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Sample records for irradiated swine skin

  1. A Multiscale Computational Model of the Response of Swine Epidermis After Acute Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events can lead to very high skin dose for astronauts on exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth s magnetic field [1]. Assessing the detrimental effects to human skin under such adverse conditions could be predicted by conducting territorial experiments on animal models. In this study we apply a computational approach to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis [2]. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters into a multiscale tissue modeling framework, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation index comparable to unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments [3]. It is noted the basal cell doubling time is 10 to 16 days in the intact population, but drops to 13.6 hr in the regenerating populations surviving irradiation. This complex 30-fold variation is proposed to be attributed to the shortening of the G1 phase duration. We investigate this radiation induced effect by considering at the sub-cellular level the expression and signaling of TGF-beta, as it is recognized as a key regulatory factor of tissue formation and wound healing [4]. This integrated model will allow us to test the validity of various basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and should lead to a fuller understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on the skin.

  2. Effects of irradiation of skin flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Y.; Ueda, M.; Oka, T.; Torii, S.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of skin flaps to irradiation and the optimum postoperative time for irradiation was studied in the rat. Flaps showed different reactions depending on the time of irradiation. There was a correlation between the radiosensitivity and the vascularity of the flap. Those flaps in the marginal hypovascular stage of revascularization showed reactions similar to normal skin. However, severe adverse reactions were observed in the marginal hypervascular stage

  3. Skin response to X-irradiation in the guinea-pig

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    Berry, R J; Mole, R H; Barnes, D W.H. [Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit

    1976-12-01

    Skin reaction to X-irradiation has been studied in the albino quinea-pig; early response in limited-field irradiations of the flank was comparable to that commonly seen in rodents, swine and man, and was dose-dependent with a dynamic range from mild erythema to moist desquamation. The peak early skin reaction was seen between 14 and 21 days after irradiation, and declined before 30 days except at the highest doses used. Fractionation of the X-ray dose at 24 hours resulted in a 'sparing' of about 340 rad. Permanent partial epilation was detectable at doses in excess of 1400 rad, and complete epilation at 1 year occurred in 50 per cent of irradiated fields at 1740 rad. Twenty-four hour two-dose fractionation resulted in a 'sparing' of about 500 rad for epilation. Palpable dermal 'fibrosis' was detectable at 3 months after irradiation in fields given more than 2070 rad, and at 1 year after irradiation in fields given more than 1800 rad; 50 per cent of fields showed palpable 'fibrosis' at 1 year at 1930 rad. Unlike domestic swine and man, skin fields in the quinea-pig showed no dimensional contraction after X-ray doses which produced gross early skin damage.

  4. Determinants of skin sensitivity to solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, W.; Vink, A.A.; Boelsma, E.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, W.A.A.; Tijburg, L.B.M.; Veer, van 't P.; Poppel, van G.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Acute effects of UV irradiation include UV-induced erythema. Sunlight plays an important role in the development of skin cancer. Several predictive factors of UV-induced erythema could also be predictive for skin cancer. Objective: Our objective was to quantitatively assess phenotypical

  5. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  6. Characterization of dendritic cells subpopulations in skin and afferent lymph in the swine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Marquet

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous delivery of vaccines to specific skin dendritic cells (DC subsets is foreseen as a promising strategy to induce strong and specific types of immune responses such as tolerance, cytotoxicity or humoral immunity. Because of striking histological similarities between human and pig skin, pig is recognized as the most suitable model to study the cutaneous delivery of medicine. Therefore improving the knowledge on swine skin DC subsets would be highly valuable to the skin vaccine field. In this study, we showed that pig skin DC comprise the classical epidermal langerhans cells (LC and dermal DC (DDC that could be divided in 3 subsets according to their phenotypes: (1 the CD163(neg/CD172a(neg, (2 the CD163(highCD172a(pos and (3 the CD163(lowCD172a(pos DDC. These subtypes have the capacity to migrate from skin to lymph node since we detected them in pseudo-afferent lymph. Extensive phenotyping with a set of markers suggested that the CD163(high DDC resemble the antibody response-inducing human skin DC/macrophages whereas the CD163(negCD172(low DDC share properties with the CD8(+ T cell response-inducing murine skin CD103(pos DC. This work, by showing similarities between human, mouse and swine skin DC, establishes pig as a model of choice for the development of transcutaneous immunisation strategies targeting DC.

  7. Acute skin reaction after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data on acute mouse and pig skin reaction after fractionated γ or X irradiation have been analysed in terms of a new cell tissue kinetic model. The exponential-quadratic and generalized Huggett formulae have been used for cell lethality description. Fairly better results could be demonstrated with generalized Huggett formula. The speed of repopulation has been determined for fractionated regimes as well as for some irregular schedules. The repopulation is slower in the case of fractionated treatment. On considering the normal cell loss factor in the tissue, minimum cell cycle time has been calculated. Its value differs for various strains (Tsub(d)=28.8 hours for SAS/TO mice and Tsub(d) < or approximately 17 hours for WHT/Ht mice) and does not differ for plucked skin. The repopulation has been shown to follow exponential dependence after some latent period. Other factors influencing the effectiveness of radiation treatment (the length of the latent period or the changes of the survival curve during fractionated irradiation) have been considered, too

  8. Revascularization of autogenous skin grafts placed on irradiated tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Torii, S.; Kaneda, T.; Oka, T.

    1982-01-01

    Vascular changes in rat skin after irradiation were examined microangiographically. Revascularization of the skin transplanted during the chronic stage after irradiation was also studied. The results obtained through these examinations revealed higher vascular densities at the acute and the subacute stages, and low values at the chronic stages compared with those of the control. Furthermore, when the skin grafts were transplanted to the irradiated beds in the chronic stage, primary revascularization was scant, and the inhibited capillary proliferation in the recipient sites prevented new vessel penetration. This explains why grafts transplanted to previously irradiated beds fail to survive

  9. Treatment of skin damage due to irradiation and post-irradiation skin tumours, at the Hornheide special clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drepper, H.

    1987-01-01

    A short precis of 54 years of history of the Hornheide special clinic for tumours, tuberculosis, and plastic surgery of face and skin is followed by a description of the current tasks of the clinic as an interdisciplinary center for plastic surgery and rehabilitation with facilities for tumour surgery, radiotherapy, skin and tissue pathology, and psychotherapy. Important special areas of this interdisciplinary cooperation are the treatment of skin disorders due to radiation and of tumours on irradiated skin, as well as treatment and plastic surgery after removal of tumours by irradiation in order to make the affected areas fit for renewed irradiation. (TRV) [de

  10. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on skin of guinea pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenwen; Chen Qiang; Li Peng; Ling Ling; Lin Xiaochen; Ren Shuping; Liu Yajuan; Li Yun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the adverse effects of ultraviolet B (UV-B) on the skin of guinea pig. Methods: Guinea pig skin was irradiated with UV-B, the skin changes in external appearance, pathology, and the contents of OH and O 2 - produced in the skin were determined to study the adverse effects of UV-B on the guinea pig skin. Results: UV-B caused red swelling and desquamation of skin, with the increasing of the UV-B irradiation, the cells in stratum spinosum began to proliferate vigorously, the MDA and ROS contents in UVB radiation group were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: UV-B can cause injury to guinea pig skin and has the potential to produce skin cancer. (authors)

  11. Intracoronary irradiation: dose response for the prevention of restenosis in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberger, Judah; Amols, Howard; Ennis, Ronald D.; Schwartz, Allan; Wiedermann, Joseph G.; Marboe, Charles

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty represents, in part, a proliferative response of vascular smooth muscle at the site of injury. We have previously shown that high-dose radiation (20 Gy), delivered via an intracoronary 192 Ir source, causes focal medial fibrosis and markedly impairs the restenosis process after balloon angioplasty in swine. This study sought to delineate the dose-response characteristics of this effect. Methods and Materials: Forty juvenile swine underwent coronary angiography; a segment of the left coronary artery was chosen as a target for balloon injury. In 30 swine, a 2 cm ribbon of 192 Ir was positioned at the target segment and 20, 15, or 10 Gy were delivered to the vessel wall (10 animals/dose). Subsequently, overdilatation balloon angioplasty was performed at the irradiated segment. In 10 control swine, overdilatation balloon angioplasty was performed without previous irradiation. Thirty-eight animals survived until sacrifice at 30 ± 3 days. Histopathological analysis was performed by a pathologist in a blinded manner. The area of maximal luminal compromise within the target segment was analyzed via computer-assisted planimetry. Results: Neointimal area was decreased by 71.4% at 20 Gy and by 58.3% at 15 Gy compared with control animals (p < 0.05 for both). A stimulatory effect on smooth muscle cell proliferation was noted at 10 Gy, with a 123% increase in neointimal area compared with controls (p < 0.05). Mean percent area stenosis was also reduced by 63% at 20 Gy and by 74.8% at 15 Gy compared with controls (p < 0.05 for both). Conclusions: Intracoronary irradiation prior to overstretch balloon angioplasty markedly reduces neointima formation; this effect is dose dependent, with evidence of a significant stimulatory effect at 10 Gy. The effective therapeutic dose range for the prevention of restenosis in this model begins at approximately 15 Gy delivered to the vessel wall

  12. Oxidative stability examination of irradiated swine for samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formanek, Z.

    1995-01-01

    DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), OBM (Oxygen Bomb Method) methods and POV (Peroxide Value) determination was applied to determine the oxidative stability of lard samples irradiated by a Co 60 gamma source at the dose of 0; 0.75; 2.5kGy. Both of the methods seem to be suitable to determine oxidative stability of fats, because in every case lowering oxidative stability was received with increasing irradiation dose. (R.P.). 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  13. A Comparative Study of Melanin Content and Skin Morphology for Three Commonly Used Laboratory Swine (Sus scrofa domestica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory 711th Human Performance Wing Human Effectiveness Directorate Bioeffects Division Optical Radiation Bioeffects...Branch AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2013-0004 A Comparative Study of Melanin Content and Skin Morphology for Three Commonly Used Laboratory Swine (Sus scrofa...Jindra Human Effectiveness Directorate Directed Energy Bioeffects Division Optical Radiation Branch Robert W. Kornegay Rick Figueroa Human

  14. Acute skin reactions observed in fractionated proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto, Takuro; Maruhashi, Noboru; Takada, Yoshihisa; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Inada, Tetsuo; Kitagawa, Toshio

    1989-01-01

    Between May 1985 and July 1987, 49 skin reactions of 43 patients treated by proton irradiation were observed at the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center (PARMS), the University of Tsukuba. Taking the peak skin score as an endpoint, the radiobiological effects [relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and time-dose relationship] of the proton beam in multi-fractionated treatments were estimated. Factors influencing the skin dose, such as the prescribed tumor dose, tumor site, and number of applied fields, were also analyzed. The following conclusions regarding acute skin reactions to the clinical use of proton irradiation were obtained: 1) the physical skin-sparing effect of proton irradiation in single-field irradiation, especially in superficial regions, is not large compared with that of high-energy photon irradiation; 2) multidirectional proton irradiation significantly reduced the skin dose and severity of acute reasons; 3) the radiobiological effects of the proton beam, RBE and the time factor, estimated in human skin in multi-fractional treatment were slightly smaller than those of X-rays, i.e., 0.92 and -0.25±0.09, respectively. (author)

  15. Experimental testing and constitutive modeling of the mechanical properties of the swine skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagan, Sylwia D; Liber-Kneć, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was an estimation of the possibility of using hyperelastic material models to fit experimental data obtained in the tensile test for the swine skin tissue. The uniaxial tensile tests of samples taken from the abdomen and back of a pig was carried out. The mechanical properties of the skin such as the mean Young's modulus, the mean maximum stress and the mean maximum elongation were calculated. The experimental data have been used to identify the parameters in specific strain-energy functions given in seven constitutive models of hyperelastic materials: neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, Ogden, Yeoh, Martins, Humphrey and Veronda-Westmann. An analysis of errors in fitting of theoretical and experimental data was done. Comparison of load -displacement curves for the back and abdomen regions of skin taken showed a different scope of both the mean maximum loading forces and the mean maximum elongation. Samples which have been prepared from the abdominal area had lower values of the mean maximum load compared to samples from the spine area. The reverse trend was observed during the analysis of the values of elongation. An analysis of the accuracy of model fitting to the experimental data showed that, the least accurate were the model of neo- -Hookean, model of Mooney-Rivlin for the abdominal region and model of Veronda-Westmann for the spine region. An analysis of seven hyperelastic material models showed good correlations between the experimental and the theoretical data for five models.

  16. The choice of sensitive skin layer responsible for aftereffects of daily irradiation of the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirim-Markus, I.B.

    1992-01-01

    The choice of sensitive human skin layer manifesting in delayed period after daily irradiation of the human skin (stochastic and determined effects) was evaluated. It was established that delayed aftereffects of daily radiation of the skin manifested as epidem damages. This layer of papilla derma of 10-15 mg/cm 2 thick situated at the great part of body surface, 15 mg/cm 2 on dorsal side of hands and 40 mg/cm 2 on palms and pillows of the fingers. Sensitive layer of skin dosimeter for a control of daily irradiation of people must have the same geometry

  17. Adherence evaluation of vented chest seals in a swine skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Françoise; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Higgins, Adam; Kheirabadi, Bijan; McCarron, Richard; Kennedy, Daniel; Housler, Greggory

    2016-10-01

    Perforation of the chest (open pneumothorax) with and without lung injury can cause air accumulation in the chest, positive intrapleural pressure and lead to tension pneumothorax if untreated. The performance of chest seals to prevent tension physiology depends partially on their ability to adhere to the skin and seal the chest wound. Novel non-occlusive vented chest seals were assessed for their adhesiveness on skin of live swine under normal and extreme environmental conditions to simulate austere battlefield conditions. Chest seals were applied on the back of the swine on skin that was soiled by various environmental contaminants to represent battlefield situations. A peeling (horizontal rim peeling) and detachment and breaching (vertical pulling) techniques were used to quantify the adhesive performance of vented chest seals. Among eight initially selected vented seals, five (Bolin, Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM) were further down-selected based on their superior adherence scores at ambient temperatures. The adherence of these seals was then assessed after approximately 17h storage at extreme cold (-19.5°C) and hot (71.5°C) temperatures. Adherence scores for peeling (above 90%) and detachment scores (less than 25%) were comparable for four vented chest seals when tested at ambient temperature, except for the Bolin seal which had higher breaching. Under extreme storage temperatures, adherence peeling scores were comparable to those at ambient temperatures for four chest seals. Scores were significantly lower for the Bolin seal at extreme temperatures. This seal also had the highest detachment and breaching scores. In contrast, the Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM seals showed similar ability to stay air tight without breaching after hot storage. No significant difference was found in skin adherence of the five vented chest seals at ambient temperature and the four seals (Russell, Fast breathe, Hyfin and SAM) maintained superior adherence even after

  18. Effects of Intraluminal Irradiation with Holmium-166 for TIPS Stenosis: Experimental Study in a Swine Model

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    Park, Ji Seon; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Kim, Deog Yoon; Park, Yong Koo; Kim, Soo Joong [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Joon [Kang Dong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal irradiation with Holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) for reducing the pseudointimal hyperplasia (PIH) in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) tract in a swine model. TIPS was performed in 12 domestic pigs, after the creation of portal hypertension by intraportal injection of a mixture of N-butyl-2- cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and lipiodol. Five pigs first underwent intraluminal irradiation (30 Gy) in the parenchymal tract with using a {sup 166}Ho solution-filled balloon catheter, and this was followed by the placement of a nitinol stent in the TIPS tract. For the seven control pigs, the balloon was filled with saline and contrast media mixture. Two weeks later, follow-up portography and histological analysis were performed. TIPS was successfully performed in all twelve pigs with achieving artificially induced portal hypertension. Portography performed two weeks after TIPS showed the patent tracts in the TIPS tracts that were irradiated with {sup 166}Ho (5/5, 100%), whereas either completely (5/6, 83.3%) or partially (1/6, 16.7%) occluded TIPS were seen in the seven pigs of the nonirradiated control group, except in one pig that experienced periprocedural death due to bleeding. Histological analysis showed a statistically significant difference for the maximal PIH (irradiated: 32.8%, nonirradiated: 76.0%, p < 0.001) between the two groups. Intraluminal irradiation with 30 Gy of {sup 166}Ho for TIPS significantly improved the TIPS patency in a swine model of portal hypertension during a 2- week period of follow-up.

  19. Growth regulation in X-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgjo, K.; Devik, F.

    1978-01-01

    Extracts of hairless mouse skin were tested for their content of epidermal G 1 inhibitor and G 2 inhibitor at daily intervals after X-irradiation with 4 500 or 2 250 rad. After either dose the skin extracts lacked G 1 inhibitory activity on days 5 and 6 respectively after irradiation. This coincided with the time when the epidermal mitotic rate again became normal and started a period of over-shoot. The time interval of 5 to 6 days corresponds to the turnover time of the differentiating cells in hairless mouse back epidermis. The findings indicate that the proliferating cells in epidermis can respond to changes in local chalone concentration, even after X-irradiation at the tested doses, and that the irradiated epidermal cell population still retains some important properties inherent in a cybernetically regulated system. The local G 2 -inhibitory activity also varied after irradiation, but these variations could not be directly related to the corresponding mitotic rates. (author)

  20. Erlotinib-induced rash spares previously irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene M.; Vonk, Ernest J.A.; Koster, Mariska E.Y.; Houwing, Ronald H.

    2011-01-01

    Erlotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor prescribed to patients with locally advanced or metastasized non-small cell lung carcinoma after failure of at least one earlier chemotherapy treatment. Approximately 75% of the patients treated with erlotinib develop acneiform skin rashes. A patient treated with erlotinib 3 months after finishing concomitant treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer is presented. Unexpectedly, the part of the skin that had been included in his previously radiotherapy field was completely spared from the erlotinib-induced acneiform skin rash. The exact mechanism of erlotinib-induced rash sparing in previously irradiated skin is unclear. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon needs to be explored further, because the number of patients being treated with a combination of both therapeutic modalities is increasing. The therapeutic effect of erlotinib in the area of the previously irradiated lesion should be assessed. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of different skin preservation methods with gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Linda; Camacho, Bernardo

    2017-06-01

    Allografts are in constant demand, not only for burn victims, but also for all open wounds as "biological dressings". Tissue quality and security are two of the major concerns of Tissue Banks. There are limited studies published. There has been extensive discussion on the subject of preservation methods for cadaver skin. Most literature available comes from clinical reports. In this research, the authors compared 85% glycerolized non irradiated skin allografts with three glycerolized irradiated skin allografts (using different glycerol concentrations 50%, 70% and 85%). The evaluation of allograft quality was done by measuring physical and biological properties of such prepared human tissue grafts. In the histological structure evaluation changes were minimal and did not alter the skin structure. The clinical function of their behavior as temporal dressings was tested. They proved to have similar capabilities for improving granulating tissue and contributing to wound beds closure (Hickerson et al. (1994) [1]). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Decreased adventitial neovascularization after intracoronary irradiation in swine: a time course study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollum, Marc; Cottin, Yves; Chan, Rosanna C.; Kim, Han Soo; Bhargava, Balram; Vodovotz, Yoram; Waksman, Ron

    2001-01-01

    Background: Intracoronary radiation (IR) suppresses the formation of neointima after arterial injury in swine, through mechanisms incompletely understood. Neointimal development appears related to expansion of adventitial microvessels; we therefore examined the hypothesis that IR inhibits neointima formation through an anti-angiogenic effect. Methods and Results: Juvenile swine were treated with either 0 or 15 Gy 192 Ir (γ-source) and euthanized 3, 7, or 14 days later or treated with 18 Gy 90 Y (β-source) and euthanized after 14 days. Adventitial area (AA), intimal area (IA), IA corrected for medial fracture length, and adventitial vessel area were assessed in both injured and uninjured segments by computer-aided histomorphometry on Verhoeff-Von Giesson stained sections. Adventitial vessel count (AVC) was enumerated visually on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and confirmed by anti-factor VIII-associated antigen immunostaining for endothelial cells. AA and IA were reduced in injured arteries subjected to IR as compared to controls. The AVC was significantly lower in injured irradiated arterial segments as well as all uninjured segments as compared with injured control segments. In the injured and irradiated arteries, the AVC remained unchanged at 3, 7, and 14 days. The injured segments of arteries treated with IR demonstrated a significantly lower adventitial microvessel density (AVC/AA) as compared to the injured control segments. Comparison of γ- and β-irradiation at 14 days did not show any differences for vessel parameters and measurements of adventitial microvessels. IA and AVC were correlated positively (R 2 = 0.63, α = 0.79, p < 0.01). Conclusion: IR induced an early and sustained anti-angiogenic effect between 3 and 14 days. The relation between IA and AVC may indicate an antiproliferative effect associated with an anti-angiogenic effect independent of the type of radiation. CONDENSED ABSTRACT Intracoronary radiation suppresses neointima

  3. An experimental studies of skin autograft in irradiated bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Minoru

    1981-01-01

    Effects of irradiation to revascularization and skin grafting were studied. Wistar rats were irradiated with 1000, 2000, and 3000 rad of x-ray. One 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after irradiation each group, consisted of 10 rats, was compared with that of 34 untreated rats. A new score system of skin reaction was proposed. The highest moist skin reaction was observed after 2 weeks in 3 irradiated groups. In the 2000 and 3000 rad groups, the acute reaction appeared with 1 week latent period and recovered in 8 weeks followed by marked skin atrophy and epilation, while in the 1000 rad group complete recovery was observed in 3 weeks without late squlae. In order to carry out microangiography, a new device to inject the contrast medium at constant temperature and pressure was used. Marked inflammation was observed in 4 weeks, began to recover in 4 weeks, and hypovascular area appeared in 8 weeks. As for the blood area density, no variation was found for the 1000 rad group. However, in the 2000 and 3000 rad groups, the highest density was observed in 2 weeks and decreased after 8 weeks to that lower than the control. Revascularization after the skin grafting was followed by microangiography. In the control group, primary and secondary revascularization was observed one and 3 days after transplantation. As for the 3000 rad groups both revascularizations were hardly recognized when transplanted 8 weeks after irradiation. The optimum time for skin grafting was found to be acute or subacute period of the vascular damage. (Nakanishi, T.)

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in previously burned or irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.J.; Hirsch, R.M.; Broadwater, J.R.; Netscher, D.T.; Ames, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising in previously burned or irradiated skin was reviewed in 66 patients treated between 1944 and 1986. Healing of the initial injury was complicated in 70% of patients. Mean interval from initial injury to diagnosis of SCC was 37 years. The overwhelming majority of patients presented with a chronic intractable ulcer in previously injured skin. The regional relapse rate after surgical excision was very high, 58% of all patients. Predominant patterns of recurrence were in local skin and regional lymph nodes (93% of recurrences). Survival rates at 5, 10, and 20 years were 52%, 34%, and 23%, respectively. Five-year survival rates in previously burned and irradiated patients were not significantly different (53% and 50%, respectively). This review, one of the largest reported series, better defines SCC arising in previously burned or irradiated skin as a locally aggressive disease that is distinct from SCC arising in sunlight-damaged skin. An increased awareness of the significance of chronic ulceration in scar tissue may allow earlier diagnosis. Regional disease control and survival depend on surgical resection of all known disease and may require radical lymph node dissection or amputation

  5. Total skin electron irradiation: evaluation of dose uniformity throughout the skin surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Yavuz; Arican, Zumre; Bar-Deroma, Raquel; Tamir, Ada; Kuten, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    In this study, in vivo dosimetic data of 67 total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) treatments were analyzed. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements were made at 10 different body points for every patient. The results demonstrated that the dose inhomogeneity throughout the skin surface is around 15%. The homogeneity was better at the trunk than at the extratrunk points, and was worse when a degrader was used. There was minimal improvement of homogeneity in subsequent days of treatment

  6. Twenty two cases of skin cancer following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Kazuyuki; Hayasaka, Ken-ichi

    1978-01-01

    21 cases of spinocellular carcinoma (2 cases of them complicated basal-cell carcinoma) and a case of fibrosarcoma following irradiation were observed. The source which poses some problems in soft x-ray used for the treatment. Soft x-ray is used for the treatment of eczema, progressive keratodermia palmaris et plantaris, pustulosis palmaris et plantaris, trichophytia, hemangioma etc.. However, details of the irradiation are unknown in many of the cases. Carcinogenesis was noted 10 years at least-36 years at most after the irradiation. In 7 cases of 12 which received soft x-ray irradiation (including superficial therapy), multiple or double cancer was observed. In many of the cases, irradiation is repeated at low voltage, and radiation keratosis preceded cancerization. As the therapy of this type of keratosis, wide excision and skin grafting are generally recommended. The prognoses of the cases which received this therapy seem to be favorable. There were 6 cases of death out of 22 cases. The mortality (23.8%) is not high except for that of fibrosarcoma. Utilization of radiotherapy for skin diseases in future will be judged after a long-period followup. However, repeated irradiation for a long period, even if the source is extra-soft or limiting ray, should be avoided. (Ueda, J.)

  7. Photodynamic therapy improves the ultraviolet-irradiated hairless mice skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Ana Elisa S.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-03-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet (UV) sunlight causes premature skin aging. In light of this fact, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging modality for treating cancer and other skin conditions, however its response on photoaged skin has not been fully illustrated by means of histopathology. For this reason, the aim of this study was analyze whether PDT can play a role on a mouse model of photoaging. Hence, SKH-1 hairless mice were randomly allocated in two groups, UV and UV/PDT. The mice were daily exposed to an UV light source (280-400 nm: peak at 350 nm) for 8 weeks followed by a single PDT session using 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) topically. After the proper photosensitizer accumulation within the tissue, a non-coherent red (635 nm) light was performed and, after 14 days, skin samples were excised and processed for light microscopy, and their sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson's Trichrome. As a result, we observed a substantial epidermal thickening and an improvement in dermal collagen density by deposition of new collagen fibers on UV/PDT group. These findings strongly indicate epidermal and dermal restoration, and consequently skin restoration. In conclusion, this study provides suitable evidences that PDT improves the UV-irradiated hairless mice skin, supporting this technique as an efficient treatment for photoaged skin.

  8. Effect of Irradiated Yeast Fermented Cassava on Performance of Starter and Growing Swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khammeng, Terdsak; Sanchisuriya, Pitcharat; Nontaso, Ngarmnit; Piadang, Nattayana

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a supplementation of fermented cassava with Saccharomyces sp. KKU.1 on the swine diet. The fermented products were added in the rat in at 0, 3, 6, and 9%, respectively. Thirty-two (4 week-old) crossbreed swine (Large white x Land race x Duroc) were randomly allotted according to Completely Randomize Design in two periods. Four dietary treatments and four replications (1 male and 1 female) were tested in the starting swine. Four dietary treatments and two replications (2 male and 2 female) were tested in the growing swine. The swine were tested for 6 week (August 2006-September 2006) at the swine unit, Deparment of Animal Science, Khon Kaen University. The results revealed that the fermented cassava in the diet had no affect (P>0.05) on productive performance (growth rate and feed conversion ratio) of swine in both periods.

  9. Morphological changes in skin tumors caused by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalik, K G; Lipova, V A; Neyshtadt, E L

    1979-01-01

    Morphological changes induced by treating melanomas, basaloma and flatcell skin cancers with a pulsed neodymium laser at 1060 nm, pulse length 1 msec and energy 250 to 500 J/cm/sup 2/, were studied using impressions and scrapings from the affected area. Nuclear pyknosis, nuclear and cellular elongation, vacuolization, frequent complete loss of cytoplasm, particulaly in the zone of direct irradiation, and loss of cellular structure were seen. These dystrophic changes increased with closeness to the zone of direct irradiation, culminating in necrosis. Formed and decomposed blood elements and melanin accumulated in the intracellular spaces, due to disruption of capillaries and small arteries and veins. Fewer and more aggregated melanoblasts were found after melanoma irradiation. Nuclear chromatin fusion, cytoplasmic changes and altered cell shape were observed. Basaloma cells were clustered and elongated after irradiation, with many fibrous structures and loss of cellular elements. Cytoplasmic vacuolization and lysis, bare nuclei, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and karyopyknosis were seen in corneous flat-cell cancer. In the few cases in which malignant cells were found under the scab from the first treatment the procedure was repeated. The morphological changes induced by pulsed laser irradiation are very similar to electrocoagulation necrosis, but are more localized. The ability of low and middle energy lasers to induce thrombosis and coagulation in vascular walls reduced the probability of hematogenic tumor cell dissemination. Cytological examination is highly effective in determining the degree of radical skin cancer healing due to laser treatment. 12 references, 2 figures.

  10. Effect of repeated ultraviolet irradiation on skin of hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpermann, H.; Vogel, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of repeated UV-irradiation on mechanical and biochemical parameters was studied in skin of hairless mice. uV-A irradiation for a period of 1 h daily over 8 weeks caused only a slight increase in skin thickness and a decrease in ultimate strain. The changes induced by UV-B and C, however, were quite remarkable. Skin thickness was increased depending on the daily dose exposure time (15-90 s at an irradiation rate of 20mW/cm 2 UV-B and A and of 14mW/cm 2 UV-C) and the duration of treatment (1-6 weeks). Ultimate load, tensile strength and modulus of elasticity showed an increase following medium dosages after 1 and 2 weeks, however, a decrease after high dosages and longterm treatment. Ultimate strain was found to be the most sensitive parameter being decreased depending on exposure time and duration of treatment. Insoluble collagen and total collagen were decreased after long-term treatment thus being correlated with the mechanical parameters. The elastin content was only barely influenced and not correlated with the mechanical data, e.g. the modulus of elasticity. Thus, a favourable effect of short-treatment with low doses of UV-irradiation of mechanical parameters of skin could be demonstrated. Long-term treatment with relatively high doses of UV-B, however, resulted in unfavourable effects, whereby first ultimate strain, then ultimate load, modulus of elasticity and tensile strength were decreased. (orig.) [de

  11. Skin carcinogenesis following uniform and non-uniform β irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.W.; Williams, J.P.; Coggle, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Where workers or the general public may be exposed to ionising radiation, the irradiation is rarely uniform. The risk figures and dose limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) are based largely on clinical and epidemiological studies of reasonably uniform irradiated organs. The paucity of clinical or experimental data for highly non-uniform exposures has prevented the ICRP from providing adequate recommendations. This weakness has led on a number of occasions to the postulate that highly non-uniform exposures of organs could be 100,000 times more carcinogenic than ICRP risk figures would predict. This so-called ''hot-particle hypothesis'' found little support among reputable radiobiologists, but could not be clearly and definitively refuted on the basis of experiment. An experiment, based on skin tumour induction in mouse skin, is described which was developed to test the hypothesis. The skin of 1200 SAS/4 male mice has been exposed to a range of uniform and non-uniform sources of the β emitter 170 Tm (E max ∼ 1 MeV). Non-uniform exposures were produced using arrays of 32 or 8 2-mm diameter sources distributed over the same 8-cm 2 area as a uniform control source. Average skin doses varied from 2-100 Gy. The results for the non-uniform sources show a 30% reduction in tumour incidence by the 32-point array at the lower mean doses compared with the response from uniform sources. The eight-point array showed an order-of-magnitude reduction in tumour incidence compared to uniform irradiation at low doses. These results, in direct contradiction to the ''hot particle hypothesis'', indicate that non-uniform exposures produce significantly fewer tumours than uniform exposures. (author)

  12. Modulation of accelerated repopulation in mouse skin during daily irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.-R.; Shirazi, A.; Heasman, F.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: The timing of acceleration of repopulation in the epidermis during daily irradiation is related to the development of skin erythema and epidermal hypoplasia. Therefore, the relationship between impairment of the epidermal barrier function, the dermal inflammatory response and epidermal hypoplasia with the acceleration of repopulation was investigated.Materials and purpose: Skin fields of approximately 1 cm 2 on the thighs of TUC mice were given five daily fractions of 3 Gy in each week followed by top-up doses at the end of the first, the second, or the third week to determine residual epidermal tolerance and to calculate repopulation rates in weeks 1, 2, or 3. Systemic modulation of repopulation was attempted by daily indomethacine during fractionated irradiation whereas tape stripping or UV-B exposure before the start of fractionated irradiation attempted local modulation. In parallel experiments, the water permeability coefficient of the epidermis was determined ex vivo by studying transepidermal transport of tritiated water.Results: Without modulation, no repopulation was found in the first week of daily fractionation but repopulation compensated 30% of the dose given in week two and 70% of the dose given in week three. Only tape stripping before the start of fractionated irradiation accelerated repopulation in week one. UV-B had no effect on repopulation although it stimulated proliferation as much as tape stripping. Indomethacin did not suppress acceleration of repopulation. A significant increase in transepidermal water loss was found but only after repopulation had already accelerated.Conclusions: Acceleration of repopulation in mouse epidermis during daily-fractionated irradiation is not related to the simultaneous development of an inflammatory response. Also, the loss of the epidermal barrier function is not involved in the development of the acceleration response, which rather seems to be triggered directly by the decreased

  13. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of previous x-irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 0 C), x-irradiation, and irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 0 C or 44 0 C) was studied in mouse foot skin. Irradiation of mice feet 90 days before, with 20 Gy, increased the subsequent response to heat alone, or combined with irradiation, as well as to irradiation alone. It had little effect on the thermal enhancement ratios for both acute and late skin reactions. Memory of the previous irradiation treatment could be masked when the temperature of the subsequent heat treatment alone, or combined with irradiation, was 44 0 C. Priming heat treatment induced resistance to a subsequent heat treatment and to a subsequent combined irradiation-heat treatment in normal as well as previously irradiated skin. When late skin reaction was considered, a larger 'memory' of the previous irradiation treatment was always evident, compared to acute skin reaction: the 'remembered' dose in the late skin reaction was about twice the 'remembered' dose in the acute reaction. (U.K.)

  14. Late nonstochastic changes in pig skin after β irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Wells, J.; Charles, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Late radiation-induced changes in pig skin have been assessed following irradiation with β-rays from a 22.5- or 15-mm-diameter 90 Sr/ 90 Y source and a 19- or 9-mm-diameter 170 Tm source. Late damage, in terms of dermal atrophy, was assessed 2 years after irradiation from measurements of dermal thickness of 40-50% of the control value, occurred at a dose of approx. 40 Gy from the 22.5-mm source and approx. 75 Gy from the 15-mm source. In the case of 170 Tm the 19- and 9-mm sources produced similar degrees of atrophy at equal doses. Maximum atrophy occurred at approx. 70 Gy, when the dermis was approx. 70% of the thickness of normal skin. Significant late tissue atrophy was seen at doses, from both types of radiation, which only produced minimal erythema in the early reaction. Such late reactions need to be taken into account when revised radiological protection criteria are proposed for skin

  15. Repopulation in irradiated pig skin: late versus early effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Peel, D.M.; Dodd, P.; Simmonds, R.H.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    In the first 16 weeks after irradiation, two distinct waves of reaction can be observed in pig skin, the first wave (3-9 weeks) represents the expression of damage to the epithelium while the second is indicative of primary damage to the dermis, mediated through vascular injury. Comparison of single doses with two equal doses separated by 28 days produced a D 2 -D 1 value of 14.0 Gy at the doses which produced moist desquamation in 50% of fields (ED 50 ) after strontium-90 irradiation. After X-irradiation, comparison of ED 50 doses for the later dermal reaction suggested a D 2 -D 1 value of 4.2 Gy. These values of D 2 -D 1 for epithelial and dermal reactions in pig skin were compared with earlier data from this laboratory for similar split-dose experiments with a one-day interval. Such a comparison allowed for the estimation of the component of recovery in the present 28-day interval experiments due to repopulation. This component was found to be 6.5 Gy for the early epithelial damage, but was zero for the later dermal damage. (Auth.)

  16. Postoperative irradiation after reconstructive surgery: comparative study of radiosensitivity between free-skin grafts and skin flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Y.; Ueda, M.; Kaneda, T.; Oka, T.; Torii, S.; Sakuma, S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects after reconstructive surgery (free-skin grafts and skin flaps) were studied in the rat, and the optimum time for irradiation was determined. The radiosensitivity of both free-skin grafts and skin flaps showed the same trend depending on time of irradiation after operation. The grafts or flaps irradiated in the hypervascular stage showed severe reactions to irradiation, whereas those irradiated in the hypovascular stage showed milder reactions in gross and microangiographic observation. Vascular damage should be given primary consideration when deciding the proper time for irradiation after reconstructive surgery. In general, free-skin grafts showed more severe reactions than skin flaps, especially in the grafts irradiated in the early stage after operation. The experimental results of this study cannot be readily transferred to a clinical setting, but they suggest that postoperative irradiation could be begun 3 to 4 weeks after operation with respect to graft or flap survival, and the results of the clinical cases almost coincide with these experimental results

  17. Cutaneous collateral axonal sprouting re-innervates the skin component and restores sensation of denervated Swine osteomyocutaneous alloflaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhaib Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Reconstructive transplantation such as extremity and face transplantation is a viable treatment option for select patients with devastating tissue loss. Sensorimotor recovery is a critical determinant of overall success of such transplants. Although motor function recovery has been extensively studied, mechanisms of sensory re-innervation are not well established. Recent clinical reports of face transplants confirm progressive sensory improvement even in cases where optimal repair of sensory nerves was not achieved. Two forms of sensory nerve regeneration are known. In regenerative sprouting, axonal outgrowth occurs from the transected nerve stump while in collateral sprouting, reinnervation of denervated tissue occurs through growth of uninjured axons into the denervated tissue. The latter mechanism may be more important in settings where transected sensory nerves cannot be re-apposed. In this study, denervated osteomyocutaneous alloflaps (hind- limb transplants from Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC-defined MGH miniature swine were performed to specifically evaluate collateral axonal sprouting for cutaneous sensory re-innervation. The skin component of the flap was externalized and serial skin sections extending from native skin to the grafted flap were biopsied. In order to visualize regenerating axonal structures in the dermis and epidermis, 50 um frozen sections were immunostained against axonal and Schwann cell markers. In all alloflaps, collateral axonal sprouts from adjacent recipient skin extended into the denervated skin component along the dermal-epidermal junction from the periphery towards the center. On day 100 post-transplant, regenerating sprouts reached 0.5 cm into the flap centripetally. Eight months following transplant, epidermal fibers were visualized 1.5 cm from the margin (rate of regeneration 0.06 mm per day. All animals had pinprick sensation in the periphery of the transplanted skin within 3 months post

  18. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The skin of the mouse foot was used to study the effects of previous irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 degrees C), to irradiation, or to irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 degrees C or 44 degrees C). Hyperthermia was applied by immersing the mouse foot into a hot waterbath and

  19. Relationship between measurements of blood oxidative metabolites and skin reaction in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Takashi; Goto, Jun; Nomiya, Takuma; Nemoto, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Recently, oxidative metabolites have been able to be measured by simple small device. It has been reported that the value of oxidative metabolites increases under several conditions such as hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, etc. Radiation used in radiotherapy also causes free radicals and oxidative metabolites, and irradiation causes dermatitis and sometimes causes skin ulcer in the irradiated site. We analyzed the relationships between the value of oxidative metabolites and skin reactions. A certain doses of radiation were irradiated to the right thigh of rats, and oxidative metabolites of rat's blood from caudal vein were measured by d-reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) test using an exclusive device. Skin reactions were evaluated according to a skin-reaction grading system from the day before irradiation to day 38 after irradiation. As a results, a significant correlation was shown between irradiation dose and skin grade. And a significant correlation was also shown between the value of oxidative metabolites and irradiation dose. The increase in oxidative metabolites was seen in the Day 16 after irradiation, and that corresponded with the appearance of skin reaction. It was suggested that the value of oxidative metabolites seems to be useful for estimating degree of skin reaction and time to appear skin reaction after irradiation. (author)

  20. Comparison of three techniques for skin total irradiation with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Delano V.S.; Bardella, Lucia H.; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da

    2011-01-01

    This paper compared three techniques of skin total irradiation with electrons: 1) horizontal positioning, 2) vertical positioning - rotatory technique and 3) vertical positioning - six fields technique. For that, a anthropomorphic phantom was positioned according to the recommendation for each technique and was i radiated at the linear accelerator by using the 6 MeV electrons. Radiochromic films were positioned on the surface in various regions of the phantom for measurement of absorbed dose. A ionization chamber was positioned inside of equivalent issue plates for dose evaluation due to the photons produced by electron stopping. The technique 2 and 3 have shown too similar in the results and number or discrepant points (8 and 10 respectively) of prescription lower than the technique 1 (22 points). The total body dose of photons of the 1, 2 and 3 techniques was 2.2%, 5.3% and 5.2% respectively

  1. Rotational total skin electron irradiation with a linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael D.C.; Devic, Slobodan; Parker, William; Freeman, Carolyn R.; Roberge, David; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2008-01-01

    The rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) technique at our institution has undergone several developments over the past few years. Replacement of the formerly used linear accelerator has prompted many modifications to the previous technique. With the current technique, the patient is treated with a single large field while standing on a rotating platform, at a source‐to‐surface distance of 380 cm. The electron field is produced by a Varian 21EX linear accelerator using the commercially available 6 MeV high dose rate total skin electron mode, along with a custom‐built flattening filter. Ionization chambers, radiochromic film, and MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) detectors have been used to determine the dosimetric properties of this technique. Measurements investigating the stationary beam properties, the effects of full rotation, and the dose distributions to a humanoid phantom are reported. The current treatment technique and dose regimen are also described. PACS numbers: 87.55.ne, 87.53.Hv, 87.53.Mr

  2. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K; Chen, Y J; Ohira, C; Nojima, K; Ando, S; Kobayashi, N; Ohbuchi, T; Shimizu, W [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S; Kanai, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  3. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W.; Koike, S.; Kanai, T.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  4. Smart skin structures for identifying and locating laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Goeller, R.M.; Murray, H.S.

    1992-12-31

    A pyramidal arrangement of wavelength-selective optical detectors can be used to determine the identity (wavelength), intensity, and direction-of-arrival of faser irradiation. The advantages of this technique are that only unobtrusive, skin-like structures are required and that large collection areas provide high sensitivity. The disadvantage is that the angular resolution (approximately 5 degrees in a 60 degree field-of--view) is less than that which can be achieved using methods requiring thicker structures. The detector elements are large-area, polyvinylidine fluoride, pyroelectric devices with wavelength selective coatinits. Four identical arrays of these elements are situated on the top and sides of a frustrated, three--sided prism. Since only the relative orientations are significant, these faces can be selected regions on the surface of an existing structure. We first describe the construction of the detectors and the system, then develop the mathematical description of the system. Using coated detectors whose performance has been experimentally verified, we will model the response to in-channel, monochromatic irradiation and then describe the data analysis algorithm. Although we will limit our model to a simple, two-channel system, the concept and algorithm can easily be extended to a system of any reasonable number of nonoverlapping channels.

  5. Smart skin structures for identifying and locating laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Goeller, R.M.; Murray, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    A pyramidal arrangement of wavelength-selective optical detectors can be used to determine the identity (wavelength), intensity, and direction-of-arrival of faser irradiation. The advantages of this technique are that only unobtrusive, skin-like structures are required and that large collection areas provide high sensitivity. The disadvantage is that the angular resolution (approximately 5 degrees in a 60 degree field-of--view) is less than that which can be achieved using methods requiring thicker structures. The detector elements are large-area, polyvinylidine fluoride, pyroelectric devices with wavelength selective coatinits. Four identical arrays of these elements are situated on the top and sides of a frustrated, three--sided prism. Since only the relative orientations are significant, these faces can be selected regions on the surface of an existing structure. We first describe the construction of the detectors and the system, then develop the mathematical description of the system. Using coated detectors whose performance has been experimentally verified, we will model the response to in-channel, monochromatic irradiation and then describe the data analysis algorithm. Although we will limit our model to a simple, two-channel system, the concept and algorithm can easily be extended to a system of any reasonable number of nonoverlapping channels.

  6. Irradiation on cereal bars incorporated with pineapple skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques; Silva, Yasmini Portes Abraham; Costa, Naiane Vieira; Almeida, Thatyana Lacerda; Damiani, Clarissa; Arthur, Valter; Lage, Moacir Evandro; Asquieri, Eduardo Ramirez

    2011-01-01

    One of the major current concerns to the food industry is the management of residues generated in its production processes. Thus, several studies have been developed, seeking alternative uses for these residues, in order to minimize environmental impacts and add value to products previously discarded. Combining this idea with the increasingly search for healthy and practical products, by consumers, this study aimed the characterization of cereal bars irradiated with doses of 0 kGy, 1 kGy, and 2 kGy, incorporated with dried pineapple skin. The following analyses were carried out: moisture, proteins, lipids, ashes, carbohydrates, energetic value, antioxidant potential, phenolic content, organic acids, and fatty acids profile. The results observed for the centesimal composition did not vary as a function of the radiation doses used, reducing only the levels of antioxidants, phenolic compounds, and organic acids. The product showed potential for becoming an effective way of reusing a food industry residue and the irradiation interfered on the nutritional characteristics of the final product. (author)

  7. 76 FR 28886 - Importation of Swine Hides and Skins, Bird Trophies, and Ruminant Hides and Skins; Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... of animal byproducts to, among other things, provide specific conditions under which deer and other... importation of animal byproducts to, among other things, provide specific conditions under which deer and... skins from Mexico may enter the United States without other restriction if they are hard dried...

  8. Skin response to cobalt 60 irradiation and the consequences for matching the color of facial prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Oort, R.P.; Vermey, J.; Ten Bosch, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A radiotherapy treatment ( 60 Co) of cancer in the head and neck region causes side effects in the skin that postpone the facial prosthetic treatment. The increasing and fading erythema and pigmentation of the skin was investigated with the use of a subtractive colorimeter. This method was verified with photographs scored according to the Oxford scoring system. Fourteen patients were investigated during a period of 24 weeks. The mean colorimetric skin response showed a peak 6 weeks after the onset of irradiation. Six to 7 weeks later, there was no significant difference between the skin color before and after irradiation. At this time the dry desquamation of the skin is healed. From this viewpoint, the color matching procedure for a facial prosthesis may start not earlier than 15 weeks from the onset of irradiation. If a nonirradiated control field in the facial region is present, a color match for the facial prosthesis can be started just after the irradiation period

  9. Skin allografts in lethally irradiated animals repopulated with syngeneic hemopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwadron, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Total body irradiation and repopulation with syngeneic hemopoietic cells can be used to induce tolerance to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched heart and kidney grafts in rats and mice. However, this protocol does not work for MHC mismatched skin grafts in rats or mice. Furthermore, LEW rats that accept WF cardiac allografts after irradiation and repopulation reject subsequent WF skin grafts. Treatment of skin allograft donors with methotrexate prior to grafting onto irradiated and reconstituted mice resulted in doubling of the mean survival time. Analysis of which antigens provoked skin graft rejection by irradiation and reconstituted animals revealed the importance of I region antigens. Cardiac allograft acceptance by irradiated and reconstituted animals is mediated by suppressor cells found in the spleen. Adoptively tolerant LEW rats accepted WF skin grafts in 50% of grafted animals. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed that the adoptive transfer procedure itself was important in achieving skin allograft acceptance by these animals. In general, it seems that the lack of ability of irradiated and reconstituted animals to accept fully MHC disparate skin grafts results from the inability of these animals to suppress lymph node effector cells against I region antigen seen on highly immunogenic allogeneic Langerhans cells in the skin

  10. Allograft tolerance in pigs after fractionated lymphoid irradiation. I. Skin grafts after partial lateral irradiation and bone marrow cell grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiman, M.; Daburon, F.; Remy, J.; Villiers, P.A.; de Riberolles, C.; Lecompte, Y.; Mahouy, G.; Fradelizi, D.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments with pigs have been performed to establish bone marrow chimerism and skin graft tolerance between SLA genotyped animals. Recipients were conditioned by means of fractionated partial irradiation from lateral cobalt sources (partial lateral irradiation (PLI)). The head, neck, and lungs were protected with lead, the rest of the body being irradiated including the thymus, the majority of lymphoid organs with spleen, and most of the bone marrow sites

  11. Quantitative measurements of oxidative stress in mouse skin induced by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Cuiping; Tanaka, Ryoko; Okuda, Yohei; Ikota, Nobuo; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Anzai, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Haruhiko; Urano, Shiro

    2005-01-01

    To find efficient methods to evaluate oxidative stress in mouse skin caused by X-ray irradiation, several markers and methodologies were examined. Hairless mice were irradiated with 50 Gy X-rays and skin homogenates or skin strips were prepared. Lipid peroxidation was measured using the skin homogenate as the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The level of lipid peroxidation increased with time after irradiation and was twice that of the control at 78 h. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of skin strips showed a clear signal for the ascorbyl radical, which increased with time after irradiation in a manner similar to that of lipid peroxidation. To measure levels of glutathione (GSH) and its oxidized forms (GSSG) simultaneously, two high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, sample derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and detection with a UV detector (method A) and no derivatization and detection with an electrochemical detector (method B), were compared and the latter was found to be better. No significant change was observed within 24 h after irradiation in the levels of GSH and GSSG measured by method B. The GSH/GSSG ratio may be a less sensitive parameter for the evaluation of acute oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation in the skin. Monitoring the ascorbyl radical seems to be a good way to evaluate oxidative stress in skin in vivo. (author)

  12. An experimental study of the effect of total lymphoid irradiation on the survival of skin allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Charn Il; Han, Man Chung

    1981-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of fractionated high-dose total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on the survival of skin allograft despite major histocompatibility difference. Total lymphoid irradiation is a relatively safe form of radiotherapy, has been used extensively to treat lymphoid malignancies in humans with few side effects. A total of 90 rats, Sprague-Dawley rat as recipient and Wistar rat as donor, were used for the experiment, of which 10 rats were used to determine mixed lymphocyte response (MLR) for antigenic difference and skin allografts was performed in 30 rats given total lymphoid irradiation to assess the immunosuppressive effect of total lymphoid irradiation despite major histocompatibility difference. In addition, the peripheral white blood cell counts and the proportion of lymphocytes was studied in 10 rats given total lymphoid irradiation but no skin graft to determine the effects of bone marrow suppression. The results obtained are summarized as follows. 1. The optimum dose of total lymphoid irradiation was between 1800 rads to 2400 rads. 2. The survival of skin graft on rats given total lymphoid irradiation (23.2 ± 6.0 days) was prolonged about three folds as compared to unirradiated control (8.7 ± 1.3 days). 3. Total lymphoid irradiation resulted in a severe leukopenia with marked lymphopenia, but the count was normal by the end of 3rd week. 4. The study suggests that total lymphoid irradiation is a nonlethal procedure that could be used successfully in animals to transplant allograft across major histocompatibility barriers

  13. An experimental study of the effect of total lymphoid irradiation on the survival of skin allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Charn Il; Han, Man Chung [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-06-15

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of fractionated high-dose total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on the survival of skin allograft despite major histocompatibility difference. Total lymphoid irradiation is a relatively safe form of radiotherapy, has been used extensively to treat lymphoid malignancies in humans with few side effects. A total of 90 rats, Sprague-Dawley rat as recipient and Wistar rat as donor, were used for the experiment, of which 10 rats were used to determine mixed lymphocyte response (MLR) for antigenic difference and skin allografts was performed in 30 rats given total lymphoid irradiation to assess the immunosuppressive effect of total lymphoid irradiation despite major histocompatibility difference. In addition, the peripheral white blood cell counts and the proportion of lymphocytes was studied in 10 rats given total lymphoid irradiation but no skin graft to determine the effects of bone marrow suppression. The results obtained are summarized as follows. 1. The optimum dose of total lymphoid irradiation was between 1800 rads to 2400 rads. 2. The survival of skin graft on rats given total lymphoid irradiation (23.2 {+-} 6.0 days) was prolonged about three folds as compared to unirradiated control (8.7 {+-} 1.3 days). 3. Total lymphoid irradiation resulted in a severe leukopenia with marked lymphopenia, but the count was normal by the end of 3rd week. 4. The study suggests that total lymphoid irradiation is a nonlethal procedure that could be used successfully in animals to transplant allograft across major histocompatibility barriers.

  14. Unscheduled DNA synthesis after β-irradiation of mouse skin in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuyama, Akira; Tanooka, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    The skin of ICR mouse was irradiated with β-rays from 90 Sr- 90 Y with surface doses up to 30 krad. Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured by autoradiography after labeling the skin with radioactive thymidine using the forceps-clamping method. The level of UDS in epithelial cells of the skin was detected as an increasing function of radiation dose. Fibroblastic cells, compared with epithelial cells and hair follicle cells at the same depth of the skin, showed a lower level of UDS, indicating a lower DNA repair activity in fibroblasts. Cancer risk of the skin was discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Primary Observations on the Influence of 60Co Local Irradiation on Free Skin Flaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建荣; 张园

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of postoperative radiation on free skin flaps.Methods Twenty-nine patients with free skin flaps applied to the plerosis of the postoperative defectwere followed up. Twenty-eight out of 29 patients received forearm free flaps while 1 had anterolater-al femoris skin flaps in a size ranging from 14 cm× 6 cm to 8 cm× 4 cm. These flaps were exposedto 60Co radiation ranging 40-69 Gy. Results Observation during irradiation: no visible changes ofskin flaps and oral mucous membrane were detected when irradiation dose was within 40 Gy; somechanges may be detected over 40 Gy. Observation 1 - 4 months after irradiation: pigmentations werefound in areas of erosion epidermis; skin flaps got dark but without evidence of necrosis. Observation2 years after irradiation: no necrosis happened in 29 skin flaps. Hairs were found on 15 of 29flaps. Sensation occurred within the margin of 1 cm. Conclusion Free skin flap can endure irradi-ation at the dose of 60 Gy.

  16. Electron spin resonance characterization of radical components in irradiated black pepper skin and core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics of free radical components of irradiated black pepper fruit (skin) and the pepper seed (core) were analyzed using electron spin resonance. A weak signal near g=2.005 was observed in black pepper before irradiation. Complex spectra near g=2.005 with three lines (the skin) or seven lines (the core) were observed in irradiated black pepper (both end line width; ca. 6.8 mT). The spectral intensities decreased considerably at 30 days after irradiation, and continued to decrease steadily thereafter. The spectra simulated on the basis of the content and the stability of radical components derived from plant constituents, including fiber, starch, polyphenol, mono- and disaccharide, were in good agreement with the observed spectra. Analysis showed that the signal intensities derived from fiber in the skin for an absorbed dose were higher, and the rates of decrease were lower, than that in the core. In particular, the cellulose radical component in the skin was highly stable. - Highlights: → We identified the radical components in irradiated black pepper skin and core. → The ESR spectra near g=2.005 with 3-7 lines were emerged after irradiation. → Spectra simulated basing on the content and the stability of radical from the plant constituents. → Cellulose radical component in black pepper skin was highly stable. → Single signal near g=2.005 was the most stable in black pepper core.

  17. UV irradiation to mouse skin decreases hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic protein expression via HPA axis activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mira; Ban, Jae-Jun; Bae, Jung-Soo; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-11-14

    The skin senses external environment, including ultraviolet light (UV). Hippocampus is a brain region that is responsible for memory and emotion. However, changes in hippocampus by UV irradiation to the skin have not been studied. In this study, after 2 weeks of UV irradiation to the mouse skin, we examined molecular changes related to cognitive functions in the hippocampus and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. UV exposure to the skin decreased doublecortin-positive immature neurons and synaptic proteins, including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2 A and postsynaptic density protein-95, in the hippocampus. Moreover, we observed that UV irradiation to the skin down-regulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and ERK signaling in the hippocampus, which are known to modulate neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. The cutaneous and central HPA axes were activated by UV, which resulted in significant increases in serum levels of corticosterone. Subsequently, UV irradiation to the skin activated the glucocorticoid-signaling pathway in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Interestingly, after 6 weeks of UV irradiation, mice showed depression-like behavior in the tail suspension test. Taken together, our data suggest that repeated UV exposure through the skin may negatively affect hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity along with HPA axis activation.

