 Shanghai (China); Zhou, Wei, E-mail: wzhou@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, 200240 Shanghai (China); Wang, Jun; Sun, Baode [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced High-temperature Materials and Precision Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, 200240 Shanghai (China); The State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • High intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation were performed to improve the properties of as-cast AZ31 magnesium alloy. • After 10 shots HIPIB irradiation, the average microhardness was increased by 27.1% and wear rate was reduced by 38.5%. • After 10 shots HIPIB irradiation, the corrosion rate was reduced by 24.8%, and the corrosion rate was decreased from 23.15 g m{sup −2} h{sup −1} to 17.4 g m{sup −2} h{sup −1}. - Abstract: High intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation was performed as surface modification to improve the properties of as-cast AZ31 magnesium (Mg) alloys. The surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated Mg alloys were characterized and their microhardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance before and after HIPIB irradiation were measured. The results show that the formation of crater on the surface was attributed to the particles impacted from the irradiated cathode material. HIPIB irradiation resulted in more vacancy defects on the surface of the material. Moreover, new dislocations were generated by the reaction between vacancies, and the dislocation configuration was also changed. These variations caused by the HIPIB are beneficial for improving the material properties. After 10 shots of irradiation, the average microhardness increased by 27.1% but the wear rate decreased by 38.5%. The corrosion rate was reduced by 24.8% according to the salt spray corrosion experiment.

  12. Tunneling and migration of the dumbbell defect in electron irradiated aluminum-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements have been made on irradiated Al-Zn alloys (Zn concentrations of .01%, .1%, and .5% atomic). They provide strong evidence for a tunneling relaxation of the predominant mixed dumbbell defect at low temperatures and for mixed dumbbell migration at the Stage II anneal temperature. The effect of an internal strain varying with the zinc concentration of the measured decrement and modulus change is striking. Evaluated in the framework of a six level system, this reveals the simultaneous action of resonance and non-classical relaxation processes. Using Fe as a probe atom, it is shown that mixed dumbbell dissociation is in an insignificant component of the annealing of this defect. The decrease of the annealing temperature at higher zinc concentrations provides evidence that the mixed dumbbell migrates as a unit during annealing. The energies associated with dumbbell migration and interstitial escape are derived. Further evidence for the migration mechanism is obtained from successive irradiation and annealing measurements on the Al-Zn .01% alloy, and from a comparison of these results with published radiation damage rate measurements of dilute Al-Zn alloys

  13. Experimental study and numerical modeling of the plastic behavior of zirconium alloys under and after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Recrystallized zirconium alloys are widely used as constitutive material of cladding tubes in Pressurized Water Reactors. During their lifetime in reactor, these materials are submitted to irradiation, creating a large amount of defects and changing their mechanical behavior. Despite the broad knowledge of macroscopic modifications due to irradiation, microscopic mechanisms involved remain partially known and understood. This study aims at understanding this issue using two different means, experimental and numerical, to investigate interactions between moving dislocations and dislocation loops created by irradiation. The experimental approach is based on irradiating with Zr ions Zircaloy-4 samples. Then, these samples are strained in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Mobile dislocations interacting with irradiation induced loops are observed, following different mechanisms. Loops can act as strong obstacles to moving dislocations, pinning their further glide and hardening the material. Therefore, this type of mechanism participates in irradiation hardening. Dislocations absorbing loops have also been observed, showing the ability of dislocations to clear up defects. This mechanism explains the formation of clear bands observed in the material after irradiation and mechanical testings. The numerical approach is based on Dislocation Dynamics (DD) simulations of mobile dislocations gliding in prismatic or basal planes of the hexagonal close packed lattice and loops, using NUMODIS. The results of this study are consistent with a recent study of interactions of dislocations in a prismatic plane and loops studied by molecular dynamics. The counterpart of this study with gliding dislocations in the basal plane, performed only using DD simulations, show interesting explanations of the observed clear band formation in basal and prismatic planes, with broader channels in basal planes. A situation observed during in situ TEM experiments has been simulated using DD

  14. Power ultrasound irradiation during the alkaline etching process of the 2024 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutarlier, V.; Viennet, R.; Rolet, J.; Gigandet, M.P.; Hihn, J.Y., E-mail: jean-yves.hihn@univ-fcomte.fr

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Result of an etching step in ultrasound presence on intermetallic particles on a 2024 aluminum alloy. - Highlights: • Etching step prior to anodization on 2024 aluminum alloy. • Etching rate measurement and hydroxide film characterization by GDOES and SEM. • Various etching parameters (temperature, presence or absence of ultrasound). • Improvement of corrosion resistance show by electrochemical tests. - Abstract: Prior to any surface treatment on an aluminum alloy, a surface preparation is necessary. This commonly consists in performing an alkaline etching followed by acid deoxidizing. In this work, the use of power ultrasound irradiation during the etching step on the 2024 aluminum alloy was studied. The etching rate was estimated by weight loss, and the alkaline film formed during the etching step was characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The benefit of power ultrasound during the etching step was confirmed by pitting potential measurement in NaCl solution after a post-treatment (anodizing).

  15. Power ultrasound irradiation during the alkaline etching process of the 2024 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutarlier, V.; Viennet, R.; Rolet, J.; Gigandet, M.P.; Hihn, J.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Result of an etching step in ultrasound presence on intermetallic particles on a 2024 aluminum alloy. - Highlights: • Etching step prior to anodization on 2024 aluminum alloy. • Etching rate measurement and hydroxide film characterization by GDOES and SEM. • Various etching parameters (temperature, presence or absence of ultrasound). • Improvement of corrosion resistance show by electrochemical tests. - Abstract: Prior to any surface treatment on an aluminum alloy, a surface preparation is necessary. This commonly consists in performing an alkaline etching followed by acid deoxidizing. In this work, the use of power ultrasound irradiation during the etching step on the 2024 aluminum alloy was studied. The etching rate was estimated by weight loss, and the alkaline film formed during the etching step was characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The benefit of power ultrasound during the etching step was confirmed by pitting potential measurement in NaCl solution after a post-treatment (anodizing).

  16. On the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of martensitic alloys neutron irradiated to 26 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on specimens made of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo in various heat treatment conditions which were irradiated in EBR-II to 26 dpa at 390 to 500 0 C. The results are compared with previous results on specimens irradiated to 13 dpa. HT-9 base metal irradiated at low temperatures showed a small additional increase in ductile brittle transition temperature and a decrease in upper shelf energy from 13 to 26 dpa. No fluence effect was observed in 9Cr-1Mo base metal. The 9Cr-1Mo weldment showed degraded DBTT but improved USE response compared to base metal, contrary to previous findings on HT-9. Significant differences were observed in HT-9 base metal between mill annealed material and normalized and tempered material. The highest DBTT for HT-9 alloys was 50 0 C higher than for the worst case in 9Cr-1Mo alloys. Fractography and hardness measurements were also obtained. Significant differences in fracture appearance were observed in different product forms, although no dependence on fluence was observed. Failure was controlled by the preirradiation microstructure

  17. Effect of thermal neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of alloys for HTR core applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yutaka; Kondo, Tatsuo; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohtsuka, Tamotsu

    1979-01-01

    An industrial heat of Hastelloy-X containing 2.3 ppm boron was creep-tested at 900 0 C after irradiating thermal neutrons by 6.6 x 10 20 n.cm -2 at temperatures 670 to 880 0 C in JMTR. Significant reduction in rupture life and ductility was observed, and large shift of accelerated deformation stage to short time side was also apparent at comparatively high stresses. Below about 2.2 kg.mm -2 , apparent relief from the degradation was seen. The elongation, however, was found to be due to the formation of numerous intergranular cracks in the premature stage of deformation. Based on the post irradiation tensile properties of several industrial alloys the degree of the ductility loss was found to be nearly dependent on the boron content of the alloys. The post irradiation tensile tests for a special low boron grade heat revealed the means of protecting materials from the effect to be feasible. (author)

  18. Effect of thermal neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of alloys for HTR core applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yutaka; Kondo, Tatsuo; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohtsuka, Tamotsu

    1979-02-01

    An industrial heat of Hastelloy-X containing 2.3 ppm boron was creep-tested at 900 0 C after irradiating thermal neutrons by 6.6 x 10 20 n/cm 2 at temperatures 670 to 880 0 C in JMTR. Significant reduction in rupture life and ductility was observed, and large shift of accelerated deformation stage to short time side was also apparent at comparatively high stresses. Below about 2.2 kg/mm 2 , apparent relief from the degradation was seen. The elongation, however, was found to be due to the formation of numerous intergranular cracks in the premature stage of deformation. Based on the post irradiation tensile properties of several industrial alloys the degree of the ductility loss was found to be nearly dependent on the boron content of the alloys. The post irradiation tensile tests for a special low boron grade heat revealed the means of protecting materials from the effect to be feasible. (author)

  19. Irradiation induced surface segregation in concentrated alloys: a contribution; Contribution a l`etude de la segregation de surface induite par irradiation dans les alliages concentres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandjean, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A new computer modelization of irradiation induced surface segregation is presented together with some experimental determinations in binary and ternary alloys. The model we propose handles the alloy thermodynamics and kinetics at the same level of sophistication. Diffusion is described at the atomistic level and proceeds vis the jumps of point defects (vacancies, dumb-bell interstitials): the various jump frequencies depend on the local composition in a manner consistent with the thermodynamics of the alloy. For application to specific alloys, we have chosen the simplest statistical approximation: pair interactions in the Bragg Williams approximation. For a system which exhibits the thermodynamics and kinetics features of Ni-Cu alloys, the model generates the behaviour parameters (flux and temperature) and of alloy composition. Quantitative agreement with the published experimental results (two compositions, three temperatures) is obtained with a single set of parameters. Modelling austenitic steels used in nuclear industry requires taking into account the contribution of dumbbells to mass transport. The effects of this latter contribution are studied on a model of Ni-Fe. Interstitial trapping on dilute impurities is shown to delay or even suppress the irradiation induced segregation. Such an effect is indeed observed in the experiments we report on Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Fe{sub 49}Ni{sub 50}Hf{sub 1} alloys. (author). 190 refs.

  20. The irradiation-induced microstructural development and the role of γ' on void formation in Ni-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takahiko; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Masaoka, Isao; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Takeyama, Taro; Ohnuki, Soumei; Osanai, Hisashi

    1984-05-01

    The microstructural development for Inconel X-750, N1-13 at%A1, and Ni-11.5 at%Si alloys during irradiation was investigated. These alloys were previously heat-treated at temperatures of 723-1073 K, and γ' precipitates were produced. Irradiation was performed in a high voltage electron microscope (1000 kV) in the temperature range 673-823 K. In the case of solution-treated Inconel, interstitial dislocation loops were formed initially, while voids were nucleated after longer times. When the Inconel specimen containing a high number density of small γ' was irradiated, dislocation loops were formed in both the matrix and precipitate-matrix interface. The loops formed on the interface scarcely grew during irradiation. On the other hand, for the Ni-Al alloy fine γ' nucleated during irradiation, the large γ' precipitated by pre-aging, dissolved. A similar resolution process was also observed in Ni-Si alloy. Furthermore, in the Ni-Si alloy precipitates of γ' formed preferentially at interstitial dislocation loops and both specimen surfaces.

  1. The irradiation induced microstructural development and the role of γ' on void formation in Ni-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, T.; Nakata, K.; Masaoka, I.; Takahashi, H.; Takeyama, T.; Ohnuki, S.; Osanai, H.

    1984-01-01

    The microstructural development for Inconel X-750, Ni-13 at% Al, and Ni-11.5 at% Si alloys during irradiation was investigated. These alloys were previously heat-treated at temperatures of 723-1073 K, and γ' precipitates were produced. Irradiation was performed in a high voltage electron microscope in the temperature range 627-823 K. In the case of solution-treated Inconel, interstitial dislocation loops were formed initially, while voids were nucleated after longer times. When the Inconel specimen containing a high number density of small γ' was irradiated, dislocation loops were formed in both the matrix and precipitate-matrix interface. The loops formed on the interface scarcely grew during irradiation. On the other hand, for the Ni-Al alloy fine γ' nucleated during irradiation, the large γ' precipitated by pre-aging, dissolved. A similar resolution process was also observed in Ni-Si alloy. Furthermore, in the Ni-Si alloy precipitates of γ' formed preferentially at interstitial dislocation loops and both specimen surfaces. (orig.)

  2. Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel and nickel-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyabu, Ken; Asano, Kyoichi; Takahashi, Hidenori; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Kawano, Shohei; Nakamura, Tomomi; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki; Koshiishi, Masato; Kato, Takahiko; Katsura, Ryoei; Nishimura, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    Degradation of of weldability caused by helium, which is generated by nuclear transmutation irradiated material, is an important issue to be addressed in planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internal components. In this work, the weldability of neutron.irradiated stainless steel and nickel-base alloy, which are major constituting materials for components, was practically evaluated. The weldability was first examined by TIG welding in relation to the weld heat input and helium content using various specimens (made of SUS304 and SUS316L) sampled from reactor internal components. The specimens were neutron irradiated in a boiling water reactor to fluences from 4 x 10 24 to 1.4 x 10 26 n/ m 2 (E> l MeV ), and resulting helium generation ranged from 0.1 to 103 appm. The weld defects were characterized by dye penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel was shown to be better at lower weld heat input and lower helium content. To evaluate mechanical properties of welded joints, thick plates (20 mm) specimens of SUS304 and Alloy 600 were prepared and irradiated in Japan Material Test Reactor (JMTR). The helium content of the specimens was controlled to range from 0.11 to 1.34 appm selected to determine threshold helium content to weld successfully. The welded joints had multiple passes by TIG welding process at 10 and 20 kJ/cm heat input. The welded joints of thick plate were characterized by dye penetrant test, cross-sectional metallography, tensile test, side bend test and root bend test. It was shown that irradiated stainless steel containing below 0.14 appm of helium could be welded with conventional TIG welding process (heat input below 20 kJ/cm). Nickel-base alloy, which contained as much helium as stainless steel could be welded successfully, could also be welded with conventional TIG welding process, These results served as basis to evaluate the applicability of repair welding to

  3. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Neutron Irradiated Cold-worked Al-1050 and Al-6063 Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munitz, A.; Cotler, A; Talianker, M.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of neutron irradiation on the internal microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture morphology of cold-worked Al-1050 and Al-6063 alloys was studied, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and tensile measurements. Specimens consisting of 50 mm long and 6 mm wide gauge sections, were punched out from Al-1050 and Al-6063 23% cold-worked tubes. They were exposed to prolonged neutron irradiation of up to 4.5x10 25 and 8x10 25 thermal neutrons/m 2 (E -3 s -1 . In general, the uniform and total elongation, the yield stress, and the ultimate tensile strength increase as functions of fluence. However, for Al-1050 a decrease in the ultimate tensile strength and yield stress was observed up to a fluence of 1x10 25 thermal neutrons/m 2 which then increase with thermal neutrons fluence. Metallographic examination and fractography for Al-6063 revealed a decrease in the local area reduction of the final fracture necking. This reduction is accompanied by a morphology transition from ductile transgranular shear rupture to a combination of transgranular shear with intergranular dimpled rupture. The intergranular rupture area increases with fluence. In contrast, for Al-1050, fracture morphology remains ductile transgranular shear rupture and the final local area reduction remains almost constant No voids could be observed in either alloy up to the maximum fluence. The dislocation density of cold-worked Al was found to decrease with the thermal neutron fluence. Prolonged annealing of unirradiated cold-worked Al-6063 at 52 degree led to similar results. Thus, it appears that, under our irradiation conditions, whereby the temperature encompassing the samples increases the exposure to this thermal field is the major factor influencing the mechanical properties and microstructure of aluminum alloys

  4. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on thermodynamically equilibrium Zr-Excel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hongbing [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Liang, Jianlie [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); College of Science, Guangxi University for Nationalities, 188, East Da Xue Rd., Nanning, Guangxi, 530006 P.R.C (China); Yao, Zhongwen, E-mail: yaoz@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kirk, Mark A. [Material Science Division Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Daymond, Mark R., E-mail: mark.daymond@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    The thermodynamically equilibrium state was achieved in a Zr-Sn-Nb-Mo alloy by long-term annealing at an intermediate temperature. The fcc intermetallic Zr(Mo, Nb){sub 2} enriched with Fe was observed at the equilibrium state. In-situ 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} heavy ion irradiation was performed in a TEM to study the stability of the intermetallic particles under irradiation and the effects of the intermetallic particle on the evolution of type dislocation loops at different temperatures from 80 to 550 °C. Chemi-STEM elemental maps were made at the same particles before and after irradiation up to 10 dpa. It was found that no elemental redistribution occurs at 200 °C and below. Selective depletion of Fe was observed from some precipitates under irradiation at higher temperatures. No change in the morphology of particles and no evidence showing a crystalline to amorphous transformation were observed at all irradiation temperatures. The formation of type dislocation loops was observed under irradiation at 80 and 200 °C, but not at 450 and 550 °C. The loops were non-uniformly distributed; a localized high density of type dislocation loops were observed near the second phase particles; we suggest that loop nucleation is favored as a result of the stress induced by the particles, rather than by elemental redistribution. The stability of the second phase particles and the formation of the type loops under heavy ion irradiation are discussed.

  5. Tensile properties and bend ductility of (Fe,Ni)3V long-range-ordered alloys after irradiation in HFIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the tensile properties and bend ductility of (Fe,Ni) 3 V long-range-ordered (LRO) alloys. Several (Fe,Ni) 3 V LRO alloys were irradiated in HFIR-CTR-42 and -43 at 400 to 600 0 C, to approximately 10 dpa and approximately 1000 at. ppm He. Additions of cerium or carbon and the use of cold-worked microstructures did not improve the embrittlement resistance of the LRO alloys. The LRO-37-5RS alloy, with a microstructure produced by rapid solidification, exhibited the highest ductilities, and further study of the RS microstructure is warranted. The correlation between bend ductility and tensile ductility was poor

  6. On possibility of high energy electron irradiation usage for material alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirskij, R.A.; Livshits, V.B.; Payuk, V.A.; Plotnikov, S.V.; Kuz'minykh, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Review of papers concerning over 2.5 MeV fast electron beam (FEB) irradiation of metals and semiconductors is made. It makes possible to transform physical and mechanical properties ofsurface layers due to their alloyage with different elements or due to redistribution of alloy impurities at the essential depth. It is shown, that electron beam irradiation of materials results in the formation of essential temperature gradient in the sample near the surface and defect nonequilibrium concentration. Along with the increase of diffusion effective ratio the heterogeneous distribution of temperature and defects results in the formation of atom nucompensated fluxes within the sample, which result in element redistribution. Drift of one element through the layer of the second one occurs as a result. Gradient of temperature and defects, amfient temperature and correlation of migration activation energies of element atoms are considered as determining factors at anomalous mass transfer

  7. Huang scattering from self-interstitials in electron-irradiated Fe-40 at % Al ordered alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, J.P.; Riviere, J.P.; Beaufort-Richard, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    A single crystal of Fe-40 at % Al ordered alloy has been irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons at liquid hydrogen temperature, and diffuse X-ray scattering (MoKα 1 ) near Bragg reflections has been studied after annealing the sample up to 300 K. The characteristic diffuse scattering from point defects with weak displacement fields (Huang diffusion) has been observed near the (200) Bragg reflection in the directions [011] and [100] and near the (110) reflection in the directions [110] and [110]. This Huang scattering has been attributed to self interstitials since under the same irradiations conditions, electrical resistivity measurements indicate that the long range migration of self interstitials by annihilation at vacancies would occur only for temperatures higher than 300 K. The comparison of the experimental results with the different simple intertitial configurations proposed for b.c.c. crystals suggest that the most probable configuration should be the [110] split interstitial with orthorhombic symmetry [fr

  8. Ion irradiation effects on high purity bcc Fe and model FeCr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Arunodaya

    2014-01-01

    FeCr binary alloys are a simple representative of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (F-M) steels, which are currently the most promising candidates as structural materials for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) and future fusion systems. However, the impact of Cr on the evolution of the irradiated microstructure in these materials is not well understood in these materials. Moreover, particularly for fusion applications, the radiation damage scenario is expected to be complicated further by the presence of large quantities of He produced by the nuclear transmutation (∼ 10 appm He/dpa). Within this context, an elaborate ion irradiation study was performed at 500 C on a wide variety of high purity FeCr alloys (with Cr content ranging from ∼ 3 wt.% to 14 wt.%) and a bcc Fe, to probe in detail the influence of Cr and He on the evolution of microstructure. The irradiations were performed using Fe self-ions, in single beam mode and in dual beam mode (damage by Fe ions and co-implantation of He), to separate ballistic damage effect from the impact of simultaneous He injection. Three different dose ranges were studied: high dose (157 dpa, 17 appm He/dpa for the dual beam case), intermediate dose (45 dpa, 57 appm He/dpa for dual beam case) and in-situ low dose (0.33 dpa, 3030 appm He/dpa for the dual beam case). The experiments were performed at the JANNuS triple beam facility and dual beam in situ irradiation facility at CEA-Saclay and CSNSM, Orsay respectively. The microstructure was principally characterized by conventional TEM, APT and EDS in STEM mode. The main results are as follows: 1) A comparison of the cavity microstructure in high dose irradiated Fe revealed strong swelling reduction by the addition of He. It was achieved by a drastic reduction in cavity sizes and an increased number density. This behaviour was observed all along the damage depth, up to the damage peak. 2) Cavity microstructure was also studied in the dual beam high dose

  9. Tunneling and migration of the dumbbell defect in electron-irradiated aluminum-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements on irradiated Al-Zn alloys (0.01, 0.1, and 0.5 at %) indicate a tunneling relaxation of the predominant mixed dumbbell defect at low temperatures, and mixed dumbbell migration at the Stage II anneal temperature. The effect of an internal strain varying with the zinc concentration on the measured decrement and modulus change is striking. Evaluated in the framework of a six-level system, this reveals the simultaneous action of resonance and nonclassical relaxation processes. Using Fe as a probe atom, it is shown that mixed dumbbell dissociation is in an insignificant component of the annealing of this defect. The decrease of the annealing temperature at higher zinc concentrations provides evidence that the mixed dumbbell migrates as a unit during annealing. The energies associated with dumbbell migration and interstitial escape are derived. Further evidence for the migration mechanism is obtained from successive irradiation and annealing

  10. Neutron irradiation effects on grain-refined W and W-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Fukuda, M.; Tanno, T.; Nogami, S.; Yabuuchi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Muroga, T.

