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Sample records for irradiated reactor structural

  1. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  2. Irradiation effects on the ductility of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudamous, F.

    1986-10-01

    Austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steels have been proposed as first wall structural materials for the next generation of fusion devices. In order to study the effect of high temperature irradiation on their tensile properties, specimens of the steel AISI 316 L (CEC reference), of the martensitic steel W. Nr 1.4914 and of the duplex ferritic-martensitic steel EM12 have been irradiated in the BR2 reactor in Mol. The austenitic steel was irradiated at 470 0 C to about 1.1 10 22 n/cm 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) while the ferritic-martensitic steels were irradiated at 590 0 C to about 7.7 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). The tensile tests of the 316 L steel have been performed between 250 and 750 0 C. Below around 550 0 C, the yield stress after irradiation increased from about 160 to 270 MPa and the total elongation decreased from 42 to about 26%. At 750 0 C, the yield stress increase was small but the total elongation decreased from 60 to only 10%. At this temperature, the rupture of the irradiated specimen was intergranular while all the other specimens presented a transgranular rupture. At 650 0 C the variations were intermediate. The change of the ultimate tensile strength was small at all test temperatures. The EM12 and W. Nr 1.4914 steels tested only at 550 0 C, showed a decrease of the yield and tensile strength as well as an increase of the total elongation. The same tests performed on specimens which have been heat treated in parallel showed that the observed changes were due, in a large part, if not completely, to the maintenance of steels at high temperature

  3. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  4. Investigation of structural materials of reactors using high-energy heavy-ion irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguang

    2007-01-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials of fission/fusion reactors is mainly attributed to the evolution of intensive atom displacement damage induced by energetic particles (n, α and/or fission fragments) and high-rate helium doping by direct α particle bombardments and/or (n, α) reactions. It can cause severe degradation of reactor structural materials such as surface blistering, bulk void swelling, deformation, fatigue, embrittlement, stress erosion corrosion and so on that will significantly affect the operation safety of reactors. However, up to now, behavior of structural materials at the end of their service can hardly be fully tested in a real reactor. In the present work, damage process in reactor structural materials is briefly introduced, then the advantages of energetic ion implantation/irradiation especially high-energy heavy ion irradiation are discussed, and several typical examples on simulation of radiation effects in reactor candidate structural materials using high-energy heavy ion irradiations are pronounced. Experimental results and theoretical analysis suggested that irradiation with energetic particles especially high-energy heavy ions is very useful technique for simulating the evolution of microstructures and macro-properties of reactor structural materials. Furthermore, an on-going plan of material irradiation experiments using high energy H- and He-ions based on the Heavy Ion Research Facilities in Lanzhou (HIRFL) is also briefly interpreted. (authors)

  5. A Study on Conjugate Heat Transfer Analysis of Reactor Vessel including Irradiated Structural Heat Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Kunwoo; Cho, Hyuksu; Im, Inyoung; Kim, Eunkee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Though Material reliability programs (MRPs) have a purpose to provide the evaluation or management methodologies for the operating RVI, the similar evaluation methodologies can be applied to the APR1400 fleet in the design stage for the evaluation of neutron irradiation effects. The purposes of this study are: to predict the thermal behavior whether or not irradiated structure heat source; to evaluate effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in relation to isotropic and anisotropic conductivity of porous media for APR1400 Reactor Vessel. The CFD simulations are performed so as to evaluate thermal behavior whether or not irradiated structure heat source and effective thermal conductivity for APR1400 Reactor Vessel. In respective of using irradiated structure heat source, the maximum temperature of fluid and core shroud for isotropic ETC are 325.8 .deg. C, 341.5 .deg. C. The total amount of irradiated structure heat source is about 5.41 MWth and not effect to fluid temperature.

  6. Influence of high dose irradiation on core structural and fuel materials in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) periodically organizes meeting to discuss and review important aspects of fast reactor technology. The fifth meeting held in Obninsk, Russian Federation, 16-19 June 1997, was devoted to the influence of high dose irradiation on the mechanical properties of reactor core structural and fuel materials. The proceedings includes the papers submitted at this meeting each with a separate abstract

  7. Studies on the behavior of graphite structures irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.; Ridealgh, F.

    1971-11-15

    Design data for the physical and mechanical property changes which occur in graphite structural and fuel body components irradiated in an HTR are largely obtained from small specimens tested in the laboratory and in materials test reactors. A brief data summary is given. This graphite physics data can be used to predict dimensional changes, internal stress generation and strength changes in the graphite materials of HTR fuel elements irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. In this paper, the results which have been obtained from post-irradiation examination of a number of fuel pins, are compared with prediction.

  8. Irradiation of structural materials in contact with lead bismuth eutectic in the high flux reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magielsen, A.J., E-mail: magielsen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Jong, M.; Bakker, T.; Luzginova, N.V.; Mutnuru, R.K.; Ketema, D.J.; Fedorov, A.V. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-08-31

    In the framework of the materials domain DEMETRA in the European Transmutation research and development project EUROTRANS, irradiation experiment IBIS has been performed in the High Flux Reactor in Petten. The objective was to investigate the synergystic effects of irradiation and lead bismuth eutectic exposure on the mechanical properties of structural materials and welds. In this experiment ferritic martensitic 9 Cr steel, austenitic 316L stainless steel and their welds have been irradiated for 250 Full Power Days up to a dose level of 2 dpa. Irradiation temperatures have been kept constant at 300 deg. C and 500 deg. C. During the post-irradiation test phase, tensile tests performed on the specimens irradiated at 300 deg. C have shown that the irradiation hardening of ferritic martensitic 9 Cr steel at 1.3 dpa is 254 MPa, which is in line with the irradiation hardening obtained for ferritic martensitic Eurofer97 steel investigated in the fusion program. This result indicates that no LBE interaction at this irradiation temperature is present. A visual inspection is performed on the specimens irradiated in contact with LBE at 500 deg. C and have shown blackening on the surface of the specimens and remains of LBE that makes a special cleaning procedure necessary before post-irradiation mechanical testing.

  9. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    1993-01-01

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocik, J; Keilova, E [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding) to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Standardization of accelerator irradiation procedures for simulation of neutron induced damage in reactor structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lin; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Kim, Hyosim; Garner, Frank A.; Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2017-10-01

    Self-ion irradiation is widely used as a method to simulate neutron damage in reactor structural materials. Accelerator-based simulation of void swelling, however, introduces a number of neutron-atypical features which require careful data extraction and, in some cases, introduction of innovative irradiation techniques to alleviate these issues. We briefly summarize three such atypical features: defect imbalance effects, pulsed beam effects, and carbon contamination. The latter issue has just been recently recognized as being relevant to simulation of void swelling and is discussed here in greater detail. It is shown that carbon ions are entrained in the ion beam by Coulomb force drag and accelerated toward the target surface. Beam-contaminant interactions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. By applying a multiple beam deflection technique, carbon and other contaminants can be effectively filtered out, as demonstrated in an irradiation of HT-9 alloy by 3.5 MeV Fe ions.

  12. Specific Features of Structural-Phase State and Properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel at Elevated Irradiation Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuleshova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers influence of elevated irradiation temperature on structure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel. The steel is investigated after accelerated irradiation at 300°C (operating temperature of VVER-1000-type RPV and 400°C supposed to be the operating temperature of advanced RPVs. Irradiation at 300°C leads to formation of radiation-induced precipitates and radiation defects-dislocation loops, while no carbide phase transformation is observed. Irradiation at a higher temperature (400°C neither causes formation of radiation-induced precipitates nor provides formation of dislocation loops, but it does increase the number density of the main initial hardening phase—of the carbonitrides. Increase of phosphorus concentration in grain boundaries is more pronounced for irradiation at 400°C as compared to irradiation at 300°C due to influence of thermally enhanced diffusion at a higher temperature. The structural-phase changes determine the changes of mechanical properties: at both irradiation temperatures irradiation embrittlement is mainly due to the hardening mechanism with some contribution of the nonhardening one for irradiation at 400°C. Lack of formation of radiation-induced precipitates at T = 400°C provides a small ΔTK shift (17°C. The obtained results demonstrate that the investigated 15Kh2NMFAA steel may be a promising material for advanced reactors with an elevated operating temperature.

  13. Recommendations on the measurement of irradiation received by the structural materials of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genthon, J.P.; Mas, P.; Wright, S.B.; Zijp, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    The recommendations have been compiled by a working group Radiation Damage which has been set up by the Euratom Working Group for reactor Dosimetry. The parameters are indicated which must be defined for the characterisation of the neutron dose causing radiation-induced damage in construction materials important for reactor technique. Following an explanation of some theoretical aspects, practical guidelines for neutron metrology on irradiation of graphite and of metals are given. A thorough knowledge of the spectrum of the incident neutrons is required for a proper interpretation of the results of irradiation experiments

  14. Irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of aluminium and the structural integrity of aluminium reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.P.; McDonald, N.R.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Hellier, A.K.; Stathers, P.A.; Carr, D.G.; Ripley, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    The results of micro-structural and mechanical property studies on aluminum after being exposed to large fluences of neutrons are presented. These property changes are of importance in determining the structural integrity of the Australian HIFAR reactor aluminium tank, which in turn determines the lifetime of the reactor. (author)

  15. Irradiation effects on reactor structural materials. Semi-annual progress report, August 1974--February 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudson, T.T.

    1975-03-01

    Data are reported on: effects of cold work on creep-fatigue of irradiated 304 and 316 stainless steel (ss); swelling of 304 and 316 ss irradiated with protons and fast neutrons; effects of hold time on fatigue crack propagation in neutron-irradiated 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; radiation resistance of 0.03 percent Cu A533-B steel; microstructure of irradiated Inconel 718, Incoloy 800, PH13-8Mo, Mo, and Nb; dose dependence of 2.8-MeV Ni + ion damage (swelling) in Ni; notch ductility and strength of 316 ss submerged arc weld deposits; effects of microstructure of 316 ss on its irradiation response; in-reactor deformation of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; microstructure of HFIR-irradiated 316 ss; void microstructures of V bombarded by 46-MeV Ni 6+ ions (with and without preinjected helium) or 7.5-MeV Ta 3+ ions; swelling of Mo, Mo--0.5 Ti, Nb, Nb--1 Zr, W, and W--25 Re after fast neutron irradiation; swelling of V ion-irradiated Mo; creep of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss at 850, 1000, and 1100 0 F; effects of fast neutrons on mechanical properties of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; notch effects in tensile behavior of irradiated, annealed 304 ss (EBR-II duct thimbles); equations for thermal creep in pressurized tubes of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; irradiation creep in cold-worked 316 ss; helium production cross sections in neutron-irradiated elements; and radiation effects on various alloys. (U.S.)

  16. Structural evaluation of fast reactor core restraint with irradiation creep-swelling opposition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinowski, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiation creep and swelling correlations are derived from primary loading in-reactor experiments in which irradiation creep and swelling act in the same direction. When correlation uncertainty bands are applied in core restraint evaluations, significant variability in sub-assembly behavior is predicted. For example, sub-assemblies in the outer core region where neutron flux and duct temperature gradients are significant exhibit bowing responses ranging from a creep dominated outward bow to a swelling dominated inward bow. Furthermore, solutions based on upper bound and lower bound correlation uncertainty combinations are observed to cross-over indicating that such combinations are physically unrealistic in the assessment of creep-swelling opposition effects. In order to obtain realistic upper and lower bound sub-assembly responses, judgement must be applied in the selection of creep-swelling equation uncertainty combinations. Experimental programs have been defined which will provide the needed basic as well as prototypic creep-swelling opposition data for reference and advanced sub-assembly duct alloys. The first of these is an irradiation of cylindrical capsules subjected to a through-wall temperature gradient. This test which is presently underway in the EBR-II reactor will provide the data needed to refine irradiation creep and swelling correlations and their associated uncertainties when applied to core restraint evaluations. Restrained pin and duct bowing experiments in FFTF have also been defined. These will provide the prototypic data necessary to verify irradiated duct bowing methodology. The results of this experimental program are expected to reduce creep and swelling uncertainties and permit better definition of the design window for load plane gaps. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of radiation fields from neutron irradiated structural components of the 40 MW research reactor CIRUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaranarayanan, S.; Sharma, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of an assessment of the radiation fields from the long-lived neutron activation products (including the decay chain products) in the various structural components of the CIRUS reactor. Special attention is given for the analysis of neutron activation of impurity elements present in the materials of the structure. 16 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  18. Research and materials irradiation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Guigon, B.

    2004-01-01

    Devoted to the fundamental and applied research on materials irradiation, research reactors are nuclear installations where high neutrons flux are maintained. After a general presentation of the research reactors in the world and more specifically in France, this document presents the heavy water cooled reactors and the water cooled reactors. The third part explains the technical characteristics, thermal power, neutron flux, operating and details the Osiris, the RHF (high flux reactor), the Orphee and the Jules Horowitz reactors. The last part deals with the possible utilizations. (A.L.B.)

  19. JNC-JAERI united research report. A study on degradation of structural materials under irradiation environment in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiya, Taiji; Takaya, Shigeru; Nagae, Yuji; Aoto, Kazumi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yasuo; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Ohmi, Masao; Saito, Junichi; Shimizu, Michio

    2004-10-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have started a JNC-JAERI united research program cooperatively in fiscal year 2003, which has been aimed for efficient progress and synergistic effect on the research activities of both Institutes in order to lead the facing task of unification between JNC and JAERI. This study has been chosen one of the united research themes because it has been common objective for both Institutes in the research field of structural materials such as Fast Breeder Reactor and Light Water Reactors components. The purpose of the study is to clarify damage mechanism of structural materials under irradiation, and then to develop the methods for damage evaluation and detection in earlier stage of progressing process of damage along grain boundaries. In fiscal year 2003, magnetic flux density distribution (JNC) and micro-corrosion (JAERI) measurement apparatus were newly developed and equipped in Hot Facilities in two Institutes, respectively. The former apparatus, supersensitive Flux Gate sensor was installed, could detector leaked magnetic flux from material damaged by neutron irradiation. The latter one, Atomic Force Microscope was installed, could detect grain boundary corrosion loss after an electrochemical corrosion test of irradiated material. These apparatus were designed and produced in consideration of radiation resistance and remote-controlled operation to equip in hot cells. As the results of preliminary studies using Ni ion irradiated specimen, damage detection by corrosion property in grain boundary was possible but magnetic property change could not detect. We will start the study on neutron irradiation damage by employing the two apparatus as the next step. (author)

  20. Irradiated topaz in the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, A.I.; Zahran, N.F.; Gomaac, M.A.M.; Salama, S.

    2007-01-01

    Gem stones are those stones which have beauty that can be based on its color, transparency, brilliance and the crystalline perfection . Topaz is used mainly as gemstones, It is the most common irradiated gem on the market. High energy such as neutrons, have enough energy to produce color centers . Irradiation is most often carried out in nuclear reactors (high-energy neutrons). Irradiation of topaz in the Egyptian research reactor (ETRR-2) by neutrons changes its cloudy white color to a reddish pink which could be changed to blue by heating

  1. Irradiation effects on reactor structural materials. Semiannual progress report, March 1975--July 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudson, T.T.

    1975-12-01

    Mechanical properties and irradiation effects are reported by Aerojet, ANL, AI, GE, HEDL, NRL, ORNL, PNL, and Univ. of Cincinnati for: Type 304, 304L, and 316 stainless steels; Inconel 718; nickel; Ni alloys; V alloys; Mo; Nb; and Nb--1 Zr

  2. Structural design of a shipping container of fuel elements, non-irradiated, for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Uzqueda, Eduardo Mario

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a project whose ultimate goal the creation and subsequent discharge of a transport container fuel assemblies for use by the Chilean Commission for Energy Nuclear. In principle it is covered in the design stage, considering the materials and methods used, to further develop a stage of checking voltages in the container to be manufactured. To achieve the first phase of the study is necessary to understand and warn the importance, geometry and content of the fuel elements to be transported, for which there are standards that provide fundamental material for proper classification of both content and container design. Once approved the design of the structure is critical examine both in normal operation and in the case of accidents that are established by international bodies. for appropriate analytical methods that seek to achieve is use a appropriate representation of the behavior of the structure. in addition to strengthen the theory computer simulations of the tests used applied, where the results will be contrasted with the first method of calculation. Results are obtained for the stress field and displacement total delivering the information necessary to approve the container

  3. Selection of support structure materials for irradiation experiments in the HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] at temperatures up to 500 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.; Longest, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The key factor in the design of capsules for irradiation of test specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at preselected temperatures up to 500 degree C utilizing nuclear heating is a narrow gas-filled gap which surrounds the specimens and controls the transfer of heat from the specimens through the wall of a containment tube to the reactor cooling water. Maintenance of this gap to close tolerances is dependent on the characteristics of the materials used to support the specimens and isolate them from the water. These support structure materials must have low nuclear heating rates, high thermal conductivities, and good dimensional stabilities under irradiation. These conditions are satisfied by certain aluminum alloys. One of these alloys, a powder metallurgy product containing a fine dispersion of aluminum oxide, is no longer manufactured. A new alloys of this type, with the trade name DISPAL, is determined to be a suitable substitute. 23 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Irradiation Microstructure of Austenitic Steels and Cast Steels Irradiated in the BOR-60 Reactor at 320°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Chen, Yiren; Huang, Yina; Allen, Todd; Rao, Appajosula

    Reactor internal components are subjected to neutron irradiation in light water reactors, and with the aging of nuclear power plants around the world, irradiation-induced material degradations are of concern for reactor internals. Irradiation-induced defects resulting from displacement damage are critical for understanding degradation in structural materials. In the present work, microstructural changes due to irradiation in austenitic stainless steels and cast steels were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor, a fast breeder reactor, up to 40 dpa at 320°C. The dose rate was approximately 9.4x10-7 dpa/s. Void swelling and irradiation defects were analyzed for these specimens. A high density of faulted loops dominated the irradiated-altered microstructures. Along with previous TEM results, a dose dependence of the defect structure was established at 320°C.

  5. Role of irradiation reactor mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casali, F.; Cerles, J.M.; Debrue, J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey is given of the utilization of low power facilities in support to irradiation reactor experiments. The BRO2, ISIS and RB3 facilities are described as neutronic mock-ups of the BR2, OSIRIS and ESSOR reactors respectively

  6. Irradiation techniques at BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, W.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1963 the material testing reactor BR2 at Mol is operated for the realisation of numerous research programs and experiments on the behavior of materials under nuclear radiation and in particular under intensive neutron exposure. During this period special irradiation techniques and experimental devices were developed according to the desiderata of the different experiments and to the irradiation possibilities offered at BR2. The design and the operating characteristics of quite a number of those irradiation rigs of proven reliability may be used or can be made available for new irradiation experiments. A brief description is given of some typical irradiation devices designed and constructed by CEN/SCK, Technology and Energy Dpt. They are compiled according to their main use for the different research and development programs realized at BR2. Their eventual application however for different objectives could be possible. A final chapter summarizes the principal irradiation conditions offered by BR2 reactor. (author)

  7. The structural-phenomenological description of plastic anisotropy of H-1 and H-2.5 alloys, subjected to reactors irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamshchikov, N.V.; Prasolov, P.F.; Lebedinskij, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    The structural-phenomenological model of anisotropic single hpc textured polycrystals is described. The formulation of the present model is assumed that the polycrystal is continuous three-dimensional collection of transversal crystallites, the plastic properties which Hill's yield criteria are described. This model is allowed to determine six parameters in the Hill's yield criteria for ortho tropic materials based on only of uniaxial tension test in three directions and crystallographic texture. Yield surfaces of zircaloy alloys at 293 K and 623 K, subjected to irradiation in the reactor with total exposition dose 10 20 n/cm 2 are determined. Strongly influence of irradiation on the plastic behaviour of H-1 and H-2,5 alloys is observed. 2 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tables. (author)

  8. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  9. Analytical electron microscopy of neutron-irradiated reactor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to the high neutron fluxes and temperatures from 400 to 650 0 C in the core region of a fast breeder reactor profoundly alters the microstructure and properties of structural steels and superalloys. The development of irradiation-induced voids, dislocations and precipitates, as well as segregation of alloying elements on a microscopic scale has been related to macroscopic swelling, creep, hardening and embrittlement which occur during prolonged exposures in reactor. Microanalytical studies using TEM/STEM methods, primarily energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) microanalysis, have greatly aided understanding of alloy behavior under irradiation. The main uses of analytical electron microscopy in studying irradiated alloys have been the identification of irradiation-induced precipitates and determination of the changes in local composition due to irradiation-induced solute segregation

  10. Improvement of neutron irradiation field of research reactors for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Otohiko

    1992-01-01

    The modification of research reactors for an improvement of the irradiation field for BNCT has been investigated in comparison with the field characteristics of the 'old' configuration at the Musashi reactor. The new point of this study is that the evaluation has been done by using an arrangement including both the facility structure and a whole-body phantom, and also by considering the whole-body absorbed dose. (author)

  11. BR2 Reactor: Irradiation of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwimp, A.

    2005-01-01

    Safe, reliable and economical operation of reactor fuels, both UO 2 and MOX types, requires in-pile testing and qualification up to high target burn-up levels. In-pile testing of advanced fuels for improved performance is also mandatory. The objectives of research performed at SCK-CEN are to perform Neutron irradiation of LWR (Light Water Reactor) fuels in the BR2 reactor under relevant operating and monitoring conditions, as specified by the experimenter's requirements and to improve the on-line measurements on the fuel rods themselves

  12. Plan and reports of coupled irradiation (JRR-3 and JOYO of research reactors) and hot facilities work (WASTEF, JMTR-HL, MMF and FMF). R and D project on irradiation damage management technology for structural materials of long-life nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Masaya; Yoshitake, Tsunemitsu; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Iwamatsu, Shigemi; Ichikawa, Shoichi; Yamagata, Ichiro; Soga, Tomonori; Yonekawa, Minoru; Kitamura, Ryoichi; Miyake, Osamu; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuyoshi; Kikuchi, Taiji; Usami, Koji; Endo, Shinya; Ichise, Kenichi; Numata, Masami; Onozawa, Atsushi; Aizawa, Masao; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Nakata, Masahito; Abe, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kazuhiro; Takaya, Shigeru; Nagae, Yuji; Wakai, Eiichi; Aoto, Kazumi

    2010-03-01

    'R and D Project on Irradiation Damage Management Technology for Structural Materials of Long-life Nuclear Plant' was carried out from FY2006 in a fund of a trust enterprise of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The coupled irradiations or single irradiation by JOYO fast reactor and JRR-3 thermal reactor were performed for about two years. The irradiation specimens are very important materials to establish of 'Evaluation of Irradiation Damage Indicator' in this research. For the acquisition of the examination specimens irradiated by the JOYO and JRR-3, we summarized about the overall plan, the work process and the results for the study to utilize these reactors and some facilities of hot laboratory (WASTEF, JMTR-HL, MMF and FMF) of the Oarai Research and Development Center and the Nuclear Science Research Institute in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  13. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV; VALERIY. V. IAKOVLEV; ANDREY. E. NOVOSELOV; VLADIMIR. A. STARKOV; ALEKSEY. A. SHELDYAKOV; VALERIY. YU. SHISHIN; VLADIMIR. M. KOSENKOV; ALEKSANDR. V. VATULIN; IRINA. V. DOBRIKOVA; VLADIMIR. B. SUPRUN; GENNADIY. V. KULAKOV

    2013-01-01

    The paper summarizes the irradiation test and post-irradiation examination (PIE) data for the U-Mo low-enriched fuel that was irradiated in the MIR reactor under the RERTR Program. The PIE data were analyzed for both full-size fuel rods and mini-rods with atomized powder dispersed in Al matrix as well as with additions of 2%, 5% and 13% of silicon in the matrix and ZrN protective coating on the fuel particles. The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; th...