  18. Effect of Bifidobacterium breve B-3 on skin photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, T; Murata, M; Iwabuchi, N; Odamaki, T; Wakabayashi, H; Yamauchi, K; Abe, F; Xiao, J Z

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have been shown to have a preventative effect on skin photoaging induced by short term UV irradiation, however, the underlying mechanisms and the effect of probiotics on skin photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of Bifidobacterium breve B-3 on skin photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation in hairless mice. Mice were irradiated with UVB three times weekly and orally administered B. breve B-3 (2×10(9) cfu/mouse /day) for 7 weeks. Nonirradiated mice and UVB-irradiated mice without probiotic treatment were used as controls. B. breve B-3 significantly suppressed the changes of transepidermal water loss, skin hydration, epidermal thickening and attenuated the damage to the tight junction structure and basement membrane induced by chronic UVB irradiation. Administration of B. breve B-3 tended to suppress the UV-induced interleukin-1β production in skin (P=0.09). These results suggest that B. breve B-3 could potentially be used to prevent photoaging induced by chronic UV irradiation.

  19. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  20. Modeling and simulation of heat distribution in human skin caused by laser irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luan, Y.; Dams, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    Study of light-based skin rejuvenation needs prospective insights of mechanism of laser tissue interaction. A well-built model plays a key role in predicting temperature distribution in human skin exposed to laser irradiation. Therefore, it not only provides guidance for in vitro experiment, but

  1. Curcumin Stimulates the Antioxidant Mechanisms in Mouse Skin Exposed to Fractionated γ-Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Chandra Jagetia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractionated irradiation is one of the important radiotherapy regimens to treat different types of neoplasia. Despite of the immense therapeutic gains accrued by delivering fractionated irradiation to tumors, the radiation burden on skin increases significantly. Low doses of irradiation to skin adversely affect its molecular and metabolic status. The use of antioxidant/s may help to alleviate the radiation-induced changes in the skin and allow delivering a higher dose of radiation to attain better therapeutic gains. Curcumin is an antioxidant and a free radical scavenging dietary supplement, commonly used as a flavoring agent in curries. Therefore, the effect of 100 mg/kg body weight curcumin was studied on the antioxidant status of mice skin exposed to a total dose of 10, 20 and 40 Gy γ-radiation below the rib cage delivered as a single fraction of 2 Gy per day for 5, 10 or 20 days. Skin biopsies from both the curcumin treated or untreated irradiated groups were collected for the biochemical estimations at various post-irradiation times. The irradiation of animals caused a dose dependent decline in the glutathione concentration, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities and increased the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated skin. Curcumin treatment before irradiation resulted in a significant rise in the glutathione concentration and activities of both the glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in mouse skin, whereas lipid peroxidation declined significantly. The present study indicates that curcumin treatment increased the antioxidant status of mouse exposed to different doses of fractionated γ-radiation.

  2. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  3. Long-term survival of skin allografts in mice treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavin, S.; Strober, S.; Fuks, Z.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1976-01-01

    Treatment of recipient Balb/c mice with fractionated, high-dose total lymphoid irradiation, a procedure commonly used in the therapy of human malignant lymphomas, resulted in fivefold prolongation of the survival of C57BL/Ka skin allografts despite major histocompatibility differences between the strains (H-2/sup d/ and H-2/sup b/, respectively). Infusion of 10 7 (C57BL/Ka x Balb/c)F 1 bone marrow cells after total lymphoid irradiation further prolonged C57BL/Ka skin graft survival to more than 120 days. Total lymphoid irradiation may eventually prove useful in clinical organ transplantation

  4. THE IMPACT OF ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION ON MORPHO-FUNCTIONAL STATE OF SKIN IN GUINEA PIGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myronchenko, S; Naumova, O; Zvyagintseva, T

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of ultraviolet irradiation (UV) on morphological and functional condition of the skin in guinea pigs. The study involved 30 albino guinea pigs weighing 400-500 g subjected to local exposure to UV irradiation. Control group consisted of intact guinea pigs. Histological studies of the skin were carried out at different stages of the trial (2 hours, 4 hours, 3 days, 8 days following the exposure). Microscopic examination showed morphological signs of acute inflammation in the skin of animals within the first three days following the exposure to UV irradiation. Within 2 hours following the exposure to UV irradiation these changes were minimal with signs of mild exudative changes. In 4 hours after the exposure histological changes increased. The specimens were also found to contain altered apoptotic keratinocytes (sunburn cells). Histopathological changes persisted and reached maximum severity by the 3rd day. Within post-erythema period (the 8th day) proliferative, hyperplastic, degenerative and dystrophic changes in the skin persisted. The prolonged nature of the changes in the skin is suggestive of the development of chronic inflammation in the skin of guinea pigs subjected to local exposure to UV irradiation.

  5. Late changes in pig skin after irradiation from beta-emitting sources of different energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Heryet, J.C.; Hopewell, J.W.; Wells, J.; Charles, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    Skin fields were irradiated on 3-month-old pigs with Sr 90 , Tm 170 and Pm 147 sources, ranging in size from 1mm to 22.5 mm in diameter. The severity of late skin atrophy was assessed 2 years after irradiation by a comparison of the thickness of the dermis in exposed skin with that of an adjacent area of unirradiated skin. Quantitative measurements were made from histological sections. The maximum dermal thinning after Sr 90 β-irradiation was approx. 55%. Irradiation with Tm 170 produced a maximal thinning of approximately 35%. Irradiation with Pm 147 produced no observable atrophy in pig skin. These differences reflect the different depth-dose characteristics of the three β-emitting sources. Significant late dermal atrophy was seen after doses which only produced a minimal erythema in the acute phase of the reaction. There was also a lack of a field-size effect for late atrophy with all but the two smallest Sr 90 sources. This is the converse of the marked field-size effects reported for the acute skin reactions. (author)

  6. A dielectric method for measuring early and late reactions in irradiated human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuutinen, J.; Lahtinen, T.; Turunen, M.; Alanen, E.; Tenhunen, M.; Usenius, T.; Kolle, R.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: To measure the dielectric constant of irradiated human skin in order to test the feasibility of the dielectric measurements in the quantitation of acute and late radiation reactions. Materials and methods: The dielectric constant of irradiated breast skin was measured at an electromagnetic frequency of 300 MHz in 21 patients during postmastectomy radiotherapy. The measurements were performed with an open-ended coaxial line reflection method. The irradiation technique consisted of an anterior photon field to the lymph nodes and a matched electron field to the chest wall using conventional fractionation of five fractions/week to 50 Gy. Fourteen out of the 21 patients were remeasured 2 years later and the skin was palpated for subcutaneous fibrosis. Results: At 5 weeks the dielectric constant had decreased by 31 and 39% for the investigated skin sites of the photon and electron fields, respectively. There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between the mean dielectric constant and the clinical score of erythema. An unexpected finding was a decrease of the dielectric constant of the contralateral healthy skin during radiotherapy. Two years later a statistically significant positive correlation was found between the dielectric constant at the irradiated skin sites and the clinical score of subcutaneous fibrosis. Conclusions: Dielectric measurements non-invasively yield quantitative information concerning radiation-induced skin reactions. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Comparison of atmospheric microplasma and plasma jet irradiation for increasing of skin permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, K; Tran, N A; Hayashida, K; Blajan, M

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric plasma is attracting interest for medical applications such as sterilization, treatment of cancer cells and blood coagulation. Application of atmospheric plasma in dermatology has potential as a novel tool for wound healing, skin rejuvenation and treatment of wrinkles. In this study, we investigated the enhancement of percutaneous absorption of dye as alternative agents of transdermal drugs. Hypodermic needles are often the only way to deliver large-molecule drugs into the dermis, although a safe transdermal drug delivery method that does not require needles would be desirable. We therefore explored the feasibility of using atmospheric microplasma irradiation to enhance percutaneous absorption of drugs, as an alternative delivery method to conventional hypodermic needles. Pig skin was used as a biological sample, exposed to atmospheric microplasma, and analyzed by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A tape stripping test, a representative method for evaluating skin barrier performance, was also conducted for comparison. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured and compared with and without atmospheric microplasma irradiation, to quantify water evaporation from the inner body through the skin barrier. The results show that the stratum corneum, the outermost skin layer, could be chemically and physically modified by atmospheric microplasma irradiation. Physical damage to the skin by microplasma irradiation and an atmospheric plasma jet was also assessed by observing the skin surface. The results suggest that atmospheric microplasma has the potential to enhance percutaneous absorption. (paper)

  8. Analysis of reactive aldehydes formed from the irradiated skin lipid, triolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyati-Shirkhodaee, F.; Shibamoto. Y.

    1992-01-01

    One of the major skin lipids, triolein, was irradiated by 300 nm uv light under conditions approximately those at the skin surface exposed to sunlight for different periods of time. Irradiated samples were analyzed for acrolein, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde by gas chromatography. Acrolein formed was derivatized to more stable 1-methyl-2-pyrazoline with N-methylhydrazine and analyzed by a nitrogen-phosphorus specific detector. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde formed were reacted with cysteamine to give thiazolidine and 2-methylthiazolidine, respectively and analyzed by a flame photometric sulfur specific detector. The maximum amount of acrolein (1.05 nmol/mg triolein) was formed after 6 hr irradiation. The maximum quantities of formaldehyde (6 nmol/mg triolein) and acetaldehyde (2.71 nmol/mg triolein) were formed after 12 hr irradiation. Both formaldehyde and acrolein have been known to cause skin irritation in the levels of 1 ppM

  9. An investigation into the management of acute skin reactions from tangential breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, M.A.; Haycocks, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This research examined the acute skin reaction of two consecutive groups receiving tangetial breast irradiation for carcinoma of the breast. The first group used the traditional skin care advice of using warm water only within the treatment area, while the second group continued with their normal skin care regime. Data was collected on the physical manifestations of the acute reaction, medical history, the use of concurrent cytotoxic agents, treatment parameters and skin care products used. Statistical analysis using the T-test method showed no difference in the skin reaction between the two groups. The investigation has lead to a change of policy in the management of acute breast reactions. Patients receiving radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall can now use their routine skin care products with no adverse effect on skin reactions. (author)

  10. Establishment and application of rat model of acute β-irradiated skin injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Guoliang; Lu Xing'an; Tang Jun; Wang Xiuzhen; Wu Shiliang; Tian Ye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish an experimental rat model of acute β-irradiated skin injury and to study the effects of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on wound healing. Methods: Areas of buttock skin (20 mm x 40 mm) of 40 male SD rats were irradiated with 45 Gy/β-rays generated by linear accelerator, and then the forty rats were divided into two groups randomly: treatment group administrated with SOD (n=20) and control group administrated with normal saline (NS) (n=20). The wound healing time and rate were observed. The pathological changes were observed by light microscopy. The expressions of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and bFGF (basic fibroblast growth factor) were determined by SP immunohistochemical method. Results: The deep second-degree burns was observed following 45 Gy irradiation. The wound healing time in treatment group was shorter than that of the control group (P<0.05). Strongly positive (+ + +) expression of VEGF, bFGF in treatment group and positive (+ +) expression of VEGF, bFGF in the control group were observed 6 weeks, 7 weeks and 8 weeks after the irradiation, while only weakly positive (+) expressions of VEGF and bFGF in both groups 4 weeks, 5 weeks and 9 weeks after the irradiation. Conclusions: The wound model of acute β-irradiated skin injury in rat was established and used in study of the effect of medicine on wound healing. SOD can promote the wound healing of acute β-irradiated skin injury. (authors)

  11. Clinical implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment with a 6 MeV electron beam in high-dose total skin electron mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, J. F.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) is a special treatment technique offered by modern radiation oncology facilities, given for the treatment of mycosis fungoides, a rare skin disease, which is type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. During treatment the patient’s entire skin is irradiated with a uniform dose. The aim of this work is to present implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment using IAEA TRS-398 code of practice for absolute dosimetry and taking advantage of the use of radiochromic films.

  12. Clinical implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment with a 6 MeV electron beam in high-dose total skin electron mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucero, J. F., E-mail: fernando.lucero@hoperadiotherapy.com.gt [Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Heredia (Costa Rica); Hope International, Guatemala (Guatemala); Rojas, J. I., E-mail: isaac.rojas@siglo21.cr [Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI, San José (Costa Rica)

    2016-07-07

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) is a special treatment technique offered by modern radiation oncology facilities, given for the treatment of mycosis fungoides, a rare skin disease, which is type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. During treatment the patient’s entire skin is irradiated with a uniform dose. The aim of this work is to present implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment using IAEA TRS-398 code of practice for absolute dosimetry and taking advantage of the use of radiochromic films.

  13. [UV-irradiation-induced skin cancer as a new occupational disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepgen, T L; Drexler, H; Elsner, P; Schmitt, J

    2015-03-01

    With the revision of the German Ordinance on Occupational Diseases, skin cancer due to UV irradiation was amended as a new occupational disease to the list of occupational diseases in Germany. The new occupational disease BK 5103 has the following wording: "Squamous cell carcinoma or multiple actinic keratosis of the skin caused by natural UV irradiation". Actinic keratoses are to be considered as multiple according to this new occupational diseases if they occur as single lesions of more than five annually, or are confluent in an area > 4 cm(2) (field cancerization). It is estimated that more than 2.5 million employees are exposed to natural UV irradiation due to their work (outdoor workers) in Germany and therefore have an increased risk of skin cancer. In this article the medical and technical prerequisites which have to be fulfilled for this new occupational disease in Germany are introduced.

  14. The response of mouse skin to re-irradiation with x-rays or fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Egawa, Sunao; Kumazawa, Akiyoshi; Iino, Yuu.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of neutrons and x-rays on mouse skin which had been previously irradiated with x-rays were investigated. Two tattoo marks were placed in the hairless legs of mice at intervals of 15 mm. The legs were exposed to various doses of x-ray and neutrons to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) using the contraction of the skin as an index. The RBE was 0.93 - 1.73. The legs of the mice were preexposed to 25 Gy of x-ray, and exposed 4 months later. The contraction of the skin began earlier than after the first irradiation. RBE was 2.18 - 2.47. This RBE was higher than that in untreated mice. These results suggest that previously irradiated normal tissues are much more sensitive to neutrons than to x-rays. (author)

  15. Irradiation of skin with visible light induces reactive oxygen species and matrix-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Frank; Kaur, Simarna; Ruvolo, Eduardo; Kollias, Nikiforos; Southall, Michael D

    2012-07-01

    Daily skin exposure to solar radiation causes cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are a primary factor in skin damage. Although the contribution of the UV component to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology. Solar radiation comprises UV, and thus the purpose of this study was to examine the physiological response of skin to visible light (400-700 nm). Irradiation of human skin equivalents with visible light induced production of ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression. Commercially available sunscreens were found to have minimal effects on reducing visible light-induced ROS, suggesting that UVA/UVB sunscreens do not protect the skin from visible light-induced responses. Using clinical models to assess the generation of free radicals from oxidative stress, higher levels of free radical activity were found after visible light exposure. Pretreatment with a photostable UVA/UVB sunscreen containing an antioxidant combination significantly reduced the production of ROS, cytokines, and MMP expression in vitro, and decreased oxidative stress in human subjects after visible light irradiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that other portions of the solar spectrum aside from UV, particularly visible light, may also contribute to signs of premature photoaging in skin.

  16. Effects of UV irradiation on a living skin equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D; Gay, R J [Organogenesis Incorporated, Camton, MA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Living Skin Equivalent is an organotypic coculture composed of human dermal fibroblasts interspersed in a collagen-containing matrix and overlaid with human keratinocytes forming a stratified epidermis. The LSE has a dry, air-exposed epidermal surface suitable for the application of oils, creams and emulsions. The protective effects of an 8% homosylate standard and of five UV-A sunscreens, topically applied to the LSE, were determined and compared with their reported protection factors in human skin. Morphological changes and the release of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-1-''alpha, tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] and prostaglandin E2) implicated in UV-induced erythema were also demonstrated in the LSE exposed to UV-A or UV-B. The data suggest that the LSE can be used for studying the effects of UV radiation on skin and may have utility for assessing the efficacy of certain sunscreens against UV-B and UV-A. (Author).

  17. Effects of UV irradiation on a living skin equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.; Gay, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Living Skin Equivalent is an organotypic coculture composed of human dermal fibroblasts interspersed in a collagen-containing matrix and overlaid with human keratinocytes forming a stratified epidermis. The LSE has a dry, air-exposed epidermal surface suitable for the application of oils, creams and emulsions. The protective effects of an 8% homosylate standard and of five UV-A sunscreens, topically applied to the LSE, were determined and compared with their reported protection factors in human skin. Morphological changes and the release of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-1-''alpha, tumor necrosis factor-α and prostaglandin E2) implicated in UV-induced erythema were also demonstrated in the LSE exposed to UV-A or UV-B. The data suggest that the LSE can be used for studying the effects of UV radiation on skin and may have utility for assessing the efficacy of certain sunscreens against UV-B and UV-A. (Author)

  18. Isolation and identification of previtamin D3 from the skin of rats exposed to ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holick, M.F.; Richtand, N.M.; McNeill, S.C.; Holick, S.A.; Frommer, J.E.; Henley, J.W.; Potts, J.T. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The process of the photolytic activation of vitamin D precursor(s) in the skin has been elucidated by a detailed analysis of the products formed after ultraviolet light exposure. The photolytic product isolated from the skin of rats exposed to ultraviolet irradiation was identified as previtamin D 3 by several criteria including its characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum, mass spectrum, and thermal isomerization to vitamin D 3 , which itself was identified also by mass spectroscopy. Vitamin D 3 per se was not formed by ultraviolet irradiation-vitamin D 3 arises exclusively from the thermal conversion of previtamin D 3 . Detectable amounts of lumisterol 3 or tachysterol 3 were not seen

  19. Evaluation of skin exposure of patients and the irradiation field dimensions in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, H.J.; Hazin, C.A.; Andrade Lima, F.R.; Lopes Filho, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    This work aimed to estimate the skin exposure to patients in dental radiography, as well as, evaluate the magnitude of the skin area irradiated during a typical radiographic procedure. The study was based in a preliminary survey of dental X-ray equipments installed in the metropolitan region of Recife. The results showed that in 90% of the equipments surveyed the estimated patient skin exposure was above the recommended value of 500 mR. For X-ray beam diameters, the results showed values ranging from 4.5 to 11.5 cm, which do not agree with those set up by either national or international radiation protection organizations. (author)

  20. APPLICATION OF THE HACCP METHOD IN THE SWINE ABATTOIR BY SCALDING-SKINNING ECOLOGICAL PROCESSING / APPLICATION DE LA METHODE HACCP DANS L’ABATTOIR PORCIN PAR LE PROCESSUS ECOLOGIQUE D’ÉCHAUDAGE-DÉPEÇAGE

    OpenAIRE

    IULIAN SUCEVEANU; IRINA-CLAUDIA ALEXA; LUMINITA GROSU; OANA-IRINA PATRICIU; IRINA IFRIM; MIRELA SUCEVEANU

    2017-01-01

    In the food industry development, the food safety and the valorization of by-products represent important aspects. The present study consists in the application of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) method in pig slaughterhouses for scalding-skinning technology in order to ensure the conformity of meat quality and the by-products management and recycling. In order to optimize the scalding-skinning process of swine, all the classical technological steps of the technological...

  1. Characterization of Ninjurin and TSC22 induction after X-irradiation of normal human skin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Manabu; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Koike, Aki

    2008-01-01

    The skin is an external organ that is most frequently exposed to radiation. It is important to elucidate the influence of radiation exposure on the skin at the molecular level. To identify radiation-responsive genes in human skin cells, we used microarray technology to examine the effects of irradiation on 641 genes in normal human epidermal keratinocytes at 4 h and 8 h postirradiation with a cytotoxic dose of X-ray (10 Gy). We found that 18 genes were upregulated and 35 genes were downregulated in keratinocytes at 4 h and/or 8 h postirradiation. Ninjurin, whose function remains unknown in keratinocytes, was induced most strongly by X-irradiation. Several known apoptosis-related genes, such as TSC22, were also upregulated. We characterized Ninjurin and TSC22 induction after X-irradiation of normal human skin cells. The induction of the expression of Ninjurin and TSC22 mRNA in keratinocytes following high-dose X-irradiation was confirmed by northern blot analysis. In dermal fibroblasts, Ninjurin, but not TSC22, was induced after X-ray irradiation. The dependence of both gene expression on the status of an apoptosis regulator, p53, was found. In addition, the expression of both mRNA was induced upon treatment with an apoptosis inducer, etoposide. On the other hand, TSC22, but not Ninjurin, was induced and accumulated in keratinocytes upon treatment with an apoptosis inducer, anisomycin. However, in transient expression assay, EYFP-TSC22, as well as EYFP-Ninjurin or EYFP alone, did not induce apoptosis in keratinocytes in contrast to EYFP-GADD45. Taken together, these findings have important implications on the understanding of the mechanism underlying the complex response of skin cells following X-irradiation. (author)

  2. Hypopituitarism as a delayed result of irradiation of the facial skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boers, G.H.J.; Jong, M. de

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a man aged 63 with complaints and deficiencies caused by hypopituitarism. Examination of the endocrine functions showed that the deficiency was generally of hypothalamic origin. The most plausible cause of this hypothalamic dysfunction proved to be damage due to an overdose of skin irradiation of both cheeks and the nose, in the treatment of a cutaneous form of lupus erythematosus. (Auth.)

  3. Hypopituitarism as a delayed result of irradiation of the facial skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boers, G H.J.; de Jong, M [Department of Medicine, St. Franciscus Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a man aged 63 with complaints and deficiencies caused by hypopituitarism. Examination of the endocrine functions showed that the deficiency was generally of hypothalamic origin. The most plausible cause of this hypothalamic dysfunction proved to be damage due to an overdose of skin irradiation of both cheeks and the nose, in the treatment of a cutaneous form of lupus erythematosus.

  4. Late health effects of childhood nasopharyngeal radium irradiation: nonmelanoma skin cancers, benign tumors, and hormonal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronckers, Cécile M.; Land, Charles E.; Hayes, Richard B.; Verduijn, Pieter G.; Stovall, Marilyn; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2002-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal radium irradiation (NRI) was widely used from 1940 through 1970 to treat otitis serosa in children and barotrauma in airmen and submariners. We assessed whether NRI-exposed individuals were at higher risk for benign tumors, nonmelanoma skin cancer, thyroid disorders, and conditions

  5. Caspase-3 activation and DNA damage in pig skin organ culture after solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacqueville, Daniel; Mavon, Alain

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a convenient and easy-to-handle skin organ culture was developed from domestic pig ears using polycarbonate Transwell culture inserts in 12-well plate. This alternative model was then tested for its suitability in analyzing the short-term effects of a single solar radiation dose (from 55 to 275 kJ.m(-2)). Differentiation of the pig skin was maintained for up to 48 h in culture, and its morphology was similar to that of fresh human skin. Solar irradiation induced a significant release of the cytosolic enzymes lactate dehydrogenase and extracellular signal-related kinase 2 protein in the culture medium 24 h after exposure. These photocytotoxic effects were associated with the formation of sunburn cells, thymine dimers and DNA strand breaks in both the epidermis and dermis. Interestingly, cell death was dose dependent and associated with p53 protein upregulation and strong caspase-3 activation in the basal epidermis. None of these cellular responses was observed in non-irradiated skin. Finally, topical application of a broad-spectrum UVB + A sunfilter formulation afforded efficient photoprotection in irradiated explants. Thus, the ex vivo pig ear skin culture may be a useful tool in the assessment of solar radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and for evaluating the efficacy of sunscreen formulations.

  6. Induction of resveratrol biosynthesis in skins of three grape cultivars by ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayanagi, Tsutomu; Okuda, Tohru; Mine, Yohei; Yokotsuka, Koki

    2004-01-01

    Resveratrol production and expression of the genes related to resveratrol biosynthesis were investigated in the skins of three Vitis vinifera cultivars Chardonnay, Koshu and an American hybrid grape, Muscat Bailey A (Bailey x Muscat Hamburg). Resveratrol concentration in the skins of all the grapes increased significantly when exposed to ultraviolet (UV-C, 254 nm) irradiation. The UV-induced resveratrol concentration in the grape skins was lower after veraison (onset of ripening) than before it. The maximum concentration of the UV-induced resveratrol in 'Muscat Bailey A' was higher than those in the other two cultivars. The relative mRNA expression levels of stilebene synthase (STS), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) genes in grape skins 8 hr after UV irradiation were determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results revealed that STS- and PAL-mRNA expressions were significantly increased by UV irradiation. STS-mRNA expressions in 'Muscat Bailey A' were higher than those in 'Chardonnay' throughout berry development. The UV-induced CHS-mRNA expression in the grape skins decreased before veraison and subsequently increased. (author)

  7. The clinical observation on the treatment of irradiated injuries of the skin and mucosa by using vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Hui; Li, Jianchao; Xie, Xiuzhen; Chen, Quiang; Yang, Yongguang

    1987-01-01

    A clinical study of the treatment of irradiated skin and mucosa injuries (40 cases). This paper introduces two methods of treating irradiated injuries of the skin and mucosa. By using Vitamin B 12 both externaly and applying in the mouth, we can stop the pain promptly, reduce the exudation, improve the growth of granulation and the healing of the ulcer especialy in the early acute stage. In addition Vitamin B 12 produces good effects on other kinds of skin injuries. Shu BaiKe considered that the skin had the same function as the liver, which includes various kinds of enzymes. We thought that using Vitamin B 12 externaly on skin injuries, it would be absorbed and join the RNA synthesizing process in the liver and skin. After applying Vitamin B 12 , the RNA content rose. The results of animal experiments coincided with clinial treatment. It clarified the mechanisms needed to treat the third degree acute irradiated skin injuries. (author)

  8. Studies of skin cancer and thyroid tumors after irradiation of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, R.E.; Moseson, M.; Hildreth, N.

    1992-01-01

    Two longitudinal studies of children given medical X-irradiation to the head and neck are described, one of 2,650 infants who received x-ray treatment for enlarged thymus glands and the other of 2,200 children who received x-ray treatment for tinea capitis (ringworm of the scalp). The thymus study showed a dose-related excess of thyroid cancer and a long period of excess risk. The tinea study also showed an excess of thyroid tumors even though the thyroid dose was only about 0.06 Gy. An excess of non-melanotic skin cancers has also occurred in the tinea study, but no evidence for excess malignant melanomas. The skin cancer excess is not evident among blacks in the study, and, among Caucasians, it is more prominent among those with a light complexion. This suggests that host-susceptibility to ultraviolet effects is an important modifier of skin cancer risk from ionizing irradiation. (author)

  9. Effects of irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridium botulinum types A and B inoculated onto chicken skins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfulian, M.; Bartlett, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of 0.3-Mrad irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridum botulinum types A and B on chicken skins. Irradiation followed by aerobic or anaerobic incubation at 30 0 C extended the shelf life of skin samples and delayed growth and toxin production by C. botulinum. During 2 weeks of incubation at 10 0 C, the irradiated and nonirradiated C. botulinum spores failed to grow or produce toxin

  10. Effect of hyperthermia on epithelial microneoplastic cell populations induced by irradiation of rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gragtmans, N.J.; McGregor, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Two groups of male rats of the Charles River CD stock received a dose of 1,600 rad beta-radiation (700 rad/min) on the skin of the dorsum. Two months later, the site of irradiation of one of the groups was treated with hyperthermia at 44 degrees C for 2.5 minutes. A third control group received only the hyperthermic treatment. Over 90% of the animals in the 2 irradiated groups developed skin tumors (benign and malignant epithelial) at the irradiated site. There was no significant difference between these 2 groups in incidence of animals with tumors, incidence of tumors, distribution of tumor types, or rate of tumor appearance. The incidence of animals with tumors in the control group was less than 4% at any time

  11. Effect of low-power red light laser irradiation on the viability of human skin fibroblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarska, K.; Rozga, B.; Leyko, W.; Bryszewska, M. [Institute of Biophysics, University of Lodz (Poland); Kolodziejczyk, K.; Szosland, D. [Diabetological Clinic, Medical Academy of Lodz (Poland)

    1998-10-01

    Human skin fibroblast monolayers (S-126 cell line) were exposed to laser radiation (wavelength 670 nm, power density 40 mW/cm{sup 2}). The energy densities were 2 J/cm{sup 2} and 12 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively, and the irradiation was carried out at a temperature of 22 C. For fibroblast viability evaluation, the colorimetric assay (conversion of thiazolyl blue to formazan) was used. The experiments were carried out at 37 C, in the presence of 5% CO{sub 2}, and at different time periods of incubation after irradiation (2, 4, 8 h and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 days). The results indicated that there was a certain stimulating effect on the long-term proliferation of skin fibroblasts and that the stimulation proceeded in two stages, the first one 2 h and the second one 3 days post-irradiation. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  12. Preliminary study of the irradiation-induced modification of skin permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, R.; Istin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of the skin of an animal leads immediately to a strong increase in vascular permeability. If a dye is at once injected intraveinously it diffuses very rapidly in the irradiated zone, this becomes highly coloured and the colour intensity measurement gives a clue to the severity of the lesions produced. This phenomenon has been used in the past as a pharmacological test to study vascular permeability and is employed in this work to observe the effect of diosmine-titrated flavonoids on vascular permeability in inflammatory diseases. The capillary permeability increase due to local γ irradiation of rabbit skin has been accurately determined by measurement of the colouration observed after injection of Geigy Blue. Diosmine, injected intraperitoneally, protects the vascular system against increased permeability due to ionising radiations [fr

  13. DNA repair in Bloom's syndrome skin fibroblasts after ultraviolet light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Takayuki; Inoue, Masao; Kawashima, Hiroko; Yagi, Takashi; Takebe, Hiraku.

    1981-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts from a patient with Bloom's syndrome (86NoKi) were assayed for various DNA repair activities after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. Cultured fibroblasts as well as lymphocytes obtained from this patient showed a high frequency of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). There was no significant difference between 86NoKi fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts from normal donors in the sensitivity to UV as measured by inactivation of colony forming activity, the capacity of host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated virus, and the amount of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) after UV irradiation. However, the yield of UV-induced SCEs in 86NoKi cells was significantly higher than that in normal cells. (author)

  14. Influence of water and salt solutions on UVB irradiation of normal skin and psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.; Schothorst, A.A.; Boom, B.; Suurmond, D.; Hermans, J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of tap-water (TW) and salt solutions on the minimal erythema dose (MED) was investigated for normal human skin and uninvolved skin of psoriasis patients. MED (UVB) determinations on the forearm revealed that: (1) the MED definitely decreases whenever the arm is immersed in TW or NaCl solutions with a low concentration (4%) prior to UVB exposure, whereas almost saturated NaCl solution (26%), as well as locum Dead Sea water (LDSW), do not produce a change in the MED, and (2) the decrease in MED obtained by wetting the skin with TW was no longer present when the skin was allowed to dry for 20 min. A decrease in water uptake by skin (in vivo) and by callus (in vitro) was found as the salt concentration of the external solution increased. It is proposed that water taken up by the skin plays an important role in the sensitivity of the skin to UVB exposure. Bathing in TW or 4% NaCl prior to UVB exposure offered a slight to moderate improvement in psoriasis over UVB irradiation alone. Finally, it was shown that there is no obvious difference in clearance of the psoriatic skin between a bath in TW, 4% NaCl, or LDSW prior to UVB exposure. (orig.)

  15. First experiences with super fractionated skin irradiations using large afterloading molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Peter; Hensley, Frank W.; Berns, Christiane; Schraube, Peter; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer requires large radiation fields and high doses. This report examines the effectiveness and sequelae of super fractionated irradiation of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer with afterloading molds on preirradiated and nonirradiated skin. Methods and Materials: A flexible reusable skin mold was developed for use with a pulsed (PDR) after loader. An array of 18 parallel catheters was sewn between two foam rubber slabs 5 mm in thickness to provide a defined constant distance to the skin. By selection of appropriate dwell positions, arbitrarily shaped skin areas can be irradiated up to a maximal field size of 17 x 23.5 cm 2 . Irradiations are performed with a nominal 37 GBq 192 Ir stepping source in pulses of 1 Gy/h at the skin surface. The dose distribution is geometrically optimized. The 80 and 50% dose levels lie 5 and 27 mm below the skin surface. Sixteen patients suffering from metastases at the thoracic wall were treated with 18 fields (78-798 cm 2 ) and total doses of 40-50 Gy applying two PDR split courses with a pause of 4-6 weeks. Eleven of the fields had been previously irradiated with external beam therapy to doses of 50-60 Gy at 7-22 months in advance. Results: For preirradiated fields (n = 10) the results were as follows: follow-up 4.5-28.5 months (median 17); local control (LC): 8 of 10; acute skin reactions: Grade 2 (moist desquamation) 2 of 10; intermediate/late skin reactions after minimum follow-up of 3 months: Grade 1 (atrophy/pigmentation): 2 of 10, Grade 2-3a (minimal/marked telangiectasia): 7 of 10, Grade 4 (ulcer): 1 of 10; recurrencies: 2 of 10. For newly irradiated fields (n = 7) results were: follow-up: 2-20 months (median 5); LC: 6 of 7; acute reactions: Grade 1:4 of 7, Grade 2:3 of 7; intermediate/late skin reactions after minimum follow-up of 3 months (n = 5): Grade 2-3a: 2 of 5; recurrencies: 0 of 7. Local control could be achieved in 82% of the mold fields. Geometric

  16. Effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity, and skin graft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, K.; Iijima, M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of ultraviolet B irradiation on the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to alloantigens by epidermal cells (EC), on the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to alloantigens, and on skin graft rejection was studied. After the skin was irradiated with UVB in vitro, EC were obtained. The EC were injected subcutaneously, and the DTH reaction was compared with that induced by non-UVB-irradiated EC. A reduction in the DTH reaction was observed (from 62% to 99.1%). CTL activity in these mice was assessed after in vitro stimulation. CTL activity in mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC did not reject a subsequent skin allograft in an accelerated fashion, whereas mice sensitized with non-UVB-irradiated EC did. The mechanism(s) of these reactions and the clinical application of the UVB irradiation prior to grafting are discussed

  17. Two new types of chromosomal rearrangements in the swine species induced by semen irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franceschini, P.H.; Mikich, A.B.; Garcia, J.M.; Almeida Junior, I.L.; Pinheiro, L.E.L.

    1991-01-01

    In the present experiment were used one boar and 5 descendent of Landrace and Large White cross-breeding were used, all the animals were healthy concerning to the reproductive aspect and chromosome constitution. Initially semen was collected from the boar through the glove hand method, diluted and submitted to gamma irradiation. The total applied dose was of 800 R, with an exposition period of 3,76 min. The artificial insemination of the females with the treated semen was performed from the time of observation of positive tolerance reflex, with each animal receiving 2 inseminations with a 12 hour interval in between. after birth, the piglets had their blood aseptically collected for karyotype preparation and analysis. From 17 piglets born and cytogenetically analysed, 2 chromosomal rearrangements were detected, namely, a reciprocal translocation or insertion, 8q-; 14p+ in a female a pericentric inversion in chromosome 1 in a male. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs

  18. The treatment of extensively burned patents and β irradiational injury skin burn patients with irradiated pigskin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhongyi; Lu Xingan; Jing Ling; Qi Qiang

    1994-01-01

    Obvious therapeutic effects achieved by the covering of irradiation sterilized pigskin on burn wounds, escarectomized 3rd degree burn wounds β injured burns are discussed. The article also describes the manufacture processes of irradiated pigskins and the selection of surgical treatments of various burns. 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  19. Enzyme release in the skin of mice as an effect of soft X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltesz, L.

    1976-01-01

    The shaved skin of 7-8 week old male mice was irradiated locally on the back by doses of 100, 500, 1000, 2000 or 4000 R of soft X-ray. The enzyme activity of the washing solution and of the homogenate of the removed skin, the nitrogen content and the incorporation of 3 H-thymidine were measured immediately after irradiation or 1,2,4,8,16 hours later. The activity of lysosomal enzymes (acid phosphatase, beta-glucuronidase, cathepsine D) increased in the washing solution, whereas in the homogenate no significant change was observed. The maximal values were measured on the second day after irradiation with 1000 R. Tha activity of alkaline phosphatase and leucinaminopeptidase (non-lysosomal enzymes) did not change. Neither was any change observed in the nitrogen content of the skin. The incorporation of 3 H-thymidine considerably decreased. It can be concluded that small doses (500-1000 R) of local X-irradiation damage the membrane of lysosoms and lead to a release of cell destructing enzymes. (L.E.)

  20. Erbium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser irradiation ameliorates skin permeation and follicular delivery of antialopecia drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-11-01

    Alopecia usually cannot be cured because of the available drug therapy being unsatisfactory. To improve the efficiency of treatment, erbium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er-YAG) laser treatment was conducted to facilitate skin permeation of antialopecia drugs such as minoxidil (MXD), diphencyprone (DPCP), and peptide. In vitro and in vivo percutaneous absorption experiments were carried out by using nude mouse skin and porcine skin as permeation barriers. Fluorescence and confocal microscopies were used to visualize distribution of permeants within the skin. Laser ablation at a depth of 6 and 10 μm enhanced MXD skin accumulation twofold to ninefold depending on the skin barriers selected. DPCP absorption showed less enhancement by laser irradiation as compared with MXD. An ablation depth of 10 μm could increase the peptide flux from zero to 4.99 and 0.33 μg cm(-2) h(-1) for nude mouse skin and porcine skin, respectively. The laser treatment also promoted drug uptake in the hair follicles, with DPCP demonstrating the greatest enhancement (sixfold compared with the control). The imaging of skin examined by microscopies provided evidence of follicular and intercellular delivery assisted by the Er-YAG laser. Besides the ablative effect of removing the stratum corneum, the laser may interact with sebum to break up the barrier function, increasing the skin delivery of antialopecia drugs. The minimally invasive, well-controlled approach of laser-mediated drug permeation offers a potential way to treat alopecia. This study's findings provide the basis for the first report on laser-assisted delivery of antialopecia drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Response of the skin of hamsters to fractionated irradiation with X rays or accelerated carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, J.T.; Powers-Risius, P.; Woodruff, K.H.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ventral thoracic skin of hamsters was irradiated with either single, split (two fractions given in 24 hr), or multiple (five fractions given daily) exposures of X rays or accelerated carbon ions using a 4-cm spread Bragg peak. Animals were positioned in the heavy-ion beam so that the ventral thoracic skin surface was 1 cm distal to the proximal peak of the modified beam. Early skin reactions from 6 to 30 days postirradiation were assessed. Using the average skin reactions produced in this period, it was found that the relative biological effect (RBE) for single doses of carbon ions was about 1.6 (5-17 Gy per fraction), for two fractions about 1.8 (5-17 Gy perfraction), and for five fractions about 1.9 (2.4-7.2 Gy per fraction). The fractional amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation was about 0.3 (at dose levels of 2.4-8.0 Gy per fraction) compared to a value of about 0.45 (at dose levels of 60-13.0 Gy per fraction) found for the fractionated X irradiations, indicting about a 33% decrease in the relative amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation in this position in the spread Bragg curve. Also, data were interpreted using plots of the reciprocal total dose needed to produce a given level of skin damage versus the dose per fraction used in the multifraction experiments, and of the RBE versus dose per fraction obtained from a nonparametric analysis of the responses. These approaches allow estimation of RBE at dose levels relevant to the clinical situation. Also, estimation may be made of the maximum permissible RBE by using the zero dose intercept value from the linear reciprocal dose plot. With this approach, the RBE at a dose level of 2 Gy is about 2.5 and the maximum RBE value is about 2.7

  2. Development of a Skin Burn Predictive Model adapted to Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneck-Museux, N.; Scheer, E.; Perez, L.; Agay, D.; Autrique, L.

    2016-12-01

    Laser technology is increasingly used, and it is crucial for both safety and medical reasons that the impact of laser irradiation on human skin can be accurately predicted. This study is mainly focused on laser-skin interactions and potential lesions (burns). A mathematical model dedicated to heat transfers in skin exposed to infrared laser radiations has been developed. The model is validated by studying heat transfers in human skin and simultaneously performing experimentations an animal model (pig). For all experimental tests, pig's skin surface temperature is recorded. Three laser wavelengths have been tested: 808 nm, 1940 nm and 10 600 nm. The first is a diode laser producing radiation absorbed deep within the skin. The second wavelength has a more superficial effect. For the third wavelength, skin is an opaque material. The validity of the developed models is verified by comparison with experimental results (in vivo tests) and the results of previous studies reported in the literature. The comparison shows that the models accurately predict the burn degree caused by laser radiation over a wide range of conditions. The results show that the important parameter for burn prediction is the extinction coefficient. For the 1940 nm wavelength especially, significant differences between modeling results and literature have been observed, mainly due to this coefficient's value. This new model can be used as a predictive tool in order to estimate the amount of injury induced by several types (couple power-time) of laser aggressions on the arm, the face and on the palm of the hand.

  3. Thread Embedding Acupuncture Inhibits Ultraviolet B Irradiation-Induced Skin Photoaging in Hairless Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Jung Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thread embedding acupuncture (TEA is an acupuncture treatment applied to many diseases in Korean medical clinics because of its therapeutic effects by continuous stimulation to tissues. It has recently been used to enhance facial skin appearance and antiaging, but data from evidence-based medicine are limited. To investigate whether TEA therapy can inhibit skin photoaging by ultraviolet B (UVB irradiation, we performed analyses for histology, histopathology, in situ zymography and western blot analysis in HR-1 hairless mice. TEA treatment resulted in decreased wrinkle formation and skin thickness (Epidermis; P=0.001 versus UV in UVB irradiated mice and also inhibited degradation of collagen fibers (P=0.010 versus normal by inhibiting proteolytic activity of gelatinase matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9. Western blot data showed that activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK induced by UVB (P=0.002 versus normal group was significantly inhibited by TEA treatment (P=0.005 versus UV with subsequent alleviation of MMP-9 activation (P=0.048 versus UV. These results suggest that TEA treatment can have anti-photoaging effects on UVB-induced skin damage by maintenance of collagen density through regulation of expression of MMP-9 and related JNK signaling. Therefore, TEA therapy may have potential roles as an alternative treatment for protection against skin damage from aging.

  4. Enhancement of skin tumorigenesis by cigarette smoke condensate following beta-irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The tumor-promoting ability of cigarette-smoke condensate (CSC) has been demonstrated in rat skin after beta-irradiation. Skin tumors from male albino Charles River CD rats (outbred Sprague-Dawley descended) were classified into 2 groups: carcinomas and other noncarcinoma tumors. A statistically significant increase (P less than 0.01) in tumor yield occurred after CSC treatment that began 2 months after irradiation. This finding confirmed our previously published pilot observation. Extension of the pilot experiment to obtain data on carcinoma yield and an experiment to observe the effects of CSC treatment beginning immediately after irradiation were performed. When CSC treatment began immediately after irradiation, the yield of noncarcinoma tumors was significantly reduced (P less than 0.01), whereas the carcinoma yield increased but statistically not significantly (P . 0.12). The increased yield of noncarcinoma tumors is attributed to a significant increase (P less than 0.01) of acute ulceration caused by CSC on recently irradiated skin. The increase in carcinoma yield resulted from an increase in the rate of conversion of noncarcinoma tumors to cancer. Carcinoma yield was also increased by CSC treatment beginning 2 months after irradiation, but the increase was not significant (P . 0.08). The lack of statistical significance for the carcinoma yields in both experiments may be ascribed to the insufficient number of cancers produced by the treatments. The relative ratios of cancer yields (1.7 and 2.5) did not differ greatly from the 2.2 ratio for the increase of noncarcinoma tumors. The possible relevance of the findings to human carcinogenesis is discussed

  5. Defense of cutaneous cells against uv irradiation. II. Restricted photomediated binding of trimethyl psoralen to pigmented skin in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.M.; Jegasothy, B.V.; Condit, E.S.

    1973-01-01

    Distinct differences in grain distribution were seen in autoradiographs of pigmented and nonpigmented skin from spotted guinea-pig ears subjected to photosensitizing conditions by the topical application of tritiated trimethyl psoralen ( 3 H TMP) and exposure to uv irradiation at 365 nm. Grains were localized over cells throughout the epidermis in nonpigmented skin, but they were not seen beneath the stratum corneum in pigmented skin. Since TMP covalently binds to epidermal nucleic acids only after irradiation, these experiments demonstrate that the compacted melanized cells of the outer epidermis shield the DNA of underlying cells by severely restricting the penetration of uv light into the skin. (auth)

  6. Infrared irradiation of skin for the development of non-invasive health monitoring technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdussamad Abbas, Hisham; Triplett, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    Infrared radiation was employed to study the optical transmission properties of pigskin and the factors that influence transmission at room temperature. The skin samples from the forehead of piglets were irradiated using an infrared-pulsed source by varying the beam properties such as optical power, power density, duty cycle, as well as sample thickness. Because infrared radiation in select instances can penetrate through thick-fleshy skin more easily than visible radiation, temperature fluctuations observed within the skin samples stemming from exposure-dependent absorption revealed interesting transmission properties and the limits of optical exposure. Pigskin was selected for this study since its structure most closely resembles that of human skin. Furthermore, the pulsed beam technique compared to continuous operation offers more precise control of heat generation within the skin. Through this effort, the correlated pulsed-beam parameters that influence infrared transmission were identified and varied to minimize the internal absorption losses through the dermis layers. The two most significant parameters that reduce absorption losses were frequency and duty cycle of the pulsed beam. Using the Bouger-Beer-Lambert Law, the absorption coefficient from empirical data is approximated, while accepting that the absorption coefficient is neither uniform nor linear. Given that the optical source used in this study was single mode, the infrared spectra obtained from irradiated samples also reveal characteristics of the skin structure. Realization of appropriate sample conditions and exposure parameters that reduce light attenuation within the skin and sample degradation could give way to novel non-invasive measuring techniques for health monitoring purposes.

  7. The morphological effect of electron irradiation on the healing of skin wounds and skin grafts in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Current oncological practice frequently uses pre-, intra- or post-operative radiotherapy/chemotherapy. Before such treatment can begin it is imperative to establish that satisfactory wound healing will occur. Many previous studies have examined the response of wound healing to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. In general, clinical and experimental reports indicate that ionizing radiation produces poor to difficult healing of wounds, and can even prevent healing altogether. It is for this reason that the effect of radiation on wound repair has been a long standing concern for surgeons, radiotherapists and radiobiologists. Electron irradiation produces large differences in depth-dose distributions. This enables the delivery of a constant maximal dose throughout the superficial layer of tissue, for example, the total depth of skin, with less damage in deeper tissue layers, compared to that produced by the use of electromagnetic radiation such as X-rays. It is for this reason that electron beam irradiation has been selected as a radiation source for radiation of the graft bed. To date there have been few morphological examinations of the effect of electron radiation on the healing of skin wounds in rats. A review of the literature shows no information on the use of radiation of the graft bed in skin graft surgery. In the present work the processes involved in wound repair in response to radiation were studied, morphologically, using two experimental models, incisional wounds combined with pre-operative radiation and skin autografts combined with radiation of the wound bed. In the latter case an unirradiated skin graft was surgically attached to an irradiated wound bed. Light microscopy (LM), backscattered electron imaging (BEI), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used as investigative tools. These repair processes include inflammation, re-epithelialization, re-formation of the dermo-epidermal junction, re

  8. The morphological effect of electron irradiation on the healing of skin wounds and skin grafts in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q

    1995-07-01

    Current oncological practice frequently uses pre-, intra- or post-operative radiotherapy/chemotherapy. Before such treatment can begin it is imperative to establish that satisfactory wound healing will occur. Many previous studies have examined the response of wound healing to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. In general, clinical and experimental reports indicate that ionizing radiation produces poor to difficult healing of wounds, and can even prevent healing altogether. It is for this reason that the effect of radiation on wound repair has been a long standing concern for surgeons, radiotherapists and radiobiologists. Electron irradiation produces large differences in depth-dose distributions. This enables the delivery of a constant maximal dose throughout the superficial layer of tissue, for example, the total depth of skin, with less damage in deeper tissue layers, compared to that produced by the use of electromagnetic radiation such as X-rays. It is for this reason that electron beam irradiation has been selected as a radiation source for radiation of the graft bed. To date there have been few morphological examinations of the effect of electron radiation on the healing of skin wounds in rats. A review of the literature shows no information on the use of radiation of the graft bed in skin graft surgery. In the present work the processes involved in wound repair in response to radiation were studied, morphologically, using two experimental models, incisional wounds combined with pre-operative radiation and skin autografts combined with radiation of the wound bed. In the latter case an unirradiated skin graft was surgically attached to an irradiated wound bed. Light microscopy (LM), backscattered electron imaging (BEI), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used as investigative tools. These repair processes include inflammation, re-epithelialization, re-formation of the dermo-epidermal junction, re

  9. Vitamin E-deficiency did not exacerbate partial skin reactions in mice locally irradiated with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, C.; Hayashi, Daisuke; Nemoto, Masato; Nyui, Minako; Anzai, Kazunori; Urano, Shiro

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that free radicals and oxidative stress are involved in radiation-induced skin reactions. Since vitamin E (VE) is a particularly important lipophilic antioxidant, VE-deficient mice were used to examine its effects on radiation-induced skin damage. The VE content of the skin was reduced to one fourth of levels of normal mice. Neither the time of onset nor the extent of the reactions quantified with a scoring system differed between normal and VE-deficient mice after local X-irradiation (50 Gy). Similarly, there was no difference in the levels of the ascorbyl radical between the groups, although they were higher in irradiated skin than non-irradiated skin. X-irradiation increased the amount of Bax protein in the skin of normal mice both in the latent and acute inflammatory stages, time- and dose-dependently. The increase was associated with an increase in cytochrome c in the cytosolic fraction, indicating that apoptosis was also promoted by the irradiation. The increase in Bax protein correlated well with the thickness of the skin. Although a deficiency in VE should lower resistance to free radicals in the mitochondrial membrane and thus enhance radiation-induced Bax expression and apoptosis, it actually attenuated the increase in Bax protein caused by irradiation. (author)

  10. In vivo and in vitro conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol into vitamin D3 in rat skin by ultraviolet ray's irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Toshio; Yasumura, Mitsue; Mizuno, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tadashi

    1978-01-01

    The photochemical conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) into vitamin D 3 in rat skin was experimentally studied. The skin stripped off from a sacrificed normal rat was irradiated with an ultraviolet light for a constant period in the first in vitro experiment. The normal rat irradiated under the same conditions mentioned above was sacrificed and then the skin was stripped off in the second in vivo experiment. Lipids were individually extracted with chloroformmethanol (1:1) from the skin obtained in the two experiments and the solvent was evaporated. The resulting residue was saponified and the unsaponified matter extracted with benzene was purified by application to hydroxyalkoxypropyl (HAP) Sephadex column chromatography. The resulting purified vitamin D 3 fraction was applied to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in order to estimate vitamin D 3 . No peak, aside from that of alphanaphthol as an initial standard, was observed in the HPLC chromatogram on the skin obtained from the non-irradiated rat, whereas the peak corresponding to vitamin D 3 was observed in each HPLC chromatogram on both the irradiated skin (in vitro experiment) and the skin obtained from the irradiated rat (in vivo experiment). The result shows that 7-DHC in rat skin was photochemically converted into vitamin D 3 . (Iwakiri, K.)

  11. Biochemical response of skin-coated citrus fruits irradiated for preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.S.

    1977-01-01

    Orange fruits (citrus Sinensis) Kind Egyptian Balady variety, were irradiated for 100, 200 and 400 Krad γ-ray doses in combination with sodium orthophenylphenate, 0.0025% incorporated in wax coatings as preirradiation treatment. The data revealed the utility of combined treatment to control postharvest decay in citrus fruits. 100 Krad extend shelflife of skin-coated fruits by 15 weeks without significant losses in Vitamin C, reducing sugars, or free amino acids and without storage disorders. Unirradiated non skin-coated and unirradiated skin-coated had a shelf-life of 7, and 10 weeks, respectively, under the same experimental storage conditions (14-20 C and R.H. 65-75%)

  12. Biologic changes due to long-wave ultraviolet irradiation on human skin: ultrastructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakiri, M.; Hashimoto, K.; Willis, I.

    1977-01-01

    Alteration of the skin induced by single and repeated long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) exposures was studied. Following a single exposure to relatively large doses of UVA, pronounced dermal damage was observed. In the papillary dermis, superficial dermal vessels showed widely open endothelial gaps and extravasation of blood cells. Marked changes of fibroblasts were also seen in the superficial dermis. In the reticular dermis, extravascular fibrin deposition was seen. After repeated exposures to UVA the formation of cross-banded filamentous aggregations (''Zebra bodies'') was observed in the superficial and reticular dermis. These were often found in amorphous masses surrounding the blood vessels. These striking dermal alterations were absent in skin irradiated by solar stimulating radiation and in control skin. Dyskeratotic ''sunburn cells'' were occasionally seen in the epidermis after single as well as repeated exposures to UVA. The number of these cells was less than that seen after a single exposure to solar simulating radiation

  13. Prolonged bone marrow and skin allograft survival after pretransplant conditioning with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersey, J.H.; Kruger, J.; Song, C.; Kloster, B.

    1980-01-01

    Current studies were designed to provide long-term survival of allogeneic skin and bone marrow in mice preconditioned with various combinations of cyclophosphamide (CY) and/or total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). Long-term skin graft and bone marrow survival was obtained across the major histocompatibility barrier (BALB/c into C57BL/6) using pregrafting conditioning with either fractionated TLI or the combination of CY with a single dose of TLI. CY alone and a single dose of TLI alone were relatively ineffective as regrafting immunosuppressive combinations. Allogeneic bone marrow was required for long-term skin graft survival with either conditioning regimen. Allogeneic marrow transplantation resulted in somewhat more deaths than syngeneic transplantation with both CY + TLI and fractionated TLI

  14. Yeast flora of the mouth and skin during and after irradiation for oral and laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.V.; Al-Tikriti, U.; Bramley, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative changes occurring in the fungal flora of 22 patients with oral and 9 with laryngeal carcinoma were studied during and after radiation therapy. Each patient received 6000 rad of externally applied radiation in divided doses for 5 weeks. The fungal flora was isolated from the patients' oral cavity and irradiated skin sites during irradiation and 2 weeks and 4-6 months afterwards. The number and types of fungi increased in both groups of patients after the start of irradiation and persisted at high levels for at least 4-6 months after treatment. Candida albicans and C. tropicalis were the principal yeasts isolated throughout the period studied but seven other species were also identified. All the yeast isolates were sensitive in vitro to miconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin. Any of these antifungal agents should be appropriate for therapy. (author)

  15. Yeast flora of the mouth and skin during and after irradiation for oral and laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.V.; Al-Tikriti, U.; Bramley, P.A. (Sheffield Univ. (UK))

    1981-11-01

    The quantitative and qualitative changes occurring in the fungal flora of 22 patients with oral and 9 with laryngeal carcinoma were studied during and after radiation therapy. Each patient received 6000 rad of externally applied radiation in divided doses for 5 weeks. The fungal flora was isolated from the patients' oral cavity and irradiated skin sites during irradiation and 2 weeks and 4-6 months afterwards. The number and types of fungi increased in both groups of patients after the start of irradiation and persisted at high levels for at least 4-6 months after treatment. Candida albicans and C. tropicalis were the principal yeasts isolated throughout the period studied but seven other species were also identified. All the yeast isolates were sensitive in vitro to miconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin. Any of these antifungal agents should be appropriate for therapy.