    2014-10-01

    Microstructural data of neutron irradiated Tungsten (W) such as size and number density of voids and precipitates obtained by W up to 1.5dpa irradiation in the temperature range of 400-800degC were compiled quantitatively. Nucleation and growth process of these defects were clarified and a qualitative prediction of the damage structure development and hardening of W in fusion reactor environments were made taking into account the solid transmutation effects for the first time. To improve recrystallization behavior and low temperature embrittlement, grain refined-W alloys were fabricated by K- or La-doping method. Rhenium addition to the grain refining process was also examined to improve mechanical properties. Characterizations of unirradiated materials were performed. (author)

  11. Study of point defect clustering in electron and ion irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellio, C.; Boulanger, L.

    1986-09-01

    Dislocation loops created by 500 keV Zr + ions and 1 MeV electrons in zirconium have a/3 type Burgers vectors, and in ion irradiated samples, loops lie preferentially on planes close to (1010). From in-situ observations of loop growth under 1 MeV electron irradiation in zirconium and dilute Zr (Nb,O) alloys, a strong increase of the vacancy migration energy with oxygen concentration was observed, from 0.72 eV for pure zirconium to 1.7 eV for Zr and Zr-1% Nb doped with 1800 ppm weight oxygen, indicating large trapping of vacancies by O single interstitials or clusters

  12. Amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation by neutron irradiation of the alloy Fe/sub 83/B/sub 17/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, J.; Gabris, F.; Cerven, I.; Sitek, J. (Slovenska Vysoka Skola Technicka, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1984-03-01

    The purpose of the present work is to investigate the structural changes of amorphous Fe/sub 83/B/sub 17/ alloy after irradiation with fast neutrons ( > 1 MeV) and to compare with the crystallization behaviour of the amorphous Fe/sub 83/B/sub 17/ alloy after annealing. The structural changes were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction with the usual Fourier analysis.

  13. Evolution of zirconium-based precipitates during oxidation and irradiation of Zr alloys (impact on the oxidation kinetics of Zr alloys)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecheur, Dominique

    1993-01-01

    As the oxidation of the zircaloy sheath is one of the factors which limit the lifetime of nuclear fuel rods, this research thesis aims at a better knowledge of the involved oxidation mechanisms and to improve the oxidation resistance in order to increase rod lifetime. Oxidation test performed in autoclave to study zirconium alloy oxidation without irradiation showed that oxidation kinetics is significantly higher under irradiation. This difference is attributed to a different evolution of the sheath material under irradiation. Thus, this research focused on the role of precipitates in the oxidation process of zirconium alloys, and on the impact of their amorphization on this oxidation. After a detailed description of the context and of the various implemented experimental means, the author presents the results obtained on a reference material on the one hand, and on a material irradiated by ions or neutrons on the other hand. More particularly, the author studied in these both cases the introduction of precipitates in the oxide layer by transmission electronic microscopy, and oxidation kinetics obtained in autoclave on these two types of material. He reports the analysis of the introduction of precipitates in the oxide layer formed on the reference material. He proposes interpretations for the evolutions of structure and of chemical compositions of precipitates in the oxide layer. These observations are then correlated with oxidation kinetics in these alloys. Finally, the author discusses results of oxidation tests obtained on materials irradiated by ions and by neutrons [fr

  14. Pre- and post-irradiation properties of copper alloys at 250 deg. C following bonding and bakeout thermal cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Edwards, D.J.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.

    1997-01-01

    Screening experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the oxide dispersion strengthened (GlidCop, CuAl-25) and the precipitation hardened (CuCrZr, CuNiBe) copper alloys. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing, and bonding thermal treatment followed by re-ageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 350 deg. C for 100 h. Tensile specimens of CuAl-25 were given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of heat treated specimens were neuron irradiated at 250 deg. C to a dose level of ∼ 0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with various heat treatments were tensile tested at 250 deg. C. The microstructure and electrical resistivity of these specimens were determined in the unirradiated as well as irradiated conditions. The post-deformation microstructure of the irradiated specimens was also investigated. The fracture surfaces of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were examined. Results of these investigations are reported in the present report. The main effect of the bonding thermal cycle heat treatment was a slight decrease in strength of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. The strength of CuAl-25, on the other hand, remained almost unaltered. The post irradiation tests at 250 deg. C showed a severe loss of ductility in the case of CuNiBe alloy. The irradiated CuAl-25 and CuCrZr specimens, on the other hand, exhibited a reasonable amount of uniform elongation. The results are briefly discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and particles and irradiation-induced segregation, precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. (au) 7 tabs., 28 ills., 15 refs

  15. Neutron irradiation effects on mechanical properties in SA508 Gr4N high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minchul; Lee, Kihyoung; Park, Sanggyu; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang

    2012-01-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is the key component in determining the lifetime of nuclear power plants because it is subject to the significant aging degradation by irradiation and thermal aging, and there is no practical method for replacing that component. Advanced reactors with much larger capacity than current reactor require the usage of higher strength materials inevitably. The SA508 Gr.4N Ni Cr Mo low alloy steel, in which Ni and Cr contents are larger than in conventional RPV steels, could be a promising RPV material offering improved strength and toughness from its tempered martensitic microstructure. For a structural integrity of RPV, the effect of neutron irradiation on the material property is one of the key issues. The RPV materials suffer from the significant degradation of transition properties by the irradiation embrittlement when its strength is increased by a hardening mechanism. Therefore, the potential for application of SA508 Gr.4N steel as the structural components for nuclear power reactors depends on its ability to maintain adequate transition properties against the operating neutron does. However, it is not easy to fine the data on the irradiation effect on the mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.4N steel. In this study, the irradiation embrittlement of SA508 Gr.4N Ni Cr Mo low alloy steel was evaluated by using specimens irradiated in research reactor. For comparison, the variations of mechanical properties by neutron irradiation for commercial SA508 Gr.3 Mn Mo Ni low alloy steel were also evaluated

  16. Surface composition, microstructure and corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy irradiated by high-intensity pulsed ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, P.; Lei, M.K.; Zhu, X.P.

    2011-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) irradiation of AZ31 magnesium alloy is performed and electrochemical corrosion experiment of irradiated samples is carried out by using potentiodynamic polarization technology in order to explore the effect of HIPIB irradiation on corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy. The surface composition, cross-sectional morphology and microstructure are characterized by using electron probe microanalyzer, optical microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results indicated that HIPIB irradiation leads to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy, in terms of the considerable increase in both corrosion potential and pitting breakdown potential. The microstructural refinement and surface purification induced by HIPIB irradiation are responsible for the improved corrosion resistance. - Research Highlights: → A modified layer about 30 μm thick is obtained by HIPIB irradiation. → Selective ablation of element/impurity phase having lower melting point is observed. → More importantly, microstructural refinement occurred on the irradiated surface. → The modified layer exhibited a significantly improved corrosion resistance. → Improved corrosion resistance is ascribed to the combined effect induced by HIPIB.

  17. Microstructural evolution of Fe−22%Cr model alloy under thermal ageing and ion irradiation conditions studied by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korchuganova, Olesya A., E-mail: KorchuganovaOA@gmail.com [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics of National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Thuvander, Mattias [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96, Göteborg (Sweden); Aleev, Andrey A.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics of National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Boll, Torben [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96, Göteborg (Sweden); Kulevoy, Timur V. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics of National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Nanostructure evolution during ion irradiation of two thermally aged binary Fee22Cr alloys has been investigated using atom probe tomography. Specimens aged at 500 °C for 50 and 200 h were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe ions at room temperature up to fluences of 0.3 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The effect of irradiation on the material nanostructure was examined at a depth of 1 μm from the irradiated surface. The analysis of Cr radial concentration functions reveals that dense α′-phase precipitates in the 200 h aged alloy become diffuse and thereby larger when subjected to irradiation. On the other hand, less Cr-enriched precipitates in the alloy aged for 50 h are less affected. The CreCr pair correlation function analysis shows that matrix inhomogeneity decreases under irradiation. Irradiation leads to a decrease in the number density of diffuse clusters, whereas in the case of well-developed precipitates it remains unchanged.

  18. Microstructural evolution of Fe−22%Cr model alloy under thermal ageing and ion irradiation conditions studied by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganova, Olesya A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Aleev, Andrey A.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V.; Boll, Torben; Kulevoy, Timur V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructure evolution during ion irradiation of two thermally aged binary Fee22Cr alloys has been investigated using atom probe tomography. Specimens aged at 500 °C for 50 and 200 h were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe ions at room temperature up to fluences of 0.3 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 and 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 . The effect of irradiation on the material nanostructure was examined at a depth of 1 μm from the irradiated surface. The analysis of Cr radial concentration functions reveals that dense α′-phase precipitates in the 200 h aged alloy become diffuse and thereby larger when subjected to irradiation. On the other hand, less Cr-enriched precipitates in the alloy aged for 50 h are less affected. The CreCr pair correlation function analysis shows that matrix inhomogeneity decreases under irradiation. Irradiation leads to a decrease in the number density of diffuse clusters, whereas in the case of well-developed precipitates it remains unchanged.

  19. Microstructural evolution of Fesbnd 22%Cr model alloy under thermal ageing and ion irradiation conditions studied by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganova, Olesya A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Aleev, Andrey A.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V.; Boll, Torben; Kulevoy, Timur V.

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructure evolution during ion irradiation of two thermally aged binary Fee22Cr alloys has been investigated using atom probe tomography. Specimens aged at 500 °C for 50 and 200 h were irradiated by 5.6 MeV Fe ions at room temperature up to fluences of 0.3 × 1015 ions/cm2 and 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The effect of irradiation on the material nanostructure was examined at a depth of 1 μm from the irradiated surface. The analysis of Cr radial concentration functions reveals that dense α‧-phase precipitates in the 200 h aged alloy become diffuse and thereby larger when subjected to irradiation. On the other hand, less Cr-enriched precipitates in the alloy aged for 50 h are less affected. The CreCr pair correlation function analysis shows that matrix inhomogeneity decreases under irradiation. Irradiation leads to a decrease in the number density of diffuse clusters, whereas in the case of well-developed precipitates it remains unchanged.

  20. Nanoindentation on V–4Ti alloy irradiated by H and He ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yitao; Zhang, Chonghong; Meng, Yancheng; Liu, Juan; Gou, Jie; Xian, Yongqiang; Song, Yin

    2015-01-01

    V–4Ti and V samples were irradiated by H/He ions with various energies to produce a damage plateau in the region from surface to the depth of 1.5 um at room temperature. Nanoindentation was performed to investigate the hardening behavior of the two materials under irradiation. It is found that the relation of maximum depth of plastic zone and indentation depth is not a fixed value. The maximum depth of plastic zone decreases with increase of damage level. Nix and Gao model was used to fit the measured hardness to obtain a hardness value H 0 excluding indentation size effect (ISE), which can be used to characterize the hardening effect induced by irradiation. After fitting the data of H 0 , it is found that there is an exponential relation between the H 0 and damage level for both the V–4Ti and V materials. When the damage level is higher than ∼0.2 dpa, the hardness increases slowly, this indicates a slow increase of pinning centers in samples at this damage level. Comparing the hardening fraction of V–4Ti and V samples, significant hardening can be seen for V sample, and it becomes severe especially at damage higher than ∼0.2 dpa. The irradiation hardening resistance property of V–4Ti alloy is better than that of pure V

  1. Effects of cavitation on damage calculations in ion-irradiated P7 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Farrens, S.N.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of voids on the depth-dependent damage energy in ion-irradiated metals. Corrections to the dose at the swelling peak will be used to obtain the swelling rate of ion-irradiated 316-type stainless steels. Samples of the P7 alloy were ion-irradiated to four fluence levels up to a peak dose level of 100 dpa at 650 0 C. The depth-dependent void parameters extracted in cross section were used to model the effect of voids on the depth-dependent damage produced during 14 MeV nickel ion irradiation. An increase in the range of damage produced from the original foil surface for the target containing voids was modeled as a first-order correction to the damage profile. A second-order effect, void straggling, was shown to cause a time-dependent decrease in the damage rate at the peak swelling depth. Corrections applied to the dose at the peak swelling depth yield swelling rates approaching 0.7%/dpa

  2. Irradiation-Induced Solute Clustering in a Low Nickel FeMnNi Ferritic Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, E.; Barbu, A.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Toffolon, C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is required to be able to operate safely a nuclear power plant or to extend its lifetime. The mechanical properties degradation is partly due to the clustering of solute under irradiation. To gain knowledge about the clustering process, a Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%) alloy was irradiated in a test reactor at two fluxes of 0.15 and 9 *10 17 n E≥1MeV . m -2 .s -1 and at increasing doses from 0.18 to 1.3 *10 24 n E≥1MeV ) . m -2 at 300 degrees C. Atom probe tomography (APT) experiments revealed that the irradiation promotes the formation in the α iron matrix of Mn/Mn and/or Ni/Ni pair correlations at low dose and Mn-Ni enriched clusters at high dose. These clusters dissolve partially after a thermal treatment at 400 degrees C. Based on a comparison with thermodynamic calculations, we show that the solute clustering under irradiation can just result from an induced mechanism. (authors)

  3. On the position of local levels of defects in proton-irradiated Pb1-xSnxTe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, N.B.; Gas'kov, A.M.; Ladygin, E.A.; Skipetrov, E.P.; Khorosh, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of fast proton irradiation (T≅300 K, E=200 keV, F≤2x10 14 cm -2 ) on electrophysical properties of thin layers p-Pb 1-x Sn x Te (0.17 ≤x≤ 0.26) is investigated. Saturation of radiation flux dependences of hole density due to occurrence of a resonance level under irradiation, which is near the ceiling of the valence band of alloys, and due to stabilization of the Fermi level with the resonance level is detected. Possibility of coordination of novadays data on the position of the levels of radiation defects in alloys Pb 1-x Sn x Te is discussed

  4. Ion irradiation studies on the void swelling behavior of a titanium modified D9 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, S.; Mohan, Sruthi; Amirthapandian, S.; Chinnathambi, S.; David, C.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    The sensitivity of Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) for probing vacancy defects and their environment is well known. Its applicability in determination of swelling and the peak swelling temperature was put to test in our earlier work on ion irradiated D9 alloys [1]. Upon comparison with the peak swelling temperature determined by conventional step height measurements it was found that the peak swelling temperature determined using PAS was 50 K higher. It was conjectured that the positrons trapping in the irradiation induced TiC precipitation could have caused the shift. In the present work, D9 alloys have been implanted with 100 appm helium ions and subsequently implanted with 2.5 MeV Ni ions up to peak damage of 100 dpa. The nickel implantations have been carried out through a range of temperatures between 450 °C and 650 °C. The evolution of cavities and TiC precipitates at various temperatures has been followed by TEM and this report provides an experimental verification of the conjecture.

  5. Effect of solute atoms on swelling in Ni alloys and pure Ni under He + ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, E.; Ezawa, T.; Imamura, J.; Takenaka, T.; Tanabe, T.; Oshima, R.

    2002-12-01

    The effects of solute atoms on microstructural evolutions have been investigated using Ni alloys under 25 keV He + irradiation at 500 °C. The specimens used were pure Ni, Ni-Si, Ni-Co, Ni-Cu, Ni-Mn and Ni-Pd alloys with different volume size factors. The high number densities of dislocation loops about 1.5×10 22 m -3 were formed in the specimens irradiated to 1×10 19 ions/m 2, and they were approximately equivalent, except for Ni-Si. The mean size of loops tended to increase with the volume size factor of solute atoms. In a dose of 4×10 20 ions/m 2, the swelling was changed from 0.2% to 4.5%, depending on the volume size factors. The number densities of bubbles tended to increase with the absolute values of the volume size factor, and the swelling increased with the volume size factors. This suggests that the mobility of helium and vacancy atoms may be influenced by the interaction of solute atoms with them.

  6. Impact of neutron irradiation on mechanical performance of FeCrAl alloy laser-beam weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussev, M. N.; Cakmak, E.; Field, K. G.

    2018-06-01

    Oxidation-resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys demonstrate better performance in Loss-of-Coolant Accidents, compared with austenitic- and zirconium-based alloys. However, further deployment of FeCrAl-based materials requires detailed characterization of their performance under irradiation; moreover, since welding is one of the key operations in fabrication of light water reactor fuel cladding, FeCrAl alloy weldment performance and properties also should be determined prior to and after irradiation. Here, advanced C35M alloy (Fe-13%Cr-5%Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions were characterized after neutron irradiation in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor at 1.8-1.9 dpa in a temperature range of 195-559 °C. Specimen sets included as-received (AR) materials and specimens after controlled laser-beam welding. Tensile tests with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scatter diffraction analysis, fractography, and x-ray tomography analysis were performed. DIC allowed for investigating local yield stress in the weldments, deformation hardening behavior, and plastic anisotropy. Both AR and welded material revealed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening for low-temperature irradiation; however, irradiation at high-temperatures (i.e., 559 °C) had little overall effect on the mechanical performance.

  7. Identification of ultra-fine Ti-rich precipitates in V-Cr-Ti alloys irradiated below 300 deg. C by using positron CDB technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Matsui, Hideki; Ohkubo, Hideaki; Tang, Zheng; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Hasegawa, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Irradiation-induced Ti-rich precipitates in V-Ti and V-4Cr-4Ti alloys are studied by TEM and positron annihilation methods (positron lifetime, and coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB)). The characteristics of small defect clusters formed in V alloys containing Ti at irradiation temperatures below 300 deg. C have not been identified by TEM techniques. Strong interaction between vacancy and Ti solute atoms for irradiated V alloys containing Ti at irradiation temperatures from 220 to 350 deg. C are observed by positron lifetime measurement. The vacancy-multi Ti solute complexes in V-alloys containing Ti are definitely identified by using CDB measurement. It is suggested that ultra-fine Ti-rich precipitates or Ti segregation at periphery of dislocation loops are formed in V alloys containing Ti at irradiation temperatures below 300 deg. C

  8. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the mechanical behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys; Approche experimentale et modelisation micromecanique du comportement des alliages de zirconium irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onimus, F

    2003-12-01

    Zirconium alloys cladding tubes containing nuclear fuel of the Pressurized Water Reactors constitute the first safety barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. Thus, it is essential to predict the mechanical behavior of the material in-reactor conditions. This study aims, on the one hand, to identify and characterize the mechanisms of the plastic deformation of irradiated zirconium alloys and, on the other hand, to propose a micro-mechanical modeling based on these mechanisms. The experimental analysis shows that, for the irradiated material, the plastic deformation occurs by dislocation channeling. For transverse tensile test and internal pressure test this channeling occurs in the basal planes. However, for axial tensile test, the study revealed that the plastic deformation also occurs by channeling but in the prismatic and pyramidal planes. In addition, the study of the macroscopic mechanical behavior, compared to the deformation mechanisms observed by TEM, suggested that the internal stress is higher in the case of irradiated material than in the case of non-irradiated material, because of the very heterogeneous character of the plastic deformation. This analysis led to a coherent interpretation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated materials, in terms of deformation mechanisms. The mechanical behavior of irradiated materials was finally modeled by applying homogenization methods for heterogeneous materials. This model is able to reproduce adequately the mechanical behavior of the irradiated material, in agreement with the TEM observations. (author)

  9. Characterization of ion-irradiated ODS Fe–Cr alloys by doppler broadening spectroscopy using a positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parente, P.; Leguey, T. [Departamento de Física and IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Castro, V. de, E-mail: vanessa.decastro@uc3m.es [Departamento de Física and IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Gigl, T.; Reiner, M.; Hugenschmidt, C. [FRM II and Physics Department, Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching (Germany); Pareja, R. [Departamento de Física and IAAB, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    The damage profile of oxide dispersion strengthened steels after single-, or simultaneous triple-ion irradiation at different conditions has been characterized using a low energy positron beam in order to provide information on microstructural changes induced by irradiation. Doppler broadening and coincident Doppler broadening measurements of the positron annihilation line have been performed on different Fe–Cr–(W,Ti) alloys reinforced with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to identify the nature and stability of irradiation-induced open-volume defects and their possible association with the oxide nanoparticles. It was found that irradiation induced vacancy clusters are associated with Cr atoms. The results are of highest interest for modeling the damage induced by 14 MeV neutrons in reduced activation Fe–Cr alloys relevant for fusion devices.