  15. Irradiation facilitates at the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, Blaine S.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC - formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950's with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world's data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens. The paper has the following contents: ATR description and capabilities; ATR operations, quality and safety requirements; Static capsule experiments; Lead experiments; Irradiation test vehicle; In-pile loop experiments; Gas test loop; Future testing; Support facilities at RTC; Conclusions. To summarize, the ATR has a long history in fuel and material irradiations, and will be fulfilling a critical role in the future fuel and material testing necessary to develop the next generation reactor systems and advanced fuel cycles. The

  16. Structural materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Baluc, N.; Spaetig, P.

    2001-01-01

    In order to preserve the condition of an environmentally safe machine, present selection of materials for structural components of a fusion reactor is made not only on the basis of adequate mechanical properties, behavior under irradiation and compatibility with other materials and cooling media, but also on their radiological properties, i.e. activity, decay heat, radiotoxicity. These conditions strongly limit the number of materials available to a few families of alloys, generically known as low activation materials. We discuss the criteria for deciding on such materials, the alloys resulting from the application of the concept and the main issues and problems of their use in a fusion environment. (author)

  17. Positron annihilation studies on reactor irradiated and thermal annealed ferrocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques Netto, A.; Carvalho, R.S.; Magalhaes, W.F.; Sinisterra, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Retention and thermal annealing following (n, γ) reaction in solid ferrocene, Fe(C 5 H 5 ) 2 , were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PAL). Positronium (Ps) formation was observed in the non-irradiated compound with a probability or intensity (I 3 ) of 30%. Upon irradiation of the compound with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, I 3 decreases with increasing irradiation time. Thermal treatment again increases I 3 values from 16% to 25%, revealing an important proportion of molecular reformation without variation of the ortho-positronium lifetime (τ 3 ). These results point out the major influence of the electronic structure as determining the Ps yields in the pure complex. In the irradiated and non irradiated complexes the results are satisfactorily explained on the basis of the spur model. (orig.)

  18. On elastic structural elements for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povolo, F.

    1978-03-01

    The in-pile stress-relaxation behaviour of materials usually employed for the elastic structural elements, in nuclear reactors, is critically reviewed and the results are compared with those obtained in commercial zirconium alloys irradiated under similar conditions. Finally, it is shown that, under certain conditions, some zirconium alloys may be used as an alternative material for these structural elements. (orig.) [de

  19. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Schaaf, Van Der; Barnea, Y.; Bradley, E.; Morris, C.; Rao, D. V. H. [Research Reactor Section, Vianna (Australia); Shokr, A. [Research Reactor Safety Section, Vienna (Australia); Zeman, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from

  20. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Schaaf, Van Der; Barnea, Y.; Bradley, E.; Morris, C.; Rao, D. V. H.; Shokr, A.; Zeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from the MS

  1. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  2. Design experiences for medical irradiation field at the musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Otohiko

    1994-01-01

    The design of the medical irradiation field at the Musashi reactor was carried out from 1974 to 1975, about 20 years ago. Various numerical analyses have been carried out recently, and it is astonishing to find out that the performance close to the optimum as a 100 kW reactor has been obtained. The reason for this is that the design was carried out by dividing into the stationary part and the moving part, and as for the moving part, the structure was determined by repeating trial and error and experiments. In this paper, the comparison of the analysis carried out later with the experimental data and the change of the absorbed dose at the time of medical irradiation accompanying the change of neutron energy spectra are reported. As the characteristics of the medical irradiation field at the Musashi reactor, the neutron energy spectra and the absorbed dose and mean medical irradiation time are shown. As the problems in boron neutron capture therapy, the neutron fluence required for the therapy, the way of thinking on background dose, and the problem of determining the irradiation time are discussed. The features of epithermal neutron beam are explained. (K.I.)

  3. Irradiation behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Walters, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Metallic fuels were the first fuels chosen for liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMR's). In the late 1960's world-wide interest turned toward ceramic LMR fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel was realized. However, during the 1970's the performance limitations of metallic fuel were resolved in order to achieve a high plant factor at the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The 1980's spawned renewed interest in metallic fuel when the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept emerged at Argonne National Laboratory. A fuel performance demonstration program was put into place to obtain the data needed for the eventual licensing of metallic fuel. This paper will summarize the results of the irradiation program carried out since 1985

  4. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  5. Irradiation devices for fusion reactor materials results obtained from irradiated lithium aluminate at the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.; Rasneur, B.; Botter, F.

    1986-06-01

    Studies about controlled fusion reactor of the Tokamak type require the examination of the radiation effects on the behaviour of various potential materials. Thus, in the first part of this paper, are presented the devices adapted to these materials studies and used in the OSIRIS reactor. In a second part, is described an experiment of irradiation ceramics used as candidates for breeding material and are given the first results

  6. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  7. Reactor container structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshimi; Fukuda, Yoshio.

    1993-01-01

    A main container of an FBR type reactor using liquid sodium as coolants is attached to a roof slug. The main container contains, as coolants, lower temperature sodium, and high temperature sodium above a reactor core and a partitioning plate. The main container has a structure comprising only longitudinal welded joints in parallel with axial direction in the vicinity of the liquid surface of high temperature sodium where a temperature gradient is steep and great thermal stresses are caused without disposing lateral welded joints in perpendicular to axial direction. Only the longitudinal welded joints having a great fatigue strength are thus disposed in the vicinity of the liquid surface of the high temperature sodium where axial thermal stresses are caused. This can improve reliability of strength at the welded portions of the main container against repeating thermal stresses caused in vicinity of the liquid surface of the main container from a view point of welding method. (I.N.)

  8. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  9. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Condie, K.G.; Daw, J.E.; Taylor, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  10. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean; Hayes, Steven Lowe; Dempsey, Douglas; Harp, Jason Michael

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  11. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  12. XAFS study on silica glasses irradiated in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoko; Yoshida, Hisao; Hara, Takanobu; Ii, Tatsuya; Okada, Tomohisa; Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    X-ray absorption technique (XANES and EXAFS) was applied to study the local structures of silica glasses before and after the irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Although our separate photoluminescence (PL) measurements clearly showed the different aspects about oxygen vacancies in these samples, i.e., at least the B 2β type oxygen-deficient center exists as an intrinsic defect in the fused silica glass while another type B 2α center is formed in the synthesized silica glass, such differences did not directly reflect on the X-ray absorption spectra (XANES and EXAFS). However, the curve-fitting analysis of EXAFS showed that the number of oxygen atoms coordinated to Si relatively increased after the irradiation. This result may indicate the occurrence of the structural relaxation in the irradiated samples, that is, a slightly distorted SiO 4 tetrahedra in silica glasses relaxed to the regular SiO 4 tetrahedra due to the break of some connections between SiO 4 units in the silica glasses. Thus, the X-ray absorption technique gave the important information of the in-reactor irradiated silica glasses which complements the results obtained from PL measurements

  13. Comparative Analysis of Structural Changes In U-Mo Dispersed Fuel of Full-Size Fuel Elements And Mini-Rods Irradiated In The MIR Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izhutov, Aleksey L.; Iakovlev, Valeriy V.; Novoselov, Andrey E. and others

    2013-12-15

    The paper summarizes the irradiation test and post-irradiation examination (PIE) data for the U-Mo low-enriched fuel that was irradiated in the MIR reactor under the RERTR Program. The PIE data were analyzed for both full-size fuel rods and mini-rods with atomized powder dispersed in Al matrix as well as with additions of 2%, 5% and 13% of silicon in the matrix and ZrN protective coating on the fuel particles. The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%{sup 235}U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%{sup 235}U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Structural Changes In U-Mo Dispersed Fuel of Full-Size Fuel Elements And Mini-Rods Irradiated In The MIR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izhutov, Aleksey L.; Iakovlev, Valeriy V.; Novoselov, Andrey E. and others

    2013-01-01

    The paper summarizes the irradiation test and post-irradiation examination (PIE) data for the U-Mo low-enriched fuel that was irradiated in the MIR reactor under the RERTR Program. The PIE data were analyzed for both full-size fuel rods and mini-rods with atomized powder dispersed in Al matrix as well as with additions of 2%, 5% and 13% of silicon in the matrix and ZrN protective coating on the fuel particles. The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60% 235 U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85% 235 U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%

  15. Irradiation routine in the IPR-R1 Triga reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maretti Junior, F.

    1980-01-01

    Information about irradiations in the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor and procedures necessary for radioisotope solicitation are presented All procedures necessary for asking irradiation in the reactor, shielding types, norms of terrestrial and aerial expeditions, payment conditions, and catalogue of disposable isotopes with their respective saturation activities are described. (M.C.K.)

  16. Development of a Low Temperature Irradiation Capsule for Research Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Kee Nam; Cho, Man Soon; Lee, Cheol Yong; Yang, Sung Woo; Shin, Yoon Taek; Park, Seng Jae; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun

    2013-01-01

    A new capsule design was prepared and tested at HANARO for a neutron irradiation of core materials of research reactors as a part of the research reactor development project. Irradiation testing of the materials including graphite, beryllium, and zircaloy-4 that are supposed to be used as core materials in research reactors was required for irradiation at up to 8 reactor operation cycles at low temperature (<100 .deg. C). Therefore, three instrumented capsules were designed and fabricated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the core materials (Graphite, Be, Zircaloy-4) of research reactors. The capsules were first designed and fabricated to irradiate materials at low temperature (<100 .deg. C) for a long cycle of 8 irradiation cycles at HANARO. Therefore, the safety of the new designed capsule should be fully checked before irradiation testing. Out-pile performance and endurance testing before HANARO irradiation testing was performed using a capsule under a 110% condition of a reactor coolant flow amount. The structural integrity of the capsule was analyzed in terms of a vibration-induced fatigue cracking of a rod tip of the capsule that is suspected to be the most vulnerable part of a capsule. Another two capsules were irradiated at HANARO for 4 cycles, and one capsule was transferred to a hot cell to examine the integrity of the rod tip of the capsule. After confirming the soundness of the 4 cycle-irradiated capsule, the remaining capsule was irradiated at up to 8 cycles at HANARO. Based on the structural integrity analysis of the capsule, an improved capsule design will be suggested for a longer irradiation test at HANARO

  17. Thermogravimetric analysis of reactor-neutrons-irradiated LEXAN polycarbonate film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of reactor-neutrons irradiation on the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis of LEXAN polycarbonate film in air were studied. Irradiation enhances the degradation rate and the effect increases further with increasing neutron fluence. The kinetics of the different steps of degradation were also evaluated from the TG curves. The activation energy values calculated for all the degradation stages decrease on irradiation. (author)

  18. A new materials irradiation facility at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yanagita, S.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Tsujimoto, H.; Kozuka, T.; Kamae, K.; Mishima, K.; Shiroya, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new materials irradiation facility with improved control capabilities has been installed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Several deficiencies of conventional fission neutron material irradiation systems have been corrected. The specimen temperature is controlled both by an electric heater and by the helium pressure in the irradiation tube without exposure to neutrons at temperatures different from the design test conditions. The neutron spectrum is varied by the irradiation position. Irradiation dose is changed by pulling the irradiation capsule up and down during irradiation. Several characteristics of the irradiation field were measured. The typical irradiation intensity is 9.4x10 12 n/cm 2 s (>0.1 MeV) and the irradiation temperature of specimens is controllable from 363 to 773 K with a precision of ±2 K

  19. MAPPING FLOW LOCALIZATION PROCESSES IN DEFORMATION OF IRRADIATED REACTOR STRUCTURAL ALLOYS - FINAL REPORT. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program No. MSF99-0072. Period: August 1999 through September 2002. (ORNL/TM-2003/63)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K.

    2003-09-26

    Metals that can sustain plastic deformation homogeneously throughout their bulk tend to be tough and malleable. Often, however, if a metal has been hardened it will no longer deform uniformly. Instead, the deformation occurs in narrow bands on a microscopic scale wherein stresses and strains become concentrated in localized zones. This strain localization degrades the mechanical properties of the metal by causing premature plastic instability failure or by inducing the formation of cracks. Irradiation with neutrons hardens a metal and makes it more prone to deformation by strain localization. Although this has been known since the earliest days of radiation damage studies, a full measure of the connection between neutron irradiation hardening and strain localization is wanting, particularly in commercial alloys used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Therefore, the goal of this project is to systematically map the extent of involvement of strain localization processes in plastic deformation of three reactor alloys that have been neutron irradiated. The deformation processes are to be identified and related to changes in the tensile properties of the alloys as functions of neutron fluence (dose) and degree of plastic strain. The intent is to define the role of strain localization in radiation embrittlement phenomena. The three test materials are a tempered bainitic A533B steel, representing reactor pressure vessel steel, an annealed 316 stainless steel and annealed Zircaloy-4 representing reactor internal components. These three alloys cover the range of crystal structures usually encountered in structural alloys, i.e. body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and close-packed hexagonal (cph), respectively. The experiments were conducted in three Phases, corresponding to the three years duration of the project. Phases 1 and 2 addressed irradiations and tensile tests made at near-ambient temperatures, and covered a wide range of neutron fluences

  20. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  1. Irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.; Findeisen, A.; Katzmann, H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is concerning with an irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors in particular for materials with a high heat generation due to irradiation. A good heat transfer between the irradiated material and the irradiation can environment has been guaranteed by a special can design. The outside of the can consists of a tube or a tube bandle which has been formed as a water guide tube. One or more tubes containing the irradiated materials have been positioned at the inner areas of the irradiated can

  2. Irradiation Creep of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels EP-450, EP-823 and EI-852 Irradiated in the BN-350 Reactor over Wide Ranges of Irradiation Temperature and Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Ivanov, A.A.; Shulepin, S.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels appear to be the most promising materials for advanced nuclear systems, especially for fusion reactors. Their main advantages are higher resistance to swelling and lower irradiation creep rate as has been repeatedly demonstrated in examinations of these materials after irradiation. Nevertheless, available experimental data on irradiation resistance of F/M steels are insufficient, with the greatest deficiency of data for high doses and for both low and high irradiation temperatures. From the very beginning of operation the BN-350 fast reactor has been used for irradiation of specimens of structural materials, including F/M steels. The most unique feature of BN-350 was its low inlet sodium temperature, allowing irradiation at temperatures over a very wide range of temperatures compared with the range in other fast reactors. In this paper data are presented on swelling and irradiation creep of three Russian F/M steels EP-450, EP-823 and EI-852, irradiated in experimental assemblies of the BN-350 reactor at temperatures in the range of 305-700 deg. C to doses ranging from 20 to 89 dpa. The investigation was performed using gas-pressurized creep tubes with hoop stresses in the range of 0 - 294 MPa. (authors)

  3. Analysis of the micro-structural damages by neutronic irradiation of the steel of reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Characterization of the design steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moranchel y Rodriguez, M.; Garcia B, A.; Longoria G, L. C.

    2010-09-01

    The vessel of a nuclear reactor is one of the safety barriers more important in the design, construction and operation of the reactor. If the vessel results affected to the grade of to have fracture and/or cracks it is very probable the conclusion of their useful life in order to guarantee the nuclear safety and the radiological protection of the exposure occupational personnel, of the public and the environment avoiding the exposition to radioactive sources. The materials of the vessel of a nuclear reactor are exposed continually to the neutronic irradiation that generates the same nuclear reactor. The neutrons that impact to the vessel have the sufficient energy to penetrate certain depth in function of the energy of the incident neutron until reaching the repose or to be absorbed by some nucleus. In the course of their penetration, the neutrons interact with the nuclei, atoms, molecules and with the same crystalline nets of the vessel material producing vacuums, interstitial, precipitate and segregations among other defects that can modify the mechanical properties of the steel. The steel A533-B is the material with which is manufactured the vessel of the nuclear reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is an alloy that, among other components, it contains atoms of Ni that if they are segregated by the neutrons impact this would favor to the cracking of the same vessel. This work is part of an investigation to analyze the micro-structural damages of the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde due to the neutronic irradiation which is exposed in a continuous way. We will show the characterization of the design steel of the vessel, what offers a comprehension about their chemical composition, the superficial topography and the crystalline nets of the steel A533-B. It will also allow analyze the existence of precipitates, segregates, the type of crystalline net and the distances inter-plains of the design steel of the vessel. (Author)

  4. A study on the proton irradiation effect of reactor materials using cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Park, Deuk Keun; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung

    1993-02-01

    Understanding on radiation damage of important structural materials is important for safe operation and radiation damage evaluation of new reactor structural materials. This study was performed to simulate and evaluate 14 MeV neutron irradiation effects on mechanical properties of candidate structural materials (HT-9/SS316) of next generation reactors (FBR, Fusion) irradiated by Cyclotron(MC-50) using SP test technique. After qualification of SP test techniques from J IC and ε qf correlation, SP tests were performed to evaluate 16MeV proton irradiation effects on mechanical properties of irradiated and unirradiated HT-9/SS316 steels. Test results were evaluated for ε qf , energy and displacement up to failure and J IC change. In addition, damaged zone and dpa upon depth after irradiation were calculated using TRIM code and Doppler broadening line shapes were measured to evaluate defects for 15% cold worked HT-9 steel using PAS. (Author)

  5. Conceptual design for simulator of irradiation test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Noriyuki; Ohto, Tsutomu; Magome, Hirokatsu; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko

    2012-03-01

    A simulator of irradiation test reactors has been developed since JFY 2010 for understanding reactor behavior and for upskilling in order to utilize a nuclear human resource development (HRD) and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR, one of the irradiation test reactors, and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of accidents caused by the reactor and irradiation facility. The development of the simulator is sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. The training using the simulator will be started for the nuclear HRD from JFY 2012. This report summarizes the result of the conceptual design of the simulator in JFY 2010. (author)

  6. Surveillance of irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najzer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Surveillance of irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels is briefly discussed. The experimental techniques and computer programs available for this work at the J. Stefan Institute are described. (author)

  7. Results of charpy V-notch impact testing of structural steel specimens irradiated at ∼30 degrees C to 1 x 1016 neutrons/cm2 in a commercial reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Stoller, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    A capsule containing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and mini-tensile specimens was irradiated at ∼ 30 degrees C (∼ 85 degrees F) in the cavity of a commercial nuclear power plant to a fluence of 1 x 10 16 neutrons/cm 2 (> 1MeV). The capsule included six CVN impact specimens of archival High Flux Isotope Reactor A212 grade B ferritic steel and five CVN impact specimens of a well-studied A36 structural steel. This irradiation was part of the ongoing study of neutron-induced damage effects at the low temperature and flux experienced by reactor supports. The plant operators shut down the plant before the planned exposure was reached. The exposure of these specimens produced no significant irradiation-induced embrittlement. Of interest were the data on unirradiated specimens in the L-T orientation machined from a single plate of A36 structural steel, which is the same specification for the structural steel used in some reactor supports. The average CVN energy of five unirradiated specimens obtained from one region of the plate and tested at room temperature was ∼ 99 J, while the energy of 11 unirradiated specimens from other locations of the same plate was 45 J, a difference of ∼ 220%. The CVN impact energies for all 18 specimens ranged from a low of 32 J to a high of 111 J. Moreover, it appears that the University of Kansas CVN impact energy data of the unirradiated specimens at the 100-J level are shifted toward higher temperatures by about 20 K. The results were an example of the extent of scatter possible in CVN impact testing. Generic values for the CVN impact energy of A36 should be used with caution in critical applications

  8. Design and fabrication of irradiation testing capsule for research reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Seung Jae; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Oh, Jong Myeong; Choi, Myeong Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Dae Jong; Chun, Young Bum; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the demand of research reactors is increasing because there are many ageing research reactors in the world. Also, the production of radioisotope related with the medical purpose is very important. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is designing and licensing for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) and new type research reactor for export which will be constructed in Amman, Jordan and Busan, Korea, respectively. Thus, It is expected that more research reactors will be designed and constructed by KAERI. To design the research reactor, the irradiation performance and behavior of core structure material are necessary. However, the irradiation behavior of these materials is not yet investigated. Therefore, the irradiation performance must be verified by irradiation test. 11M 20K and 11M 21K irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated to conduct the irradiation test for some candidate core materials, Zircaloy 4, beryllium, and graphite, at HANARO. In this paper, the design and fabrication features of 11M 20K and 11M 21K were discussed

  9. Design and fabrication of irradiation testing capsule for research reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Seung Jae; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Oh, Jong Myeong; Choi, Myeong Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Dae Jong; Chun, Young Bum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Recently, the demand of research reactors is increasing because there are many ageing research reactors in the world. Also, the production of radioisotope related with the medical purpose is very important. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is designing and licensing for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) and new type research reactor for export which will be constructed in Amman, Jordan and Busan, Korea, respectively. Thus, It is expected that more research reactors will be designed and constructed by KAERI. To design the research reactor, the irradiation performance and behavior of core structure material are necessary. However, the irradiation behavior of these materials is not yet investigated. Therefore, the irradiation performance must be verified by irradiation test. 11M 20K and 11M 21K irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated to conduct the irradiation test for some candidate core materials, Zircaloy 4, beryllium, and graphite, at HANARO. In this paper, the design and fabrication features of 11M 20K and 11M 21K were discussed.