  16. 500-Gray γ-Irradiation May Increase Adhesion Strength of Lyophilized Cadaveric Split-Thickness Skin Graft to Wound Bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Cheng, Ya-Chen; Li, Chun-Chang; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2017-03-01

    Human cadaveric skin grafts are considered as the "gold standard" for temporary wound coverage because they provide a more conductive environment for natural wound healing. Lyophilization, packing, and terminal sterilization with gamma-ray can facilitate the application of cadaveric split-thickness skin grafts, but may alter the adhesion properties of the grafts. In a pilot study, we found that 500 Gy γ-irradiation seemed not to reduce the adherence between the grafts and wound beds. We conducted this experiment to compare the adherences of lyophilized, 500-Gy γ-irradiated skin grafts to that of lyophilized, nonirradiated grafts. Pairs of wounds were created over the backs of Sprague- Dawley rats. Pairs of "lyophilized, 500-Gy γ-irradiated" and "lyophilized, nonirradiated" cadaveric split-thickness skin grafts were fixed to the wound beds. Adhesion strength between the grafts and the wound beds was measured and compared. On post-skin-graft day 7 and day 10, the adhesion strength of γ-irradiated grafts was greater than that of the nonirradiated grafts. Because lyophilized cadaveric skin grafts can be vascularized and the collagen of its dermal component can be remodeled after grafting, the superior adhesion strength of 500-Gy γ-irradiated grafts can be explained by the collagen changes from irradiation.

  17. Effect of low dose UVB irradiation on the migratory properties and functional capacities of human skin dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richters, C. D.; Reits, E. A.; van Pelt, A. M.; Hoekstra, M. J.; van Baare, J.; Du Pont, J. S.; Kamperdijk, E. W.

    1996-01-01

    We recently described the 'spontaneous' migration of skin dendritic cells out of human split skin during culture. Since newly infiltrating cells from the circulation are excluded, this in vitro model is very suitable for studying the effect of UVB irradiation on the migratory properties, phenotype

  18. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [de

  19. Skin toxicity during hypo fractionated breast irradiation in patient with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, Deva; Smichkoska, Snezhana

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component in the treatment of breast cancer. (1) Many women with an early stage of breast cancer are candidates for a breast conservation therapy, which combines both conservative surgery and radiotherapy. (2) According to the data from some series, an estimated 90% of the patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer will develop a degree of radiation-induced dermatitis. (3) The severity of the skin reactions during and following the breast irradiation is influenced by both treatment-related and patient-related factors. The treatment - related factors include the fraction size (the dose delivered with each treatment), the total dose delivered, the volume of tissue treated, the type of radiation (4) and the addition of chemotherapy. (5) The patient-related factors include breast size, smoking, axillary lymphocele drainage before treatment, age, and infection of the surgical wound. (6) A hypo fractionation radiotherapy is alternative for a standard fractionation radiotherapy for women with early stage of breast cancer after conservative surgery. The aim of the study was to analyse the acute skin reactions during a hypo fractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer at our institution. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with early stage of breast cancer (Stadium I and II) and conservative surgery (quadrantectomy of breast with ipsilateral axillary dissection) were analysed. The patients were treated with 6MV x rays on LINAC, using tangential fields with 2.65Gy per fraction and the total dose prescribed to target volume was 42,4 Gy. These patients were observed for acute skin toxicity during the second week and at the end of the treatment. We evaluated dryness, epilation, pigmentation, changes and eritema, dry desquamation (clinically characterized by scaling and pruritus) and moist desquamation (characterized by serious oozing and exposure of the dermis). By using the radiation therapy oncology group’s (RTOG

  20. 2nd Tuebingen radiotherapy symposium: Whole body, large field and whole skin irradiation. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, K.H.; Frommhold, W.

    1987-01-01

    The symposium which took place on the 11th and 12th April 1986 set itself the task of discussing three different groups of radiotherapy topics. The chief issue was whole-body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplants, in which all the therapy centres in West Germany, Austria, East Germany and German-speaking Switzerland made clinical and radiophysical contributions. The second part of the Symposium consisted mainly of talks and discussions on large-field irradiation, more precisely half-body and sequential partial body irradiation. This topic was chosen because this type of therapy is scarcely practised at all, particularly in West Germany, whereas in the United States, East Germany, Switzerland and a number of other countries it has long since become one of the established methods. The last talk at the Symposium explained clinical and radiophysical aspects of whole-skin irradiation. Here too, one was impressed by the wide diversity of the equipment and methods of irradiation used which, nevertheless, all demonstrated satisfactory practical solutions in their common aim of distributing the dose as homogeneously as possible. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Repair of skin damage during fractionated irradiation with gamma rays and low-LET carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Uzawa, Akiko; Takai, Nobuhiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Aoki, Mizuho; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-01-01

    In clinical use of carbon-ion beams, a deep-seated tumor is irradiated with a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) with a high-linear energy transfer (LET) feature, whereas surface skin is irradiated with an entrance plateau, the LET of which is lower than that of the peak. The repair kinetics of murine skin damage caused by an entrance plateau of carbon ions was compared with that caused by photons using a scheme of daily fractionated doses followed by a top-up dose. Right hind legs received local irradiations with either 20 keV/μm carbon ions or γ rays. The skin reaction of the irradiated legs was scored every other day up to Day 35 using a scoring scale that consisted of 10 steps, ranging from 0.5 to 5.0. An isoeffect dose to produce a skin reaction score of 3.0 was used to obtain a total dose and a top-up dose for each fractionation. Dependence on a preceding dose and on the time interval of a top-up dose was examined using γ rays. For fractionated γ rays, the total dose linearly increased while the top-up dose linearly decreased with an increase in the number of fractions. The magnitude of damage repair depended on the size of dose per fraction, and was larger for 5.2 Gy than 12.5 Gy. The total dose of carbon ions with 5.2 Gy per fraction did not change till 2 fractions, but abruptly increased at the 3rd fraction. Factors such as rapid repopulation, induced repair and cell cycle synchronization are possible explanations for the abrupt increase. As an abrupt increase/decrease of normal tissue damage could be caused by changing the number of fractions in carbon-ion radiotherapy, we conclude that, unlike photon therapy, skin damage should be carefully studied when the number of fractions is changed in new clinical trials. (author)

  2. The dose penumbra of a custom-made shield used in hemibody skin electron irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Charlotte I; AlDahlawi, Ismail; Wang, Iris Z; Singh, Anurag K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2016-11-08

    We report our technique for hemibody skin electron irradiation with a custom-made plywood shield. The technique is similar to our clinical total skin electron irradiation (TSEI), performed with a six-pair dual field (Stanford technique) at an extended source-to-skin distance (SSD) of 377 cm, with the addition of a plywood shield placed at 50 cm from the patient. The shield is made of three layers of stan-dard 5/8'' thick plywood (total thickness of 4.75 cm) that are clamped securely on an adjustable-height stand. Gafchromic EBT3 films were used in assessing the shield's transmission factor and the extent of the dose penumbra region for two different shield-phantom gaps. The shield transmission factor was found to be about 10%. The width of the penumbra (80%-to-20% dose falloff) was measured to be 12 cm for a 50 cm shield-phantom gap, and reduced slightly to 10 cm for a 35 cm shield-phantom gap. In vivo dosimetry of a real case confirmed the expected shielded area dose. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. Correlation of blister diameter and blister skin thickness in helium-ion-irradiated Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.; Fenske, G.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic study of the correlation between blister diameter and blister skin thickness has been performed for helium-ion irradiation of monocrystalline and polycrystalline Nb for ion energies ranging from 20 to 500 keV. The results indicate that a relationship Datsub mpatproportionaltatsup 1.50at between the most probable blister diameter, Datsub mpat, and blister skin thickness, t, which has been suggested by other authors, does not exist for the various types of Nb targets studied. For example, for room-temperature irradiation of annealed polycrystalline Nb the experimentally determined relationship is Datsub mpat<10.3tatsup 1.22at. Furthermore, the D-t relationship was found to depend on the irradiation temperature in contrast to theoretical predictions by the lateral stress model of blister formation. These results do not appear to support the lateral stress model which predicts the relationship Dproportionaltatsup 1.5at. However, the experimentally determined relationships can be explained in part by the gas pressure model of blister formation

  4. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Jung, E-mail: forejs2@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won, E-mail: JUNWON@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyun, E-mail: gochunghee@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Woori, E-mail: asleo02@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Hoon, E-mail: wonhoon@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seoae, E-mail: seoae@cnkgenomics.com [C& K Genomics, Seoul National University Mt.4-2, Main Bldg. #514, SNU Research Park, NakSeoungDae, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jeong, E-mail: yunk9275@daum.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-760 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  5. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-01-01

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm 2 fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL-33

  6. Effect of UV irradiation on cutaneous cicatrices: a randomized, controlled trial with clinical, skin reflectance, histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Eva; Rossen, Kristian; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Kliem, Anette; Karlsmark, Tonny; Haedersdal, Merete

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on human cutaneous cicatrices. In this randomized, controlled study, dermal punch biopsy wounds served as a wound healing model. Wounds healed by primary or second intention and were randomized to postoperative solar UV irradiation or to no UV exposure. Evaluations after 5 and 12 weeks included blinded clinical assessments, skin reflectance measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical analyses of the N-terminal propeptide from procollagen-1, hydroxyproline, hydroxylysine, and proline. Twelve weeks postoperatively, UV-irradiated cicatrices healing by second intention: (i) were significantly pointed out as the most disfiguring; (ii) obtained significantly higher scores of colour, infiltration and cicatrix area; and (iii) showed significantly higher increase in skin-reflectance measurements of skin-pigmentation vs. non-irradiated cicatrices. No histological, immunohistochemical or biochemical differences were found. In conclusion, postoperative UV exposure aggravates the clinical appearance of cicatrices in humans.

  7. Gene expression in skin tumors induced in hairless mice by chronic exposure to ultraviolet B irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiromi; Tanaka, Misao; Kobayashi, Shizuko; Suzuki, Junko S.; Ogiso, Manabu; Tohyama, Chiharu

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the expressions of c-Ha-ras, c-jun, c-fos, c-myc genes and p53 protein in the development of skin tumours induced by chronic exposure to UVB without a photosensitizer using hairless mice. When mice were exposed to UVB at a dose of 2 kJ/m 2 three times a week, increased c-Ha-ras and c-myc transcripts were detected after only 5 weeks of exposure, while no tumour appeared on the exposed skin. The increase in gene expression continued until 25 weeks, when tumours, identified pathologically as mainly squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), developed in the dorsal skin. In these SCC, overexpression of c-fos mRNA was also observed along with the increases in c-Ha-ras and c-myc. A single dose of UVB (2 kJ/m 2 ) applied to the backs of hairless mice transiently induced overexpression of the early event genes c-fos, c-jun and c-myc, but not c-Ha-ras, in the exposed area of skin. Accumulation of p53 protein was determined by Western blotting analysis of immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies PAb 240 or 246, which recognize mutant or wide type, respectively. In the SCC, a mutant p53 protein accumulated in the cytoplasm and nucleus. After single-dose irradiation, the increased wild-type p53 protein was observed in the nuclei of epidermal cells. The present results suggest that overexpression of the c-fos, c-myc and c-Ha-ras genes, and the mutational changes in p53 protein might be associated with skin photocarcinogenesis. Moreover, overexpression of the c-Ha-ras and c-myc genes might be an early event in the development of UVB-induced skin tumors in mice. (author)

  8. Effect of chemical peeling on the skin in relation to UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaka, Yoko; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed; Kawana, Seiji; Nishigori, Chikako

    2012-07-01

    Chemical peeling is one of the dermatological treatments available for certain cutaneous diseases and conditions or improvement of cosmetic appearance of photoaged skin. However, it needs to be clarified whether the repetitive procedure of chemical peeling on photodamaged skin is safe and whether the different chemicals used for peeling results in similar outcomes or not. In this article, we reviewed the effect of peeling or peeling agents on the skin in relation to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The pretreatment of peeling agents usually enhance UV sensitivity by inducing increased sunburn cell formation, lowering minimum erythematous dose and increasing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. However, this sensitivity is reversible and recovers to normal after 1-week discontinuation. Using animals, the chronic effect of peeling and peeling agents was shown to prevent photocarcinogenesis. There is also an in vitro study using culture cells to know the detailed mechanisms of peeling agents, especially on cell proliferation and apoptotic changes via activating signalling cascades and oxidative stress. It is important to understand the effect of peeling agents on photoaged skin and to know how to deal with UV irradiation during the application of peeling agents and treatment of chemical peeling in daily life. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Long-term changes in cell population kinetics of skin tissue after local beta-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-06-01

    Using /sup 3/H-thymidine autoradiography, long-term alterations in cell kinetics were studied in guinea pig skin after ..beta..irradiation with 3000 rads. After complete depopulation, epidermal basal cells at the radiation margin became proliferative 10 days postirradiation and spread over the depopulated area. When epithelization (20 days) was complete the cell cycle time of the basal cells reverted to normal, but the differentiation rate was much slower than that in unirradiated skin. This appeared to be a cause of the persistent (acanthotic) hyperplasia. Similar but slower changes were found in dermal tissue. Reparative proliferation of fibroblasts and capillary endothelial cells began at 20 and 30 days, respectively. Active fibroblastic proliferation was found as late as 110 days. This, along with the abortive nature of the reparative angiogenesis, seemed to be a cause of the later fibrosis (150 to 400 days).

  10. Local gene expression changes after UV-irradiation of human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weinkauf

    Full Text Available UV-irradiation is a well-known translational pain model inducing local inflammation and primary hyperalgesia. The mediators and receptor proteins specifically contributing to mechanical or heat hyperalgesia are still unclear. Therefore, we irradiated buttock skin of humans (n = 16 with 5-fold MED of UV-C and assessed the time course of hyperalgesia and axon reflex erythema. In parallel, we took skin biopsies at 3, 6 and 24 h after UVC irradiation and assessed gene expression levels (RT-PCR of neurotrophins (e.g. NGF, BDNF, GDNF, ion channels (e.g. NaV1.7, TRPV1, inflammatory mediators (e.g. CCL-2, CCL-3 and enzymes (e.g. PGES, COX2. Hyperalgesia to mechanical impact (12 m/s and heat (48 °C stimuli was significant at 6 h (p<0.05 and p<0.01 and 24 h (p<0.005 and p<0.01 after irradiation. Axon reflex erythema upon mechanical and thermal stimuli was significantly increased 3 h after irradiation and particularly strong at 6 h. A significant modulation of 9 genes was found post UV-C irradiation, including NGF (3, 6, 24 h, TrkA (6, 24 h, artemin, bradykinin-1 receptor, COX-2, CCL-2 and CCL-3 (3 and 6 h each. A significant down-regulation was observed for TRPV1 and iNOS (6, 24 h. Individual one-to-one correlation analysis of hyperalgesia and gene expression revealed that changes of Nav1.7 (SCN9A mRNA levels at 6 and 24 h correlated to the intensity of mechanical hyperalgesia recorded at 24 h post UV-irradiation (Pearson r: 0.57, p<0.04 and r: 0.82, p<0.001. Expression of COX-2 and mPGES at 6 h correlated to the intensity of heat-induced erythema 24 h post UV (r: 0.57, p<0.05 for COX-2 and r: 0.83, p<0.001 for PGES. The individual correlation analyses of functional readouts (erythema and pain response with local expression changes provided evidence for a potential role of Nav1.7 in mechanical hyperalgesia.

  11. Membrane damage induced in cultured human skin fibroblasts by UVA irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboriau, F.; Morliere, P.; Marquis, I.; Moysan, A.; Geze, M.; Dubertret, L.

    1993-01-01

    Irradiation of cultured human skin fibroblasts with ultraviolet light from 320 to 400 nm (UVA) leads to a decrease in the membrane fluidity exemplified by an enhanced fluorescence anisotropy of the lipophilic fluorescent probe 1-[4-trimethylamino)-phenyl]-6-phenylhexa-1,3,5-triene. This UVA-induced decrease in fluidity is associated with lactate dehydrogenase leakage in the supernatant. Vitamin E, an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, exerts a protective effect on both phenomena. Therefore, this UVA-induced damage in membrane properties may be related to lipid peroxidation processes. Moreover, exponentially growing cells are more sensitive to these UVA-induced alterations than confluent cells. (Author)

  12. Cytogenetic study of skin fibroblasts in a case of accidental acute irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouthuy, M.; Dutrillaux, B.

    1982-01-01

    The cytogenetic study of skin fibroblasts from a young boy, heavily irradiated by handling of an iridium-192 source of 25 curies is reported. About half of the cells examined had chromosomal abnormalities. The same clone, with multiple chromosome rearrangement, was observed in cultures from biopsies obtained 25 and 35 months after the accident. Several other clones were detected in vitro. The results obtained from cultures of biopsies from different locations show that no direct relationships were found between the absorbed dose and the frequency of stable chromosomal rearrangements. The comparison of the intrachromosomal rearrangements, mostly inversions, observed in this study with those detected in human pathology, in irradiation experiments in vitro, and in various species of primates indicates that these rearrangements do not occur at random. (orig.)

  13. Inter-individual and inter-cell type variation in residual DNA damage after in vivo irradiation of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, Melvin Lee Kiang; Somaiah, Navita; Bourne, Sara; Daley, Frances; A'Hern, Roger; Nuta, Otilia; Davies, Sue; Herskind, Carsten; Pearson, Ann; Warrington, Jim; Helyer, Sarah; Owen, Roger; Yarnold, John; Rothkamm, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare inter-individual and inter-cell type variation in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair following in vivo irradiation of human skin. Materials and methods: Duplicate 4 mm core biopsies of irradiated and unirradiated skin were collected from 35 patients 24 h after 4 Gy exposure using 6 MeV electrons. Residual DSB were quantified by scoring 53BP1 foci in dermal fibroblasts, endothelial cells, superficial keratinocytes and basal epidermal cells. Results: Coefficients of inter-individual variation for levels of residual foci 24 h after in vivo irradiation of skin were 39.9% in dermal fibroblasts, 44.3% in endothelial cells, 32.9% in superficial keratinocytes and 46.4% in basal epidermal cells (p < 0.001, ANOVA). In contrast, the coefficient of inter-cell type variation for residual foci levels was only 11.3% in human skin between the different epidermal and dermal cells (p = 0.034, ANOVA). Foci levels between the different skin cell types were correlated (Pearson's R = 0.855-0.955, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patient-specific factors appear to be more important than cell type-specific factors in determining residual foci levels following in vivo irradiation of human skin.

  14. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging.

  15. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT : Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jung-In; Park, So-Yeon; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie; Kim, Jin Ho; Wu, Hong-Gyun

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field.

  16. A synthetic superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-207 mitigates radiation dermatitis and promotes wound healing in irradiated rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctrow, Susan R; Lopez, Argelia; Schock, Ashley M; Duncan, Nathan E; Jourdan, Megan M; Olasz, Edit B; Moulder, John E; Fish, Brian L; Mäder, Marylou; Lazar, Jozef; Lazarova, Zelmira

    2013-04-01

    In the event of a radionuclear attack or nuclear accident, the skin would be the first barrier exposed to radiation, though skin injury can progress over days to years following exposure. Chronic oxidative stress has been implicated as being a potential contributor to the progression of delayed radiation-induced injury to skin and other organs. To examine the causative role of oxidative stress in delayed radiation-induced skin injury, including impaired wound healing, we tested a synthetic superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase mimetic, EUK-207, in a rat model of combined skin irradiation and wound injury. Administered systemically, beginning 48 hours after irradiation, EUK-207 mitigated radiation dermatitis, suppressed indicators of tissue oxidative stress, and enhanced wound healing. Evaluation of gene expression in irradiated skin at 30 days after exposure revealed a significant upregulation of several key genes involved in detoxication of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This gene expression pattern was primarily reversed by EUK-207 therapy. These results demonstrate that oxidative stress has a critical role in the progression of radiation-induced skin injury, and that the injury can be mitigated by appropriate antioxidant compounds administered 48 hours after exposure.

  17. Effect of Thai banana (Musa AA group) in reducing accumulation of oxidation end products in UVB-irradiated mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerach, Nontaphat; Yakaew, Swanya; Phimnuan, Preeyawass; Soimee, Wichuda; Nakyai, Wongnapa; Luangbudnark, Witoo; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2017-03-01

    Chronic UVB exposure causes skin disorders and cancer through DNA strand breaks and oxidation of numerous functional groups of proteins and lipids in the skin. In this study, we investigated the effects of Thai banana (Musa AA group, "Khai," and Musa ABB group, "Namwa") on the prevention of UVB-induced skin damage when fed to male ICR mice. Mice were orally fed banana (Khai or Namwa) fruit pulps at dose of 1mg/g body weight/day for 12weeks. The shaved backs of the mice were irradiated with UVB for 12weeks. The intensity dose of UVB-exposure was increased from 54mJ/cm 2 /exposure at week 1 to 126mJ/cm 2 /exposure at week 12. A significant increase in skin thickness, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation end products, and expression of MMP-1 was observed in UVB-irradiated mouse skin. A reduction in the accumulation of oxidation end products was found in the skin of UVB-irradiated mice receiving Khai. This occurred in conjunction with a reduction in MMP-1 expression, inhibition of epidermal thickening, and induction of γ-GCS expression. The dietary intake of Khai prevented skin damage from chronic UVB exposure by increased γ-GCS expression and reduced oxidation end products included carbonyls, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity of reciprocity rule on mouse skin thermal damage due to CO2 laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, P.; Dehghanpour, H. R.; Moghadam, M. S.; Daneshafrooz, V.

    2013-07-01

    CO2 laser (10.6 μm) is a well-known infrared coherent light source as a tool in surgery. At this wavelength there is a high absorbance coefficient (860 cm-1), because of vibration mode resonance of H2O molecules. Therefore, the majority of the irradiation energy is absorbed in the tissue and the temperature of the tissue rises as a function of power density and laser exposure duration. In this work, the tissue damage caused by CO2 laser (1-10 W, ˜40-400 W cm-2, 0.1-6 s) was measured using 30 mouse skin samples. Skin damage assessment was based on measurements of the depth of cut, mean diameter of the crater and the carbonized layer. The results show that tissue damage as assessed above parameters increased with laser fluence and saturated at 1000 J cm-2. Moreover, the damage effect due to high power density at short duration was not equivalent to that with low power density at longer irradiation time even though the energy delivered was identical. These results indicate the lack of validity of reciprocity (Bunsen-Roscoe) rule for the thermal damage.

  19. The co-application effects of fullerene and ascorbic acid on UV-B irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shinobu; Itoga, Kazuyoshi; Yamato, Masayuki; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Okano, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    The role of fullerene as a pro-oxidant or anti-oxidant in Ultraviolet B ray (UV-B)-induced disorders in mouse skin was investigated. Fullerene gave no photo-toxic effect to UV-B-irradiated mouse skin. Since erythema was concentrated at the pore circumference in a UV-B irradiation experiment in mouse skin, the sebaceous gland pairs was strongly implicated as a site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In a histological evaluation of the skin stained with CH 3 MDFDA (ROS index) and YO-Pro-1 (apoptosis index), the fluorescence intensity of a sebaceous gland significantly increased with UV-B irradiation. With the application of fullerene to UV-irradiated mouse skin, no toxicity was recognized in comparison with the control, and erythema, the ROS index, and the apoptosis index decrease with the application of fullerene. Ascorbyl radical (AA·) increased with the application of ascorbate (AA) to UV-B-irradiated mouse skin, and AA· decreased with the application of fullerene. The co-application of AA and fullerene, which suppressed AA· in vitro, significantly suppressed erythema, and also suppressed both the ROS index and apoptosis index in mouse skin after UV-B irradiation. In both mouse skin at 48 h after UV-B irradiation and in an attempt to reproduce this phenomenon artificially in vitro, a similar high AA· peak (AA·/H· > 4) was observed in electron spin resonance (ESR) charts. The binding of fullerene with AA impairs the Fenton reaction between AA and Fe-protein based on the observation of ascorbate-specific UV absorption and a linear equation for the calibration curve. Therefore, fullerene may impair the intercalation of AA to a heme pocket by binding with AA. These results suggest that the co-application of AA and fullerene is effective against oxidative skin damage caused by UV-B irradiation, and the development of an AA· inhibitor such as fullerene should be useful for reducing organ damage associated with Fe-protein oxidation.

  20. UV irradiation-induced methionine oxidation in human skin keratins: Mass spectrometry-based non-invasive proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Matsushima, Keita; Miyamoto, Kohei; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2016-02-05

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the major environmental factor that causes oxidative skin damage. Keratins are the main constituents of human skin and have been identified as oxidative target proteins. We have recently developed a mass spectrometry (MS)-based non-invasive proteomic methodology to screen oxidative modifications in human skin keratins. Using this methodology, UV effects on methionine (Met) oxidation in human skin keratins were investigated. The initial screening revealed that Met(259), Met(262), and Met(296) in K1 keratin were the most susceptible oxidation sites upon UVA (or UVB) irradiation of human tape-stripped skin. Subsequent liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-MS and tandem MS analyses confirmed amino acid sequences and oxidation sites of tryptic peptides D(290)VDGAYMTK(298) (P1) and N(258)MQDMVEDYR(267) (P2). The relative oxidation levels of P1 and P2 increased in a time-dependent manner upon UVA irradiation. Butylated hydroxytoluene was the most effective antioxidant for artifactual oxidation of Met residues. The relative oxidation levels of P1 and P2 after UVA irradiation for 48 h corresponded to treatment with 100mM hydrogen peroxide for 15 min. In addition, Met(259) was oxidized by only UVA irradiation. The Met sites identified in conjunction with the current proteomic methodology can be used to evaluate skin damage under various conditions of oxidative stress. We demonstrated that the relative Met oxidation levels in keratins directly reflected UV-induced damages to human tape-stripped skin. Human skin proteins isolated by tape stripping were analyzed by MS-based non-invasive proteomic methodology. Met(259), Met(262), and Met(296) in K1 keratin were the most susceptible oxidation sites upon UV irradiation. Met(259) was oxidized by only UVA irradiation. Quantitative LC/ESI-SRM/MS analyses confirmed a time-dependent increase in the relative oxidation of target peptides (P1 and P2) containing these Met residues, upon UVA irradiation

  1. Dose characteristics of total-skin electron-beam irradiation with six-dual electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Tae Jin; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae

    1998-01-01

    To obtain the uniform dose at limited depth to entire surface of the body, the dose characteristics of degraded electron beam of the large target-skin distance and the dose distribution of the six-dual electron fields were investigated. The experimental dose distributions included the depth dose curve, spatial dose and attenuated electron beam were determined with 300 cm of Target-Skin Distance (TSD) and full collimator size (35x35 cm 2 on TSD 100 cm) in 4 MeV electron beam energy. Actual collimated field size of 105 cmx105 cm at the distance of 300 cm could include entire hemibody. A patient was standing on step board with hands up and holding the pole to stabilize his/her positions for the six-dual fields technique. As a scatter-degrader, 0.5 cm of acrylic plate was inserted at 20 cm from the body surface on the electron beam path to induce ray scattering and to increase the skin dose. The Full Width at Half Maximum(FWHM) of dose profile was 130 cm in large field of 105x105 cm 2 . The width of 100±10% of the resultant dose from two adjacent fields which were separated at 25 cm from field edge for obtaining the dose uniformity was extended to 186 cm. The depth of maximum dose lies at 5 mm and the 80% depth dose lies between 7 and 8 mm for the degraded electron beam by using the 0.5 cm thickness of acrylic absorber. Total skin electron beam irradiation (TSEBI) was carried out using the six dual fields has been developed at Stanford University. The dose distribution in TSEBI showed relatively uniform around the flat region of skin except the protruding and deeply curvatured portion of the body, which showed excess of dose at the former and less dose at the latter. The percent depth dose, profile curves and superimposed dose distribution were investigated using the degraded using the degraded electron beam through the beam absorber. The dose distribution obtained by experiments of TSEBI showed within±10% difference excepts the protruding area of skin which needs a

  2. Limb regeneration from X-irradiated tails of Ambystoma mexicanum following transplantation of flank skin from region adjacent to hindlimb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, D.K.; Kleinebeckel, D.; Luther, W.

    1978-01-01

    In the experiments performed by W. Luther on young Ambystoma mexicanum, tails of host animals were irradiated with 2000 r. Afterwards a skin cuff was removed from the mid-tail region. From non-irradiated donor animals, square pieces of skin dorsally adjacent to both hindlimbs were grafted (either 90 0 -rotated or unrotated) to both sides of the denuded area of the irradiated host tail. After 3 weeks the tails were amputated across the skin transplants, and the structures which had regenerated from the distal portions of the tails were fixed 6-16 weeks later. Morhological and histological investigation revealed that 4 out of 12 regenerates from rotated grafts showed clear limb characteristics. (orig./AJ) [de

  3. Mitochondria-Targeted Vitamin E Protects Skin from UVB-Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Serk; Kim, Ikyon; Kim, Wang-Kyun; Choi, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Doo Yeong; Moon, Sung-Guk; Min, Hyung-Keun; Song, Min-Kyu; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E (MVE) is designed to accumulate within mitochondria and is applied to decrease mitochondrial oxidative damage. However, the protective effects of MVE in skin cells have not been identified. We investigated the protective effect of MVE against UVB in dermal fibroblasts and immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). In addition, we studied the wound-healing effect of MVE in animal models. We found that MVE increased the proliferation and survival of fibroblasts at low concentration (i.e., nM ranges). In addition, MVE increased collagen production and downregulated matrix metalloproteinase1. MVE also increased the proliferation and survival of HaCaT cells. UVB increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in fibroblasts and HaCaT cells, while MVE decreased ROS production at low concentration. In an animal experiment, MVE accelerated wound healing from laser-induced skin damage. These results collectively suggest that low dose MVE protects skin from UVB irradiation. Therefore, MVE can be developed as a cosmetic raw material.

  4. Radioprotective effects of Aloe vera leaf extract on skin of Swiss mice after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlot, Prashasnika; Saini, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Biological effects of radiation are detrimental to life. Skin being a cell-renewal system is one of the best organ for studying radiation induced effects and their modulation by antioxidants. An attempt has been made to evaluate radioprotective efficacy of Aloe vera leaf extract on skin in Swiss mice (1g/kg body wt/day). The mice selected from inbreed colony were divided into two groups. The first group was given Aloe vera extract orally for 15th consecutive days and served as experimental group while the other group received DDW (vol. equal to Aloe extract) to serve as control group. On the 15th day, after 30 min of above treatment animals of both the groups were exposed to 2 Gy gamma irradiation and autopsied on 6h 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. DNA as well as total protein decreases in control group as compared to the normal value. Surprisingly, in experimental group, DNA and protein increases in comparison to the control group. Thus, Aloe vera were found to have positive influence against radiation induced alterations on skin of Swiss albino mice

  5. Epithelial cell kinetics in mouse and rat skin irradiated with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster-Schuyler, L.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the kinetic responses of mouse and rat epidermal cells in vivo after single doses of ionizing radiation including responses of hair follicles at times after irradiation. The labeling indices in both species were reduced to 30 to 50% of control values immediately following irradiation at all the doses. In the rat, the labeling indices recovered and overshot control values within the first three days after 300 to 1200 rads. The mouse labeling indices continued to be suppressed for up to 10 days after 300 to 2400 rads. This indicated that rat G 1 phase epidermal cells recovered three times faster than those of the mouse with respect to the ability to maintain or increase control level cell proliferation after irradiation. After 1800 and 2400 rads, doses which produce skin ulceration, both species showed a reduction in their labeling indices for up to 7 days, indicating that a dose-dependent mechanism of recovery may be operable in the rat. 99 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Effects of whole-body and partial-body x irradiation upon epidermal mitotic activity during wound healing in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1977-01-01

    Mitotic activity of normal (unwounded) and wounded skin was measured in the control (nonirradiated) and whole-body or partial-body x-irradiated mouse. Higher mitotic activity in the anterior than in the posterior region of the body was found in both the normal and the wounded skin of the control mouse. Whole-body irradiation (500 R) depressed completely the mitotic activity of normal skin 2 to 4 days after irradiation. In spite of this depression in mitotic activity, a surgical incision made 1 to 3 days after irradiation could induce a burst of proliferation after an inhibition of an initial mitosis increase. When the animals were partially irradiated with 500 R 3 days before wounding, it was shown that mitosis at 24 hr after wounding was inhibited markedly by the local effect of irradiation and that mitosis also could be inhibited diversely by the abscopal effect of irradiation. Because of a close similarity of sequential mitotic patterns between whole-body-irradiated and flapped-skin-only-irradiated groups (direct irradiation), the effect of irradiation upon mitosis was considered to be primarily local. Some discussions were made concerning the possible reasons which made a difference in mitotic patterns between the head-only-irradiated group, the irradiated group including the head and other parts of the body except for the skin flap

  7. Evaluation of Six Split-thickness Skin Graft Donor-site Dressing Materials in a Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Pamela C.; Balent, Eric M.; Carlson, Terri L.; Lee, Karen W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous dressings for split-thickness skin graft donor sites are commercially available with no conclusive evidence-based consensus regarding the optimal dressing choice. This study was conducted to identify which of 5 commonly used materials promotes wound healing most effectively for use on split-thickness donor sites in comparison with our standard dressing, Xeroform (petrolatum gauze). Methods: Twenty-four partial-thickness wounds were created on the backs of 4 pigs using a dermatome. Wounds (n = 4 per dressing type per pig) were treated with Xeroform, Opsite (polyurethane film), Kaltostat ( calcium sodium alginate), DuoDERM (hydrocolloid), Aquacel (hydrofiber), and Mepilex (silicone foam). Full-thickness skin samples were excised at 3 or 5 days and evaluated histologically for reepithelialization and inflammation. Comparisons also included incidence of infection, ease of use, and cost analyses. Results: DuoDERM elicited the greatest percent reepithelialization (81%) and Mepilex the lowest (33%) after 3 days (P = 0.004). All dressings demonstrated complete reepithelialization except Mepilex (85%) at 5 days. There were no infections and inflammation was mild among all treatments. Mepilex was easiest to use, whereas Aquacel, Kaltostat, and Opsite were most difficult (P = 0.03). Xeroform was most cost-effective and Aquacel most expensive. Combined scoring revealed DuoDERM = Xeroform > Opsite = Mepilex > Kaltostat > Aquacel. Conclusions: DuoDERM and Xeroform were most effective overall. DuoDERM tended to outperform all dressings in reepithelialization at 3 days, while Xeroform was least expensive, easy to use, and demonstrated rapid reepithelialization. These findings suggest that Xeroform may be preferred for use on large donor-site areas. DuoDERM may be more appropriate for small donor sites when healing time is a priority. PMID:25289278

  8. Response of pig skin to single doses of irradiation from strontium-90 sources of differing surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopewell, J.W.; Hamlet, R.; Peel, D. (Churchill Hospital, Oxford (UK). Research Inst.)

    1985-08-01

    In the present investigations the effects of irradiation of pig skin with 22.5 and 40 mm diameter /sup 90/Sr plaques are compared. In addition to comparing peak epithelial reactions, comparisons were also made as to the healing times for comparable peak skin reactions for each field size. The ED/sub 50/ values (dose to produce moist desquamation in 50% of the skin fields) 26.5 +- 1.5 Gy for the 22.5 diameter field was not significantly different from that obtained for the larger 40 mm diameter source (ED/sub 50/ 29.0 +- 1.5 Gy).

  9. The response of pig skin to single doses of irradiation from strontium-90 sources of differing surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopewell, J.W.; Hamlet, R.; Peel, D.

    1985-01-01

    In the present investigations the effects of irradiation of pig skin with 22.5 and 40 mm diameter 90 Sr plaques are compared. In addition to comparing peak epithelial reactions, comparisons were also made as to the healing times for comparable peak skin reactions for each field size. The ED 50 values (dose to produce moist desquamation in 50% of the skin fields) 26.5+-1.5 Gy for the 22.5 diameter field was not significantly different from that obtained for the larger 40 mm diameter source (ED 50 29.0+-1.5 Gy). (U.K.)

  10. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs Language: English (US) Español ...

  11. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  12. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Robotics Research Laboratory for Extreme Environments, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seung Hyuck [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Noorie [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm{sup 2}, respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [German] Beim Einsatz eines Magnetresonanztomographie(MRT)-gefuehrten Bestrahlungsgeraets kann durch die Wechselwirkung von Magnetfeld und Strahlenquelle unerwuenscht

  13. Effects of cryogen spray cooling and high radiant exposures on selective vascular injury during laser irradiation of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, James W; Chang, David W; Johnston, Carol; Torres, Jorge H; Patrick, Charles W; Miller, Michael J; Thomsen, Sharon L; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-06-01

    Increasing radiant exposure offers a means to increase treatment efficacy during laser-mediated treatment of vascular lesions, such as port-wine stains; however, excessive radiant exposure decreases selective vascular injury due to increased heat generation within the epidermis and collateral damage to perivascular collagen. To determine if cryogen spray cooling could be used to maintain selective vascular injury (ie, prevent epidermal and perivascular collagen damage) when using high radiant exposures (16-30 J/cm2). Observational study. Academic hospital and research laboratory. Twenty women with normal abdominal skin (skin phototypes I-VI). Skin was irradiated with a pulsed dye laser (wavelength = 585 nm; pulse duration = 1.5 milliseconds; 5-mm-diameter spot) using various radiant exposures (8-30 J/cm2) without and with cryogen spray cooling (50- to 300-millisecond cryogen spurts). Hematoxylin-eosin-stained histologic sections from each irradiated site were examined for the degree of epidermal damage, maximum depth of red blood cell coagulation, and percentage of vessels containing perivascular collagen coagulation. Long cryogen spurt durations (>200 milliseconds) protected the epidermis in light-skinned individuals (skin phototypes I-IV) at the highest radiant exposure (30 J/cm2); however, epidermal protection could not be achieved in dark-skinned individuals (skin phototypes V-VI) even at the lowest radiant exposure (8 J/cm2). The red blood cell coagulation depth increased with increasing radiant exposure (to >2.5 mm for skin phototypes I-IV and to approximately 1.2 mm for skin phototypes V-VI). In addition, long cryogen spurt durations (>200 milliseconds) prevented perivascular collagen coagulation in all skin types. Cryogen spurt durations much longer than those currently used in therapy (>200 milliseconds) may be clinically useful for protecting the epidermis and perivascular tissues when using high radiant exposures during cutaneous laser therapies

  14. Effects of intense abdominal irradiation at a high dose (1100 rd) on gastric secretion and apparent feed digestibility in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.; Tricaud, Y.; Bourhoven, D.

    1980-01-01

    Gastric and pancreatic secretions were studied in 8 pigs irradiated at 1100 rd on the hind-half of the body. Irradiation always caused achlorhydria lasting at least 10 days. Recovery was partial and variable; rehabilitation or the persistence of anorexia closely depended on recovery. Stomachal mucosa response to gastrin stimulation was very disturbed. Impairment of the pancreatic endocrine function led to progressive diabetes; the exocrine function also seemed to decrease with the survival time

  15. SU-F-T-82: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Shield Used for Hemi-Body Skin Electron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivers, C; Singh, A [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); AlDahlawi, I; Wang, I; Podgorsak, M [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We had several mycosis fungoides patients with a limited disease to about half of the skin surface. A custom-made plywood shield was used to protect the non-targeted skin region with our total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique. We report a dosimetric evaluation for our “hemi-body” skin electron irradiation technique. Methods: The technique is similar to our clinical total skin electron irradiation (TSEI), performed with a six-pair dual field (Stanford technique) at an extended source-to-skin distance (SSD) of 377 cm, with the addition of a plywood shield placed 50 cm from the patient. The shield is made of three layers of standard 5/8″ thick plywood (total thickness of 4.75 cm) that are clamped securely on an adjustable-height stand. Gafchromic EBT3 films were used in assessing the shield’s transmission factor and the extend of the dose penumbra region. To verify the dose delivered for hemi-body skin radiation in a real patient treatment, in-vivo dosimetry using Gafchromic EBT3 films were performed. Film pieces were taped on the patient skin to measure the dose received during the first two fractions, placed on the forehead and upper body (shielded region); and also at the level of pelvic area, left thigh, and left ankle. Results: The shield transmission factor was found to be 10%, and the width of the penumbra (80-to-20% dose fall-off) was about 12 cm. In-vivo dosimetry of a real case confirmed the expected shielded area dose. Conclusion: Hemi-Body skin electron irradiation at an extended SSD is feasible with the addition of a plywood shield at a distance from patient skin. The penumbra dose region and the shield’s transmission factor should be evaluated prior to clinical use. We have treated several hemi-body skin patients with our custom-made plywood shield, the current patient measurements are representative of these for other patients as well.

  16. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen and irradiation on experimental skin flaps in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemiroff, P.M.; Merwin, G.E.; Brant, T.; Cassisi, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and irradiation (RT) on experimental skin flaps in rats under varying conditions. Animals were assigned at random to 1 of 15 groups that represented all possible ordering effects of HBO, RT, and flap, as well as controls that included flap-only, RT-only, and HBO-only groups. Cranially based skin flaps measuring 3 x 9 cm were elevated on the dorsum. The surviving length was evaluated with fluorescein dye 7 days after the operation. Depending on the treatment condition, HBO was given either 48 hours or 24 hours before flap elevation, or within 4 hours or 48 hours after flap elevation. Rats receiving RT ( 60 Co) were given a single dose of 1000 rads to the dorsum. Results showed that all groups receiving HBO within 4 hours after flap elevation had significantly greater flap survival length, with as much as a 22% greater length of surviving flap. HBO given 48 hours before flap elevation also significantly improved flap survival over controls. RT appeared to have no immediate significant effect on flap survival. However, rats receiving RT, regardless of other factors, gained significantly less weight than did controls. Findings clearly indicate that, to be effective, HBO needs to be given as soon after surgery as possible

  17. The protective effects of fucosterol against skin damage in UVB-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunson; Park, Sang-Yong; Sun, Zheng-wang; Shin, Heon-Sub; Lee, Don-Gil; Yi, Tae Hoo

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light causes matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) overexpression and extracellular matrix depletion, leading to skin photoaging. The activation of MMP is related to increased interlukin-6 (IL-6) and type I procollagen production, which is regulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation induces MMP-1 production and reduces type I procollagen secretion. Fucosterol, which is extracted and purified from the brown algae Hizikia fusiformis, is a phytosterol. We assessed the effects of fucosterol on photodamage and investigated its molecular mechanism of action in UVB-irradiated normal human dermal fibroblasts by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that fucosterol significantly decreased the UVB-induced expression of MMP-1, IL-6, p-c-Jun, and p-c-Fos. Additionally, fucosterol markedly increased the UVB-induced production of type I procollagen and TGF-β1. Our results indicate that fucosterol regulates MMP-1 and type I procollagen expression by modulating AP-1 and TGF-β1 signaling and that MMP-1 activation is correlated with IL-6. These data suggest that fucosterol is a promising botanical agent to protect against skin photodamage.

  18. Effect of laser irradiation for healing of the skin-muscle wounds of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapina, Victoria A.; Veremei, Eduard I.; Pancovets, Evgeniy A.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to study the medical effect of low-intensity laser influence on healing of skin- muscle wounds of agricultural animals. We used the laser radiation of low intensity for cub's therapy: to sucking-pigs after herniotomy and castration, to cattle cubs after skin- muscle wounds. The animals were kept under clinical observation up to their recovery. The recuperation dynamic was observed by changing of blood quotients, leukograms, sizes of inflammatory edema, general behavior of animals. The positive dynamic of blood quotients of the experimental animal groups was really higher than that in control. The analysis of wound healing after laser influence shows that wound surface of experimental group was to a great extent smaller in comparison with control group of animals. So, these facts testify about anti-inflammatory action of laser radiation, which hastens regenerative and rehabilitative processes. Analysis of the obtained experimental data has revealed the positive influence of laser irradiation on the dynamics of wound adhesion of agricultural animals.

  19. Djulis (Chenopodium formosanum Koidz. Water Extract and Its Bioactive Components Ameliorate Dermal Damage in UVB-Irradiated Skin Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Han Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermal photoaging is a condition of skin suffering inappropriate ultraviolet (UV exposure and exerts inflammation, tissue alterations, redness, swelling, and uncomfortable feelings. Djulis (Chenopodium formosanum Koidz. is a cereal food and its antioxidant and pigment constituents may provide skin protection from photoaging, but it still lacks proved experiments. In this study, protective effects of djulis extract (CFE on UVB-irradiated skin were explored. The results showed that HaCaT cells with 150 μg/mL CFE treatment had higher survival and less production of interleukin- (IL- 6, matrix metalloprotease- (MMP- 1, and reactive oxygen species (ROS in UVB-irradiated conditions. Subsequently, in animal studies, mice supplemented with CFE (100 mg/kg BW were under UVB irradiation and had thinner epidermis and lower IL-6 levels in skin layer. These data demonstrate that bioactive compounds possessing the potency of antiphotoaging exist in CFE. Following that, we found rutin and chlorogenic acid (10–100 μM could significantly increase cell viability and decrease the production of IL-6 in UVB models. Additionally, djulis pigment-betanin has no effect of increasing cell viability in this study. Our findings suggest CFE can protect skin against UV-induced damage and this protection is mainly from contributions of rutin and chlorogenic acid.

  20. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR HEAD AND NECK BASAL CELL SKIN CANCER WITH ADDITIONAL INTERSTITIAL LASER IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kapinus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the development and evaluation of the effi ciency of photodynamic therapy (PDT with photosensitizer photolon with additional interstitial laser irradiation in patients with head and  neck basal cell skin cancer (BCSC. Treatment was performed in 55  patients. On the fi rst stage, all patients underwent photodynamic  therapy with interstitial irradiation using fl exible optical fi bers with  cylindrical diffuser, on the second stage PDT with distant delivery of  laser at a dose of 50-300 J/cm2 was carried out. During the follow- up period of 6 months to 4 years in 13 (23.6% of the 55 patients a  recurrence of the disease was diagnosed. A higher rate of recurrence was in the group of patients who underwent PDT for recurrent  neoplasms compared with patients with primary disease (37.5% and 4.3%, respectively, in patients with endophytic growth of the tumor compared to patients with exophytic component (30.0% and 16.0%,respectively and in patients with large tumors (up to 2.0 cm – 14.3%, from 2.0 to 5.0 cm – 16.7% and more than 5.0 cm – 54.4%.

  1. Enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated human skin explants treated with T4N5 liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarosh, D.B.; Kibitel, J.T.; Green, L.A.; Spinowitz, A.

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes cultured from explants of skin cancer patients, including biopsies from xeroderma pigmentosum patients, were ultraviolet light-irradiated and DNA repair synthesis was measured. Repair capacity was much lower in xeroderma pigmentosum patients than in normal patients. The extent of DNA repair replication did not decline with the age of the normal patient. Treatment with T4N5 liposomes containing a DNA repair enzyme enhanced repair synthesis in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum keratinocytes in an irradiation- and liposome-dose dependent manner. These results provide no evidence that aging people or skin cancer patients are predisposed to cutaneous malignancy by a DNA repair deficiency, but do demonstrate that T4N5 liposomes enhance DNA repair in the keratinocytes of the susceptible xeroderma pigmentosum and skin cancer population

  2. APPLICATION OF THE HACCP METHOD IN THE SWINE ABATTOIR BY SCALDING-SKINNING ECOLOGICAL PROCESSING / APPLICATION DE LA METHODE HACCP DANS L’ABATTOIR PORCIN PAR LE PROCESSUS ECOLOGIQUE D’ÉCHAUDAGE-DÉPEÇAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IULIAN SUCEVEANU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the food industry development, the food safety and the valorization of by-products represent important aspects. The present study consists in the application of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP method in pig slaughterhouses for scalding-skinning technology in order to ensure the conformity of meat quality and the by-products management and recycling. In order to optimize the scalding-skinning process of swine, all the classical technological steps of the technological processes were analyzed separately and globally, with the adaptation of the HACCP method for the new technology. The result of this study shows that the implementation of the new technology that combines existing technologies has many advantages from both an economic and a technological point of view. At the same time the new technology ensures food safety by taking account of the application of the food safety system, respectively, HACCP method.

  3. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete β/γ -emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete Β- and γ-emitting (ΒγE) sources (e.g., ΒγE hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot ΒγE particles are 60 Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 μm and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 μCi) of radioactivity. For such ΒγE sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete ΒγE sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete ΒγE sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized Β irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete ΒγE sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to Β radiation from ΒγE sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects

  4. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  5. Swine flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sinha

    Full Text Available Summary: The recent outbreak of human infection with a novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1 virus is spreading rapidly through sustained human-to-human transmission in multiple countries. Human-to-human transmission occurs by inhalation of infectious droplets and droplet nuclei, and by direct contact, which is facilitated by air and land travel and social gatherings. The most frequently reported symptoms are fever, cough, myalgia, and sore throat. Detailed contact and travel histories and knowledge of viral activity in community are essential for prompt case detection by the health personnel. Real-time Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction analysis of throat swabs or lower respiratory samples is a sensitive means of diagnosis. Use of oral oseltamivir may be warranted for the treatment of severe illness. Keywords: Swine influenza, H1N1, Swine flu, Oseltamivir

  6. Impact of Age and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 on DNA Damage Responses in UV-Irradiated Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Michael G; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2017-02-26

    The growing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) necessitates a thorough understanding of its primary risk factors, which include exposure to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths of sunlight and age. Whereas UV radiation (UVR) has long been known to generate photoproducts in genomic DNA that promote genetic mutations that drive skin carcinogenesis, the mechanism by which age contributes to disease pathogenesis is less understood and has not been sufficiently studied. In this review, we highlight studies that have considered age as a variable in examining DNA damage responses in UV-irradiated skin and then discuss emerging evidence that the reduced production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) by senescent fibroblasts in the dermis of geriatric skin creates an environment that negatively impacts how epidermal keratinocytes respond to UVR-induced DNA damage. In particular, recent data suggest that two principle components of the cellular response to DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair and DNA damage checkpoint signaling, are both partially defective in keratinocytes with inactive IGF-1 receptors. Overcoming these tumor-promoting conditions in aged skin may therefore provide a way to lower aging-associated skin cancer risk, and thus we will consider how dermal wounding and related clinical interventions may work to rejuvenate the skin, re-activate IGF-1 signaling, and prevent the initiation of NMSC.

  7. Impact of Age and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 on DNA Damage Responses in UV-Irradiated Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Kemp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC necessitates a thorough understanding of its primary risk factors, which include exposure to ultraviolet (UV wavelengths of sunlight and age. Whereas UV radiation (UVR has long been known to generate photoproducts in genomic DNA that promote genetic mutations that drive skin carcinogenesis, the mechanism by which age contributes to disease pathogenesis is less understood and has not been sufficiently studied. In this review, we highlight studies that have considered age as a variable in examining DNA damage responses in UV-irradiated skin and then discuss emerging evidence that the reduced production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 by senescent fibroblasts in the dermis of geriatric skin creates an environment that negatively impacts how epidermal keratinocytes respond to UVR-induced DNA damage. In particular, recent data suggest that two principle components of the cellular response to DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair and DNA damage checkpoint signaling, are both partially defective in keratinocytes with inactive IGF-1 receptors. Overcoming these tumor-promoting conditions in aged skin may therefore provide a way to lower aging-associated skin cancer risk, and thus we will consider how dermal wounding and related clinical interventions may work to rejuvenate the skin, re-activate IGF-1 signaling, and prevent the initiation of NMSC.

  8. Localized skin changes at the site of immunization with highly irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni are associated with enhanced resistance to a challenge infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.L.; Smithers, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    The level of immunity to a percutaneous cercarial challenge with Schistosoma mansoni was assayed 4-6 weeks after immunization of mice with highly irradiated (20 krad.) cercariae or schistosomula. When immunization and challenge occurred through the same skin site, resistance, particularly that which occurred in the skin, was greater than that observed when immunization and challenge occurred in different sites. The enhanced resistance is believed to be due to localized changes in the skin; 4 weeks after exposure to irradiated cercariae, abdominal skin is characterized by a thickened epidermis, changes in the ground substance and a cellular infiltration of the dermis. A convenient mouse model is described in which one or both ear pinnae are exposed to irradiated cercariae and a percutaneous challenge is given via the abdomen, thus eliminating the effects of local skin changes. In this model, the majority of the challenge infection which succumbs to the immune response appears to be killed in the skin. (author)

  9. Development of sterilization and storage processes of Xeno-skins by gamma irradiation for the Industrialization as dressing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Il; Lee, Ju Woon; Kim, Jae Hun; Song, Beom Seok; Kim, Jae Kyung; Park, Jong Hum; Sung, Nak Yun; Jo, Eu Ri; Kim, Jeong Soo

    2011-08-01

    Allografts have been increased in concerns as treatment methods to be use in replacement and reconstruction procedures of tissue. The major concern about tissue and bone transplantation is the risk of transferring bacteria, viruses from recipient to the donors, especially from different species. To avoid these risks, tissue and bone banks use many different sterilization methods such as a deep-frozenness, freeze-drying ethylene oxide-sterilization and gamma-irradiation. Among these methods, gamma-irradiation has been widely used to sterilize the tissue for allograft and xenograft safety. Gamma irradiation could be an effective method for sterilization of soft tissue for the development of xenografts. Also, this study suggests the potential of development as tissue graft with the improved mechanical property of the structural stability and protection of tissue materials by antioxidant on porcine skin irradiated for sterilization and storage process

  10. In vivo skin leptin modulation after 14 MeV neutron irradiation: a molecular and FT-IR spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cestelli Guidi, M.; Mirri, C.; Marcelli, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati - INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Fratini, E.; Amendola, R. [ENEA, UT BIORAD-RAB, Rome (Italy); Licursi, V.; Negri, R. [Universita La Sapienza, Dip. Biologia e Biotecnologie ' ' Charles Darwin' ' , Rome (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    This paper discusses gene expression changes in the skin of mice treated by monoenergetic 14 MeV neutron irradiation and the possibility of monitoring the resultant lipid depletion (cross-validated by functional genomic analysis) as a marker of radiation exposure by high-resolution FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) imaging spectroscopy. The irradiation was performed at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG), which is specifically dedicated to biological samples. FNG is a linear electrostatic accelerator that produces up to 1.0 x 10{sup 11} 14-MeV neutrons per second via the D-T nuclear reaction. The functional genomic approach was applied to four animals for each experimental condition (unirradiated, 0.2 Gy irradiation, or 1 Gy irradiation) 6 hours or 24 hours after exposure. Coregulation of a subclass of keratin and keratin-associated protein genes that are physically clustered in the mouse genome and functionally related to skin and hair follicle proliferation and differentiation was observed. Most of these genes are transiently upregulated at 6 h after the delivery of the lower dose delivered, and drastically downregulated at 24 h after the delivery of the dose of 1 Gy. In contrast, the gene coding for the leptin protein was consistently upregulated upon irradiation with both doses. Leptin is a key protein that regulates lipid accumulation in tissues, and its absence provokes obesity. The tissue analysis was performed by monitoring the accumulation and the distribution of skin lipids using FT-IR imaging spectroscopy. The overall picture indicates the differential modulation of key genes during epidermis homeostasis that leads to the activation of a self-renewal process at low doses of irradiation. (orig.)