  10. Characterization of ion-irradiated ODS Fe–Cr alloys by doppler broadening spectroscopy using a positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parente, P.; Leguey, T.; Castro, V. de; Gigl, T.; Reiner, M.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Pareja, R.

    2015-01-01

    The damage profile of oxide dispersion strengthened steels after single-, or simultaneous triple-ion irradiation at different conditions has been characterized using a low energy positron beam in order to provide information on microstructural changes induced by irradiation. Doppler broadening and coincident Doppler broadening measurements of the positron annihilation line have been performed on different Fe–Cr–(W,Ti) alloys reinforced with Y 2 O 3 , to identify the nature and stability of irradiation-induced open-volume defects and their possible association with the oxide nanoparticles. It was found that irradiation induced vacancy clusters are associated with Cr atoms. The results are of highest interest for modeling the damage induced by 14 MeV neutrons in reduced activation Fe–Cr alloys relevant for fusion devices

  11. Microstructural evolutions of zirconium alloys under irradiation. Link with the irradiation growth phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonot, C.

    1995-01-01

    This study deals with the irradiation-induced growth and microstructural evolutions of Zircaloy-4 type materials (ZrSn 1.2-1.7 Fe 0.18-0.24 Cr 0.07-0.13 O 0.09-0.15 ), used as cladding and guide-tubes in PWR's fuel assemblies. The main objective was to obtain a better understanding of the growth acceleration which may occur at high doses for the recrystallized metallurgical state. The elongation values of stress-free tubes irradiated at 400 deg in experimental reactors give clear indication of accelerated growth after a critical dose. Microstructural investigations reveal some large basal plane dislocation loops with vacancy character, which is an unexpected defect configuration for an hexagonal material with a c/a ratio less than the ideal value. In addition, a significant redistribution of iron and chromium solute elements comes from the dissolution of the initial Zr(Fe,Cr) 2 phases. In a guide-tube irradiated to high dose at 320 deg in a power reactor, a large density of these c-component loops was also observed in coincidence with a large iron re-solution due to the progressive partial amorphization of Laves phases. By contrast, as long as a negligible amount of iron is available in the matrix (start of progressive amorphization at 350 deg or complete amorphization without any chemical change at 280 deg, only prism plane loops with interstitial and vacancy character are observed and the steady-state growth rate is low. A mechanism taking into account the Diffusional Anisotropy Difference of the radiation induced point defects seems to be the most suitable to explain the correlations between microstructural evolutions and growth rates. However it does not allow to predict the dose necessary for the formation of the basal plane loops responsible for the growth acceleration. Several factors (dose, temperature, metallurgical state) are required and the iron re-solution is likely to play a major role to stabilize such defects, by a decrease in stacking fault energy

  12. Direct observation of solute segregation to voids in a fast-neutron irradiated (Mo/1.0 at. % Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.; Seidman, D.N.

    1978-11-01

    The atom-probe field-ion microscope was used to study segregation effects to voids in a Mo--Ti alloy which had been irradiated with fast neutrons. The Ti does not segregate significantly to voids, concentration of Ti in solid solution and the spacial distribution of Ti was not affected by irradiation, carbon was not detected, resolution of TiC or MoC precipitates did not occur

  13. Study of short range order in alloy of glassy metals and effect of neutron irradiation on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibi, S.; Banaee, N.; Salman, M.; Gupta, A.; Principi, G.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we have studied a series of glassy metals with composition Fe 78-x Ni x Si 8 B 14 with x=0, 15, 25,38,53, 58. We have used Moessbauer spectroscopy to get information about short range order and local structure in these alloys. The specimens are exposed to neutron irradiation to perturb local structure and their short range order. The hyperfine parameters obtained from spectra before and after n-irradiation and are compared

  14. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure and deformation behaviour of mono- and polycrystalline molybdenum and its alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Evans, J.H.; Horsewell, A.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of neutron irradiation on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of mono- and polycrystalline molybdenum and its alloys has been investigated. Tensile specimens and 3 mm diameter discs of monocrystals of pure molybdenum and Mo-5%Re were irradiated with fission neutrons...... microscopy are presented and discussed in terms of intracascade clustering of self-interstitial atoms and the role of one-dimensional glide of these clusters in controlling microstructural evolution and the resulting mechanical properties....

  15. Posterior magnetic effect on the pure and doped Fe-Ni alloy under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Iris

    1974-01-01

    Polycrystalline specimens of unirradiated and neutron irradiated Fe-Ni alloys have been studied in the temperature range RT - 500 deg C. The study was carried out in pure (50-50) as well as in Si, A1, Cr and Mo doped samples. Initial magnetic permeability was measured in unirradiated (virgin)and in neutron irradiated samples, during isochronal and linear thermal treatments. The main results are: a magnetic After Effect (MAE) is detected in the temperature range 370 deg C - Tc, where Tc is the Curie Temperature. In this range an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.2 eV was determined for the Cr doped Fe-Ni alloy (impurity content: 0.1%); measurements made in the irradiated samples, during a linear temperature treatment, show the existence of several MAE zones in the temperature range RT - Tc. The isochronal annealing experiments show that these MAE zones are accompanied by a decrease in the room temperature value of the magnetic permeability, for zones between RT and a certain temperature T 1 . Above this range there is a steep increase in the room temperature permeability. Activation energies were determined for pure and Mo-doped (0.1%) samples for the first MAE zone (50 deg C - 120 deg C). The values obtained 1.25 - 0.08 eV and 1.42 ± 0.09 eV, respectively; the impurity - doped samples show a different behaviour relative to the pure ones: samples with low impurity content (0.1% and 0.5% of Si, Al or Mo) present an enhancement in the amplitude and also an overlapping of the diffusion stages. On the other hand, samples with higher impurity content (2 and 4% of Mo) show a decrease in these amplitudes. (author)

  16. The effects of thermal-neutron irradiation on platinum and dilute platinum-gold alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piani, C.S.B.

    1978-12-01

    The effect of varying defect concentrations on the recovery spectrum of thermal-neutron-irradiated pure platinum after isochronal anneals was investigated. The dose-independence of substages I(A), I(B) and I(C), and the dose dependence of substage I(D) and I(E), were observed to be in agreement with electron-irradiated studies. The 120 K substage in pure platinum was shown not to be due to interstitial-interstitial reactions, but could possibly be accounted for in terms of detrapping of interstitials from impurities or intrinsic immobile defects. The 360 K stage was shown to shift and was suppressed with increasing defect concentration. The possible conversion of the crowdion to a dumbbell near 160 K in Stage ll in platinum, as predicted by the two-interstitial model, was investigated by consideration of the initial slopes of the production curves between 80 K and 300 K. A minimum in these slopes was observed near 160 K and could be interpreted as due to the conversion of the highly mobile crowdion to an immobile dumbbell at this temperature. The influence of varying gold concentrations on the recovery spectrum of platinum was investigated in dilute platinum-gold alloys. The characteristics of several additional substages in Stage ll, due to the gold alloying were comparable to the results of electron-irradiation experiments. The observations made with regard to the impurity (gold) dependence of these substages could be interpreted in terms of the concentrations of the interstitials, vacancies and impurities present in the material. The interpretation of these substages was found to be consistent, if the recovery spectrum was investigated as a function of defect concentration [af

  17. Microstructural changes of Y-doped V-4Cr-4Ti alloys after ion and neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Watanabe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High-purity Y-doped V-4Cr-4Ti alloys (0.1–0.2wt. % Y, manufactured by the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS, were used for this study. Heavy-ion and fission-neutron irradiation was carried out at temperatures 673–873K. During the ion irradiation at 873K, the microstructure was controlled by the formation of Ti(C,O,N precipitates lying on the (100 plane. Y addition effectively suppressed the growth of Ti(C,O,N precipitates, especially at lower dose irradiation to up to 4 dpa. However, at higher dose levels (12.0 dpa, the number density was almost at the same levels irrespective of the presence of Y. After neutron irradiation at 873K, fine titanium oxides were also observed in all V alloys. However, smaller oxide sizes were observed in the Y-doped samples under the same irradiation conditions. The detailed analysis of EDS showed that the center of the Ti(C,O,N precipitates was mainly enriched by nitrogen. The results showed that the contribution of not only oxygen atoms picked up from the irradiation environment but also nitrogen atoms is essential to understand the microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti-Y alloys.

  18. Vacancies supersaturation induced by fast neutron irradiation in FeNi alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucki, G.; Chambron, W.; Watanabe, S.; Verdone, J.

    1975-01-01

    The void formation in metals and alloys during irradiation with high-energy particles is a problem of interest in physics and of paramount importance in nuclear technology. Voids are formed as a consequence of vacancy supersaturation and result in swelling as well as in changes of mechanical, electrical and magnetic properties of materials used in power reactors. Isothermal annealings were performed between 400 and 500 0 C with and without fast-neutron (1 MeV) irradiation. Pure Fe--Ni (50--50 at. percent) was irradiated in the Melousine reactor in Grenoble, and Fe--Ni(Mo) (50--50 at. percent + 50 ppM), in the IEAR-1 reactor at the Instituto de Energia Atomica in Sao Paulo. The toroidal-shaped specimens were fabricated from Johnson Mathey zone-refined ingots, and were initially annealed at 800 0 C during 1 h in hydrogen atmosphere and then slowly cooled (4 h) inside the furnace. Magnetic After Effect measurements (MAE) permitted the evaluation of activation energies during fast-neutron irradiation (1.54 eV) and without irradiation (3.14 eV) for pure Fe--Ni and respectively (1.36 eV) and (2.32 eV) for Fe--Ni(Mo). Since the time constants of the relaxation process are inversely proportional to the vacancy concentration, a quantitative evaluation of vacancy supersaturation was made; it decreases from the value 700 at 410 0 C to the value 40 at 490 0 C for pure Fe--Ni and from 765 to 121 for Fe--Ni(Mo) in the same temperature range. 3 figures, 5 tables

  19. Atom probe study of the microstructural evolution induced by irradiation in Fe-Cu ferritic alloys and pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareige, P.

    1996-04-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in pressurized water reactors are low alloyed ferritic steels. They may be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are generally supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and/or copper rich clusters. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced-damage in these steels has not been clearly identified yet. In order to improve our vision of this damage, we have characterized the microstructure of several steels and model alloys irradiated with electrons and neutrons. The study was performed with conventional and tomographic atom probes. The well known importance of the effects of copper upon pressure vessel steel embrittlement has led us to study Fe-Cu binary alloys. We have considered chemical aging as well as aging under electron and neutron irradiations. The resulting effects depend on whether electron or neutron irradiations ar used for thus. We carried out both kinds of irradiation concurrently so as to compare their effects. We have more particularly considered alloys with a low copper supersaturation representative of that met with the French vessel alloys (0.1% Cu). Then, we have examined steels used on French nuclear reactor pressure vessels. To characterize the microstructure of CHOOZ A steel and its evolution when exposed to neutrons, we have studied samples from the reactor surveillance program. The results achieved, especially the characterization of neutron-induced defects have been compared with those for another steel from the surveillance program of Dampierre 2. All the experiment results obtained on model and industrial steels have allowed us to consider an explanation of the way how the defects appear and grow, and to propose reasons for their influence upon steel embrittlement. (author). 3 appends

  20. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balart, Silvia N.; Bruzzoni, Pablo; Granovsky, Marta S.; Gribaudo, Luis M. J.; Hermida, Jorge D.; Ovejero, Jose; Rubiolo, Gerardo H.; Vicente, Eduardo E.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-α phase to transform to UH 3 : a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert γ -phase to α -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this α -phase to UH 3 . The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  1. Effect of irradiation temperature on crystallization of {alpha}-Fe induced by He irradiations in Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} amorphous alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San-noo, Toshimasa; Toriyama, Tamotsu; Wakabayashi, Hidehiko; Iijima, Hiroshi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Isao

    1997-03-01

    Since amorphous alloys are generally highly resistant to irradiation and their critical radiation dose is an order of magnitude higher for Fe-B amorphous alloy than Mo-methods, these alloys are expected to become applicable as for fusion reactor materials. The authors investigated {alpha}-Fe crystallization in an amorphous alloy, Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} using internal conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy. The amount of {alpha}-Fe component was found to increase by raising the He-irradiation dose. The target part was modified to enable He ion radiation at a lower temperature (below 400 K) by cooling with Peltier element. Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} amorphous alloy was cooled to keep the temperature at 300 K and exposed to 40 keV He ion at 1-3 x 10{sup 8} ions/cm{sup 2}. The amount of {alpha}-Fe crystal in each sample was determined. The crystal formation was not observed for He ion radiation below 2 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, but that at 3 x 10{sup 8} ions/ cm{sup 2} produced a new phase ({delta} +0.40 mm/sec, {Delta} = 0.89 mm/sec). The decrease in the radiation temperature from 430 to 300 K resulted to extremely repress the production of {alpha}-Fe crystal, suggesting that the crystallization induced by He-radiation cascade is highly depending on the radiation temperature. (M.N.)

  2. Report on fundamental modeling of irradiation-induced swelling and creep in FeCrAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dasgupta, Dwaipayan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-23

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, the material response must be demonstrated to provide suitable radiation stability, in order to ensure that there will not be significant dimensional changes (e.g., swelling), as well as quantifying the radiation hardening and radiation creep behavior. In this report, we describe the use of cluster dynamics modeling to evaluate the defect physics and damage accumulation behavior of FeCrAl alloys subjected to neutron irradiation, with a particular focus on irradiation-induced swelling and defect fluxes to dislocations that are required to model irradiation creep behavior.

  3. Prediction model for oxide thickness on aluminum alloy cladding during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G.L.; Hanan, N.A.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    An empirical model predicting the oxide film thickness on aluminum alloy cladding during irradiation has been developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The existing models in the literature are neither consistent among themselves nor fit the measured data very well. They also lack versatility for various reactor situations such as a pH other than 5, high coolant flow rates, and fuel life longer than ∼1200 hrs. Particularly, they were not intended for use in irradiation situations. The newly developed model is applicable to these in-reactor situations as well as ex-reactor tests, and has a more accurate prediction capability. The new model demonstrated with consistent predictions to the measured data of UMUS and SIMONE fuel tests performed in the HFR, Petten, tests results from the ORR, and IRIS tests from the OSIRIS and to the data from the out-of-pile tests available in the literature as well. (author)

  4. Reirradiation in FFTF of swelling-resistant Path A alloys previously irradiated in HFIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Disks of Path A Prime Candidate Alloys (in several pretreatment conditions) and several heats of cold-worked (CW) type 316 and D9 type austenitic stainless steels have been irradiated in HFIR at 300, 500, and 600 0 C to fluences producing about 10 to 44 dpa and 450 to 3600 at. ppm He. These samples are being reirradiated in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) in FFTF at 500 and 600 0 C, together (side by side) with previously unirradiated disks of exactly the same materials, to greater than 100 dpa. These samples many of which have either very fine helium cluster or helium bubble distributions after HFIR irradiation, are intended to test the possibility and magnitude of a helium-induced extension of the initial low-swelling transient regime relative to the void swelling behavior normally found during FFTF irradiation. Further, these samples will reveal the microstructural stability or evolution differences that correlate with such helium effects. 17 references, 4 tables

  5. Swift heavy ion irradiation of Cu-Zn-Al and Cu-Al-Ni alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelaya, E; Tolley, A; Condo, A M; Schumacher, G

    2009-05-06

    The effects produced by swift heavy ions in the martensitic (18R) and austenitic phase (β) of Cu based shape memory alloys were characterized. Single crystal samples with a surface normal close to [210](18R) and [001](β) were irradiated with 200 MeV of Kr(15+), 230 MeV of Xe(15+), 350 and 600 MeV of Au(26+) and Au(29+). Changes in the microstructure were studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). It was found that swift heavy ion irradiation induced nanometer sized defects in the 18R martensitic phase. In contrast, a hexagonal close-packed phase formed on the irradiated surface of β phase samples. HRTEM images of the nanometer sized defects observed in the 18R martensitic phase were compared with computer simulated images in order to interpret the origin of the observed contrast. The best agreement was obtained when the defects were assumed to consist of local composition modulations.

  6. Enhancement in anomalous Hall resistivity of Co/Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy by Ga+ ion irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing; Mi, Wenbo; Li, Jingqi; Cheng, Yingchun; Zhang, Xixiang

    2014-01-01

    /Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy have been observed after irradiations at doses of 2.4 × 1015 and 3.3×10 15 ions/cm2, respectively. Skew scattering and side jump contributions to AHE have been analyzed based on the scaling relationship ρAH = aρxx + bρ2xx. For the Co

  7. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  8. Effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 350 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1997-02-01

    Screening experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the oxide dispersion strengthened (GlidCop, CuAl-25) and the precipitation hardened (CuCrZr, CuNiBe) cooper alloys. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing, and bonding thermal treatment followed by re-ageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 350 deg. C for 100 h. Tensile specimens of CuAl-25 were given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of heat treated specimens were neutron irradiated at 350 deg. C to a dose level of ∼ 0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with various heat treatments were tensile tested at 350 deg. C. The microstructure and electrical resistivity of these specimens were determined in the unirradiated as well as irradiated conditions. The post-deformation microstructure of the irradiated specimens was also investigated. The fracture surfaces of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were examined. Results of these investigations are reported in the present report. The results are briefly discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and particles and irradiation-induced segregation, precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. (au) 6 tabs., 24 ills., 9 refs

  9. The influence of nickel content on microstructures of Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys irradiated with nickel ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.; Garner, F.A.

    1990-11-01

    The objectives of this effort is to identify the mechanisms involved in the radiation-induced evolution of microstructure in materials intended for fusion applications. The results of this study are useful in interpreting the results of several other ongoing experiments involving either spectral or isotopic tailoring to study the effects of helium on microstructure evolution. Ion-irradiated Fe-15Cr-XNi (X = 20, 35, 45, 60, 75) ternary alloys and a 15Cr-85Ni binary alloy were examined after bombardment at 675 degree C and compared to earlier observations made on these same alloys after irradiation in EBR-II at 510 or 538 degree C. The response of the ion-irradiated microstructures to nickel content appears to be very consistent with that of neutron irradiation even though there are four orders of magnitude difference in displacement rate and over 200 degree C difference in temperature. It appears that the transition to higher rates of swelling during both types of irradiation is related to the operation of some mechanisms that is not directly associated with void nucleation. 6 refs., 8 figs

  10. Effects of neutron irradiation at 4500C and 16 dpa on the properties of various commercial copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Heinisch, H.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    High-purity copper and eight copper alloys were irradiated to approx.16 dpa at approx.450 0 C in the MOTA experiment in FFTF. These alloys were also examined after aging at 400 0 C for 1000 hours. The radiation-induced changes in the electrical conductivity, tensile properties, and density were measured and compared to those of the aged materials. The changes in conductivity can be either positive or negative depending on the alloy. Changes in tensile properties of most, but not all, of the alloys seem to be primarily dependent on thermal effects rather than the effect of atomic displacements. Radiation at 450 0 C induced changes in density varying from 0.66% densification to 16.6% swelling. The latter occurred in Cu-O.1% Ag and implies a swelling rate of at least 1%/dpa. 6 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  11. High-temperature strength of Nb-1%Zr alloy for irradiation-capsules inner-shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Nakata, Hirokatsu; Tanaka, Mitsuo; Fukaya, Kiyoshi.