  10. Defects investigation in neutron irradiated reactor steels by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2003-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) based on positron lifetime measurements using the Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) was applied to the investigation of defects of irradiated and thermally treated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. PLEPS results showed that the changes in microstructure of the RPV-steel properties caused by neutron irradiation and post-irradiation heat treatment can be well detected. From the lifetime measurements in the near-surface region (20-550 nm) the defect density in Russian types of RPV-steels was calculated using the diffusion trapping model. The post-irradiation heat treatment studies performed on non-irradiated specimens are also presented. (author)

  11. US/Japan collaborative program on fusion reactor materials: Summary of the tenth DOE/JAERI Annex I technical progress meeting on neutron irradiation effects in first wall and blanket structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    This meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on March 17, 1989, to review the technical progress on the collaborative DOE/JAERI program on fusion reactor materials. The purpose of the program is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior and dimensional stability of US and Japanese austenitic stainless steels. Phase I of the program focused on the effects of high concentrations of helium on the tensile, fatigue, and swelling properties of both US and Japanese alloys. In Phase II of the program, spectral and isotropic tailoring techniques are fully utilized to reproduce the helium:dpa ratio typical of the fusion environment. The Phase II program hinges on a restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor by mid-1989. Eight target position capsules and two RB* position capsules have been assembled. The target capsule experiments will address issues relating to the performance of austenitic steels at high damage levels including an assessment of the performance of a variety of weld materials. The RB* capsules will provide a unique and important set of data on the behavior of austenitic steels irradiated under conditions which reproduce the damage rate, dose, temperature, and helium generation rate expected in the first wall and blanket structure of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A.M.; Vernon, H.C.

    1961-05-30

    A neutronic reactor is described. It has a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water and having a K-factor greater than unity which is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water having a Kfactor less than unity.

  13. Irradiation Facilities at the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) (formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950s with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world's data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens

  14. Review of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1977-02-01

    A review is made of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research under way in both commercial power plants and test reactors. Such experiments are grouped in two; first, LWR fuel performance under normal and abnormal operating conditions, and second, irradiation effects on fracture toughness in LWR vessels. In the former are fuel densification, swelling, and the influence of power ramp and cycling on fuel rod, and also fuel rod behavior under accident conditions in in-reactor experiment. In the latter are the effects of neutron exposure level on the ferritic steel of pressure vessels, etc.. (auth.)

  15. Irradiation devices at the upgraded research reactor BER II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlik, D.; Robertson, T.

    1992-06-01

    An overview is given of those properties of the BER II research reactor which are important for carrying out irradiation experiments. The subsequent section describes the irradiation devices currently installed in the reactor, or which are under construction, and some of the experiments which can be conducted using them. The field of application of these experiments extends from the study of the metabolism of trace elements in man, employing a highly sensitive element analysis, via radiation damage of high-tech materials, to the identification of paintings of the old masters. The report concludes with a review of the technical details of the irradiation devices, giving information of interest for potential users. (orig.)

  16. Modeling irradiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 10, numerical modeling of irradiation embrittlement in reactor vessel steels are introduced. Physically-based models are developed and their role in advancing the state-of-the-art of predicting irradiation embrittlement of RPV steels is stressed

  17. Effects of cryogenic reactor irradiation on organic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Teruo

    1995-01-01

    Insulators for the superconducting magnets of fusion reactor are classified as electrical and thermal insulators for which tough organic materials will be used. When the magnet is exposed by fast neutrons and gamma-rays from plasma in a fusion reactor, the fusion reactor systems will cause fatal damage by the degradation of insulators. Therefore, it is necessary to select materials resistant irradiation damage for use as insulators. Electrical and mechanical tests were carried out at 4.2 K without warmup after the reactor irradiation at 5 K. The effects of reactor irradiation at the dose of 10 7 Gy on epoxy resins (bisphenol-A), G-10 CR, VL-E 200 and G-11 CR caused large decreases in mechanical strength. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyimide and phenol novolac resins, which were used to laminate reinforced plastics with glass-cloth against irradiation, showed good resistance. Effects of cryogenic reactor irradiation on several organic materials and epoxy laminate-reinforced plastics with glass-cloth and Kevlar-cloth were also discussed. (author)

  18. Standard irradiation facilities for use in TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbasov, B.N.; Luse, R.A.

    1972-01-01

    The standard neutron irradiation facility (SNIP) was developed under IAEA and FAO co-ordinated research program for the standardization of neutron irradiation facilities for radiobiological research, resulting in the possibility to use fast neutrons from pool-type reactors for radiobiological studies. The studies include irradiation of seeds for crop improvement, of Drosophila for genetic studies, and of microorganisms for developing industrially useful mutants, as well as fundamental studies in radiation biology. The facilities, located in the six pool-type reactors (in Austria, Bulgaria, India, Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan), have been calibrated and utilized to compare the response to fast neutrons of barley seeds (variety Himalaya CI 000620) which were selected as a standard biological monitor by which to estimate neutron fluxes in different reactors. These comparative irradiation studies showed excellent agreement and reproducibility

  19. Preliminary irradiation test results from the Yankee Atomic Electric Company reactor vessel test irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.; Fyfitch, S.; Campbell, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Plate materials each containing 0.24 w/o copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63 w/o and 0.19 w/o, were heat treated to simulate the Yankee vessel heat treatment (austenitized at 1800 deg F) and to simulate Regulatory Guide 1.99 database materials (austenitized at 1600 deg. F). These heat treatments produced different microstructures so the effect of microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity could be tested. Because the nickel content of the test plates varied and the copper level was constant, the effect of nickel on irradiation embrittlement was also tested. Correlation monitor material, HSST-02, was included in the program to benchmark the Ford Nuclear Reactor (U. of Michigan Test Reactor) which had never been used for this type of irradiation program. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs. 1/4T) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from the rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. If the improved properties are maintained, pressurized thermal shock calculations could utilize this margin. Finally, for one experiment, irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (500 deg. F and 550 deg. F) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The preliminary results of the irradiation program show an increase in T 30 shift of 69 deg. F for a decrease in irradiation temperature of 50 deg. F. The results suggest that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained after irradiation and for the copper content tested, nickel had no apparent effect on irradiation response. No apparent microstructure

  20. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  1. Irradiation Experiments on Plutonium Fuels for Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, B. R.T.; Wait, E. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment Harwell, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    An assessment carried out some years ago indicated that cermet fuels might provide the high burn-up and integrity required for fast reactors. An irradiation programme was started at Harwell on (U, Pu)O{sub 2} -SS cermet plates and rods, mainly In thermal neutron fluxes, to gain experience of dimensional stability at temperatures typical of modern sodium-cooled fast reactor designs (600-650 Degree-Sign C). A subsequent assessment showed that cermets carried a large penalty as far as breeding was concerned and (U, Pu)C was chosen by Harwell for long-term study as an alternative, economic, fast reactor fuel. However, the results from the cermet experiments were of sufficient promise to proceed with parallel irradiation programmes on cermets and carbide. The studies of cermets showed that dimensional instability (swelling and cladding rupture) were caused by the pressures exerted on the steel matrix by the fuel particles, and that the initial density of the fuel particles was important in determining the burn-up at which failure occurred. Further, it was shown that cermets provided a useful vehicle for studying the changes occurring in oxide fuel particles with increasing burn-up. The disappearance of initial porosity and its replacement by fission gas bubbles and segregated solid fission products was studied in some detaiL No significant differences were observed between UO{sub 2} and(U,Pu)O{sub 2} particles. The initial studies of (U, Pu)C were concerned with the effect of varying composition and structure on swelling and fission gas release. A tantalum-lined nickel alloy cladding material was used to contain both pellet and powder specimens In an irradiation experiment in the core of the Dounreay fast reactor. This showed that the presence of a metal phase in the fuel led to a high swelling rate, that fission gas release was low up to {approx} 3% bum-up, and that a low density powder accommodated the swelling without excessive straining of the can. A subsequent

  2. Gamma irradiation plants using reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckow, W.

    1976-11-01

    Recent irradiation plants utilizing fuel elements are described. Criteria for optimizing such plants, evaluation of the plants realized so far, and applications for the facilities are discussed. (author)

  3. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shozo

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs

  4. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs.

  5. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, J.

    2000-01-01

    From the historical decision of closing the Yankee Rowe NPP because of the uncertainties on the level of reactor pressure vessel neutron embrittlement, this paper reviews the technical-scientist bases of the degradation phenomena, and refers to the evolution of reactor pressure vessel radiation surveillance programs. (Author)

  6. Irradiation-accelerated corrosion of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, David; Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie

    2012-09-01

    The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, but also applies to most all other GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion presents a unique and extremely challenging environment for materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is essentially absent. Irradiation can affect corrosion or oxidation in at least three different ways. Radiation interaction with water results in the decomposition of water into radicals and oxidizing species that will increase the electrochemical corrosion potential and lead to greater corrosion rates. Irradiation of the solid surface can produce excited states that can alter corrosion, such as in the case of photo-induced corrosion. Lastly, displacement damage in the solid will result in a high flux of defects to the solid-solution interface that can alter and perhaps, accelerate interface reactions. While there exists reasonable understanding of how corrosion is affected by irradiation of the aqueous environment, there is little understanding of how irradiation affects corrosion through its impact on the solid, whether metal or oxide. The reason is largely due to the difficulty of conducting experiments that can measure this effect separately. We have undertaken a project specifically to separate the several effects of irradiation on the mechanisms of corrosion. We seek to answer the question: How does radiation damage to the solution-oxide couple affect the oxidation process differently from radiation damage to either component alone? The approach taken in this work is to closely compare corrosion accelerated by (1) proton irradiation, (2) electron irradiation, and (3) chemical corrosion potential effects alone, under typical PWR operating conditions at 300 deg. C. Both 316 stainless steel and zirconium are to be studied. The proton

  7. New irradiation devices at the FRN reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, W.

    1980-01-01

    In order to fulfill the experimental demands three additional devices were constructed and installed. The first is a vertical irradiation tube in air surrounded by a lead cylinder (in the irradiation position). The second device is a rabbit system ending within the graphite moderator of the thermal column. The third device is so called rotating disk assembly, built to replace the rotary specimen rack

  8. CRBR reactor structures design. BRC meeting presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the more important developments in LMFBR structures design technology are described and the application of the technology to design of the CRBR reactor components is illustrated. The LMFBR is both a high-temperature and a high-ΔT machine. High-temperature operation (up to 1100 0 F) requires that the designer consider the effects of thermal creep as a deformation mechanism and stress rupture as a failure mode. The large ΔT across the core coupled with a low core thermal inertia and the high conductivity of the sodium coolant combine to produce severe temperature gradients during a reactor scram. Structures designed to operate in this environment must be both light and stiff to minimize transient thermal stresses and prevent unacceptable flow-induced vibrations. Thermal shields may be required to protect the load-bearing structure. At CRBR core-component goal fluence levels, the predicted magnitude of core-component dimensional changes due to irradiation swelling and creep is very large compared with the more familiar dimensional changes associated with thermal expansion and thermal creep. The design of the core components, and in particular the core restraint system, is dominated by the need to accommodate the effects of irradiation swelling, creep and du []tility loss considerations. (auth)

  9. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called 'Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, ...) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program

  10. Flux effect on neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Tsuno, S.; Akiyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, T.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is of great concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. In particular, the embrittlement of the RPV steels of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at very high fluences beyond 6*10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, needs to be understood in more depth because materials irradiated in material test reactors (MTRs) to such high fluences show larger shifts than predicted by current embrittlement correlation equations available worldwide. The primary difference between the irradiation conditions of MTRs and surveillance capsules is the neutron flux. The neutron flux of MTR is typically more than one order of magnitude higher than that of surveillance capsule, but it is not necessarily clear if this difference in neutron flux causes difference in mechanical properties of RPV. In this paper, we perform direct comparison, in terms of mechanical property and microstructure, between the materials irradiated in surveillance capsules and MTRs to clarify the effect of flux at very high fluences and fluxes. We irradiate the archive materials of some of the commercial reactors in Japan in the MTR, LVR-15, of NRI Rez, Czech Republic. Charpy impact test results of the MTR-irradiated materials are compared with the data from surveillance tests. The comparison of the results of microstructural analyses by means of atom probe tomography is also described to demonstrate the similarity / differences in surveillance and MTR-irradiated materials in terms of solute atom behavior. It appears that high Cu material irradiated in a MTR presents larger shifts than those of surveillance data, while low Cu materials present similar embrittlement. The microstructural changes caused by MTR irradiation and surveillance irradiation are clearly different

  11. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This publication is the third in a proposed series of annual publications issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to public information requests regarding the Commission's regulation of shipments of irradiated reactor fuel. Subsequent issues in this series will update the information contained herein. This publication contains basically three kinds of information: (1) routes approved by the Commission for the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel, (2) information regarding any safeguards-significant incidents which have been reported to occur during shipments along such routes, and (3) cumulative amounts of material shipped

  12. Microstructural evolution in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, C.A.; Phythian, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. The microstructural evolution in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels is described. The damage mechanisms are elaborated and techniques for examining the microstructure are suggested. The importance of the initial damage event is analysed, and the microstructural evolution in RPV steels is examined

  13. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  14. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  15. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  16. Low temperature irradiation facility at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Okada, Moritami; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kodaka, Hisao; Miyata, Kiyomi.

    1977-01-01

    A new refrigeration system has been substituted to the low temperature irradiation facility at KUR instead of the previous one, since April in 1975. The model 1204 CTi He liquifier was designed to be modified for the refrigerator with the capacity of 30 watts at 10 K. The refrigeration capacity of 38 watts at 10 K was defined using a special cryostat and transfer-tubes, and the lowest temperature of about 18 K was measured using the irradiation loop without reactor operation. The reconstructed facility enables us to hold the many specimens simultaneously in the sample chamber of the irradiation loop at about 25 K during reactor operation of 5 MW. The irradiation dose has been reached about 6.6 x 10 16 n sub(f)/cm 2 and 6.1 x 10 17 n sub(th)/cm 2 with the normal reactor operation cycle of up to 77 hours. The stable operation condition of the machine and the special safety system for the refrigeration system enable us to maintain easily the facility with a constant operation condition for such a long time irradiation. Many kinds of low temperature neutron irradiation experiments are carried out using the facility, which techniques are partially reported. (auth.)

  17. Structural mechanics and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, K.

    1983-01-01

    Operational safety and reliability of nuclear power plants widely depend on the mechanical behaviour of their structural components and their resistance to the various and complex influences. Durability and consistency of structural components are determined by the kind of strain - during the life - and by environmental conditions. The Conferences on Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology (SMiRT) are dedicated to the discussion of such questions. The 7th of these Conferences taking place in 2-year increments was held in Chicago in August 1983. The number of contributions again increased, the number of participants slightly decreased. There are some trends in this field worth mentioning, in particular the fact that experience from design and operation of nuclear power plants now available is more and more made use of, and that more and more attention is given the problems of fusion reactors. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Behavior of high Tc-superconductors and irradiated defects under reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Fukuoka, Noboru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1991-01-01

    It has been well known that the lattice defects of various types are introduced in ceramics without exception, and exert large effect to the function of these materials. Among oxides, the electronic materials positively using oxygen defect control have been already put in practical use. Also in the oxide high temperature superconductors which are Perovskite type composite oxides, the superconductive characteristics are affected largely by the concentration of the oxygen composing them. This is regarded as an important factor for causing superconductivity, related with the oxygen cavities arising at this time and the carriers bearing superconductivity. In this study, the irradiation effect with relatively low dose, the measurement under irradiation, the effect of irradiation temperature, and the effect of radiation quality were evaluated by the irradiation of YBCO, EBCO and LBCO. The experimental method, and the irradiation effect at low temperature and normal temperature, the effect of Co-60 gamma ray irradiation instead of reactor irradiation are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Analysis of the micro-structural damages by neutronic irradiation of the steel of reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Characterization of the design steel; Analisis de los danos micro-estructurales por irradiacion neutronica del acero de la vasija de los reactores de la Central Nuclear de Laguna Verde. Caracterizacion del acero de diseno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel y Rodriguez, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Luis Enrique Erro s/n, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.m [ININ, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The vessel of a nuclear reactor is one of the safety barriers more important in the design, construction and operation of the reactor. If the vessel results affected to the grade of to have fracture and/or cracks it is very probable the conclusion of their useful life in order to guarantee the nuclear safety and the radiological protection of the exposure occupational personnel, of the public and the environment avoiding the exposition to radioactive sources. The materials of the vessel of a nuclear reactor are exposed continually to the neutronic irradiation that generates the same nuclear reactor. The neutrons that impact to the vessel have the sufficient energy to penetrate certain depth in function of the energy of the incident neutron until reaching the repose or to be absorbed by some nucleus. In the course of their penetration, the neutrons interact with the nuclei, atoms, molecules and with the same crystalline nets of the vessel material producing vacuums, interstitial, precipitate and segregations among other defects that can modify the mechanical properties of the steel. The steel A533-B is the material with which is manufactured the vessel of the nuclear reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is an alloy that, among other components, it contains atoms of Ni that if they are segregated by the neutrons impact this would favor to the cracking of the same vessel. This work is part of an investigation to analyze the micro-structural damages of the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde due to the neutronic irradiation which is exposed in a continuous way. We will show the characterization of the design steel of the vessel, what offers a comprehension about their chemical composition, the superficial topography and the crystalline nets of the steel A533-B. It will also allow analyze the existence of precipitates, segregates, the type of crystalline net and the distances inter-plains of the design steel of the vessel. (Author)

  20. Cerenkov methodology for monitoring irradiated reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, N.; Dowdy, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    Attribute measurement methods for confirming declared irradiated fuel inventories at nuclear installations under safeguards surveillance are of significant interest to inspectors. High-gain measurements of the intensity of the Cerenkov glow from exposed assemblies in water-filled storage ponds are promising for this purpose because the measured intensities depend on cooling times and burnup. We have developed a Cerenkov Measuring Device, a hand-held instrument that examines irradiated fuel assemblies in water-filled storage ponds and measures the intensity of the associated Cerenkov glow. In addition, we have developed a method for making such high-gain measurements in the presence of intense ambient light

  1. Preliminary irradiation test results from the Yankee Atomic Electric Company reactor vessel test irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.; Fyfitch, Stephen; Campbell, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Plate materials each containing 0.24 w/o copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63 w/o and 0.19 w/o, were heat treated to simulate the Yankee vessel heat treatment (austenitized at 982 o C (1800 o F)) and to simulate Regulatory Guide 1.99 database materials (austenitized at 871 o C (1600 o F)). These heat treatments produced different microstructures so the effect of microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity could be tested. Because the nickel content of the test plates varied and the copper level was constant, the effect of nickel on irradiation embrittlement was also tested. Correlation monitor material, HSST-02, was included in the program to benchmark the Ford Nuclear Reactor (University of Michigan Test Reactor) which had never been used before for this type of irradiation program. Materials taken from plate surface locations (versus 1/4 T) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from the rapid quench, are maintained after irradiation. If the improved properties are maintained, pressurized thermal shock calculations could utilize this margin. Finally, for one experiment, irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (260 o C and 288 o C) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. (Author)

  2. Reactor structure for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Tsukasa.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent deformation of equipment for FBR structure by inhibiting free convection generated at the roof slab through device. Constitution: The labyrinth is placed between the lower part of the roof slab and the lower one of the positioning flange, and then, convection-preventive wrinkle is provided for the side wall for the positioning flange against the roof slab side wall. The upper part of the positioning flange is fixed to the upper surface of the roof slab, the through-device flange is connected to the lower flange, and prevent generation of thermal stress. Thus, free convection at the through-device is prevented, and it has become possible to miniaturize the seal section of the intermediate heat exchanger and prevent galling of the circulating pump. The joint position of the positioning flange with the through-device flange can be shifted to the same height level of the roof slab, and the length under the hook of the overhead crance can be reduced. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  4. Experimental study associated to irradiation of FBR structural material, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The study presents one of the bases to evaluate the results of the post-irradiation tests to conduct the thermal control tests related to the second JMTR irradiation (70M-61P) of the demestic austenitic stainless steels for the structural material of the FBR performed by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The thermal control specimens were given the temperature history which simulated that of the irradiation temperature in vacuum by the electrical furnance, and then the tensile, fatigue and Charpy impact tests were performed. The changes of the material properties caused by the thermal history were investigated. (auth.)