  11. In vivo skin leptin modulation after 14 MeV neutron irradiation: a molecular and FT-IR spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestelli Guidi, M; Mirri, C; Fratini, E; Licursi, V; Negri, R; Marcelli, A; Amendola, R

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses gene expression changes in the skin of mice treated by monoenergetic 14 MeV neutron irradiation and the possibility of monitoring the resultant lipid depletion (cross-validated by functional genomic analysis) as a marker of radiation exposure by high-resolution FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) imaging spectroscopy. The irradiation was performed at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG), which is specifically dedicated to biological samples. FNG is a linear electrostatic accelerator that produces up to 1.0 × 10(11) 14-MeV neutrons per second via the D-T nuclear reaction. The functional genomic approach was applied to four animals for each experimental condition (unirradiated, 0.2 Gy irradiation, or 1 Gy irradiation) 6 hours or 24 hours after exposure. Coregulation of a subclass of keratin and keratin-associated protein genes that are physically clustered in the mouse genome and functionally related to skin and hair follicle proliferation and differentiation was observed. Most of these genes are transiently upregulated at 6 h after the delivery of the lower dose delivered, and drastically downregulated at 24 h after the delivery of the dose of 1 Gy. In contrast, the gene coding for the leptin protein was consistently upregulated upon irradiation with both doses. Leptin is a key protein that regulates lipid accumulation in tissues, and its absence provokes obesity. The tissue analysis was performed by monitoring the accumulation and the distribution of skin lipids using FT-IR imaging spectroscopy. The overall picture indicates the differential modulation of key genes during epidermis homeostasis that leads to the activation of a self-renewal process at low doses of irradiation.

  12. Association of malignancy with rapid growth in early lesions induced by irradiation of rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial lesions induced by irradiation of rat skin were studied to determine (a) the relationship of malignancy to dose, (b) the types of lesions and circumstances leading to overt malignancy, and (c) the growth rates of lesions progressing to malignancy versus those of lesions remaining benign. High doses of radiation were shown to be associated with the production of epidermal cancers, the maximum yield being obtained at 6,400 rads. Conversely, a peak yield of noncancerous lesions was obtained at 1,600 rads. This association between malignancy and high dose was consistent for cancers evolving from warts, cysts, and chronic ulcers. Although the proportion of warts among the induced lesions was much higher than that of the cysts or chronic ulcers (76, 14, and 10%, respectively), the likelihood of warts becoming cancerous was substantially lower (14, 23, and 21%). The combined data for all doses showed that the latency period of the epidermal cancers was significantly (P = 0.015) shorter than that of the benign tumors. Rapid growth rates were observed for warts, cysts, and chronic ulcers progressing to overt cancer, and these did not overlap at any point on the growth scale with rates for benign tumors. This finding suggested that the potential for malignant development had been established early in the carcinogenic process, very likely at induction

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation upon the mutation of skin color of the Fuji apple cultivar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yoshio

    1984-03-01

    The new apple cultivar Fuji was bred at the Morioka Branch, Fruit Tree Research Station, in 1958. Although the quality of the Fuji fruits is high, the skin color is not very attractive. In 1963 and 1964, the Fuji cultivar was irradiated with gamma ray in the growing tree stage and the state of dormant scions. Some promising mutants of the color sport were selected. In 1963, two year old Fuji saplings grafted to Marubakaido were planted in a gamma field of the Institute of Radiation Breeding, and exposed to the dose from a Co-60 source from 200 to 12.5 R per day for 223 days, thereafter they were transplanted in the Morioka Branch in 1964. The dormant scions of the Fuji cultivar were sealed in polyethylene bags, and placed at different distances from a Co-60 source. The treatment in 1963 was at 6000 or 3000 R for one day, and in 1964, at 6000, 3000, 1200 and 600 R for one day, two, five and ten days, respectively, thus the total dose was 6000 R in all cases. Thereafter, they were grafted to Marubakaido. All trees which received over 20,000 R in total died, and those which received less than 5000 R produced no mutant. The scions except 600 R/day x 10 days group produced mutants. 15 color sports and 3 spur type mutants were selected in this experiment. (J.P.N.).

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation upon the mutation of skin color of the 'Fuji' apple cultivar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshio

    1984-01-01

    The new apple cultivar ''Fuji'' was bred at the Morioka Branch, Fruit Tree Research Station, in 1958. Although the quality of the Fuji fruits is high, the skin color is not very attractive. In 1963 and 1964, the Fuji cultivar was irradiated with gamma ray in the growing tree stage and the state of dormant scions. Some promising mutants of the color sport were selected. In 1963, two year old Fuji saplings grafted to Marubakaido were planted in a gamma field of the Institute of Radiation Breeding, and exposed to the dose from a Co-60 source from 200 to 12.5 R per day for 223 days, thereafter they were transplanted in the Morioka Branch in 1964. The dormant scions of the Fuji cultivar were sealed in polyethylene bags, and placed at different distances from a Co-60 source. The treatment in 1963 was at 6,000 or 3,000 R for one day, and in 1964, at 6,000, 3,000, 1,200 and 600 R for one day, two, five and ten days, respectively, thus the total dose was 6,000 R in all cases. Thereafter, they were grafted to Marubakaido. All trees which received over 20,000 R in total died, and those which received less than 5,000 R produced no mutant. The scions except 600 R/day x 10 days group produced mutants. 15 color sports and 3 spur type mutants were selected in this experiment. (J.P.N.)

  15. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Shungite against Ultraviolet B Irradiation-Induced Skin Damage in Hairless Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Easter Joy Sajo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As fullerene-based compound applications have been rapidly increasing in the health industry, the need of biomedical research is urgently in demand. While shungite is regarded as a natural source of fullerene, it remains poorly documented. Here, we explored the in vivo effects of shungite against ultraviolet B- (UVB- induced skin damage by investigating the physiological skin parameters, immune-redox profiling, and oxidative stress molecular signaling. Toward this, mice were UVB-irradiated with 0.75 mW/cm2 for two consecutive days. Consecutively, shungite was topically applied on the dorsal side of the mice for 7 days. First, we found significant improvements in the skin parameters of the shungite-treated groups revealed by the reduction in roughness, pigmentation, and wrinkle measurement. Second, the immunokine profiling in mouse serum and skin lysates showed a reduction in the proinflammatory response in the shungite-treated groups. Accordingly, the redox profile of shungite-treated groups showed counterbalance of ROS/RNS and superoxide levels in serum and skin lysates. Last, we have confirmed the involvement of Nrf2- and MAPK-mediated oxidative stress pathways in the antioxidant mechanism of shungite. Collectively, the results clearly show that shungite has an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action against UVB-induced skin damage in hairless mice.

  16. Chitosan Dermal Substitute and Chitosan Skin Substitute Contribute to Accelerated Full-Thickness Wound Healing in Irradiated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Bakar Mohd Hilmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wounds with full-thickness skin loss are commonly managed by skin grafting. In the absence of a graft, reepithelialization is imperfect and leads to increased scar formation. Biomaterials can alter wound healing so that it produces more regenerative tissue and fewer scars. This current study use the new chitosan based biomaterial in full-thickness wound with impaired healing on rat model. Wounds were evaluated after being treated with a chitosan dermal substitute, a chitosan skin substitute, or duoderm CGF. Wounds treated with the chitosan skin substitute showed the most re-epithelialization (33.2 ± 2.8%, longest epithelial tongue (1.62 ± 0.13 mm, and shortest migratory tongue distance (7.11 ± 0.25 mm. The scar size of wounds treated with the chitosan dermal substitute (0.13 ± 0.02 cm and chitosan skin substitute (0.16 ± 0.05 cm were significantly decreased (P<0.05 compared with duoderm (0.45 ± 0.11 cm. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA expression on days 7, 14, and 21 revealed the presence of human hair follicle stem cells and fibroblasts that were incorporated into and surviving in the irradiated wound. We have proven that a chitosan dermal substitute and chitosan skin substitute are suitable for wound healing in full-thickness wounds that are impaired due to radiation.

  17. An extract of Polygonum multiflorum protects against free radical damage induced by ultraviolet B irradiation of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K. Hwang

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, the incidence of ultraviolet B (UVB-related skin problems has been increasing. Damages induced by UVB radiation are related to mutations that occur as a result of direct DNA damage and/or the production of reactive oxygen species. We investigated the anti-oxidant effects of a Polygonum multiflorum thumb extract against skin damage induced by UVB irradiation. Female SKH-1 hairless mice were divided into three groups: control (N = 7, distilled water- (N = 10, and P. multiflorum extract-treated (PM, N = 10 groups. The PM (10 g was extracted with 100 mL distilled water, cryo-dried and 9.8 g was obtained. The animals received a topical application of 500 µL distilled water or PM extract (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16%, w/v, dissolved in distilled water for 30 min after UVB irradiation (wavelength 280-320 nm, 300 mJ/cm²; 3 min of the dorsal kin for 14 days, and skin immunohistochemistry and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 activity were determined. SOD1 immunoreactivity, its protein levels and activities in the skin were significantly reduced by 70% in the distilled water-treated group after UVB irradiation compared to control. However, in the PM extract-treated groups, SOD1 immunoreactivity and its protein and activity levels increased in a dose-dependent manner (1-16%, w/v, PM extract compared to the distilled water-treated group. SOD1 protein levels and activities in the groups treated with 8 and 16%, w/v, PM extract recovered to 80-90% of the control group levels after UVB. These results suggest that PM extract strongly inhibits the destruction of SOD1 by UV radiation and probably contains anti-skin photoaging agents.

  18. Excision of pyrimidine dimers from epidermal DNA and nonsemiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis following ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G.T.; Trosko, J.E.; Shapas, B.G.; Boutwell, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimer production and excision in epidermal DNA were studied at five different dose levels of ultraviolet light in the skin of intact mice. Dimer production increased with dose up to 50,400 ergs/sq mm. Approximately 30 percent of the thymine-containing dimers were excised by 24 hr after irradiation at three lower dose levels of ultraviolet light. Nonsemiconservative DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated mouse skin was shown to continue for at least 18 hr. The rate of nonsemiconservative replication decreased with time, but did so slowly. The initial rates of nonsemiconservative replication increased with ultraviolet light dose levels up to about 4200 ergs/sq mm, after which the initial rates were decreased. Semiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis was shown to be inhibited by hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea had no effect on ultraviolet light-induced nonsemiconservative DNA replication. The observed pyrimidine dimer excision and nonsemiconservative DNA replication suggest that in the intact mouse the cells of the epidermis are capable of DNA excision repair after ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

  19. Lack of Cetuximab induced skin toxicity in a previously irradiated field: case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mutation, amplification or dysregulation of the EGFR family leads to uncontrolled division and predisposes to cancer. Inhibiting the EGFR represents a form of targeted cancer therapy. Case report We report the case of 79 year old gentlemen with a history of skin cancer involving the left ear who had radiation and surgical excision. He had presented with recurrent lymph node in the left upper neck. We treated him with radiation therapy concurrently with Cetuximab. He developed a skin rash over the face and neck area two weeks after starting Cetuximab, which however spared the previously irradiated area. Conclusion The etiology underlying the sparing of the previously irradiated skin maybe due to either decrease in the population of EGFR expressing cells or decrease in the EGFR expression. We raised the question that "Is it justifiable to use EGFR inhibitors for patients having recurrence in the previously irradiated field?" We may need further research to answer this question which may guide the physicians in choosing appropriate drug in this scenario. PMID:20478052

  20. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with common tumor antigens on UV-induced tumors also react with hyperplastic UV-irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, C.W.; Beauchamp, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Most murine skin tumors induced by ultraviolet light (UVB, 280-340 nm) can be successfully transplanted only into syngeneic hosts that have received subcarcinogenic doses of UVB. The tumor susceptible state is long-lived and mediated by T suppressor cells that control effector responses against common antigens on UV-induced tumors. Because antigen specific suppression arises prior to the appearance of a tumor, questions arise about the source of the original antigen. They have previously reported transplantation studies indicating that UV-irradiated skin is antigenically cross-reactive with UV-induced tumors. They now report on flow cytometry analyses showing that a series of MoAb reactive with common antigens expressed by UV-induced tumors are also reactive on cells from UV-irradiated skin. Various antigens appear at different times in the UV irradiation scheme, and some persist while others are transient. They speculate that the common antigens detected may be the ones to which functional suppression is directed. If true, these results suggest that successful tumors need not escape host defenses to emerge. Rather, tumors may arise and grow progressively if they express antigens that cross-react with specificities to which the host has previously mounted a suppressive response

  1. Factors affecting growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum type E on irradiated (0.3 Mrad) chicken skins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firstenberg-Eden, R.; Rowley, D.B.; Shattuck, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    A model system (chicken skins with chicken exudate) was used to determine if Clostridium botulinum type E (Beluga) spores, stressed by low dose irradiation, would develop and produce toxin at abuse temperatures of 10 and 30 0 C in the absence of characteristic spoilage. Unstressed spores germinated, multiplied, and produced toxin on vacuum-packed chicken skins, stored at either 30 or 10 0 C. Cell numbers increased faster and toxin was evident sooner at 30 0 C than at 10 0 C. At 30 0 C, growth occurred and toxin was produced more slowly when samples were incubated aerobically than anaerobically. When samples were incubated aerobically at 10 0 C, no toxin was detected within a test period of 14 days. An irradiation dose of 0.3 Mrad at 5 0 C reduced a spore population on vacuum-sealed chicken skins by about 90%. The surviving population produced toxin at 30 0 C under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, at 10 0 C no toxin was detected even on skins incubated anaerobically. Under the worst conditions (30 0 C, vacuum packed) toxin was not detected prior to characteristic spoilage caused by the natural flora surviving 0.3 Mrad

  2. Comparison of human skin opto-thermal response to near-infrared and visible laser irradiations: a theoretical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Tianhong [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Pikkula, Brian M [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Wang, Lihong V [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Anvari, Bahman [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2004-11-07

    Near-infrared wavelengths are absorbed less by epidermal melanin, and penetrate deeper into human skin dermis and blood than visible wavelengths. Therefore, laser irradiation using near-infrared wavelengths may improve the therapeutic outcome of cutaneous hyper-vascular malformations in moderately to heavily pigmented skin patients and those with large-sized blood vessels or blood vessels extending deeply into the skin. A mathematical model composed of a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate the distribution of absorbed light, numerical solution of a bio-heat diffusion equation to calculate the transient temperature distribution, and a damage integral based on an empirical Arrhenius relationship to quantify the tissue damage was utilized to investigate the opto-thermal response of human skin to near-infrared and visible laser irradiations in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling. In addition, the thermal effects of a single continuous laser pulse and micropulse-composed laser pulse profiles were compared. Simulation results indicated that a 940 nm wavelength induces improved therapeutic outcome compared with a 585 and 595 nm wavelengths for the treatment of patients with large-sized blood vessels and moderately to heavily pigmented skin. On the other hand, a 585 nm wavelength shows the best efficacy in treating small-sized blood vessels, as characterized by the largest laser-induced blood vessel damage depth compared with 595 and 940 nm wavelengths. Dermal blood content has a considerable effect on the threshold incident dosage for epidermal damage, while the effect of blood vessel size is minimal. For the same macropulse duration and incident dosage, a micropulse-composed pulse profile results in higher peak temperature at the basal layer of skin epidermis than an ideal single continuous pulse profile.

  3. Heterogeneous response to X-ray and ultraviolet light irradiations of cultured skin fibroblasts in two families with Gardner's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Li, F.P.; Meyer, R.J.; Marchetto, D.J.; Patterson, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    A heterogeneous response to X-ray and far UV (254 nm) light irradiations was found in cultured skin fibroblast lines from 2 separate families with Gardner's syndrome. When compared to 2 normal control cultures and cultures from 2 patients with nonfamilial colon cancer, cultures from 4 clinically affected members of family 1 showed increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of both X-ray and UV light irradiations. These cells also showed a delayed pattern of X-ray potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and absent UV PLDR. In contrast, cultures from 3 members of family 2 (2 of whom were clinically affected) showed a normal response of survival and PLDR to both X-ray and UV light irradiations. Thus increased sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts to X-ray and UV light irradiations was not a consistent in vitro finding in patients with Gardner's syndrome. However, in families with Gardner's syndrome who demonstrate in vitro radiosensitivity, additional studies are needed to assess the usefulness of these techniques in detecting affected individuals prior to the development of colon carcinoma and other manifestations

  4. One of the problems of radiation protection in nuclear medicine: hand skin irradiation of the of workers in selected activities with radiopharmaceutical 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudzietzova, J.; Sabol, J.; Fueloep, M.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the evaluation of local irradiation of hand skin of the personnel of selected PET department on the basis of experimental measurements with TLD. Activities were considered during manipulation with a radiopharmaceutical 18 F-labeled radionuclide (radiopharmaceutical preparation and application). The paper also discussed the effects on the size of the local hand skin irradiation including the possibilities of reducing them. (authors)

  5. Improvement effect of gamma-irradiated complex leaf extract of date plum, persimmon and mulberry on UVB-induced skin damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Won; Cho, Byoung Ok; Che, Denis Nchang; Shin, Jae Young; Fang, Chong Zhou; Jang, Seon Il [Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the improvement effect of gamma-irradiated complex leaf extract of Date Plum, Persimmon and Mulberry (γ-DPME) on UVB induced skin damage. The samples were gamma irradiated at doses of 10 kGy. γ-DPME treatment tended to decrease UVB-induced immune cell infiltration and erthyderma index than the groups treated with non-gamma-irradiated DPME (n-DPME) and L-ascobic acid (AA). In addition, γ-DPME treatment significantly decreased skin thickness, melanin index and mast cell infiltration in UVB-irradiated skin. Moreover, γ-DPME treatment significantly decreased the compound 48/80-induced scratching behavior and immune cell infiltration than n-DPME group. These results show that gamma irradiation can be used to increase the physiological activities of DPME.

  6. Pigmented guinea pig skin irradiated with Q-switched ruby laser pulses. Morphologic and histologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, J.S.; Margolis, R.J.; Polla, L.L.; Watanabe, S.; Hruza, G.J.; Parrish, J.A.; Anderson, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Q-switched ruby laser pulses cause selective damage to cutaneous pigmented cells. Repair of this selective damage has not been well described. Therefore, using epilated pigmented and albino guinea pig skin, we studied the acute injury and tissue repair caused by 40-ns, Q-switched ruby laser pulses. Gross observation and light and electron microscopy were performed. No specific changes were evident in the albino guinea pigs. In pigmented animals, with radiant exposures of 0.4 J/cm2 or greater, white spots confined to the 2.5-mm exposure sites developed immediately and faded over 20 minutes. Delayed depigmentation occurred at seven to ten days, followed by full repigmentation by four to eight weeks. Regrowing hairs in sites irradiated at and above 0.4 J/cm2 remained white for at least four months. Histologically, vacuolation of pigment-laden cells was seen immediately in the epidermis and the follicular epithelium at exposures of 0.3 J/cm2 and greater. Melanosomal disruption was seen immediately by electron microscopy at and above 0.3 J/cm2. Over the next seven days, epidermal necrosis was followed by regeneration of a depigmented epidermis. By four months, melanosomes and melanin pigmentation had returned; however, hair follicles remained depigmented and devoid of melanocytes. This study demonstrates that selective melanosomal disruption caused by Q-switched ruby laser pulses leads to transient cutaneous depigmentation and persistent follicular depigmentation. Potential exists for selective treatment of pigmented epidermal and dermal lesions with this modality.

  7. DNA-repair after UV-irradiation in skin fibroblasts from patients with actinic keratosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbano, E.; Andreassi, L.; Fimiani, M.; Valentino, A.; Baiocchi, R.

    1978-01-01

    Autoradiographic counting technique was utilized to measure the ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis of skin fibroblasts from 12 patients with chronic actinic keratosis and from 12 healthy donors of about the same age. In order to reveal a possible regional difference of DNA repair between the parts of the body ordinarily exposed and those parts unexposed to sunlight, two cell strains were used for each examined subject; one developed from the forehead skin and the other from the abdominal or axillary skin. Unscheduled DNA synthesis appeared depressed in actinic keratosis patients, as compared with controls. In all examined subjects, however, cell strains from exposed skin showed a DNA repair more active than cell strains from unexposed skin. These findings show that skin cancer may be promoted in actinic keratosis patients by a defect of DNA repair. The exalted DNA repair of chronically sun exposed skin is probably the consequence of a defensive process caused by enzymatic induction. (orig.) [de

  8. Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant disease involving the skin represents a significant work load to the general radiotherapist and can involve interesting diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Primary skin cancer is also relatively common and there is a need to provide an efficient service in which the first treatment is successful in the majority of patients. The reward for careful attention to technique is very considerable both in terms of clinical cancer control and functional results. Squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and intra-epidermal carcinoma constitute the majority of the lesions dealt with clinically, but metastatic disease, lymphomas, and malignant melanomas are also referred regularly for opinions and may require radiotherapy. The general principle of the techniques of assessment and radiotherapeutic management to be described are equally applicable to any malignant skin tumour once the decision has been made to accept it for radiotherapy. Dosage and fractionation may have to be adjusted to allow for the nature of the disease process and the intent of the treatment

  9. Effects of a turmeric extract (Curcuma longa) on chronic ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin damage in melanin-possessing hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2009-12-01

    Turmeric (the rhizomes of Curcuma longa L., Zingiberacease) is widely used as a dietary pigment and spice, and has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation, skin wounds and hepatic disorders in Ayurvedic, Unani and Chinese medicine. Although the topical application or oral administration of turmeric is used to improve skin trouble, there is no evidence to support this effect. The aim of this study was to clarify whether turmeric prevents chronic ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated skin damage. We examined the effects of a turmeric extract on skin damage including changes in skin thickness and elasticity, pigmentation and wrinkling caused by long-term, low-dose ultraviolet B irradiation in melanin-possessing hairless mice. The extract (at 300 or 1000 mg/kg, twice daily) prevented an increase in skin thickness and a reduction in skin elasticity induced by chronic UVB exposure. It also prevented the formation of wrinkles and melanin (at 1000 mg/kg, twice daily) as well as increases in the diameter and length of skin blood vessels and in the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Prevention of UVB-induced skin aging by turmeric may be due to the inhibition of increases in MMP-2 expression caused by chronic irradiation.

  10. Skin changes in `screen dermatitis` versus classical UV- and ionizing irradiation-related damage - similarities and differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi, S.; Johansson, O. [Karolinska Inst., Dept. of Neuroscience, Experimental Dermatology Unit, stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    An increasing number of persons say that they get cutaneous problems as well as symptoms from certain internal organs, such as the central nervous system (CNS) and the heart, when being close to electric equipment. A major group of these patients are the users of video display terminals (VDTs), who claim to have subjective and objective skin- and mucosa-related symptoms, such as pain, itch, heat sensation, ery-therma, papules, and pustules. The CNS symptoms are, e.g. dizziness, tiredness, and headache. Erythema, itch, heat sensation, edema and pain are also common symptoms of sunburn (UV dermatitis). Alterations have been observed in cell populations of the skin of patients suffering from so-called `screen dermatitis` similar to those observed in the skin damaged due to ultraviolet (UV) light or ionizing radiation. In `screen dermatitis` patients a much higher number of mast cells have been observed. It is known that UVE irradiation induces mast cell degranulation and release of TNF-{alpha}. The high number of mast cells present in the `screen dermatitis` patients and the possible release of specific substances, such as histamine, may explain their clinical symptoms of itch, pain, edema and erythema. The most remarkable change among cutaneous cells, after exposure with the above-mentioned irradiation sources, is the disappearance of the Langerhans` cells. This change has also been observed in `screen dermatitis` patients, again pointing to a common cellular and molecular basis. The results of this literature study demonstrate that highly similar changes exist in the skin of `screen dermatitis` patients, as regard the clinical manifestations as well as alterations in the cell populations, and in skin damaged by UV light or ionizing radiation. (au) 93 refs.

  11. Skin changes in 'screen dermatitis' versus classical UV- and ionizing irradiation-related damage - similarities and differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi, S.; Johansson, O.

    1997-01-01

    An increasing number of persons say that they get cutaneous problems as well as symptoms from certain internal organs, such as the central nervous system (CNS) and the heart, when being close to electric equipment. A major group of these patients are the users of video display terminals (VDTs), who claim to have subjective and objective skin- and mucosa-related symptoms, such as pain, itch, heat sensation, ery-therma, papules, and pustules. The CNS symptoms are, e.g. dizziness, tiredness, and headache. Erythema, itch, heat sensation, edema and pain are also common symptoms of sunburn (UV dermatitis). Alterations have been observed in cell populations of the skin of patients suffering from so-called 'screen dermatitis' similar to those observed in the skin damaged due to ultraviolet (UV) light or ionizing radiation. In 'screen dermatitis' patients a much higher number of mast cells have been observed. It is known that UVE irradiation induces mast cell degranulation and release of TNF-α. The high number of mast cells present in the 'screen dermatitis' patients and the possible release of specific substances, such as histamine, may explain their clinical symptoms of itch, pain, edema and erythema. The most remarkable change among cutaneous cells, after exposure with the above-mentioned irradiation sources, is the disappearance of the Langerhans' cells. This change has also been observed in 'screen dermatitis' patients, again pointing to a common cellular and molecular basis. The results of this literature study demonstrate that highly similar changes exist in the skin of 'screen dermatitis' patients, as regard the clinical manifestations as well as alterations in the cell populations, and in skin damaged by UV light or ionizing radiation. (au)

  12. EPR detection of free radicals in UV-irradiated skin: mouse versus human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, B.A.; Buettner, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation produces free radicals in Skh-1 mouse skin, contributing to photoaging and carcinogenesis. If a mouse model is a general indicator of free radical processes in human skin photobiology, then radical production observed in mouse and human skin should be directly comparative. In this work we show that UV radiation (λ > 300 nm, 14 μW/cm 2 UVB; 3.5 mW/cm 2 UVA) increases the ascorbate free radical (Asc) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal in both Skh-1 mouse skin (45%) and human facial skin biopsies (340%). Visible light (λ > 400 nm; 0.23 mW/cm 2 UVA) also increased the Ascsignal in human skin samples (45%) but did not increase baseline mouse Asc, indicating that human skin is more susceptible to free radical formation and that a chromophore for visible light may be present. Using EPR spin-trapping techniques, UV radiation produced spin adducts consistent with trapping lipid alkyl radicals in mouse skin (α-[4-pyridyl 1-oxide]-N-tert-butyl nitrone/alkyl radical adduct; a N = 15.56 G and a H 2.70 G) and lipid alkoxyl radicals in human skin (5,5-dimethylpyrroline -1-oxide/alkoxyl radical adduct; a N = 14.54 G and a H = 16.0 G). Topical application of the iron chelator Desferal to human skin significantly decreases these radicals (∼50%), indicating a role for iron in lipid peroxidation. (Author)

  13. Herpes virus production as a marker of repair in ultra-violet irradiated human skin cells of different origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J; Nocentini, S; Menezes, S [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie; Moreno, G

    1979-07-01

    Human skin fibroblast cultures were irradiated with ultraviolet light 0 to 48 hours before infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV). Different viral yields were obtained according to the origin of the host cells. Cells from normal donors showed a dose-dependent recovery of HSV production during the 36-40 hours following U.V. exposure. The recovery was maximal for a dose at which a plateau level of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was reached (24Jm/sup -2/). In a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) heterozygote line from a mother of XP children, the level of UDS after irradiation up to 48 Jm/sup -2/ was normal whereas the extent of recovery of HSV production capacity was lower than normal. In strains from XP children, with a normal UDS (XP variants), the recovery process was slower and its extent was lower than in normal or XP heterozygote cells. Excision-deficient XP strains from XP children presented little or no recovery, the extent of which was in good agreement with the corresponding level of UDS. Measurement of this recovery seems to be a very sensitive assay for detecting differences in the repair abilities of U.V.-irradiated human skin cells of various origins.

  14. Photoprotective Properties of Isothiocyanate and Nitrile Glucosinolate Derivatives From Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba Against UVB Irradiation in Human Skin Equivalent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan L. Carpenter

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB irradiation of the skin leads to numerous dermatological concerns including skin cancer and accelerated aging. Natural product glucosinolate derivatives, like sulforaphane, have been shown to exhibit chemopreventive and photoprotective properties. In this study, we examined meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba glucosinolate derivatives, 3-methoxybenzyl isothiocyanate (MBITC and 3-methoxyphenyl acetonitrile (MPACN, for their activity in protecting against the consequences of UV exposure. To that end, we have exposed human primary epidermal keratinocytes (HPEKs and 3D human skin reconstructed in vitro (EpiDermTM FT-400 to UVB insult and investigated whether MBITC and MPACN treatment ameliorated the harmful effects of UVB damage. Activity was determined by the compounds’ efficacy in counteracting UVB-induced DNA damage, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP expression, and proliferation. We found that in monolayer cultures of HPEK, MBITC and MPACN did not protect against a UVB-induced loss in proliferation and MBITC itself inhibited cell proliferation. However, in human reconstructed skin-equivalents, MBITC and MPACN decrease epidermal cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs and significantly reduce total phosphorylated γH2A.X levels. Both MBITC and MPACN inhibit UVB-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression indicating their role to prevent photoaging. Both compounds, and MPACN in particular, showed activity against UVB-induced proliferation as indicated by fewer epidermal PCNA+ cells and prevented UVB-induced hyperplasia as determined by a reduction in reconstructed skin epidermal thickness (ET. These data demonstrate that MBITC and MPACN exhibit promising anti-photocarcinogenic and anti-photoaging properties in the skin microenvironment and could be used for therapeutic interventions.

  15. Swine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plain, Ronald L; Lawrence, John D

    2003-07-01

    The US swine industry is large and growing. The quantity of pork desired by consumers of US pork is growing at the rate of 1.5%/y. New production systems and new technology have enabled production per sow to grow at a rate of 4% annually in recent years. Consequently, the number of sows in the United States is declining. Because productivity growth is outpacing demand growth, the deflated price of hogs and pork is declining. Hog production and prices continue to exhibit strong seasonal and cyclic patterns. Pork production is usually lowest in the summer and highest in the fall. Production and prices tend to follow 4-year patterns. The US swine industry continues to evolve toward fewer and larger producers who rely on contracts for both hog production and marketing. In 2000, over half of the hogs marketed were from approximately 156 firms marketing more than 50,000 head annually. These producers finished 60% of their production in contract facilities. Over 90% of their marketings were under contract or were owned by a packer. These producers expressed a high level of satisfaction with hog production. Both they and their contract growers were satisfied with production contracts. These large producers were satisfied with their marketing contracts and planned to continue them in the future. The hog industry has changed a great deal in the last decade. There is little reason to believe this rapid rate of change will not continue. This swine industry is highly competitive and profit driven. Profit margins are too small to allow producers the luxury of ignoring new technology and innovative production systems. Consequently, hog production will continue its rapid evolution from traditional agriculture to typical industry.

  16. Early changes in blood flow of the mouse skin after irradiation as measured by the 133Xe clearance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Irie, Goro

    1983-01-01

    The early effects of radiation on the local blood flow in the skin of mice were evaluated by measuring the local clearance rate of 133 Xe after its subcutaneous injection; this was done at four to five weeks after irradiation during the animals' normal resting conditions. The fractionation schedules employed were single fractions, two fractions in 15 days and four fractions in 15 days. The dose effect curves with these schedules showed a two-component pattern. There was a uniform reduction in flood flow after 10 to 30 Gy, and a steady increase in flood flow after doses more than 40 Gy. The blood flow after higher-fractionated doses was always lower than less-fractionated doses. It was considered that radiation doses causing higher severity of acute skin reactions might have predominated a degree of acute vasodilatation over fibrotic changes, thus resulting in increased blood flow. A steady increase in early blood flow was observed with increasing severity of acute skin reactions, but the early blood flow was not a good indicator for predicting late skin reactions, except for a severe leg deformity which was accompanied with a significant increase in early blood flow. (author)

  17. Use of primary cell cultures to measure the late effects in the skins of rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.; Lett, J. T.

    Previous pilot investigations of the uses of primary cell cultures to study late damage in stem cells of the skin of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit and the rhesus monkey /1-3/, have been extended to individual monkeys exposed to 55 MeV protons. Protons of this energy have a larger range in tissue of (~2.6 cm) than the 32 MeV protons (~0.9 cm) to which the animals in our earlier studies had been exposed. Although the primary emphases in the current studies were improvement and simplification in the techniques and logistics of transportation of biopsies to a central analytical facility, comparison of the quantitative measurements obtained thus far for survival of stem cells in the skins from animals irradiated 21 years ago reveals that the effects of both proton energies are similar.

  18. Inhibition of ultraviolet irradiation response of human skin by topical phlogostatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirich, E.G.; Lutz, U.C.

    1977-01-01

    By adaption of the model of UV dermatitis in human skin a test procedure has been developed which facilitates realistic assessment of topical contra-inflammatory activity of steroidal as well as non-steroidal compounds. Sixt typical skin drug agents were tested according to their reaction inhibition effect. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Characteristics of histocompatibility barriers in congenis strains of mice. III. Passive enhancement of skin allografts in x-irradiated hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, J.L.; Kaliss, N.; Hildemann, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    Passive immunological enhancement of skin allografts was investigated in three donor-host combinations of congenic mice disparate at non-H-2 loci. Serum against the graft donor was derived from mice that had received donor strain lymphoid cells as neonates, and thereby were rendered specifically tolerant of a skin allograft. We refer to this serum as ''allograft-tolerant'' serum. Each strain combination was chosen to provide only two non-H-2 histoincompatibilities present in the donor and absent in the host. The differences are categorized as immunogenetically strong, moderate, or weak, on the basis of skin allograft survival times. With passively administered allograft-tolerant serum, significantly prolonged graft survivals were noted for the weakest combination only. Combined treatment with sublethal x-irradiation and allograft-tolerant serum significantly prolonged graft survival in both the moderate and weak combinations, with the largest effect present in the weakest disparity. A hyperimmune alloantiserum (produced in adults) directed against the graft donor prolonged allograft survival in the strongest disparity when given in combination with irradiation. In this combination, graft survival time was increased in hosts exposed to x-ray alone, but joint treatment with x-ray and the alloantiserum gave the largest increment. In contrast, combined treatment with the serum and an antithymocyte alloantiserum did not affect graft survival times. Treatment with both radiation and antithymocyte serum did not prolong graft survival beyond that in mice given only x-radiation. Immunological enhancement with central inhibition is assumed as the mechanism underlying prolonged graft survival, and it is suggested that a population of thymus-derived killer cells, sensitive to x-irradiation, is required for normal graft rejection. (U.S.)

  20. Evaluation of the role of laser bio stimulation on skin and liver of gamma-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is used in different medical fields due to its therapeutic effects on reparative processes, pain relief and bio stimulation (Castro-e-silva et al., 2003). The present study aimed at evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of He-Ne laser in stimulating the reparative processes after whole body irradiation of mice using a sublethal dose (5 Gy) of gamma rays. Two vital organs were studied, a radio-sensitive one (the skin) as well as a relatively radio-resistant one (the liver) . During the course of the present work, some biochemical parameters as well as histopathological changes in the skin and liver tissues induced by whole body gamma ionizing radiation were studied. Female mice (240) were used and divided into 6 groups and laser therapy was carried out using a computerized scanner emitting He-Ne(C W) with a wavelength of 632.8 nm and the fluence was 5 j/cm 2 . Experimental investigation have been carried out along two main lines: Biochemical investigations for the assessment of serum transferases and histopathological assessment of liver and skin biopsy.On the basis of the current results it could be concluded that mice exposed to whole body gamma irradiation either by the US of the shot or the fractionated sublethal dose suffered an aggravated histopathological changes in the skin and liver tissues which were associated with certain biochemical disturbances of the liver function testes. These undesirable alterations were ameliorated by the early treatment of mice by He -Ne laser immediately post exposure before being irreversibly damaged

  1. Determining and optimizing effective factors in laser irradiation on skin tensional strength using a hybrid DOE and DEA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashiri, M.; Dehghan, E.; Mottaghian, F.; Amjadi, A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the characteristic of a suitable irradiation on skin's tensional strength using design of experiments. The experiments in this research are designed in two phases and data envelopment analysis is used for performance measurement of each phase. Material and Methods: Samples were provided from pleura as surface tissue made of collagen and elastin fibers. In each experiment, the sample was stretched before and after irradiation. Variation of the sample length was measured. Then force-length data were plotted and the slope of the fitted line was calculated. Variation in these slopes was used as a criterion to determine tissue strength variation after laser irradiation. Furthermore, the output oriented data envelopment analysis model by variable return to scale was used to examine performance of the designed experiments for each phase. Results: Results of the first phase experiments showed that the main effect of time duration was significant; but this was not the case for beam radius. Regarding polarization, only its interaction effect with time duration was significant. Results of the second phase indicated that laser irradiation with parallel polarization for 10 seconds caused a greater increase in tensional strength. Resultant efficiencies of applying data envelopment analysis showed that the first phase experiments were more efficient. Discussion and Conclusions: This research has combined data envelopment analysis and design of experiments to investigate the effects of laser on skin elasticity. Comparing the results of the two phases indicates that it is more efficient to use the experimental design of phase 1 in our experiment. So for similar future studies, we suggest using more levels for experiments of phase 1 instead of doing the experimental design in two phases.

  2. Determining and Optimizing Effective Factors in Laser Irradiation on Skin Tensional Strength using a Hybrid DOE and DEA Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bashiri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We investigated the characteristic of a suitable irradiation on skin's tensional strength using design of experiments (DOE. The experiments in this research are designed in two phases and data envelopment analysis (DEA is used for performance measurement of each phase. Material and Methods: Samples were provided from pleura as surface tissue made of collagen and elastin fibers. In each experiment, the sample was stretched before and after irradiation. Variation of the sample length was measured. Then force-length data were plotted and the slope of the fitted line was calculated. Variation in these slopes was used as a criterion to determine tissue strength variation after laser irradiation. Furthermore, the output oriented DEA model by variable return to scale was used to examine performance of the designed experiments for each phase. Results: Results of the first phase experiments showed that the main effect of time duration was significant; but this was not the case for beam radius. Regarding polarization, only its interaction effect with time duration was significant. Results of the second phase indicated that laser irradiation with parallel polarization for 10 seconds caused a greater increase in tensional strength. Resultant efficiencies of applying DEA showed that the first phase experiments were more efficient. Discussion and Conclusions: This research has combined DEA and DOE to investigate the effects of laser on skin elasticity. Comparing the results of the two phases indicates that it is more efficient to use the experimental design of phase 1 in our experiment. So for similar future studies, we suggest using more levels for experiments of phase 1 instead of doing the experimental design in two phases.

  3. Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimer formation and induction of ornithine decarboxylase in human skin fibroblasts after UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggli, H.J.; Roethlisberger, R.

    1988-01-01

    Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimers as well as the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) may serve as biochemical markers of the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet light (UV). For this reason, it is important to compare the formation of pyrimidine dimers with the induction of ODC in human skin fibroblasts after irradiation with UVC (200-290 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm). In our studies we determined cytosine-thymine (C-T) as well as thymine-thymine dimer yields (T-T) by high-pressure liquid chromatography in cultures of neonatal normal human foreskin-derived fibroblasts after irradiation with UVC and UVB light. It was found that the yield of dimerization and the ratio of T-T/C-T decreased from the UVC to the UVB region. Time-course studies of ODC-induction in the same cells indicated that the maximal activity after UVB irradiation was retarded compared to UVC exposure. For the UV-induced ODC-levels, however, no significant difference in maximal induction could be measured after UVC and UVB irradiation at fluences where comparable yields of thymine dimerization are produced. Similar ODC-maxima were obtained with strains from children, while cells from adults showed significantly less pronounced ODC induction, indicating that ODC-response decreases with age and may therefore be used as a marker of aging

  4. A biosafety evaluation of synchrotron radiation X-ray to skin and bone marrow: single dose irradiation study of rats and macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yifan; Tang, Guanghui; Lin, Hui; Lin, Xiaojie; Jiang, Lu; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Wang, Yongting

    2017-06-01

    Very limited experimental data is available regarding the safe dosages related to synchrotron radiation (SR) procedures. We used young rats and macaques to address bone marrow and skin tolerance to various doses of synchrotron radiation. Rats were subjected to 0, 0.5, 2.5, 5, 25 or 100 Gy local SR X-ray irradiation at left hind limb. Rat blood samples were analyzed at 2-90 days after irradiation. The SR X-ray irradiated skin and tibia were sectioned for morphological examination. For non-human primate study, three male macaques were subjected to 0.5 or 2.5 Gy SR X-ray on crus. Skin responses of macaques were observed. All rats that received SR X-ray irradiation doses greater than 2.5 Gy experienced hair loss and bone-growth inhibition, which were accompanied by decreased number of follicles, thickened epidermal layer, and decreased density of bone marrow cells (p X-ray but showed significant hair loss when the dose was raised above 2.5 Gy. The safety threshold doses of SR X-ray for rat skin, bone marrow and macaque skin are between 0.5 and 2.5 Gy. Our study provided essential information regarding the biosafety of SR X-ray irradiation.

  5. Skin-safe photothermal therapy enabled by responsive release of acid-activated membrane-disruptive polymer from polydopamine nanoparticle upon very low laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Gao, Feng; Piao, Ji-Gang; Yang, Lihua

    2017-07-25

    How to ablate tumor without damaging skin is a challenge for photothermal therapy. We, herein, report skin-safe photothermal cancer therapy provided by the responsive release of acid-activated hemolytic polymer (aHLP) from the photothermal polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticle upon irradiation at very low dosage. Upon skin-permissible irradiation (via an 850 nm laser irradiation at the power density of 0.4 W cm -2 ), the nanoparticle aHLP-PDA generates sufficient localized-heat to bring about mild hyperthermia treatment and consequently, responsively sheds off the aHLP polymer from its PDA nanocore; this leads to selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells under the acidic conditions of the extracellular microenvironment of tumor. As a result, our aHLP-PDA nanoparticle upon irradiation at a low dosage effectively inhibits tumor growth without damaging skin, as demonstrated using animal models. Effective in mitigating the otherwise inevitable skin damage in tumor photothermal therapy, the nanosystem reported herein offers an efficient pathway towards skin-safe photothermal therapy.

  6. Bacteriological investigations of the irradiation of fresh fish using a new classification scheme for bacteria of the fish skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnop, G.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations were made on the effect of irradiation with 36, 72, 108 and 144 kr, carried out once and twice, on the bacterial flora of the skin of red fish on the day of catching and after 9, 16 and 23 days of storage in ice. With an initial total count of the fish of 13,700 bacteria/cm 2 of skin surface irradiation with 36 kr (108 kr) on the day of catching caused a reduction of the total count to 11% (1.3%) of the nonirradiated fish on the 9th day of storage. Nearly all differences disappeared by the 16th day. A second irradiation with 36 kr and 108 kr on the 9th day reduced the bacterial count on a large scale by which on the 16th day the total count of these fishes was lower than that of the nonirradiated fish on the 9th day. Later on the differentiation disappeared quickly but there were small differences unlike the nonirradiated fish on the 23rd day. The rapid equalization during the last storage period is possibly only typical of the storage in boxes. A scheme for the characterization of types of spoilage bacteria recently established and based on the bacterial attack on leucine, β-alanine, creatine, creatinine and cystine yielded the following results: The different Pseudomonas types were reduced much more than Achromobacter types. The irradiation effect does not only consist in a reduction of the general total count of bacteria but also in the selective destruction of the most active spoilage bacteria with a very extensive enzymatic pattern which concerns many organic nitrogen compounds in the tissue of fish. By means of a sub-group of Pseudomonas and several maturity stages of the bacterial populations a 7 days delay of the bacterial evolution, caused by the second irradiation with 36 kr, could be observed. The useful effect of irradiation carried out twice with doses about 50 kr was discussed and estimated at a 10-12 days delay of the bacterial spoilage. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Bacteriological investigations of the irradiation of fresh fish using a new classification scheme for bacteria of the fish skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnop, G [Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Fischerei, Hamburg (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemie und Technologie

    1975-04-01

    Investigations were made on the effect of irradiation with 36, 72, 108 and 144 kr, carried out once and twice, on the bacterial flora of the skin of red fish on the day of catching and after 9, 16 and 23 days of storage in ice. With an initial total count of the fish of 13,700 bacteria/cm/sup 2/ of skin surface irradiation with 36 kr (108 kr) on the day of catching caused a reduction of the total count to 11% (1.3%) of the nonirradiated fish on the 9th day of storage. Nearly all differences disappeared by the 16th day. A second irradiation with 36 kr and 108 kr on the 9th day reduced the bacterial count on a large scale by which on the 16th day the total count of these fishes was lower than that of the nonirradiated fish on the 9th day. Later on the differentiation disappeared quickly but there were small differences unlike the nonirradiated fish on the 23rd day. The rapid equalization during the last storage period is possibly only typical of the storage in boxes. A scheme for the characterization of types of spoilage bacteria recently established and based on the bacterial attack on leucine, ..beta..-alanine, creatine, creatinine and cystine yielded the following results: The different Pseudomonas types were reduced much more than Achromobacter types. The irradiation effect does not only consist in a reduction of the general total count of bacteria but also in the selective destruction of the most active spoilage bacteria with a very extensive enzymatic pattern which concerns many organic nitrogen compounds in the tissue of fish. By means of a sub-group of Pseudomonas and several maturity stages of the bacterial populations a 7 days delay of the bacterial evolution, caused by the second irradiation with 36 kr, could be observed. The useful effect of irradiation carried out twice with doses about 50 kr was discussed and estimated at a 10 to 12 days delay of the bacterial spoilage.

  8. Radiation fibrosis of guinea pig skin after. beta. irradiation and an attempt at its suppression with proline analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohuchi, K.; Chang, L.F.; Tabachnick, J.

    1979-08-01

    The skins of adult, male albino guinea pigs were irradiated with a dose of 3500-rad ..beta.. rays from a /sup 90/Sr-/sup 90/Y sealed source on 25 x 25-mm flank areas. Abnormal collagen deposition (fibrosis) occurred between the first and fourth months as evidenced by the replacement of the normal thick random whorls of collagen fibers by embryonic-like thin fibers parallel to the hyperplastic epidermis. These histologic changes were confined primarily to about 0.4 mm of upper dermis. By the fourth month and up to 2.5 years postirradiation, there was a decreased content of acid-soluble and -insoluble collagen in the irradiated upper dermis concomitant with an increase in noncollageneous protein. With the exception of occluded arterioles in the lower dermis, there were no obvious chemical or histological changes in collagen of remaining dermis. Injection for 4 months or longer of the proline analogs, DL-3,4-dehydroproline, L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, or cis-4-hydroxy-L-proline significantly decreased the small amount of metabolically active soluble collagen but had no effect on the content of insoluble fibrous collagen nor the abnormal deposition of collagen fibers in the upper dermis. The data indicate that the proline analogs are of little or no value in suppressing radiation fibrosis in skin.

  9. Radiation fibrosis of guinea pig skin after β irradiation and an attempt at its suppression with proline analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchi, K.; Chang, L.F.; Tabachnick, J.

    1979-01-01

    The skins of adult, male albino guinea pigs were irradiated with a dose of 3500-rad β rays from a 90 Sr- 90 Y sealed source on 25 x 25-mm flank areas. Abnormal collagen deposition (fibrosis) occurred between the first and fourth months as evidenced by the replacement of the normal thick random whorls of collagen fibers by embryonic-like thin fibers parallel to the hyperplastic epidermis. These histologic changes were confined primarily to about 0.4 mm of upper dermis. By the fourth month and up to 2.5 years postirradiation, there was a decreased content of acid-soluble and -insoluble collagen in the irradiated upper dermis concomitant with an increase in noncollageneous protein. With the exception of occluded arterioles in the lower dermis, there were no obvious chemical or histological changes in collagen of remaining dermis. Injection for 4 months or longer of the proline analogs, DL-3,4-dehydroproline, L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, or cis-4-hydroxy-L-proline significantly decreased the small amount of metabolically active soluble collagen but had no effect on the content of insoluble fibrous collagen nor the abnormal deposition of collagen fibers in the upper dermis. The data indicate that the proline analogs are of little or no value in suppressing radiation fibrosis in skin

  10. Immunoglobulins and complement in the skin of Rhesus monkeys immunized with X-irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li-Hsue, S.Y.; Hsue, H.F.; Hanson, H.O.

    1981-01-01

    Skin sections of Rhesus monkeys immunized with X-irradiated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae were stained by an unlabeled antibody enzyme method for the detection of IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE, and C3. While all of them could be found in the skin lesions, their distribution patterns varied with time and reactions. In whealing reaginic reactions, IgE appeared prominent, having an affinity to the mast cells. In Arthus-like reactions, IgG was predominant. IgG complexes were found on the schistosomula, on the walls of blood vessels, and in granulocytes near the schistosomula. In the late stage of Arthus-like reactions and in delayed hypersensitive reactions, IgA was predominant in granulocytes, mononuclear cells, and macrophages. Characteristics of each immunoglobulin pattern seemed to reflect its function in the effector mechanism. It may be speculated that these immunoglobulins and C3, together with effector cells, synergistically and sequentially destroy schistosomula in the skin.

  11. Immunoglobulins and complement in the skin of Rhesus monkeys immunized with X-irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Hsue, S.Y.; Hsue, H.F.; Hanson, H.O.

    1981-01-01

    Skin sections of Rhesus monkeys immunized with X-irradiated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae were stained by an unlabeled antibody enzyme method for the detection of IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE, and C3. While all of them could be found in the skin lesions, their distribution patterns varied with time and reactions. In whealing reaginic reactions, IgE appeared prominent, having an affinity to the mast cells. In Arthus-like reactions, IgG was predominant. IgG complexes were found on the schistosomula, on the walls of blood vessels, and in granulocytes near the schistosomula. In the late stage of Arthus-like reactions and in delayed hypersensitive reactions, IgA was predominant in granulocytes, mononuclear cells, and macrophages. Characteristics of each immunoglobulin pattern seemed to reflect its function in the effector mechanism. It may be speculated that these immunoglobulins and C3, together with effector cells, synergistically and sequentially destroy schistosomula in the skin. (orig.)

  12. Chimaerism in lymph nodes of F1 into irradiated parental recipient chimaeras rejecting skin allografts from the other parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, L.; Silobrcic, V.; Kastelan, A.

    1978-01-01

    Mice of the C57BL strain were irradiated with 800 R over the whole body. The next day they received i.v. a mixture of 50 x 10 6 spleen and bone marrow cells from (C57BL x CBA-T6T6)F 1 hybrid mice, and were challenged with CBA-T6T6 skin grafts later on. About 20% of the recipients rejected the CBA-T6T6 skin, whereas the others were completely tolerant for more than 200 days. By using the cytotoxic test, we found that both tolerant and nontolerant recipients were complete chimaeras, i.e., had only (C57BL x CBA-T6T6)F 1 cells in their lymph nodes. However, analysis of the same mice by the chromosome marker technique disclosed a proportion of host (C57BL) cells in lymph nodes of both tolerant and nontolerant chimaeras. The percentage of host metaphases in nontolerant chimaeras was significantly higher than that in tolerant chimaeras (P 1 cells reacting against skin-specific transplantation antigen(s) of the parental graft

  13. Q-switched ruby laser irradiation of normal human skin. Histologic and ultrastructural findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruza, G J; Dover, J S; Flotte, T J; Goetschkes, M; Watanabe, S; Anderson, R R

    1991-12-01

    The Q-switched ruby laser is used for treatment of tatoos. The effects of Q-switched ruby laser pulses on sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, as well as senile lentigines, were investigated with clinical observation, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A pinpricklike sensation occurred at radiant exposures as low as 0.2 J/cm2. Immediate erythema, delayed edema, and immediate whitening occurred with increasing radiant exposure. The threshold for immediate whitening varied inversely with skin pigmentation, ranging from a mean of 1.4 J/cm2 in lentigines to 3.1 J/cm2 in sun-protected skin. Transmission electron microscopy showed immediate alteration of mature melanosomes and nuclei within keratinocytes and melanocytes, but stage I and II melanosomes were unaffected. Histologically, immediate injury was confined to the epidermis. There was minimal inflammatory response 1 day after exposure. After 1 week, subthreshold exposures induced hyperpigmentation, with epidermal hyperplasia and increased melanin staining noted histologically. At higher radiant exposures, hypopigmentation occurred with desquamation of a pigmented scale/crust. All sites returned to normal skin color and texture without scarring within 3 to 6 months. These observations suggest that the human skin response to selective photothermolysis of pigmented cells is similar to that reported in animal models, including low radiant exposure stimulation of melanogenesis and high radiant exposure lethal injury to pigmented epidermal cells.

  14. ''Blood flow measurements in the irradiated pig skin using β emitters radionuclides''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.; Lefaix, J.L.; Leplat, J.J.; Fayart, G.; Delacroix, D.; Le Thanh, P.

    1997-01-01

    Non invasive methods of study of the skin blood flow are numerous, but generally do not give any indication on the cutaneous micro-circulatory flow, except for cutaneous laser Doppler. The isotopic exploration of the skin with injected γ radionuclides, even of weak energy, doe snot allow to characterize the skin blood flow, because of the important contribution of the subcutaneous tissues. The use of β emitters energy spectrum, analyzed by different quantitative methods, are proportional to the thickness of the screen localized between the radioactive source and detector. Using simple and complex phantoms composed of tissue equivalent screens, with 32 P sources placed at different depths, it was possible to study the degradation of β spectra, simulating respectively the sub-epidermis and sub-dermis vascular levels. A modelization and an experimental study in-vivo are proposed in this work, with 32 P phosphate administered intravenously in pigs. (author)

  15. Effect of radiation on reconstitution of skin equivalent (dermal alterations); Effet de l`irradiation sur la reconstruction d`une peau equivalente (alterations dermiques)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentilhomme, E.; Bergier, J.; Richard, M.; Neveux, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Dermal equivalents have been treated by single doses of gamma irradiation of 10, 20, 30 and 50 Gray. Numerations at different times show a dose and time dependant diminution of cellular population. This diminution is histologically observed in dermal part of reconstituted skin, in association with cellular and functional alterations of fibroblast cells. Modifications of epidermal epithelia are also noted in some reconstituted skin. This model would be useful to apprehend the effect of a dermal irradiation lesion on the later epidermization. (author). 4 refs.

  16. Efficacy of elective nodal irradiation in skin squamous cell carcinoma of the face, ears, and scalp

    OpenAIRE

    Wray, Justin; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Werning, John; Mendenhall, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients at high risk for regional node metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin of the face, ear, or scalp, radiotherapy to the regional nodes is an alternative to parotid or neck surgery. Data on the efficacy of elective nodal radiotherapy in this setting are scarce such that there is no publication specifically addressing the subject. The purpose of our study is to fill this void in the skin cancer literature. Methods This is a single-institution study of out...

  17. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-01-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N 2 on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm 2 , to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  18. In situ localization of chloroquine and immunohistological studies in UVB-irradiated skin of photosensitive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjölin-Forsberg, G.; Berne, B.; Eggelte, T. A.; Karlsson-Parra, A.