    1978-04-01

    Coated fuel particles in capsules will be irradiated at about 1600 0 C in JMTR. Nb-1%Zr alloy was chosen for inner shell material of the capsules because of its sufficient strength at 1000 0 C and low induced radioactivity. Nb-1%Zr ingot produced by electron beam melting was formed into seamless tubes by hollowing and swaging, followed by annealing. Creep test in helium flow and tensile test in vacuum were made to examine mechanical strength of the Nb-1%Zr tubes at 1000 0 C. Following are the results; 1) 0.2% yield stress at 1000 0 C is about 6 kg/mm 2 . 2) 3000 hr creep rupture stress at 1000 0 C is about 6 kg/mm 2 . (auth.)

  12. Stress relaxation in dilute Al-0.02 at.% Mn alloy under electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystrov, L.N.; Ivanov, L.I.; Pletnev, M.N.; Reznitsky, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Stress relaxation in cold-worked and annealed (573 K for 2 hours) specimens of the dilute alloy Al-0.02 at.% Mn has been studied experimentally over a range of initial stresses 5 to 80 MPa, both with and without irradiation by 2.1 MeV electrons. Thermoactivation analysis has revealed that relaxation proceeds in two stages with different activation parameters. The deformation rate in the first stage is controlled by diffusion of the impurity (Mn), and in the second stage by the self-diffusion of aluminum. A new method has been proposed for evaluating the internal stresses from experimental data. The effect of radiation-induced diffusion on the kinetics of relaxation is discussed. (author)

  13. Metastable phases in Zr-Excel alloy and their stability under heavy ion (Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hongbing, E-mail: 12hy1@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Zhang, Ken; Yao, Zhongwen [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kirk, Mark A. [Material Science Division Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States); Long, Fei; Daymond, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    Zr-Excel alloy (Zr-3.5Sn-0.8Nb-0.8Mo, wt.%) has been proposed as a candidate material of pressure tubes in the CANDU-SCWR design. It is a dual-phase alloy containing primary hcp α-Zr and metastable bcc β-Zr. Metastable hexagonal ω-Zr phase could form in β-Zr as a result of aging during the processing of the tube. A synchrotron X-ray study was employed to study the lattice properties of the metastable phases in as-received Zr-Excel pressure tube material. In situ heavy ion (1 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiations were carried out at 200 °C and 450 °C to emulate the stability of the metastable phase under a reactor environment. Quantitative Chemi-STEM EDS analysis was conducted on both un-irradiated and irradiated samples to investigate alloying element redistribution induced by heavy ion irradiation. It was found that no decomposition of β-Zr was observed under irradiation at both 200 °C and 450 °C. However, ω-Zr particles experienced shape changes and shrinkage associated with enrichment of Fe at the β/ω interface during 200 °C irradiation but not at 450 °C. There is a noticeable increase in the level of Fe in the α matrix after irradiation at both 200 °C and 450 °C. The concentrations of Nb, Mo and Fe are increased in the ω phase but decreased in the β phase at 200 °C. The stability of metastable phases under heavy ion irradiation associated with elemental redistribution is discussed.

  14. Electron irradiation effect on the reverse phase transformation temperatures in TiNi shape memory alloy thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.G.; Zu, X.T.; Fu, Y.Q.; Zhu, S.; Wang, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, Ti-Ni shape memory alloy thin films were irradiated by 1.7 MeV electron with three types of fluences: 4 x 10 20 , 7 x 10 20 and 1 x 10 21 /m 2 . The influence of electron irradiation on the transformation behavior of the TiNi thin films were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The transformation temperatures A s and A f shifted to higher temperature after electron irradiation, the martensite was stabilized. The electron irradiation effect can be easily eliminated by one thermal cycle. The shifts of the transformation temperatures can be explained from the change of potential energy barrier and coherency energy between parent phase and martensite after irradiation

  15. Swelling of austenitic iron-nickelchromium ternary alloys during fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling data are now available for 15 iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys irradiated to exposures as high as 110 displacements per atom (dpa) in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) between 400 and 650 0 C. These data confirm trends observed at lower exposure levels and extend the generality of earlier conclusions to cover a broader range of composition and temperature. It appears that all austenitic iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys eventually approach an intrinsic swelling rate of about1%/dpa over a range of temperature even wider than studied in this experiment. The duration of the transient regime that precedes the attainment of this rate is quite sensitive to nickel and chromium content, however. At nickel and chromium levels typical of 300 series steels, swelling does not saturate at engineering-relevant levels. However, there appears to be a tendency toward saturation that increases with declining temperature, increasing nickel and decreasing chromium levels. Comparisons of these results are made with those of similar studies conducted with charged particles. Conclusions are then drawn concerning the validity of charged particle simulation studies to determine the compositional and temperature dependence of swelling

  16. Structural and chemical evolution in neutron irradiated and helium-injected ferritic ODS PM2000 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hee Joon [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Edwards, Dan J., E-mail: dan.edwards@pnnl.gov [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Kurtz, Richard J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Odette, G. Robert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    An investigation of the influence of helium on damage evolution under neutron irradiation of an 11 at% Al, 19 at% Cr ODS ferritic PM2000 alloy was carried out in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using a novel in situ helium injection (ISHI) technique. Helium was injected into adjacent TEM discs from thermal neutron {sup 58}Ni(n{sub th},γ) {sup 59}Ni(n{sub th},α) reactions in a thin NiAl layer. The PM2000 undergoes concurrent displacement damage from the high-energy neutrons. The ISHI technique allows direct comparisons of regions with and without high concentrations of helium since only the side coated with the NiAl experiences helium injection. The corresponding microstructural and microchemical evolutions were characterized using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques. The evolutions observed include formation of dislocation loops and associated helium bubbles, precipitation of a variety of phases, amorphization of the Al{sub 2}YO{sub 3} oxides (which also variously contained internal voids), and several manifestations of solute segregation. Notably, high concentrations of helium had a significant effect on many of these diverse phenomena. These results on PM2000 are compared and contrasted to the evolution of so-called nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA).

  17. Phase instability of alloys caused by transmutation effects during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platov, Yu.M.; Pletnev, M.N.

    1994-01-01

    A theory of the phase changes in a two-phase binary A-B alloy in the coarsening condition caused by burnout of solute B due to nuclear reactions is presented. It is shown that this burnout process introduces diffusion redistribution of solute between second phase precipitates and solid solution. The burnout induced solute flux away from second phase precipitates to solid solution maintaining the concentration of element B in the vicinity to its solubility limit and stimulates, thus, the second phase particle dissolution. This occurs in addition to a process decreasing their sizes as a result of direct burnout of atoms B in the precipitates. In the framework of the theory developed here, analytical expressions describing time evolution of the precipitate size distributions, changes of mean radius and number density of the precipitates, and second phase dissolution times are obtained. On the basis of these results and numerical calculations for aluminium-scandium alloy, it is shown that the burnout processes can induce essential phase changes, and thus cause significant changes of the properties of irradiated materials at high neutron fluences. ((orig.))

  18. The effect of low energy helium ion irradiation on tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys under fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonderman, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, tungsten remains the best candidate for plasma-facing components (PFCs) for future fusion devices because of its high melting point, low erosion, and strong mechanical properties. However, continued investigation has shown tungsten to undergo severe morphology changes under fusion-like conditions. These results motivate the study of innovative PFC materials which are resistant to surface morphology evolution. The goal of this work is to examine tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys, a potential PFC material, and their response to low energy helium ion irradiation. Specifically, W-Ta samples are exposed to 100 eV helium irradiations with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, at 873 K, 1023 K, and 1173 K for 1 h duration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals significant changes in surface deterioration due to helium ion irradiation as a function of both temperature and tantalum concentration in W-Ta samples. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) studies show a slight lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples compared to pure W samples. The observed lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples (proportional to increasing Ta wt.% concentrations) reflect significant differences observed in the evolution of surface morphology, i.e., fuzz development processes for both increasing Ta wt.% concentration and target temperature. These results suggest a correlation between the observed morphology differences and the induced crystal structure change caused by the presence of tantalum. Shifts in the XRD peaks before and after 100 eV helium irradiation with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, 1023 K, for 1 h showed a significant difference in the magnitude of the shift. This has suggested a possible link between the atomic spacing of the material and the accumulated damage. Ongoing research is needed on W-Ta alloys and other innovative materials for their application as irradiation resistant materials in future fusion or irradiation environments.

  19. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors: A model for irradiation induced enhancement by local radiolysis in the porous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaignan, C; Salot, R [CEA/DRN/DTP, CENG-SECC, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    An analysis has been undertaken of the various cases of local enhancement of corrosion rate of zirconium alloys under irradiation. It is observed that in most cases a strong emission of energetic {beta}{sup -} is present leading to a local energy deposition rate higher than the core average. This suggests that the local transient radiolytic oxidizing species produced in the coolant by the {beta}{sup -} particles could contribute to corrosion enhancement, by increasing the local corrosion potential. This process is applicable to the local enhanced corrosion found in front of stainless steels structural parts, due to the contribution of Mn, and in front of Pt inserts or Cu-rich cruds. It explains also the irradiation corrosion enhancement of Cu-Zr alloys. Enhanced corrosion around neutron absorbing material is explained similarly by pair production from conversion of high energy capture photons in the cladding, leading to energetic electrons. The same process was found to be active with other highly ionizing species like {alpha} from Ni-rich alloys and fission products in homogeneous reactors. Due to the changes induced by the irradiation intensity on the concentration of the radiolytic species, the coolant chemistry, that controls the boundary conditions for oxide growth, has to be analyzed with respect to the local value of the energy deposition rate. An analysis has been undertaken which shows that, in a porous media, the water is exposed to a higher intensity than bulk water. This leads to a higher concentration of oxidizing radiolytic species at the root of the cracks of the porous oxide, and increases the corrosion rate under irradiation. This mechanism, deduced from the explanation proposed for localized irradiation enhanced corrosion, can be extended to the whole reactor core, where the general enhancement of Zr alloys corrosion under irradiation could be attributed to the general radiolysis in the porous zirconia. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  20. Tensile properties of several 800 MeV proton-irradiated bcc metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Wechsler, M.S.; Tschalar, C.

    1987-01-01

    A spallation neutron source for the 600-MeV proton accelerator facility at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN) consists of a vertical cylinder filled with molten Pb-Bi. The proton beam enters the cylinder, passing upward through a window in contact with the Pb-Bi eutectic liquid that must retain reasonable strength and ductility upon irradiation at about 673 K to fluence of about 1 x 10/sup 25/ protons/m/sup 2/. Investigations are underway at the 800-MeV proton accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to test the performance of candidate SIN window materials under appropriate conditions of temperature, irradiation, and environment. Based on considerations of chemical compatibility with molten Pb-Bi, as well as interest in identifying fundamental radiation damage mechanisms, Fe, Ta, Fe-2.25Cr-1Mo, and Fe-12Cr-1Mo(HT-9) were chosen as candidate materials. Sheet tensile samples, 0.5-mm thick, of the four materials were fabricated and heat treated. The samples were sealed inside capsules containing Pb-Bi and were proton-irradiated at LAMPF to two fluences, 4.8 and 54 x 10/sup 23/ p/m/sup 2/. The beam current was approximately equal to the 1 mA anticipated for the upgraded SIN accelerator. The power deposited by the proton beam in the capsules was sufficient to maintain sample temperatures of about 673 K. Post-irradiation tensile tests were conducted at room temperature at a strain rate of 9 x 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/. The yield and ultimate strengths increased upon irradiation in all materials, while the ductility decreased, as indicated by the uniform strain. The pure metals, Ta and Fe, exhibited the greatest radiation hardening and embrittlement. The HT-9 alloy showed the smallest changes in strength and ductility. The increase in strength following irradiation is discussed in terms of a dispersed-barrier hardening model, for which the barrier sizes and formation cross sections are calculated

  1. Influence of helium generation rate and temperature history on mechanical properties of model Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated in FFTF at relatively low displacement rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.; Edwards, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    In agreement with earlier studies conducted at higher displacement rates, evolution of mechanical properties of model Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated at lower displacement rates in the 59 Ni isotopic doping experiment does not appear to be strongly affected by large differences in helium generation rate. This insensitivity to helium/dpa ratio is exhibited during both isothermal and non-isothermal irradiation. The overall behavior of the model alloys used in this study is dominated by the tendency to converge to a saturation strength level that is independent of thermomechanical starting state and helium/dpa ratio, but which is dependent on irradiation temperature and alloy composition

  2. Nanocavity formation and hardness increase by dual ion beam irradiation of oxide dispersion strengthened FeCrAl alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koegler, R., E-mail: r.koegler@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Anwand, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Richter, A. [Department of Engineering, Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Bahnhofstrasse 1, 15745 Wildau (Germany); Butterling, M.; Ou, Xin; Wagner, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Chen, C.-L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 840, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-15

    Open volume defects generated by ion implantation into oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy and the related hardness were investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy and nanoindentation measurements, respectively. Synchronized dual beam implantation of Fe and He ions was performed at room temperature and at moderately enhanced temperature of 300 Degree-Sign C. For room temperature implantation a significant hardness increase after irradiation is observed which is more distinctive in heat treated than in as-received ODS alloy. There is also a difference between the simultaneous and sequential implantation mode as the hardening effect for the simultaneously implanted ODS alloy is stronger than for sequential implantation. The comparison of hardness profiles and of the corresponding open volume profiles shows a qualitative agreement between the open volume defects generated on the nanoscopic scale and the macroscopic hardness characteristics. Open volume defects are drastically reduced for performing the simultaneous dual beam irradiation at 300 Degree-Sign C which is a more realistic temperature under application aspects. Few remaining defects are clusters of 3-4 vacancies in connection with Y oxide nanoparticles. These defects completely disappear in a shallow layer at the surface. The results are in agreement with hardness measurements showing little hardness increase after irradiation at 300 Degree-Sign C. Suitable characteristics of ODS alloy for nuclear applications and the close correlation between He-related open volume defects and the hardness characteristics are verified.

  3. Establishment of technological basis for fabrication of U-Pu-Zr ternary alloy fuel pins for irradiation tests in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Hironobu; Iwai, Takashi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Arai, Yasuo; Nakamura, Kinya; Ogata, Takanari

    2011-01-01

    A high-purity Ar gas atmosphere glove box accommodating injection casting and sodium-bonding apparatuses was newly installed in the Plutonium Fuel Research Facility of Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, in which several nitride and carbide fuel pins were fabricated for irradiation tests. The experiences led to the establishment of the technological basis of the fabrication of U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins for the first time in Japan. After the injection casting of the U-Pu-Zr alloy, the metallic fuel pins were fabricated by welding upper and lower end plugs with cladding tubes of ferritic-martensitic steel. Subsequent to the sodium bonding for filling the annular gap region between the U-Pu-Zr alloy and the cladding tube with the melted sodium, the fuel pins for irradiation tests are inspected. This paper shows the apparatuses and the technological basis for the fabrication of U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins for the irradiation test planned at the experimental fast test reactor Joyo. (author)

  4. Growth rate of dislocation loop in Fe-Ni-Cr alloy under Kr+ ion and electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimoto, T.; Allen, C.W.; Rehn, L.E.

    1991-10-01

    In order to examine the effect of irradiating particle species on the growth rate of radiation-induced dislocation loops, a solution-annealed Fe-25Ni-15Cr-0.02C alloy was irradiated at 723 K first by 1.5 MeV Kr + ions for 2520 sec, then by 1.5 MeV Kr + ions and 1.0 MeV electrons simultaneously for 780 sec, and finally by 1.0 MeV electrons for 780 sec with the HVEM-Tandem Facility in Argonne National Laboratory. The calculated damage rate by 1.5 MeV Kr + ions was 5.8 x 10 -4 dpa/s, and that by 1.0 MeV electrons was 1 x 10 -4 dpa/s. The growth rate of a dislocation loop located at the center of the specimen was 7 x 10 -3 nm/s for the Kr + ion irradiation, 4 x 10 -2 nm/s for the simultaneous Kr + and electron irradiation, and (2--3) x 10 -2 nm/s for the electron irradiation. This implies that the electron irradiation is about 19 times more effective in the growth of radiation-induced dislocation loops than the Kr + ion irradiation. The dislocation loop growth rate under the simultaneous Kr + and electron irradiation is higher than the sum of the growth rates under the individual Kr + and electron irradiations. 5 refs., 4 figs

  5. The Primary Origin of Dose Rate Effects on Microstructural Evolution of Austenitic Alloys During Neutron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Taira; Sato, Toshihiko; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on neutron-induced microstructural evolution was experimentally estimated. Solution-annealed austenitic model alloys were irradiated at approximately 400 degrees C with fast neutrons at seven different dose rates that vary more than two orders difference in magnitude, and two different doses were achieved at each dose rate. Both cavity nucleation and growth were found to be enhanced at lower dose rate. The net vacancy flux is calculated from the growth rate of cavities that had already nucleated during the first cycle of irradiation and grown during the second cycle. The net vacancy flux was found to be proportional to (dpa/sec) exp (1/2) up to 28.8 dpa and 8.4 x 10 exp (-7) dpa/sec. This implies that mutual recombination dominates point defect annihilation, in this experiment even though point defect sinks such as cavities and dislocations were well developed. Thus, mutual recombination is thought to be the primary origin of the effect of dose rate on microstructural evolution

  6. Recent results on the neutron irradiation of ITER candidate copper alloys irradiated in DR-3 at 250{degrees}C to 0.3 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1997-04-01

    Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment with additional specimens re-aged and given a reactor bakeout treatment at 350{degrees}C for 100 h. CuAl-25 was also heat treated to simulate the effects of a bonding thermal cycle on the material. A number of heat treated specimens were neutron irradiated at 250{degrees}C to a dose level of {approximately}0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor as Riso. The main effect of the bonding thermal cycle heat treatment was a slight decrease in strength of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. The strength of CuAl-25, on the other hand, remained almost unaltered. The post irradiation tests at 250{degrees}C showed a severe loss of ductility in the case of the CuNiBe alloy. The irradiated CuAl-25 and CuCrZr specimens exhibited a reasonable amount of uniform elongation, with CuCrZr possessing a lower strength.

  7. {sup 197}Au irradiation study of phase-change memory cell with GeSbTe alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Lian, Jie; Rao, Feng; Liu, Bo; Song, Sannian; Liu, Weili; Feng, Songlin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhou, Xilin; Liu, Xuyan [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2010-10-15

    A {sup 197}Au ion source was used to irradiate a Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}-alloy-based phase-change memory (PCM) cell to study the ion-irradiation effect on the properties of the cell. The PCM devices with the tungsten (W) heating electrode of 260 nm diameter were fabricated by 0.18 {mu}m complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Four different doses (10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, 10{sup 12}, and 5 x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively) were applied to irradiate the PCM cell. The samples before and after irradiation were characterized by current-voltage and resistance measurements at room temperature. It is found that the cell properties (resistance value of the amorphous and crystalline states, threshold voltage, and current for phase transition, etc.) have hardly changed, even for the sample irradiated up to 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} dose, and the cell still has good set-reset operation ability (above 10{sup 5} cycles). Furthermore, the resistance ratio remains at 1000 even after 10{sup 5} cycles of the set-reset operation. The results show the PCM cell with Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} alloy has a strong ion-irradiation tolerance. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Initiation and propagation of cleared channels in neutron-irradiated pure copper and a precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N; Edwards, D.J.; Bilde-Sørensen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of plastic flow localization in the form of "cleared" channels has been frequently observed in neutron irradiated metals and alloys for more than 40 years. So far, however, no experimental evidence as to how and where these channels areinitiated during post-irradiation deformation...... has emerged. Recently we have studied the problem of initiation and propagation of cleared channels during post-irradiation tensile tests of pure copper and a copper alloy irradiated with fission neutrons.Tensile specimens of pure copper and a precipitation hardened copper alloy (CuCrZr) were neutron...... irradiated at 323 and 373K to displacement doses in the range of 0.01 to 0.3 dpa (displacement per atom) and tensile tested at the irradiation temperature.The stress-strain curves clearly indicated the occurrence of a yield drop. The post-deformation microstructural examinations revealed that the channels...