  5. Education and training by utilizing irradiation test reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Shohei; Koike, Sumio; Takemoto, Noriyuki; Tanimoto, Masataka; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, at its Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), completed an irradiation test reactor simulator in May 2012. This simulator simulates the operation, irradiation test, abnormal transient change during operation, and accident progress events, etc., and is able to perform operation training on reactor and irradiation equipment corresponding to the above simulations. This simulator is composed of a reactor control panel, process control panel, irradiation equipment control panel, instructor control panel, large display panel, and compute server. The completed simulator has been utilized in the education and training of JMTR operators for the purpose of the safe and stable operation of JMTR and the achievement of high operation rate after resuming operation. For the education and training, an education and training curriculum has been prepared for use in not only operation procedures at the time of normal operation, but also learning of fast and accurate response in case of accident events. In addition, this simulator is also being used in operation training for the purpose of contributing to the cultivation of human resources for atomic power in and out of Japan. (A.O.)

  6. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This publication contains basically three kinds of information: routes approved by the Commission for the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel, information regarding any safeguards-significant incidents which have been reported to occur during shipments along such routes, and cumulative amounts of material shipped

  7. Irradiation proposition of ferritic steels in a russian reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seran, J.L.; Decours, J.; Levy, L.

    1987-04-01

    Using the low temperatures of russian reactors, a sample irradiation is proposed to study mechanical properties and swelling of martensitic steels (EM10, T91, 1.4914, HT9), ferrito-martensitic (EM12) and ferritic (F17), at temperatures lower than 400 0 C [fr

  8. HFR irradiation testing of light water reactor (LWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markgraf, J.F.W.

    1985-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information with emphasis on LWR fuel rod testing capabilities and hot cell investigation is presented. Additionally a summary of LWR fuel irradiation programmes performed and forthcoming programmes are described. Project management information and a list of publications pertaining to LWR fuel rod test programmes is given

  9. Irradiation effects on fuels for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranken, W.A.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    A review of irradiation-induced swelling and gas release experience is presented here for the three principal fuels UO 2 , UC, and UN. The primary advantage of UC and UN over UO 2 is higher thermal conductivity and attendant lower fuel temperature at equivalent pellet diameter and power density, while UO 2 offers the distinct benefit of well-known irradiation performance. Irradiation test results indicate that at equivalent burnup, temperature, and porosity conditions, UC experiences higher swelling than UO 2 or UN. Fission gas swelling becomes important at fuel temperatures above 1320 K for UC, and at somewhat higher temperatures for UO 2 and UN. Evidence exists that at equivalent fuel temperatures and burnups, high density UO 2 and UN experience comparable swelling behavior; however, differences in thermal conductivity influence overall irradiation performance. The low conductivity of UO 2 results in higher thermal gradients which contribute to fuel microcracking and gas release. As a result UO 2 exhibits higher fractional gas release than UN, at least or burnups up to about 3%

  10. Irradiation effects on Zr-2.5Nb in power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C., E-mail: Carol.Song@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Zirconium alloys are widely used as structural materials in nuclear applications because of their attractive properties such as a low absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, excellent corrosion resistance in water, and good mechanical properties at reactor operating temperatures. Zr-2.5Nb is one of the most commonly used zirconium alloys and has been used for pressure tube materials in CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) and RBMK (Reaktor Bolshoy Moshchnosti Kanalnyy, 'High Power Channel-type Reactor') reactors for over 40 years. In a recent report from the Electric Power Research Institute, Zr-2.5Nb was identified as one of the candidate materials for use in normal structural applications in light-water reactors owing to its increased resistance to irradiation-induced degradation as compared with currently used materials. Historically, the largest program of in-reactor tests on zirconium alloys was performed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Over many years of in-reactor testing and CANDU operating experience with Zr- 2.5Nb, extensive research has been conducted on the irradiation effects on its microstructures, mechanical properties, deformation behaviours, fracture toughness, delayed hydride cracking, and corrosion. Most of the results on Zr-2.5Nb obtained from CANDU experience could be used to predict the material performance under light water reactors. This paper reviews the irradiation effects on Zr-2.5Nb in power reactors (including heavy-water and light-water reactors) and summarizes the current state of knowledge. (author)

  11. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  12. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  13. Effect of gamma rays on crystalline materials during irradiation in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaenko, V.A.; Karpukhin, V.I.; Gordeev, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The article presents and discusses the results of experiments to determine the effect of gamma rays on the change in the properties of diamond, graphite, and structural steel. The materials were irradiated in a VVER type reactor. For diamonds, the effect on the annealing of defects was investigated. As gamma ray intensity increased, the crystal lattice expansion and defect concentration increased. Graphite lattice expansion and the mechanical properties of structural steel were also examined. Graphite lattice expansion increased with increased neutron flux and decreased irradiation temperature. Changes in the impact toughness of structural steel correlated precisely to the gamma ray flux in the experiments. 6 refs., 3 figs

  14. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  15. Nuclear reactor structural material forming less radioactive corrosion product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide nuclear reactor structural materials forming less radioactive corrosion products. Constitution: Ni-based alloys such as inconel alloy 718, 600 or inconel alloy 750 and 690 having excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical property even in coolants at high temperature and high pressure have generally been used as nuclear reactor structural materials. However, even such materials yield corrosion products being attacked by coolants circulating in the nuclear reactor, which produce by neutron irradiation radioactive corrosion products, that are deposited in primary circuit pipeways to constitute exposure sources. The present invention dissolves dissolves this problems by providing less activating nuclear reactor structural materials. That is, taking notice on the fact that Ni-58 contained generally by 68 % in Ni changes into Co-58 under irradiation of neutron thereby causing activation, the surface of nuclear reactor structural materials is applied with Ni plating by using Ni with a reduced content of Ni-58 isotopes. Accordingly, increase in the radiation level of the nuclear reactor structural materials can be inhibited. (K.M.)

  16. Structure of thermonuclear reactor wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro.

    1991-01-01

    In a thermonuclear reactor wall, there has been a worry that the brazing material is melted by high temperature heat and particle load, to peel off the joined portion and the protecting material is destroyed by temperature elevation, to expose the heat sink material. Then, in the reactor core structures of a thermonuclear reactor, such as a divertor plate comprising a protecting material made of carbon material and the heat sink material joined by brazing, a plate material made of a so-called refractory metal having a high atomic number such as tungsten, molybdenum or the alloy thereof is embedded or attached to an accurate position of the protecting material. This can prevent the brazing portion from destruction by escaping electrons generated upon occurrence of abnormality in the thermonuclear reactor, and peeling or destroy of the protecting material and the heat sink material. Sufficient characteristics of plasmas can always be maintained by disposing a material having a small atomic number, for example, carbon material, to the position facing to the plasmas. (N.H.)

  17. Investigation of neutron irradiated reactor vessel steels using post-irradiation annealing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Hayato; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    The matrix damage is known to be a major factor that contributes to embrittlement and hardening of irradiated reactor vessel steels, and is assumed to be composed of the point defect clusters. However field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) and atom probe (AP) could not detect any evidence of the matrix damage. In this study, post irradiation annealing experiments combining positron annihilation lineshape analysis (PALA) and hardness experiments were applied to an actual surveillance test specimen and a sample of reactor vessel steel irradiated in a material test reactor (MTR), in order to investigate the matrix damage recovery behavior and its contribution to hardening. It was confirmed that higher fluence increased the hardness and the volume fraction of open volume defects and that higher flux decreased the thermal stability of matrix damage and the effect on hardening. The contribution of matrix damage to hardening could be estimated to be below 30%. (author)

  18. Irradiation creep in reactor graphites for HTR applications. [Neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veringa, H J; Blackstone, R [Stichting Reactor Centrum Nederland, Petten

    1976-01-01

    A series of restrained shrinkage experiments on a number of graphites in the temperature range 400 to 1400/sup 0/C is described. A description is given of the experimental method and method of data evaluation. The results are compared with data from other sources. Analysis of data confirms that the creep coefficient, which is defined as the radiation induced creep strain per unit stress per unit neutron fluence, is inversely proportional to the pre-irradiation value of the Young's modulus of the material. The radiation creep coefficient increases with temperature in the range 400 to 1400/sup 0/C. It can be represented by the sum of two temperature dependent functions, one of which is inversely proportional to the neutron flux density, the other independent of the neutron flux density. When the data are analysed in this way it is found that the graphites investigated in the present work, although made from widely different starting materials and by different processes, show the same dependence of the irradiation creep coefficient on the temperature and the neutron flux density.

  19. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Facilities and Capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Blaine Grover; Raymond V. Furstenau

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These different capabilities include passive sealed capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. The ATR has enhanced capabilities in experiment monitoring and control systems for instrumented and/or temperature controlled experiments. The control systems utilize feedback from thermocouples in the experiment to provide a custom blended flowing inert gas mixture to control the temperature in the experiments. Monitoring systems have also been utilized on the exhaust gas lines from the experiment to monitor different parameters, such as fission gases for fuel experiments, during irradiation. ATR's unique control system provides axial flux profiles in the experiments, unperturbed by axially positioned control components, throughout each reactor operating cycle and over the duration of test programs requiring many years of irradiation. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 1.6 cm (0.625 inches) to 12.7 cm (5.0 inches) over an active core length of 122 cm (48.0 inches). Thermal and fast neutron fluxes can be adjusted radially across the core depending on the needs of individual test programs. This paper will discuss the different irradiation capabilities available and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. Examples of different experiments will also be discussed to demonstrate the use of the capabilities and facilities at ATR for performing irradiation experiments

  20. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorla, A.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Y.; Štemberk, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A meso-scale finite element model for irradiated concrete is developed. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • Confrontation with expansion and damage obtained from experiments is successful. • Effects of paste shrinkage, creep and ductility are discussed. - Abstract: A numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale is detailed in this paper. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al., 1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al., 2015). The proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  1. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Vaitová, M. [Czech Technical University, Thakurova 7, 166 29 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Le Pape, Y., E-mail: lepapeym@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Štemberk, P. [Czech Technical University, Thakurova 7, 166 29 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A meso-scale finite element model for irradiated concrete is developed. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • Confrontation with expansion and damage obtained from experiments is successful. • Effects of paste shrinkage, creep and ductility are discussed. - Abstract: A numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale is detailed in this paper. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al., 1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al., 2015). The proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  2. ODS alloys for structures subjected to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlan, Y. de

    2010-01-01

    ODS (oxide-dispersion-strengthened) materials are considered for cladding purposes for the fourth-generation sodium-cooled fast reactors. ODS materials afford many benefits. Indeed, these high-performance materials combine, at the same time, remarkable mechanical strength, in hot conditions, and outstanding irradiation behavior. New ODS steel grades, exhibiting better performance levels than the last-generation austenitic steels, afford not only negligible swelling under irradiation, owing to their 'ferritic' body-centered cubic structure - by contrast to austenitic grades, which feature a face-centered cubic structure - but equally outstanding creep properties, owing to the nano-reinforcements present in the matrix. ODS materials are obtained by powder metallurgy, the first fabrication step involves co-grinding a metal powder together with yttrium oxide (Y 2 O 3 ) powder. At this stage, an iron oxide may also be added, or an yttrium-rich intermetallic compound in order to provide the amounts of yttrium, and oxygen required for the formation of nano-oxides. The metal powder consists of a powder pre-alloyed to the chemical composition of the desired material. Once the powder has been obtained, consolidation of the ODS materials is achieved either by hot extrusion, or by hot isostatic pressing. (A.C.)

  3. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  4. Accelerated irradiation test of gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279 degrees C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed

  5. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  6. Characteristics of irradiation creep in the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    A number of significant differences in the irradiation environment of a fusion reactor are expected with respect to the fission reactor irradiation environment. These differences are expected to affect the characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor. Special conditions of importance are identified as the (1) large number of defects produced per pka, (2) high helium production rate, (3) cyclic operation, (4) unique stress histories, and (5) low temperature operations. Existing experimental data from the fission reactor environment is analyzed to shed light on irradiation creep under fusion conditions. Theoretical considerations are used to deduce additional characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor environment for which no experimental data are available

  7. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A 2 ). (Author)

  8. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  9. Project accent: graphite irradiated creep in a materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooking, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atkins manages a pioneering programme of irradiation experiments for EDF Energy. One of these projects is Project ACCENT, designed to obtain evidence of a beneficial physical property of the graphite, which may extend the life of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The project team combines the in-house experience of EDF Energy with two supplier organisations (providing the material test reactors and testing facilities) and supporting consultancies (Atkins and an independent technical expert). This paper describes: - Brief summary of the Project; - Discussion of the challenges faced by the Project; and - Conclusion elaborating on the aims of the Project. These challenging experiments use bespoke technology and both un-irradiated (virgin) and irradiated AGR graphite. The results will help to better understand graphite irradiation-induced creep (or stress modified dimensional change) properties and therefore more accurately determine lifetime and safe operating envelopes of the AGRs. The first round of irradiation has been completed, with a second round about to commence. This is a key step to realising the full lifetime ambition for AGRs, demonstrating the relaxation of stresses within the graphite bricks. (authors)

  10. ''Sleeping reactor'' irradiations: Shutdown reactor determination of short-lived activation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerde, E.A.; Glasgow, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    At the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the principal irradiation system has a thermal neutron flux (φ) of ∼ 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 · s, permitting the detection of elements via irradiation of 60 s or less. Irradiations of 6 or 7 s are acceptable for detection of elements with half-lives of as little as 30 min. However, important elements such as Al, Mg, Ti, and V have half-lives of only a few minutes. At HFIR, these can be determined with irradiation times of ∼ 6 s, but the requirement of immediate counting leads to increased exposure to the high activity produced by irradiation in the high flux. In addition, pneumatic system timing uncertainties (about ± 0.5 s) make irradiations of 9 Be(γ,n) 8 Be, the gamma rays principally originating in the spent fuel. Upon reactor SCRAM, the flux drops to ∼ 1 x 10 10 n/cm 2 · s within 1 h. By the time the fuel elements are removed, the flux has dropped to ∼ 6 x 10 8 . Such fluxes are ideal for the determination of short-lived elements such as Al, Ti, Mg, and V. An important feature of the sleeping reactor is a flux that is not constant

  11. Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S.; Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding

  12. Accelerated Irradiations for High Dose Microstructures in Fast Reactor Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhijie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the extent to which high dose rate, self-ion irradiation can be used as an accelerated irradiation tool to understand microstructure evolution at high doses and temperatures relevant to advanced fast reactors. We will accomplish the goal by evaluating phase stability and swelling of F-M alloys relevant to SFR systems at very high dose by combining experiment and modeling in an effort to obtain a quantitative description of the processes at high and low damage rates.

  13. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  14. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  15. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  16. Experimental fuel channel for samples irradiation at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Markovic, H.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Miric, I.; Prokic, M.; Strugar, P.

    1984-12-01

    An 80% enriched UO 2 fuel channel at the RB nuclear reactor in the 'Boris Kidric' Institute of Nuclear Sciences is modified for samples irradiation by fast neutrons. Maximum sample diameter is 25 mm and length up to 1000 mm. Characteristics of neutron and gamma radiation fields of this new experimental channel are investigated. In the centre of the channel, the main contribution to the total neutron absorbed dose, i.e. 0.29 Gy/Wh of reactor operation, is due to the fast neutron spectrum component. Only 0.05 Gy and 0.07 Gy in the total neutron absorbed dose are due to intermediate and thermal neutrons, respectively. At the same time the gamma absorbed dose is 0.35 Gy. The developed experimental fuel channel, EFC, has wide possibilities for utilization, from fast neutron spectrum studies, electronic component irradiations, dosemeters testing, up to cross-section measurements. (author)

  17. Microstructural evolution in reactor pressure vessel steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Katsumi; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Understanding microstructural changes in reactor pressure vessel steels is important in order to evaluate radiation-induced embrittlement, one of the major aging phenomena affecting the extension of plant life. In this study, actual surveillance test specimens and samples of rector vessel low-alloy steel (A533B steel) irradiated in a research reactor were examined using state-of-the-art techniques to clarify the neutron flux effect on the microstructural changes. These techniques included small angle neutron scattering and atom probes. Microstructural changes which are considered to be the main factors affecting embrittlement, including the production of copper-rich precipitates and the segregation of impurity elements, were confirmed by the results of the study. In addition, the mechanical properties were predicted based on the obtained quantitative data such as the diameters of precipitates. Consequently, the hardening due to irradiation was almost simulated. (author)

  18. Final report of the HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] irradiation facilities improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.H.; Thoms, K.R.; West, C.D.

    1987-09-01

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has outstanding neutronics characteristics for materials irradiation, but some relatively minor aspects of its mechanical design severely limited its usefulness for that purpose. In particular, though the flux trap region in the center of the annular fuel elements has a very high neutron flux, it had no provision for instrumentation access to irradiation capsules. The irradiation positions in the beryllium reflector outside the fuel elements also have a high flux; however, although instrumented, they were too small and too few to replace the facilities of a materials testing reactor. To address these drawbacks, the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement Project consisted of modifications to the reactor vessel cover, internal structures, and reflector. Two instrumented facilities were provided in the flux trap region, and the number of materials irradiation positions in the removable beryllium (RB) was increased from four to eight, each with almost twice the available experimental space of the previous ones. The instrumented target facilities were completed in August 1986, and the RB facilities were completed in June 1987

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN U-MO DISPERSED FUEL OF FULL-SIZE FUEL ELEMENTS AND MINI-RODS IRRADIATED IN THE MIR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSEY. L. IZHUTOV

    2013-12-01

    The full-size fuel rods were irradiated up to an average burnup of ∼ 60%235U; the mini-rods were irradiated to an average burnup of ∼ 85%235U. The presented data show a significant increase of the void fraction in the U-Mo alloy as the U-235 burnup rises from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%. The effect of irradiation test conditions and U-235 burnup were analyzed with regard to the formation of an interaction layer between the matrix and fuel particles as well as generation of porosity in the U-Mo alloy. Shown here are changes in distribution of U fission products as the U-235 burnup increases from ∼ 40% up to ∼ 85%.

  20. The proposed cold neutron irradiation facility at the Breazeale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimeo, R. M.; Sokol, P. E.; Carpenter, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the design considerations of a Cold Neutron Irradiation Facility (CNIF) originally to have been installed at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The goal of this project was to study the effects of radiation-induced damage to cryogenic moderators and, in particular, solid methane. This work evolved through the design stage undergoing a full safety analysis and received tentative approval from the PSBR Safeguards Committee but was discontinued due to budgetary constraints. (auth)

  1. Miniature tensile test specimens for fusion reactor irradiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Three miniature sheet-type tensile specimens and a miniature rod-type specimen are being used to determine irradiated tensile properties for alloy development for fusion reactors. The tensile properties of type 316 stainless steel were determined with these different specimens, and the results were compared. Reasonably good agreement was observed. However, there were differences that led to recommendations on which specimens are preferred. 4 references, 9 figures, 6 tables

  2. Structure changes of irradiated UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Junji; Yokouchi, Yoji; Kajiyama, Takashi; Terunuma, Toshihiro; Koizumi, Masumichi

    1973-01-01

    The structural change of UO 2 irradiated in GETR reactor was analyzed on void distribution, fuel cracking, and gap conductance between fuel and cladding. Metallographic analysis was carried out on 21 sections of irradiated fuel pins. Radial void distribution was measured by the linear analysis technique based on the equivalence between the volume fraction of voids and the intercepted length of lines between void boundaries. Fuel cracks were classified into two types, namely radial cracks and circumferential cracks. The radial position, length, angle and number of each fuel clad were measured on metallographic section and autoradiography. The gap conductance between fuel and cladding was calculated from the equation h = q/(T sub(s) - T sub(i)) where h is gap conductance, T sub(i) is inside clad temperature and T sub(s) is outside clad temperature. In void distribution, as the result of studying the effect of linear heat rating on the radial void fraction of UO 2 fuel irradiated with the similar level of burnup, one specimen showed that the void fraction of columnar grain growth region was comparable to that of fabricated region, and two specimens showed higher void fraction at fabricated region than the calculated one. In fuel cladding, no significant effect of burnup on fuel cracking was observed, and the number of fuel cracking increased with shutdown or scram numbers, but the radial position of circumferential cracks was not much changed. In gap conductance, it was influenced by the estimation of temperature of columnar grain growth. (Iwakiri, K.)

  3. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)-Effect of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N.; Kantoglu, Omer; Dilek, Filiz B.

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD 5 /COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm -3 . Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm -3 . Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  4. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)-Effect of gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Kantoglu, Omer [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06982, Kazan, Ankara (Turkey); Dilek, Filiz B., E-mail: fdilek@metu.edu.t [Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD{sub 5}/COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm{sup -3}. Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm{sup -3}. Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  5. Primary Damage Characteristics in Metals Under Irradiation in the Cores of Thermal and Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechenkin, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    For an analysis and forecasting of radiation-induced phenomena in structural materials of WWERs, PWRs and BN reactors the fast neutron fluence is usually used (for structural materials of the reactor cores and internals the fluence of neutrons with energy > 0.1 MeV, for WWER and PWRs vessel steels the fluence of neutrons with energy > 0.5 MeV in Russia and East Europe, and with energy > 1.0 MeV in USA and France). Displacements per atom (dpa) seem to be a more appropriate correlation parameter, because it allows comparing the results of materials irradiation in different neutron energy spectra or with different types of particles (neutrons, ions, fast electrons). Energy spectra of primary knocked atoms (PKA) and 'effective' dpa, which are introduced to take into account the point defect recombination during the relaxation stage of a displacement cascade, can be still better representation of the effect of irradiation on material properties. In this work the results of calculating dose rates (dpa/s, NRT-model), PKA energy spectra and PKA mean energies in metals under irradiation in the cores of Russian reactors WWER-440, WWER-1000 (both power thermal reactors) and BN-600 (power fast reactor) and BR-10 (test fast reactor) are presented. In all the reactors Fe and Zr are considered, with addition of Ti and W in BN-600. 'Effective' dose rates in these metals are calculated. Limitations and uncertainties in the standard dpa formulation (the NRT-dpa) are discussed. IPPE activities in the fields related to the TM subject are considered

  6. Synthetic study of reactor irradiation for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Shigehiro; Furuhashi, Akira; Kanda, Keiji; Sumita, Kenji; Kakihana, Hidetake.