    1995-01-01

    Chloroquine can prevent photosensitivity reactions, but its mechanism of action is poorly understood. To investigate if the drug may interfere with inflammatory or immunological mechanisms of the UV-induced erythema of photosensitive patients, we studied the localization of chloroquine in the skin

  19. Preconditioning With Low-Level Laser Irradiation Enhances the Therapeutic Potential of Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells in a Mouse Model of Photoaged Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xuan; Li, Sheng-Hong; Xie, Guang-Hui; Xie, Shan; Xiao, Li-Ling; Song, Jian-Xing; Liu, Hong-Wei

    2018-02-19

    This study was conducted to explore the therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) irradiated with a low-level laser (LLL). Cultured ADSCs were treated with 650-nm GaAlAs laser irradiation at 2, 4 and 8 J cm -2 . Cell proliferation was quantified by MTT assays, cytokine secretion was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and adipogenic differentiation was examined by oil red O staining. Additionally, the expression profiles of putative ADSC surface markers were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, a mouse photoaged skin model was established by UVB irradiation. Effects of GaAlAs laser-treated ADSCs on the thicknesses of the epidermis and dermis were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The results showed that GaAlAs laser treatment of cells at a radiant exposure of 4 J cm -2 enhanced ADSC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation and increased secretion of growth factors. Furthermore, GaAlAs laser irradiation upregulated the expression of putative ADSC surface markers. In the mouse model of photoaged skin, ADSCs treated with GaAlAs laser irradiation had markedly decreased the epidermal thickness and increased the dermal thickness of photoaged mouse skin. Our data indicate that LLL irradiation is an effective biostimulator of ADSCs and might enhance the therapeutic potential of ADSCs for clinical use. © 2018 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. An evaluation of the accuracy of semi-permanent skin marks for breast cancer irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probst, H.; Dodwell, D.; Gray, J.C.; Holmes, M.

    2006-01-01

    A randomised trial was designed to investigate the accuracy of semi-permanent ink marks versus permanent tattoos for early stage breast cancer irradiation. No significant difference in random and systematic errors was identified between the two groups. On multivariate analysis no specific patient characteristic had a major influence on the systematic errors identified

  1. An evaluation of the accuracy of semi-permanent skin marks for breast cancer irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, H. [Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, Collegiate Crescent Campus, Sheffield S10 2BP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: h.probst@shu.ac.uk; Dodwell, D. [Cookridge Hospital Leeds (United Kingdom); Gray, J.C. [University of Newcastle (United Kingdom); Holmes, M. [Leeds Metropolitan University (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    A randomised trial was designed to investigate the accuracy of semi-permanent ink marks versus permanent tattoos for early stage breast cancer irradiation. No significant difference in random and systematic errors was identified between the two groups. On multivariate analysis no specific patient characteristic had a major influence on the systematic errors identified.

  2. High-fat diet exacerbates inflammation and cell survival signals in the skin of ultraviolet B-irradiated C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeran, Syed M.; Singh, Tripti; Nagy, Tim R.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation induced by chronic exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases. We formulated the hypothesis that a high-fat diet may influence the UV-induced inflammatory responses in the skin. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet or control diet and exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm 2 ) three times/week for 10 weeks. The mice were then sacrificed and skin and plasma samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. We found that the levels of inflammatory biomarkers were increased in the UVB-exposed skin of the mice fed the high-fat diet than the UVB-exposed skin of the mice fed the control diet. The levels of inflammatory biomarkers of early responses to UVB exposure (e.g., myeloperoxidase, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin-E 2 ), proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser 473 ) were higher in high-fat-diet-fed mouse skin than control-diet-fed mouse skin. The plasma levels of insulin growth factor-1 were greater in the UVB-irradiated mice fed the high-fat diet than the UVB-irradiated mice fed the control diet, whereas the levels of plasma adiponectin were significantly lower. This pronounced exacerbation of the UVB-induced inflammatory responses in the skin of mice fed a high-fat diet suggests that high-fat diet may increase susceptibility to inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  3. Abnormal sensitivity of diploid skin fibroblasts from a family with Gardner's syndrome to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts isolated from two members of the same family with the cancer-prone disease Gardner's Syndrome (intestinal polyposis, colon cancer, bone and soft tissue tumors) showed enhanced sensitivity to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C. These cells showed no liquid-holding type recovery following UV-irradiation of confluent cultures, but were normal in their capacity for UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. UV survival was not influenced by post-irradiation incubation with caffeine. (orig.)

  4. Light absorption in blood during low-intensity laser irradiation of skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2010-01-01

    An analytical procedure is proposed for describing optical fields in biological tissues inhomogeneous in the depth direction, such as human skin, with allowance for multiple scattering. The procedure is used to investigate the depth distribution of the optical power density in homogeneous and multilayer dermis when the skin is exposed to a laser beam. We calculate the absorbed laser power spectra for oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin at different depths in relation to the absorption selectivity of these haemoglobin derivatives and the spectral dependence of the optical power density and demonstrate that the spectra vary considerably with depth. A simple exponential approximation is proposed for the depth distribution of the power density in the epidermis and dermis. (laser methods in medicine)

  5. Organelle-specific injury to melanin-containing cells in human skin by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.F.; Shepard, R.S.; Paul, B.S.; Menkes, A.; Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1983-12-01

    Physical models predict that ultraviolet laser radiation of appropriately brief pulses can selectively alter melanin-containing cellular targets in human skin. Skin of normal human volunteers was exposed to brief (20 nanosecond) 351-nm wave length pulses from a XeF excimer laser, predicting that those cells containing the greatest quantities of melanized melanosomes (lower half of the epidermis) would be selectively damaged. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the earliest cellular alteration to be immediate disruption of melanosomes, both within melanocytes and basal keratinocytes. This disruption was dose dependent and culminated in striking degenerative changes in these cells. Superficial keratinocytes and Langerhans cells were not affected. It was concluded that the XeF excimer laser is capable of organelle-specific injury to melanosomes. These findings may have important clinical implications in the treatment of both benign and malignant pigmented lesions by laser radiations of defined wave lengths and pulse durations.

  6. Expression of apoptosis-related genes in acute β-irradiated skin injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaoyu; He Hanliang; Qi Qiang; Lin Wei; Shen Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the dynamic expression of apoptosis-related genes Bcl-2, Bax and P53 in acute radiation-induced skin ulcers, and to explore the underlying mechanism involved in retarded healing of the ulcer. Methods: Fifty-four female SD rats were divided into 3 groups. The model of acute radiation-induced skin injury, in rats was replicated with 45 Gy electron accelerator β-ray to the skin as radiation group (n=24); the model of deep second degree scald in rats was established as burn group (n=24); 6 normal rats were served as normal control group. From different periods skin wounds, the expression of Bcl-2, Bax and P53 were respectively assessed by means of immunohistochemical technique and. apoptosis was observed by TUNEL assay. Results: (1) The result of the TUNEL manifested that the integral absorbance (IA) of the radiation group was much higher than that of the control group. There is statistical significance between the two groups (P<0.05). (2) 0, 1, 2, 3 weeks after wound emerging, the Bax and P53 integral absorbance (IA) in radiation group was much higher than that of the control group. The Bcl-2 integral absorbance (IA) in bum group was much higher than that of the radiation group. There is statistical significance between the two groups (P<0.05). Conclusions: It was shown that apoptosis of β radiation manifested three typical characteristics, namely early occurrence, high frequency and delayed disappearance after radiation, which might explain the delayed wound healing caused by β radiation. (authors)

  7. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation with interstitial implants. The clinical relevance of the calculation of skin doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, O.J.; Lotter, M.; Sauer, R.; Strnad, V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe relative skin dose estimations and their impact on cosmetic outcome in interstitial multicatheter accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Patients and Methods: Between April 2001 and January 2005, 105 consecutive patients with early breast cancer were recruited in Erlangen, Germany, for this substudy of the German-Austrian APBI phase II trial. 51% (54/105) received pulsed-dose-rate (PDR), and 49% (51/105) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Prescribed reference dose for HDR brachytherapy was 32 Gy in eight fractions of 4 Gy, twice daily. Prescribed reference dose in PDR brachytherapy was 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive fractions of 0.6 Gy every hour. Total treatment time was 3-4 days. With a wire cross on the skin surface during the brachytherapy-planning procedure the minimal, mean and maximal relative skin doses (SD min% , SD max% , SD mean% ) were recorded. Endpoint of this evaluation was the cosmetic outcome in relation to the relative skin doses. Results: Median follow-up time was 38 months (range, 19-65 months). Cosmetic results for all patients were excellent in 57% (60/105), good in 36% (38/105), and fair in 7% (7/105). The SD min% (27.0% vs. 31.7%; p = 0.032), SD mean% (34.2% vs. 38.1%; p 0.008), and SD max% (38.2% vs. 46.4%; p 0.003) were significantly lower for patients with excellent cosmetic outcome compared to patients with a suboptimal outcome. SD mean% (37.6% vs. 34.2%; p = 0.026) and SD max% (45.4% vs. 38.2%; p = 0.008) were significantly higher for patients with good cosmetic outcome compared with the patients with excellent results. Conclusion: The appraisal of skin doses has been shown to be relevant to the achievement of excellent cosmetic outcome. Further investigations are necessary, especially on the basis of CT-based brachytherapy planning, to further improve the treatment results of multicatheter APBI. (orig.)

  8. A dicyanotriterpenoid induces cytoprotective enzymes and reduces multiplicity of skin tumors in UV-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Jenkins, Stephanie N.; Wehage, Scott L.; Huso, David L.; Benedict, Andrea L.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Fahey, Jed W.; Liu Hua; Liby, Karen T.; Honda, Tadashi; Gribble, Gordon W.; Sporn, Michael B.; Talalay, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Inducible phase 2 enzymes constitute a primary line of cellular defense. The oleanane dicyanotriterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-onitrile (TP-225) is a very potent inducer of these systems. Topical application of TP-225 to SKH-1 hairless mice increases the levels of NAD(P)H-quinone acceptor oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and protects against UV radiation-induced dermal thickening. Daily topical treatments of 10 nmol of TP-225 to the backs of mice that were previously subjected to low-level chronic UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm 2 /session, twice a week for 17 weeks), led to 50% reduction in multiplicity of skin tumors. In addition, the total tumor burden of squamous cell carcinomas was reduced by 5.5-fold. The identification of new agents for protection against UV radiation-induced skin cancer and understanding of their mechanism(s) of action is especially important in view of the fact that human skin cancers represent a significant source of increasing morbidity and mortality

  9. The acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation of mouse skin and the factors affecting the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, S.G.; Coggle, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Several problems regarding acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation were investigated in order to clarify protection problems of localised doses to the skin. A study into the acute biological effects of different energy beta emitters and the effects of energy and area on the response showed direct relationships between these criteria for a range of different acute responses with different time courses. Three different types of acute response were found and these are described as 'moist desquamation', 'acute ulceration' and 'acute epidermal necrosis'. An unexpected finding was that the lower energy beta emitter 170 Tm was as efficient at inducing scab formation as the higher energy 90 Sr sources for the same area of exposure. Experiments using 2x4 cm 2 exposures to 224 Cm alpha particles showed that the response to this poorly penetrating radiation was minimal after doses as high as 180 Gy measured at 10 μm into the skin. In comparison, large area exposure to 170 Tm produced areas of prolonged scabbing after doses up to 100 Gy. However, the intensity of the reaction varied between strains. (author)

  10. The action of a dietary retinoid on gene expression and cancer induction in electron-irradiated rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.; Chen, S.; Xu, G.; Wu, F.; Tang, M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Current models of radiation carcinogenesis generally assume that the DNA is damaged in a variety of ways by the radiation and that subsequent cell divisions contribute to the conversion of the damage to heritable mutations. Cancer may seem complex and intractable, but its complexity provides multiple opportunities for preventive interventions. Mitotic inhibitors are among the strongest cancer preventive agents, not only slowing the growth rate of preneoplasias but also increasing the fidelity of DNA repair processes. Ionizing radiation, including electrons, is a strong inducer of cancer in rat skin, and dietary retinoids have shown potent cancer preventive activity in the same system. A non-toxic dietary dose of retinyl acetate altered gene expression levels 24 hours after electron irradiation of rat skin. Of the 8740 genes on an Affymetrix rat expression array, the radiation significantly (5 fold or higher) altered 188, while the retinoid altered 231, including 16 radiation-altered genes that were reversely altered. While radiation strongly affected the expression of stress response, immune/inflammation and nucleic acid metabolism genes, the retinoid most strongly affected proliferation-related genes, including some significant reversals, such as, keratin 14, retinol binding protein, and calcium binding proteins. These results point to reversal of proliferation-relevant genes as a likely basis for the anti-radiogenic effects of dietary retinyl acetate. (author)

  11. Ultrastructure and Light Microscope Analysis of Intact Skin after a Varying Number of Low Level Laser Irradiations in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamie Mizusaki Iyomasa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been used to relieve pain, inflammation, and wound healing processes. Thus, the skin is overexposed to laser and this effect is not completely understood. This study analyzed the effects of the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10 on the intact skin of the masseteric region in mice of strain HRS/J. The animals (n=30 were equally divided into control (0 J/cm2 and irradiated (20 J/cm2, and each of these groups was further equally divided according to the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10 and underwent LLLT on alternate days. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The animals receiving applications exhibited open channels more dilated between the keratinocytes and photobiomodulation effect on endothelial cells and fibroblasts by TEM. Under the light microscope after 10 laser applications, the type I collagen decreased (P<0.05 compared to the three and six applications. Under these experimental conditions, all numbers of applications provided photobiomodulatory effect on the epidermis and dermis, without damage. More studies are needed to standardize the energy density and number of applications recommended for laser therapy to have a better cost-benefit ratio associated with treatment.

  12. Dose measurements in the treatment of mycosis fungoides with total skin irradiation using a 4 MeV electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, M.E.R. [Hospital Real e Benemerita Sociedade Portuguesa de Beneficencia (Brazil); Todo, A.S.; Campos, L.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, CNEN/SP Travessa R, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2000-05-01

    The total skin irradiation (TSI) is one of the most efficient techniques in the treatment administered with curative intent of the mycosis fungoides. The cure may be obtained in 10% to 40% of cases. The original Stanford University technique, created in 1960, was applied in a 4.8 MeV linear accelerator, that provided 2.5 MeV electrons in the patient, by the use of 4 couple beams with the patient placed in front of the beam, 3 meters distant from the apparatus. In this work we describe a 4 MeV electrons beam treatment method. We intend to improve the uniformity of the dose in the patient, as well, to reduce the problems with the overlapping treatment fields, that occurs in conventional treatment that uses 1 meter of focus-skin distance, and the treatment time to the patient. Only one modification was done in the apparatus: the dose rate for this treatment was doubled. The patient is placed on a rotative base and he assumes successively 6 positions: stand up and perpendicular to the beam, distant 2.83 meters from the gantry, with 60 degrees of interval between the rotations. In each position, the patient receives a couple of beams (the beam angulation is 19.5 degrees above the transversal axis in the middle of the patient and 19.5 degrees below it). The dosimetric data obtained were compared to the international protocols (AAPM). The delivered doses in the patient were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed on skin surface and with Kodak XV-2 films placed between different slabs of an anthropomorphic phantom. The dose distribution in the phantom shows a good uniformity, in all thickness of interest, so it is possible to use this technique in the treatment of the mycosis fungoides as well Kaposi's sarcoma. (author)

  13. Irradiation on cereal bars incorporated with pineapple skin; Irradiacao em barras de cereais incorporadas com casca de abacaxi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques; Silva, Yasmini Portes Abraham; Costa, Naiane Vieira; Almeida, Thatyana Lacerda; Damiani, Clarissa, E-mail: drilavras@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: yasmibipas@hotmail.com, E-mail: naiane@hotmail.com, E-mail: thototy@gmail.com, E-mail: damianiclarissa@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias, Escola de Agronomia e Engenharia de Alimentos, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Laboratorio de Radioentomologia e Irradiacao de Alimentos, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Lage, Moacir Evandro, E-mail: moacir@cpa.vet.ufg.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Escola de Veterinaria, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Asquieri, Eduardo Ramirez, E-mail: asquieri@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias, Escola de Farmacia, Goiania, GO (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    One of the major current concerns to the food industry is the management of residues generated in its production processes. Thus, several studies have been developed, seeking alternative uses for these residues, in order to minimize environmental impacts and add value to products previously discarded. Combining this idea with the increasingly search for healthy and practical products, by consumers, this study aimed the characterization of cereal bars irradiated with doses of 0 kGy, 1 kGy, and 2 kGy, incorporated with dried pineapple skin. The following analyses were carried out: moisture, proteins, lipids, ashes, carbohydrates, energetic value, antioxidant potential, phenolic content, organic acids, and fatty acids profile. The results observed for the centesimal composition did not vary as a function of the radiation doses used, reducing only the levels of antioxidants, phenolic compounds, and organic acids. The product showed potential for becoming an effective way of reusing a food industry residue and the irradiation interfered on the nutritional characteristics of the final product. (author)

  14. Semi-conservative deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in unirradiated and ultraviolet-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rude, J.M.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    Rates of semiconservative DNA synthesis have been investigated in asynchronous xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP variant, and normal human skin fibroblasts using the technique of cellular autoradiography. In unirradiated cells, no differences in DNA synthesis rates were detected among the three cell strains. Exposure to UV radiation caused the rate of DNA synthesis to decrease for at least three hours in all three cell strains. In the normal cell strain, recovery of the DNA synthetic rate occurred at later times following a UV fluence of 5 J/m 2 . At this same UV fluence, recovery was absent in classical XP cells during a 24 h post-irradiation period while it was slower than normal in XP variant cells. When the UV fluence to classical XP and XP variant cells was reduced so that survival in all three cell strains was approximately the same (25%), recovery of the DNA synthetic rate was similar in all three cell strains. These results are discussed in terms of current models of DNA replication in UV-irradiated cells and indicate: (1) that pyrimidine dimers are very effective blocks to DNA synthesis and (2) that there is no inherent defect in semiconservative DNA synthesis in either classical XP or XP variant cells which is independent of a defect in DNA repair capacity

  15. Semi-conservative deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in unirradiated and ultraviolet-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rude' e, J.M.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1977-03-01

    Rates of semiconservative DNA synthesis have been investigated in asynchronous xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP variant, and normal human skin fibroblasts using the technique of cellular autoradiography. In unirradiated cells, no differences in DNA synthesis rates were detected among the three cell strains. Exposure to uv radiation caused the rate of DNA synthesis to decrease for at least three hours in all three cell strains. In the normal cell strain, recovery of the DNA synthetic rate occurred at later times following a uv fluence of 5 J/m2. At this same uv fluence, recovery was absent in classical XP cells during a 24 h post-irradiation period while it was slower than normal in XP variant cells. When the uv fluence to classical XP and XP variant cells was reduced so that survival in all three cell strains was approximately the same (25%), recovery of the DNA synthetic rate was similar in all three cell strains. These results are discussed in terms of current models of DNA replication in uv-irradiated cells and indicate: (1) that pyrimidine dimers are very effective blocks to DNA synthesis and (2) that there is no inherent defect in semi-conservative DNA synthesis in either classical XP or XP variant cells which is independent of a defect in DNA repair capacity.

  16. Irradiation of neglected spinocellular carcinomas of the skin following the synchronizing of partial cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, P.

    1979-01-01

    The methods of synchronized irradiation as well as the results of the treatment of 20 cases of spinocellular carcinomas have been described. The majority of spinocellular carcinomas were already in the advanced stage. Synchronizing was carried out with a 5-FU in 1000-1000 mg doses twice a week for 12 hour periods in a solution of 1500 ml dissolved in 5 percent dextrose. 8.5 hours after the completion of infusion, irradiation was performed by a Dermopan equipment using 500 R fractions. The total dose reached 4000-5000 R. The conditions of the irradiation were as follows: 50 kV, 25 mA, 5, 10, 15 and 30 cm FB distance. During the treatment the patients were kept under strict clinical control. No toxic side effects were found in the process. It was determined that the patients have tolerated the synchronized ray treatment well. As a direct result of the therapy, 16 out of the 20 spinocellular carcinomas have entirely regressed and four was significantly reduced in size. Patients were kept under a systematic control. Subsequent check-ups revealed only two cases of newly developed tumours. The follow-up control examinations have lasted from six months to four or five years. (author)

  17. The regeneration of thermal wound on mice skin (Mus Musculus) after Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation for cancer therapy candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsari, R.; Nahdliyatun, E.; Winarni, D.

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the regeneration of mice skin tissue (Mus Musculus) irradiated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser and morphological change due to Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation compared to conventional heating (hairdryer). The 2-3 month of twenty-seven mice were used for experimental animals. Mice were incised in the dorsum by the damage effect of laser energy dose (therapeutic dose) of 29.5 J/cm2 with 10 seconds of exposure time, 10 Hz of repetition rate, and 100 pulses of the given single pulse energy. The mice skin tissue was injuried by hairdryer to get burned effect. Mice were divided into three groups, Group I (control) were not treated by anything, Group II were treated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation and sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days, and Group III were treated by hairdryer then sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days. Pathology examination showed that the energy of 29,5 J/cm2 dose produced the hole effect (ablation) through the hypodermic layer caused by optical breakdown and collagen coagulation. Thus, the 60 °C temperature of burn showed coagulation necrosis because piknosis discovered in the injured area. The regeneration process showed that the mice skin tissue's ability to regenerate was irradiated by fast laser because of the focus of Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser. It was showed by the scab releases on third day and completely reepithelialization formation on the fifth day. The collagen fibers distribution was same as normal skin tissue on day 5 and so did angiogenesis. Therefore, Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser can be applied for problems of dermatology medical therapies, especially melasma, nevus of ota and tatto therapy. For skin cancer therapy application, energy dose of unregenerated skin tissue is chosen because the death expected effect is permanent.

  18. Comparative evaluation of radiation injuries in skin histological structures under local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchanova, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate quantitatively to what degree the various histologic structures of the skin undergo changes after a radiation injury and during the reparative process, white rats have been used to study these changes in relation to the radiation dose and the time elapsed after exposure. The rats have been locally exposed on a single occasion to long-wave (10.2 keV) x-radiation in doses of 250, 500, 1000, or 2000 R. Greatest changes in histologic structures occured with doses of 250-1000 R on days 96-115 postexposure. With higher doses, these changes are most clearly marked as early as on day 38

  19. Sinclair swine melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hook, R.R.; Berkelhammer, J.; Hamby, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    Sinclair(S-1) miniature swine spontaneously develop melanomas which have many biologic and histologic features in common with human superficial spreading melanoma. Host control of this neoplasm was indicated by the high incidence of spontaneous regression, a decrease in tumor development with age and a decrease in progressive growth of the tumor as age of tumor development increases. Immunologic mechanisms were implicated in host control by histologic observation of a mononuclear inflammatory infiltration of tumors which lead to depigmentation and fibrosis. In vitro immunologic studies revealed that leukocytes from melanoma swine were sensitized specifically to a tumor associated antigen like substance present in extracts of cutaneous melanomas and cultured swine melanoma cells and that melanoma swine leukocytes were cytotoxic for swine melanoma cells. Furthermore, these studies suggested the existence of a common cross reactive, melanoma associated antigen shared by human and swine melanomas. Antigenic analyses of swine melanomas with mouse monoclonal antibodies developed to a single swine melanoma cell culture and with rabbit antisera developed to pooled extracts of cutaneous melanomas demonstrated the presence of tumor associated antigens in swine melanoma cell culture and cutaneous melanomas. The failure of mouse monoclonal antibodies to detect antigens in cutaneous melanoma extracts and the failure of rabbit antisera to detect antigens in melanoma cell culture extracts suggested a differential in antigen expression between swine melanoma cells grown in vitro and in vivo

  20. Wound healing in porcine skin following low-output carbon dioxide laser irradiation of the incision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.K.; Garden, J.M.; Taute, P.M.; Leibovich, S.J.; Lautenschlager, E.P.; Hartz, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Wound healing of scalpel incisions to the depth of adipose tissue closed with conventional methods was compared with closure by low-output carbon dioxide laser irradiation. In 3 Pitman-Moore minipigs wound healing was evaluated at intervals from 1 to 90 days by the following methods: clinical variables of wound healing; formation of the basement membrane components bullous pemphigoid antigen, laminin, and fibronectin; and histological evaluation of the regeneration of the epidermis, neovascularization, and elastin and collagen formation. There was no significant difference in healing between wounds closed by the various conventional methods and by the low-output carbon dioxide laser.

  1. GC and GC-MS studies of the effects of gamma-irradiation on olive oil and chicken skin tissue fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuominen, J.; Kiutamo, T.; Sjoeberg, A.M.; Leinonen

    1991-01-01

    Reduction of the microbial cell count in a frozen packaged chicken by ionizing radiation is an advantageous method with a microbiologically optimum dose of 4 kGy (5). However, the detection of irradiation in poultry is a problem in food analysis. Our study focused on to the possible changes in the fatty acid composition and formation of long-chain hydrocarbons in the chicken fat. The composition of chicken fat is complex. Therefore, our study was started with some pure fatty acids and a vegetable oil consisting mainly of triglycerides of fatty acids and having, qualitatively, the same fatty acids as the chicken. Pure olive oil (a retail oil from Italy) was chosen for the purpose. Later, also fat extracted from chicken skin was analysed. All samples were analysed as irradiated and non-irradiated. The results show that no new radiolytically induced fatty acids or other related compounds could be detected by using a BP-21 polar capillary column and flame ionization detector. Moreover, the composition of the major fatty acids remained constant. In the qualitative analysis of hydrocarbons produced by irradiation, it was shown that there is a distinct difference in the hydrocarbon pattern between non-irradiated and irradiated chicken skin tissues. (5 figs, 2 tabs, 6 refs)

  2. Photocarcinogenesis and persistent hyperplasia in UV-irradiated SENCAR mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickland, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    Susceptibility to photocarcinogenesis has been examined in several mouse strains and stocks including SENCAR, CD-1, BALB/c, C3H, C57Bl, and NZB. SENCAR mice are hypersusceptible to tumorigenesis caused by single high dose exposures to ultraviolet (UV) radiation but not by chronic low-dose exposures. SENCAR mice also exhibit an exaggerated and persistent epidermal hyperplasia in response to UV-induced tissue damage. The persistent hyperplasia is apparently due to a sustained proliferation of the epithelial basal cells, rather than to delayed cell differentiation. SENCAR mice did not exhibit persistent hyperplasia following other forms of tissue damage (surgical or thermal). In related studies, the levels of thymine dimers induced in SENCAR epidermis by UV radiation were comparable to those observed in BALB/c epidermis. In addition, no differences were found in the tissue distribution or persistence of thymine dimers in SENCAR and BALB/c skin

  3. Survival of human diploid skin fibroblasts from normal individuals after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Strong, L.C.; Nichols, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of X-rays was measured by a colony formation assay in multiple experiments with fibroblast cell strains derived from 24 presumably normal individuals, received as 65 different coded and blinded samples. Each strain was received on two or more occasions at different times and bearing different codes. The means and standard deviations of the survival curve parameters for the 24 strains were: D 0 = 123 +- 23; D 10 = 273 +- 42 cGy. The D 0 ranged from 89 to 175 and the D 10 from 196 to 372 cGy. The degree of interexperimental variation, though generally minimal, differed considerably among cell strains. There was no systematic effect of passage level, cloning efficiency, serum lot, age or sex of the donor on X-ray survival. These results confirm that the intrinsic radiosensitivity varies significantly among skin fibroblasts isolated from clinically normal individuals, apparently owing to as yet unidentified genetic factors. (Author)

  4. Possible relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis in rat skin after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    The possible mechanistic relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis seen after radiation exposure was studied in rats were given single x ray doses of either 2000 or 5000 rads to standardized fields of the inner thigh. The results suggest that two mechanisms are responsible for the radiation-induced increase in extravasation rate and vascular injury seen early after irradiation. First, direct cytocidal damage of the endothelium; and second, chemically mediated, possibly complement dependent mechanisms. Indirect histological evidence suggests a correlation between the PMN infiltrate and the indirect vascular damage. In addition, one may conclude from these data that both direct and indirect damage to the vasculature play a role in influencing the subsequent late radiation-induced fibrosis; and a decrease in the indirect damage may allow the maintenance of a supportive vasculature at lower doses or allow the reestablishment of a vascular bed in the case of higher doses. (U.S.)

  5. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm 2 ) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E 2 production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser 473 ) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-κB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  6. Topical administration of Tetrasodium-Mesotetraphenyl-Porphinesulfonate (TPPS): correlations between drug penetration and depth of necrosis in skin of nude mice following red light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, R.; Melloni, E.; Fava, G.

    1987-01-01

    The main side effect in photodynamic therapy is photosensitization of the patient's skin following systemic administration of the photosensitizing agent. In the case of superficial lesions, this problem can be avoided by topically applying the drug: in this way a local treatment can be performed. The photosensitizing properties of a 2% solution of TPPS (Tetrasodium-Tetraphenylpophinesulfonate) in a vehicle containing a penetration enhancer, Azone, on skin of nude mice has been tested. An aliquot of 0.1 ml/cm 2 of the solution was painted on the skin overlying an s.c. implanted NMU-1 tumor. Subsequently, animals were sacrificed at different times after applications. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that TPPS penetration depth was related to time elapsed after application and to painting modalities. Solution penetration was enhanced by wiping with ether immediately before painting. Irradiation at 80 mW/cm 2 for 20 min with a dye laser emitting at 640 nm, 4 h after TPPS applications, produced necrosis of the upper skin layers, up to 0.2 mm in depth. These findings suggest that topical TPPS administration, followed by laser irradiation, may be a suitable treatment modality for skin lesions involving epithelial layers, even though several aspects of this methodology need further investigation

  7. SU-F-T-248: FMEA Risk Analysis Implementation (AAPM TG-100) in Total Skin Electron Irradiation Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez-Rosello, B; Bautista-Ballesteros, J; Bonaque, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchis, A; Lopez-Torrecilla, J; Brualla-Gonzalez, L; Garcia-Hernandez, T; Vicedo-Gonzalez, A; Granero, D; Serrano, A; Borderia, B; Solera, C [Hospital General ERESA, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Rosello, J [Hospital General ERESA, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Total Skin Electron Irradiation (TSEI) is a radiotherapy treatment which involves irradiating the entire body surface as homogeneously as possible. It is composed of an extensive multi-step technique in which quality management requires high consumption of resources and a fluid communication between the involved staff, necessary to improve the safety of treatment. The TG-100 proposes a new perspective of quality management in radiotherapy, presenting a systematic method of risk analysis throughout the global flow of the stages through the patient. The purpose of this work has been to apply TG-100 approach to the TSEI procedure in our institution. Methods: A multidisciplinary team specifically targeting TSEI procedure was formed, that met regularly and jointly developed the process map (PM), following TG-100 guidelines of the AAPM. This PM is a visual representation of the temporal flow of steps through the patient since start until the end of his stay in the radiotherapy service. Results: This is the first stage of the full risk analysis, which is being carried out in the center. The PM provides an overview of the process and facilitates the understanding of the team members who will participate in the subsequent analysis. Currently, the team is implementing the analysis of failure modes and effects (FMEA). The failure modes of each of the steps have been identified and assessors are assigning a value of severity (S), frequency of occurrence (O) and lack of detection (D) individually. To our knowledge, this is the first PM made for the TSEI. The developed PM can be useful for those centers that intend to implement the TSEI technique. Conclusion: The PM of TSEI technique has been established, as the first stage of full risk analysis, performed in a reference center in this treatment.

  8. Skin dose and response for the head and neck in patients irradiated with x-ray for tinea capitis: implications for environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.H.; Kolber, A.B.; Shore, R.E.; Albert, R.E.; Altman, S.M.; Pasternack, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    The dose delivered to the skin of the head and neck in patients treated with x-ray irradiation for childhood tinea capitis was reconstructed. This was possible by utilizing a phantom made from the skull of a seven year old child and irradiating it with the same technique and x-ray machine used in tinea capitis therapy two to four decades ago. Seventy-eight basal cell carcinomas (BCC) have appeared so far in 40 of 1727 irradiated white children and none in 500 irradiated black children. The dose distribution over the face and scalp is used to estimate the risk of BCC per person per rad. These results must be considered preliminary due to the relatively young age of the irradiated group (<50 years) at the present time. From the decreased risk per rad for the portion of the scalp that is hair covered, it appears that environmental ultraviolet radiation may play a key role in the expression of BCC. A cumulative hazard plot is utilized to tentatively extend the data to lifetime risk of 0.003 per rad with an upper limit of 0.006 per rad. Environmental radiation dose to the skin possibly account for 20% of observed BCC if this tentative risk estimate is valid

  9. Possible relationships between the early inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis in rat skin after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to examine possible mechanistic relationships between the early inflammatory response and the subsequent fibrosis seen after radiation exposure. Anesthetized Rochester ex-Wistar rats were given single x-ray doses of either 2000 or 5000 rads to standardized fields of the inner thigh. The data suggest that two mechanisms are responsible for the radiation-induced increase in extravasation rate and vascular injury seen early after irradiation. First, direct cytocidal damage of the endothelium; and second, chemically mediated, possibly complement dependent mechanisms. Indirect histological evidence suggests a correlation between the PMN infiltrate and the indirect vascular damage. In addition, one may conclude from these data that (1) both direct and indirect damage to the vasculature play a role in influencing the subsequent late radiation-induced fibrosis; and (2) a decrease in the indirect damage may allow the maintenance of a supportive vasculature at lower doses or allow the reestablishment of a vascular bed in the case of higher doses

  10. Melanosomes are a primary target of Q-switched ruby laser irradiation in guinea pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polla, L.L.; Margolis, R.J.; Dover, J.S.; Whitaker, D.; Murphy, G.F.; Jacques, S.L.; Anderson, R.R.

    1987-09-01

    The specific targeting of melanosomes may allow for laser therapy of pigmented cutaneous lesions. The mechanism of selective destruction of pigmented cells by various lasers, however, has not been fully clarified. Black, brown, and albino guinea pigs were exposed to optical pulses at various radiant exposure doses from a Q-switched, 40 nsec, 694 nm ruby laser. Biopsies were analyzed by light and electron microscopy (EM). Albino animals failed to develop clinical or microscopic evidence of cutaneous injury after irradiation. In both black and brown animals, the clinical threshold for gross change was 0.4 J/cm2, which produced an ash-white spot. By light microscopy, alterations appeared at 0.3 J/cm2 and included separation at the dermoepidermal junction, and the formation of vacuolated epidermal cells with a peripheral cytoplasmic condensation of pigment. By EM, enlarged melanosomes with a central lucent zone were observed within affected epidermal cells at 0.3 J/cm2. At 0.8 and 1.2 J/cm2, individual melanosomes were more intensely damaged and disruption of melanosomes deep in the hair papillae was observed. Dermal-epidermal blisters were formed precisely at the lamina lucida, leaving basal cell membranes and hemidesmosomes intact. Possible mechanisms for melanosomal injury are discussed. These observations show that the effects of the Q-switched ruby laser are melanin-specific and melanin-dependent, and may be useful in the selective destruction of pigmented as well as superficial cutaneous lesions.

  11. Model-based approach for quantitative estimates of skin, heart, and lung toxicity risk for left-side photon and proton irradiation after breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco; D'Avino, Vittoria; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Conson, Manuel; Farace, Paolo; Palma, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Marco; Cella, Laura; Pacelli, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Proton beam therapy represents a promising modality for left-side breast cancer (BC) treatment, but concerns have been raised about skin toxicity and poor cosmesis. The aim of this study is to apply skin normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization in left-side BC. Ten left-side BC patients undergoing photon irradiation after breast-conserving surgery were randomly selected from our clinical database. Intensity modulated photon (IMRT) and IMPT plans were calculated with iso-tumor-coverage criteria and according to RTOG 1005 guidelines. Proton plans were computed with and without skin optimization. Published NTCP models were employed to estimate the risk of different toxicity endpoints for skin, lung, heart and its substructures. Acute skin NTCP evaluation suggests a lower toxicity level with IMPT compared to IMRT when the skin is included in proton optimization strategy (0.1% versus 1.7%, p < 0.001). Dosimetric results show that, with the same level of tumor coverage, IMPT attains significant heart and lung dose sparing compared with IMRT. By NTCP model-based analysis, an overall reduction in the cardiopulmonary toxicity risk prediction can be observed for all IMPT compared to IMRT plans: the relative risk reduction from protons varies between 0.1 and 0.7 depending on the considered toxicity endpoint. Our analysis suggests that IMPT might be safely applied without increasing the risk of severe acute radiation induced skin toxicity. The quantitative risk estimates also support the potential clinical benefits of IMPT for left-side BC irradiation due to lower risk of cardiac and pulmonary morbidity. The applied approach might be relevant on the long term for the setup of cost-effectiveness evaluation strategies based on NTCP predictions.

  12. Multiomics in Grape Berry Skin Revealed Specific Induction of the Stilbene Synthetic Pathway by Ultraviolet-C Irradiation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mami; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Sakurai, Nozomu; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Goto, Susumu; Suzuki, Makoto; Jasinski, Michal; Martinoia, Enrico; Otagaki, Shungo; Matsumoto, Shogo; Saito, Kazuki; Shiratake, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Grape (Vitis vinifera) accumulates various polyphenolic compounds, which protect against environmental stresses, including ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light and pathogens. In this study, we looked at the transcriptome and metabolome in grape berry skin after UV-C irradiation, which demonstrated the effectiveness of omics approaches to clarify important traits of grape. We performed transcriptome analysis using a genome-wide microarray, which revealed 238 genes up-regulated more than 5-fold by UV-C light. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology terms showed that genes encoding stilbene synthase, a key enzyme for resveratrol synthesis, were enriched in the up-regulated genes. We performed metabolome analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and 2,012 metabolite peaks, including unidentified peaks, were detected. Principal component analysis using the peaks showed that only one metabolite peak, identified as resveratrol, was highly induced by UV-C light. We updated the metabolic pathway map of grape in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database and in the KaPPA-View 4 KEGG system, then projected the transcriptome and metabolome data on a metabolic pathway map. The map showed specific induction of the resveratrol synthetic pathway by UV-C light. Our results showed that multiomics is a powerful tool to elucidate the accumulation mechanisms of secondary metabolites, and updated systems, such as KEGG and KaPPA-View 4 KEGG for grape, can support such studies. PMID:25761715

  13. Herpes virus production as a marker of repair in ultraviolet irradiated human skin cells of different origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J; Nocentini, S [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France); Moreno, G [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital de Bicetre, 94 - le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1978-01-01

    When confluent human skin cultures are ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated before infection with Herpes Simplex type 1 virus (HSV), their capacity to support virus growth is impaired. When the time interval between UV-exposure and infection is increased up to 36 hours, different recoveries of HSV production capacity are observed according to the origin of the host cells. 1) Two normal donors: the cells present a dose dependent recovery which is maximal for a dose (24 J/m/sup 2/) at which a plateau level of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) is reached. 2) A mother of two Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) children: in this line which exhibits a normal level of UDS, the extent of recovery is significantly decreased after exposures <=12 J/m/sup 2/. 3) An XP child: these cells have a normal level of UDS (XP variant) whereas they present a low extent of recovery as compared with that of the normal subjects. 4) Five XP children: in these excision deficient lines (UDS < 15%), HSV production capacity decreases with increasing time intervals after UV exposure for doses >=3 J/m/sup 2/. For doses < 3 J/m/sup 2/, a small recovery with an overshoot of viral production is observed 24 h after UV exposure in the lines (three) which present the highest UDS (10-15%) and not in the two lines which present a very low UDS (1-2%).

  14. Specific binding of prostaglandin E2 to membrane preparations from human skin: receptor modulation by UVB-irradiation and chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, J.T.; Ziboh, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    Human skin membranes bind prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) with high affinity and specificity. This binding is inhibited by trypsin or heat treatment suggesting that PGE2 receptors have protein components. Exposure of the membranes to ultraviolet irradiation (UVB) resulted in the loss of the membrane binding capacity for PGE2. This UVB-inhibitory effect could be prevented by a known protein sulfhydryl-oxidizing agent and a known lipid anti-oxidant

  15. Occupational skin cancer due to UV-irradiation--Analyses of notified cases as "virtually-certain" occupational disease in Germany between 2005 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jochen; Diepgen, Thomas L

    2014-06-01

    UV-induced skin cancer is not yet included in the German ordinance on occupational diseases and can only be notified and recognized acknowledged as "virtually-certain" occupational disease. The objective of the study was to analyze notified and acknowledged cases of occupational skin cancer due to UV-irradiation in Germany between 2005 and 2011. All notified cases of occupational skin cancer due to UV-irradiation have been analyzed which have been registered by the German Statutory accident insurance as of May 2012 were analyzed. The data analyze was descriptive stratified annually for presenting time trends.Data analysis was descriptive, stratified by year to defect time trends. Notified cases have increased annually with a total of 548 registered cases of occupational skin cancer induced by UV-irradiation between 2005 and 2011, and 74 recognized acknowledged cases. In 56 cases the procedure was not yet finished. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and in-situ squamous cell carcinoma (actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease) were most frequent and have been the most frequentlyobserved in 333 notified cases. and between 15.6 % and 24.9 % have been recognizedof cases with SCC and actinic keratosis were recognized, respectively. 184 patients with basal cell carcinoma were notified but only 6.5 % recognized acknowledged and only 3 cases with exclusive basal cell carcinoma. Out of 50 notified patients with Mmelanoma only one was recognizedacknowledged. The results are in good agreement with the proposal of the German Minister of labor to establish UV-induced skin cancer as a new occupational disease. © 2014 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Clinical application of a OneDose(TM) MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-01-01

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose(TM) in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs. (note)

  17. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and chemically-treated herpes simplex virus-1 by xeroderma pigmentosum, xp heterozygotes and normal skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylamino-fluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP was studied in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human skin fibroblasts. Virus treated with either agent demonstrated lower survival in XP cells from complementation groups A, B, C and D than in normal fibroblasts. The relative reactivation ability of XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups was found to be the same for both irradiated and chemically treated virus. In addition, the inactivation kinetics for virus treated with either agent in the XP variant were comparable to that seen in normal skin fibroblasts. The addition of 2 or 4 mmoles caffeine to the post-infection assay medium had no effect on the inactivation kinetics of virus treated by either agent in the XP variant or in XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups. Treatment of the virus with nitrogen mustard resulted in equivalent survival in normal and XP genetic complementation group D cells. No apparent defect was observed in the ability of XP heterozygous skin fibroblasts to repair virus damaged with up to 100 μg N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene per ml. These findings indicate that the repair of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus is accomplished by the same pathway or different pathways sharing a common intermediate step and that the excision defect of XP cells plays little if any role in the reactivation of nitrogen mustard treated virus. (Auth.)

  18. Clinical application of a OneDose MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-07-21

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs.

  19. Experimental research and observation of the skin response of mice with a second-degree scald during irradiation by a CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxia; Wu, Shulian; Li, Zhifang; Xu, Xiaohui; Li, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Second-degree scalding is a common dermatological injury. Inappropriate treatment methods in clinical practice always produce scarring, and can lead to skin cancer and other complications in the longer term. In this study optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with a skin detector was used to monitor the response of second-degree scalded skin tissue irradiated by a CO2 laser. The process of treatment of second-degree scalding was systematically studied from the perspective of tissue optics. The OCT signal intensity was stronger within the whole recovery period in the experimental group undergoing CO2 laser treatment, and the attenuation coefficient (μt) returned to its original value in a shorter time. The results help us to understand tissue injury in a second-degree scald and may help improve the standard treatment.

  20. The development of criteria for limiting the non-uniform irradiation of skin: the rationale for a study of non-stochastic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.; Charles, M.W.

    1979-06-01

    Recent recommendations of the ICRP (1977) provide little guidance for the treatment of non-uniform skin exposures such as those which may occur as the result of contamination with radioactive particulates. This lack of guidance is due to a paucity of data regarding biological effects in this area. A rationale is presented for the study of the early (non-stochastic) effects of non-uniform skin irradiation. As a basis for the presentation of this rationale a framework is provided by a resume of basic biology of the skin and a review of previous experimental work in this field. Animal experiments, which are being carried out in collaboration with specialist university groups, are described both in terms of broad concept and experimental detail. The aim is to provide biological data which can provide guidance in radiological protection situations. (author)

  1. Effect of red light irradiation on skin coloration and carotenoid composition of stored ''Miyauchi'' iyo (Citrus iyo hort. ex Tanaka) tangor fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohishi, H.; Watanabe, J.; Kadoya, K.

    1996-01-01

    Effect of red light irradiation on skin color development and carotenoid composition of stylar end of Miyauchi iyo (citrus iyo hort. ex Tanaka) tangor fruit was examined during storage. Both increase in a and a/b value and decrease in b value were enhanced by the irradiation. The a/b values of the fruit exposed were higher than those of control during the whole storage period. HPLC analyses also revealed the increase in total carotenoids content, of which the carotenoids that were tentatively named B and F most greatly accumulated. Similar tendencies were observed at equator and stem end portions. These results indicate that red light irradiation is involved in not only acceleration of overall color development but also enhancement of red color pigmentation by influencing a certain specific pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis

  2. A novel p53 mutational hotspot in skin tumors from UV-irradiated Xpc mutant mice alters transactivation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inga, Alberto; Nahari, Dorit; Velasco-Miguel, Susana; Friedberg, Errol C; Resnick, Michael A

    2002-08-22

    A mutation in codon 122 of the mouse p53 gene resulting in a T to L amino acid substitution (T122-->L) is frequently associated with skin cancer in UV-irradiated mice that are both homozygous mutant for the nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene Xpc (Xpc(-/-)) and hemizygous mutant for the p53 gene. We investigated the functional consequences of the mouse T122-->L mutation when expressed either in mammalian cells or in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Similar to a non-functional allele, high expression of the T122-->L allele in p53(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts and human Saos-2 cells failed to suppress growth. However, the T122-->L mutant p53 showed wild-type transactivation levels with Bax and MDM2 promoters when expressed in either cell type and retained transactivation of the p21 and the c-Fos promoters in one cell line. Using a recently developed rheostatable p53 induction system in yeast we assessed the T122-->L transactivation capacity at low levels of protein expression using 12 different p53 response elements (REs). Compared to wild-type p53 the T122-->L protein manifested an unusual transactivation pattern comprising reduced and enhanced activity with specific REs. The high incidence of the T122-->L mutant allele in the Xpc(-/-) background suggests that both genetic and epigenetic conditions may facilitate the emergence of particular functional p53 mutations. Furthermore, the approach that we have taken also provides for the dissection of functions that may be retained in many p53 tumor alleles.

  3. 9 CFR 85.10 - Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of swine semen and... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS PSEUDORABIES § 85.10 Interstate movement of swine semen and swine embryos for insemination of or implantation into swine. Swine semen and swine embryos moved...

  4. Breast irradiation causes pallor in the nipple-areolar complex in women with Celtic skin type (result from the St. George and Wollongong randomised breast boost trial)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoo Young Dominique; Hau, Eric; Browne, Lois H.; Chin, Yaw; Lee, Jessica; Szwajcer, Alison; Cail, Stacy; Nolan, David N.; Graham, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    The nipple-areolar complex (NAC) has special histological properties with higher melanocyte concentration than breast skin. To date, there are no data describing the late effects on the NAC following breast-conserving therapy (BCT). This study evaluated colour changes in the NAC in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy after 5 years. Digital photographs obtained at 5 years following breast irradiation from the St. George and Wollongong (SGW) trial (NCT00138814) were evaluated by five experts using an iPad® (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA, USA) application specifically created for this study. The SGW trial randomised 688 patients with Tis-2, N0-1, M0 carcinoma to the control arm of 50Gy in 25 fractions and boost arm of 45Gy in 25 fractions and 16 Gy in 8 fractions electron boost. A total of 141/372 (38%) patients had altered NAC (86% lighter, 10% darker). Patients with Celtic skin type had increased likelihood of having an altered NAC (odds ratio (OR), 1.75 (CI 1.1–2.7, P=0.011)). On subgroup analysis, those with Celtic skin type receiving biologically equivalent dose (BED) Gy3 ≥ 80Gy had OR of 3.03 (95% CI 1.2–7.5, P=0.016) for having altered colour. There was a dose response with more profound changes seen in the NAC compared with irradiated breast skin if BED Gy3 ≥ 80Gy with OR of 2.42 (95% CI 1.1–5.6, P=0.036). In this Caucasian BCT population, over 30% of patients developed lighter NAC and more commonly in women with Celtic skin type. The degree of this effect increased with higher radiation dose.

  5. SU-G-201-14: Is Maximum Skin Dose a Reliable Metric for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Brachytherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S; Ragab, O; Patel, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M; Kim, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of the maximum point dose (Dmax) to the skin surface as a dosimetric constraint, we investigated the correlation between Dmax at the skin surface and dose metrics at various definitions of skin thickness. Methods: 42 patients treated with APBI using a Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) applicator between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Target (PTV-EVAL) and organs at risk (OARs: skin, lung, and ribs) were delineated on a CT following NSABP B-39 guidelines. Six skin structures were contoured: a rind 3cm external to the body surface and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5mm thick rinds deep to the body surface. Inverse planning simulated annealing optimization was used to deliver 32–34Gy in 8-10 fractions to the target while minimizing OAR doses. Dmax, D0.1cc, D1.0cc, and D2.0cc to the various skin structures were calculated. Linear regressions between the metrics were evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R"2). Results: The average±SD PTV-EVAL volume and cavity-to-skin distances were 71.1±28.5cc and 6.9±5.0mm. The target V90 and V95 were 97.3±2.3% and 95.1±3.2%. The Dmax to the skin structures were 78.7±10.2% (skin surface), 82.2±10.7% (skin-1mm), 89.4±12.6% (skin-2mm), 97.9±15.4% (skin-3mm), 114.1±32.5% (skin-4mm), and 157.0±85.3% (skin-5mm). Linear regression analysis showed D1.0cc and D2.0cc to the skin 1mm and Dmax to the skin-4mm and 5mm were poorly correlated with other metrics (R"2=0.413±0.204). Dmax to the skin surface was well correlated (R"2=0.910±0.047) and D1.0cc to the skin-3mm was strongly correlated with all subsurface skin layers (R"2=0.935±0.050). Conclusion: Dmax to the skin surface is a relevant metric for breast skin dose. Contouring discontinuities in the skin with a 1mm subsurface rind and the active dwells in the skin 4 and 5mm introduced significant variations in skin DVH. D0.1cc, D1.0cc, and D2.0cc to a 3mm skin rind are more robust metrics in breast brachytherapy.

  6. Effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans (nutmeg) on expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and type I procollagen in UVB-irradiated human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-Eun; Mun, Sukyeong; Pyun, Hee-Bong; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light causes premature skin aging that is associated with upregulated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and decreased collagen synthesis. Macelignan, a natural lignan compound isolated from Myristica fragrans HOUTT. (nutmeg), has been reported to possess antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. This study assessed the effects of macelignan on photoaging and investigated its mechanisms of action in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts (Hs68) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results show that macelignan attenuated UV-induced MMP-1 expression by suppressing phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) induced by reactive oxygen species. Macelignan also increased type I procollagen expression and secretion through transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling. These findings indicate that macelignan regulates the expression of MMP-1 and type I procollagen in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts by modulating MAPK and TGF-β/Smad signaling, suggesting its potential as an efficacious antiphotoaging agent. (author)

  7. Swine brucellosis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen SC

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available SC Olsen, FM Tatum Infectious Bacterial Diseases of Livestock Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Ames, IA, USA Abstract: Brucella suis is a significant zoonotic species that is present in domestic livestock and wildlife in many countries worldwide. Transmission from animal reservoirs is the source of human infection as human-to-human transmission is very rare. Although swine brucellosis causes economic losses in domestic livestock, preventing human infection is the primary reason for its emphasis in disease control programs. Although disease prevalence varies worldwide, in areas outside of Europe, swine brucellosis is predominantly caused by B. suis biovars 1 and 3. In Europe, swine are predominantly infected with biovar 2 which is much less pathogenic in humans. In many areas worldwide, feral or wild populations of swine are important reservoir hosts. Like other Brucella spp. in their natural host, B. suis has developed mechanisms to survive in an intracellular environment and evade immune detection. Limitations in sensitivity and specificity of current diagnostics require use at a herd level, rather for individual animals. There is currently no commercial vaccine approved for preventing brucellosis in swine. Although not feasible in all situations, whole-herd depopulation is the most effective regulatory mechanism to control swine brucellosis. Keywords: livestock, transmission, pathogenicity, vaccine, host, infection

  8. Arterial and venous oxygen partial pressure and utilization factor η, resp., and 133Xe muscle clearance after UV irradiation of skin or blood of healthy persons and patients with occlusive arterial disease and psoriasis, resp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherf, H.P.; Strangfeld, D.; Meffert, H.; Glatzel, E.; Siewert, H.; Soennichsen, N.; Correns, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    In three teams of test persons series of UV irradiations of the skin (λ max 365 nm) and of the blood (λ max 254 nm) were performed, and moreover pseudoirradiations of the blood as placebo and infrared irradiations of the skin were carried out. UV irradiations of the blood increased the factor η (O 2 utilization) in all test persons. In healthy persons and patients with psoriasis UV irradiations of the skin involved a homogeneous, but less distinct effect, this was, however, not the case in patients with vascular diseases. According to the results of the 133 Xe muscle clearance the improved utilization of oxygen does not result from increased peripheral blood supply. (author)

  9. The effect of x-ray irradiation on proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira

    1980-01-01

    To elucidate radiation injuries and the recovery mechanism of epithelial cells exposed to 150 R or 450 R of x-ray, the epidermal proliferative unit (EPU) in the backs of mice was analysed histologically and dynamically by measuring the labelled index of cells with 3 H-thymidine and measuring differentiation index of cells. EPU was normal for 6 days after irradiation with both 150 R and 450 R. However, partial hyperplasia and EPU disorders in a range consistent with hyperplasia appeared in segmented preparations 7 days after irradiation. Both doses inhibited cell differentiation for 5 days after irradiation. Cell proliferation, which was higher than the normal rate, peaked 7 days after irradiation with 150 R and 9 days after irradiation with 540 R. Cell proliferation returned to normal 10 days after irradiation. DNA synthesis was inhibited one day after irradiation with both 150 R and 450 R, but it returned to normal 3 days after irradiation. There was an overshoot of DNA synthesis, but synthesis returned to normal 9 days after irradiation with 150 R and 12 days after irradiation with 450 R. EPU disorders returned to normal according to normalization of cell differentiation and DNA synthesis. (Tsunoda, M.)