  9. Mobility of dislocations in thermal aged and irradiated Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, D.; Bonny, G.; Malerba, L.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The choice of the Cr concentration in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications is largely based on the observed minimum radiation-induced embrittlement, in terms of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift (ΔDBTT), found around 9%Cr [1]. To date, no physical explanation for the existence of this minimum has been provided. It is known that in high-Cr ferritic alloys the precipitation of the Cr-rich, coherent α' phase occurs for concentrations above 9% Cr, both due to irradiation or thermal ageing at high enough temperature [2]. The formation of a fine dispersion of precipitates can therefore explain the increased embrittlement above this concentration, but it is unclear why the ΔDBTT should increase also for lower Cr concentrations. In addition, it is suspected that under irradiation a' precipitation may be induced also for Cr contents below 9% [3]. At the same time, it is known that below 9% Cr ferritic alloys exhibit a tendency to ordering, i.e. Cr atoms are not distributed as in a random solid solution and try to be as far apart as possible from each other, thereby tending to create a superlattice [4]. In order to cast some light on the effect that these phase changes may have on dislocation motion in the presence of radiation damage, we study at the atomic level the mobility of dislocations in FeCr alloys of different concentrations where Cr is distributed in different fashions (i.e. ordered, clustered or in a random solid solution) and in the presence of radiation damage (e.g. point-defect clusters created by cascades). The microstructure will be obtained by making the system evolve according to the acting thermodynamic driving forces (also in the presence of defects) using Metropolis Monte Carlo techniques. Subsequently, the simulation of the dislocation motion will be performed using large scale molecular dynamics, whereby the corresponding stress-strain curve can be obtained. The

  10. Enhancement in anomalous Hall resistivity of Co/Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy by Ga+ ion irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of Ga+ ion irradiation on anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and longitudinal resistivity (ρxx) in [Co(3 Å)/Pd(5 Å)]80 multilayer and Co 42Pd58 alloy. 4- and 2-fold increases in anomalous Hall resistivity (ρAH) in the Co/Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy have been observed after irradiations at doses of 2.4 × 1015 and 3.3×10 15 ions/cm2, respectively. Skew scattering and side jump contributions to AHE have been analyzed based on the scaling relationship ρAH = aρxx + bρ2xx. For the Co/Pd multilayer, AHE is mainly affected by ion irradiation-induced interface diffusion and defects. For the CoPd alloy, the increase in doses above 1.5 × 1015 ions/cm2 induces a sign change in skew scattering, followed by the skew scattering contribution to AHE overwhelming the side jump contribution, this phenomenon should be attributed to irradiation-induced defects and modifications in chemical ordering. © Copyright EPLA, 2014.

  11. Preliminary Analysis of the General Performance and Mechanical Behavior of Irradiated FeCrAl Base Alloys and Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Briggs, Samuel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The iron-based, iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are promising, robust materials for deployment in current and future nuclear power plants. This class of alloys demonstrates excellent performance in a range of environments and conditions, including high-temperature steam (>1000°C). Furthermore, these alloys have the potential to have prolonged survival under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions compared to the more traditional cladding materials that are either Zr-based alloys or austenitic steels. However, one of the issues associated with FeCrAl alloys is cracking during welding. The present project investigates the possibility of mitigating welding-induced cracking via alloying and precise structure control of the weldments; in the frame work of the project, several advanced alloys were developed and are being investigated prior to and after neutron irradiation to provide insight into the radiation tolerance and mechanical performance of the weldments. The present report provides preliminary results on the post-irradiation characterization and mechanical tests performed during United States Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. Chapter 1 provides a general introduction, and Chapter 2 describes the alloy compositions, welding procedure, specimen geometry and manufacturing parameters. Also, a brief discussion of the irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is provided. Chapter 3 is devoted to the analysis of mechanical tests performed at the hot cell facility; tensile curves and mechanical properties are discussed in detail focusing on the irradiation temperature. Limited fractography results are also presented and analyzed. The discussion highlights the limitations of the testing within a hot cell. Chapter 4 underlines the advantages of in-situ testing and discusses the preliminary results obtained with newly developed miniature specimens. Specimens were moved to the Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) laboratory and prepared for

  12. Effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 350 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Edwards, D.J.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    2001-01-01

    Screening experiments were carried out to determine the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the oxide dispersion strengthened (GlidCop, CuAl-25) and the precipitation hardened (CuCrZr, CuNiBe) copper alloys. Tensile...... results are described and their salient features discussed. The most significant effect of neutron irradiation is a severe loss of ductility in the case of CuNiBe alloys. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Prediction of irradiation induced microstructures in the AgCu model alloy using a multiscale method coupling atomistic and phase field modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Demange, Gilles; Pontikis, Vassilis; Lunéville, Laurence; Simeone, David

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a multiscale approach based on phase field was developed to simulate the microstructure's evolution under irradiation in binary systems, from atomic to microstructural scale. For that purpose, an efficient numerical scheme was developed. In the case of AgCu alloy under Krypton ions irradiation, phenomenological parameters were computed using atomistic methods, as a function of the temperature and the irradiation flux. As a result, we predicted the influence of the irradiation fl...

  14. Irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels (Heavy-Section Steel Technology program series 4 and 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, J.J.; Nanstad, R.K.; Thoms, K.R.; Menke, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents studies on the irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels. The Fourth Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Irradiation Series, almost completed, was aimed at elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture toughness of low-copper weldments (''current practice welds''). A typical nuclear pressure vessel plate steel was included for statistical purposes. The Fifth HSST Irradiation Series, now in progress, is aimed at determining the shape of the K/sub IR/ curve after significant radiation-induced shift of the transition temperatures. This series includes irradiated test specimens of thicknesses up to 100 mm and weldment compositions typical of early nuclear power reactor pressure vessel welds. 27 refs., 22 figs

  15. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation: Microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-10-01

    As part of a program to provide a data base on the bainitic alloy Fe-2-1/4-1Mo for fusion energy applications, microstructural examinations are reported for nine specimen conditions for 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel which had been irradiated by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 510 0 C. Void swelling is found following irradiation at 400 0 C to 480 0 C. Concurrently dislocation structure and precipitation developed. Peak void swelling, void density, dislocation density and precipitate number density formed at the lowest temperature, approximately 400 0 C, whereas mean void size, and mean precipitate size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The examination results are used to provide interpretation of in-reactor creep, density change and post irradiation tensile behavior

  16. Assessment of helium effects on swelling by reirradiation in FFTF of Path A alloys previously irradiated in HFIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Specimens of the Path A Prime Candidate Alloys and of N-lot SS 316 were irradiated in HFIR at 400 to 600 0 C to fluences producing approximately 10 to 44 dpa and 500 to 3600 at. ppm He, in both the solution annealed and 20 to 25% cold-worked conditions. The cavity swelling and total microstructural evolution of most samples were observed via transmission electron microscopy on identical disks irradiated side by side in HFIR, and immersion densities were also measured prior to insertion into FFTF/MOTA (Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility). These disks are being irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA (cycles 5 and 6), side by side with disks of the same materials which were not previously irradiated in HFIR. These specimens have been divided into two subsets for discharges after 30 and 60 dpa. 4 references, 1 table

  17. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Département Matériaux et Mécanique des Composants, Les Renardières, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a “grey alloy” approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe–C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe–C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  18. Nonequilibrium segregation and phase instability in alloy films during elevated-temperature irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of defect-production rate gradients, caused by the radial nonuniformity in the electron flux distribution, on solute segregation and phase stability in alloy films undergoing high-voltage electron-microscope (HVEM) irradiation at high temperatures are assessed. Two-dimensional (axially symmetric) compositional redistributions were calculated, taking into account both axial and transverse radial defect fluxes. It was found that when highly focused beams were employed radiation-induced segregation consisted of two stages: dominant axial segregation at the film surfaces at short irradiation times and competitive radial segregation at longer times. The average alloy composition within the irradiated region could differ greatly from that irradiated with a uniform beam, because of the additional atom transport from or to the region surrounding the irradiated zone under the influence of radial fluxes. As a result, damage-rate gradient effects must be taken into account when interpreting in-situ HVEM observations of segregation-induced phase instabilities. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations of the temporal and spatial dependence of segregation-induced precipitation in thin films of Ni-Al, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si solid solutions

  19. Nonequilibrium segregation and phase instability in alloy films during elevated-temperature irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of defect-production rate gradients, caused by the radial nonuniformity in the electron flux distribution, on solute segregation and phase stability in alloy films undergoing high-voltage electron-microscope (HVEM) irradiation at high temperatures are assessed. Two-dimensional (axially symmetric) compositional redistributions were calculated, taking into account both axial and transverse radial defect fluxes. It was found that when highly focused beams were employed radiation-induced segregation consisted of two stages: dominant axial segregation at the film surfaces at short irradiation times and competitive radial segregation at longer times. The average alloy composition within the irradiated region could differ greatly from that irradiated with a uniform beam, because of the additional atom transport from or to the region surrounding the irradiated zone under the influence of radial fluxes. Damage-rate gradient effects must be taken into account when interpreting in-situ HVEM observations of segregation-induced phase instabilities. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations of the temporal and spatial dependence of segregation-induced precipitation in thin films of Ni-Al, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si solid solutions.

  20. Neutron irradiation of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the BOR-60 fast reactor: Description of the fusion-1 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The FUSION-1 irradiation capsule was inserted in Row 5 of the BOR-60 fast reactor in June 1995. The capsule contains a collaborative RF/U.S. experiment to investigate the irradiation performance of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the temperature range 310 to 350{degrees}C. This report describes the capsule layout, specimen fabrication history, and the detailed test matrix for the U.S. specimens. A description of the operating history and neutronics will be presented in the next semiannual report.

  1. Effects of bonding bakeout thermal cycles on pre- and post irradiation microstructures, physical, and mechanical properties of copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    At present, dispersion strengthened (DS) copper is being considered as the primary candidate material for the ITER first wall and divertor components. Recently, it was agreed among the ITER parties that a backup alloy should be selected from the two well known precipitation hardened copper alloys, CuCrZr and CuNiBe. It was therefore decided to carry out screening experiments to simulate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. On the basis of the results of these experiments, one of the two alloys will be selected as a backup material. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime ageing, and bonding thermal cycle followed by reageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 623K for 100 hours. Tensile specimens of the DS copper were also given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of these heat treated specimens of CuCrZr, CuNiBe, and DS copper were neutron irradiated at 523K to a dose level of {approx}0.3 dpa (NRT) in the DR-3 reactor at Riso. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with the various heat treatments were tensile tested at 532K. The dislocation, precipitate and void microstructures and electrical resistivity of these specimens were also determined. Results of these investigations will be reported and discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and irradiation-induced precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. Results show that the bonding and bakeout thermal cycles are not likely to have any serious deleterious effects on the performance of these alloys. The CuNiBe alloys were found to be susceptible to radiation-induced embrittlement, however, the exact mechanism is not yet known. It is thought that radiation-induced precipitation and segregation of the beryllium may be responsible.

  2. Evaluation of defect formation in helium irradiated Y2O3 doped W-Ti alloys by positron annihilation and nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Asta; Anwand, Wolfgang; Chen, Chun-Liang; Böttger, Roman

    2017-10-01

    Helium implanted tungsten-titanium ODS alloys are investigated using positron annihilation spectroscopy and nanoindentation. Titanium reduces the brittleness of the tungsten alloy, which is manufactured by mechanical alloying. The addition of Y2O3 nanoparticles increases the mechanical properties at elevated temperature and enhances irradiation resistance. Helium ion implantation was applied to simulate irradiation effects on these materials. The irradiation was performed using a 500 kV He ion implanter at fluences around 5 × 1015 cm-2 for a series of samples both at room temperature and at 600 °C. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the pristine and irradiated W-Ti-ODS alloy are compared with respect to the titanium and Y2O3 content. Radiation damage is studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy analyzing the lifetime and the Doppler broadening. Three types of helium-vacancy defects were detected after helium irradiation in the W-Ti-ODS alloy: small defects with high helium-to-vacancy ratio (low S parameter) for room temperature irradiation, larger open volume defects with low helium-to-vacancy ratio (high S parameter) at the surface and He-vacancy complexes pinned at nanoparticles deeper in the material for implantation at 600 °C. Defect induced hardness was studied by nanoindentation. A drastic hardness increase is observed after He ion irradiation both for room temperature and elevated irradiation temperature of 600 °C. The Ti alloyed tungsten-ODS is more affected by the hardness increase after irradiation compared to the pure W-ODS alloy.

  3. Degradation of protective properties of oxide films on Zr-Nb alloys after neutron and ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belykh, T.A.; Kruzhalov, A.V.; Neshov, F.G.; Matveev, A.V.; Perekhozhev, V.I.; Sinel'nikov, L.P.; Kozlov, A.V.; Kalachikov, V.E.

    2000-01-01

    Specimens of zirconium-niobium alloys with surface oxide films, which had been working in technological channels of boiling nuclear reactor and were irradiated with nitrogen (10 MeV) and carbon (9 MeV) ions, were investigated by the methods of electrochemical decoration and resistance measuring. The role of the radiation effect in the processes of nodular corrosion formation and development is studied [ru

  4. Electron irradiation effect on short-range ordering in Cu-Al and Ag-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulish, N.P.; Mel'nikova, N.A.; Petrenko, P.V.; Ryabishchuk, A.L.; Tatarov, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Method of X-ray diffuse scattering is used to study short-range order variation in Cu-Al and Ag-Al alloys under radiation effect and the following heat treatment. Irradiation was carried out at -40 deg C by 1.6 MeV electrons, fluence of 5x10 7 cm -2 and 0.5 MeV gamma-rays, the dose being 10 7 pH

  5. Modeling copper precipitation hardening and embrittlement in a dilute Fe-0.3at.%Cu alloy under neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Ke, Huibin; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin W.

    2017-11-01

    Neutron irradiation in light water reactors can induce precipitation of nanometer sized Cu clusters in reactor pressure vessel steels. The Cu precipitates impede dislocation gliding, leading to an increase in yield strength (hardening) and an upward shift of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (embrittlement). In this work, cluster dynamics modeling is used to model the entire Cu precipitation process (nucleation, growth, and coarsening) in a Fe-0.3at.%Cu alloy under neutron irradiation at 300°C based on the homogenous nucleation mechanism. The evolution of the Cu cluster number density and mean radius predicted by the modeling agrees well with experimental data reported in literature for the same alloy under the same irradiation conditions. The predicted precipitation kinetics is used as input for a dispersed barrier hardening model to correlate the microstructural evolution with the radiation hardening and embrittlement in this alloy. The predicted radiation hardening agrees well with the mechanical test results in the literature. Limitations of the model and areas for future improvement are also discussed in this work.

  6. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy and Small Angle Neutron Scattering Characterization of Nanostructural Features in Irradiated Fe-Cu-Mn Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B D; Asoka-Kumar, P; Howell, R H; Odette, G R; Sterne, P A

    2001-01-01

    Radiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from a high number density of nanometer sized Cu-Mn-Ni rich precipitates (CRPs) and sub-nanometer matrix features, thought to be vacancy-solute cluster complexes (VSC). However, questions exist regarding both the composition of the precipitates and the defect character and composition of the matrix features. We present results of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) characterization of irradiated and thermally aged Fe-Cu and Fe-Cu-Mn alloys. These complementary techniques provide insight into the composition and character of both types of nanoscale features. The SANS measurements indicate populations of CRPs and VSCs in both alloys. The CRPs are coarser in the Fe-Cu alloy and the number densities of CRP and VSC increase with the addition of Mn. The PAS involved measuring both the positron lifetimes and the Doppler broadened annihilation spectra in the high momentum region to provide elemental sensitivity at the annihilation site. The spectra in Fe-Cu-Mn specimens thermally aged to peak hardness at 450 C and irradiated at 288 C are nearly identical to elemental Cu. Positron lifetime and spectrum measurements in Fe-Cu specimens irradiated at 288 C clearly show the existence of long lifetime (∼500 ps) open volume defects, which also contain Cu. Thus the SANS and PAS provide a self-consistent picture of nanostructures composed of CRPs and VSCs and tend to discount high Fe concentrations in the CRPs

  7. Tensile behavior of RAFM alloys after neutron irradiation of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materna-Morris, E., E-mail: edeltraud.materna-morris@kit.edu; Schneider, H.-C., E-mail: hans-christian.schneider@kit.edu; Möslang, A., E-mail: anton.moeslang@kit.edu

    2014-12-15

    Tensile specimen of steel EUROFER97 and other alloys on the basis of RAFM steels such, as OPTIFER and F82H alloys, and Ga3X were irradiated and post-examined during a neutron irradiation program of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in the Netherlands. These tensile results were compared with former irradiation programs, with lower neutron doses of up to 0.8 and 2.4 dpa to quantify the difference in tensile strengthening. The average increase of tensile strength was in a range of 300 MPa between 0.8 and 16.3 dpa at temperatures of 250–300 °C. This behavior can be correlated with irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure. Most of the hardening can be attributed to dislocation loops, point defects or small precipitates as observed in boron-free alloys as F82H mod. and EUROFER97. Whereas the hardening in boron-containing alloys OPTIFER alloys and Ga3X can be correlated in addition with the combination of helium bubbles. At the highest irradiation and test temperature at 450 °C, all tensile data of all investigated materials were in the range of those of non-irradiated and irradiated material due to thermal aging effects.

  8. Tensile behavior of RAFM alloys after neutron irradiation of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna-Morris, E.; Schneider, H.-C.; Möslang, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tensile specimen of steel EUROFER97 and other alloys on the basis of RAFM steels such, as OPTIFER and F82H alloys, and Ga3X were irradiated and post-examined during a neutron irradiation program of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in the Netherlands. These tensile results were compared with former irradiation programs, with lower neutron doses of up to 0.8 and 2.4 dpa to quantify the difference in tensile strengthening. The average increase of tensile strength was in a range of 300 MPa between 0.8 and 16.3 dpa at temperatures of 250–300 °C. This behavior can be correlated with irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure. Most of the hardening can be attributed to dislocation loops, point defects or small precipitates as observed in boron-free alloys as F82H mod. and EUROFER97. Whereas the hardening in boron-containing alloys OPTIFER alloys and Ga3X can be correlated in addition with the combination of helium bubbles. At the highest irradiation and test temperature at 450 °C, all tensile data of all investigated materials were in the range of those of non-irradiated and irradiated material due to thermal aging effects

  9. Corrosion of carbon steel and low-alloy steel in diluted seawater containing hydrazine under gamma-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Seawater was injected into reactor cores of Units 1, 2, and 3 in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station as an urgent coolant. It is considered that the injected seawater causes corrosion of steels of the reactor pressure vessel and primary containment vessel. To investigate the effects of gamma-rays irradiation on weight loss in carbon steel and low-alloy steel, corrosion tests were performed in diluted seawater at 50°C under gamma-rays irradiation. Specimens were irradiated with dose rates of 4.4 kGy/h and 0.2 kGy/h. To evaluate the effects of hydrazine (N 2 H 4 ) on the reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, N 2 H 4 was added to the diluted seawater. In the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 , weight loss in the steels irradiated with 0.2 kGy/h was similar to that in the unirradiated steels, and weight loss in the steels irradiated with 4.4 kGy/h increased to approximate 1.7 times of those in the unirradiated steels. Weight loss in the steels irradiated in the diluted seawater containing N 2 H 4 was similar to that in the diluted seawater without N 2 H 4 . When N 2 was introduced into the gas phase in the flasks during gamma-rays irradiation, weight loss in the steels decreased. (author)

  10. Diffusion and coupled fluxes in concentrated alloys under irradiation: a self-consistent mean-field approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastar, M.

    2008-01-01

    When an alloy is irradiated, atomic transport can occur through the two types of defects which are created: vacancies and interstitials. Recent developments of the self-consistent mean field (SCMF) kinetic theory could treat within the same formalism diffusion due to vacancies and interstitials in a multi-component alloy. It starts from a microscopic model of the atomic transport via vacancies and interstitials and yields the fluxes with a complete Onsager matrix of the phenomenological coefficients. The jump frequencies depend on the local environment through a 'broken bond model' such that the large range of frequencies involved in concentrated alloys is produced by a small number of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. Kinetic correlations are accounted for through a set of time-dependent effective interactions within a non-equilibrium distribution function of the system. The different approximations of the SCMF theory recover most of the previous diffusion models. Recent improvements of the theory were to extend the multi-frequency approach usually restricted to dilute alloys to diffusion in concentrated alloys with jump frequencies depending on local concentrations and to generalize the formalism first developed for the vacancy diffusion mechanism to the more complex diffusion mechanism of the interstitial in the dumbbell configuration. (author)

  11. Defects and related phenomena in electron irradiated ordered or disordered Fe-Co and Fe-Co-V alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, J.P.; Dinhut, J.F.; Desarmot, G.