    1978-01-01

    This report is described on the results of the study on the reactor irradiation for medical use shared by the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, and other seventeen facilities. Boron neutron-capturing therapy developed in Japan is extremely significant treating method for tumors by destroying tumor cells of encephaloma, etc. selectively. This is the synthetic study for promoting the above therapeutic method. Two existing reactors were reconstructed into the thermal neutron reactors for boron neutron-capturing therapy. The various preparatory and physical researches were made with the reconstruction, and the therapy was tried on eleven cases. Further experiments were made on the following points: (1) To promote treatment on encephaloma by boron neutron-capturing therapy. (2) To develop its application to malignant tumors other than encephaloma. (3) Animal irradiation experiments. (4) The basic experiments on the cellular level. (5) The study of remote controlled anesthesia. (6) To control irradiated dose. (7) To improve boron compounds. (8) To condense radioisotopes. (Kobatake, H.)

  7. Effects of irradiation on ceramics for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, D.L.

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of this study, coordinated with efforts of LANL and Grumman Aircraft, was to lay some basic groundwork to study the irradiation effects on the engineering properties of some useful classes of ceramic materials; ANL's efforts were pointed towards multiphase materials (glass ceramics and partially-stabilized zirconias). The materials were irradiated at 400 and 550 0 C to fast (E > 0.1 MeV) neutron fluences of approx. 2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . Fluorophlogapite mica based glass ceramics (Macor, etc.) were found susceptible to weakening due to void formtion between mica plates. Composition variations within this class of glass ceramics seemed to cause sharp variations in the magnitude of the effect. Lithium silicate glass ceramic (ReX) showed sharp contrasts between the effects of ionization irradiation and displacement damage, neutron irradiation having little effect on the ReX structure while electron irradiation creating lithium silicate vitrification and rapid structural annealing

  8. Development of radiation resistant structural materials utilizing fission research reactors in Japan (Role of research reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Nozawa, T.; Muroga, T.; Aoyama, T.; Kawamura, H.; Ishihara, M.; Ito, C.; Kaneda, S.; Mimura, S.

    2009-01-01

    Structural materials for next-generation nuclear power systems should have a good radiation resistance, where the expected accumulation dose will largely exceed 10 dpa. Among several candidate materials, materials of five categories, 1. Austenitic steels, including high nickel alloys, 2. Low activation ferritic martensitic steels, 3. ODS steels (austenitic and ferritic), 4. Vanadium based alloys, 5. Silicon carbide composites (SiC/SiCf). All have been most extensively studied in Japan, in collaboration among industries, national institutes such as Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) and National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and universities. The high nickel base alloys were studied for their low swelling behaviors mainly by the NIMS and the austenitic steels are studied for their reliable engineering data base and their reliable performance in irradiation environments mainly by the JAEA, mainly for their application in the near-term projects such as the ITER and the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors. The most extensive studies are now concentrated on the Low Activation Ferritic Marsensitic steels and ODS steels, for their application in a demonstration fusion reactor and prototype sodium cooled fast reactors. Fundamental studies on radiation effects are carried out, mainly utilizing Japan Materials Testing Rector (JMTR) with its flexible irradiation ability, up to a few dpa. For higher dpa irradiation, a fast test reactor, JOYO is utilized up to several 10s dpa. Some international collaborations such as Japan/USA and Japan/France are effective to utilize reactors abroad, such as High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and sodium cooled high flux fast reactors in France. Silicon carbide based composites are extensively studied by university groups led by Kyoto University and the JAEA. For their performance in heavy irradiation environments, the Japan/USA collaboration plays an important role

  9. Helium production in mixed spectrum reactor-irradiated pure elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneff, D.W.; Oliver, B.M.; Skowronski, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to apply helium accumulation neutron dosimetry to the measurement of neutron fluences and energy spectra in mixed-spectrum fission reactors utilized for fusion materials testing, and to measure helium generation rates of materials in these irradiation environments. Helium generation measurements have been made for several Fe, Cu Ti, Nb, Cr, and Pt samples irradiated in the mixed-spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results have been used to integrally test the ENDF/B-V Gas Production File, by comparing the measurements with helium generation predictions made by Argonne National Laboratory using ENDF/B-V cross sections and adjusted reactor spectra. The comparisons indicate consistency between the helium measurements and ENDF/B-V for iron, but cross section discrepancies exist for helium production by fast neutrons in Cu, Ti, Nb, and Cr (the latter for ORR). The Fe, Cu, and Ti work updates and extends previous measurements

  10. Microstructural stability of fast reactor irradiated 10 to 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Stoter, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    The strength and microstructural stability of three 10 to 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic stainless steels have been characterized following fast reactor irradiation to damage levels of 30 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures in the range 380 to 615 0 C. Irradiation results in either increases or decreases in room temperature hardness depending on the irradiation temperature. These strength changes can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of the combined effects of irradiation-induced interstitial dislocation loop formation and recovery of the dislocation networks comprising the initial tempered martensite structures. Precipitate evolution in the irradiated steels is associated with the nonequilibrium segregation of the elements nickel, silicon, molybdenum, chromium and phosphorus, brought about by solute-point defect interactions. The principal irradiation-induced precipitates identified are M 6 X, intermetallic chi and sigma phases and also α' (Cr-rich ferrite). The implications of the observed microstructural changes on the selection of martensitic stainless steels for fast reactor wrapper applications are briefly considered

  11. Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactor Fuel. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    Fast reactors are vital for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear energy in the long term. They offer vastly more efficient use of uranium resources and the ability to burn actinides, which are otherwise the long-lived component of high level nuclear waste. These reactors require development, qualification, testing and deployment of improved and innovative nuclear fuel and structural materials having very high radiation resistance, corrosion/erosion and other key operational properties. Several IAEA Member States have made efforts to advance the design and manufacture of technologies of fast reactor fuels, as well as to investigate their irradiation behaviour. Due to the acute shortage of fast neutron testing and post-irradiation examination facilities and the insufficient understanding of high dose radiation effects, there is a need for international exchange of knowledge and experience, generation of currently missing basic data, identification of relevant mechanisms of materials degradation and development of appropriate models. Considering the important role of nuclear fuels in fast reactor operation, the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) proposed a Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactors Fuels', which was hosted by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 30 May to 3 June 2011. The TM included a technical visit to the fuel production plant MSZ in Elektrostal. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum to share knowledge, practical experience and information on the improvement and innovation of fuels for fast reactors through scientific presentations and brainstorming discussions. The meeting brought together 34 specialists from national nuclear agencies, R and D and design institutes, fuel vendors and utilities from 10 countries. The presentations were structured into four sections: R and D Programmes on FR Fuel

  12. Structural properties and neutron irradiation effects of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Toyohiko

    1994-01-01

    In high temperature gas-cooled reactors and nuclear fusion reactors being developed at present, various ceramics are to be used in the environment of neutron irradiation for undertaking important functions. The change of the characteristics of those materials by neutron irradiation must be exactly forecast, but it has been known that the response of the materials is different respectively. The production method of ceramics and the resulted structures of ceramics which control their characteristics are explained. The features of covalent bond and ionic bond, the synthesis of powder and the phase change by heating, sintering and sintering agent, and grain boundary phase are described. The smelling of ceramics by neutron irradiation is caused by the formation of the clusters of Frenkel defects and minute spot defects. Its restoration by annealing is explained. The defects remaining in materials after irradiation are the physical defects by flipping atoms cut due to the collision with high energy particles and the chemical defects by nuclear transformation. Some physical defects can be restored, but chemical defects are never restored. The mechanical properties of ceramics and the effect of irradiation on them, and the thermal properties of ceramics and the effect of irradiation on them are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Assessment of structural materials inside the reactor pool of the Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Nhi Dien; Luong Ba Vien; Nguyen Minh Tuan; Trang Cao Su

    2010-01-01

    Originally the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) was a 250-kW TRIGA MARK II reactor, started building from early 1960s and achieved the first criticality on February 26, 1963. During the 1982-1984 period, the reactor was reconstructed and upgraded to 500kW, and restarted operation on March 20, 1984. From the original TRIGA reactor, only the pool liner, beam ports, thermal columns, and graphite reflector have been remained. The structural materials of pool liner and other components of TRIGA were made of aluminum alloy 6061 and aluminum cladding fuel assemblies. Some other parts, such as reactor core, irradiation rotary rack around the core, vertical irradiation facilities, etc. were replaced by the former Soviet Union's design with structural materials of aluminum alloy CAV-1. WWR-M2 fuel assemblies of U-Al alloy 36% and 19.75% 235 U enrichment and aluminum cladding have been used. In its original version, the reactor was setting upon an all-welded aluminum frame supported by four legs attached to the bottom of the pool. After the modification made, the new core is now suspended from the top of the pool liner by means of three aluminum concentric cylindrical shells. The upper one has a diameter of 1.9m, a length of 3.5m and a thickness of 10mm. This shell prevents from any visual access to the upper part of the pool liner, but is provided with some holes to facilitate water circulation in the 4cm gap between itself and the reactor pool liner. The lower cylindrical shells act as an extracting well for water circulation. As reactor has been operated at low power of 500 kW, it was no any problem with degradation of core structural materials due to neutron irradiation and thermal heat, but there are some ageing issues with aluminum liner and other structures (for example, corrosion of tightening-up steel bolt in the fourth beam port and flood of neutron detector housing) inside the reactor pool. In this report, the authors give an overview and assessment of

  14. Meso-scale magnetic signatures for nuclear reactor steel irradiation embrittlement monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, J. D., E-mail: pradeep.ramuhalli@pnnl.gov; Ramuhalli, P., E-mail: pradeep.ramuhalli@pnnl.gov; Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Jiang, W.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Johnson, B. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); McCloy, J. S., E-mail: john.mccloy@wsu.edu; Xu, K., E-mail: john.mccloy@wsu.edu [Washington State University, PO Box 642920, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the “state of health” of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of nondestructive evaluation technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results of integrating advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models. In the future, this will help to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in structural materials. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. Ongoing research is focused on extending the measurements and models on thin films to gain insights into the structural state of irradiated materials and the resulting impact on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  15. Irradiation effects on material properties of steels used in nuclear reactors: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerceker, N.; Dara, I. H.

    2001-01-01

    The structural materials of a nuclear power plant are of vital importance as they provide mechanical strength, structural support and physical containment for the primary reactor components as well as the nuclear power plant itself. These structural materials comprise mainly of metals and their alloys, ceramics and cermets. However, metals and their alloys are the most widely used materials and the irradiation effects are more pronounced on metallic materials as of their high temperature properties are more sensitive (with respect to ceramics and cermets) to any kind of external effects. The wholesale creation of effects on material properties has been studied for over four decades and it is not realistic to attempt to represent even a small part of the field in single poster paper. In the present contribution, a literature review of the irradiation effects on the material properties of different types of steel alloys will be given because steels are widely used as structural materials in reactors and therefore the irradiation effects on steels may be of paramount importance for reactor design, operation and safety concepts which will be discussed about radiation effects on material properties of steels will provide highlights to better understanding of the origins and development of radiation effects in materials

  16. 78 FR 50313 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Orders; rescission. SUMMARY... the NRC published a final rule, ``Physical Protection of Irradiated Fuel in Transit,'' on May 20, 2013... of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit'' (RIN 3150-AI64; NRC-2009-0163). The final rule incorporates...

  17. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements.

  18. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements

  19. Swedish studies on irradiation effect in structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M; Myers, H P

    1962-12-15

    A brief description of work in hand at AB Atomenergi concerning the effects of neutron irradiation on structural materials is given. Some recent data is listed for the following pressure vessel steels 2103/R3 as used in the Aagesta reactor, SIS 142103, NO345, Fortiweld and weld metal OK 54 P. Zircaloy-2 has been studied regarding the combined effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen content on tensile properties. The difficulties associated with determination of neutron dose and the correlation of damage with dose and neutron energy spectrum are discussed.

  20. Swedish studies on irradiation effect in structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.; Myers, H.P.

    1962-12-01

    A brief description of work in hand at AB Atomenergi concerning the effects of neutron irradiation on structural materials is given. Some recent data is listed for the following pressure vessel steels 2103/R3 as used in the Aagesta reactor, SIS 142103, NO345, Fortiweld and weld metal OK 54 P. Zircaloy-2 has been studied regarding the combined effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen content on tensile properties. The difficulties associated with determination of neutron dose and the correlation of damage with dose and neutron energy spectrum are discussed

  1. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettger, H.; Hardt, P. von der; Tas, A.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to January 1981

  2. CR-39 as induced track detector in reactor: irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylberberg, H.

    1989-07-01

    A systematic study about reactor's neutrons radiation effect and gamma radiation effect on the properties of CR-39 that are significant for its use as induced fission track detector is showed. The following studies deserved attention: kinetics of the fission track chemical development; efficiency to register and to develop fission track; losses of developable tracks; variation in the number of developable tracks and variation in the visible and ultraviolet radiation spectrum. The dissertation is organized in seven specific chapters: solid state nuclear tracks (SSNT); CR-39 as SSNT; objectives and problems presentation; preparation and characterization of CR-39 as SSNT; gamma irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT; reactor neutron irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT and, results discussions and conclusions. The main work contributions are the use of CR-39 in the determination of fissionable nuclide as thorium and uranium in solid and liquid samples; gamma radiation damage on CR-39 as well as the reactor's neutron damage on CR-39. (B.C.A.) 62 refs, 53 figs, 21 tabs

  3. Irradiation experience with HTGR fuels in the Peach Bottom Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, W.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1974-01-01

    Fuel performance in the Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is reviewed, including (1) the driver elements in the second core and (2) the test elements designed to test fuel for larger HTGR plants. Core 2 of this reactor, which is operated by the Philadelphia Electric Company, performed reliably with an average nuclear steam supply availability of 85 percent since its startup in July 1970. Core 2 had accumulated a total of 897.5 equivalent full power days (EFPD), almost exactly its design life-time of 900 EFPD, when the plant was shut down permanently on October 31, 1974. Gaseous fission product release and the activity of the main circulating loop remained significantly below the limits allowed by the technical specifications and the levels observed during operation of Core 1. The low circulating activity and postirradiation examination of driver fuel elements have demonstrated the improved irradiation stability of the coated fuel particles in Core 2. Irradiation data obtained from these tests substantiate the performance predictions based on accelerated tests and complement the fuel design effort by providing irradiation data in the low neutron fluence region

  4. Irradiation Tests Supporting LEU Conversion of Very High Power Research Reactors in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Cole, J. I.; Glagolenko, I.; Holdaway, K. K.; Housley, G. K.; Rabin, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    The US fuel development team is developing a high density uranium-molybdenum alloy monolithic fuel to enable conversion of five high-power research reactors. Previous irradiation tests have demonstrated promising behavior for this fuel design. A series of future irradiation tests will enable selection of final fuel fabrication process and provide data to qualify the fuel at moderately-high power conditions for use in three of these five reactors. The remaining two reactors, namely the Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor, require additional irradiation tests to develop and demonstrate the fuel’s performance with even higher power conditions, complex design features, and other unique conditions. This paper reviews the program’s current irradiation testing plans for these moderately-high irradiation conditions and presents conceptual testing strategies to illustrate how subsequent irradiation tests will build upon this initial data package to enable conversion of these two very-high power research reactors.

  5. Heterogeneity of structure and properties of 12Cr18Ni10Ti and 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 stainless steels irradiated up to high damaging doses in reactor Bn-350

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimkin, O.P.; Tivanova, O.V.; Turubarova, L.G.; Silnyagina, N.S.; Doronina, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Earlier, during investigation of post-operating properties and structure of responsible units of fast neutron reactors there was shown /1, 2/ that depending on character of preliminary treatment of austenite stainless steel (austenization, cold deformation, mechanical and thermal treatment) radiation effects could be different. In /2/ one could observe heterogeneity at swelling of cold- worked hexahedral ducts along perimeter, in particular, the swelling of corners was less than plates'. At the same time after mechanical-thermal treatment the corners swell in 3-5 times of magnitude higher than plates. By the present there are several assumptions about nature of this phenomenon. One of them is a difference of deformation degree of material in corners and plates of the duct. It is known that /3/ external effects (including deformation) induce martensitic γ→α transformation in austenitic steels, due to which the structure and properties of steel are changed. In particular, paramagnetic FCC matrix reveals sites with ferromagnetic BCC structure. Steel heating, containing martensitic α-phase higher than ∼ 450-800 deg C, results in reverse γ→α transformation in material, which in its turn leads to formation of phase phase-hardened austenite. We can expect that only peculiarities of processes of direct and reverse martensitic transformations, which took place during preliminary austenitic steel treatment, will predetermine its behavior under irradiation. Taking into account the above mentioned there have been carried out complex material-scientific investigations of 12Cr18Ni10Ti and 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 steel samples cut off from different sites (both adjacent to corners and far from them) of hexagonal ducts of spent fuel assemblies of BN-350 reactor. There were used samples in the form of plates of different sizes: 5x10x2 mm - for metallographic investigations (microscope Neophot-2) and determination of microhardness (PMT-3); 2x20x0,3 mm - for mechanical

  6. A review of formulas for predicting irradiation embrittlement of reactors vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrequin, P.

    1995-01-01

    Formulas developed in different countries for predicting irradiation embrittlement of reactors vessel materials are presented. Results of predictions were compared with different data sets, from surveillance programmes or studies in test reactors, with different residual elements contents. Figs

  7. The problem of helium in structural materials for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, A.S.; Zakharov, A.P.; Chuev, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The processes of helium buildup in some metals and alloys at different energy neutron flux irradiation under thermonuclear reactor conditions are considered. The data on high temperature helium embrittlement of a number of stainless steels, titanium and aluminium alloys etc. are given A review of experiments concerning the implanted helium behaviour is presented. Possible reactions between helium atoms and point defects or their clusters are discussed. Analysed are material structure variations upon buildup in them up to 1 at % of helium

  8. Modified fuel channel for sample irradiation at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Markovic, H.; Sokcic, M.; Miric, I.; Prokic, M.; Strugar, P.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel channel of 80% enriched UO 2 at RB reactor in Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences is modified for sample irradiation in the fast neutron field. Maximum sample diameter is 25 mm and length up to 100 mm. Characteristics of neutron as well as gamma radiation fields of this new experimental channel are investigated. In the center of channel, the main contribution to the total neutron absorbed dose i.e. 0.29 Gy per 1 Wh of reactor operation, is due to the fast neutron spectrum component. Only 0.05 Gy and 0.07 Gy in the total neutron absorbed dose are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons respectively. At the same time gamma absorption dose is 0.35 Gy. The development of experimental fuel channel GRK has wide possibility for utilization, from electronic components fast neutron studies, dosimeters testing, to cross section measurements for fast neutron energies. (author)

  9. Examination in hot laboratories of irradiated fuels from fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clottes, G.; Peray, R.; Ratier, J.L.

    1980-05-01

    Low irradiation rate examinations were carried out soon after the Rapsodie, Rapsodie Fortissimo and Phenix reactors were started up for the first time in order to check the level of maximum temperatures reached and the radial migration of oxygen and plutonium and to assess the movements of fuels inside the cladding. The other examinations were effected at a high specific burnup in order to defines the limit specific burnup securing the integrity of the fuel pin claddings (distortion, ruptures and possible consequences). The examinations carried out so far on fuel elements coming from Phenix or Rapsodie have allowed good fuel surveillance to be undertaken and the acquisition of a large number of data, thanks to which the fuel characteristics of future reactors of the system have been developed [fr

  10. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This circular has been prepared to provide information on the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel (spent fuel) subject to regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and to meet the requirements of Public Law 96--295. The report provides a brief description of NRC authority for certain aspects of transporting spent fuel. It provides descriptive statistics on spent fuel shipments regulated by the NRC from 1979 to 1992. It also lists detailed highway and railway segments used within each state from October 1, 1987 through December 31, 1992

  11. Alternative methodology for irradiation reactor experimental shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellozo, Sergio de Oliveira; Vital, Helio de Carvalho

    1996-01-01

    Due to a change in the project of the Experimental Irradiation Reactor, its shielding design had to be recalculated according to an alternative simplified analytical approach, since the standard transport calculations were temporarily unavailable. In the calculation of the new width for the shielding made up of steel and high-density concrete layers, the following radiation components were considered: fast neutrons and primary gammas (produced by fission and beta decay), from the core; and secondary gammas, produced by thermal neutron capture in the shielding. (author)

  12. Design of unique pins for irradiation of higher actinides in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Birney, K.R.; Weber, E.T.; Adair, H.L.; Quinby, T.C.; Raman, S.; Butler, J.K.; Bateman, B.C.; Swanson, K.M.