  10. Granzyme B mediates both direct and indirect cleavage of extracellular matrix in skin after chronic low-dose ultraviolet light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Leigh G; Toro, Ana; Zhao, Hongyan; Brown, Keddie; Tebbutt, Scott J; Granville, David J

    2015-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation is a hallmark of many chronic inflammatory diseases that can lead to a loss of function, aging, and disease progression. Ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation from the sun is widely considered as the major cause of visible human skin aging, causing increased inflammation and enhanced ECM degradation. Granzyme B (GzmB), a serine protease that is expressed by a variety of cells, accumulates in the extracellular milieu during chronic inflammation and cleaves a number of ECM proteins. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to ECM degradation in the skin after UV irradiation through both direct cleavage of ECM proteins and indirectly through the induction of other proteinases. Wild-type and GzmB-knockout mice were repeatedly exposed to minimal erythemal doses of solar-simulated UV irradiation for 20 weeks. GzmB expression was significantly increased in wild-type treated skin compared to nonirradiated controls, colocalizing to keratinocytes and to an increased mast cell population. GzmB deficiency significantly protected against the formation of wrinkles and the loss of dermal collagen density, which was related to the cleavage of decorin, an abundant proteoglycan involved in collagen fibrillogenesis and integrity. GzmB also cleaved fibronectin, and GzmB-mediated fibronectin fragments increased the expression of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings indicate a significant role for GzmB in ECM degradation that may have implications in many age-related chronic inflammatory diseases. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Red Light Combined with Blue Light Irradiation Regulates Proliferation and Apoptosis in Skin Keratinocytes in Combination with Low Concentrations of Curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing; Ren, Qu; Wei, Lizhao

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a widely known natural phytochemical from plant Curcuma longa. In recent years, curcumin has received increasing attention because of its capability to induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation as well as its anti-inflammatory properties in different cancer cells. However, the therapeutic benefits of curcumin are severely hampered due to its particularly low absorption via trans-dermal or oral bioavailability. Phototherapy with visible light is gaining more and more support in dermatological therapy. Red light is part of the visible light spectrum, which is able to deeply penetrate the skin to about 6 mm, and directly affect the fibroblast of the skin dermis. Blue light is UV-free irradiation which is fit for treating chronic inflammation diseases. In this study, we show that curcumin at low concentrations (1.25–3.12 μM) has a strong anti-proliferative effect on TNF-α-induced psoriasis-like inflammation when applied in combination with light-emitting-diode devices. The treatment was especially effective when LED blue light at 405 nm was combined with red light at 630 or 660 nm, which markedly amplified the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of curcumin. The experimental results demonstrated that this treatment reduced the viability of human skin keratinocytes, decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, inhibited NF-κB activity and activated caspase-8 and caspase-9 while preserving the cell membrane integrity. Moreover, the combined treatment also down-regulated the phosphorylation level of Akt and ERK. Taken together, our results indicated that the combination of curcumin with LED blue light united red light irradiation can attain a higher efficiency of regulating proliferation and apoptosis in skin keratinocytes. PMID:26382065

  12. Red Light Combined with Blue Light Irradiation Regulates Proliferation and Apoptosis in Skin Keratinocytes in Combination with Low Concentrations of Curcumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhui Niu

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a widely known natural phytochemical from plant Curcuma longa. In recent years, curcumin has received increasing attention because of its capability to induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation as well as its anti-inflammatory properties in different cancer cells. However, the therapeutic benefits of curcumin are severely hampered due to its particularly low absorption via trans-dermal or oral bioavailability. Phototherapy with visible light is gaining more and more support in dermatological therapy. Red light is part of the visible light spectrum, which is able to deeply penetrate the skin to about 6 mm, and directly affect the fibroblast of the skin dermis. Blue light is UV-free irradiation which is fit for treating chronic inflammation diseases. In this study, we show that curcumin at low concentrations (1.25-3.12 μM has a strong anti-proliferative effect on TNF-α-induced psoriasis-like inflammation when applied in combination with light-emitting-diode devices. The treatment was especially effective when LED blue light at 405 nm was combined with red light at 630 or 660 nm, which markedly amplified the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of curcumin. The experimental results demonstrated that this treatment reduced the viability of human skin keratinocytes, decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, inhibited NF-κB activity and activated caspase-8 and caspase-9 while preserving the cell membrane integrity. Moreover, the combined treatment also down-regulated the phosphorylation level of Akt and ERK. Taken together, our results indicated that the combination of curcumin with LED blue light united red light irradiation can attain a higher efficiency of regulating proliferation and apoptosis in skin keratinocytes.

  13. Direct biological effects of fractional ultrapulsed CO2 laser irradiation on keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human organotypic full-thickness 3D skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, L; Huth, S; Amann, P M; Marquardt, Y; Heise, R; Fietkau, K; Huth, L; Steiner, T; Hölzle, F; Baron, J M

    2018-05-01

    Molecular effects of various ablative and non-ablative laser treatments on human skin cells-especially primary effects on epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts-are not yet fully understood. We present the first study addressing molecular effects of fractional non-sequential ultrapulsed CO 2 laser treatment using a 3D skin model that allows standardized investigations of time-dependent molecular changes ex vivo. While histological examination was performed to assess morphological changes, we utilized gene expression profiling using microarray and qRT-PCR analyses to identify molecular effects of laser treatment. Irradiated models exhibited dose-dependent morphological changes resulting in an almost complete recovery of the epidermis 5 days after irradiation. On day 5 after laser injury with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2 , gene array analysis identified an upregulation of genes associated with tissue remodeling and wound healing (e.g., COL12A1 and FGF7), genes that are involved in the immune response (e.g., CXCL12 and CCL8) as well as members of the heat shock protein family (e.g., HSPB3). On the other hand, we detected a downregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (e.g., MMP3), differentiation markers (e.g., LOR and S100A7), and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1α.Overall, our findings substantiate the understanding of time-dependent molecular changes after CO 2 laser treatment. The utilized 3D skin model system proved to be a reliable, accurate, and reproducible tool to explore the effects of various laser settings both on skin morphology and gene expression during wound healing.

  14. Host-cell reactivation of uv-irradiated and chemically treated Herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain mp was studied in normal human skin fibroblasts and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts from XP genetic complementation groups A-D and in an XP variant. The increasing relative order for the host-cell reactivation of both types of damaged virus in the different complementation groups is A = D < B < C; XP variant = normal controls. XP complementation group D cells, which manifest the most severe inhibition of her ability for both UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus, can reactivate nitrogen mustard treated HSV-1 mp to the same extent as normal cells. Together, these results indicate that (1) Excision repair of UV and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene DNA damaged viruses share a common rate limiting enzymatic step and (2) The repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells plays little or no role in the recovery of nitrogen mustard treated virus. The results of studies on the effect of caffeine on the survival of both UV- and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus in normal and XP cells imply that the reactivation of HSV-1 mp is mediated by an excision repair process with little if any recovery contributed by post-replication repair mechanisms. The host-cell reactivation of N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated HSV-1 mp was also correlated with the defective UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in two skin fibroblast strains established from a skin biopsy obtained from each of two juvenile females who had been clinically diagnosed as xeroderma pigmentosum. These findings are discussed in relation to the further characterization of the xeroderma pigmentosum phenotype and their possible utilization for the selection and isolation of new mammalian cell DNA repair mutants

  15. Effect of low-dose-rate irradiation on the division potential of cells in vitro. V. Human skin fibroblasts from donors with a high risk of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diatloff, C.; Macieira-Coelho, A.

    1979-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts from normal donors, donors with ataxia-telanglectasia or Fanconi's anemia, and from 1 cancer patient were treated with repeated γ radiation at about 16 rads per hour. The remaining division potential of all fibroblasts, except for the Fanconi's anemia cells, was reduced to different extents by radiation. The growth potential of Fanconl's anemia cells was increased in all the irradiated cultures. The increase was 54% in the group that survived the longest. These results were identical to those obtained with fibroblasts from certain species that have a high probability of transformation

  16. Wavelength dependence of pyrimidine dimer formation in DNA of human skin irradiated in situ with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, S.E.; Hacham, H.; Gange, R.W.; Maytum, D.J.; Sutherland, J.C.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The UV components of sunlight are believed to be a major cause of human skin caner, and DNA is though to be the principal molecular target. Alterations of the intensity and wavelength distribution of solar UV radiation reaching the surface of the earth, for example by depletion of stratospheric ozone, will change the effectiveness of solar radiation in damaging DNA in human skin. Evaluation of the magnitude of such effects requires knowledge of the altered sunlight spectrum and of the action spectrum for damaging DNA in human skin. The authors have determined an action spectrum for the frequency of pyrimidine dimer formation induced in the DNA of human skin per unit dose of UV incident on the skin surface. The peak of this action spectrum is near 300 nm and decreases rapidly at both longer and shorter wavelengths. The decrease in the action spectrum for wavelengths <300 nm is attributed to the absorption of the upper layers of the skin. Convolution of the dimer action spectrum with the solar spectra corresponding to a solar angle of 40 degree under current levels of stratospheric ozone and those for 50% ozone depletion, indicate about a 2.5-fold increase in dimer formation. If the action spectrum for DNA damage that results in skin cancer resembles that for dimer induction in skin, these results suggest that a 50% decrease in stratospheric ozone would increase the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers among white males in Seattle, Washington, by 7.5- to 8-fold, to a higher incidence than is presently seen in the corresponding population of Albuquerque, New Mexico

  17. Low levels of glutathione are sufficient for survival of keratinocytes after UV irradiation and for healing of mouse skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telorack, Michèle; Abplanalp, Jeannette; Werner, Sabine

    2016-08-01

    Reduced levels of the cellular antioxidant glutathione are associated with premature skin aging, cancer and impaired wound healing, but the in vivo functions of glutathione in the skin remain largely unknown. Therefore, we analyzed mice lacking the modifier subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glutathione biosynthesis. Glutathione levels in the skin of these mice were reduced by 70 %. However, neither skin development and homeostasis, nor UVA- or UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis were affected. Histomorphometric analysis of excisional wounds did not reveal wound healing abnormalities in young Gclm-deficient mice, while the area of hyperproliferative epithelium as well as keratinocyte proliferation were affected in aged mice. These findings suggest that low levels of glutathione are sufficient for wound repair in young mice, but become rate-limiting upon aging.

  18. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  19. Inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis in UV-irradiated mouse skin by 2-difluoromethylornithine, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaepyaho, K.; Lauharanta, J.; Jaenne, J.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of mouse skin to UVB irradiation greatly enhanced the biosynthesis and accumulation of putrescine and spermidine before or concomitantly with stimulation of epidermal macromolecular (DNA and protein) synthesis. Topical treatment of UV-exposed skin with 2 inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) prevented the enhanced epidermal accumulation of polyamines, especially spermidine, and also inhibited the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA and protein. When applied in combination, these 2 antimetabolites of polyamines produced an inhibition of macromolecular synthesis that was at least additive: (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation decreased by 80% and (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation by 44% as compared with the UVB-irradiated control mice. A slight decrease in the ratio of (/sup 3/H)histidine/(/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation indicated that protein synthesis of the differentiating cell layers was also affected by the inhibitors. The effects of the combined DFMO and MGBG treatment were partially reversed by concomitant topical application of spermidine.

  20. Inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis in UV-irradiated mouse skin by 2-difluoromethylornithine, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaepyaho, K.; Lauharanta, J.; Jaenne, J.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of mouse skin to UVB irradiation greatly enhanced the biosynthesis and accumulation of putrescine and spermidine before or concomitantly with stimulation of epidermal macromolecular (DNA and protein) synthesis. Topical treatment of UV-exposed skin with 2 inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) prevented the enhanced epidermal accumulation of polyamines, especially spermidine, and also inhibited the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA and protein. When applied in combination, these 2 antimetabolites of polyamines produced an inhibition of macromolecular synthesis that was at least additive: [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation decreased by 80% and [ 14 C]leucine incorporation by 44% as compared with the UVB-irradiated control mice. A slight decrease in the ratio of [ 3 H]histidine/[ 14 C]leucine incorporation indicated that protein synthesis of the differentiating cell layers was also affected by the inhibitors. The effects of the combined DFMO and MGBG treatment were partially reversed by concomitant topical application of spermidine

  1. Dose enhancement in the neighborhood of foreign bodies of the skin due to electron irradiation. A Monte-Carlo study using MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heide, Bernd [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (DE). Inst. of Radiation Research (ISF)

    2011-07-01

    Foreign bodies penetrate into the skin in the region of the hand very frequently. If they are amicrobic, they can get stuck in the skin and do no harm to the body in normal case. However, when handling with a radioactive material, like an Sr-90/Y-90 syringe for example, a stuck foreign body in a finger can lead to an enhanced absorbed dose in the neighbourhood of a few hundredths of millimetre of a foreign body, which just is in magnitude of a body cell. In the following, we shall investigate the dose enhancement effect of graphite, lead, and gold when embedded in soft tissue and irradiated with electrons. This case study focusses on the region close to the piece of metal (foreign body) without consideration for the depth in which the foreign body is located. It holds some other idealised assumptions (concerning vacuum, shape and size of foreign bodies, tissue composition, and direction of the radiation field) but still is near to real situations. Among others, this case study served to estimate the dose enhancement in the neighbourhood of a pike of lead located at the right forefinger of a member of our Institute of Radiation Research after an Sr-90/Y-90 irradiation. (orig.)

  2. Inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, A.A.; Roza, L.; Moodycliffe, A.M.; Shreedhar, V.

    1997-01-01

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase, which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosomes treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function

  3. Swine Brucellosis: Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucella suis is a significant zoonosis that is present in domestic livestock and wildlife in many countries worldwide. Transmission from animal reservoirs is the source of human infection as human to human transmission is very rare. Although swine brucellosis causes economic losses in domestic liv...

  4. Effects of radiation on the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopewell, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of X-irradiation on pig skin are described, comparing and contrasting the effects seen in human and rodent skin. It is concluded that, anatomically, pig skin is the best animal model for human skin. The applications of the 'pig skin model' to investigations of the problems of radiation therapy and radiological protection of human skin are discussed. (U.K.)

  5. A retrospective review of pain control by a two-step irradiance schedule during topical ALA-photodynamic therapy of non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouni, Nathalie C; Paquette, Anne D; Housel, Joseph P; Shi, Yi; Wilding, Gregory E; Foster, Thomas H; Henderson, Barbara W

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) of non-melanoma skin cancers is often associated with treatment-limiting pain. A previous study on basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) at Roswell Park Cancer Institute evaluated a two-step irradiance scheme as a means of minimizing pain, preserving outcomes, and limiting treatment time. We used an initial low irradiance until 90% of the protoporphyrin IX was photobleached, followed by a high irradiance interval until the prescribed fluence was delivered. Success of this pilot investigation motivated integration of the protocol into routine practice. Here, we present a retrospective review of recent clinical experience in a broad patient population. This was a retrospective review of an existing dermatology database. Fourteen caucasion patients-nine men and five women, ages 18-80, with a total of 51 superficial and 73 nodular BCCs, and three Bowen's disease lesions-were included. ALA was applied to each lesion for approximately 4 hours. Lesions received an initial irradiance of 30-50 mW/cm(2) for 20 J/cm(2) , followed by 150 mW/cm(2) for a total fluence of 200-300 J/cm(2) . Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Clinical outcome was determined at 6-12 months. Median VAS scores were 1.0 for both irradiances. Five of 127 lesions required pain control with 1% xylocaine. Pain was strongly influenced by lesion location but not by lesion type, number, or size. Complete responses were achieved in 84.1% of BCCs, which compares favorably with reported results for single ALA-PDT treatments. Two of three Bowen's disease lesions showed a complete response. Complete responses for nodular BCCs were 37%, which are also within the range of reported outcomes. A two-step irradiance protocol in ALA-PDT effectively minimizes pain, maintains excellent clinical outcomes in superficial lesions, and adds minimal treatment time. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation induces selective influx of CD4+ T lymphocytes in normal human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nuzzo, S.; de Rie, M. A.; van der Loos, C. M.; Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    The proportion and composition of the human cutaneous CD3+ T lymphocyte population was determined in situ following a single exposure to physiological, erythema-inducing doses of simulated solar radiation, mainly consisting of UV radiation. Biopsies were taken 1, 2 and 7 days after local irradiation

  7. Comparison of three techniques for skin total irradiation with electrons; Comparacao de tres tecnicas de irradiacao total da pele com eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: dbatista@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bardella, Lucia H. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rosa, Luiz A.R. da, E-mail: lrosa@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper compared three techniques of skin total irradiation with electrons: 1) horizontal positioning, 2) vertical positioning - rotatory technique and 3) vertical positioning - six fields technique. For that, a anthropomorphic phantom was positioned according to the recommendation for each technique and was i radiated at the linear accelerator by using the 6 MeV electrons. Radiochromic films were positioned on the surface in various regions of the phantom for measurement of absorbed dose. A ionization chamber was positioned inside of equivalent issue plates for dose evaluation due to the photons produced by electron stopping. The technique 2 and 3 have shown too similar in the results and number or discrepant points (8 and 10 respectively) of prescription lower than the technique 1 (22 points). The total body dose of photons of the 1, 2 and 3 techniques was 2.2%, 5.3% and 5.2% respectively

  8. Common-path Fourier domain optical coherence tomography of irradiated human skin and ventilated isolated rabbit lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, A.; Wendel, M.; Knels, L.; Knuschke, P.; Mehner, M.; Koch, T.; Boller, D.; Koch, P.; Koch, E.

    2005-08-01

    A compact common path Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system based on a broadband superluminescence diode is used for biomedical imaging. The epidermal thickening of human skin after exposure to ultraviolet radiation is measured to proof the feasibility of FD-OCT for future substitution of invasive biopsies in a long term study on natural UV skin protection. The FD-OCT system is also used for imaging lung parenchyma. FD-OCT images of a formalin fixated lung show the same alveolar structure as scanning electron microscopy images. In the ventilated and blood-free perfused isolated rabbit lung FD-OCT is used for real-time cross-sectional image capture of alveolar mechanics throughout tidal ventilation. The alveolar mechanics changing from alternating recruitment-derecruitment at zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to persistent recruitment after applying a PEEP of 5 cm H2O is observed in the OCT images.

  9. Ultraviolet B irradiation of skin induces mast cell degranulation and release of tumour necrosis factor-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    In the 'sunburn' response in skin, dermal blood vessels are activated and traffic of dendritic Langerhans' cells altered. While these changes have been attributed to the cytokine TNF-α, the source of this acutely released TNF has not been identified. This report demonstrates that the 'sunburn' response, both in vivo and in vitro, is accompanied by rapid degranulation of cutaneous mast cells, with consequential release of intracellular stores of TNF. Epidermal keratinocytes were only minor contributors to local TNF production. Expression of the TNF-inducible CD62E (E-selectin/ELAM-1) and CD54 adhesion molecules on cutaneous endothelium occurred 2 hours following mast cell degranulation, and this event was sensitive to blockade of mast cells with disodium cromoglycate. These results indicate that TNF release in skin in the acute sunburn response can largely be attributed to mast cells. 47 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  10. Ultraviolet B irradiation of skin induces mast cell degranulation and release of tumour necrosis factor-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, L.J. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Dentistry, Immunopathology Unit

    1995-06-01

    In the `sunburn` response in skin, dermal blood vessels are activated and traffic of dendritic Langerhans` cells altered. While these changes have been attributed to the cytokine TNF-{alpha}, the source of this acutely released TNF has not been identified. This report demonstrates that the `sunburn` response, both in vivo and in vitro, is accompanied by rapid degranulation of cutaneous mast cells, with consequential release of intracellular stores of TNF. Epidermal keratinocytes were only minor contributors to local TNF production. Expression of the TNF-inducible CD62E (E-selectin/ELAM-1) and CD54 adhesion molecules on cutaneous endothelium occurred 2 hours following mast cell degranulation, and this event was sensitive to blockade of mast cells with disodium cromoglycate. These results indicate that TNF release in skin in the acute sunburn response can largely be attributed to mast cells. 47 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  11. SU-F-T-515: Increased Skin Dose in Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Due to Carbon Fiber Couch and Vacuum Bag Immobilization Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, D; Zhao, Z; Wang, X; Yang, J [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the surface dose for supine craniospinal irradiation employing posterior beams, treating through an imaging couch and BlueBag immobilization device. Methods: The percentage depth dose (PDD) in the buildup region of a clinical 6 MV photon beam was measured using an Advanced Markus parallel plate ionization chamber in a solid water phantom. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} anterior beam was measured at 100 cm SSD, simulating a traditional prone craniospinal technique. The measurements were compared to commissioning and treatment planning system data. The PDD was also measured in a posterior setup with the phantom surface laying directly on the Brainlab carbon fiber imaging couch, with the phantom surface 100 cm from the source, simulating a supine craniospinal setup. The posterior measurements were repeated with a BlueBag vacuum immobilization device between the couch and phantom, with thicknesses of 1.7 cm and 5 cm. The PDD from a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field and a typical 6×30 cm{sup 2} craniospinal field were also compared. The PDDs were normalized at 5 cm to reflect typical craniospinal prescription dose normalization. Results: The measured PDD curve from the anterior setup agreed well with commissioning and treatment planning data, with surface doses of 19.9%, 28.8% and 27.7%, respectively. The surface doses of the 10×10 cm{sup 2} and 6×30 cm{sup 2} fields delivered through the imaging couch were both 122.4%. The supine setup yielded surface doses of 122.4%, 121.6%, and 119.6% for the couch only, 1.7 cm bag, and 5 cm bag setups, respectively. Conclusion: Delivering craniospinal irradiation through a carbon fiber couch removes the majority of skin sparing. The addition of a vacuum bag immobilization device restores some skin sparing, but the magnitude of this effect is negligible.

  12. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in UVA-irradiated human skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treina, G.; Scaletta, C.; Frenk, E.; Applegate, L.A.; Fourtanier, A.; Seite, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation represents an important oxidative stress to human skin and certain forms of oxidative stress have been shown to modulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. ICAM-1 has been shown to play an important part in many immune reactions and the perturbations of this molecule by ultraviolet radiation could have implications in many inflammatory responses. An enhancement immunohistochemical method with avidin/biotin was used for analysing the early effects of UVA radiation on human cell cultures and human skin (340-400 nm). Both in vitro and in vivo data show that ICAM-1 staining in epidermal keratinocytes, which was expressed constitutively, decreased in a UVA dose-dependent manner. The decrease was most noted at 3-6 h following UVA radiation with some ICAM-1 staining returning by 48 h post-UVA. ICAM-1 positive staining in the dermis was specific for vascular structures and was increased 24 h after UVA radiation. Cultured dermal fibroblasts exhibited ICAM-1 staining which increased slightly within 6-48 h post-UVA radiation. As epidermal ICAM-1 expression is depleted following UVA radiation and dermal expression increases due to an increase in the vascular structures, ICAM-1 provides a valuable marker following UVA radiation in human skin that can be readily measured in situ. (author)

  13. Reduction of birefringence in a skin-layer of injection molded polymer strips using CO{sub 2} laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Yasuo; Satoh, Isao; Saito, Takushi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Intelligent Systems Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Injection molding of polymers is currently utilized for numerous industrial applications. Because of high productivity and stable quality of molded products, the injection-molding process makes the production costs lower, and therefore, is expected to spread more widely in the future. This paper deals with a technique for improving the optical quality of injection molded polymer products using radiative heating. The birefringence frozen in a skin-layer of the molded part was reduced by CO{sub 2} laser heating, and the efficiency of this technique was investigated experimentally. Namely, a simple numerical calculation was performed to estimate the heating efficiency of CO{sub 2} laser in the polymer, effects of radiation heating on the skin-layer of the molded polymer were observed by using a mold with transparent windows, and the residual birefringence frozen in the final molded specimen was measured. The results clearly showed that the birefringence in the skin-layer of injection molded polymer strips was reduced with CO{sub 2} laser heating. The authors believe that the proposed method for reducing the birefringence frozen in injection-molded polymer products is suitable for practical molding, because process time required for the injection-molding is only slightly increased with this method.

  14. Ultraviolet-B irradiation decreases IFN-gamma and increases IL-4 expression in psoriatic lesional skin in situ and in cultured dermal T cells derived from these lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskin, Gamze; Koomen, Cornelis W.; Picavet, Daisy; Bos, Jan D.; Teunissen, Marcel B. M.

    2003-01-01

    Type 1 cytokine producing T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is effective in the treatment of this disease. In normal skin, UVB causes a change in dermal microenvironment, leading to a decrease of IFN-gamma expressing type 1 T cells and a

  15. Frequent induction of chromosomal aberrations in in vivo skin fibroblasts after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: hints to chromosomal instability after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massenkeil, G.; Zschieschang, P.; Thiel, G.; Hemmati, P. G.; Budach, V.; Dörken, B.; Pross, J.; Arnold, R.

    2015-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been part of standard conditioning regimens before allogeneic stem cell transplantation for many years. Its effect on normal tissue in these patients has not been studied extensively. We studied the in vivo cytogenetic effects of TBI and high-dose chemotherapy on skin fibroblasts from 35 allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) patients. Biopsies were obtained prospectively (n = 18 patients) before, 3 and 12 months after allogeneic SCT and retrospectively (n = 17 patients) 23–65 months after SCT for G-banded chromosome analysis. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 2/18 patients (11 %) before allogeneic SCT, in 12/13 patients (92 %) after 3 months, in all patients after 12 months and in all patients in the retrospective group after allogeneic SCT. The percentage of aberrant cells was significantly higher at all times after allogeneic SCT compared to baseline analysis. Reciprocal translocations were the most common aberrations, but all other types of stable, structural chromosomal aberrations were also observed. Clonal aberrations were observed, but only in three cases they were detected in independently cultured flasks. A tendency to non-random clustering throughout the genome was observed. The percentage of aberrant cells was not different between patients with and without secondary malignancies in this study group. High-dose chemotherapy and TBI leads to severe chromosomal damage in skin fibroblasts of patients after SCT. Our long-term data suggest that this damage increases with time, possibly due to in vivo radiation-induced chromosomal instability

  16. Studies of DNA and chromosome damage in skin fibroblasts and blood lymphocytes from psoriasis patients treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredberg, A.; Lambert, B.; Lindblad, A.; Swanbeck, G.; Wennersten, G.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of human lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts in vitro to a single, clinically used dose of PUVA, i.e., 0.1 micrograms/ml of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus 0.9-4 J/cm2 of longwave ultraviolet radiation (UVA), lead to the formation of DNA damage as determined by alkaline elution, and to chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). When lymphocyte-enriched plasma was obtained from psoriasis patients 2 h after oral intake of 8-MOP and then UVA irradiated (1.8-3.6 J/cm2) in vitro, an increased frequency of chromosome aberrations and SCE was observed. Normal levels of chromosome aberrations and SCE were found in lymphocytes of psoriasis patients after 3-30 weeks of PUVA treatment in vivo. A small but statistically significant increase in the SCE frequency was observed in the lymphocytes of psoriasis patients treated for 1-6 years with PUVA (mean 18.0 SCE/cell) as compared with before PUVA (mean 15.8, p less than 0.05). Skin fibroblasts of psoriasis patients analyzed 5 years after the start of PUVA treatment showed a normal number of SCE but a high fraction of filter-retained DNA in the alkaline elution assay, suggesting the presence of cross-linked DNA

  17. Radiosensitivity of T and B lymphocytes. V. Effects of whole-body irradiation on numbers of recirculating T cells and sensitization to primary skin grafts in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Williams, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Whole-body exposure of mice to 50, 100, 300, or 500 rads results in an acute dose-related decrease in the number of viable recirculating T cells. The magnitude of this decrement becomes more pronounced with the passage of time. The dose-response relationship over this range of dosages appears to consist of three components: a steep drop between 0 and 50 rads, a plateau between 50 and 500 rads, and a second drop between 300 and 500 rads. The residual radioresistant cells are able to recognize a histoincompatible skin graft during the initial 5 days after irradiation. Low to moderate doses (50 to 300 rads) abrogate the partial tolerance noted in nonirradiated recipients exposed to the skin graft for 5 days and then regrafted from the same donor source 25 days after complete removal of the primary graft. A large (500 rads) dose results in prolonged graft survival in comparison with the nonirradiated group. It is suggested that the subpopulation of recirculating T cells which develops partial tolerance during a 5-day exposure to a homograft is more radiosensitive than the effector subpopulation which is involved in graft rejection

  18. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  19. Ciprofloxacin Enhances Stress Erythropoiesis in Spleen and Increases Survival after Whole-Body Irradiation Combined with Skin-Wound Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Figure 3D ). Analysis performed on kidney lysates from the same animals, however, revealed neither CI nor CIP significantly changed the total amount of HIF...cotton for nesting and a plastic dome. Irradiation Mice were placed in well-ventilated acrylic restrainers and given specified doses of whole-body...sterile water (vehicle) and after brief centrifugation sterile-filtered using a.22 mm cellulose nitrate (CN) filter system (Corning, Corning, NY). Each

  20. Mechanism of immune suppression by ultraviolet irradiation in vivo. I. Evidence for the existence of a unique photoreceptor in skin and its role in photoimmunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Fabo, E.C.; Noonan, F.P.

    1983-01-01

    UV irradiation of mice causes a systemic immune alteration that can be detected either by suppression of the immunologic rejection of UV-induced tumors, or by suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Suppression of these two immunologic responses has similar photobiologic characteristics and in both cases is associated with the generation of antigen-specific suppressor T cells. To identify whether a specific photoreceptor for this effect exists, the relative wavelength effectiveness (action spectrum) was determined for the UV-induced suppression of CHS. Narrow bands of UV (half bandwidth 3 nm) were used at 10 wavelengths from 250 to 320 nm to obtain dose-response curves. The action spectrum derived from the dose-response curves has a maximum between 260 and 270 nm, a shoulder at 280-290 nm, and declines steadily to approximately 3% of maximum at 320 nm. The finding of such a clearly defined wavelength dependence implies the presence of a specific photoreceptor for this effect. Removing the stratum corneum by tape stripping before UV irradiation prevented the suppression of CHS using 254-nm radiation, suggesting the photoreceptor is superficially located in the skin. The hypothesis is advanced that the photoreceptor for systemic UV-induced immunosuppression of contact hypersensitivity may be urocanic acid. As such, it may also play a role in UV-induced carcinogenesis via the production of tumor-specific suppressor cells

  1. Effects of whole body γ irradiation on skin wound cells and the repaired-promoting action of W11-a12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Chongxiang; Cheng Tianmin; Yan Guohe; Ran Xinze

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of 6 Gy whole body γ irradiation on components of wound cells and the repair-promoting action of W 11 -a 12 , an extract from Periplaneta americana. Methods: After mice were received 6 Gy gamma ray irradiation, the area of healing range in wound cross section, the cellular infiltration of wound and the content of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in wound epithelial cells were observed and the healing-promoting effect of W 11 -a 12 on the radiation-impaired wound was investigated. Results: The area of healing range in cross section was decreased, various infiltrated cells were all inhibited by radiation, but the range of inhibition was more or less different, and the descending order of severity was as follows: macrophages, vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts and epithelial cells. The content of bFGF in epithelial cells was decreased. W 11 -a 12 had beneficial heal-promoting effect on radiation-impaired wound: it increased cellular infiltration and promoted synthesis and secretion of bFGF in epithelial cells. Conclusion: The depletion of wound cells is mainly responsible for the healing deficits of radiation-impaired skin wound and W 11 -a 12 enhances cell migration and proliferation and promotes synthesis and secretion of bFGF in epithelial cells

  2. Cell kinetic changes in the follicular epithelium of pig skin after irradiation with single and fractionated doses of X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in cell kinetics of the follicular epithelium of the pig were studied after x-irradiation with single and fractionated doses (30 fractions/39 days) and compared with previous epidermal data. In the follicular epithelium there was an initial degenerative phase, when the rate of cell depletion was independent of radiation dose and mode of administration. Repopulation was seen between the 14th and 18th days after single doses (15 or 20 Gy) and by the 28th day after the start of irradiation with fractionated doses (52.3-80.0 Gy). The degree of cell depletion and subsequent rate of repopulation were independent of dose. The regenerative phase was characterized by an increased cell proliferation. Islands of cells with appearance similar to cells in the normal follicular epithelium, were seen 18 days after a single dose of 20 Gy and 42 days after the start of fractionated irradiation. Compared with the epidermis, the follicular epithelium exhibited considerably less evidence of damage after both single and fractionated doses. There was a lower incidence of degenerate cells and reduced levels of cell depletion in the follicular epithelium. (author)

  3. Physical examination of swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, B J; Hamilton, M; Masters, P G

    1992-07-01

    Swine may be examined to evaluate a disease state or a lowered economic performance or as a herd health consultation. As much of the examination as possible should be performed without handling the animal. A thorough history, evaluation of herd records, environmental examination, and herd examination should be performed prior to the evaluation of an individual animal. All necessary equipment should be available when starting the individual examination. The animals is then restrained and examined, and necessary samples are taken. Post-mortem examinations or slaughter house evaluations are a very frequent part of a health examination on swine. All samples taken should be in accordance with the standards of the laboratory that you use. You should work closely with the laboratory to obtain the best results. Physical examination of swine can be rewarding for the veterinarian as well as the producer. The most important aspect to remember is to have enough information and the proper equipment available to handle the animals for the minimal amount of time to gain the maximum benefits. Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs are similar to domestic swine in terms of their diseases and health but are dissimilar in management; pot-bellied pigs are frequently brought to the veterinarian for individual examinations. History is the most valuable part of the examination, followed by observation. Pot-bellied pigs prefer to be held securely with a hand under the chin and rump. The examination is conducted similarly to the examination of any companion animal. Chemical restraint often is necessary for sampling or minor surgical procedures. Owners should be consulted prior to the use of any restraint. This will help win their approval and confidence when working on their pets. While performing the physical examination, look at the pig's overall health as well as specific breed characteristics. Try to stay abreast of swine vaccination recommendations; you may be consulted in this regard. Most

  4. Effects of CO2 laser irradiation on the wettability and human skin fibroblast cell response of magnesia partially stabilised zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, L.; Lawrence, J.

    2003-01-01

    Human skin fibroblast cells in vitro responses on the surface of a bioinert zirconia ceramic partially stabilised with magnesia partially stabilised zirconia (MgO-PSZ) bioinert ceramic before and after CO 2 laser treatment were investigated to find the interrelationship between the cell adhesion, wettability and laser parameters. Contact angle, θ, measurements of a set of test liquids were a clear indication that surface treatment of the MgO-PSZ with a CO 2 laser brought about a reduction in θ, indicating that the wettability of the MgO-PSZ had been enhanced. A relationship was found between the wettability and the microstructure of the MgO-PSZ surface and laser processing parameters. It was subsequently deduced that the factors active in causing the observed modification in the wettability of the MgO-PSZ were the increases in the surface O 2 content and the polar component of the surface energy, γ sv p , the latter resulting from surface melting and resolidification. Moreover, the investigation into the human skin fibroblast cell response revealed that the CO 2 laser treatment of the MgO-PSZ had resulted in a surface favourable for cell adhesion, as the extent of cell attachment and adhesion on the MgO-PSZ surface was enhanced depending on laser parameters. Such an improvement in cell adhesion, which could be greatly beneficial to developing enhanced bonding at the tissue and implant interface, was influenced by the surface properties of the modified MgO-PSZ, particular wettability

  5. Acute leukemia after radiotherapy in a patient with Turcot's syndrome. Impaired colony formation in skin fibroblast cultures after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.P.; Little, J.B.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Paterson, M.C.; Arlett, C.; Garnick, M.B.; Mayer, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Colonic polyposis and carcinoma developed in a woman with Turcot's syndrome at the age of 31 years; astrocytoma developed when she was 37. Her brother and sister had died of astrocytoma at the ages of 18 and 33 years, respectively. Progressive neutropenia developed in the patient three months after radiotherapy for her brain tumor and acute myelomonocytic leukemia 19 months after treatment. Three laboratories independently evaluated cultures of her skin fibroblasts for in vitro sensitivity to cell killing (loss of colony-forming ability) by x-rays. Survival assays consistently revealed slight but significant radiosensitivity in an early-passage (six to 10 doublings) fibroblast subculture. A later subculture (21 to 29 doublings) showed no abnormality, a possible effect of selective in vitro loss of radiosensitive cells

  6. Skin Inqjuries Reduce Survival and Modulate Corticosterone, C-Reactive Protein, Complement Component 3, IgM, and Prostaglandin E2 after Whole-Body Reactor-Produced Mixed Field (n + γ-Photons Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliann G. Kiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin injuries such as wounds or burns following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury (RCI increase mortality more than whole-body γ-irradiation alone. Wound-induced decreases in survival after irradiation are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection. Among these factors, radiation-induced increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6 concentrations in serum were amplified by skin wound trauma. Herein, the IL-6-induced stress proteins including C-reactive protein (CRP, complement 3 (C3, immunoglobulin M (IgM, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were evaluated after skin injuries given following a mixed radiation environment that might be found after a nuclear incident. In this report, mice received 3 Gy of reactor-produced mixed field (n+γ-photons radiations at 0.38 Gy/min followed by nonlethal skin wounding or burning. Both wounds and burns reduced survival and increased CRP, C3, and PGE2 in serum after radiation. Decreased IgM production along with an early rise in corticosterone followed by a subsequent decrease was noted for each RCI situation. These results suggest that RCI-induced alterations of corticosterone, CRP, C3, IgM, and PGE2 cause homeostatic imbalance and may contribute to reduced survival. Agents inhibiting these responses may prove to be therapeutic for RCI and improve related survival.

  7. Photodynamic therapy using a novel irradiation source, LED lamp, is similarly effective to photodynamic therapy using diode laser or metal-halide lamp on DMBA- and TPA-induced mouse skin papillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakajima, Susumu; Ogasawara, Koji; Asano, Ryuji; Nakae, Yoshinori; Sakata, Isao; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is useful for superficial skin tumors such as actinic keratosis and Bowen disease. Although PDT is non-surgical and easily-performed treatment modality, irradiation apparatus is large and expensive. Using 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 12-ο-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin papilloma model, we compared the efficacy of TONS501- and ALA-PDT with a LED lamp, a diode laser lamp or a metal-halide lamp on the skin tumor regression. TONS501-PDT using 660 nm LED lamp showed anti-tumor effect at 1 day following the irradiation and the maximal anti-tumor effect was observed at 3 days following the irradiation. There was no significant difference in the anti-tumor effects among TONS501-PDT using LED, TONS501-PDT using diode laser, and 5-aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride (ALA)-PDT using metal-halide lamp. Potent anti-tumor effect on DMBA- and TPA-induced mouse skin papilloma was observed by TONS501-PDT using 660 nm LED, which might be more useful for clinical applications. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Skin graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... donor site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  9. Seroprevalence of hepatitis E in swine abattoir workers.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The disease poses economic ... III and IV infect both swine and humans; and are re- ... associated with transmission in swine abattoir workers in ..... tal evidence for cross-species infection by swine hepatitis ... A novel virus in swine is closely.

  10. MANAGEMENT PATIENT OF SWINE INFLUENZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endra Gunawan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an acute respiratory diseases caused by various influenza virus which infect the upper and lower respiratory tract and often accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever, headache and muscle pain. Influenza spreads through the air. Swine influenza comes from swine and can cause an outbreaks in pig flocks. Even this is a kind of a rare case but the swine influenza could be transmitted to human by direct contact with infected swine or through environment that already being contaminated by swine influenza virus. There are 3 types of swine influenza virus namely H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2. Type H1N1 swine-virus had been known since 1918. Avian influenza virus infection is transmitted from one person to another through secret containing virus. Virus is binded into the mucous cells of respiratory tract before it is finally infecting the cells itself. Management patients with H1N1 influenza is based on the complications and the risk. Besides, it is also need to consider the clinical criteria of the patient. Therapy medicamentosa is applied to the patients by giving an antiviral, antibiotics and symptomatic therapy. Prevention can be done by avoid contact with infected animal or environment, having antiviral prophylaxis and vaccination.

  11. Control of African swine fever epidemics in industrialized swine populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten

    2016-01-01

    , it is important to explore strategies that can effectively control an epidemic of ASF. In this study, the epidemiological and economic effects of strategies to control the spread of ASF between domestic swine herds were examined using a published model (DTU-DADS-ASF). The control strategies were the basic EU...... and national strategy (Basic), the basic strategy plus pre-emptive depopulation of neighboring swine herds, and intensive surveillance of herds in the control zones, including testing live or dead animals. Virus spread via wild boar was not modelled. Under the basic control strategy, the median epidemic......African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a high impact on swine health. The disease is endemic in certain regions in the Baltic countries and has spread to Poland constituting a risk of ASF spread toward Western Europe. Therefore, as part of contingency planning...

  12. Evidence that novobiocin and nalidixic acid do not inhibit excision repair in u.v.-irradiated human skin fibroblasts at a pre-incision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of novobiocin and nalidixic acid on the specific toxicity of aphidicolin towards u.v. irradiated arrested human skin fibroblasts have been determined. Contrary to the result expected if either drug were causing inhibition of excision repair at a pre-incision step the sector of toxicity due to a combined treatment of 300 μg ml -1 nalidixic acid and 1.0 μg ml -1 aphidicolin is unchanged when compared with that due to treatment with 1.0 μg ml -1 aphidicolin alone, while that for 150 μg ml -1 novobiocin + 1.0 μg ml -1 aphidicolin was slightly increased. In parallel measurements of the inhibition of u.v.-induced DNA repair synthesis in arrested fibroblasts by these drugs, 150 μg ml -1 novobiocin inhibited repair synthesis by approx.60% over the fluence range employed. Nalidixic acid (300 μg ml -1 ) caused no detectable inhibition of repair synthesis. It was concluded that the mode of action of novobiocin in the inhibition of DNA excision repair is not via the inhibition of a pre-incision step and the data do not support the hypothesis that a type II topoisomerase mediated change in DNA supercoiling is an essential early step in excision repair of u.v.-induced damage. (author)

  13. Evidence that novobiocin and nalidixic acid do not inhibit excision repair in u.v.-irradiated human skin fibroblasts at a pre-incision step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of novobiocin and nalidixic acid on the specific toxicity of aphidicolin towards u.v. irradiated arrested (nondividing) human skin fibroblasts have been determined. Contrary to the result expected if either drug were causing inhibition of excision repair at a pre-incision step the sector of toxicity due to a combined treatment of 300 micrograms ml -1 nalidixic acid and 1.0 micrograms ml -1 aphidicolin is unchanged when compared with that due to treatment with 1.0 micrograms ml -1 aphidicolin alone, while that for 150 micrograms ml -1 novobiocin + 1.0 micrograms ml -1 aphidicolin was slightly increased. In parallel measurements of the inhibition of u.v.-induced DNA repair synthesis in arrested fibroblasts by these drugs, 150 micrograms ml -1 novobiocin inhibited repair synthesis by approximately 60% over the fluence range employed. Nalidixic acid at a concentration of 300 micrograms ml -1 caused no detectable inhibition of repair synthesis. The authors conclude that the mode of action of novobiocin in the inhibition of DNA excision repair is not via the inhibition of a pre-incision step and the data do not support the hypothesis that a type II topoisomerase mediated change in DNA supercoiling is an essential early step in excision repair of u.v.-induced damage

  14. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  15. Radiation effects on vitamin A and β-carotene contents in bovine liver and swine pate de foie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taipina, Magda Sinigalia

    2001-01-01

    In this study, vitamin A and β-carotene contents and the percent of activity retention were analyzed in 3 kGy and 30 kGy 60 Co γ-irradiated samples of bovine liver and swine liver pate. Six different lots of liver samples weighing 100 g obtained at the meat market were employed. Irradiation was performed with liver samples initially frozen (-15 deg C). Similarly, six different lots of swine liver pate samples weighing about 100 - 125 g , at temperature of 7 deg C were irradiated. Pre-treatments and analysis methods were those described in Instituto Adolfo Lutz Norms for food analyses. Two and five- gram samples in duplicates for bovine liver and five gram-samples for swine liver pate were used. The results showed that there were no losses of either vitamin A or provitamin A activities in the samples of bovine liver and swine liver pate irradiated with a dose of 3 kGy (retention about 100%). On the other hand, for swine liver pate samples of vitamin A were maintained after irradiation with 30 kGy. (author)

  16. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend ...

  17. African Swine Fever Virus, Siberia, Russia, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasov, Denis; Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Gogin, Andrey; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is arguably the most dangerous and emerging swine disease worldwide. ASF is a serious problem for the swine industry. The first case of ASF in Russia was reported in 2007. We report an outbreak of ASF in Siberia, Russia, in 2017.

  18. Using Pig skin to treat Burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katebe, R.

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses the use of irradiated Pig Skin for the treatment of Burns, traumatic dermal denudations and poorly healing Decubitus ulcers. It gives a brief history of Pig skin use its characteristics

  19. Utilização da nebulização e ventilação forçada sobre o desempenho e a temperatura da pele de suínos na fase de terminação Effect of nebulization and artificial ventilation on the performance and skin temperature of finishing swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Euquério de Carvalho

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da nebulização e ventilação forçada sobre o desempenho e a temperatura da pele de suínos na fase de terminação. Utilizaram-se 137 animais (Landrace x Large White x Duroc machos castrados e fêmeas, distribuídos em um delineamento de blocos ao acaso, com dois tratamentos de oito repetições por tratamento, com média de oito animais/baia. Os tratamentos utilizados foram: T1 = sem nebulização de água e ventilação forçada e T2 = com nebulização de água e ventilação forçada. Durante o período experimental, a temperatura média observada foi de 26,32ºC (variando de 23,32 a 30,72ºC e a umidade relativa do ar média, de 64,5%. Os resultados não demonstraram diferenças significativas entre os tratamentos utilizados para as variáveis ganho de peso médio diário, consumo de ração médio diário e conversão alimentar. Entretanto, a nebulização de água associada à ventilação forçada apresentou menores valores de temperatura da pele, indicando melhor conforto aos animais. Não é necessário o uso de nebulização e ventilação forçada em instalações para suínos na fase de terminação, pois, apesar da melhoria no conforto dos animais (temperatura da pele, não trouxe benefício sobre o desempenho dos mesmos.An experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of nebulization and artificial ventilation on the performance and skin temperature of finishing swine. Castrated males and females (n = 137; Landrace x Large White x Duroc were allotted to two treatments by using a radomized bolck design, with eight replicates: T1 = pens without either nebulization or artificial ventilation; T2 = pens with both nebulization and artificial ventilation. There was an average of eight animals per each pen. During the experimental period, average air temperature was 26.32ºC (from 23.32 to 30.72ºC and humidity, 64.5%. No signifgicant effects of treatments on

  20. Swine Flu -A Comprehensive View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vandana; Sood, Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    The present article is aimed on comprehensive view of Swine flu. It was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in USA. Pandemic caused by H1N1 in 2009 brought it in limelight. Itís a viral respiratory disease caused by viruses that infects pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine virus consist of eight RNA strands, one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu spreads from infected person to healthy person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets contaminated with virus while sneezing or coughing. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu, flu shot and nasal spray. WHO recommended for pandemic period to prevent its future outbreaks through vaccines or non-vaccines means. Antiviral drugs effective against this virus are Tamiflu and Relenza. Rapid antigen testing (RIDT), DFA testing, viral culture, and molecular testing (RT-PCR) are used for its diagnosis in laboratory

  1. Feed quality in swine diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Branislav

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper will demonstrate the quality of some feed used in swine diet. The emphasis will be on feed whose incorporation into mixes could result in unfavorable effects on production, health and economic production of swine. Data will be presented on maize and its possible negative effects, having in mind toxins. Soybean meal, or genetically modified soybean meal, will also be observed. The next feed which will be discussed will be soybean whey obtained by different procedures and the potential dangers of its use in swine diet rations. Sunflower meal, feed of animal origin, with emphasis on fish flour and meat-bone flour will also be covered in the work. A feed which has been attracting particular attention lately is yeast imported from Italy. Its quality characteristics will be discussed, the so-called non-protein nitrogen. Analyses of mineral feed will include sources of phosphorus, phosphates (monocalciumphosphate, dicalcium phosphate phytases and resolving the problem of phosphorus in swine rations. Finally, an inevitable segment are synthetic amino acids, especially lysine and its role in swine diet.

  2. Tissue Disposition and Withdrawal Time of Fosfomycin in Swines after Oral and Intramuscular Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, Denisa Soledad; Soraci, Alejandro Luis; Tapia, Maria Ofelia

    2016-01-01

    A HPLC-MS/MS method, which was suitable to be used in withdrawal time studies, was validated for the determination of fosfomycin in swine muscle, liver, kidney and skin-fat. Therefore, the withdrawal time of fosfomycin in swines, considering a MRL of 0.5 μg/mL was studied. Forty-eight pigs were assigned to two groups; in group one, fosfomycin was orally administered daily with 30 mg⁄kg bw and to the other group a dose of 15 mg⁄kg bw of the antibiotic was intramuscularly administered. Pigs wer...

  3. Validation and dosimetric evaluation employing the techniques of TL and OSL of thermoluminescent materials for application in the dosimetry of clinical beams of electrons used in total irradiation of the skin - TSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Shirlane Barbosa de

    2017-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry has become an important role for the treatment of total skin irradiation within a rigorous quality assurance program that should be an integral part of the radiotherapy departments. TSI dosimetry is difficult because of the complexity of the treatment in assessing dose uniformity and measuring the dose absorbed at shallow depths throughout the skin surface extent, resulting in a wide variation in dose distribution. The TLDs have proven to be very useful for the distribution and verification of the dose prescribed for the patient as the dose may differ from place to place due to patient body geometry, overlapping of structures and asymmetries of the radiation field. The use of TLDs in vivo can identify variations in the prescribed dose because its measurement accuracy and great precision. Several types of dosimeters have been used in the radiotherapy sectors, the most commonly used are Lithium Fluride (TLD-100), where it obtains a long history in this type of application. New dosimetric materials have gained great importance in the dosimetry of clinical electron beams, such as Dysprosium-doped Calcium Sulphate (TL) and Carbon doped (OSL) based Aluminum Oxide, This work evaluates the performance of the respective thermoluminescent dosimeters and the optically stimulated luminescence in the dosimetry of clinical electron beams used in total irradiation of the skin. (author)

  4. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Skin KidsHealth / For Kids / Your Skin What's in this ... body) are really dead skin cells. Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  5. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be..., except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or exposed to pseudorabies. Pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered...

  6. Time and dose-related changes in the thickness of pig skin after irradiation with single doses of [sup 90]Sr/[sup 90]Y [beta]-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezvani, M.; Hamlet, R.; Hopewell, J.W.; Sieber, V.K. (Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-01

    Time-related changes in pig skin thickness have been evaluated using a non-invasive ultrasound technique after exposure to a range of single doses of [sup 90]Sr/[sup 90]Yr [beta]-rays. The reduction in relative skin thickness developed in two distinct phases: the first was between 12 and 20 weeks postirradiation. No further changes were then seen until 52 weeks postirradiation when a second phase of skin thinning was observed. This was complete after 76 weeks and no further changes in relative skin thickness were seen in the maximum follow up period of 129 weeks. The timings of these phases of damage were independent of the radiation dose, however, the severity of both phases of radiation-induced skin thinning were dose related. (Author).

  7. Time and dose-related changes in the thickness of pig skin after irradiation with single doses of 90Sr/90Y β-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezvani, M.; Hamlet, R.; Hopewell, J.W.; Sieber, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    Time-related changes in pig skin thickness have been evaluated using a non-invasive ultrasound technique after exposure to a range of single doses of 90 Sr/ 90 Yr β-rays. The reduction in relative skin thickness developed in two distinct phases: the first was between 12 and 20 weeks postirradiation. No further changes were then seen until 52 weeks postirradiation when a second phase of skin thinning was observed. This was complete after 76 weeks and no further changes in relative skin thickness were seen in the maximum follow up period of 129 weeks. The timings of these phases of damage were independent of the radiation dose, however, the severity of both phases of radiation-induced skin thinning were dose related. (Author)

  8. Fully portable blood irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    A fully portable blood irradiator was developed using the beta emitter thulium-170 as the radiation source and vitreous carbon as the body of the irradiator, matrix for isotope encapsulation, and blood interface material. These units were placed in exteriorized arteriovenous shunts in goats, sheep, and dogs and the effects on circulating lymphocytes and on skin allograft retention times measured. The present work extends these studies by establishing baseline data for skin graft rejection times in untreated animals

  9. Microbiome overview in swine lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Maboni Siqueira

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiologic agent of swine enzootic pneumonia. However other mycoplasma species and secondary bacteria are found as inhabitants of the swine respiratory tract, which can be also related to disease. In the present study we have performed a total DNA metagenomic analysis from the lungs of pigs kept in a field condition, with suggestive signals of enzootic pneumonia and without any infection signals to evaluate the bacteria variability of the lungs microbiota. Libraries from metagenomic DNA were prepared and sequenced using total DNA shotgun metagenomic pyrosequencing. The metagenomic distribution showed a great abundance of bacteria. The most common microbial families identified from pneumonic swine's lungs were Mycoplasmataceae, Flavobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae, whereas in the carrier swine's lungs the most common families were Mycoplasmataceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Flavobacteriaceae. Analysis of community composition in both samples confirmed the high prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae. Moreover, the carrier lungs had more diverse family population, which should be related to the lungs normal flora. In summary, we provide a wide view of the bacterial population from lungs with signals of enzootic pneumonia and lungs without signals of enzootic pneumonia in a field situation. These bacteria patterns provide information that may be important for the establishment of disease control measures and to give insights for further studies.

  10. Production system dynamism and parasitic interac- tion of swine in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pasture and on swine with poor body condition compared to zero grazing, and on swine with ... Many countries practice different kinds of production approaches. ... farms with an average herd size of 29 swine were sampled by random sam-.

  11. Microbiota in fermented feed and swine gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Shi, Changyou; Zhang, Yu; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Wang, Yizhen

    2018-04-01

    Development of alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) used in swine production requires a better understanding of their impacts on the gut microbiota. Supplementing fermented feed (FF) in swine diets as a novel nutritional strategy to reduce the use of AGP and feed price, can positively affect the porcine gut microbiota, thereby improving pig productivities. Previous studies have noted the potential effects of FF on the shift in benefit of the swine microbiota in different regions of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The positive influences of FF on swine gut microbiota may be due to the beneficial effects of both pre- and probiotics. Necessarily, some methods should be adopted to properly ferment and evaluate the feed and avoid undesired problems. In this mini-review, we mainly discuss the microbiota in both fermented feed and swine gut and how FF influences swine gut microbiota.

  12. Human adipose-derived stem cell spheroid treated with photobiomodulation irradiation accelerates tissue regeneration in mouse model of skin flap ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Su; Chung, Phil-Sang; Ahn, Jin Chul; Leproux, Anais

    2017-11-01

    Skin flap grafting is a form of transplantation widely used in plastic surgery. However, ischemia/reperfusion injury is the main factor which reduces the survival rate of flaps following grafting. We investigated whether photobiomodulation (PBM) precondition prior to human adipose-derived stromal cell (hASC) spheroid (PBM-spheroid) transplantation improved skin tissue functional recovery by the stimulation of angiogenesis and tissue regeneration in skin flap of mice. The LED had an emission wavelength peaked at 660 ± 20 nm (6 J/cm 2 , 10 mW/cm 2 ). The expression of angiogenic growth factors in PBM-spheroid hASCs was much greater than that of not-PBM-treated spheroid or monolayer-cultured hASCs. From immunochemical staining analysis, the hASCs of PBM-spheroid were CD31 + , KDR + , and CD34 + , whereas monolayer-cultured hASCs were negative for these markers. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of hASC PBM-spheroid in vivo, PBS, monolayer-cultured hASCs, and not-PBM-spheroid were transplanted into a skin flap model. The animals were observed for 14 days. The PBM-spheroid hASCs transplanted into the skin flap ischemia differentiated into endothelial cells and remained differentiated. Transplantation of PBM-spheroid hASCs into the skin flap ischemia significantly elevated the density of vascular formations through angiogenic factors released by the skin flap ischemia and enhanced tissue regeneration at the lesion site. Consistent with these results, the transplantation of PBM-spheroid hASCs significantly improved functional recovery compared with PBS, monolayer-cultured hASCs, and not-PBM-spheroid treatment. These findings suggest that transplantation of PBM-spheroid hASCs may be an effective stem cell therapy for the treatment of skin flap ischemia.

  13. The dependence of skin lesions on the depth-dose distribution from β-irradiation of people in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanova, A.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed study was made of conditions of exposure of 56 Chernobyl victims who suffered skin radiation lesions. The most typical conditions were experimentally reconstructed to investigate specific characteristics of dose distribution to the skin according to depth for different exposure conditions. Absorbed doses at depths of 7 mg cm -2 and 150 mg cm -2 were calculated on the basis of measurements with multilayer skin dosemeters. Patients were classified into four groups. Dosimetric characteristics for each group were compared with clinical pictures to establish critical factors in the occurrence of lesions. It was demonstrated that depth-dose distribution of β-radiation to the skin is of great influence not only for early effects of radiation but also for later effects. Radiation lesions in the skin led to death if the area of the lesions exceeded about 50% total body surface, and if doses to the skin were about 200-300 Gy at 7 mg cm -2 and more than about 30 Gy at 150 mg cm -2 . (author)

  14. Post irradiation conical keratosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestey, J.P.; Hunter, J.A.A.; Mallet, R.B.; Rodger, A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have recently seen 3 patients affected by a widespread eruption of minute keratoses confined to areas of irradiated skin with clinical and histologial features of which they have been unable to find previous literary descriptions. A fourth patient with similar clinical and histopathological features occurring after exposure only to actinic irradiation is described. (author)

  15. Post irradiation conical keratosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestey, J.P.; Hunter, J.A.A. (Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (UK)); Mallet, R.B. (Westminster Hospital, London (UK)); Rodger, A. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (UK))

    1989-03-01

    The authors have recently seen 3 patients affected by a widespread eruption of minute keratoses confined to areas of irradiated skin with clinical and histologial features of which they have been unable to find previous literary descriptions. A fourth patient with similar clinical and histopathological features occurring after exposure only to actinic irradiation is described. (author).