    1983-01-01

    Two B 2 type alloys Fe 50 at.%-Co 50 at.% and Fe 49 at.%-Co 49 at.%-V 2 at.% either in the ordered or the disordered state have been irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons at liquid hydrogen temperature. The recovery of the resistivity damage was studied during subsequent isochronal annealing up to 700 K. The resistivity damage rates for both initially disordered Fe-Co and Fe-Co-V alloys are interpreted in terms of point defect production. The intrinsic resistivities rhosub(F) of Frenkel pairs and the effective recombination volumes V 0 are determined. In the Fe-Co ordered alloy point defect production superimposed with a disordering process can account for the resistivity damage. The effective displacement rate causing disordering is determined, indicating that replacement collisions are the dominant disordering mechanism. A calculation of the average number of replacements along directions per Frenkel pair is proposed. During the recovery of the radiation induced resistivity three main stages are observed in both ordered and disordered alloys. The particular resistivity behavior of the Fe-Co-V alloy complicates the interpretation of production and recovery data. (author)

  12. Microstructure of RERTR DU-alloys irradiated with krypton ions up to 100 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, J. [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Keiser, D.D., E-mail: Dennis.Keiser@inl.gov [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Miller, B.D.; Wachs, D.M. [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Allen, T.R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kirk, M.; Rest, J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The radiation stability of the interaction product formed at the fuel-matrix interface of research reactor dispersion fuels, under fission-product bombardment, has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted uranium alloys were cast that consisted of the following five phases to be investigated: U(Si, Al){sub 3}, (U, Mo)(Si, Al){sub 3}, UMo{sub 2}Al{sub 20}, U{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}Al{sub 43}, and UAl{sub 4}. Irradiation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disc samples with 500-keV Kr ions at 200 deg. C to doses up to {approx}100 displacements per atom (dpa) were conducted using a 300-keV electron microscope equipped with an ion accelerator. TEM results show that the U(Si, Al){sub 3} and UAl{sub 4} phases remain crystalline at 100 dpa without forming voids. The (U, Mo)(Si, Al){sub 3} and UMo{sub 2}Al{sub 20} phases become amorphous at 1 and {approx}2 dpa, respectively, and show no evidence of voids at 100 dpa. The U{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}Al{sub 43} phase goes to amorphous at less than 1 dpa and reveals high density voids at 100 dpa.

  13. Microstructure of RERTR DU-alloys irradiated with krypton ions up to 100 dpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D., Jr.; Miller, B. D.; Wachs, D. M.; Allen, T. R.; Kirk, M.; Rest, J.

    2011-04-01

    The radiation stability of the interaction product formed at the fuel-matrix interface of research reactor dispersion fuels, under fission-product bombardment, has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted uranium alloys were cast that consisted of the following five phases to be investigated: U(Si, Al) 3, (U, Mo)(Si, Al) 3, UMo 2Al 20, U 6Mo 4Al 43, and UAl 4. Irradiation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disc samples with 500-keV Kr ions at 200 °C to doses up to ˜100 displacements per atom (dpa) were conducted using a 300-keV electron microscope equipped with an ion accelerator. TEM results show that the U(Si, Al) 3 and UAl 4 phases remain crystalline at 100 dpa without forming voids. The (U, Mo)(Si, Al) 3 and UMo 2Al 20 phases become amorphous at 1 and ˜2 dpa, respectively, and show no evidence of voids at 100 dpa. The U 6Mo 4Al 43 phase goes to amorphous at less than 1 dpa and reveals high density voids at 100 dpa.

  14. Internal friction of Fe-B alloys neutron irradiated at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazunori; Futagami, Koji; Abe, Hironobu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made on the internal friction of Fe-B alloys irradiated by neutron at 16 0 K to the dose of 3x10 16 nvt (>1 MeV) and 6x10 17 nvt (thermal). Boron was used to enhance the production of defects by the nuclear transformation B 10 (n,α)Li 7 . Relaxation peaks were found in specimens containing dispersed fine precipitates of NbB 2 in range of B 500--7200 wt ppm and Nb 2000--30000 wt ppm. The most prominent peak is the one with the peak temperature of 169 0 K at the frequency of 264 c/sec. Activation energy determined from the peak shift is 0.28+-0.01 eV, which is nearly equal to that of migration of self-interstitial reported on pure iron. However activation energy of the decay of peaks by annealing is about 0.7 eV. Interpretation was presented that the peak may be attributed to re-orientation of self-interstitials loosely bound to a boron atom. (auth.)

  15. Molecular dynamics study of interstitial-solute interactions in irradiated alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Doan, N.V.; Adda, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The molecular dynamics technique has been used, in conjunction with the interionic potentials of Dagens et al, to study the stability, configuration, binding, and induced migration of mixed dumbbells in an irradiated Al-Zn alloy. For the purpose of comparisons, self-interstitials in pure Al were also investigated. The Al-Al and Al-Zn interactions were described by pair potentials which extended to ninth-neighbour distances. Both the self-interstitial dumbbell and the mixed dumbbell were found to be stable in the configuration. The formation energy of the self-interstitial is 2.89 eV and the mixed-dumbbell binding energy is 0.38 eV. As a result of this strong binding, the threshold energy required to induce the migration of the mixed dumbbell is about 1.2 eV, which is significantly larger than the minimum energy of about 0.15 eV transferred to a self-interstitial to induce its jumps in pure Al. Caging motions of the mixed dumbbell were observed. The present computer-simulation results are compared with experimental measurements. (author)

  16. Microchemical effects in irradiated Fe–Cr alloys as revealed by atomistic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malerba, L., E-mail: lmalerba@sckcen.be [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D. [Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure Unit, SMA/NMS, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d’Etudes de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Zhurkin, E.E. [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, K-89, Faculty of Physics and Mechanics, Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytekhnicheskaya Str., 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hou, M. [Physique des Solides Irradiés et des Nanostructures CP234, Faculté des Sciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bd du Triomphe, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Vörtler, K.; Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-Tekes, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-11-15

    Neutron irradiation produces evolving nanostructural defects in materials, that affect their macroscopic properties. Defect production and evolution is expected to be influenced by the chemical composition of the material. In turn, the accumulation of defects in the material results in microchemical changes, which may induce further changes in macroscopic properties. In this work we review the results of recent atomic-level simulations conducted in Fe–Cr alloys, as model materials for high-Cr ferritic–martensitic steels, to address the following questions: 1. Is the primary damage produced in displacement cascades influenced by the Cr content? If so, how? 2. Does Cr change the stability of radiation-produced defects? 3. Is the diffusivity of cascade-produced defects changed by Cr content? 4. How do Cr atoms redistribute under irradiation inside the material under the action of thermodynamic driving forces and radiation-defect fluxes? It is found that the presence of Cr does not influence the type of damage created by displacement cascades, as compared to pure Fe, while cascades do contribute to redistributing Cr, in the same direction as thermodynamic driving forces. The presence of Cr does change the stability of point-defects: the effect is weak in the case of vacancies, stronger in the case of self-interstitials. In the latter case, Cr increases the stability of self-interstitial clusters, especially those so small to be invisible to the electron microscope. Cr reduces also significantly the diffusivity of self-interstitials and their clusters, in a way that depends in a non-monotonic way on Cr content, as well as on cluster size and temperature; however, the effect is negligible on the mobility of self-interstitial clusters large enough to become visible dislocation loops. Finally, Cr-rich precipitate formation is favoured in the tensile region of edge dislocations, while it appears not to be influenced by screw dislocations; prismatic dislocation loops

  17. Void formation and growth in copper-nickel alloys during irradiation in the high voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leffers, T.; Singh, B.N.; Barlow, P.

    1977-05-01

    The formation and growth of voids during irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope were studied in copper and Cu-Ni alloys. For each composition, the range of irradiation temperatures from 250 deg C to 550 deg C was covered. The development of the irradiation-induced dislocation structure was also studied. At irradiation temperatures up to 450 deg C, the void swelling decreased rapidly with increasing Ni content and became practically zero for Cu-10%Ni. The decrease in swelling was produced mainly by decreased void growth (and not by decreased void number density). At 550 deg C the void swelling increased with increasing Ni content up to 5%, whereas for Cu-10%Ni the swelling became practically zero; again the changes in swelling with Ni content were mainly determined by changes in void growth. The reduction in void swelling and growth due to alloying is ascribed to vacancy or interstitial trapping at submicroscopic Ni precipitates, i.e. to the precipitates acting as recombination centres. The increase in void swelling and growth with increasing Ni content, on the other hand, is ascribed to dislocation climb sources that emit loops, and hence produce a fairly high dislocation density at a temperature where there are only few dislocations in pure copper or Cu-Ni with lower Ni content. (author)

  18. The effect of the initial microstructure in terms of sink strength on the ion-irradiation-induced hardening of ODS alloys studied by nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Binghuang; Heintze, Cornelia; Bergner, Frank; Ulbricht, Andreas; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Oñorbe, Elvira; de Carlan, Yann; Wang, Tieshan

    2017-11-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr alloys are promising candidates for structural components in nuclear energy production. The small grain size, high dislocation density and the presence of particle matrix interfaces may contribute to the improved irradiation resistance of this class of alloys by providing sinks and/or traps for irradiation-induced point defects. The extent to which these effects impede hardening is still a matter of debate. To address this problem, a set of alloys of different grain size, dislocation density and oxide particle distribution were selected. In this study, three-step Fe-ion irradiation at both 300 °C and 500 °C up to 10 dpa was used to introduce damage in five different materials including three 9Cr-ODS alloys, one 14Cr-ODS alloy and one 14Cr-non-ODS alloy. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and nanoindentation testing were applied, the latter before and after irradiation. Significant hardening occurred for all materials and temperatures, but it is distinctly lower in the 14Cr alloys and also tends to be lower at the higher temperature. The possible contribution of Cr-rich α‧-phase particles is addressed. The impact of grain size, dislocation density and particle distribution is demonstrated in terms of an empirical trend between total sink strength and hardening.

  19. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process; Obtencion de polvo de aleaciones U-8% Mo y U-7% Mo (en peso) mediante hidruracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balart, Silvia N; Bruzzoni, Pablo; Granovsky, Marta S; Gribaudo, Luis M.J.; Hermida, Jorge D; Ovejero, Jose; Rubiolo, Gerardo H; Vicente, Eduardo E [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales

    2000-07-01

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-{alpha} phase to transform to UH{sub 3}: a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert {gamma} -phase to {alpha} -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this {alpha} -phase to UH{sub 3}. The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  20. EL2-related defects in neutron irradiated GaAs1/sub -x/P/sub x/ alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, E.; Garcia, F.; Jimenez, B.; Calleja, E.; Gomez, A.; Alcober, V.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of EL2-related defects in GaAsP alloys by fast neutron irradiation has been studied through deep level transient spectroscopy and photocapacitance techniques. After irradiation p-n junctions were not annealed at high temperatures. In the composition range x>0.4, fast neutrons generate a broad center at E/sub c/-0.7 eV that it is suggested to belong to the EL2 family. The presence of photocapacitance quenching effects has been taken as a preliminary fingerprint to make the above assignment. From computer analysis of the nonexponential transient capacitance waveforms, evidence that neutron irradiation creates a family of midgap levels, EL2-related, is found

  1. Radiation enhanced copper clustering processes in Fe-Cu alloys during electron and ion irradiations as measured by electrical resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, S.; Chimi, Y.; Bagiyono; Tobita, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Suzuki, M.; Iwase, A.

    2003-01-01

    To study the mechanism of radiation-enhanced clustering of copper atoms in Fe-Cu alloys, in situ electrical resistivity measurements are performed during irradiation with 100 MeV carbon ions and with 2 MeV electrons at 300 K. Two kinds of highly pure Fe-Cu alloys with Cu content of 0.02 and 0.6 wt% are used. The results are summarized as follows: - Although there is a steep initial resistivity increase below about 10 μdpa, the resistivity steadily decreases after this initial transient in Fe-0.6wt%Cu alloy, while in Fe-0.02wt%Cu alloy, the resistivity either decreases slowly or stays almost constant. The rate of change in resistivity depends on copper concentration. - The rate of change in resistivity per dpa is larger for electron irradiation than for ion irradiation. - Change in dose rate from 10 -8 to 10 -9 dpa/s slightly enhances the rate of resistivity change per dpa. The decrease in resistivity with dose is considered to be due to clustering or precipitation of copper atoms. The initial abrupt increase in resistivity is too large to be accounted for by initial introduction of point defects before copper clustering. Tentatively the phenomenon is explained as due to the formation of embryos of copper precipitates with a large strain field around them. Quantitative evaluation of the results using resistivity contribution of a unit concentration of Frenkel pairs and that of copper atoms gives an important conclusion that more than one copper atom are removed from solid solution by one Frenkel pair. The clustering efficiency is surprisingly high in the present case compared with the ordinary radiation-induced or radiation-enhanced precipitation processes

  2. Can gamma irradiation during radiotherapy influence the metal release process for biomedical CoCrMo and 316L alloys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Edin, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anna Emelie; Petrovic, Katarina; Soroka, Inna L; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Yolanda

    2018-02-09

    The extent of metal release from implant materials that are irradiated during radiotherapy may be influenced by irradiation-formed radicals. The influence of gamma irradiation, with a total dose of relevance for radiotherapy (e.g., for cancer treatments) on the extent of metal release from biomedical stainless steel AISI 316L and a cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCrMo) was investigated in physiological relevant solutions (phosphate buffered saline with and without 10 g/L bovine serum albumin) at pH 7.3. Directly after irradiation, the released amounts of metals were significantly higher for irradiated CoCrMo as compared to nonirradiated CoCrMo, resulting in an increased surface passivation (enhanced passive conditions) that hindered further release. A similar effect was observed for 316L showing lower nickel release after 1 h of initially irradiated samples as compared to nonirradiated samples. However, the effect of irradiation (total dose of 16.5 Gy) on metal release and surface oxide composition and thickness was generally small. Most metals were released initially (within seconds) upon immersion from CoCrMo but not from 316L. Albumin induced an increased amount of released metals from AISI 316L but not from CoCrMo. Albumin was not found to aggregate to any greater extent either upon gamma irradiation or in the presence of trace metal ions, as determined using different light scattering techniques. Further studies should elucidate the effect of repeated friction and fractionated low irradiation doses on the short- and long term metal release process of biomedical materials. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. New Phase in the System Uranium-Molybdenum-Silicon; Nouvelle phase dans le systeme uranium-molybdene-silicium; Novaya faza v sisteme uran-molibden'-kremnij; Una fase nueva en el sistema uranio-molibdeno-silicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikirica, M.; Ban, Z. [Rudjer Bokovic Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1963-11-15

    During the investigation of the ternary system uranium-molybdenum-silicon, a new phase with the composition U{sub 4}Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3} was formed. Structure determination exclusively based on the powder data showed that the particular phase belongs to the hexagonal system. Space group P6/mmc or one of the sub-groups is indicated. Unit cell dimensions were found to be a = 5.37{sub 0}A, c = 8 . 58{sub 2}A. A comparison of calculated and observed intensities shows close resemblance to the structure of the Laves phases of the C14-type. (author) [French] Au cours de recherches sur le systeme ternaire uranium-molybdene-silicium, on a constate la formation d'une nouvelle phase, de composition U{sub 4}Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Une determination de la structure, exclusivement fondee sur des donnees relatives a la poudre, a revele que cette phase particuliere appartenait au systeme hexagonal. Les auteurs indiquent un groupe spatial P6/mmc ou un des sous-groupes. Les dimensions d'une maille individuelle sont donnees par a = 5,37{sub 0}A, c = 8,58{sub 2}A. La comparaison entre l'intensite calculee et Tintensite observee montre une ressemblance etroite avec la structure des phases de Laves du type C-14. (author) [Spanish] En-el curso del estudio del sistema temario uranio-molibdeno-silicio, los autores observaron la formacion de una fase cuya composicion responde a la formula U{sub 4}Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. La determinacion de la estructura, basada exclusivamente en los datos referentes al material en polvo, demuestra que esa fase pertenece al sistema hexagonal. Se senalo la existencia de un grupo especial P6/mmc y se comprobo que las dimensiones de la celda elemental son a = 5,37{sub 0}A, c = 8,58{sub 2}A. La comparacion de las intensidades calculadas con las observadas indica que existe una analogia estrecha con la estructura de la fase de Laves del tipo C 14. (author) [Russian] Pri izuchenii trojnoj sistemy uran - molibden - kremnij obrazovalas' novaya faza sostava U{sub 4}Mo{sub 5

  4. Investigation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr alloys by self-consistent plasticity theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiazi [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, BIC-ESAT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Terentyev, Dmitry [Structural Material Group, Institute of Nuclear Materials Science, SCK CEN, Mol (Belgium); Yu, Long [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Bakaev, A. [Structural Material Group, Institute of Nuclear Materials Science, SCK CEN, Mol (Belgium); Jin, Zhaohui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Duan, Huiling, E-mail: hlduan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, BIC-ESAT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of non-irradiated (at 223 K, 302 K and 573 K) and neutron irradiated (at 573 K) Fe-2.5Cr, Fe-5Cr and Fe-9Cr alloys is studied by a self-consistent plasticity theory, which consists of constitutive equations describing the contribution of radiation defects at grain level, and the elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent method to obtain polycrystalline behaviors. Attention is paid to two types of radiation-induced defects: interstitial dislocation loops and solute rich clusters, which are believed to be the main sources of hardening in Fe-Cr alloys at medium irradiation doses. Both the hardening mechanism and microstructural evolution are investigated by using available experimental data on microstructures, and implementing hardening rules derived from atomistic data. Good agreement with experimental data is achieved for both the yield stress and strain hardening of non-irradiated and irradiated Fe-Cr alloys by treating dislocation loops as strong thermally activated obstacles and solute rich clusters as weak shearable ones. - Highlights: • A self-consistent plasticity theory is proposed for irradiated Fe-Cr alloys. • Both the irradiation-induced hardening and plastic flow evolution are studied. • Dislocation loops and solute rich clusters are considered as the main defects. • Numerical results of the proposed model match with corresponding experimental data.

  5. Effect of He+ fluence on surface morphology and ion-irradiation induced defect evolution in 7075 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Ma, Qian; Wan, Hao; Yang, Bin; Ge, Junjie; Zhang, Lingyu; Si, Naichao

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of microstructure for 7075 aluminum alloys with 50 Kev helium ions irradiation were studied by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 were selected, and irradiation experiments were conducted at room temperatures. The transmission process of He+ ions was simulated by using SRIM software, including distribution of ion ranges, energy losses and atomic displacements. Experimental results show that irradiated pits and micro-cracks were observed on irradiation sample surface, and the size of constituent particles (not including Mg2Si) decreased with the increasing dose. The x-ray diffraction results of the pair of peaks is better resolved in irradiated samples might indicate that the stressed structure consequence due to crystal defects (vacancies and interstitials) after He+ implantation. TEM observation indicated that the density of MgZn2 phase was significantly reduced after helium ion irradiation which is harmful to strength. Besides, the development of compressive stress produced a large amount of dislocation defects in the 1015 ions cm-2 sample. Moreover, higher fluence irradiation produced more dislocations in sample. At fluence of 1016 ions cm-2, dislocation wall formed by dislocation slip and aggregation in the interior of grains, leading to the refinement of these grains. As fluence increased to 1017 ions cm-2, dislocation loops were observed in pinned dislocation. Moreover, dislocation as effective defect sink, irradiation-induced vacancy defects aggregated to these sinks, and resulted in the formation of helium bubbles in dislocation.

  6. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of neutron irradiated copper alloys at 250 and 350 deg. C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Stubbins, J.F.; Toft, P.

    2000-01-01

    V) to influence levels of 1.0 - 1.5 x 1024 n/m2 (E> 1 MeV) at 250 and 350 deg. C. These irradiations were carried out in temperature controlled rigs where the irradiation temperature was monitored and controlledcontinuously throughout the whole irradiation experiment. Both unirradiated and irradiated speciments...