    1982-03-01

    The actinides produced by transmutation reactions in nuclear reactor fuels are a significant factor in nuclear fuel burnup, transportation and reprocessing. Irradiation testing is a primary source of data of this type. A segmented pin design was developed which provides for incorporation of multiple specimens of actinide oxides for irradiation in the UK's Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay Scotland. Results from irradiation of these pins will extend the basic neutronic and material irradiation behavior data for key actinide isotopes

  13. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  14. Consequences of the improvement of fast reactor material behavior under irradiation on fuel element performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclere, J.; Dupouy, J.M.; Marcon, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The most important problems in fast reactor fuel element come from the excessive swelling of the structural materials used. The limitations of irradiation time for a given reactor result from the cladding or hexagonal wrapper deformations. Irradiation creep plays a major role, either in inducing additional deformations, or in providing possible ways of accommodation of bending stresses. Progress has been made in designing swelling resistant and/or low irradiation creep modulus materials. For instance in FRANCE, annealed 316 SS has been eliminated from pin and subassembly, and replaced by cold worked 316; we are now considering introduction of stabilizing elements in 316 SS as a further improvement and studying different alloys (nickel alloys, or ferritic steels). It has to be checked that the improvement of irradiation characteristic is not counterbalanced by losses on other properties (embrittlement for instance). Considering that pushing off or eliminating a limit may lead to the onset of a new one, it is porposed to make a review of the consequences of substantial improvement of structural material behavior

  15. Study on dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Kohyama, A.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    A Japan-USA Program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, 'JUPITER', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment using fission reactors. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. The irradiation capsules for in-situ measurement and varying temperature were developed successfully. It was found that insulating ceramics were worked up to 3 dpa. The property changes and related issues in low activation structural materials were summarized. (author)

  16. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  17. Accelerator-Based Irradiation Creep of Pyrolytic Carbon Used in TRISO Fuel Particles for the (VHTR) Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lumin; Was, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the important structural materials in the TRISO fuel particles which will be used in the next generation of gas-cooled very-high-temperature reactors (VHTR). When the TRISO particles are under irradiation at high temperatures, creep of the PyC layers may cause radial cracking leading to catastrophic particle failure. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the creep behavior of PyC during irradiation is required to predict the overall fuel performance.

  18. Fabrication of Fast Reactor Fuel Pins for Test Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsten, G. [Institute for Applied Reactor Physics, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Dippel, T. [Institute for Radiochemistry, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Laue, H. J. [Institute for Applied Reactor Physics, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1967-09-15

    An extended irradiation programme is being carried out for the fuel element development of the Karlsruhe fast breeder project. A very important task within the programme is the testing of plutonium-containing fuel pins in a fast-reactor environment. This paper deals with fabrication of such pins by our laboratories at Karlsruhe. For the fast reactor test positions at present envisaged a fuel with 15% plutonium and the uranium fully enriched is appropriate. Hie mixed oxide is both pelletized and vibro-compacted with smeared densities between 80 and 88% theoretical. The pin design is, for example, such that there are two gas plena at the top and bottom, and one blanket above the fuel with the fuel zone fitting to the test reactor core length. The specifications both for fuel and cladding have been adapted to the special purpose of a fast-breeder reactor - the outer dimensions, the choice of cladding and fuel types, the data used and the kind of tests outline the targets of the development. The fuel fabrication is described in detail, and also the powder line used for vibro-compaction. The source materials for the fuel are oxalate PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} from the UF{sub 6} process. The special problems of mechanical mixing and of plutonium homogeneity have been studied. The development of the sintering technique and grain characteristics for vibratory compactive fuel had to overcome serious problems in order to reach 82-83% theoretical. The performance of the pin fabrication needed a major effort in welding, manufacturing of fits and decontamination of the pin surfaces. This was a stimulation for the development of some very subtle control techniques, for example taking clear X-ray photographs and the tube testing. In general the selection of tests was a special task of the production routine. In conclusion the fabrication of the pins resulted in valuable experiences for the further development of fast reactor fuel elements. (author)

  19. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  20. Structural material irradiations in FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA); instrumentation and control system; MOTA neutronic data; pressurized tube specimens; stress-rupture measurements for reactor materials; miniature specimen design; the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell at the FFTF; support services; and general information concerning the FFTF

  1. Advance of investigation of irradiation embrittlement mechanism of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels. History and future of irradiation embrittlement researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is the most important component of LWR plants required to be safe. This paper describes contents of the title consisting of four chapters. The first chapter states the general theory of irradiation effects, irradiation embrittlement and decreasing of toughness, and some kinds of pressure vessel steels. The second chapter explains history of irradiation embrittlement investigations and the advance of research methods for experiments and calculation. The third chapter contains information of inner structure of irradiated materials and development of prediction equations, recent information of embrittlement mechanism and mechanism guided prediction method, USA model and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) model. The fourth chapter states recent problems from viewpoints of experimental and analytical approaches. Comparison of standards of LWR pressure vessel steels between Japan and USA, relation between the density of number of cluster and the copper content, effect of flux on clustering of copper atoms, and CRIEPI's way of approaching the prediction method are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  2. Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Korolev, Y.N.; Nanstad, R.K.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. Even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification of available models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The Working Group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible ), and test two materials of the other. Charpy V-notch (CVN) and tensile specimens were included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing, including static fracture toughness) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPVs, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation, annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program Plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Weld 73W. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. The ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>l MeV). In both cases, irradiations were conducted at ∼290 C and annealing treatments were conducted at ∼454 C. The ORNL and RRC

  3. An analysis of cobalt irradiation in CANDU 6 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, E.D.; Dumitrache, I.

    2003-01-01

    In CANDU reactors, one has the ability to replace the stainless steel adjuster rods with neutronically equivalent Co assemblies with a minimum impact on the power plant safety and efficiency. The 60 Co produced by 59 Co irradiation is used extensively in medicine and industry. The paper mainly describes some of the reactor physics and safety requirements that must be carried into practice for the Co adjuster rods. The computations related to the neutronically equivalence of the stainless steel adjusters with the Co adjuster assemblies, as well as the estimations of the activity and the heating of the irradiated cobalt rods are performed using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS2.1. The 60 Co activity and heating evaluations are closely related to the neutronics computations and to the density evolution of cobalt isotopes during assumed in-core irradiation period. Unfortunately, the activities of these isotopes could not be evaluated directly using the burn-up capabilities of the MONTEBURNS code because of the lack of their neutron cross-section from the MCNP5 code library. Additional MCNP5 runs for all the cobalt assemblies have been done in order to compute the flux-spectrum, the 59 Co and the 60 Co radiative capture reaction rates in the adjusters. The 60m Co cross-section was estimated using the flux-spectrum and the ORIGEN2.1 code capabilities THERM and RES. These computational steps allowed the evaluation of the one-group cross-section for the radiative capture reactions of cobalt isotopes. The values obtained replaced the corresponding ones from the ORIGEN library, which have been estimated using the flux-spectrum specific to the fuel. The activity values are used to evaluate the dose at the surface of the device designed to transport the cobalt adjusters. (authors)

  4. Preliminary decay heat calculations for the fuel loaded irradiation loop device of the RMB multipurpose Brazilian reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campolina, Daniel; Costa, Antonio Carlos L. da; Andrade, Edison P., E-mail: campolina@cdtn.br, E-mail: aclp@cdtn.br, E-mail: epa@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SETRE/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores

    2017-07-01

    The structuring project of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) is responsible for meeting the capacity to develop and test materials and nuclear fuel for the Brazilian Nuclear Program. An irradiation test device (Loop) capable of performing fuel test for power reactor rods is being conceived for RMB reflector. In this work preliminary neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to determine parameters to the cooling system of the Loop basic design. The heat released as a result of radioactive decay of fuel samples was calculated using ORIGEN-ARP and it resulted less than 200 W after 1 hour of irradiation interruption. (author)

  5. Reactor control rod supporting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tokuzo; Miyata, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable stable reactor core control even in extremely great vertical earthquakes, as well as under normal operation conditions in FBR type reactors. Constitution: Since a mechanism for converting the rotational movement of a control rod into vertical movement is placed at the upper portion of the reactor core at high temperature, the mechanism should cause fusion or like other danger after the elapse of a long period of time. In view of the above, the conversion mechanism is disposed to the lower portion of the reactor core at a lower temperature region. Further, the connection between the control rod and the control rod drive can be separated upon great vertical earthquakes. (Seki, T.)

  6. Clarification of dissolved irradiated light-water-reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, G.C.

    1983-02-01

    Bench-scale studies with actual dissolved irradiated light water reactor (LWR) fuels showed that continuous centrifugation is a practical clarification method for reprocessing. Dissolved irradiated LWR fuel was satisfactorily clarified in a bench-scale, continuous-flow bowl centrifuge. The solids separated were successfully reslurried in water. When the reslurried solids were mixed with clarified centrate, the resulting suspension behaved similar to the original dissolver solution during centrifugation. Settling rates for solids in actual irradiated fuel solutions were measured in a bottle centrifuge. The results indicate that dissolver solutions may be clarified under conditions achievable by available plant-scale centrifuge technology. The effective particle diameter of residual solids was calculated to be 0.064 microns for Oconee-1 fuel and 0.138 microns for Dresden-1 fuel. Filtration was shown unsuitable for clarification of LWR fuel solutions. Conventional filtration with filter aid would unacceptably complicate remote canyon operation and maintenance, might introduce dissolved silica from filter aids, and might irreversibly plug the filter with dissolver solids. Inertial filtration exhibited irreversible pluggage with nonradioactive stand-in suspensions under all conditions tested

  7. CEA fuel pencil qualification under irradiation: from component conception to fuel assembly irradiation in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.-F.; Pillet, Claude; Francois, Bernard; Morize, Pierre; Petitgrand, Sylvie; Atabek, R.-M.; Houdaille, Brigitte.

    1981-06-01

    Fabrication of fuel pins made of uranium oxide pellets and of a zircaloy 4 cladding is described. Irradiation experiment results are given. Thermomechanical behavior of the fuel pin in a power reactor is examined [fr

  8. Development of a method of testing irradiation devices by gamma scanning inside a research nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Francois.

    1975-01-01

    A tridimensional experiment of spectrometry of an irradiation device located inside the reactor Siloe at a place shielded against spurious radiations, is exposed. The automatic scanning system that was developed, makes it possible to fully analyze in about 24 hours, the irradiation device (fuel pin, coolant and structures). The process combined with a 'pre-processing' program allows first partial results to be simultaneously obtained, more refined results being achieved during the next week, using the 'heavy processing'. The irradiation of the device is only interrupted during the compelling duty shutdown of the reactor, the evolution of the device during the successive irradiation cycles being thus followed up without pertubing said evolution. The reproducibility was studied at a local stage for testing the collimation of the detection unit (1% accuracy) and for testing the whole set 'processing measurement and computation' (5% accuracy). The sensitivity has been illustrated by detecting and measuring local singularities inside fuel (pellets), determining the detection efficiency dependence on the radial distribution of fission products and measuring nucleides inside the coolant flow (limiting value 10 -7 ). The accuracy of the method is evaluated at 5% for relative measurement of an experimental device during its in-pile lifetime and as 10% for quantitative absolute measurements [fr

  9. Industrial structure at research reactor suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Bogusch, E.; Friebe, T.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the recent joining of the forces of Framatome S. A. from France and the Nuclear Division of Siemens AG Power Generation (KWU) from Germany to a Joint Venture named Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power S.A.S., the issue of the necessary and of the optimal industrial structure for nuclear projects as a research reactor is, was discussed internally often and intensively. That discussion took place also in the other technical fields such as Services for NPPs but also in the field of interest here, i. e. Research Reactors. In summarizing the statements of this presentation one can about state that: Research Reactors are easier to build than NPPs, but not standardised; Research Reactors need a wide spectrum of skills and experiences; to design and build Research Reactors needs an experienced team especially in terms of management and interfaces; Research Reactors need background from built reference plants more than from operating plants; Research Reactors need knowledge of suitable experienced subsuppliers. Two more essential conclusions as industry involved in constructing and upgrading research reactors are: Research Reactors by far are more than a suitable core that generates a high neutron flux; every institution that designs and builds a Research Reactor lacks quality or causes safety problems, damages the reputation of the entire community

  10. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  11. Overview of the FUTURIX-FTA Irradiation Experiment in the Phénix Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heather J.M. Chichester; Steve L. Hayes; Kenneth J. McClellan; Jean-Luc Paul; Marc Masson; Stewart L. Voit; Fabienne Delage

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign utilizes the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) for most of its irradiation testing. Cadmium-shrouded baskets are used in ATR to modify the neutron spectrum to simulate a fast reactor environment for the fuel. FUTURIX-FTA is an irradiation experiment conducted in the Phenix fast reactor in France. Results from FUTURIX-FTA and irradiation tests in ATR using identical fuel compositions will be compared to identify and evaluate any differences in fuel behavior due to differences in the irradiation source.

  12. Status of IVO-FR2-Vg7 experiment for irradiation of fast reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbel, H.; Kummerer, K.; Bojarsky, K.; Lopez Jimenez, J.; Otero de la Gandara, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Report on the Seminar celebrated in Madrid between KfK (Karlsruhe) and JEN (Madrid) concerning a Joint Irradiation Program of Fast Reactor Fuel Rods. The design of fuel rods in general is defined, and, in particular of those with a density 94% DT and diameter 7.6 mm up to a burn-up of 7% FIMA, to be irradiated in the FR2 Reactor (Karlsruhe). Together with the design of NaK and single-wall capsules used in this irradiation, other possibilities of irradiation in the reactor will also be described. (auth.)

  13. Transmission electron-microscopic studies of structural changes in polycrystalline graphite after high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Karpukhin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Transmission electron-microscopic investigation of polycrystalline graphite before and after irradiation is carried out. The direct use of graphite samples after ion thinning, as an inquiry subject is the basic peculiarity of the work. Main structural components of MPG-6 graphite before and after irradiation are revealed, the structural mechanism of the reactor graphite destruction under irradiation is demonstrated. The mean values of L αm and L cm crystallite dimensions are determined. Radiation defects, occuring in some crystallites after irradiation are revealed by the dark-field electron microscopy method

  14. Experimental Irradiations of Materials and Fuels in the BR2 Reactor: An Overview of Current Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.; Koonen, E.; Verwerft, M.; Wéber, M.

    2013-01-01

    The BR2 material test reactor offers a variety of experimental irradiation possibilities for testing of materials, fuels and instruments. The current paper gives an overview of the recent and ongoing programmes in order to illustrate the experimental potential of the reactor. Three domains of applications are reviewed: Irradiation of materials and fuels for pressurised water reactors (PWR); irradiation of materials for accelerator driven systems (ADS), cooled by liquid lead alloys; and irradiation of fuel for Material Test Reactors (MTR). For PWR relevant tests, a dedicated loop is available, providing a full simulation of the thermo hydraulic conditions of a PWR. ADS related tests require particular control of the irradiation environment and the necessary safety precautions in order to avoid 210 Po contamination. In-core mechanical testing of materials is done in comparison and complimentarily to post-irradiation examinations in order to assess flux related effects on the deformation behaviour of materials. (author)

  15. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments in a technological irradiation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccorsi, Th.

    2007-09-01

    A Material Testing Reactor (MTR) makes it possible to irradiate material samples under intense neutron and photonic fluxes. These experiments are carried out in experimental devices localised in the reactor core or in periphery (reflector). Available physics simulation tools only treat, most of the time, one physics field in a very precise way. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments therefore require a sequential use of several calculation codes and data exchanges between these codes: this corresponds to problems coupling. In order to facilitate multi-physic simulations, this thesis sets up a data model based on data-processing objects, called Technological Entities. This data model is common to all of the physics fields. It permits defining the geometry of an irradiation device in a parametric way and to associate information about materials to it. Numerical simulations are encapsulated into interfaces providing the ability to call specific functionalities with the same command (to initialize data, to launch calculations, to post-treat, to get results,... ). Thus, once encapsulated, numerical simulations can be re-used for various studies. This data model is developed in a SALOME platform component. The first application case made it possible to perform neutronic simulations (OSIRIS reactor and RJH) coupled with fuel behavior simulations. In a next step, thermal hydraulics could also be taken into account. In addition to the improvement of the calculation accuracy due to the physical phenomena coupling, the time spent in the development phase of the simulation is largely reduced and the possibilities of uncertainty treatment are under consideration. (author)

  16. Pathfinder irradiation of advanced fuel (Th/U mixed oxide) in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant Pinheiro, R.

    1993-01-01

    Within the joint Brazilian-German cooperative R and D Program on Thorium Utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors carried out from 1979 to 1988 by Nuclebras/CDTN, KFA-Juelich, Siemens/KWU and NUKEM, a pathfinder irradiation of Th/U mixed oxide fuel in the Angra 1 nuclear power reactor was planned. The objectives of this irradiation testing, the irradiation strategy, the work performed and the status achieved at the end of the joint Program are presented. (author)

  17. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This circular has been prepared to provide information on the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel (spent fuel) subject to regulation by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It provides a brief description of spent fuel shipment safety and safeguards requirements of general interest, a summary of data for 1979--1989 highway and railway shipments, and a listing, by State, of recent highway and railway shipment routes. The enclosed route information reflects specific NRC approvals that have been granted in response to requests for shipments of spent fuel. This publication does not constitute authority for carriers or other persons to use the routes described to ship spent fuel, other categories of nuclear waste, or other materials. 11 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The circular has been prepared to provide information on the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel (spent fuel) subject to regulation by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It provides a brief description of spent fuel shipment safety and safeguards requirements of general interest, a summary of data for 1979--1991 highway and railway shipments, and a listing, by State, of recent highway and railway shipment routes. The enclosed route information reflects specific NRC approvals that have been granted in response to requests for shipments of spent fuel. This publication does not constitute authority for carriers or other persons to use the routes described to ship spent fuel, other categories of nuclear waste, or other materials

  19. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  20. Mathematical models in Slowpoke reactor internal irradiation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, J.

    2007-01-01

    The main objective is to build representative mathematical models of neutron activation analysis in a Slowpoke internal irradiation site. Another significant objective is to correct various elements neutron activation analysis measured mass using these models. The neutron flux perturbation is responsible for the measured under-estimation of real masses. We supposed that neutron flux perturbation measurements taken during the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal Slowpoke reactor first fuel loading were still valid after the second fuelling. .We also supposed that the thermal neutrons spatial and kinetic energies distributions as well as the absorption microscopic cross section dependence on the neutrons kinetic energies were important factors to satisfactorily represent neutron activation analysis results. In addition, we assumed that the neutron flux is isotropic in the laboratory system. We used experimental results from the Slowpoke reactor internal irradiation sites, in order to validate our mathematical models. Our models results are in close agreement with these experimental results..We established an accurate global mathematical correlation of the neutron flux perturbation in function of samples volumes and macroscopic neutron absorption cross sections. It is applicable to sample volumes ranging from 0,1 to 1,3 ml and macroscopic neutron absorption cross section up to 5 moles-b for seven (7) elements with atomic numbers (Z) ranging from 5 to 79. We first came up with a heuristic neutron transport mathematical semi-analytical model, in order to better understand neutrons behaviour in presence of one of several different nuclei samples volumes and mass. In order to well represent the neutron flux perturbation, we combined a neutron transport solution obtained from the spherical harmonics method of a finite cylinder and a mathematical expression combining two cylindrical harmonic functions..With the help of this model and the least squares method, we made extensive

  1. Positron annihilation and Moessbauer studies of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Matz, W.; Liszkay, L.; Molnar, B.

    1990-11-01

    Positron annihilation (lifetime, Doppler broadening) and Moessbauer studies on unirradiated, neutron irradiated and neutron irradiated plus annealed reactor pressure vessel steels (Soviet type 15Kh2NMFA) are presented. The role of microstructural properties and the formation of irradiation-induced precipitates is discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Irradiation capability of Japanese materials test reactor for water chemistry experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Satoshi; Hata, Kuniki; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Nakamura, Takehiko

    2012-09-01

    Appropriate understanding of water chemistry in the core of LWRs is essential as chemical species generated due to water radiolysis by neutron and gamma-ray irradiation govern corrosive environment of structural materials in the core and its periphery, causing material degradation such as stress corrosion cracking. Theoretical model calculation such as water radiolysis calculation gives comprehensive understanding of water chemistry at irradiation field where we cannot directly monitor. For enhancement of the technology, accuracy verification of theoretical models under wide range of irradiation conditions, i.e. dose rate, temperature etc., with well quantified in-pile measurement data is essential. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has decided to launch water chemistry experiments for obtaining data that applicable to model verification as well as model benchmarking, by using an in-pile loop which will be installed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). In order to clarify the irradiation capability of the JMTR for water chemistry experiments, preliminary investigations by water radiolysis / ECP model calculations were performed. One of the important irradiation conditions for the experiments, i.e. dose rate by neutron and gamma-ray, can be controlled by selecting irradiation position in the core. In this preliminary study, several representative irradiation positions that cover from highest to low absorption dose rate were chosen and absorption dose rate at the irradiation positions were evaluated by MCNP calculations. As a result of the calculations, it became clear that the JMTR could provide the irradiation conditions close to the BWR. The calculated absorption dose rate at each irradiation position was provided to water radiolysis calculations. The radiolysis calculations were performed under various conditions by changing absorption dose rate, water chemistry of feeding water etc. parametrically. Qualitatively, the concentration of H 2 O 2 , O 2 and

  3. Vibration-damping structure for reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Toshio; Iba, Chikara; Tanaka, Hideki; Kageyama, Mitsuru

    1998-01-01

    In a damping structure of a reactor building, an inner concrete body and a reactor container are connected by way of a vibration absorbing member. As the vibration absorbing member, springs or dampers are used. The inner concrete body and the reactor container each having weight and inherent frequency different from each other are opposed displaceably by way of the vibration absorbing member thereby enabling to reduce seismic input and reduce shearing force at least at leg portions. Accordingly, seismic loads are reduced to increase the grounding rate of the base thereby enabling to satisfy an allowable value. Therefore, it is not necessary to strengthen the inner concrete body and the reactor container excessively, the amount of reinforcing rods can be reduced, and the amount of a portion of the base buried to the ground can be reduced thereby enabling to constitute the reactor building easily. (N.H.)

  4. Irradiation of an uranium silicide prototype in RA-3 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, R.; Estrik, G.; Notari, C.