  16. Development of blood irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This project is designed to improve the techniques of blood irradiation through the development of improved and portable blood irradiators. A portable blood irradiator, consisting of a vitreous carbon body and thulium-170 radiation source, was attached to dogs via a carotid-jugular shunt, and its effects on the immune system measured. The device has demonstrated both significant suppression of circulating lymphocytes and prolonged retention of skin allografts

  17. Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  18. The Role of AKT/mTOR Pathway in Stress Response to UV-Irradiation: Implication in Skin Carcinogenesis by Regulation of Apoptosis, Autophagy and Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozyk, Elwira; Kulms, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Induction of DNA damage by UVB and UVA radiation may generate mutations and genomic instability leading to carcinogenesis. Therefore, skin cells being repeatedly exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light have acquired multilayered protective mechanisms to avoid malignant transformation. Besides extensive DNA repair mechanisms, the damaged skin cells can be eliminated by induction of apoptosis, which is mediated through the action of tumor suppressor p53. In order to prevent the excessive loss of skin cells and to maintain the skin barrier function, apoptotic pathways are counteracted by anti-apoptotic signaling including the AKT/mTOR pathway. However, AKT/mTOR not only prevents cell death, but is also active in cell cycle transition and hyper-proliferation, thereby also counteracting p53. In turn, AKT/mTOR is tuned down by the negative regulators being controlled by the p53. This inhibition of AKT/mTOR, in combination with transactivation of damage-regulated autophagy modulators, guides the p53-mediated elimination of damaged cellular components by autophagic clearance. Alternatively, p53 irreversibly blocks cell cycle progression to prevent AKT/mTOR-driven proliferation, thereby inducing premature senescence. Conclusively, AKT/mTOR via an extensive cross talk with p53 influences the UV response in the skin with no black and white scenario deciding over death or survival. PMID:23887651

  19. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  20. Chronic effects of UV on human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarini, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Chronic exposures and acute accidents of the skin to UV has been recognized as an important risk for skin cancers in human. Attempts have been made with mathematical models to correlate the ambient UV dose and occupational irradiations with the risk of skin cancers. Development of accurate global measurements of solar irradiance and personal dosimetry is expected in the future in order to reduce the exposure of the general population, to precise the measures to be taken for indoor and outdoor workers. (author)

  1. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  2. Analysis of the collagen birefringence and the relative attenuation coefficient of health and burned skin irradiated with linearly polarized He-Ne laser; Analise da birrefringencia do colageno e do coeficiente de atenuacao de amostras de pele sadia e queimada irradiadas pelo laser de He-Ne linearmente polarizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da

    2002-07-01

    Low-intensity laser therapy is characterized by its ability to induce athermic effects and nondestructive photobiological processes. Although it has been in use for more than 40 years, this phototherapy is still not an established therapeutic modality. The objectives of this study were: to quantify the collagen fibers organization by polarized light microscopy in normal and burned skin samples at day 17 post-injury considering preferential axis as the animal's spinal column and aligning the linear laser polarization in two directions of polarization, parallel or perpendicular to this axis; to determine the relative attenuation coefficient for the intensity light by the technique of imaging the light distribution in normal and burned skin during wound healing process taking only parallel direction of polarization. To reach the objectives, burns about 6 mm in diameter were created with liquid N{sub 2} on the back of the rats and the lesions were irradiated on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-wounding, D= 1 J/cm{sup 2}, to investigate the effects of low-intensity linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam on skin wounds healing. Control lesions were not irradiated. The results have demonstrated that: the skin samples irradiated with linearly parallel polarized He-Ne laser beam showed collagen fibers more organized; burned skin samples presents a higher attenuation coefficient than normal skin samples. These results are important to optimize low intensity laser therapy dosimetry on acceleration wound healing. (author)

  3. Antibody levels to hepatitis E virus in North Carolina swine workers, non-swine workers, swine, and murids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Mark R; Correa, Maria T; Morrow, Morgan; Stebbins, Martha E; Seriwatana, Jitvimol; Webster, W David; Boak, Marshall B; Vaughn, David W

    2002-04-01

    In a cross-sectional serosurvey, eastern North Carolina swine workers (n = 165) were compared with non-swine workers (127) for the presence of antibodies to hepatitis E virus as measured by a quantitative immunoglobulin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Using a cutoff of 20 Walter Reed U/ml, swine-exposed subjects had a 4.5-fold higher antibody prevalence (10.9%) than unexposed subjects (2.4%). No evidence of past clinical hepatitis E or unexplained jaundice could be elicited. Swine (84) and mice (61), from farm sites in the same region as exposed subjects, were also tested. Antibody prevalence in swine (overall = 34.5%) varied widely (10.0-91.7%) according to site, but no antibody was detected in mice. Our data contribute to the accumulating evidence that hepatitis E may be a zoonosis and specifically to the concept of it as an occupational infection of livestock workers.

  4. Protocol: Transmission and prevention of influenza in Hutterites: Zoonotic transmission of influenza A: swine & swine workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeb Mark

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among swine, reassortment of influenza virus genes from birds, pigs, and humans could generate influenza viruses with pandemic potential. Humans with acute infection might also be a source of infection for swine production units. This article describes the study design and methods being used to assess influenza A transmission between swine workers and pigs. We hypothesize that transmission of swine influenza viruses to humans, transmission of human influenza viruses to swine, and reassortment of human and swine influenza A viruses is occurring. The project is part of a Team Grant; all Team Grant studies include active surveillance for influenza among Hutterite swine farmers in Alberta, Canada. This project also includes non-Hutterite swine farms that are experiencing swine respiratory illness. Methods/Design Nurses conduct active surveillance for influenza-like-illness (ILI, visiting participating communally owned and operated Hutterite swine farms twice weekly. Nasopharyngeal swabs and acute and convalescent sera are obtained from persons with any two such symptoms. Swabs are tested for influenza A and B by a real time RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction at the Alberta Provincial Laboratory for Public Health (ProvLab. Test-positive participants are advised that they have influenza. The occurrence of test-positive swine workers triggers sampling (swabbing, acute and convalescent serology of the swine herd by veterinarians. Specimens obtained from swine are couriered to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN for testing. Veterinarians and herd owners are notified if animal specimens are test-positive for influenza. If swine ILI occurs, veterinarians obtain samples from the pigs; test-positives from the animals trigger nurses to obtain specimens (swabbing, acute and convalescent serology from the swine workers. ProvLab cultures influenza virus from human specimens, freezes these cultures and

  5. Blood flow measurements in the irradiated pig skin using {beta} emitters radionuclides; Mesure de la circulation sanguine cutanee chez le porc irradie a l`aide de radioisotopes emetteurs {beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daburon, F; Lefaix, J L; Leplat, J J; Fayart, G; Delacroix, D; Le Thanh, P

    1997-01-01

    Non invasive methods of study of the skin blood flow are numerous, but generally do not give any indication on the cutaneous micro-circulatory flow, except for cutaneous laser Doppler. The isotopic exploration of the skin with injected {gamma} radionuclides, even of weak energy, doe snot allow to characterize the skin blood flow, because of the important contribution of the subcutaneous tissues. The use of {beta} emitters energy spectrum, analyzed by different quantitative methods, are proportional to the thickness of the screen localized between the radioactive source and detector. Using simple and complex phantoms composed of tissue equivalent screens, with {sup 32}P sources placed at different depths, it was possible to study the degradation of {beta} spectra, simulating respectively the sub-epidermis and sub-dermis vascular levels. A modelization and an experimental study in-vivo are proposed in this work, with {sup 32}P phosphate administered intravenously in pigs. (author).

  6. Quantitative studies of the fate of epidermal Langerhans cells after X-irradiation of guinea-pig and mouse footpad skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, S.; Fairweather, J.M.; Townsend, K.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Langerhans cell numbers, morphology and distribution were observed in cross sections of footpad epidermis from 1 to 28 days after exposure of the hind feed of CBA/H mice or albino guinea-pigs to a single absorbed dose of 20 Gy of X-rays. In mice, the number of Langerhans cells reactive with anti-macrophage F4/80 monoclonal antibody steadily declined by approximately 85% within 10 days after irradiation. Remaining Langerhans cells were exceptionally dendritic. Very few Birbeck granule-containing cells were found in murine popliteal lymph nodes before or after irradiation but damaged cells were present in superficial strata of irradiated epidermis. The morphology and number of epidermal F4/80-positive cells approached normal by 15 days after irradiation. In guinea-pigs, gradual suprabasal movement and loss of rounded, ATPase-positive Langerhans cells from the epidermis were detectable from 5 to 20 days after irradiation but the magnitude of the cell loss and redistribution was partially obscured by the simultaneous appearance of clusters of replacement Langerhans cells in the basal layer and by keratinocyte hyperplasia.

  7. Two new types of chromosomal rearrangements in the swine species induced by semen irradiation; Descricao de dois novos tipos de rearranjos cromossonicos, na especie suina, induzidos pela irradiacao do semen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, P H; Mikich, A B; Garcia, J M; Almeida, Junior, I L [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias; Pinheiro, L E.L. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Zootecnia

    1991-06-01

    In the present experiment were used one boar and 5 descendent of Landrace and Large White cross-breeding were used, all the animals were healthy concerning to the reproductive aspect and chromosome constitution. Initially semen was collected from the boar through the glove hand method, diluted and submitted to gamma irradiation. The total applied dose was of 800 R, with an exposition period of 3,76 min. The artificial insemination of the females with the treated semen was performed from the time of observation of positive tolerance reflex, with each animal receiving 2 inseminations with a 12 hour interval in between. after birth, the piglets had their blood aseptically collected for karyotype preparation and analysis. From 17 piglets born and cytogenetically analysed, 2 chromosomal rearrangements were detected, namely, a reciprocal translocation or insertion, 8q-; 14p+ in a female a pericentric inversion in chromosome 1 in a male. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs.

  8. Differentiation of irradiation and cetuximab induced skin reactions in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer undergoing radioimmunotherapy: the HICARE protocol (Head and neck cancer: ImmunoChemo and Radiotherapy with Erbitux) – a multicenter phase IV trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habl, G; Potthoff, K; Haefner, MF; Abdollahi, A; Hassel, JC; Boller, E; Indorf, M; Debus, J

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN) not being capable to receive platinum-based chemoradiation, radiotherapy can be intensified by addition of cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab is a feasible treatment option showing a favourable toxicity profile. The most frequent side effect of radiotherapy is radiation dermatitis, the most common side effect of treatment with cetuximab is acneiform rash. Incidence and severity of these frequent, often overlapping and sometimes limiting skin reactions, however, are not well explored. A clinical and molecular differentiation between radiogenic skin reactions and skin reactions caused by cetuximab which may correlate with outcome, have never been described before. The HICARE study is a national, multicenter, prospective phase IV study exploring the different types of skin reactions that occur in patients with LASCCHN undergoing radioimmun(chemo)therapy with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab. 500 patients with LASCCHN will be enrolled in 40 participating sites in Germany. Primary endpoint is the rate of radiation dermatitis NCI CTCAE grade 3 and 4 (v. 4.02). Radioimmunotherapy will be applied according to SmPC, i.e. cetuximab will be administered as loading dose and then weekly during the radiotherapy. Irradiation will be applied as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or 3D-dimensional radiation therapy. The HICARE trial is expected to be one of the largest trials ever conducted in head and neck cancer patients. The goal of the HICARE trial is to differentiate skin reactions caused by radiation from those caused by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab, to evaluate the incidence and severity of these skin reactions and to correlate them with outcome parameters. Besides, the translational research program will help to identify and confirm novel

  9. 9 CFR 93.517 - Swine from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine from Canada. 93.517 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Canada 7 § 93.517 Swine from Canada. (a) For purposes other than immediate slaughter. Swine offered for importation from Canada for purposes other than immediate slaughter...

  10. Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Miguel A; Zakaria, Alan; Nizran, Parminder

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer accounts for most malignancies across the globe. They are primarily divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin malignancies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Fair skin and chronic ultraviolet B exposure are the most important risk factors. Primary prevention is achieved by avoiding sun exposure and tanning beds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassmann, W.; Wottge, H.U.; von Kolzynski, M.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibility of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient

  12. Skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Kammer, Jenna N

    2011-01-01

    Skin tightening describes the treatment of skin laxity via radiofrequency (RF), ultrasound, or light-based devices. Skin laxity on the face is manifested by progressive loss of skin elasticity, loosening of the connective tissue framework, and deepening of skin folds. This results in prominence of submandibular and submental tissues. Genetic factors (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (ultraviolet radiation) both contribute to skin laxity. There are many RF, ultrasound, and light-based devices directed at treating skin laxity. All of these devices target and heat the dermis to induce collagen contraction. Heating of the dermis causes collagen denaturation and immediate collagen contraction in addition to long-term collagen remodeling. Via RF, light, or ultrasound, these skin tightening devices deliver heat to the dermis to create new collagen and induce skin tightening. This chapter will provide an overview of the various skin tightening devices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Occupational skin cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawkrodger, D.J. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dermatology

    2004-10-01

    Skin cancer due to occupation is more common than is generally recognized, although it is difficult to obtain an accurate estimate of its prevalence. Over the past two centuries, occupational skin cancers have particularly been due to industrial exposure of men (it seems more so than women) to chemical carcinogens such as polycyclic hydrocarbons (e.g. from coal tar products) or to arsenic. Industrial processes have improved in most Western countries to limit this type of exposure, but those with outdoor occupations are still exposed to solar ultraviolet irradiation without this being widely recognized as an industrial hazard. Ionizing radiation such as X-rays can also cause skin cancer. Occupational skin cancers often resemble skin tumours found in non-occupational subjects, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, but some pre-malignant lesions can be more specific and point to an occupational origin, e.g. tar keratoses or arsenical keratoses. An uncommon but well-recognized cause of occupational skin cancer is that which results from scar formation following an industrial burn. In the future it will be necessary to focus on preventative measures, e.g. for outdoor workers, the need to cover up in the sun and use sun protective creams and a campaign for earlier recognition of skin cancers, which are usually curable if treated in their early stages.

  14. Proof-of-Principle Dermal Decontamination Experiments: Swine Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    cycles and the measurements taken after each cycle were recorded. All water rinses were performed using tap water and applied using a gentle stream...uniform and highly reproducible. EpiDermFT ( EFT ) consists of organized basal, spinous, granular, and cornified epidermal layers analogous to those found...in vivo. The dermal compartment is composed of a collagen matrix containing viable normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). EFT is mitotically and

  15. Efficacy of patient skin dose reduction by a compensating filter through of irradiation field overlaps on the area during percutaneous coronary intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Sadao; Yamamoto, Naomi; Miyagawa, Takashi; Hirose, Etsuko; Takenaka, Tatsuaki; Nakahara, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Our study was involved with entrance surface dose reduction and irradiation field by the filter use of PCI, and insertion in place of an effective compensating filter to maximize entrance surface dose reduction, which we verified. The radiation dosimetry put a 6 cc ion chamber on the back side of the thorax phantom, and changed the filter of the four corners (a: upper left, b: upper right, c: lower right, d: lower left) of the monitor confirmed with fluoroscopy [(0) no filter, (1) one filter, (2) two filters]. The angle of C arm was assumed to be eight directions and 0 degrees adopted by this hospital. It was compared with a corrective rate of which one was no filter. Next, the presence of filter and irradiation field overlaps on the area in monitor in the angle of C arm was verified by this hospital's classic example. As for corrective rate, (1) becomes 0.41 and (2) become 0.25 at fluoroscopy, (1) becomes 0.26 and (2) become 0.16 at exposure. Irradiation field overlaps on the area (+) compensating filter (-) was many with d of right anterior oblique (RAO)/cranial (CAU), a of RAO and c of CAU at left coronary angiography (CAG), c of left anterior oblique (LAO) at right CAG, b of LAO/cranial (CRA) (left CAG), b of CRA (right CAG) and a and d of RAO (right CAG) at both CAG. Irradiation field overlaps on the area (+) compensating filter (+) was many with b of CRA at left CAG, a of LAO/CRA at right CAG, b of CRA (left CAG) and b of RAO (right CAG) at both CAG. When the compensating filter is used the entrance surface dose reduction effect was great. If automatic exposure control protects the part of irradiation field overlaps on the area in the range without operating excessively, the radiological risk can be reduced, and it is conceivable as useful clinical setting. (author)

  16. Larger yield of cyclobutane dimers than 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in the DNA of UVA-irradiated human skin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdavault, Sophie; Baudouin, Caroline; Charveron, Marie; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet light is the major cause of most skin cancers. While the genotoxic properties of UVB radiation are now well understood, the DNA damaging processes triggered by less energetic but more abundant UVA photons remain to be elucidated. Evidence has been provided for the induction of oxidative lesions to cellular DNA including strand breaks and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). Formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) has also been reported, mostly in rodent cells. In order to gain insights into the relevance of the latter photoproducts in UVA-mutagenesis of human skin, we quantified the level of 8-oxodGuo and CPDs within primary cultures of normal fibroblasts and keratinocytes using specific chromatographic assays. The yield of formation of CPDs was found to be higher than that of 8-oxodGuo in both cell types. In addition, CPDs were mostly TT derivatives, and neither (6-4) photoproducts nor Dewar valence isomers were detected. These observations are reminiscent of results obtained in rodent cells and suggest that a photosensitized triplet energy transfer occurs and that this reaction is more efficient than photooxidation of DNA components. The predominant formation of CPDs with respect to oxidative damage within normal human skin cells exposed to UVA radiation should be taken into account in photoprotection strategies

  17. Larger yield of cyclobutane dimers than 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in the DNA of UVA-irradiated human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courdavault, Sophie [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Baudouin, Caroline [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire, Toulouse (France); Charveron, Marie [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire, Toulouse (France); Favier, Alain [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Cadet, Jean [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Douki, Thierry [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: tdouki@cea.fr

    2004-11-22

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet light is the major cause of most skin cancers. While the genotoxic properties of UVB radiation are now well understood, the DNA damaging processes triggered by less energetic but more abundant UVA photons remain to be elucidated. Evidence has been provided for the induction of oxidative lesions to cellular DNA including strand breaks and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). Formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) has also been reported, mostly in rodent cells. In order to gain insights into the relevance of the latter photoproducts in UVA-mutagenesis of human skin, we quantified the level of 8-oxodGuo and CPDs within primary cultures of normal fibroblasts and keratinocytes using specific chromatographic assays. The yield of formation of CPDs was found to be higher than that of 8-oxodGuo in both cell types. In addition, CPDs were mostly TT derivatives, and neither (6-4) photoproducts nor Dewar valence isomers were detected. These observations are reminiscent of results obtained in rodent cells and suggest that a photosensitized triplet energy transfer occurs and that this reaction is more efficient than photooxidation of DNA components. The predominant formation of CPDs with respect to oxidative damage within normal human skin cells exposed to UVA radiation should be taken into account in photoprotection strategies.0.

  18. Randomized phase III study comparing best supportive care to biafine as a prophylactic agent for radiation-induced skin toxicity for women undergoing breast irradiation: Radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) 97-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.; Scott, Charles; Stevens, Randy; Marconi, Barbara; Champion, Lorraine; Freedman, Gary M.; Asrari, Fariba; Pilepich, M.V.; Gagnon, James D.; Wong, Gene

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if Biafine compared to Best Supportive Care (BSC) is effective in minimizing or preventing radiation-induced dermatitis in women undergoing breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients were randomized between Biafine (n = 83) vs. BSC (n = 89). The institutions identified preference for BSC at the time of randomization. A no-treatment arm was allowed (16% received no treatment). Patients were instructed to apply randomized product three times a day, but not within 4 h of their daily RT session. Application began following their first radiation treatment and continued 2 weeks postradiation. Skin dermatitis was scored weekly utilizing the RTOG and ONS (Oncology Nursing Society) skin toxicity scales, a weekly patient satisfaction and quality-of-life questionnaire. Results: Using the RTOG toxicity scale there was no overall difference for maximum dermatitis during RT between Biafine and BSC (p = 0.77). There was no difference in maximum toxicity by arm or breast size. There was an interaction between breast size and toxicity, with large-breasted women exhibiting more toxicity. Large-breasted women receiving Biafine were more likely to have no toxicity 6 weeks post RT. Conclusion: There was no overall difference between BSC and Biafine in the prevention, time to, or duration of radiation-induced dermatitis.

  19. The cholesterol system of the swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigueperse, Jocelyne

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize the dynamic system of adult female Large White swine. The content of this system and its relationships with both the external environment and between the different parts of the system were explained. The analysis of these results in terms of compared physiology showed that the structure of the cholesterol system was the same in man and in the swine. Consequently, the swine constitutes a good biological tool to study human cholesterol indirectly and to foresee the changes that might be induced in various physio-pathological cases. (author) [fr

  20. Effect of fluocinolone acetonide cream on human skin blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimoskey, J.E.; Holloway, A. Jr.; Flanagan, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Blood flow rate was measured in the forearm skin of human subjects exposed to ultraviolet irradiation. Blood flow was determined by the 133 Xe disappearance technique 18 hr after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with a Westinghouse RS sunlamp held 10 inches from the skin for 10 min. Ultraviolet irradiation caused skin blood flow to increase. Application of fluocinolone acetonide cream, 0.025 percent, 4 times in the 16 hr following UV irradiation had no effect on either control skin blood flow or the UV-induced hyperemia

  1. Swine flu - A pandemic outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jini George

    Full Text Available Hippocrates had described influenza like outbreak in 412 B.C. and since then repeated influenza like epidemics and pandemics have been recorded in recent times. One of the greatest killers of all time was the pandemic of swine flu (Spanish flu of 1918-1919, when 230 million people died. Annual influenza epidemics are estimated to affect 5–15% of the global population, resulting in severe illness in 3–5 million patients causing 250,000–500,000 deaths worldwide. Severe illness and deaths occur mainly in the high-risk populations of infants, the elderly and chronically ill patients. The 2009 outbreak of swine flu is thought to be a mutation more specifically a reassortment of four known strains of influenza A virus subtype H1N1; one endemic in humans, one endemic in birds, and two endemic in pigs. WHO officially declared the outbreak to be a pandemic on June 11, 2009, but stressed that the new designation was a result of the global "spread of the virus," not its severity. [Vet World 2009; 2(12.000: 472-474

  2. SU-G-JeP3-02: Comparison of Magnitude and Frequency of Patient Positioning Errors in Breast Irradiation Using AlignRT 3D Optical Surface Imaging and Skin Mark Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, R; Chisela, W; Dorbu, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical usefulness of AlignRT (Vision RT Ltd., London, UK) in reducing patient positioning errors in breast irradiation. Methods: 60 patients undergoing whole breast irradiation were selected for this study. Patients were treated to the left or right breast lying on Qfix Access breast board (Qfix, Avondale, PA) in supine position for 28 fractions using tangential fields. 30 patients were aligned using AlignRT by aligning a breast surface region of interest (ROI) to the same area from a reference surface image extracted from planning CT. When the patient’s surface image deviated from the reference by more than 3mm on one or more translational and rotational directions, a new reference was acquired using AlignRT in-room cameras. The other 30 patients were aligned to the skin marks with room lasers. On-Board MV portal images of medial field were taken daily and matched to the DRRs. The magnitude and frequency of positioning errors were determined from measured translational shifts. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to evaluate statistical differences of positional accuracy and precision between AlignRT and non-AlignRT patients. Results: The percentage of port images with no shift required was 46.5% and 27.0% in vertical, 49.8% and 25.8% in longitudinal, 47.6% and 28.5% in lateral for AlignRT and non-AlignRT patients, respectively. The percentage of port images requiring more than 3mm shifts was 18.1% and 35.1% in vertical, 28.6% and 50.8% in longitudinal, 11.3% and 24.2% in lateral for AlignRT and non-AlignRT patients, respectively. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed that there were significant differences between the frequency distributions of AlignRT and non-AlignRT in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts. Conclusion: As confirmed by port images, AlignRT-assisted patient positioning can significantly reduce the frequency and magnitude of patient setup errors in breast irradiation compared to the use of lasers and skin marks.

  3. Skin Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  4. Cryotherapy - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryosurgery - skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy; Actinic keratosis - cryotherapy; Solar keratosis - cryotherapy ... may be used to: Remove warts Destroy precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses or solar keratoses) In rare ...

  5. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  6. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turkey neck,” this occurs as skin loses its elasticity and in cases where individuals have lost a ... technique or procedure is appropriate for my skin type? Did the doctor show me before-and-after ...

  7. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... like these: skin rashes or conditions, such as eczema or psoriasis skin infections, such as staph diseases, ...

  8. Skin barrier composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osburn, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    A skin barrier composition comprises a mixture of a copolymer resin of ethylene and vinyl acetate (EVA), and a water-insoluble dry tack-providing elastomer such as polyisobutylene. The composition after mixing and molding, is subjected to ionizing irradiation to form cross-linked polymer networks of the EVA. The compositions have exceptional properties for use as barrier sheets, rings, or strips in ostomy, wound drainage, and incontinence devices. (author)

  9. Skin barrier composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osburn, F G

    1985-06-12

    A skin barrier composition comprises a mixture of a copolymer resin of ethylene and vinyl acetate (EVA), and a water-insoluble dry tack-providing elastomer such as polyisobutylene. The composition after mixing and molding, is subjected to ionizing irradiation to form cross-linked polymer networks of the EVA. The compositions have exceptional properties for use as barrier sheets, rings, or strips in ostomy, wound drainage, and incontinence devices.

  10. Skin Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Ruka; Kishi, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Skin graft is one of the most indispensable techniques in plastic surgery and dermatology. Skin grafts are used in a variety of clinical situations, such as traumatic wounds, defects after oncologic resection, burn reconstruction, scar contracture release, congenital skin deficiencies, hair restoration, vitiligo, and nipple-areola reconstruction. Skin grafts are generally avoided in the management of more complex wounds. Conditions with deep spaces and exposed bones normally require the use o...

  11. 9 CFR 71.19 - Identification of swine in interstate commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... production system representative. In the event of oral notification, written confirmation shall be given as... within a swine production system. Swine moving within a swine production system to other than slaughter... identified in a valid swine production health plan for that swine production system. (2) The swine production...

  12. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  13. Effect of treatment in fractionated schedules with the combination of x-irradiation and six cytotoxic drugs on the RIF-1 tumor and normal mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelieveld, P.; Scoles, M.A.; Brown, J.M.; Phil, D.; Kallman, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    RIF-1 tumors, implanted syngeneically in the gastrocnemius muscles of the right hind legs of C3H/Km mice, were treated either with X ray alone, drug alone, or drug and X ray combined. The drugs tested were bleomycin, BCNU, cis-diamminedichloro platinum, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and actinomycin-D. All drugs were administered either in the maximum tolerated dose or a dose that causes minimal tumor growth delay. Both drugs and X rays were administered either as a single dose or in five daily fractions. In addition to the single modality controls, seven different schedules of combined modalities were tested. Tumors were measured periodically after treatment in order that the day at which each tumor reached 4 times its initial cross-sectional area, i.e., its size at the time of treatment, could be determined. The effect of treatment on tumors was based upon excess growth delay (GD), i.e., T400% (treated)-T400% (untreated control). Treatment effects for the same combined modality schedules were also determined for normal skin, using the early skin reaction as an endpoint. Dose effect factors (DEF) were computed for all combined modality schedules and were based upon calculated radiation dose equivalents. We also calculated supra-additivity ratios, SR/sub I/ and SR/sub II/, therapeutic gain factors and adjusted therapeutic gain factors. The only drugs to produce significant supra-additivity with X rays were cis-Pt and cyclo

  14. In vivo radiofrequency heating in swine in a 3T (123.2-MHz) birdcage whole body coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Devashish; Utecht, Lynn; Tian, Jinfeng; Hughes, John; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2014-10-01

    To study in vivo radiofrequency (RF) heating produced due to power deposition from a 3T (Larmour frequency = 123.2 MHz), birdcage, whole body coil. The RF heating was simulated in a digital swine by solving the mechanistic generic bioheat transfer model (GBHTM) and the conventional, empirical Pennes bioheat transfer equation for two cases: 1) when the swine head was in the isocenter and 2) when the swine trunk was in the isocenter. The simulation results were validated by making direct fluoroptic temperature measurements in the skin, brain, simulated hot regions, and rectum of 10 swine (case 1: n = 5, mean animal weight = 84.03 ± 6.85 kg, whole body average SAR = 2.65 ± 0.22 W/kg; case 2: n = 5, mean animal weight = 81.59 ± 6.23 kg, whole body average SAR = 2.77 ± 0.26 W/kg) during 1 h of exposure to a turbo spin echo sequence. The GBHTM simulated the RF heating more accurately compared with the Pennes equation. In vivo temperatures exceeded safe temperature thresholds with allowable SAR exposures. Hot regions may be produced deep inside the body, away from the skin. SAR exposures that produce safe temperature thresholds need reinvestigation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. How narrow-band and broad-band uvb irradiation influences the immunohistochemistry analyses of experimental animals’ skin – a comparative study. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Borowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of the artcle series impact narrow-band UVB radiation (NB-UVB and broad-band UVB radiation (BB-UVB on experimental animals’ skin (white Wistar female rats. The aim of this comparative study was immunohistochemistry analyses containing expression of p53 protein. Expression of p53 protein was performed on two experimental groups. One – exposed to NB-UVB; the other – exposed to BB-UVB radiation. The results indicate that p53 protein takes an active part in the process of apoptosis that is induced by both NB-UVB and BB-UVB. The results showed an increase in p53 expressing cells following BB-UVB than NB-UVB phototherapy.

  16. Epidemiology of swine trichinellosis in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z.Q.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Swine trichinellosis has been reported in 26 provinces, autonomous regions or municipalities (P/A/M of China. The prevalence rate in swine varied from 0.12 % to 34.2 % in five P/A/M, from 0.01 % to 0.0001 % in other P/A/M. The seroepidemiological survey of swine trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA in seven P/A/M, the seroprevalence varied from 0.09 % to 29.63 %. The prevalence of Thchinella infection in pork sold at the market was from 0.29 % to 5.6 % in four provinces. The transmission of trichinellosis by garbage is the main features of epidemiology of swine trichinellosis in China. Rat is an important reservoir in the domestic cycle of trichinellosis. The prevalence rates of T. spiralis infection in rats were from 1.98 % to 15.06 % in six provinces or autonomous regions. The treatment-prophylaxis with forage contained albendazole has been applied to the control of swine trichinellosis in Nanyang area of Henan province, the prevalence of swine trichinellosis had decreased from 32.2 % before prophylaxis to 0.12 % after prophylaxis.

  17. Effects of CO{sub 2} laser irradiation on the wettability and human skin fibroblast cell response of magnesia partially stabilised zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, L.; Lawrence, J

    2003-10-15

    Human skin fibroblast cells in vitro responses on the surface of a bioinert zirconia ceramic partially stabilised with magnesia partially stabilised zirconia (MgO-PSZ) bioinert ceramic before and after CO{sub 2} laser treatment were investigated to find the interrelationship between the cell adhesion, wettability and laser parameters. Contact angle, {theta}, measurements of a set of test liquids were a clear indication that surface treatment of the MgO-PSZ with a CO{sub 2} laser brought about a reduction in {theta}, indicating that the wettability of the MgO-PSZ had been enhanced. A relationship was found between the wettability and the microstructure of the MgO-PSZ surface and laser processing parameters. It was subsequently deduced that the factors active in causing the observed modification in the wettability of the MgO-PSZ were the increases in the surface O{sub 2} content and the polar component of the surface energy, {gamma}{sub sv}{sup p}, the latter resulting from surface melting and resolidification. Moreover, the investigation into the human skin fibroblast cell response revealed that the CO{sub 2} laser treatment of the MgO-PSZ had resulted in a surface favourable for cell adhesion, as the extent of cell attachment and adhesion on the MgO-PSZ surface was enhanced depending on laser parameters. Such an improvement in cell adhesion, which could be greatly beneficial to developing enhanced bonding at the tissue and implant interface, was influenced by the surface properties of the modified MgO-PSZ, particular wettability.

  18. Feral Swine in the United States Have Been Exposed to both Avian and Swine Influenza A Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brigitte E; Sun, Hailiang; Carrel, Margaret; Cunningham, Fred L; Baroch, John A; Hanson-Dorr, Katie C; Young, Sean G; Schmit, Brandon; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Lutman, Mark W; Pedersen, Kerri; Lager, Kelly; Bowman, Andrew S; Slemons, Richard D; Smith, David R; DeLiberto, Thomas; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-10-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) in swine can cause sporadic infections and pandemic outbreaks among humans, but how avian IAV emerges in swine is still unclear. Unlike domestic swine, feral swine are free ranging and have many opportunities for IAV exposure through contacts with various habitats and animals, including migratory waterfowl, a natural reservoir for IAVs. During the period from 2010 to 2013, 8,239 serum samples were collected from feral swine across 35 U.S. states and tested against 45 contemporary antigenic variants of avian, swine, and human IAVs; of these, 406 (4.9%) samples were IAV antibody positive. Among 294 serum samples selected for antigenic characterization, 271 cross-reacted with ≥1 tested virus, whereas the other 23 did not cross-react with any tested virus. Of the 271 IAV-positive samples, 236 cross-reacted with swine IAVs, 1 with avian IAVs, and 16 with avian and swine IAVs, indicating that feral swine had been exposed to both swine and avian IAVs but predominantly to swine IAVs. Our findings suggest that feral swine could potentially be infected with both avian and swine IAVs, generating novel IAVs by hosting and reassorting IAVs from wild birds and domestic swine and facilitating adaptation of avian IAVs to other hosts, including humans, before their spillover. Continued surveillance to monitor the distribution and antigenic diversities of IAVs in feral swine is necessary to increase our understanding of the natural history of IAVs. IMPORTANCE There are more than 5 million feral swine distributed across at least 35 states in the United States. In contrast to domestic swine, feral swine are free ranging and have unique opportunities for contact with wildlife, livestock, and their habitats. Our serological results indicate that feral swine in the United States have been exposed to influenza A viruses (IAVs) consistent with those found in both domestic swine and wild birds, with the predominant infections consisting of swine-adapted IAVs

  19. Antimicrobial use in swine production and its effect on the swine gut microbiota and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Chénier, Martin R

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobials have been used in swine production at subtherapeutic levels since the early 1950s to increase feed efficiency and promote growth. In North America, a number of antimicrobials are available for use in swine. However, the continuous administration of subtherapeutic, low concentrations of antimicrobials to pigs also provides selective pressure for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and resistance determinants. For this reason, subtherapeutic antimicrobial use in livestock remains a source of controversy and concern. The swine gut microbiota demonstrates a number of changes in response to antimicrobial administration depending on the dosage, duration of treatment, age of the pigs, and gut location that is sampled. Both culture-independent and -dependent studies have also shown that the swine gut microbiota contains a large number of antimicrobial resistance determinants even in the absence of antimicrobial exposure. Heavy metals, such as zinc and copper, which are often added at relatively high doses to swine feed, may also play a role in maintaining antimicrobial resistance and in the stability of the swine gut microbiota. This review focuses on the use of antimicrobials in swine production, with an emphasis on the North American regulatory context, and their effect on the swine gut microbiota and on antimicrobial resistance determinants in the gut microbiota.

  20. Organoleptic changes in the bovine and swine fats following treatment with gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanov, I.

    1976-01-01

    Studied were bovine and swine fats that had been treated with gamma-rays at the rates of 0.10 to 2.00 Mrad, in the presence of oxygen and in an atmosphere containing no oxygen as well as under storage conditions at 2 to 4 deg C, and -18 and up to -20 deg C, for 45 and 90 days, respectively. When doses of 0.25 Mrad were used no changes in the organoleptic properties were observed. Fats that were treated at the rate of more than 0.25 Mrad in the presence of oxygen assumed 'side' smell and taste. If irradiation was carried out in the absence of oxygen no such deviations from the normal taste and odor were noted - at rates of up to 0.70 Mrad for the swine fats, and at rates of more than 0.50 Mrad for the bovine fats. Destruction of the yellow pigment in the bovine fats was observed with doses higher than 0.70 Mrad. The changes in the organoleptic properties corresponded to the changes taking place with the peroxides, the water soluble fatty acids, and the epihydrinaldehyde. Changes in the organoleptic properties (odor and taste) in the bovine fats took place at lower doses of irradiation that in the swine fats. (author)

  1. Radiation effects on vitamin A and {beta}-carotene contents in bovine liver and swine pate de foie; Efeito da radiacao gama sobre a vitamina A e o {beta}-caroteno de figado bovino e suino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taipina, Magda Sinigalia

    2001-07-01

    In this study, vitamin A and {beta}-carotene contents and the percent of activity retention were analyzed in 3 kGy and 30 kGy {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiated samples of bovine liver and swine liver pate. Six different lots of liver samples weighing 100 g obtained at the meat market were employed. Irradiation was performed with liver samples initially frozen (-15 deg C). Similarly, six different lots of swine liver pate samples weighing about 100 - 125 g , at temperature of 7 deg C were irradiated. Pre-treatments and analysis methods were those described in Instituto Adolfo Lutz Norms for food analyses. Two and five- gram samples in duplicates for bovine liver and five gram-samples for swine liver pate were used. The results showed that there were no losses of either vitamin A or provitamin A activities in the samples of bovine liver and swine liver pate irradiated with a dose of 3 kGy (retention about 100%). On the other hand, for swine liver pate samples of vitamin A were maintained after irradiation with 30 kGy. (author)

  2. Source tracking swine fecal waste in surface water proximal to swine concentrated animal feeding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Christopher D; Myers, Kevin; Wing, Steve; Hall, Devon; Baron, Dothula; Stewart, Jill R

    2015-04-01

    Swine farming has gone through many changes in the last few decades, resulting in operations with a high animal density known as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). These operations produce a large quantity of fecal waste whose environmental impacts are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate microbial water quality in surface waters proximal to swine CAFOs including microbial source tracking of fecal microbes specific to swine. For one year, surface water samples at up- and downstream sites proximal to swine CAFO lagoon waste land application sites were tested for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) and candidate swine-specific microbial source-tracking (MST) markers (Bacteroidales Pig-1-Bac, Pig-2-Bac, and Pig-Bac-2, and methanogen P23-2). Testing of 187 samples showed high fecal indicator bacteria concentrations at both up- and downstream sites. Overall, 40%, 23%, and 61% of samples exceeded state and federal recreational water quality guidelines for fecal coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac showed the highest specificity to swine fecal wastes and were 2.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.03, 5.94) and 2.30 times (95% CI=0.90, 5.88) as prevalent proximal down- than proximal upstream of swine CAFOs, respectively. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac were also 2.87 (95% CI=1.21, 6.80) and 3.36 (95% CI=1.34, 8.41) times as prevalent when 48 hour antecedent rainfall was greater than versus less than the mean, respectively. Results suggest diffuse and overall poor sanitary quality of surface waters where swine CAFO density is high. Pig-1-Bac and Pig-2-Bac are useful for tracking off-site conveyance of swine fecal wastes into surface waters proximal to and downstream of swine CAFOs and during rain events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influenza D Virus Infection in Feral Swine Populations, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lucas; Luo, Kaijian; Olivier, Alicia K; Cunningham, Fred L; Blackmon, Sherry; Hanson-Dorr, Katie; Sun, Hailiang; Baroch, John; Lutman, Mark W; Quade, Bianca; Epperson, William; Webby, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2018-06-01

    Influenza D virus (IDV) has been identified in domestic cattle, swine, camelid, and small ruminant populations across North America, Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa. Our study investigated seroprevalence and transmissibility of IDV in feral swine. During 2012-2013, we evaluated feral swine populations in 4 US states; of 256 swine tested, 57 (19.1%) were IDV seropositive. Among 96 archived influenza A virus-seropositive feral swine samples collected from 16 US states during 2010-2013, 41 (42.7%) were IDV seropositive. Infection studies demonstrated that IDV-inoculated feral swine shed virus 3-5 days postinoculation and seroconverted at 21 days postinoculation; 50% of in-contact naive feral swine shed virus, seroconverted, or both. Immunohistochemical staining showed viral antigen within epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, including trachea, soft palate, and lungs. Our findings suggest that feral swine might serve an important role in the ecology of IDV.

  4. 9 CFR 93.505 - Certificate for swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate shall show that the entire region of origin is free of classical swine fever. (b) Swine from..., Equatorial Guinea, French Guiana, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India...

  5. Precision targeting of liver lesions using a novel electromagnetic navigation device in physiologic phantom and swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banovac, Filip; Tang, Jonathan; Xu Sheng; Lindisch, David; Chung, Ho Young; Levy, Elliot B.; Chang, Thomas; McCullough, Michael F.; Yaniv, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.; Cleary, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation of primary and metastatic liver tumors is becoming a potential alternative to surgical resection. We propose a novel system that uses real-time electromagnetic position sensing of the needle tip to help with precision guidance into a liver tumor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this technology in phantom and animal models. Using an electromagnetic navigation device, instrumented 18 g needles were advanced into radioopaque tumor targets in a respiratory liver phantom. The phantom featured a moving liver target that simulated cranio-caudal liver motion due to respiration. Skin-to-target path planning and real-time needle guidance were provided by a custom-designed software interface based on pre-operative 1 mm CT data slices. Needle probes were advanced using only the electromagnetic navigation device and software display. No conventional real-time imaging was used to assist in advancing the needle to the target. Two experienced operators (interventional radiologists) and two inexperienced ones (residents) used the system. The same protocol was then also used in two anesthetized 45 kg Yorkshire swine where radioopaque agar nodules were injected into the liver to serve as targets. A total of 76 tumor targeting attempts were performed in the liver phantom, and 32 attempts were done in the swine. The average time for path planning was 30 s in the phantom, and 63 s in the swine. The median time for the actual needle puncture to reach the desired target was 33 s in the phantom, and 42 s in the swine. The average registration error between the CT coordinate system and electromagnetic coordinate system was 1.4 mm (SD 0.3 mm) in the phantom, and 1.9 mm (SD 0.4 mm) in the swine. The median distance from the final needle tip position to the center of the tumor was 6.4 mm (SD 3.3 mm, n=76) in the phantom, and 8.3 mm (SD 3.7 mm, n=32) in the swine. There was no statistical difference in the planning time, procedure time, or accuracy of needle

  6. The effect of postirradiation holding at 22 degrees C on the repair of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially neoplastic transforming damage in gamma-irradiated HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Antoniono, R.J.; Mendonca, M.S.; Sun, C.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of postirradiation holding at 22 degrees C on cell growth, progression of cells through the cell cycle, and the repair of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially neoplastic transforming damage in γ-irradiated HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells has been examined. Cell growth and cell cycle progression were essentially stopped at this reduced temperature. Cell survival was dramatically reduced by holding confluent cultures for 6 h at 22 degrees C, as opposed to 37 degrees C, after 7.5 Gy γ radiation delivered at a rate of 2 Gy/min. Return of the cells to 37 degrees C for 6 h after holding at 22 degrees C did not result in increased survival. A similar effect was obtained when the cells were held at 22 degrees C between split-dose irradiation of log-phase cultures where no increase in survival was observed over a split-dose interval of 4 h. In this case a partial increase in survival was observed upon returning the cells to 37 degrees C for 3 h after holding at 22 degrees C for the first 3 h of the split-dose interval. Neoplastic transformation frequency was not enhanced by holding confluent cultures for 6 h at 22 degrees C after 7.5 Gy γ radiation. This is consistent with previous observations that misrepair of potentially neoplastic transforming damage already occurs at 37 degrees C. The overall results are interpreted in terms of the reduced temperature favoring misrepair, rather than inhibition of repair, of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially transforming radiation damage. 24 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Process optimization and photostability of silymarin nanostructured lipid carriers: effect on UV-irradiated rat skin and SK-MEL 2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pooja; Singh, Mahendra; Kanoujia, Jovita; Arya, Malti; Saraf, Shailendra K; Saraf, Shubhini A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present work was to formulate a novel stable delivery system which would not only overcome the solubility issue of silymarin, but also help to increase the therapeutic value by better permeation, anticancer action and reduced toxicity. This was envisaged through the recent developments in nanotechnology, combined with the activity of the phytoconstituent silymarin. A 2(3) full factorial design based on three independent variables was used for process optimization of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). Developed formulations were evaluated on the basis of particle size, morphology, in vitro drug release, photostability and cell line studies. Optimized silymarin-NLC was incorporated into carbopol gel and further assessed for rheological parameters. Stable behaviour in presence of light was proven by photostability testing of formulation. Permeability parameters were significantly higher in NLC as compared to marketed phytosome formulation. The NLC based gel described in this study showed faster onset, and prolonged activity up to 24 h and better action against edema as compared to marketed formulation. In case of anticancer activity of silymarin-NLC against SK-MEL 2 cell lines, silymarin-NLC proved to possess anticancer activity in a dose-dependent manner (10-80 μM) and induced apoptosis at 80 μM in SK-MEL 2 cancer cells. This work documents for the first time that silymarin can be formulated into nanostructured lipoidal carrier system for enhanced permeation, greater stability as well as anticancer activity for skin.

  8. Inhibitory Effects of 658 nm Laser Irradiation on Skin Temperature in Anesthetized Rats: Preliminary Results from a Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Litscher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red laser light stimulation can have many physiological effects. The goal of this animal experimental study was to investigate how red laser stimulation influences the temperature of anesthetized rats at different acupuncture points and nonacupoints. For that reason 12 adult male Wistar Han rats (300–380 g were investigated. Six anesthetized rats underwent red laser stimulation (wavelength 658 nm, output power 40 mW, diameter 500 µm, and duration 10 min at the Baihui (GV20 acupoint, the Zusanli acupoint (ST36, bilateral, and a control point on the forelimb. The other six rats underwent the same procedure; however, the laser remained switched off. Significant decreases in temperature were found at the acupoints Baihui, Zusanli left, and Zusanli right. In addition there was no significant temperature effect at a control point. During placebo laser irradiation (deactivated laser there were also significant temperature changes. The mechanism underlying the results is currently unknown, but brain stimulation (via laser or mechanical pressure and mainly direct central mechanisms may be responsible for the local and peripheral temperature decrease.

  9. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508 Section 93.508 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter...

  10. 9 CFR 93.521 - Declaration for swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine Mexico 9 § 93.521 Declaration for swine. For all swine offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of...

  11. 9 CFR 78.31 - Brucellosis reactor swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor swine. 78.31... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.31 Brucellosis reactor swine. (a...

  12. 9 CFR 78.32 - Brucellosis exposed swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed swine. 78.32... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.32 Brucellosis exposed swine. (a...

  13. Dry Skin Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on a budget Skin care products Skin care secrets Skin lighteners Skin of color Summer skin problems ... condition, such as eczema. Additional related information Dermatologists' top tips for relieving dry skin FIND A DERMATOLOGIST ...

  14. Reduced temperature (22 degrees C) results in enhancement of cell killing and neoplastic transformation in noncycling HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells irradiated with low-dose-rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Antoniono, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of reduced temperature (22 degrees C) or serum deprivation during low-dose-rate (0.66 cGy/min) γ irradiation on cell killing and neoplastic transformation has been examined using the HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cell system. The reduced temperature stops progression of these cells through the cell cycle while serum deprivation slows down cell turnover markedly. The data demonstrate an enhancement in both of the end points when cells are held at 22 degrees C compared to parallel experiments done at 37 degrees C. In operational terms, the decreased survival and increased neoplastic transformation are consistent with our earlier hypothesis of a higher probability of misrepair at reduced temperature. The interpretation that this damage enhancement was associated with the reduced temperature, and not the fact that the cells were noncycling, was supported by the results of experiments performed with cells cultured at 37 degrees C in serum-free medium for 35 h prior to and then during the 12.24 h low-dose-rate radiation exposure. Under these conditions, cell cycle progression, as shown by reduction in growth rate and dual-parameter flow cytometric analysis, was considerable inhibited (cell cycle time increased from 20 h to 40 h), and there was no significant enhancement of cell killing or neoplastic transformation. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Michiko

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the development of skin cancer associated with radiation, focusing on the knowledge of A-bomb radiation-induced skin cancer. Since the discovery of X radiation in 1895, acute and chronic radiation dermatitis has been the first matter of concern. Then, in 1902, skin cancer found among radiological personnel has posed a social problem. In earlier study determining the relationship between skin cancer and A-bomb radiation, there is no increase in the incidence of either skin cancer or precancerous condition during the first 20 years after A-bombing. More recent studies have showed that there is a significant correlation between the incidence of skin cancer and distance from the hypocenter; and the incidence of skin cancer is found to be remarkably increased since 1975 in the group exposed at ≤2,000 m. Excess relative risk is 2.2 at one Gy dose. The incidence of skin cancer is also found to be extremely increased with aging. Relative risk is high in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Histologically, basal cell carcinoma is more senstitive to ionizing radiation than squamous cell carcinoma. (N.K.)

  16. Swine influenza virus: zoonotic potential and vaccination strategies for the control of avian and swine influenzas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Eileen; Janke, Bruce

    2008-02-15

    Influenza viruses are able to infect humans, swine, and avian species, and swine have long been considered a potential source of new influenza viruses that can infect humans. Swine have receptors to which both avian and mammalian influenza viruses bind, which increases the potential for viruses to exchange genetic sequences and produce new reassortant viruses in swine. A number of genetically diverse viruses are circulating in swine herds throughout the world and are a major cause of concern to the swine industry. Control of swine influenza is primarily through the vaccination of sows, to protect young pigs through maternally derived antibodies. However, influenza viruses continue to circulate in pigs after the decay of maternal antibodies, providing a continuing source of virus on a herd basis. Measures to control avian influenza in commercial poultry operations are dictated by the virulence of the virus. Detection of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus results in immediate elimination of the flock. Low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses are controlled through vaccination, which is done primarily in turkey flocks. Maintenance of the current HPAI virus-free status of poultry in the United States is through constant surveillance of poultry flocks. Although current influenza vaccines for poultry and swine are inactivated and adjuvanted, ongoing research into the development of newer vaccines, such as DNA, live-virus, or vectored vaccines, is being done. Control of influenza virus infection in poultry and swine is critical to the reduction of potential cross-species adaptation and spread of influenza viruses, which will minimize the risk of animals being the source of the next pandemic.

  17. Use of autologous tissue engineered skin to treat porcine full-thickness skin defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xia; CAO Yi-lin; CUI Lei; LIU Wei; GUAN Wen-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore a feasible method to repair full-thickness skin defects utilizing tissue engineered techniques. Methods: The Changfeng hybrid swines were used and the skin specimens were cut from the posterior limb girdle region, from which the keratinocytes and fibroblasts were isolated and harvested by trypsin, EDTA, and type II collagenase. The cells were seeded in Petri dishes for primary culture. When the cells were in logarithmic growth phase, they were treated with trypsin to separate them from the floor of the tissue culture dishes. A biodegradable material, Pluronic F-127, was prefabricated and mixed with these cells, and then the cell-Pluronic compounds were seeded evenly into a polyglycolic acid (PGA). Then the constructs were replanted to the autologous animals to repair the full-thickness skin defects. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the neotissue were observed in 1, 2, 4, and 8 postoperative weeks. Results: The cell-Pluronic F-127-PGA compounds repaired autologous full-thickness skin defects 1 week after implantation. Histologically, the tissue engineered skin was similar to the normal skin with stratified epidermis overlying a moderately thick collageneous dermis. Three of the structural proteins in the epidermal basement membrane zone, type IV collagen, laminin, and type VII collagen were detected using immunohistochemical methods. Conclusions: By studying the histology and immunohistochemistry of the neotissue, the bioengineered skin graft holds great promise for improving healing of the skin defects.

  18. Estimation of the transmission dynamics of African swine fever virus within a swine house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J. P.; Larsen, T. S.; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    The spread of African swine fever virus (ASFV) threatens to reach further parts of Europe. In countries with a large swine production, an outbreak of ASF may result in devastating economic consequences for the swine industry. Simulation models can assist decision makers setting up contingency plans......·00 (95% CI 0-1). Furthermore, we simulated the spread of ASFV within a pig house using a modified SEIR-model to establish the time from infection of one animal until ASFV is detected in the herd. Based on a chosen detection limit of 2·55% equivalent to 10 dead pigs out of 360, the disease would...

  19. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction

  20. Skin Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  1. Hyperelastic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present? Genetic counseling may ...

  2. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sunlamps. There are 2 types of UV rays: UVA rays (long-wave) – UVA rays penetrate clouds and glass. They penetrate the ... to cancer. But studies have shown that both UVA and UVB damage the skin and can cause ...

  3. Proteomic analysis of swine serum following highly virulent classical swine fever virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Huan-cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical swine fever virus (CSFV belongs to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. Virulent strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV cause severe disease in pigs characterized by immunosuppression, thrombocytopenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which causes significant economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Methods To reveal proteomic changes in swine serum during the acute stage of lethal CSFV infection, 5 of 10 pigs were inoculated with the virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the remainder serving as uninfected controls. A serum sample was taken at 3 days post-infection from each swine, at a stage when there were no clinical symptoms other than increased rectal temperatures (≥40°C. The samples were treated to remove serum albumin and immunoglobulin (IgG, and then subjected to two-dimension differential gel electrophoresis. Results Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 17 protein spots showing at least 1.5-fold quantitative alteration in expression. Ten spots were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS or LTQ MS. Expression of 4 proteins was increased and 6 decreased in CSFV-infected pigs. Functions of these proteins included blood coagulation, anti-inflammatory activity and angiogenesis. Conclusion These proteins with altered expression may have important implications in the pathogenesis of classical swine fever and provide a clue for identification of biomarkers for classical swine fever early diagnosis.

  4. Impaired Skin Barrier Due to Sebaceous Gland Atrophy in the Latent Stage of Radiation-Induced Skin Injury: Application of Non-Invasive Diagnostic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyosun Jang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced skin injury can take the form of serious cutaneous damage and have specific characteristics. Asymptomatic periods are classified as the latent stage. The skin barrier plays a critical role in the modulation of skin permeability and hydration and protects the body against a harsh external environment. However, an analysis on skin barrier dysfunction against radiation exposure in the latent stage has not been conducted. Thus, we investigated whether the skin barrier is impaired by irradiation in the latent stage and aimed to identify the molecules involved in skin barrier dysfunction. We analyzed skin barrier function and its components in SKH1 mice that received 20 and 40 Gy local irradiation. Increased transepidermal water loss and skin pH were observed in the latent stage of the irradiated skin. Skin barrier components, such as structural proteins and lipid synthesis enzymes in keratinocyte, increased in the irradiated group. Interestingly, we noted sebaceous gland atrophy and increased serine protease and inflammatory cytokines in the irradiated skin during the latent period. This finding indicates that the main factor of skin barrier dysfunction in the latent stage of radiation-induced skin injury is sebaceous gland deficiency, which could be an intervention target for skin barrier impairment.