  7. Synthesis of Au and Au/Cu alloy nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by using microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangari, Vijaya K.; Dey, Sanchita; Jeelani, Shaik

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles and gold-copper alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl_4.xH_2O) and co-reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl_4.xH_2O) and Copper(II) acetate [(CH_3COO)_2Cu.H_2O] by ethylene glycol through microwave irradiation technique. In this reaction ethylene glycol used as a solvent and also reducing agent. The cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) used as surfactant. Au nanoparticles and Au-Cu nanoparticles on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotube also produced by using same procedure. The XRD analysis confirmed the formation of Au and Au-Cu alloy nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes(CNTs). The morphology and size of the particles were examined by the transmission electron microscopy. The EDS analysis on individual particles confirmed that the presence of two metals in a particle in case of alloy nanoparticle. The results presented here show that a variety of well defined metal and metal alloy nanoparticles can be produced by using the microwave polyol process with in a short period of time. (author)

  8. Measurement of in-vivo dosage increase due to dental alloys during therapeutic irradiation of the mouth cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilmann, C.; Mose, S.; Saran, F.; Schopohl, B.; Boettcher, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The degree of dosage increase in the immediate surrounding of metallic dental materials was measured in an in-vivo study during therapeutic irradiation with 60 Co gamma rays in the area of mouth cavity of 11 patients. Measurements were carried out by thermoluminescent dosimetry at permamently fixed golden teeth and alloy specimens containing gold and palladium and amalgam. The following relative dodage values according to a simultanelusly measured reference value were measured at the surface of the different dental materials: 161% near fixed golden caps, 168% near the specimen containing gold in a high percentage, 133% near the specimen of palladium and 161% near the specimen of amalgam. The in vivo measured dosage increases due to metallic dental prosthesis are less than values obtained using back scatter arramgements for irradiating phantoms. Despite this, they could be of clinical relevance. Thus the usage of a mucous membrane protection during irradiation with 60 Co, as a means of preventing local lesions of the oral mucosa, due to dental alloys within the treatment volume remains inevitable. (orig.) [de

  9. Application of a three-feature dispersed-barrier hardening model to neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, F.; Pareige, C.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Malerba, L.; Heintze, C.

    2014-05-01

    An attempt is made to quantify the contributions of different types of defect-solute clusters to the total irradiation-induced yield stress increase in neutron-irradiated (300 °C, 0.6 dpa), industrial-purity Fe-Cr model alloys (target Cr contents of 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 at.% Cr). Former work based on the application of transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, and small-angle neutron scattering revealed the formation of dislocation loops, NiSiPCr-enriched clusters and α‧-phase particles, which act as obstacles to dislocation glide. The values of the dimensionless obstacle strength are estimated in the framework of a three-feature dispersed-barrier hardening model. Special attention is paid to the effect of measuring errors, experimental details and model details on the estimates. The three families of obstacles and the hardening model are well capable of reproducing the observed yield stress increase as a function of Cr content, suggesting that the nanostructural features identified experimentally are the main, if not the only, causes of irradiation hardening in these model alloys.

  10. Filtration–UV irradiation as an option for mitigating the risk of microbiologically influenced corrosion of subsea construction alloys in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machuca, Laura L.; Jeffrey, Robert; Bailey, Stuart I.; Gubner, Rolf; Watkin, Elizabeth L.J.; Ginige, Maneesha P.; Kaksonen, Anna H.; Heidersbach, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Biofilms ennobled E corr of offshore construction alloys in natural seawater. •Filtration–UV irradiation delayed biofilm growth and activity on alloys. •Localized corrosion in seawater was lowered by the use of filtration–UV irradiation. •Biofilm community composition was affected by both substratum and seawater treatment. •Filtration–UV irradiation can be an ecofriendly practice for protection against MIC. -- Abstract: The effect of filtration–UV irradiation of seawater on the biofilm activity on several offshore structural alloys was evaluated in a continuous flow system over 90 days. Biofilms ennobled the electrode potential by +400 to 500 mV within a few days of exposure to raw untreated seawater. Filtration–UV irradiation of the seawater delayed the ennoblement of the steels for up to 40 days and lowered localized corrosion rates in susceptible alloys. Ennobling biofilms were composed of microbial cells, diatoms and extracellular polymeric substances and the bacterial community in biofilms was affected by both the alloy composition and seawater treatment

  11. Defects in hyperpure Fe-based alloys created by 3 MeV e{sup -}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X H; Moser, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee; Akamatsu, M; Van Duysen, C [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Ecuelles (France)

    1994-12-31

    Information about vacancy defects created in RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessels) steels after neutron irradiations are obtained via a simulation: the RPV steels are simulated by a series of high purity Fe-based alloys; the neutron irradiation is simulated by a 3 MeV electron irradiation; vacancy defects characteristics are obtained by positron lifetime techniques. Irradiations are made at 150 or 288 deg C, with a dose of 4*10{sup 19} e-/cm{sup 2}, and followed by isochronal annealing in the range 20-500 deg C. The observed vacancy defects are single trapped vacancies and small vacancy clusters, the size of which being lower than 10 empty atomic volumes (vacancy clusters containing more than 50 empty atomic volumes were never found). A large recovery step is observed between 200 and 400 deg C, after 150 deg C irradiation and attributed to vacancy-impurity detrapping, and also, vacancy cluster evaporation. The influence of C, Cu and Mo are presented. These results are in agreement with a model supposing, in pure Fe, single vacancy migration at -50 deg C and vacancy-impurity detrapping at 200 deg C. (authors). 4 figs., 15 refs.

  12. Effect of Ge, Sn, Sb on the resistance to swelling of austenitic alloys irradiated by 1 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, P.; Levy, V.; Seran, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of new solute elements namely Ge, Sn and Sb on the void swelling resistance of austenitic alloys irradiated with 1 MeV electrons has been studied. Except for tin in Ti-modified 316, all solute improve the swelling resistance of base alloys. Tin addition shifts the swelling peak of 316 S.S. to high temperature. In fact, these solute additions have the same qualitative effect on the swelling components: they enhance the void density and decrease strongly void growth rate. This effect is opposite to the one of usual swelling inhibitors such as Si or Ti which decrease the void density. We have explained this influence on the void nucleation and void growth by introducing a strong interaction between vacancies and solute atoms in a void growth model

  13. High-Resolution Characterization of UMo Alloy Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kovarik, Libor [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Arey, Bruce W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    This report highlights the capabilities and procedure for high-resolution characterization of UMo fuels in PNNL. Uranium-molybdenum (UMo) fuel processing steps, from casting to forming final fuel, directly affect the microstructure of the fuel, which in turn dictates the in-reactor performance of the fuel under irradiation. In order to understand the influence of processing on UMo microstructure, microstructure characterization techniques are necessary. Higher-resolution characterization techniques like transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) are needed to interrogate the details of the microstructure. The findings from TEM and APT are also directly beneficial for developing predictive multiscale modeling tools that can predict the microstructure as a function of process parameters. This report provides background on focused-ion-beam–based TEM and APT sample preparation, TEM and APT analysis procedures, and the unique information achievable through such advanced characterization capabilities for UMo fuels, from a fuel fabrication capability viewpoint.

  14. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of copper alloys and their HIP joints with austenitic stainless steel in unirradiated and neutron irradiated condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taehtinen, S.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile strength and ductility of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys decreased continuously with increasing temperature up to 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 alloy decreased continuously with increasing temperature from 20 deg C to 350 deg C whereas the fracture toughness of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy remained almost constant at temperatures up to 100 deg C, was decreased significantly at 200 deg C and slightly increased at 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of HIP joints were lower than that of corresponding copper alloy and fracture path in HIP joint specimen was always within copper alloy side of the joint. Neutron irradiation to a dose level of 0.3 dpa resulted in hardening and reduction in uniform elongation to about 2-4% at 200 deg C in both copper alloys. At higher temperatures softening was observed and uniform elongation increased to about 5% and 16% for CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys, respectively. Fracture toughness of CuAl25 IG0 alloy reduced markedly due to neutron irradiation in the temperature range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated CuCrZr alloy also decreased in the range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C, although it remained almost unaffected at temperatures below 200 deg C and decreased significantly at 350 deg C when compared with that of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy. (orig.)

  15. Review of corrosion phenomena on zirconium alloys, niobium, titanium, inconel, stainless steel, and nickel plate under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The role of nuclear fluxes in corrosion processes was investigated in ATR, ETR, PRTR, and in Hanford production reactors. Major effort was directed to zirconium alloy corrosion parameter studies. Corrosion and hydriding results are reported as a function of oxygen concentration in the coolant, flux level, alloy composition, surface pretreatment, and metallurgical condition. Localized corrosion and hydriding at sites of bonding to dissimilar metals are described. Corrosion behavior on specimens transferred from oxygenated to low-oxygen coolants in ETR and ATR experiments is compared. Mechanism studies suggest that a depression in the corrosion of the Zr--2.5Nb alloy under irradiation is due to radiation-induced aging. The radiation-induced onset of transition on several alloys is in general a gradual process which nucleates locally, causing areas of oxide prosity which eventually encompass the surface. Examination of Zry-2 process tubes reveals that accelerated corrosion has occurred in low-oxygen coolants. Hydrogen contents are relatively low, but show some localized profiles. Gross hydriding has occurred on process tubes containing aluminum spacers, apparently by a galvanic charging mechanism. Titanium paralleled Zry-2 in corrosion behavior under irradiation. Niobium corrosion was variable, but did not appear to be strongly influenced by radiation. Corrosion rates on Inconel and stainless steel were only slightly higher in-flux than out-of-reactor. Corrosion rates on nickel-plated aluminum appeared to vary substantially with preexposure treatments, but the rates generally were accelerated compared to rates on unirradiated coupons. (59 references, 11 tables, 12 figs.)

  16. Investigation of irradiation strengthening of bcc metals and their alloys. Progress report, January 1977--October 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of (a) the effect of neutron damage on the dislocation kinetics in bcc metals and their alloys, and (b) the effect of 3 He on the deformation characteristics of body centered cubic metals and their alloys. Results obtained from these projects are discussed

  17. Si effects on radiation induced segregation in high purity Fe-18Cr-14Ni alloys irradiated by Ni ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Joji; Kako, Kenji; Mayuzumi, Masami; Kusanagi, Hideo; Suzuki, Takayoshi

    1999-01-01

    To illustrate the effects of the element Si on radiation induced segregation, which causes irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), we investigated grain boundary chemistry of high purity Fe-18Cr-14Ni-Si alloys irradiated by Ni ions using FE-TEM. The addition of Si up to 1% does not affect the Cr depletion at grain boundaries, while it slightly enhances the depletion of Fe and the segregation of Ni and Si. The addition of 2% Si causes the depletion of Cr and Fe and the segregation of Ni and Si at grain boundaries. Thus, the Si content should be as low as possible. In order to reduce the depletion of Cr at grain boundaries, which is one of the major causes of IASCC, Si content should be less than 1%. (author)

  18. Revised ANL-reported tensile data for unirradiated and irradiated (FFTF, HFIR) V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    The tensile data for all unirradiated and irradiated vanadium alloys samples tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been critically reviewed and, when necessary, revised. The review and revision are based on reanalyzing the original load-displacement strip chart recordings by a methodology consistent with current ASTM standards. For unirradiated alloys (162 samples), the revised values differ from the previous values as follows: -11±19 MPa (-4±6%) for yield strength (YS), -3±15 MPa (-1±3%) for ultimate tensile strength (UTS), -5±2% strain for uniform elongation (UE), and -4±2% strain for total elongation (TE). Of these changes, the decrease in -1±6 MPa (0±1%) for UTS, -5±2% for UE, and -4±2% for TE. Of these changes, the decrease in UE values for alloys irradiated and tested at 400--435 C is the most significant. This decrease results from the proper subtraction of nongauge-length deformation from measured crosshead deformation. In previous analysis of the tensile curves, the nongauge-length deformation was not correctly determined and subtracted from the crosshead displacement. The previously reported and revised tensile values for unirradiated alloys (20--700 C) are tabulated in Appendix A. The revised tensile values for the FFTF-irradiated (400--600 C) and HFIR-irradiated (400 C) alloys are tabulated in Appendix B, along with the neutron damage and helium levels. Appendix C compares the revised values to the previously reported values for irradiated alloys. Appendix D contains previous and revised values for the tensile properties of unirradiated V-5Cr-5Ti (BL-63) alloy exposed to oxygen

  19. Influence of an external magnetic field on damage by self-ion irradiation in Fe90Cr10 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando José Sánchez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of an external magnetic field (B=0.5 T on Fe90Cr10 specimens during Fe ion irradiation, has been investigated by means of Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS. The analysis has revealed significant differences in the average hyperfine magnetic field (=0.3 T between non-irradiated and irradiated samples as well as between irradiations made with B (w/ B and without B (w/o B. It is considered that these variations can be due to changes in the local environment around the probe nuclei (57Fe; where vacancies and Cr distribution play a role. The results indicate that the Cr distribution in the neighbourhood of the iron atoms could be changed by the application of an external field. This would imply that an external magnetic field may be an important parameter to take into account in predictive models for Cr behaviour in Fe–Cr alloys, and especially in fusion conditions where intense magnetic fields are required for plasma confinement.

  20. The mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels: The case of Fe-Cu model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, A.V., E-mail: Alexey.V.Subbotin@gmail.com [Scientific and Production Complex Atomtechnoprom, Moscow 119180 (Russian Federation); Panyukov, S.V., E-mail: panyukov@lpi.ru [PN Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117924 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Mechanism of solute-enriched clusters formation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels is proposed and developed in case of Fe-Cu model alloys. The suggested solute-drag mechanism is analogous to the well-known zone-refining process. We show that the obtained results are in good agreement with available experimental data on the parameters of clusters enriched with the alloying elements. Our model explains why the formation of solute-enriched clusters does not happen in austenitic stainless steels with fcc lattice structure. It also allows to quantify the method of evaluation of neutron irradiation dose for the process of RPV steels hardening.

  1. The Effect of H and He on Irradiation Performance of Fe and Ferritic Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbins, James F.

    2010-01-01

    This research program was designed to look at basic radiation damage and effects and mechanical properties in Fe and ferritic alloys. The program scope included a number of materials ranging from pure single crystal Fe to more complex Fe-Cr-C alloys. The range of materials was designed to examine materials response and performance on ideal/model systems and gradually move to more complex systems. The experimental program was coordinated with a modeling effort. The use of pure and model alloys also facilitated the ability to develop and employ atomistic-scale modeling techniques to understand the inherent physics underlying materials performance.

  2. Mechanical property changes induced in structural alloys by neutron irradiations with different helium to displacement ratios*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, L. K.; Grossbeck, M. L.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of helium on mechanical properties of irradiated structural materials are reviewed. In particular, variations in response to the ratio of helium to displacement damage serve as the focus. Ductility in creep and tensile tests is emphasized. A variety of early work has led to the current concentration on helium effects for fusion reactor materials applications. A battery of techniques has been developed by which the helium to displacement ratio can be varied. Our main discussion is devoted to the techniques of spectral tailoring and isotopic alloying currently of interest for mixed-spectrum reactors. Theoretical models of physical mechanisms by which helium interacts with displacement damage have been developed in terms of hardening to dislocation motion and grain boundary cavitation. Austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels and vanadium alloys are considered. In each case, work at low strain rates, where the main problems may lie, at the helium to displacement ratios appropriate to fusion reactor materials is lacking. Recent experimental evidence suggests that both in-reactor and high helium results may differ substantially from post-irradiation or low helium results. It is suggested that work in these areas is especially needed.

  3. Irradiation Performance of U-Mo Alloy Based ‘Monolithic’ Plate-Type Fuel – Design Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. B. Robinson; G. S. Chang; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; D. M. Wachs; D. L. Porter

    2009-08-01

    A down-selection process has been applied to the U-Mo fuel alloy based monolithic plate fuel design, supported by irradiation testing of small fuel plates containing various design parameters. The irradiation testing provided data on fuel performance issues such as swelling, fuel-cladding interaction (interdiffusion), blister formation at elevated temperatures, and fuel/cladding bond quality and effectiveness. U-10Mo (wt%) was selected as the fuel alloy of choice, accepting a somewhat lower uranium density for the benefits of phase stability. U-7Mo could be used, with a barrier, where the trade-off for uranium density is critical to nuclear performance. A zirconium foil barrier between fuel and cladding was chosen to provide a predictable, well-bonded, fuel-cladding interface, allowing little or no fuel-cladding interaction. The fuel plate testing conducted to inform this selection was based on the use of U-10Mo foils fabricated by hot co-rolling with a Zr foil. The foils were subsequently bonded to Al-6061 cladding by hot isostatic pressing or friction stir bonding.

  4. Void swelling in fast reactor irradiated high purity binary iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Stow, D.A.

    The void swelling characteristics of a series of high purity binary iron-chromium alloys containing 0 - 615 0 C. The void swelling behaviour can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of point defect trapping and precipitation processes involving chromium atoms

  5. Morphology variation, composition alteration and microstructure changes in ion-irradiated 1060 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hao; Si, Naichao; Wang, Quan; Zhao, Zhenjiang

    2018-02-01

    Morphology variation, composition alteration and microstructure changes in 1060 aluminum irradiated with 50 keV helium ions were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) equipped with x-ray elemental scanning, 3D measuring laser microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that, helium ions irradiation induced surface damage and Si-rich aggregates in the surfaces of irradiated samples. Increasing the dose of irradiation, more damages and Si-rich aggregates would be produced. Besides, defects such as dislocations, dislocation loops and dislocation walls were the primary defects in the ion implanted layer. The forming of surface damages were related with preferentially sputtering of Al component. While irradiation-enhanced diffusion and irradiation-induced segregation resulted in the aggregation of impurity atoms. And the aggregation ability of impurity atoms were discussed based on the atomic radius, displacement energy, lattice binding energy and surface binding energy.

  6. Effect of double ion implantation and irradiation by Ar and He ions on nano-indentation hardness of metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Mook, W. M.; Fu, E. G.; Wang, Y.-Q.; Carr, D. G.; Anderoglu, O.; Mara, N. A.; Misra, A.; Harrison, R. P.; Edwards, L.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the authors have investigated the combined effect of a double layer of implantation on four different metallic alloys, ODS steel MA957, Zircaloy-4, Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy and stainless steel 316, by ions of two different species - He and Ar - on the hardening of the surface as measured by nano-indentation. The data was collected for a large number of indentations using the Continuous Stiffness Method or "CSM" mode, applying the indents on the implanted surface. Careful analysis of the data in the present investigations show that the relative hardening due to individual implantation layers can be used to obtain an estimate of the relative hardening effect of a combination of two separate implanted layers of two different species. This combined hardness was found to lie between the square root of the sum of the squares of individual hardening effects, (ΔHA2 + ΔHB2)0.5 as the lower limit and the sum of the individual hardening effects, (ΔHA + ΔHB) as the upper limit, within errors, for all depths measured. The hardening due to irradiation by different species of ions was calculated by subtracting the average hardness vs. depth curve of the un-irradiated or "virgin" material from that of the irradiated material. The combined hardening of the irradiated samples due to Ar and He irradiation was found to be described well by an approximate upper bound given by the simple linear sum of the individual hardening (L) and a lower bound given by the square root of the sum of the squares (R) of the individual hardening effects due to Ar and He irradiation along the full depth of the indentation. The peak of the combined hardness of Ar and He irradiated material appears at the depth predicted by both the R and the L curves, in all samples. The combined hardness increase due to Ar and He irradiation lies near the upper limit (L curve) for the ODS steel MA957, somewhere in between L and R curves for Zircaloy-4, and near the R curve for the stainless steel 316

  7. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  8. Microstructural evolution of neutron-irradiated Ni-Si and Ni-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Garner, F. A.

    1992-10-01

    Additions of silicon and aluminum suppress the neutron-induced swelling of pure nickel but to different degrees. Silicon is much more effective initially when compared to aluminum on a per atom basis but silicon exhibits a nonmonotonic influence on swelling with increasing concentration. Silicon tends to segregate toward grain boundaries while aluminum segregates away from these boundaries. Whereas the formation of the Ni 3Si phase is frequently observed in charged particle irradiation experiments conducted at much higher displacement rates, it did not occur during neutron irradiation in this study. Precipitation also did not occur in Ni-5Al during neutron irradiation, nor has it been reported to occur during ion irradiation.

  9. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of neutron irradiated copper alloys at 250 and 350 deg. C. (ITER R and D Task no. T213)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Stubbins, J.F.; Toft, P.