    1996-01-01

    The factibility of irradiation of an uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) prototype in the RA-3 reactor was studied. The standard RA-3 fuel element uses U 3 O 8 as fissible material. The enrichment of both standard and prototype is the same: 20% U 235 and also the frame geometry and number of plates is identical. The differences are in the plate dimensions and the fissile content which is higher in the prototype. The cooling conditions of the core allow the insertion of the prototype in any core position, even near the water trap, if the overall power is kept below 5Mw. Nevertheless, the recommendation was to begin irradiation near the periphery and later on move the prototype towards more central positions in order to increase the burnup rate. The prototype was effectively introduced in a peripheral position and the thermal fluxes were measured between plates with the foil activation technique. These were also evaluated with the fuel management codes and a reasonable agreement was found. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Remote repairs and refurbishment of reactor internal structures of magnox plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.A.; Kelly, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The original designers of the UK Magnox reactor plant made provision for the then perceived time dependent processes that could have influenced the operational life of the plant. Changes in graphite properties with irradiation, particularly dimensional change, were well understood and in-core samples were provided for subsequent laboratory examination to monitor the processes throughout plant life. The tendency towards embrittlement with irradiation of the steel of the reactor pressure vessels was also acknowledged and again in-core samples were provided for monitoring changes in materials properties in-service and thus provide data in support of structural analyses to sustain the reactor safety cases. (author)

  6. Structural performance of a graphite blanket in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.; Watson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite in a fusion reactor causes dimensional changes, enhanced creep, and changes in elastic properties and fracture strength. Temperature and flux gradients through the graphite blanket structure produce differential distortions and stress gradients. An inelastic stress analysis procedure is described which treats these variations of the graphite properties in a consistent manner as dictated by physical models for the radiation effects. Furthermore, the procedure follows the evolution of the stress and fracture strength distributions during the reactor operation as well as for possible shutdowns at any time. The lifetime of the graphite structure can be determined based on the failure criterion that the stress at any location exceeds one-half of the fracture strength. This procedure is applied to the most critical component of the blanket module in the SOLASE design

  7. Technical Meeting on Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactors Fuels. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to enable a rationalization and advancement of the design and manufacturing processes, a better selection of promising fuels, and a reduction of the time and costs currently required for R and D and testing, as well as to contribute to the improvement of the safety features of fuels under all operational states and accidental conditions. An overview of the status and perspective of the design, manufacturing and irradiation behaviour of fast reactors fuels were provided during this meeting. The main objectives are the following: Ensure sharing and dissemination of knowledge and expertise; Discuss specific features and issues of existing fuels; Improve knowledge and data for the design and engineering of fast reactor fuel and core structural materials; Discuss perspectives on advanced fuels; Consider modern technological, design and testing tools enabling reliable performance of fuels in current and planned operational environments; Establish international consensus in the developmental efforts on advanced fast reactor technologies, including collaborative programs and experiments. Contribute to the preparation and outline of the planned IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Examination of advanced fast reactor fuel and core structural materials. Each of the 24 presentations made at the meeting have been indexed separately

  8. Analytical and numerical study of graphite IG110 parts in advanced reactor under high temperature and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jinling, E-mail: Jinling_Gao@yeah.net; Yao, Wenjuan, E-mail: wj_yao@yeah.net; Ma, Yudong

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: An analytical model and a numerical procedure are developed to study the mechanical response of IG-110 graphite bricks in HTGR subjected to high temperature and irradiation. The calculation results show great accordance with each other. Rational suggestions on the calculation and design of the IG-110 graphite structure are proposed based on the sensitivity analyses including temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson’s ratio. - Highlights: • Analytical solution of stress and displacement of IG-110 graphite components in HTGR. • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Parameters analysis of mechanical response of graphite components during the whole life of the reflector. - Abstract: Structural design of nuclear power plant project is an important sub-discipline of civil engineering. Especially after appearance of the fourth generation advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor, structural mechanics in reactor technology becomes a popular subject in structural engineering. As basic ingredients of reflector in reactor, graphite bricks are subjected to high temperature and irradiation and the stress field of graphite structures determines integrity of reflector and makes a great difference to safety of whole structure. In this paper, based on assumptions of elasticity, side reflector is regarded approximately as a straight cylinder structure and primary creep strain is ignored. An analytical study on stress of IG110 graphite parts is present. Meanwhile, a finite element procedure for calculating stresses in the IG110 graphite structure exposed in the high temperature and irradiation is developed. Subsequently, numerical solution of stress in IG110 graphite structure is obtained. Analytical solution agrees well with numerical solution, which indicates that analytical derivation is accurate. Finally, influence of temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson

  9. Development of neutron irradiation embrittlement correlation of reactor pressure vessel materials of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, Naoki; Dohi, Kenji; Nomoto, Akiyoshi; Nishida, Kenji; Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of surveillance data of the RPV embrittlement of the Japanese light water reactors have been compiled since the current Japanese embrittlement correlation has been issued in 1991. Understanding on the mechanisms of the embrittlement has also been greatly improved based on both experimental and theoretical studies. CRIEPI and the Japanese electric power utilities have started research project to develop a new embrittlement correlation method, where extensive study of the microstructural analyses of the surveillance specimens irradiated in the Japanese commercial reactors has been conducted. The new findings obtained from the experimental study are that the formation of solute-atom clusters with little or no copper is responsible for the embrittlement in low-copper materials, and that the flux effect exists especially in high-copper materials and this is supported by the difference in the microstructure of the high-copper materials irradiated at different fluxes. Based on these new findings, a new embrittlement correlation method is formulated using rate equations. The new methods has higher prediction capability than the current Japanese embrittlement correlation in terms of smaller standard deviation as well as smaller mean value of the prediction error. (author)

  10. Structural changes in irradiated steels. An example of industrial studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Miloudi, S [Electricite de France (France)

    1997-04-01

    The security of nuclear reactors depends on knowledge about the degradation of some of their components by neutron irradiation. It is anticipated in the design of power reactors so as to ensure their safe operation. The long-time behaviour of reactor components is investigated. These studies serve to verify that the predictions concerning mechanical properties of reactors hold, but also to better understand the processes leading to degradation in order to find means for safely increasing the lifetimes of power plants. (author).

  11. Study on prediction model of irradiation embrittlement for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongshan; Xu Chaoliang; Huang Ping; Liu Xiangbing; Ren Ai; Chen Jun; Li Chengliang

    2014-01-01

    The study on prediction model of irradiation embrittlement for reactor pres- sure vessel (RPV) steel is an important method for long term operation. According to the deep analysis of the previous prediction models developed worldwide, the drawbacks of these models were given and a new irradiation embrittlement prediction model PMIE-2012 was developed. A corresponding reliability assessment was carried out by irradiation surveillance data. The assessment results show that the PMIE-2012 have a high reliability and accuracy on irradiation embrittlement prediction. (authors)

  12. Irradiation tests of THTR fuel elements in the DRAGON reactor (irradiation experiment DR-K3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burck, W.; Duwe, R.; Groos, E.; Mueller, H.

    1977-03-01

    Within the scope of the program 'Development of Spherical Fuel Elements for HTR', similar fuel elements (f.e.) have been irradiated in the DRAGON reactor. The f.e. were fabricated by NUKEM and were to be tested under HTR conditions to scrutinize their employability in the THTR. The fuel was in the form of coated particles moulded into A3 matrix. The kernels of the particles were made of mixed oxide of uranium and thorium with an U 235 enrichment of 90%. One aim of the post irradiation examination was the investigation of irradiation induced changes of mechanical properties (dimensional stability and elastic behaviour) and of the corrosion behaviour which were compared with the properties determined with unirradiated f.e. The measurement of the fission gas release in annealing tests and ceramografic examinations exhibited no damage of the coated particles. The measured concentration distribution of fission metals led to conclusions about their release. All results showed, that neither the coated particles nor the integral fuel spheres experienced any significant changes that could impair their utilization in the THTR. (orig./UA) [de

  13. Neutron irradiation effects in reactor pressure vessel steels and weldments. Working document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. A separate abstract was prepared for the introduction and for each of the eleven chapters, which are: 1. Reactor Pressure Vessel Design, 2. Reactor Pressure Materials, 3. WWER Pressure Vessels, 4. Determination of Mechanical Properties, 5. Neutron Exposure, 6. Methodology of Irradiation Experiments, 7. Effect of Irradiation on Mechanical Properties, 8. Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement, 9. Modelling of Irradiation Damage, 10. Annealing of Irradiation Damage, 11. Safety Assessment using Surveillance Programmes and Data Bases

  14. In-cell refabrication of experimental pencils from pencils pre-irradiated in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignesoult, N.; Atabek, R.; Ducas, S.

    1980-05-01

    For the fuel-cladding study, small irradiated pencils were fabricated in a hot cell from long elements taken from power reactors. This reconstitution in a hot cell makes it possible to: - avoid long and costly fabrications of pencils and pre-irradiations in experimental reactors, - perform re-irradiations on very long fuel elements from power reactors, - fabricate several small pencils from one pre-irradiation pencil having homogeneous characteristics. This paper describes (a) the various in-cell fabrication stages of small pre-irradiated pencils, stressing the precautions taken to avoid any pollution and modifications in the characteristics of the pencil, in order to carry out a perfectly representative re-irradiation, (b) the equipment used and the quality control made, and (c) the results achieved and the qualification programme of this operation [fr

  15. Structural integrity aspects of reactor safety

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A large experimental programme supported the structural integrity demonstration. ... Categories in which the structures, systems and components (SSC) are .... One of the ways in which the decision to live with the defect can be aided is the .... The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) (figure 18) being designed by BARC ...

  16. Structural changes induced by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300 kV electrons. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structural changes produced by irradiation. The occurrence of a continuous ring intensity in the selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern obtained on a specimen irradiated with the electron beam parallel to the c-crystallographic axis indicated that microstructural changes had occurred. However, from the SAD pattern obtained for the specimens tilted relative to the irradiation direction, it was found that up to a fluence of 1.1x10 27 e/m 2 graphite remained crystalline. An SAD pattern of a specimen irradiated with the electron beam perpendicular to the c-axis confirmed the persistence of crystalline order. High resolution electron microscopy showed that ordering along the c-axis direction remained. A density reduction of 8.9% due to irradiation was determined from the plasmon frequency shift. A qualitative model is proposed to explain these observations. A new determination of the threshold displacement energy, Ed, of carbon atoms in graphite was done by examining the appearance of a continuous ring in the SAD pattern at various electron energies. A value of 30 eV was obtained whether the incident electron beam was parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis, demonstrating that Ed is independent of the displacement direction

  17. Accumulation of the radionuclides in a target irradiated in the reactor of tajoura nuclear research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdunnobi, A.R.; Arebi, B.

    1998-01-01

    One of the main stages of radionuclides production in reactor is the distinguishing of a regime on target irradiation in order to acquire the sufficient activity and the purity of radioisotope required. The authors have derived formula for calculating radionuclidic accumulation on a target irradiated in the reactor operating 10 hours per day, 4 days a week during 4 weeks. The results of I-131 and other radionuclide accumulation are illustrated by a tellurium target irradiation in the reactor operating continuously or with interruptions

  18. Evaluation of aluminum capsules according to ISO 9978 to irradiation of gaseous samples in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Osvaldo L. da.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Feher, Anselmo; Moura, Joao A.; Souza, Carla D.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Oliveira, Henrique B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Gas irradiation in research nuclear reactors is an important way to produce radionuclides. Although some nuclear reactors centers offer this type of service, there are few publications about capsules to irradiation of gaseous samples. This paper describes a method to fabricate and evaluate aluminum capsules to irradiate gaseous samples in nuclear reactor. A semi-circular slotted die from a hydraulic press head was modified to seal aluminum tubes. The aluminum capsules were subjected to leak detection tests, which demonstrated the accordance with standard ISO 9978. (author)

  19. Irradiation creep lifetime analysis on first wall structure materials for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Bing; Peng, Lei, E-mail: penglei@ustc.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiansheng; Shi, Jingyi; Zhan, Jie

    2017-05-15

    Fusion reactor first wall services on the conditions of high surface heat flux and intense neutron irradiation. For China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) with high duty time factor, it is important to analyze the irradiation effect on the creep lifetime of the main candidate structure materials for first wall, i.e. ferritic/martensitic steel, austenite steel and oxide dispersion strengthened steel. The allowable irradiation creep lifetime was evaluated with Larson-Miller Parameter (LMP) model and finite element method. The results show that the allowable irradiation creep lifetime decreases with increasing of surface heat flux, first wall thickness and inlet coolant temperature. For the current CFETR conceptual design, the lifetime is not limited by thermal creep or irradiation creep, which indicated the room for design parameters optimization.

  20. A Study on Structural Strength of Irradiated Spacer Grid for PWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y. G.; Baek, S. J.; Kim, D. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Ahn, S. B.; Chun, Y. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. J. [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A fuel assembly consists of an array of fuel rods, spacer grids, guide thimbles, instrumentation tubes, and top and bottom nozzles. In PWR (Pressurized light Water Reactor) fuel assemblies, the spacer grids support the fuel rods by the friction forces between the fuel rods and springs/dimples. Under irradiation, the spacer grids supporting the fuel rods absorb vibration impacts due to the reactor coolant flow, and also bear static and dynamic loads during operation inside the nuclear reactor and transportation for spent fuel storage. Thus, it is important to understand the characteristics of deformation behavior and the change in structural strength of an irradiated spacer grid.. In the present study, the static compression test of a spacer grid was conducted to investigate the structural strength of the irradiated spacer grid in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. To evaluate the structural strength of an irradiated spacer grid, hot cell tests were carried out at IMEF of KAERI. The fuel assembly was dismantled and the irradiated spacer grid was obtained for the compression test. The apparatus for measuring the compression strength of the irradiated spacer grid was developed and installed successfully in the hot cell.

  1. Post irradiation examination of RAF/M steels after fast reactor irradiation up to 33 dpa and < 340 C (ARBOR1). RAFM steels. Metallurgical and mechanical characterisation. Final report for TW2-TTMS-001b, D9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). EURATOM, Inst. fuer Materialforschung, Programm Kernfusion

    2010-07-01

    In an energy generating fusion reactor structural materials will be exposed to very high dpa-levels of about 100 dpa. Due to this fact and because fast reactor irradiation facilities in Europe are not available anymore, a reactor irradiation at the State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation with its Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (SSC RIAR), Dimitrovgrad, had been performed in the fast reactor BOR 60 with an instrumented test rig. This test rig contained tensile, impact and Low Cycle Fatigue type specimens used at FZK since many years. Samples of actual Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAF/M) -steels (e.g. EUROFER 97) had been irradiated in this reactor at a lower temperature (< 340 C) up to a damage of 33 dpa. This irradiation campaign was called ARBOR 1. Starting in 2003 one half of these irradiated samples were post irradiation examined (PIE) by tensile testing, low cycle fatigue testing and impact testing under the ISTC Partner Contract 2781p in the hot cells of SSC RIAR. In the post irradiation instrumented impact tests a significant increase in the Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature as an effect of irradiation has been detected. During tensile testing the strength values are increasing and the strain values reduced due to substantial irradiation hardening. The hardening rate is decreasing with increasing damage level, but it does not show saturation. The low cycle fatigue behaviour of all examined RAF/M - steels show at total strain amplitudes below 1 % an increase of number of cycles to failure, due to irradiation hardening. From these post irradiation experiments, like tensile, low cycle fatigue and impact tests, radiation induced design data, e.g. for verification of design codes, can be generated.

  2. Swelling of structural materials in fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seran, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    The physical origin of swelling in irradiated materials and the main parameters acting on swelling of SS 316 are examined: temperature, neutron dose, dose rate, chemical composition, strain hardening. Results obtained, in Rapsodie and Phenix reactors, with fuel cans and with the hexagonal tube containing the fuel pins are analyzed and compared with results found in litterature. In conclusion hot swelling of SS 316 is too important at high doses and is will be replaced by austenitic steels stabilized by Ti and ferritic steels or high nickel steels with structural hardening [fr

  3. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  4. Evaluation of Candidate Linear Variable Displacement Transducers for High Temperature Irradiations in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.; Daw, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to promote nuclear science and technology in the U.S. Given this designation, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A fundamental component of the ATR NSUF program is to develop in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation experiments. Dimensional change is a key parameter that must be monitored during irradiation of new materials being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, dimensional changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the ATR and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data (i.e., only characterizing the end state when samples are removed from the reactor) and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable displacement transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDT vendor designs were identified for consideration - a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 C. Initial evaluation efforts include collecting calibration data as a function of temperature, long duration testing of LVDT response while held at high temperature, and the assessment of changes

  5. An Analysis of the Thermal and Structure Behaviour of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment of the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment FR2 Capsule Test Series 5a; Analisis termico y estructural del combustible UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} irradiado en el reactor FR2 dentro del experimento KVE-Vg.5a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Helmut, E.

    1981-07-01

    In the Karlsruhe research reactor FR2 nine fuel pins were irradiated within three irradiation capsules in the course of the test series 5a. The pins contained UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} fuel pellets. They reached bump values of about 6, 17 and 47 Mwd/Kg Me with linear rod powers of 400 to 600 W/cm and clad surface temperature between 500 and 700 degree centigree. A detailed analysis of the fuel structuration data (columnar-grain and equiaxed- -grain growth regions) have allowed to determine, with the help of physic-mathematical models, the radii of these regions and the heat transfer through the contact zone between fuel and clad depending on the bump. The results of the analysis showed that the fuel surface temperature rose with increasing burnup. (Author) 16 refs.

  6. Effects of irradiation on ferritic alloys and implications for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-07-01

    This paper reviews the ADIP irradiation effects data base on ferritic (martensitic) alloys to provide reactor teams with an understanding of how such alloys will behave for fusion reactor first wall applications. Irradiation affects dimensional stability, strength and toughness. Dimensional stability is altered by precipitation and void swelling. Swelling as high as 25% may occur in some ferritic alloys at 500 dpa. Irradiation alters strength both during and following irradiation. Irradiation at low temperatures leads to hardening whereas at higher temperatures and high exposures, precipitate coarsening can result in softening. Toughness can also be adversely affected by irradiation. Failure can occur in ferritic in a brittle manner and irradiation induced hardening causes brittle failure at higher temperatures. Even at high test temperatures, toughness is reduced due to reduced failure initiation stresses. 39 refs

  7. Effects of irradiation at lower temperature on the microstructure of Cr-Mo-V-alloyed reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, M; Boehmert, J; Gilles, R [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The microstructural damage process due to neutron irradiation [1] proceeds in two stages: - formation of displacement cascades - evolution of the microstructure by defect reactions. Continuing our systematic investigation about the microstructural changes of Russian reactor pressure vessel steel due to neutron irradiation the microstructure of two laboratory heats of the VVER 440-type reactor pressure vessel steel after irradiation at 60 C was studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). 60 C-irradiation differently changes the irradiation-induced microstructure in comparison with irradiation at reactor operation temperature and can, thus, provide new insights into the mechanisms of the irradiation damage. (orig.)

  8. Recent advances in the utilization and the irradiation technology of the refurbished BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekeyser, J.; Benoit, P.; Decloedt, C.; Pouleur, Y.; Verwimp, A.; Weber, M.; Vankeerberghen, M.; Ponsard, B.

    1999-01-01

    Operation and utilization of the materials testing reactor BR2 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) has since its start in 1963 always followed closely the needs and developments of nuclear technology. In particular, a multitude of irradiation experiments have been carried out for most types of nuclear power reactors, existing or under design. Since the early 1990s and increased focus was directed towards more specific irradiation testing needs for light water reactor fuels and materials, although other areas of utilization continued as well (e.g. fusion reactor materials, safety research, ...), including also the growing activities of radioisotope production and silicon doping. An important milestone was the decision in 1994 to implement a comprehensive refurbishment programme for the BR2 reactor and plant installations. The scope of this programme comprised very substantial studies and hardware interventions, which have been completed in early 1997 within planning and budget. Directly connected to this strategic decision for reactor refurbishment was the reinforcement of our efforts to requalify and upgrade the existing irradiation facilities and to develop advanced devices in BR2 to support emerging programs in the following fields: - LWR pressure vessel steel, - LWR irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), - reliability and safety of high-burnup LWR fuel, - fusion reactor materials and blanket components, - fast neutron reactor fuels and actinide burning, - extension and diversification of radioisotope production. The paper highlights these advances in the areas of BR2 utilisation and the ongoing development activities for the required new generation of irradiations devices. (author)

  9. Gamma exposure rate estimation in irradiation facilities of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    There are experimental situations in the nuclear field, in which dose estimations due to energy-dependent radiation fields are required. Nuclear research reactors provide such fields under normal operation or due to radioactive disintegration of fission products and structural materials activation. In such situations, it is necessary to know the exposure rate of gamma radiation the different materials under experimentation are subject to. Detectors of delayed reading are usually used for this purpose. Direct evaluation methods using portable monitors are not always possible, because in some facilities the entrance with such devices is often impracticable and also unsafe. Besides, these devices only provide information of the place where the measurement was performed, but not of temporal and spatial fluctuations the radiation fields could have. In this work a direct evaluation method was developed for the 'in-situ' gamma exposure rate for the irradiation facilities of the RA-1 reactor. This method is also applicable in any similar installation, and may be complemented by delayed evaluations without problem. On the other hand, it is well known that the residual effect of radiation modifies some properties of the organic materials used in reactors, such as density, colour, viscosity, oxidation level, among others. In such cases, a correct dosimetric evaluation enables in service estimation of material duration with preserved properties. This evaluation is for instance useful when applied to lubricating oils for the primary circuit pumps in nuclear power plants, thus minimizing waste generation. In this work the necessary elements required to estimate in-situ time and space integrated dose are also established for a gamma irradiated sample in an irradiation channel of a nuclear facility with zero neutron flux. (author)

  10. The post-irradiated examination of CANDU type fuel irradiated in the Institute for Nuclear Research TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuturici, I.L.; Parvan, M.; Dobrin, R.; Popov, M.; Radulescu, R.; Toma, V.