  5. Swine as a model in renal physiology and nephrology: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terris, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Swine have become an important animal model in many areas of biomedical research for a variety of reasons. They are suited for studies in nephrology and renal physiology because they are the only mammal, with the exception of the dwarf water buffalo, which has been shown to have kidneys morphologically similar to the human. Maturational characteristics of fetal and neonatal kidney are similar to those of the newborn human infant. Therefore, studies to evaluate the pyeloureteral dynamics of human like multipapillary kidneys or developmental studies related to the newborn human cannot be conducted adequately in any other mammal. The following overview addresses the morphology and pelvic and ureteral dynamics of swine and human kidneys, maturation of renal hemodynamics in the neonate, renal function and the effects of anesthesia and diruetics on renal function in the pig. Additionally, the use of swine in other areas of interest to the nephrologist and renal physiologist are considered, eg, renal response to exercise, irradiation therapy, kidney preservation and renal transplantation

  6. Irradiation of liquid manure for the purpose of utilization in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.; Gleria, M. di; Szemeredi, Gy.

    1980-01-01

    The authors give an account of the use of ionizing radiation for disinfection of swine liquid manure. The most common representatives of pathogenic and facultative pathogenic microorganisms of swine liquid manure have been irradiated and their sensitivity to different doses of 60 Co has been examined. The microorganisms proved to be more resistant to irradiation in culture media than in swine liquid manure, where most of the studied bacteria were killed by radiation dose of 4 kGy. However, a very high resistance has been found at the saprophytic and pathogenic mycobacteria and at the spore containing Clostridium perfringens having required a lethal dose of 10 and 15 kGy respectively. After radiation-treatment the liquid manure can be used in agriculture for irrigation and it can be recycled to the stall cleaning procedures. The use of irradiated liquid manure as a possible animal food is also discussed. (Auth.)

  7. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  8. Multilayer detector for skin absorbed dose measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanov, D.P.; Panova, V.P.; Shaks, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A method for skin dosimetry based on utilization of multilayer detectors and permitting to estimate distribution of absorbed dose by skin depth is described. The detector represents a set of thin sensitive elements separated by tissue-equivalent absorbers. Quantitative evaluation and forecasting the degree of radiation injury of skin are determined by the formula based on determination of the probability of the fact that cells are not destroyed and they can divide further on. The given method ensures a possibility of quantitative evaluation of radiobiological effect and forecasting clinical consequences of skin irradiation by results of corresponding measurements of dose by means of the miultilayer detector

  9. Pandemic swine influenza virus: Preparedness planning | Ojogba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The novel H1N1 influenza virus that emerged in humans in Mexico in early 2009 and transmitted efficiently in the human population with global spread was declared a pandemic strain. The introduction of different avian and human influenza virus genes into swine influenza viruses often result in viruses of increased fitness ...

  10. 75 FR 16641 - Swine Contract Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ...-AB06 Swine Contract Library AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA... Library (SCL). The statutory authority for the library lapsed on September 30, 2005. On October 5, 2006... maintenance of a library of marketing contracts offered by certain packers to producers for the purchase of...

  11. Alternative risk financing instruments for swine epidemics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    Swine epidemics can have very large devastating financial consequences. Governments generally bear the direct losses, such as the value of destroyed animals. Consequential losses, such as the losses resulting from empty buildings and movement standstills, are completely borne by the farmers (and

  12. Computerized management support for swine breeding farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huirne, R.B.M.

    1990-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTION

    The investigations described in this thesis have been directed towards computerized management support for swine breeding farms, focused on sow productivity and profitability. The study is composed of three basic parts: (1) basic description and

  13. USMARC update on swine reproduction research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine research at USMARC has continued to focus on meat quality, improvement of genomic resources and reproduction, specifically estrus traits, sow longevity and lifetime productivity. This report will focus on research in behavioral anestrus in gilts. Gilts that reach puberty at an earlier age are ...

  14. H1N1 influenza (Swine flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine flu; H1N1 type A influenza ... The H1N1 virus is now considered a regular flu virus. It is one of the three viruses included in the regular (seasonal) flu vaccine . You cannot get H1N1 flu virus from ...

  15. 9 CFR 91.9 - Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Swine. 91.9 Section 91.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING OF LIVESTOCK FOR...

  16. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  17. Individual skin care during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, J.S.; Budach, W.; Doerr, W.

    1998-01-01

    Background: In many clinical settings, the irradiated patient feels additional discomfort by the inhibition of washing the treatment portals and interruption of his adapted skin care habits. Material and methods: An analysis of the scientific recommendations as well as an analysis of the skin dose to the irradiated portals has been performed. An individual scheme for skin care under radiation has been developed. Results: A substantial decrease of the skin dose is achieved in many modern radiation techniques. The consequent reduction of severe skin reactions allowed the use of water and mild soaps as has been approved within many radiotherapy departments. This has lead to an individualized concept for skin care under radiation treatment including the allowance of gentle washing. The skin marks may be saved by using highly tolerable adhesive plasters or small tattoo points, if they are not superfluous by using masks or single referee points instead of marks for the field borders. Conclusions: The individualized concept for skin care during radiation may offer improved life quality to the patient and may decrease the acute reactions of the skin at least in some cases. (orig.) [de

  18. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yuanqin [Cancer Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Yao, Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY (United States); Gao, Ning [Department of Pharmacognos, College of Pharmacy, 3rd Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  19. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries

  20. Segmented phantoms reconstruction for skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Furnari, Laura; Reis, Gabriela S.

    2009-01-01

    There are several radio-sensitive skin diseases. Skin dosimetry is a difficult task to be properly performed, not only due to skin extension and small thickness, but also because it is usually submitted to high dose gradients. High-resolution medical images along with methods that simulate the interaction of radiation with matter, as the Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, have been widely used in medical physics procedures. These images provide the construction of realistic computational anatomical models, which after being coupled to these codes, retrieve reliable dosimetric assessments. However, present day regular images are unsuitable to correctly perform skin dose distribution evaluations. This inability is due to improper skin discrimination in most of current medical images, once its thickness stands below image resolution, i.e. pixel characteristic sizes are larger than skin thickness. This paper proposes a methodology of voxelized phantom reconstruction and segmentation, by subdividing their basic elements - voxels. It is done in order to better discriminate the skin by assigning more adequate value for skin thickness and its actual localization. Aiming at a more realistic skin modeling one is expected to get more accurate skin dose evaluations. This task is an important issue in many radiotherapy procedures. A particular interest lays in Total Skin Electron Therapy (TSET), which highlights the treatment of the whole body irradiation, a radiotherapy procedure under implementation in the Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-USP). (author)

  1. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  2. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled...... with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential...

  3. Consequences of childhood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinfeld, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    Many patients as children or adolescents received treatment for nonmalignant conditions with therapeutic-range doses of ionizing radiation. Great interest exists in this group of patients because of the possible long-term adverse effects of such irradiation. A thorough physical examination should be performed, and a careful history, listing any instances of radiation exposure, should be taken. Photographic documentation of skin and/or mucosal changes is beneficial

  4. Two genotypes of H1N2 swine influenza viruses appeared among pigs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuantian; Zhu, Qiyun; Yang, Huanliang; Zhang, Xiumei; Qiao, Chuanling; Chen, Yan; Xin, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hualan

    2009-10-01

    H1N2 is one of the main subtypes of influenza, which circulates in swine all over the world. To investigate the prevalence and genetic of H1N2 in swine of China. Two H1N2 swine influenza viruses were isolated from Tianjin and Guangdong province of China in 2004 and 2006, respectively. The molecular evolution of eight gene segments was analyzed. A/Swine/Tianjin/1/2004 has low identity with A/Swine/Guangdong/2006; in the phylogenetic tree of PA gene, A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2006 and A/Swine/Guangxi/1/2006 along with the H1N2 swine isolates of North America formed a cluster; and A/Swine/Tianjin/2004 and A/Swine/Zhejiang/2004, along with the classical H1N1 swine isolates formed another cluster; except that NA gene of A/Swine/Tianjin/1/2004 fell into the cluster of the H3N2 human influenza virus, indicating the reassortment between H3N2 human and H1N1 swine influenza viruses. Two different genotypes of H1N2 appeared among pigs in China. A/swine/Guangdong/1/06 was probably from H1N2 swine influenza viruses of North America; while A/swine/Tianjin/1/04 maybe come from reassortments of classical H1N1 swine and H3N2 human viruses prevalent in North America.

  5. [An overview on swine influenza viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Zhu, Wen-Fei; Shu, Yue-Long

    2013-05-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIVs) are respiratory pathogens of pigs. They cause both economic bur den in livestock-dependent industries and serious global public health concerns in humans. Because of their dual susceptibility to human and avian influenza viruses, pigs are recognized as intermediate hosts for genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission. Subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 circulate in swine populations around the world, with varied origin and genetic characteristics among different continents and regions. In this review, the role of pigs in evolution of influenza A viruses, the genetic evolution of SIVs and interspecies transmission of SIVs are described. Considering the possibility that pigs might produce novel influenza viruses causing more outbreaks and pandemics, routine epidemiological surveillance of influenza viruses in pig populations is highly recommended.

  6. Simulating the epidemiological and economic effects of an African swine fever epidemic in industrialized swine populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Bøtner, Anette; Mortensen, Sten

    2016-01-01

    to simulate the spread of ASF virus between domestic swine herds exemplified by the Danish swine population. ASF was simulated to spread via animal movement, low- or medium-risk contacts and local spread. Each epidemic was initiated in a randomly selected herd – either in a nucleus herd, a sow herd......African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable infectious disease with a considerable impact on animal health and is currently one of the most important emerging diseases of domestic pigs. ASF was introduced into Georgia in 2007 and subsequently spread to the Russian Federation and several Eastern...... European countries. Consequently, there is a non-negligible risk of ASF spread towards Western Europe. Therefore it is important to develop tools to improve our understanding of the spread and control of ASF for contingency planning. A stochastic and dynamic spatial spread model (DTU-DADS) was adjusted...

  7. Modelling the Growth of Swine Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The spread of swine flu has been a cause of great concern globally. With no vaccine developed as yet, (at time of writing in July 2009) and given the fact that modern-day humans can travel speedily across the world, there are fears that this disease may spread out of control. The worst-case scenario would be one of unfettered exponential growth.…

  8. The effect of gamma-radiation on the microbiological alterations of swine liquid manure artifically infected with bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleria, M. di; Beczassy, Gy-ne.; Szemeredy, Gy.

    1979-01-01

    In the present work an account on the use of ionizing radiation for disinfection of swine liquid manure is given. The most common representatives of pathogenic and facultative-pathogenic microorganisms in swine liquid manure have been irradiated and their sensitivity to different doses of 60 Co gamma radiation has been examined. Most of the studied bacteria were killed by a radiation dose of 4 kGy. However, a very high resistance has been found in the cases of saprophytic and pathogenic mycobacteria and spore containing Clostridium perfringens. These microorganisms required a lethal dose of 5 and 7 kGy, respectively. After radiation treatment the liquid manure can be used in agriculture for irrigation and it can be recycled to the stall cleaning procedures. (author)

  9. History of Swine influenza viruses in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huachen; Webby, Richard; Lam, Tommy T Y; Smith, David K; Peiris, Joseph S M; Guan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The pig is one of the main hosts of influenza A viruses and plays important roles in shaping the current influenza ecology. The occurrence of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus demonstrated that pigs could independently facilitate the genesis of a pandemic influenza strain. Genetic analyses revealed that this virus was derived by reassortment between at least two parent swine influenza viruses (SIV), from the northern American triple reassortant H1N2 (TR) and European avian-like H1N1 (EA) lineages. The movement of live pigs between different continents and subsequent virus establishment are preconditions for such a reassortment event to occur. Asia, especially China, has the largest human and pig populations in the world, and seems to be the only region frequently importing pigs from other continents. Virological surveillance revealed that not only classical swine H1N1 (CS), and human-origin H3N2 viruses circulated, but all of the EA, TR and their reassortant variants were introduced into and co-circulated in pigs in this region. Understanding the long-term evolution and history of SIV in Asia would provide insights into the emergence of influenza viruses with epidemic potential in swine and humans.

  10. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  11. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures ...

  12. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  13. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  14. Non-stochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig and mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Hansen, L.S.; Coggle, J.E.; Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this collaborative study skin areas of various sizes were irradiated with different energy beta emitters. In the post-irradiation period fields were examined for erythema, desquamation, ulceration and dermal necrosis. The aim of the study is to determine the threshold doses for the different biological reactions as a function of the energy of the radiation and the size of skin field irradiated. At St. Bartholomew's Hospital and Oxford the irradiation of mouse and pig skin was carried out using strontium-90 and thulium-170 sources. In addition, mice were irradiated with thallium-204, a slightly lower energy beta emitter than thulium. (author)

  15. A Paired, Double-Blind, Randomized Comparison of a Moisturizing Durable Barrier Cream to 10% Glycerine Cream in the Prophylactic Management of Postmastectomy Irradiation Skin Care: Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Peter H., E-mail: peter.graham@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, New South Wales (Australia); Plant, Natalie; Graham, Jennifer L.; Browne, Lois [Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, New South Wales (Australia); Borg, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia); Capp, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mater Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Cancer Care Centre, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Harvey, Jennifer [Mater Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kenny, Lisbeth [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Francis, Michael [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong (Australia); Zissiadis, Yvonne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A previous, unblinded study demonstrated that an alcohol-free barrier film containing an acrylate terpolymer (ATP) was effective in reducing skin reactions compared with a 10% glycerine cream (sorbolene). The different appearances of these products precluded a blinded comparison. To test the acrylate terpolymer principle in a double-blinded manner required the use of an alternative cream formulation, a moisturizing durable barrier cream (MDBC); the study was conducted by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) as protocol 04.01. Methods and Materials: A total of 333 patients were randomized; 1 patient was ineligible and 14 patients withdrew or had less than 7 weeks' observations, leaving 318 for analysis. The chest wall was divided into medial and lateral compartments, and patients were randomized to have MDBC applied daily to the medial or lateral compartment and sorbolene to the other compartment. Weekly observations, photographs, and symptom scores (pain and pruritus) were collected to week 12 or resolution of skin reactions if earlier. Skin dose was confirmed by centrally calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results: Rates of medial and lateral compartment Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 3, greater than or equal to grade 3 skin reactions were 23% and 41%, but rates by skin care product were identical at 32%. There was no significant difference between MDBC and sorbolene in the primary endpoint of peak skin reactions or secondary endpoints of area-under-the-curve skin reaction scores. Conclusions: The MDBC did not reduce the peak skin reaction compared to sorbolene. It is possible that this is related to the difference in the formulation of the cream compared with the film formulation. Skin dosimetry verification and double blinding are essential for radiation skin care comparative studies.

  16. A Paired, Double-Blind, Randomized Comparison of a Moisturizing Durable Barrier Cream to 10% Glycerine Cream in the Prophylactic Management of Postmastectomy Irradiation Skin Care: Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Peter H.; Plant, Natalie; Graham, Jennifer L.; Browne, Lois; Borg, Martin; Capp, Anne; Delaney, Geoff P.; Harvey, Jennifer; Kenny, Lisbeth; Francis, Michael; Zissiadis, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A previous, unblinded study demonstrated that an alcohol-free barrier film containing an acrylate terpolymer (ATP) was effective in reducing skin reactions compared with a 10% glycerine cream (sorbolene). The different appearances of these products precluded a blinded comparison. To test the acrylate terpolymer principle in a double-blinded manner required the use of an alternative cream formulation, a moisturizing durable barrier cream (MDBC); the study was conducted by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) as protocol 04.01. Methods and Materials: A total of 333 patients were randomized; 1 patient was ineligible and 14 patients withdrew or had less than 7 weeks' observations, leaving 318 for analysis. The chest wall was divided into medial and lateral compartments, and patients were randomized to have MDBC applied daily to the medial or lateral compartment and sorbolene to the other compartment. Weekly observations, photographs, and symptom scores (pain and pruritus) were collected to week 12 or resolution of skin reactions if earlier. Skin dose was confirmed by centrally calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results: Rates of medial and lateral compartment Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 3, greater than or equal to grade 3 skin reactions were 23% and 41%, but rates by skin care product were identical at 32%. There was no significant difference between MDBC and sorbolene in the primary endpoint of peak skin reactions or secondary endpoints of area-under-the-curve skin reaction scores. Conclusions: The MDBC did not reduce the peak skin reaction compared to sorbolene. It is possible that this is related to the difference in the formulation of the cream compared with the film formulation. Skin dosimetry verification and double blinding are essential for radiation skin care comparative studies

  17. Apposite of pig skin preserved in glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes F, M.L.; Gonzalez V, C.; Salinas A, M.

    2007-01-01

    In the Radio sterilized Tissue Bank (BTR) of the ININ apposite of pig skin are processed and preserved to low temperature (-80 C), which are sterilized by irradiation and transported to the hospitals in dry ice to avoid its unfreezing. With the purpose of making more simple the manipulation of the apposite it was carried out this work that consisted on developing the processing of the pig skin using glycerol like preservation medium, since this way the irradiation, the storage and transport of the apposite is carried out at refrigeration temperature, that makes its manage more simple. (Author)

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  19. Bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine: I. Autologous and SLA matched allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, L.R.; Pescovitz, M.D.; Popitz, F.; Sachs, D.H.; Sakamoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    We developed a successful bone marrow transplant protocol in MHC-inbred miniature swine (MS). Three groups of MS were studied: irradiation controls, autologous bone marrow transplants and SLA matched bone marrow allografts. One day prior to irradiation, all animals underwent Hickman catheter placement via the external jugular vein. Bone marrow was harvested by direct mechanical removal of marrow from four long bones in Groups 2 and 3 one day prior to irradiation. All animals received 900 rads of midline body radiation from a Cobalt-60 source, were treated 1 g of cephalothin IV bid from day 1 to 14, 20 mg of genetamicin IV bid, from day 4 through 14 and 250 to 350 ml of fresh, irradiated whole blood from blood group identical donors on days 7, 11 and 14. Bone marrow was filtered, washed, stored overnight at 4 C and reinfused one to six hr after irradiation. Engraftment was defined by return of the peripheral WBC to 1000/mm 3 . All six animals in Group 1 died of aplasia between days 7 and 12. Marrow engrafted in eight of 12 animals in Group 2 and 7 of 10 animals in Group 3. This model provides a means to study the biological characteristics of bone marrow transplantation in immunologically well characterized large animals and should prove useful as a model for bone marrow transplants in man

  20. Cutaneous skin tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  1. In vivo UVB irradiation induces clustering of Fas (CD95) on human epidermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Bo; Gniadecki, Robert; Larsen, Jørgen K

    2003-01-01

    a single dose of UVB irradiation. Normal healthy individuals were irradiated with three minimal erythema doses (MED) of UVB on forearm or buttock skin. Suction blisters from unirradiated and irradiated skin were raised, and Fas, FasL, and apoptosis of epidermal cells quantified by flow cytometry...

  2. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  3. Economic losses to Iberian swine production from forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Ramon Molina Martinez; Miguel Herrera Machuca; Ricardo Zamora Diaz; Fancisco Rodriguez y Silva; Armando Gonzalez-Caban

    2011-01-01

    Most forestry property in Andalusia is privately held. One of the most important possibilities for economic development of rural areas is the use of pasture lands (dehesa in Spanish). During the spring–summer season, swine grazing takes advantage of grasses between the trees, and during winter (harsher times), they use Quercus tree fruit. Swine production has a direct...

  4. Population dynamics of swine influenza virus in finishing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza virus infections in swine were first noticed in the US in 1918, during the human pandemic of the Spanish flu. In Europe, seroprevalences for the three most common swine influenza strains at the moment, H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2, range from 20-80% in finishing pigs at the end of the finishing

  5. Removal of nitrogen from anaerobically digested swine wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This result indicates that the sulfur-packed biofilter would be used as an efficient option for denitrification by autotrophic denitrifiers during swine wastewater treatment. Key words: Biological nitrogen removal, nitrification, denitrification, chemical oxygen demand (COD), intermittent aeration, sulfur-packed bed reactor, swine ...

  6. 9 CFR 93.511 - Swine quarantine facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Privately operated quarantine facilities. The importer, or his or her agent, of swine subject to quarantine... of any import permit. The facilities occupied by swine should be kept clean and sanitary to the... described in paragraph (b) of this section. The importer, or his or her agent, shall request in writing such...

  7. Molecular characterization of African swine fever virus in apparently ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly lethal and economically significant disease of domestic pigs in Uganda where outbreaks regularly occur. There is neither a vaccine nor treatment available for ASF control. Twenty two African swine fever virus (ASFV) genotypes (I - XXII) have been identified based on partial sequencing ...

  8. Close Relationship of Ruminant Pestiviruses and Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, Alexander; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Oguzoglu, Tuba Cigdem; Indenbirken, Daniela; Alawi, Malik; Fischer, Nicole; Grundhoff, Adam

    2015-01-01

    To determine why serum from small ruminants infected with ruminant pestiviruses reacted positively to classical swine fever virus (CSFV)–specific diagnostic tests, we analyzed 2 pestiviruses from Turkey. They differed genetically and antigenically from known Pestivirus species and were closely related to CSFV. Cross-reactions would interfere with classical swine fever diagnosis in pigs. PMID:25811683

  9. A case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma and skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuki; Yano, Kenji

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma, and skin cancer in a 69-year-old woman who had undergone local irradiation and application of radium directly to the skin for actinomycosis of the face at the age of twenty. Some forty to fifty years later, a skin ulcer in the preauricular area in the center of the radiodermatitis, cerebral meningioma in the right sphenoid ridge, and a keratotic skin tumor in the right auricle all developed within the previously irradiated region. The cerebral meningioma was extirpated. The skin ulcer was excised and covered with a forearm flap. After the skin tumor was excised and the subcutaneous tumor in the postauricular area was excised, the postoperative histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. It was considered that the squamous cell carcinoma was derived from irradiated keratosis. Four months later, right neck lymph node dissection was performed. Both the meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma satisfied Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced tumors. So we diagnosed these as radiation-induced cerebral meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma. We haven't detected any recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma for two years. We learned from this case that chronic radiation disturbances cause an irreversible reaction and various radiolesions, including malignancies, can occur after a long period of latency. It is important to never underestimate a small lesion in the irradiated area, to plan early preventive surgical treatment to remove skin that may have been over-subjected to irradiation, and to continue long-term follow-up for patients with chronic radiodermatitis. (author)

  10. A case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yuki; Yano, Kenji [Kure National Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma, and skin cancer in a 69-year-old woman who had undergone local irradiation and application of radium directly to the skin for actinomycosis of the face at the age of twenty. Some forty to fifty years later, a skin ulcer in the preauricular area in the center of the radiodermatitis, cerebral meningioma in the right sphenoid ridge, and a keratotic skin tumor in the right auricle all developed within the previously irradiated region. The cerebral meningioma was extirpated. The skin ulcer was excised and covered with a forearm flap. After the skin tumor was excised and the subcutaneous tumor in the postauricular area was excised, the postoperative histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. It was considered that the squamous cell carcinoma was derived from irradiated keratosis. Four months later, right neck lymph node dissection was performed. Both the meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma satisfied Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced tumors. So we diagnosed these as radiation-induced cerebral meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma. We haven't detected any recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma for two years. We learned from this case that chronic radiation disturbances cause an irreversible reaction and various radiolesions, including malignancies, can occur after a long period of latency. It is important to never underestimate a small lesion in the irradiated area, to plan early preventive surgical treatment to remove skin that may have been over-subjected to irradiation, and to continue long-term follow-up for patients with chronic radiodermatitis. (author)

  11. Resveratrol anti-ultraviolet-induced guinea pig skin injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenxing; Zhao Ying

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To Estimate on the protection effect of Stilbene on skin damage induced by ultraviolet radiation. Methods: After the normal skin in guinea pig under the intervene of Resveratrol was irradiated with over- dose of ultraviolet rays (UVB and UVA), the samples in every group were matched and compared. Results: The skin tissue in the Resveratrol intervene group irradiated by ultraviolet rays didn't change obviously as compared with that in the self-control group. But, the damage skin tissue in the control group irradiated by ultraviolet did change significantly as compared with that in the Stilbene intervene group. Conclusion: Resveratrol is a good material to protect the skin from damage effect by ultraviolet radiation. (authors)

  12. An ultrasonographic evaluation of skin thickness in breast cancer patients after postmastectomy radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Sharon; Kaur, Amarjit; Back, Michael; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jiade Jay

    2011-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of ultrasonography in the assessment of post radiotherapy skin changes in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Patients treated for postmastectomy radiotherapy in National University Hospital (NUH) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), Singapore between January 2004- December 2005 was recruited retrospectively. Ultrasound scan was performed on these Asian patients who had been treated to a total dose of 46-50 Gy with 1 cm bolus placed on the skin. The ultrasound scans were performed blinded to the RTOG scores, and the skin thickness of the individually marked points on the irradiated chest wall was compared to the corresponding points on the non-irradiated breast. The mean total skin thickness inclusive of the epidermis and the dermis of the right irradiated chest wall was 0.1712 mm (± 0.03392 mm) compared with the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast which was 0.1845 mm (± 0.04089 mm; p = 0.007). The left irradiated chest wall had a mean skin thickness of 0.1764 mm (± 0.03184 mm) compared with the right non-irradiated breast which was 0.1835 mm (± 0.02584 mm; p = 0.025). These independent t-tests produced a significant difference of reduced skin thickness on the right irradiated chest wall, p = 0.007 (p < 0.05) and left irradiated chest wall p = 0.025 (p < 0.025) in comparison to the non-irradiated skin thickness investigating chronic skin reactions. Patients with grade 2 acute skin toxicity presented with thinner skin as compared to patients with grade 1 (p = 0.006). This study has shown that there is a statistically significant difference between the skin thicknesses of the irradiated chest wall and the contra-lateral non-irradiated breast and a predisposition to chronic reactions was found in patients with acute RTOG scoring of grade1 and grade 2

  13. A device for multimodal imaging of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigulis, Janis; Garancis, Valerijs; Rubins, Uldis; Zaharans, Eriks; Zaharans, Janis; Elste, Liene

    2013-03-01

    A compact prototype device for diagnostic imaging of skin has been developed and tested. Polarized LED light at several spectral regions is used for illumination, and round skin spot of diameter 30mm is imaged by a CMOS sensor via crossoriented polarizing filter. Four consecutive imaging series are performed: (1) RGB image at white LED illumination for revealing subcutaneous structures; (2) four spectral images at narrowband LED illumination (450nm, 540nm, 660nm, 940nm) for mapping of the main skin chromophores; (3) video-imaging under green LED illumination for mapping of skin blood perfusion; (4) autofluorescence video-imaging under UV (365nm) LED irradiation for mapping of the skin fluorophores. Design details of the device as well as preliminary results of clinical tests are presented.

  14. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  15. Effect of radiation on rat skin collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Akira

    1980-01-01

    I. Albino male rats were exposed for 16 weeks to ultraviolet light (UVL) which has principle emission at 305 nm. There were no significant changes between control and UVL-exposed skins in the total hydroxyproline content. However, a little increase of citrate-soluble collagen, a little decrease of insoluble collagen and a decrease of aldehyde content in soluble collagen were observed with UVL exposure. Total acid glycosaminoglycan in skin increased 30% or more from control. These results show that the effect of UVL on rat skin in vivo was merely inflammation phenomenon and that the 'aging' process of skin was not caused in our experimental conditions. II. The effects of radiation on the solubility of rat skin collagen were examined under various conditions. 1) When intact rats were exposed to a single dose of radiation from 43 kVp X-ray source, the solubility in skin collagen did not change at 4,000 R dosage, while in irradiation of 40,000 R a decreased solubility in collagen was observed. When rats were given 400 R a week for 12 weeks, there was no changes in the solubility of collagen during experimental period. 2) In vitro exposure to skins, an irradiation of 40,000 R from 43 kVp X-ray source caused a decrease in the solubility of collagen. While an irradiation of 40,000 R of dosage from 200 kVp X-ray source resulted in the increase in soluble collagen and the decrease in insoluble collagen. 3) When intact rats were given a single dose of 40,000 R from 60 Co- gamma -ray, insoluble collagen decreased in both young and adult rats. Similar changes in collagen solubility were observed in vitro gamma -irradiation. (author)

  16. Decontamination Efficacy and Skin Toxicity of Two Decontaminants against Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad W Stratilo

    Full Text Available Decontamination of bacterial endospores such as Bacillus anthracis has traditionally required the use of harsh or caustic chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a chlorine dioxide decontaminant in killing Bacillus anthracis spores in solution and on a human skin simulant (porcine cadaver skin, compared to that of commonly used sodium hypochlorite or soapy water decontamination procedures. In addition, the relative toxicities of these decontaminants were compared in human skin keratinocyte primary cultures. The chlorine dioxide decontaminant was similarly effective to sodium hypochlorite in reducing spore numbers of Bacillus anthracis Ames in liquid suspension after a 10 minute exposure. After five minutes, the chlorine dioxide product was significantly more efficacious. Decontamination of isolated swine skin contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Sterne with the chlorine dioxide product resulted in no viable spores sampled. The toxicity of the chlorine dioxide decontaminant was up to two orders of magnitude less than that of sodium hypochlorite in human skin keratinocyte cultures. In summary, the chlorine dioxide based decontaminant efficiently killed Bacillus anthracis spores in liquid suspension, as well as on isolated swine skin, and was less toxic than sodium hypochlorite in cultures of human skin keratinocytes.

  17. Quantitative approach for the risk assessment of African swine fever and Classical swine fever introduction into the United States through legal imports of pigs and swine products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana María Herrera-Ibatá

    Full Text Available The US livestock safety strongly depends on its capacity to prevent the introduction of Transboundary Animal Diseases (TADs. Therefore, accurate and updated information on the location and origin of those potential TADs risks is essential, so preventive measures as market restrictions can be put on place. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the current risk of African swine fever (ASF and Classical swine fever (CSF introduction into the US through the legal importations of live pigs and swine products using a quantitative approach that could be later applied to other risks. Four quantitative stochastic risk assessment models were developed to estimate the monthly probabilities of ASF and CSF release into the US, and the exposure of susceptible populations (domestic and feral swine to these introductions at state level. The results suggest a low annual probability of either ASF or CSF introduction into the US, by any of the analyzed pathways (5.5*10-3. Being the probability of introduction through legal imports of live pigs (1.8*10-3 for ASF, and 2.5*10-3 for CSF higher than the risk of legally imported swine products (8.90*10-4 for ASF, and 1.56*10-3 for CSF. This could be caused due to the low probability of exposure associated with this type of commodity (products. The risk of feral pigs accessing to swine products discarded in landfills was slightly higher than the potential exposure of domestic pigs through swill feeding. The identification of the months at highest risk, the origin of the higher risk imports, and the location of the US states most vulnerable to those introductions (Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin for live swine and California, Florida and Texas for swine products, is valuable information that would help to design prevention, risk-mitigation and early-detection strategies that would help to minimize the catastrophic consequences of potential ASF/CSF introductions into the US.

  18. Irreversible Electroporation in a Swine Lung Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, Damian E.; Aswad, Bassam; Ng, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety and tissue effects of IRE in a swine lung model. Methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Nine anesthetized domestic swine underwent 15 percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE) lesion creations (6 with bipolar and 3 with 3–4 monopolar electrodes) under fluoroscopic guidance and with pancuronium neuromuscular blockade and EKG gating. IRE electrodes were placed into the central and middle third of the right mid and lower lobes in all animals. Postprocedure PA and lateral chest radiographs were obtained to evaluate for pneumothorax. Three animals were sacrificed at 2 weeks and six at 4 weeks. Animals underwent high-resolution CT scanning and PA and lateral radiographs 1 h before sacrifice. The treated lungs were removed en bloc, perfused with formalin, and sectioned. Gross pathologic and microscopic changes after standard hematoxylin and eosin staining were analyzed within the areas of IRE lesion creation. Results: No significant adverse events were identified. CT showed focal areas of spiculated high density ranging in greatest diameter from 1.1–2.2 cm. On gross inspection of the sectioned lung, focal areas of tan discoloration and increased density were palpated in the areas of IRE. Histological analysis revealed focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage with fibrosis and inflammatory infiltration that respected the boundaries of the interlobular septae. No pathological difference could be discerned between the 2- and 4-week time points. The bronchioles and blood vessels within the areas of IRE were intact and did not show signs of tissue injury. Conclusion: IRE creates focal areas of diffuse alveolar damage without creating damage to the bronchioles or blood vessels. Short-term safety in a swine model appears to be satisfactory.

  19. Zeolites in poultry and swine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Félix Schneider

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Zeolites are minerals that have intriguing properties such as water absorption, ion adsorption and cation exchange capacity. There are approximately 80 species of natural zeolites recognized and hundreds of artificial zeolites, which have been researched in several fields. Due to their chemical characteristics, zeolites have great potential for use in animal production, especially in poultry and swine farms, as food additives, litter amendment and treatment of residues, with direct and indirect effects on performance, yield and quality of carcass, ambience of farm sheds and reduction of environmental pollution.

  20. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Order the free Anyone Can ... rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? Although ...

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  2. Schistosoma mansoni: aspectos quantitativos da evolução de cercarias irradiadas a nível da pele, pulmões e sistema porta, em camundongos Schistosoma mansoni: quantitative aspects of the evolution of gamma-irradiated cercariae at the skin, lungs, and portal system, in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gileno de Sá Cardoso

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a migração do Schistosoma mansoni (cepas LE e SJ em oito grupos de camundongos albinos (Mus musculus não isogênicos, infectados transcutaneamente com cerca de 450 cercarias não irradiadas (grupos controles e irradiadas com 3 Krad, 20 Krad e 40 Krad de radiação gama proveniente de cobalto-60, Na pele, observou-se uma diminuição progressiva das taxas de recuperação em função do tempo e, nos pulmões e sistema porta, verificou-se uma relação inversa significativa entre as taxas de recuperação total e as doses de irradiação. A dose de 20 Krad praticamente impede a migração dos parasites, de ambas as cepas, dos pulmões até o sistema porta, enquanto a de 40 Krad praticamente impede a migração dos mesmos da pele para os pulmões.The migration of Schistosoma mansoni (LE and SJ strains has been studied in eight groups of outbred Swiss albino mice (Mus musculus, which were previously infected with ca 450 cercariae, transcutaneously. The infection of mice was performed with non irradiated cercariae (control groups, or with gamma-irradiated cercariae, at the schedule of 3, 20 and 40 Krad. Regarding the skin, a progressive decrease was detected for the recovery rates, related to the time of infection. As far as the lungs and portal system are concerned, a significant inverse correlation was observed between the total recovery rate and the irradiation dosages. The dose of 20 Krad practically hinders the migration of the parasites (in both strains from the lungs to the portal system, whereas the dose of 40 Krad prevents the migration of most of the parasites from the skin to the lungs.

  3. Vacuum pyrolysis of swine manure : biochar production and characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, M. [Inst. de recherche et de developpement en agroenvironnement Inc., Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Centre de recherche industrielle du Quebec, Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Godbout, S.; Larouche, J.P.; Lemay, S.P.; Pelletier, F. [Inst. de recherche et de developpement en agroenvironnement Inc., Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Solomatnikova, O. [Centre de recherche industrielle du Quebec, Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Brar, S.K. [Inst. national de la recherche scientifique, eau, terre et environnement, Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Quebec accounts for nearly 25 per cent of swine production in Canada. The issue of swine manure is addressed through land spreading and conversion into fertilizer. However, current regulations restrict the use of swine manure as fertilizer on most farmlands due to the problem of surplus phosphorus and nitrogen. Although many technologies exist to separate phosphorus and nitrogen from the organic-rich dry matter in swine manure, about 40 per cent of the treated waste matter must still be disposed in an environmentally sound manner. This study investigated the technical feasibility of pretreating the swine manure solids into biofuels on a farm-scale basis using vacuum pyrolysis process. A custom built stainless steel pressure vessel was used to carry out pyrolysis reaction of swine manure biomass at a temperature range between 200 to 600 degrees C under vacuum. The pyrolytic vapour was condensed in 2 glass condensers in series. The biochar was collected directly from the pyrolysis vessel following completion of the pyrolysis batch. The non condensable vapour and gases were considered as losses. Biochar, bio-oil, an aqueous phase and a gas mixture were the 4 products of the pyrolysis process. A thermogravimetric analysis of the swine manure samples was conducted before the pyrolysis tests. The study showed that 238 degrees C is the optimal pyrolysis temperature for biochar production.

  4. Reirradiation of healing murine skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, N.H.A.; Aldana, M.W.; Travis, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    The most common way of assessing residual radiation damage in a tissue has been to retreat at a fixed time interval after a first treatment. Previous studies in skin have shown that the greatest proportion of remembered dose (20-40%) was seen if the retreatment interval was one month, shortly after the acute reaction caused by the first treatment has subsided. Moreover, the observed state of the foot at retreatment depended on the size of the first dose. After a priming dose of 22.5 Gy, the peak skin reaction of 0.8 returned to zero by Day 27. On retreatment at Day 30, the foot was indistinguishable from controls. After higher first doses, the feet still had significant reaction scores ranging from 0.5 to more than 1.0. Thus, in this present study, feet were retreated at a common level of healing rather than after a fixed time interval. Mice feet were irradiated with a range of X-ray doses (22.5-37.5 Gy) covering the threshold to full response. The feet were reirradiated when their skin reactions had fallen to a common value of 0.5. The time of this retreatment was therefore earlier (13 days) after the lowest priming dose (22.5 Gy) than after higher doses. In these latter instances retreatment times ranged from 18-40 days. These data are compared with those from schedules where the second irradiations were performed a fixed time after the first treatment

  5. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  7. Total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    An outline review notes recent work on total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) as a means of preparing patients for grafts and particularly for bone-marrow transplantation. T.L.I. has proved immunosuppressive in rats, mice, dogs, monkeys and baboons; when given before bone-marrow transplantation, engraftment took place without, or with delayed rejection or graft-versus-host disease. Work with mice has indicated that the thymus needs to be included within the irradiation field, since screening of the thymus reduced skin-graft survival from 50 to 18 days, though irradiation of the thymus alone has proved ineffective. A more lasting tolerance has been observed when T.L.I. is followed by an injection of donor bone marrow. 50% of mice treated in this way accepted allogenic skin grafts for more than 100 days, the animals proving to be stable chimeras with 50% of their peripheral blood lymphocytes being of donor origin. Experiments of a similar nature with dogs and baboons were not so successful. (U.K.)

  8. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  9. Influence of mycotoxin zearalenone on the swine reproductive failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanov-Radulović Jasna Z.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive failure in swine is often a difficult diagnostic problem. If diagnoses of infectious disease or management related problems are not obtained, feed quality and safety may be questioned. Mycotoxins are often present in swine feed in the amount that can have detrimental impact on production and reproduction. Problems are expressed only as alterations of the reproductive cycle, reduced feed intake, slow growth or impaired feed efficiency. In Serbia, generally speaking, high concentrations of mycotoxins were noticed, especially mycotoxin zearalenone. High presence of zearalenone in swine feed is probably due to climatic influence and should be monitored constantly. This paper includes field observations regarding the influence of moldy feed containing mycotoxin zearalenone on the occurrence of the reproductive failure in swine breeding categories (sows, gilts and boars. The material for this research was obtained from four swine farms where certain reproductive disorders and health problems in breeding animals were detected. Depending on the specificity of each evaluated case and available material, the applied research methods included: anamnestic and clinical evaluation, pathomorphological examination, standard laboratory testing for detection of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and microbiological feed testing, in order to examine the presence of fungi and mycotoxins by applying the method of thin layer chromatography. On the basis of the obtained results, it could be concluded that mycotoxin zearalenone was detected in all examined feed samples. The presence of mycotoxin in feed was directly related to the reproductive failures in the examined swine categories (vulvovaginitis, endometritis, rebreeding, infertility. Swine reproduction represents the base for intensive swine production. The presence of mycotoxins in swine feed have influence on the reproduction and health status of pigs and under certain conditions may significantly

  10. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  11. Classical Swine Fever—An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Sandra; Staubach, Christoph; Henke, Julia; Carlson, Jolene; Beer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) remains one of the most important transboundary viral diseases of swine worldwide. The causative agent is CSF virus, a small, enveloped RNA virus of the genus Pestivirus. Based on partial sequences, three genotypes can be distinguished that do not, however, directly correlate with virulence. Depending on both virus and host factors, a wide range of clinical syndromes can be observed and thus, laboratory confirmation is mandatory. To this means, both direct and indirect methods are utilized with an increasing degree of commercialization. Both infections in domestic pigs and wild boar are of great relevance; and wild boars are a reservoir host transmitting the virus sporadically also to pig farms. Control strategies for epidemic outbreaks in free countries are mainly based on classical intervention measures; i.e., quarantine and strict culling of affected herds. In these countries, vaccination is only an emergency option. However, live vaccines are used for controlling the disease in endemically infected regions in Asia, Eastern Europe, the Americas, and some African countries. Here, we will provide a concise, updated review on virus properties, clinical signs and pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immune responses, diagnosis and vaccination possibilities. PMID:28430168

  12. Classical Swine Fever-An Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Sandra; Staubach, Christoph; Henke, Julia; Carlson, Jolene; Beer, Martin

    2017-04-21

    Classical swine fever (CSF) remains one of the most important transboundary viral diseases of swine worldwide. The causative agent is CSF virus, a small, enveloped RNA virus of the genus Pestivirus. Based on partial sequences, three genotypes can be distinguished that do not, however, directly correlate with virulence. Depending on both virus and host factors, a wide range of clinical syndromes can be observed and thus, laboratory confirmation is mandatory. To this means, both direct and indirect methods are utilized with an increasing degree of commercialization. Both infections in domestic pigs and wild boar are of great relevance; and wild boars are a reservoir host transmitting the virus sporadically also to pig farms. Control strategies for epidemic outbreaks in free countries are mainly based on classical intervention measures; i.e., quarantine and strict culling of affected herds. In these countries, vaccination is only an emergency option. However, live vaccines are used for controlling the disease in endemically infected regions in Asia, Eastern Europe, the Americas, and some African countries. Here, we will provide a concise, updated review on virus properties, clinical signs and pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immune responses, diagnosis and vaccination possibilities.

  13. Swine manure digestate treatment using electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rúbia Mores

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anaerobic biodigestion is an appropriate alternative for the treatment of swine wastewater due to its biogas generation properties and the possibility of its application as a source of energy for heating or electricity. However, digestate can still contain high levels of turbidity, organic carbon and nutrients and must be correctly managed as a biofertilizer, or treated to avoid any impact on the environment. Considering this, electrocoagulation (EC shows promise as a technology because of its ease of handling and high efficiency in effluent remediation. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of EC in a batch system in the treatment of swine wastewater digestate. The wastewater used in the treatment was sampled from a 10 m3 biodigestor effluent (digestate located at Concórdia, Santa Catarina, Brazil. A batch-scale experiment was carried out to evaluate the following two variables: electrode distance (ED and voltage applied (V. The removal efficiency levels (% for the best operational condition (2 cm, 5 V after 30 min were: 97 %, 98 %, 77 % and 10 % for color, turbidity, total organic carbon (TOC and total nitrogen (TN, respectively. The EC batch system produced efficient results, underlining its promise as an alternative to be applied in the treatment of digestate.

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  15. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  16. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  17. Skin color - patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003224.htm Skin color - patchy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Patchy skin color is areas where the skin color is irregular. ...

  18. Histoplasma skin test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histoplasmosis skin test ... health care provider cleans an area of your skin, usually the forearm. An allergen is injected just below the cleaned skin surface. An allergen is a substance that causes ...

  19. Skin Condition Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS Rash and Skin Condition Finder 1 Select Age Group Infant Child ... Toe Toe Webspace Toe Nail CLOSE About the Skin Condition Finder Have a health question or concern? ...

  20. Skin Complications of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  1. Skin Peeling Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rajeev

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling of the skin is an uncommonly encountered disorder. Occurrence of vesicles and bullae in peeling skin syndrome is very rare. We report a case of idiopathic peeling skin syndrome with vesicular lesions.

  2. Skin test of radiosensitivity. Application to Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Gluckman, E.

    1983-01-01

    A test of skin radiosensitivity is described. It is achieved by irradiating small skin fields (15 mm in diameter) with 50 kV X-rays. The radiosensitivity is evaluated from the skin reaction observed for a single acute dose of 8 and 10 Gy; it is considered increased if the reaction for 10 Gy exceeds the desquamation threshold, and scored according to the observed reaction. The test includes an evaluation of the cellular repair, assessed on the comparison of the reactions for single dose and split irradiation. The time of the reaction peak is also reported. Abnormal reactions have been observed on 4 out of 8 patients with Fanconi Anemia

  3. Skin test of radiosensitivity. Application to Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutreix, J. (Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)); Gluckman, E. (Centre Hayem, Hopital St.-Louis, 75 Paris (France))

    1983-01-01

    A test of skin radiosensitivity is described. It is achieved by irradiating small skin fields (15 mm in diameter) with 50 kV X-rays. The radiosensitivity is evaluated from the skin reaction observed for a single acute dose of 8 and 10 Gy; it is considered increased if the reaction for 10 Gy exceeds the desquamation threshold, and scored according to the observed reaction. The test includes an evaluation of the cellular repair, assessed on the comparison of the reactions for single dose and split irradiation. The time of the reaction peak is also reported. Abnormal reactions have been observed on 4 out of 8 patients with Fanconi Anemia.

  4. Infrared and Skin: Friend or Foe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barolet, Daniel; Christiaens, François; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, it has been proposed that the sun's IR-A wavelengths might be deleterious to human skin and that sunscreens, in addition to their desired effect to protect against UV-B and UV-A, should also protect against IR-A (and perhaps even visible light). Several studies showed that NIR may damage skin collagen content via an increase in MMP-1 activity in the same manner as is known for UVR. Unfortunately, the artificial NIR light sources used in such studies were not representative of the solar irradiance. Yet, little has been said about the other side of the coin. This article will focus on key information suggesting that IR-A may be more beneficial than deleterious when the skin is exposed to the appropriate irradiance/dose of IR-A radiation similar to daily sun exposure received by people in real life. IR-A might even precondition the skin – a process called photoprevention - from an evolutionary standpoint since exposure to early morning IR-A wavelengths in sunlight may ready the skin for the coming mid-day deleterious UVR. Consequently IR-A appears to be the solution, not the problem. It does more good than bad for the skin. It is essentially a question of intensity and how we can learn from the sun. PMID:26745730

  5. Moist skin care can diminish acute radiation-induced skin toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, F.; Weissenberger, C.; Bertelt, S.; Henke, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Radiation treatment may induce acute skin reactions. There are several methods of managing them. Validity of these methods, however, is not sufficiently studied. We therefore investigated, whether moist skin care with 3% urea lotion will reduce acute radiation skin toxicity. Patients and Methods: 88 patients with carcinomas of the head and neck undergoing radiotherapy with curative intent (mean total dose 60 Gy, range: 50-74 Gy) were evaluated weekly for acute skin reactions according to the RTOG-CTC score. In 63 patients, moist skin care with 3% urea lotion was performed. The control group consisted of 25 patients receiving conventional dry skin care. The incidence of grade I, II, and III reactions and the radiation dose at occurrence of a particular reaction were determined and statistically analyzed using the log-rank test. The dose-time relations of individual skin reactions are described. Results: At some point of time during radiotherapy, all patients suffered from acute skin reactions grade I, > 90% from grade II reactions. 50% of patients receiving moist skin care experienced grade I reactions at 26 Gy as compared to 22 Gy in control patients (p = 0.03). Grade II reactions occurred at 51 Gy versus 34 Gy (p = 0.006). Further, 22% of the patients treated with moist skin care suffered from acute skin toxicity grade III as compared to 56% of the controls (p = 0.0007). Conclusion: Moist skin care with 3% urea lotion delays the occurrence and reduces the grade of acute skin reactions in percutaneously irradiated patients with head and neck tumors. (orig.)

  6. The Romanian Swine Market in the EU Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius STANCIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pork is a traditional food product for Romania, representing more than half of the annual meat consumption per capita. Swine farming is an activity mainly at full time households, ensuring subsistence, representing a source for commercial exchanges, ensuring workforce stability in the rural areas. The Romanian pork production has presented a slightly fluctuating evolution in recent years. The paper proposes a review of the domestic production, consumption, origin and price of swine sold in the Romanian market. The comunity competitive conditions, the export limitation and food crisis (horse meat scandal, spoiled meat scandal, swine fever or swine flu affected domestic production and exports. Data used in this paper represent statistical information provided by specialized national, European or global institutions, information presented in the media, journals, food industry treatises/dissertations or official information submitted by the Ministry of Agriculture.

  7. 78 FR 27937 - Environmental Impact Statement; Feral Swine Damage Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ....m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. To be sure someone is there to help you, please call..., U.S. Virgin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa. Feral swine can inflict...

  8. Nutrient removal from swine lagoon effluent by duckweed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, B.A.; Cheng, J.; Classen, J.; Stomp, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    Three duckweed geographic isolates were grown on varying concentrations of swine lagoon effluent in a greenhouse to determine their ability to remove nutrients from the effluent. Duckweed biomass was harvested every other day over a 12-day period. Duckweed biomass production, nutrient loss from the swine lagoon effluent, and nutrient content of duckweed biomass were used to identify effluent concentrations/geographic isolate combinations that are effective in terms of nutrient utilization from swine lagoon effluent and production of healthy duckweed biomass. When Lemna minor geographic isolate 8627 was grown on 50% swine lagoon effluent, respective losses of TKN, NH{sub 3}-N, TP, OPO{sub 4}-P, TOC, K, Cu, and Zn were 83, 100, 49, 31, 68, 21, 28 and 67%.

  9. Controlled Cortical Impact in Swine: Pathophysiology and Biomechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manley, Geoffrey T; Rosenthal, Guy; Lam, Maggie; Morabito, Diane; Yan, Donghong; Derugin, Nikita; Bollen, Andrew; Knudson, M. M; Panter, S. S

    2005-01-01

    ...), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were collected for 10 hours after injury. Following injury, ICP and HR increased above baseline values in all swine with a more pronounced elevation in animals impacted to a depth of depression of 12 mm...

  10. Kinetics of Methane Production from Swine Manure and Buffalo Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Ronghou

    2015-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of swine and buffalo manure for methane production was investigated. Six kinetic models were employed to describe the corresponding experimental data. These models were evaluated by two statistical measurements, which were root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The results showed that the logistic and Fitzhugh models could predict the experimental data very well for the digestion of swine and buffalo manure, respectively. The predicted methane yield potential for swine and buffalo manure was 487.9 and 340.4 mL CH4/g volatile solid (VS), respectively, which was close to experimental values, when the digestion temperature was 36 ± 1 °C in the biochemical methane potential assays. Besides, the rate constant revealed that swine manure had a much faster methane production rate than buffalo manure.

  11. Skin and lung reaction to fractionated x iradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.B.; Hornsey, S.; Hammersmith Hospital, London

    1980-01-01

    The dependence between the summary dose and the number of fractions for lung and skin injuries of mice, are studied. Single irradiation and irradiation consisting of a different number of fractions are applied. Results are estimated in two directions. Fractionated irradiation is compared with single irradiation. In the case of such an approach the assumption that the observed lung and skin injury results from cell death, the correlation between the initial slope of the survival curve and the final slope is about 7:1. The additional dose necessary when doubling the number of fractions is measured. In the first approximation, these results agree with the model of a single-shock multi-target curve and the 3:1 slope ratio. The conclusion is made that the double-component model gives an inadequate description of cell survival curves of both skin and lungs [ru

  12. Effects of radiation on the skin blood volume pulse in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanelli, G D [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK)

    1977-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the changes in skin blood volume pulse (BVP) in the irradiated skin of three patients (two female, one male) during and up to 250 days after radiotherapy for malignant disease. The instrumentation comprised a modified commercial finger photo-plethysmograph probe with associated electronics, and a survey of the literature revealed that the consensus of opinion seems to be that the recorded pulsations arise from small 'muscular' arteries and arterioles in the 40 to 300 ..mu..m size range. The results show that, as expected, normal, untreated skin shows sizeable variations in BVP. The BVP of irradiated skin became significantly greater than that of normal skin when a dose of 1000 to 1500 rad has been accumulated. The maximum amplitude of the BVP of the irradiated skin seemed to correlate well with the overall severity of the erythema, but increases in BVP preceded erythema flare-ups. In two patients, elevated BVP were recorded for irradiated areas even when most visual signs of erythema had disappeared. Mild cooling of irradiated and non-irradiated skin had differing effects in the BVP. The measurement of the BVP of irradiated skin is a simple, reliable and completely atraumatic method for investigating vascular damage to superficial tissues in humans.

  13. Skin pigmentation kinetics after UVB exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbak, M.H.; Philipsen, P.A.; Wiegell, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    There have been few previous studies of the kinetics of pigmentation following ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure, and these have included only fair-skinned persons. The current study investigated pigmentation increase to steady state and fading in 12 Scandinavians and 12 Indians/Pakistanis. Over...... a period of 3 weeks the subjects were UV-irradiated 6 times on the right side of the back and 12 times on the left side using a Solar Simulator and narrowband UVB with equal sub-Minimal Melanogenesis Doses (individually predetermined). Pigmentation was measured from skin remittance at 555 urn and 660 nm...... (allowing correction for erythema). The absolute pigmentation increase was independent of pre-exposure pigmentation, therefore the percentage pigmentation increase was higher in fair-skinned volunteers. The UV dose to minimal pigmentation was higher in darker-skinned persons for single and multiple UV...

  14. In Vivo Radiofrequency Heating in Swine in a 3T (123.2 MHz) Birdcage Whole-Body Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Devashish; Utecht, Lynn; Tian, Jinfeng; Hughes, John; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study in vivo radiofrequency (RF) heating produced due to power deposition from a 3T (Larmour frequency = 123.2 MHz), birdcage, whole-body coil. Methods The RF heating was simulated in a digital swine by solving the mechanistic generic bioheat transfer model (GBHTM) and the conventional, empirical Pennes bioheat transfer equation for the following two cases: (1) when the porcine head was in the isocenter, and (2) when the porcine trunk was in the isocenter. The simulation results were validated by making direct fluoroptic temperature measurements in the skin, brain, simulated hot regions, and rectum of ten swine (Case 1, N= 5, mean animal weight = 84.03 ± 6.85 kg, Whole-body average SAR = 2.65 ± 0.22 W/kg; Case 2, N= 5, mean animal weight = 81.59 ± 6.23 kg, Whole-body average SAR = 2.77 ± 0.26 W/kg) during one hour of exposure to a turbo spin echo sequence. Results The GBHTM simulated the RF heating more accurately compared to the Pennes equation. In vivo temperatures exceeded safe temperature thresholds with allowable SAR exposures. Hot regions may be produced deep inside the body, away from the skin. Conclusion SAR exposures to produce safe temperature thresholds may need re-investigation. PMID:24259413

  15. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  16. Genetic parameters in a Swine Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Popa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the variance-covariance components is a very important step in animal breeding because these components are necessary for: estimation of the genetic parameters, prediction of the breeding value and design of animal breeding programs. The estimation of genetic parameters is the first step in the development of a swine breeding program, using artificial insemination. Various procedures exist for estimation of heritability. There are three major procedures used for estimating heritability: analysis of variance (ANOVA, parents-offspring regression and restricted maximum likelihood (REML. By using ANOVA methodology or regression method it is possible to obtain aberrant values of genetic parameters (negative or over unit value of heritability coefficient, for example which can not be interpreting because is out of biological limits.

  17. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  18. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Skin, Hair, and Nails KidsHealth / For Parents / Skin, Hair, and ... piel, el cabello y las uñas About Skin, Hair and Nails Skin is our largest organ. If ...

  19. Estrogens and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity...

  20. Urostomy - stoma and skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it well before you attach the pouch. Avoid skin care products that contain alcohol. These can make your skin ... the pouch to your skin. Use fewer special skin care products. This will make problems with your skin less ...