    2000-03-01

    The fatigue behaviour of a dispersion strengthened and a precipitation hardened copper alloys was investigated with and without irradiation exposure. Fatigue specimens of these alloys were irradiated with fission neutrons in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe with a flux of ∼2.5 x 10 17 n/m 2 s (E> 1 MeV) to influence levels of 1.0 - 1.5 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E> 1 MeV) at 250 and 350 deg. C. These irradiations were carried out in temperature controlled rigs where the irradiation temperature was monitored and controlled continuously throughout the whole irradiation experiment. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were fatigue tested in vacuum at the irradiation temperatures of 250 and 350 deg. C in a strain controlled mode with a loading frequency of 0.5Hz. Post-fatigue microstructures were examined using transmission electron microscopy and the fracture surfaces were investigated using scanning electron microscope. The present investigations demonstrated that the fatigue life decreases with increasing temperature and that the exposure to neutron irradiation causes further degradation in fatigue life at both temperatures. These results are discussed in terms of the observed post-fatigue microstructures and the fracture surface morphology. Finally, the main conclusions and their implications are summarised. (au)

  10. Ion mass dependence of irradiation-induced local creation of ferromagnetism in Fe60Al40 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassbender, J.; Liedke, M. O.; Strache, T.; Moeller, W.; Menendez, E.; Sort, J.; Rao, K. V.; Deevi, S. C.; Nogues, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ion irradiation of Fe 60 Al 40 alloys results in the phase transformation from the paramagnetic, chemically ordered B2 phase to the ferromagnetic, chemically disordered A2 phase. The magnetic phase transformation is related to the number of displacements per atom (dpa) during the irradiation. For heavy ions (Ar + , Kr + , and Xe + ), a universal curve is observed with a steep increase in the fraction of the ferromagnetic phase that reaches saturation, i.e., a complete phase transformation, at about 0.5 dpa. This proves the purely ballistic nature of the disordering process. If light ions are used (He + and Ne + ), a pronounced deviation from the universal curve is observed. This is attributed to bulk vacancy diffusion from the dilute collision cascades, which leads to a partial recovery of the thermodynamically favored B2 phase. Comparing different noble gas ion irradiation experiments allows us to assess the corresponding counteracting contributions. In addition, the potential to create local ferromagnetic areas embedded in a paramagnetic matrix is demonstrated

  11. Segregation and precipitation in iron-chromium alloys during thermal ageing and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senninger, O.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-Chromium alloys have a peculiar thermodynamic and diffusion behavior which is due to their magnetic properties. The alloy decomposition under thermal ageing has been studied in this thesis. An atomistic kinetic model has been performed in this aim in which we have modeled in details the chemical species thermodynamic and diffusion properties. In particular, the evolution of elements diffusion properties which the ferro-paramagnetic transition has been introduced in the model. Simulated decompositions have been compared with experiments for a large range of concentrations and temperatures. A good agreement between simulations and experiments was observed and these comparisons have highlighted the ferro to paramagnetic transition key role in the concentrated alloys kinetic decomposition. This study has also evidenced that the elements diffusion at phases interfaces is responsible for the alloy decomposition kinetic in long lasting.We have also started a study of the alloy radiation induced segregation. For that purpose, atomistic kinetic model has been performed modeling defects migration through a perfect planar sink. It have been shown, I agreement with former studies, that chromium tends to segregate in the vicinity of sinks at low temperatures and deplete at high temperature. (author) [fr

  12. Design of a single variable helium effects experiment for irradiation in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] using alloys enriched in nickel 59

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Brager, H.R.; Matsumoto, W.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Nickel enriched in nickel 59 was extracted from the fragments of a fracture toughness specimen of Inconel 600 irradiated in the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). The nickel contained 2.0% nickel 59. Three heats of austenitic steel doped with nickel-59 were prepared and inserted in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The experiment was single variable in helium effects because chemically identical alloys without nickel-59 were being irradiated side by side with the doped material. The alloys doped with nickel 59 produced 10 to 100 times more helium than the control alloys. The materials included ternary and quaternary alloys in the form of transmission electron microscope (TEM) discs and miniature tensile specimens. The helium to dpa ratio was in the range 5 to 35 and was nearly constant throughout the irradiation. The exposures ranged from 0.25 to 50 displacements per atom (dpa) over the duration of the experiment. The irradiation temperatures covered the range of 360 to 600 0 C

  13. An in situ study of the enhancement of atomic mobility under neutron irradiation in a Ag-30at%Zn alloy, using the Zener relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbwachs, M.; Hillairet, J.; Gonzalez, H.; Cost, J.

    1975-01-01

    An application of the Zener relaxation to the study of fast neutron effects on a Ag-Zn alloy is presented. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time is shown. It can be seen that the measured relaxation time at a given temperature increases with the irradiation doses [fr

  14. Nano-scale chemical evolution in a proton-and neutron-irradiated Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harte, Allan, E-mail: allan.harte@manchester.ac.uk [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Topping, M.; Frankel, P. [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jädernäs, D. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE 611 82, Nyköping (Sweden); Romero, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Columbia, SC (United States); Hallstadius, L. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, SE 72163 Västerås (Sweden); Darby, E.C. [Rolls Royce Plc., Nuclear Materials, Derby (United Kingdom); Preuss, M. [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Proton-and neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 are compared in terms of the nano-scale chemical evolution within second phase particles (SPPs) Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} and Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni). This is accomplished through ultra-high spatial resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and the use of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic methods. Fe-depletion is observed from both SPP types after irradiation with both irradiative species, but is heterogeneous in the case of Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2}, predominantly from the edge region, and homogeneously in the case of Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni). Further, there is evidence of a delay in the dissolution of the Zr{sub 2}(Fe,Ni) SPP with respect to the Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2}. As such, SPP dissolution results in matrix supersaturation with solute under both irradiative species and proton irradiation is considered well suited to emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in this context. The mechanisms of solute redistribution processes from SPPs and the consequences for irradiation-induced growth phenomena are discussed. - Highlights: •Protons emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in the evolution of chemistry and morphology of second phase particles. •Detailed energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveals heterogeneity in Zr-Fe-Cr SPPs both before and after irradiation. •Zr-Fe-Ni SPPs are delayed in irradiation-induced dissolution due to their better self-solubility with respect to Zr-Fe-Cr.

  15. Influence of neutron irradiation on the magnetic properties of the Fe Ni pure alloy and with impurities of Si and Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucki, George

    1971-01-01

    Hysteresis loop, Initial permeability and Curie Temperature measurements were conducted on several pure and polluted (with Si and Mo) Fe Ni 50-50% at. alloys. Isochronal annealings were performed between 25 deg 65 deg C, on each composition in three different ways: quenched (anisotropic) samples; quenched and irradiated samples; quenched irradiated samples annealed with saturating magnetic field. The experiment showed a sharp decrease in all parameters of the polluted alloys. Fast neutron irradiation results indicated that the magnetic properties are affected by the defects created during irradiation. The effect of thermal treatment, magnetic annealing and irradiation is greatest in anisotropic alloys. It is considered that magnetic annealing introduces a uniaxial anisotropy that tends to increase the remanence and hence the squareness of the hysteresis loop; but an increase in both remanence and coercivity was measured even in absence of the magnetic field. Magnetic after effect has been detected and a simple model for the diffusion of defects is presented. Many models have been proposed to explain the resultant properties, the most feasible being that based upon short-range ordering, proposed by Neel and Taniguchi, together with the interesting hypothesis of Heidenreich and Nesbitt. (author)

  16. Microstructural evolution and hardening of GH3535 alloy under energetic Xe ion irradiation at room temperature and 650 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hefei; Gao, Jie; Radiguet, Bertrand; Liu, Renduo; Li, Jianjian; Lei, Guanhong; Huang, Qing; Liu, Min; Xie, Ruobing

    2018-02-01

    The GH3535 alloy was irradiated with 7 MeV Xe26+ ions to a dose of 10 dpa at room temperature (RT) and 650 °C, and subsequently examined using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. High numbers of nano-sized black dots, identified as dislocation loops were observed in both irradiated samples. The dislocation loops detected at the high temperature irradiated sample (size/number density: 9.5 nm/1.9 × 1021 m-3) were found to be larger in size but less in amount as compared to that of the case of RT irradiation (6.9 nm/18.7 × 1021 m-3). In addition, the large-sized Mo-Cr rich precipitates (16.4 nm/3.7 × 1021 m-3) were observed in the sample irradiated at 650 °C. Moreover, the Xe bubbles, with smaller size (2.9 nm) but higher number density (77.8 × 1021 m-3) among the irradiated induced defects, were also detected in the case of high temperature irradiated sample via the diffusion and aggregation of Xe atoms. Nanoindentaion measurements showed a hardening phenomenon for the irradiated sample, and the hardness increment is higher in the case of high temperature irradiated sample. Dispersed barrier-hardening (DBH) model was applied to predict the hardening produced from the irradiation induced defects. The yield strength increment calculated based on TEM observations and the nanohardness increment measured using nanoindentation are in excellent agreement.

  17. Initiation and propagation of cleared channels in neutron-irradiated pure copper and a precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, D.J.; Singh, B.N.; Bilde-Sørensen, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    The formation of ‘cleared’ channels in neutron irradiated metals and alloys have been frequently reported for more than 40 years. So far, however, no unambiguous and conclusive evidence showing as to how and where these channels are initiated has emerged. In the following we present experimental...... results illustrating initiation and propagation of channels during post-irradiation deformation of neutron irradiated copper and a copper alloy. The observations strongly suggest that the channels are initiated at boundaries, large inclusions and even at previously formed cleared channels. Some...... of these newly generated dislocations in the matrix causes the formation of cleared channels. Implications of these results are discussed with specific reference to the origin and consequences of plastic flow localization....

  18. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E.

    2007-11-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  19. Surface properties of a nanocrystalline Fe-Ni-Nb-B alloy after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavuk, M.; Sitek, J.; Sedlackova, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we studied the impact of a neutron radiation on the surface properties of the nanocrystalline (Fe_0_._2_5Ni_0_._7_5)_8_1Nb_7B_1_2 alloy. Changes in topography and domain structure were observed by means of magnetic force microscopy (MFM). (authors)

  20. Investigation of the magnetic aftereffect in dilute Fe-Ni alloys after low-temperature neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blythe, H.J.; Walz, F.; Kronmueller, H.

    1982-01-01

    Dilute Fe alloys containing up to 0.5 at% Ni, neutron-irradiated at 77 K, exhibit a very complicated relaxation spectrum during anneal in the temperature range 30 to 350 K. This behaviour, in which individual peaks transform from one into another, is investigated in detail. All maxima occurring in the temperature range 30 to 140 K are found to be of Debye-type with relaxation times obeying an Arrhenius equation tau = tau 0 exp (Q/kT). The major processes of these spectra are computer-analysed in order to determine their activation parameters Q and tau 0 . The complicated peak genealogy, as observed on anneal, is attributed to the presence of two configurations of reorientating Fe interstitial atoms which form small clusters together with substitutionally and interstitially dissolved Ni atoms. (author)

  1. Trapping of self-interstitials at manganese atoms in electron-irradiated dilute AlMn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, A.; Dworschak, F.

    1985-01-01

    Dilute AlMn alloys were irradiated isothermally at different temperatures in stage II with 1.8 MeV electrons and the resistivity damage rates were measured as a function of the residual resistivity increase. The results demonstrate that Mn atoms provide deep traps at least up to 150 K for mobile interstitials. A quantitative evaluation of the data with respect to trapping radii is somewhat handicapped by the fact that the resistivity contribution of a Mn-Al interstitial complex was found to be considerably less than the sum of the resistivity contributions of an isolated solute Mn atom and an Al self-interstitial. The results can be explained by a model which assumes that both the trapping radius and the resistivity contribution of solute-self-interstitial complexes increase with the number of trapped interstitials. (author)

  2. Microstructural evolution of neutron-irradiated Ni-Si and Ni-Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Garner, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    Additions of silicon and aluminium suppress the neutron-induced swelling of pure nickel but to different degrees. Silicon is much more effective initially when compared to aluminium on a per atom basis but silicon exhibits a nonmonotonic influence on swelling with increasing concentration. Silicon tends to segregate toward grain boundaries while aluminium segregates away from these boundaries. Whereas the formation of the Ni 3 Si phase is frequently observed in charged particle irradiation experiments conducted at much higher displacement rates, it did not occur during neutron irradiation in this study. Precipitation also did not occur in Ni-5Al during neutron irradiation, nor has it been reported to occur during ion irradiation. (orig.)

  3. Dissolution and growth of precipitates under electron irradiation in an Al-11.8 at % Zn alloy by small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Dissolution and growth of precipitates in a room temperature aged Al-11.8 at % Zn alloy have been studied under electron irradiation using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). A series of electron irradiations were performed on each sample and SANS measurements were made on each irradiation. In general for low doses the results show an initial decrease in the magnitude of the scattering, but associated with an increase in the precipitate size. This is followed on prolonged irradiation by an increase in the magnitude of the scattering with a continued increase in precipitate size. It is believed, that at low doses some precipitate grow in size but others may dissolve in the matrix, which then becomes supersaturated. With the enhanced rate of diffusion as a result of the irradiation, the remaining precipitates grow rapidly. As the supersaturation reduces, a coarsening mechanism takes over, via a radiation enhanced diffusion mechanism

  4. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on the osseointegration of a titanium alloy with bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attempt has been made to analyze the potential of titanium (Ti alloy for osteointegration by the effect of surface photo functionalization in different aspects as follows: in Ringer's solution, in vitro cell growth, and in vivo study on rabbit. The present study was aimed to investigate the influence of ultraviolet (UV light on surface topography, corrosion behavior, and bioactivity of indigenously manufactured samples of Ti alloy mini-implant. Materials and Methods: The study includes surface modification of Ti samples by UV treatment, corrosion testing of the specimens using Potentiostat (GAMRY System, qualitative examination of modified surface topography using scanning electron microscope, and cellular viability test on Ti alloy surface (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide ASSAY. To find the effect of UV light on implant bone integration, biochemical test was performed on the femur of rabbits. Results and Discussion: Corrosion resistance of untreated Ti alloy in Ringer's solution was found to be less, whereas corrosion rate was more. Corrosion resistance of UV-treated samples was found to increase significantly, thereby lowering the corrosion rate. Cell growth in UV-treated specimen was observed to be higher than that in untreated samples. It is important to mention that cell growth was significantly enhanced on samples which were UV treated for longer duration of time. Conclusions: There was a marked improvement in cell growth on UV-treated Ti alloy samples. Hence, it is expected that it would enhance the process of osseointegration of Ti with bone. Another important finding obtained was that the removal torque values of UV-treated implants were higher than that of untreated implants. The overall result reveals that UV treatment of implants does help us in speeding up the osseointegration process.

  5. The independence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys of displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The majority of high fluence data on the void swelling and irradiation creep of austenitic steels were generated at relatively high displacement rates and relatively low helium/dpa levels that are not characteristic of the conditions anticipated in ITER and other anticipated fusion environments. After reanalyzing the available data, this paper shows that irradiation creep is not directly sensitive to either the helium/dpa ratio or the displacement rate, other than through their possible influence on void swelling, since one component of the irradiation creep rate varies with no correlation to the instantaneous swelling rate. Until recently, however, the non-swelling-related creep component was also thought to exhibit its own strong dependence on displacement rate, increasing at lower fluxes. This perception originally arose from the work of Lewthwaite and Mosedale at temperatures in the 270-350{degrees}C range. More recently this perception was thought to extend to higher irradiation temperatures. It now appears, however, that this interpretation is incorrect, and in fact the steady-state value of the non-swelling component of irradiation creep is actually insensitive to displacement rate. The perceived flux dependence appears to arise from a failure to properly interpret the impact of the transient regime of irradiation creep.

  6. The microstructure of neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr alloys: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintze, C.; Bergner, F.; Ulbricht, A.; Eckerlebe, H.

    2009-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic chromium steels are candidate materials for future applications in both Gen-IV fission and fusion technology. Experimental investigation of neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys is important in order to gain a better understanding of the interplay of chromium content and irradiation behaviour. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is particularly well suited to unfold the size distribution of non-planar irradiation-induced nanoscale features such as defect-solute clusters, nanovoids and α'- particles. This size distribution represents a statistically reliable average over a macroscopic volume. Assumptions on the dominant type of features can be checked against the ratio of magnetic and nuclear scattering. The materials investigated in this work are commercial-purity Fe-Cr alloys of nominal compositions Fe-2.5Cr, Fe-5Cr, Fe- 9Cr and Fe-12.5Cr (at %). Neutron irradiation was performed in the reactor BR2 at Mol (Belgium) at a temperature of 300 deg. C and neutron flux of 9 x 10 13 cm -2 s -1 (E > 1 MeV) [Matijasevic, JNM 377 (2008) 147]. The neutron exposures expressed in units of displacements per atom correspond to 0.6 and 1.5 dpa. A wavelength of 0.58 nm and three detector-sample distances of 1, 4 and 16 m were used in the SANS experiments carried out at the SANS-2 facility of GKSS Geesthacht (Germany). The samples were placed in a saturation magnetic field in order to separate magnetic and nuclear contributions. The scattering curves obtained for the unirradiated conditions of the four Fe-Cr alloys were taken as reference. We have found that the volume fraction of scatterers slightly increases with neutron exposure (Fe-9Cr) or exhibits a saturation-like behaviour (Fe-2.5Cr, Fe-5Cr and Fe-12.5Cr) and that the volume fraction at 1.5 dpa is an increasing function of the chromium level with a slight increase up to 9 at%Cr and a steep increase between 9 and 12.5 at%Cr. The radii of irradiation-induced scatterers are essentially less than 8 nm and

  7. Non-isothermal irradiation creep of nickel alloys Inconel 706 and PE-16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.R.; Chin, B.A.

    1984-06-01

    The results of in-reactor step temperature change experiments conducted on two nickel alloys, PE-16 and Inconel 706, were evaluated to determine the creep behavior under nonisothermal conditions. The effect of the temperature changes was found to be significantly different for the two alloys. Following a step temperature change, the creep rate of PE-16 adjusted to the rate found in isothermal tests at the new temperature. In contrast for Inconel 706, a reduction in temperature from 540 to 425 0 C produced a 300% increase in creep above that measured at 540 0 C in isothermal tests. The response of in-reactor creep in Inconel 706 to temperature changes was attributed to the dissolution of the gamma double-prime phase and subsequent loss of precipitation-strengthening at temperatures below 500 C

  8. Comparison of the effect of neutron irradiation on high purity vanadium and vanadium oxygen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenault, R.J.; Bressers, J.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of neutron damage on the low temperature deformation characteristics of high purity vanadium (R/sub 300K//R/sub 4.2K/ = 1100) was undertaken for two purposes. One purpose was to determine if reducing the purity interstitial content to a lower level would result in a large difference in the effective stress between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The present data along with previously obtained data does indicate that the difference increases as the impurity interstitial content is reduced. The explanation of this observation is based on the rapid increase of the non-irradiated yield stress at 77 0 K due to small increases in the oxygen content; however, the increase of the yield stress of the irradiated samples is much less with the same increase in oxygen content. A second purpose of this investigation was to determine the size and density of observable neutron produced defects as a function of oxygen content by transmission electron microscopy, and to relate the changes in density with changes in the yield stress. It was found that the density decreases and the size increases as the oxygen content decreases. There is qualitative agreement between the increase in yield stress at 300 0 K and the observable defect density. However, the change in the yield stress at 77 0 K due to neutron irradiation cannot be related to defect density and size

  9. Microstructure evolution and hardness change in ordered Ni3V intermetallic alloy by energetic ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, A.; Kaneno, Y.; Semboshi, S.; Yoshizaki, H.; Saitoh, Y.; Okamoto, Y.; Iwase, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ni 3 V bulk intermetallic compounds with ordered D0 22 structure were irradiated with 16 MeV Au ions at room temperature. The irradiation induced phase transformation was examined by means of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurement (EXAFS) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD). We also measured the Vickers hardness for unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The TEM observation shows that by the Au irradiation, the lamellar microstructures and the super lattice spot in diffraction pattern for the unirradiated specimen disappeared. This TEM result as well as the result of XRD and EXAFS measurements means that the intrinsic D0 22 structure of Ni 3 V changes into the A1 (fcc) structure which is the lattice structure just below the melting point in the thermal equilibrium phase diagram. The lattice structure change from D0 22 to A1 (fcc) accompanies a remarkable decrease in Vickers microhardness. The change in crystal structure was discussed in terms of the thermal spike and the sequential atomic displacements induced by the energetic heavy ion irradiation

  10. Reprint of: Effects of cold deformation, electron irradiation and extrusion on deuterium desorption behavior in Zr-1%Nb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, O.; Mats, O.; Mats, V.; Zhurba, V.; Khaimovich, P.

    2018-01-01

    The present article introduces the data of analysis of ranges of ion-implanted deuterium desorption from Zr-1% Nb alloy. The samples studied underwent plastic deformation, low temperature extrusion and electron irradiation. Plastic rolling of the samples at temperature ∼300 K resulted in plastic deformation with the degree of ε = 3.9 and the formation of nanostructural state with the average grain size of d = 61 nm. The high degree of defectiveness is shown in thermodesorption spectrum as an additional area of the deuterium desorption in the temperature ranges 650-850 K. The further processing of the sample (that had undergone plastic deformation by plastic rolling) with electron irradiation resulted in the reduction of the average grain size (58 nm) and an increase in borders concentration. As a result the amount of deuterium desorpted increased in the temperature ranges 650-900 K. In case of Zr-1% Nb samples deformed by extrusion the extension of desorption area is observed towards the temperature reduction down to 420 K. The formation of the phase state of deuterium solid solution in zirconium was not observed. The structural state behavior is a control factor in the process of deuterium thermodesorption spectrum structure formation with a fixed implanted deuterium dose (hydrogen diagnostics). It appears as additional temperature ranges of deuterium deso