    1995-01-01

    This post-irradiation examination work has been done under the Research Contract No. 7756/RB, concluded between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Institute for Nuclear Research. The paper contains a general description of the INR post-irradiation facility and methods and the relevant post-irradiation examination results obtained from an irradiated experimental CANDU type fuel element designed, manufactured and tested by INR in a power ramp test in the 100 kW Pressurised Water Irradiation Loop of the TRIGA 14 MW(th) Reactor. The irradiation experiment consisted in testing an assembly of six fuel elements, designed to reach a bumup of ∼ 200 MWh/kgU, with typical CANDU linear power and ramp rate. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    Radiation effects on metals or alloys used in fast reactor core components are examined in the papers presented at this conference, the accent being put on swelling and irradiation creep of steels and nickel alloys

  12. Possibilities for power reactor structural material and fuel testing in reactor RA; Mogucnosti reaktora RA za testiranje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinc, R; Lazarevic, Dj; Stefanovic, D; Cupac, S; Pesic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1978-05-15

    Nuclear reactor RA at Vinca has been designed as a high flux general purpose research reactor. Among other it was intended to play a role of material testing reactor. A scope of activities of Material Laboratory and Reactor RA Department of Boris Kidric Institute is presented in this report. Reactor RA capacity for reactor structural material and fuel irradiation is also described. The increase of RA reactor irradiation capacity is based on the improvement of VISA type fuel channel for fast neutron irradiations, as well as on the general neutron flux increase, due to introduction of highly enriched uranium fuel into reactor core and the advanced in-core fuel management. The irradiation capacities described allow for the reactor material and fuel testing to the considerable extent. Istrazivacki reaktor RA u Vinci je projektovan kao visokofluksni istrazivacki reaktor opste namene. Pored ostalog, on je namenjen i za testiranje reaktorskih konstrukcionih materijala i goriva. U radu je dat pregled aktivnosti Laboratorije za materijale IBK i reaktora RA na tom podrucju, kao i opis povecanih mogucnosti reaktora RA za ozracivanje reaktorskih materijala i goriva u cilju njihovog testiranja. Povecanje mogucnosti reaktora RA zasniva se na usavrsavanju specijalnog gorivnog kanala tipa VISA (za ozracivanje materijala brzim neutronima), kao i na opstem povecanju neutronskog fluksa na osnovu uvodjenja i nacina koriscenja visokoobogacenog uranskog goriva u reaktoru RA. Opisane mogucnosti reaktora RA dozvoljavaju u znatnoj meri ispitivanje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora.

  13. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This circular has been prepared in response to numerous requests for information regarding routes for the shipment of irradiated reactor (spent) fuel subject to regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC staff approves such routes prior to their use, in accordance with the regulatory provisions of 10 CFR Part 73.37. The objective of the safeguards regulations contained in 10 CFR Part 73.37 is to provide protection against radioactive dispersal caused by malevolent acts by persons. The design and construction of the casks used to ship the spent fuel provide adequate radiological protection of the public health and safety against accidents. Therfore, transporting appropriately packaged spent fuel over existing rail systems and via any highway system is radiologically safe without specific NRC approval of the route. However, to assure adequate planning for protection against actual or attempted acts of radiological sabotage, the NRC requires advance route approval. This approval is given on a shipment-by-shipment or series basis, it is not general approval of the route for subsequent spent fuel shipments. Spent fuel shipment routes, primarily for road transportation, but also including three rail routes, are indicated on reproductions of road maps. Also included are the amounts of material shipped during the approximate 8-year period that safeguards regulations have been effective. This information is current as of September 30, 1987

  14. Delivery of completed irradiation vehicles and the quality assurance document to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel Lee [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report details the initial fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) irradiation capsules (ATFSC01 and ATFSC02), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0202268. These irradiation experiments are testing silicon carbide composite tubes in order to obtain experimental validation of thermo-mechanical models of stress states in SiC cladding irradiated under a prototypic high heat flux. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD). A complete fabrication package record is maintained by the THIEG and is available upon request.

  15. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)—Effect of gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N.; Kantoglu, Omer; Dilek, Filiz B.

    2010-04-01

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD 5/COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm -3. Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm -3. Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  16. Behavior of Type 316 stainless steel under simulated fusion reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.; Maziasz, P.J.; Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1978-05-01

    Fusion reactor irradiation response in alloys containing nickel can be simulated in thermal-spectrum fission reactors, where displacement damage is produced by the high-energy neutrons and helium is produced by the capture of two thermal neutrons in the reactions: 58 Ni + n → 59 Ni + γ; 59 Ni + n → 56 Fe + α. Examination of type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in HFIR has shown that swelling due to cavity formation and degradation of mechanical properties are more severe than can be predicted from fast reactor irradiations, where the helium contents produced are far too low to simulate fusion reactor service. Swelling values are greater and the temperature dependence of swelling is different than in the fast reactor case

  17. Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki, E-mail: uwaba.tomoyuki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: > We evaluated diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins irradiated to 130 GWd/t. > The strain was due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. > The irradiation creep was caused by internal gas pressure and PCMI. > The PCMI was associated with pellet swelling by rim structure or by cesium uranate. > The latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction of the cladding. - Abstract: The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, 'Joyo', demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, 'Monju'. The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and {sup 137}Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

  18. Installation of remote-handling typed EBSD-OIM analyzer for heavy irradiated reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Takada, Fumiki; Ohmi, Masao; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Miwa, Yukio

    2008-06-01

    The remote-handling typed EBSD-OIM analyzer for heavy irradiated reactor materials was installed in the JMTR hot laboratory at the first time in the world. The analyzer is used to study on IASCC (irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking) or IGSCC (inter granular stress corrosion cracking) in reactor materials. This report describes the measurement procedure, the measured results and the operating experiences on the analyzer in the JMTR hot laboratory. (author)

  19. An automatic device for sample insertion and extraction to/from reactor irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloni, L.; Venturelli, A.; Meloni, S.

    1990-01-01

    At the previous European Triga Users Conference in Vienna,a paper was given describing a new handling tool for irradiated samples at the L.E.N.A plant. This tool was the first part of an automatic device for the management of samples to be irradiated in the TRIGA MARK ii reactor and successively extracted and stored. So far sample insertion and extraction to/from irradiation facilities available on reactor top (central thimble,rotatory specimen rack and channel f),has been carried out manually by reactor and health-physics operators using the ''traditional'' fishing pole provided by General Atomic, thus exposing reactor personnel to ''unjustified'' radiation doses. The present paper describes the design and the operation of a new device, a ''robot''type machine,which, remotely operated, takes care of sample insertion into the different irradiation facilities,sample extraction after irradiation and connection to the storage pits already described. The extraction of irradiated sample does not require the presence of reactor personnel on the reactor top and,therefore,radiation doses are strongly reduced. All work from design to construction has been carried out by the personnel of the electronic group of the L.E.N.A plant. (orig.)

  20. Influence of preliminary reactor irradiation on defect formation in quartz fibers under γ- ray activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurov, M.Kh.; Baydjanov, M.I.; Ibragimov, J.D.; Rustamov, I.R.; Islamov, A.Kh.; Nuritdinov, I.; Gasanov, E.M.; Yuldashev, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: For study of influence of preliminary structure defects and type of cladding material on additional defects accumulation kinetics we investigated the absorption spectra of optical fibers (OF) marked FVP-400 (quartz core and quartz clad) and FSHA-800 (quartz core and polymeric clad) preliminary irradiated by fast neutrons fluencies 10 12 , 10 13 , 10 14 , 10 15 cm -2 before and after additional irradiation by γ-rays of 60 Co source. Preliminary irradiation of samples was conducted in cadmium-plated channel of the reactor. Dose rate of accompanying γ-radiation is determined as 1250 R/s using KI quartz glass based dosimeter. The spectra of the induced absorption (losses) were calculated by an expression A(λ)=(10/L)x lg[T(λ)/T 0 (λ)], where T 0 (λ) and (λ) are transmissions of samples before and after irradiation, L-sample length [m], A(λ)- optical losses [dB/m]. It's established that the transformation processes of previously existing structure damages arising during fiber drawing into other ones and creations of additional defects under influence of neutrons depends on hydroxyl content and type of fibers cladding material. It's shown that under influence of γ-rays at doses 10 5 , 5·10 5 , 10 6 , 5.10 6 , 10 7 , 5·10 7 and 10 8 R the two-stage accumulation of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) is observed in preliminary neutron-irradiated OF. The first stage is caused by appearance of potential NBOHC arising during fiber drawing and irradiation of OF by neutrons. The dose value of γ-rays at the beginning of the second stage that is connected to creation of additional NBOHC under γ-rays action decreases with growth of preliminary irradiation fluence. We suppose that under neutron irradiation of OF along with transformation of previously existing damages and creation of additional point defects there is formation of areas with the higher density than in quartz glass which concentration increases with growth of irradiation fluence. Hence

  1. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  2. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT NDT ) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties

  3. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B{sub 4}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor, G., E-mail: g.victor@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA-DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Djourelov, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko chaussee blvd, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, 30 Reactorului Str, MG-6 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Miro, S. [CEA-DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baillet, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A. [SPCTS, UMR CNRS 7315, Centre Européen de la céramique, University of Limoges (France); Gosset, D. [CEA, Saclay, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B{sub 4}C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (S{sub e} ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B{sub 4}C structure under irradiation.

  4. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B4C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, G.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Djourelov, N.; Miro, S.; Baillet, J.; Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A.; Gosset, D.

    2015-12-01

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B4C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B4C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (Se ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B4C structure under irradiation.

  5. Neutron Field Characterization of Irradiation Locations Applied to the Slovenian TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbot, Loic; Domergue, Christophe; Breaud, Stephane; Destouches, Christophe; Villard, Jean-Francois; Snoj, Luka; Stancar, Ziga; Radulovic, Vladimir; Trkov, Andrej

    2013-06-01

    This work deals with several neutron flux measurement instruments and particle transport calculations combined in a method to assess the neutron field in experimental locations in nuclear reactor core or reflector. First test of this method in the TRIGA Mark II of Slovenia led to the assessment of three energy groups neutron fluxes in central irradiation locations within reactor core. (authors)

  6. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.G.; Sousa, M.; Santos, J.P.; Fernandes, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1 MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard.

  7. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  8. Behaviour and microstructure of stainless steels irradiated in the french fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, P.; Gilbon, D.

    1991-01-01

    The burn-up of Fast Breeder Reactors is limited by the irradiation induced dimensional changes and mechanical properties of structural materials used for replaceable in-core components. This paper describes the behaviour improvements and also the radiation-induced microstructures of the different steels used for fuel pin cladding and wrapper tubes in French reactors. Materials of fuel pin cladding are austenitic steels whose main problem is swelling. Improvements in swelling resistance by cold-working, titanium additions and modifications of matrix (Fe-Cr-Ni) from SA 316 to CW 15-15 Ti are shown. These improvements are correlated with a best stability of microstructure under irradiation. Beneficial effects of phosphorus addition and multistabilisation (NbVTi) on radiation induced microstructure and swelling resistance are also shown. Austenitic steels used for wrapper tubes are limited both by swelling and by void embrittlement. The ferritic F17 (17Cr), ferritic-martensitic EM12 (9Cr-2MoNbV) and martensitic EM10 (9Cr-1Mo) steels present high swelling resistance. Nevertheless radiation-induced embrittlement is observed in EM12 and especially in F17. This embrittlement results from a fine and uniform radiation enhanced precipitation in ferrite grains. By contrast, the microstructure of fully martensitic EM10 steel is mush more stable and its ductile-brizzle transition temperature stays below 0 0 C. 12 figs

  9. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  10. Acousto-defect interaction in irradiated and non-irradiated silicon n+-p structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olikh, O. Ya.; Gorb, A. M.; Chupryna, R. G.; Pristay-Fenenkov, O. V.

    2018-04-01

    The influence of ultrasound on current-voltage characteristics of non-irradiated silicon n+-p structures as well as silicon structures exposed to reactor neutrons or 60Co gamma radiation has been investigated experimentally. It has been found that the ultrasound loading of the n+-p structure leads to the reversible change of shunt resistance, carrier lifetime, and ideality factor. Specifically, considerable acoustically induced alteration of the ideality factor and the space charge region lifetime was observed in the irradiated samples. The experimental results were described by using the models of coupled defect level recombination, Shockley-Read-Hall recombination, and dislocation-induced impedance. The experimentally observed phenomena are associated with the increase in the distance between coupled defects as well as the extension of the carrier capture coefficient of complex point defects and dislocations. It has been shown that divacancies and vacancy-interstitial oxygen pairs are effectively modified by ultrasound in contrast to interstitial carbon-interstitial oxygen complexes.

  11. Effects of irradiation on properties of refractory alloys with emphasis on space power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The probable effects of irradiation on niobium and tungsten alloys in use as components of thermionic convertors in a space reactor were reviewed by the author in 1971. While considerably more data on refractory metals have been generated since that time, the data have not been reviewed with respect to space reactor applications. This paper attempts such a review. The approach used is to work from the most recently available review of irradiation effects for each alloy system (where such a review is available) and to discuss that review and more recent data judged to be the most useful in establishing likely behavior in high-temperature reactor service. 28 figures, 6 tables

  12. Vacuum brazing techniques for irradiation devices at TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savu, M.; Valeca, S. C.; Amzoi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic thin-walled thermocouples are required for monitoring the temperature value for experiments that are conducted in a nuclear research reactor. The different location wall crossing is made by instrumented passage. Such a passage produced by vacuum brazing using a BNi-7 alloy, represents the proper way to obtain a sealed joint, which can withstand corrosion and high temperatures, having in the same time a small neutron cross section. This paper presents the brazing experiments of K-type thermocouples with stainless steel and Inconel 600 sheath. The sheaths brittleness, hardness changing in joint.s vicinity and structural modification emphasized by metallographic analysis are aspects treated by comparing different samples obtained in brazing laboratory. For finding the correct answer regarding the attenuation of negative effects which are occurring during brazing procedure using Inconel 600 - BNi-7 combination, one can assess both the adopted solution used in designing instrumented passage and thermal regime parameters and its precisely control. (authors)

  13. Large Object Irradiation Facility In The Tangential Channel Of The JSI TRIGA Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Radulovic, Vladimir; Kaiba, Tanja; Kavsek, Darko; Cindro, Vladimir; Mikuz, Marko; Snoj, Luka

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design and installation of a new irradiation device in the Tangential Channel of the JSI TRIGA reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The purpose of the device is to enable on-line irradiation testing of electronic components considerably larger in size (of lateral dimensions of at least 12 cm) than currently possible in the irradiation channels located in the reactor core, in a relatively high neutron flux (exceeding 10^12 n cm^-2 s^-1) and to provide adequate neutron and gamma radiation shielding.

  14. Reactor Materials Program electrochemical potential measurements by ORNL with unirradiated and irradiated stainless steel specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Effect of irradiation of stainless steel on electrochemical potential (ECP) was investigated by measurements in dilute HNO 3 and H 2 O 2 solutions, conditions simulating reactor moderator. The electrodes were made from unirradiated/irradiated, unsensitized/sensitized specimens from R-reactor piping. Results were inconclusive because of budgetary restrictions. The dose rate may have been too small to produce a significant radiolytic effect. Neither the earlier CERT corrosion susceptibility tests nor the present ECP measurements showed a pronounced effect of irradiation on susceptibility of the stainless steel to IGSCC; this is confirmed by the absence in the stainless steel of the SRS reactor tanks (except for the C Reactor tank knuckle area)

  15. Reactor Materials Program electrochemical potential measurements by ORNL with unirradiated and irradiated stainless steel specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, E.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Effect of irradiation of stainless steel on electrochemical potential (ECP) was investigated by measurements in dilute HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions, conditions simulating reactor moderator. The electrodes were made from unirradiated/irradiated, unsensitized/sensitized specimens from R-reactor piping. Results were inconclusive because of budgetary restrictions. The dose rate may have been too small to produce a significant radiolytic effect. Neither the earlier CERT corrosion susceptibility tests nor the present ECP measurements showed a pronounced effect of irradiation on susceptibility of the stainless steel to IGSCC; this is confirmed by the absence in the stainless steel of the SRS reactor tanks (except for the C Reactor tank knuckle area).

  16. High temperature graphite irradiation creep experiment in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzel, R.; Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.

    1971-05-15

    The irradiation induced creep of pressed Gilsocarbon graphite under constant tensile stress has been investigated in an experiment carried out in FE 317 of the OECD High Temperature Gass Cooled Reactor ''Dragon'' at Winfrith (England). The experiment covered a temperature range of 850 dec C to 1240 deg C and reached a maximum fast neutron dose of 1.19 x 1021 n cm-2 NDE (Nickel Dose DIDO Equivalent). Irradiation induced dimensional changes of a string of unrestrained graphite specimens are compared with the dimensional changes of three strings of restrained graphite specimens stressed to 40%, 58%, and 70% of the initial ultimate tensile strength of pressed Gilsocarbon graphite. Total creep strains ranging from 0.18% to 1.25% have been measured and a linear dependence of creep strain on applied stress was observed. Mechanical property measurements carried out before and after irradiation demonstrate that Gilsocarbon graphite can accommodate significant creep strains without failure or structural deterioration. Total creep strains are in excellent agreement with other data, however the results indicate a relatively large temperature dependent primary creep component which at 1200 deg C approaches a value which is three times larger than the normally assumed initial elastic strain. Secondary creep constants derived from the experiment show a temperature dependence and are in fair agreement with data reported elsewhere. A possible determination of the results is given.

  17. Irradiation Testing Vehicles for Fast Reactors from Open Test Assemblies to Closed Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A review of irradiation testing vehicle approaches and designs that have been incorporated into past Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) or envisioned for incorporation has been carried out. The objective is to understand the essential features of the approaches and designs so that they can inform test vehicle designs for a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Fast test reactor designs examined include EBR-II, FFTF, JOYO, BOR-60, PHÉNIX, JHR, and MBIR. Previous designers exhibited great ingenuity in overcoming design and operational challenges especially when the original reactor plant’s mission changed to an irradiation testing mission as in the EBRII reactor plant. The various irradiation testing vehicles can be categorized as: Uninstrumented open assemblies that fit into core locations; Instrumented open test assemblies that fit into special core locations; Self-contained closed loops; and External closed loops. A special emphasis is devoted to closed loops as they are regarded as a very desirable feature of a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Closed loops are an important technology for irradiation of fuels and materials in separate controlled environments. The impact of closed loops on the design of fast reactors is also discussed in this report.

  18. The OPERA loop in the OSIRIS reactor core. Pressurized-water irradiation device to study Advanced Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucot, M.; Roche, M.

    1986-09-01

    This loop is designed to allow fuel qualification test, i.d. to allow irradiation of representative parts fuel assemblies operating in thermohydraulic and chemical conditions representative of these of present pressurized water reactors or in development. This paper presents the aims of the installation, the general design and the main specifications with a brief detailed description [fr

  19. Conceptual design for irradiation device used to irradiate experimental LFR fuel element in TRIGA reactor, ACPR zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioan, M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the main steps followed to conceive a small, versatile and rather cheep irradiation device used for irradiation of an experimental fuel element, specific for Lead cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), adapted to TRIGA reactor, ACPR zone. This device must be instrumented with at least 4 thermocouples and a pressure transducer. The fuel element (150 mm fuel pellets column) will be immersed in maximum 0.350 kg pure hot lead (400 deg C). The system has three protection barriers, as follows: first is the fuel tube, second is the lead container (maximum 20 mm inner diameter) and third is the external container (maximum 180 mm outside diameter). Before the reactor pulse, the temperature of the lead is set at the prescribed value using an electrical heater (300 W), coil on the second barrier. Outside the second barrier a very good thermal insulation is provided. (authors)

  20. Use of Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Materials for Extended Life Evaluations Using Power and Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Nanstad, R.K.; Odette, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    The most important component in assuring safety of the nuclear power plant is the reactor pressure (RPV). Surveillance programs have been designed to cover the licensed life of operating nuclear RPVs. The original surveillance programs were designed when the licensed life was 40 years. More than one-half of the operating nuclear plants in the USA have an extended license out to 60 years, and there are plans to continue to operate many plants out to 80 years. Therefore, the surveillance programs have had to be adjusted or enhanced to generate key data for 60 years, and now consideration must be given for 80 or more years. To generate the necessary data to assure safe operation out to these extended license lives, test reactor irradiations have been initiated with key RPV and model alloy steels, which include several steels irradiated in the current power reactor surveillance programs out to relatively high fluence levels. These data are crucial in understanding the radiation embrittlement mechanisms and to enable extrapolation of the irradiation effects on mechanical properties for these extended time periods. This paper describes the potential radiation embrittlement mechanisms and effects when assessing much longer operating times and higher neutron fluence levels. Potential methods for adjusting higher neutron flux test reactor data for use in predicting power reactor vessel conditions are discussed. (author)

  1. Super Phenix. Monitoring of structures subject to irradiation. Neutron dosimetry measurement and calculation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, J.C.; Arnaud, G.; Calamand, D.; Manent, G.; Tavassoli, A.A.

    1984-09-01

    For the Super Phenix reactor, the evolution, versus the irradiation of the mechanical properties of the core diagrid steel is the object of studies and is particularly monitored. The specimens irradiated, now in PHENIX and will be later irradiated in SUPER PHENIX as soon as the first operating cycles. An important dosimetry program coupling calculation and measurement, is parallely carried out. This paper presents the reasons, the definition of the structure, of the development and of materials used in this program of dosimetry, as also the first results of a calculation-measurement comparison [fr

  2. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments in a technological irradiation reactor; Modelisation pluridisciplinaire d'experiences d'irradiation dans un reacteur d'irradiation technologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaccorsi, Th

    2007-09-15

    A Material Testing Reactor (MTR) makes it possible to irradiate material samples under intense neutron and photonic fluxes. These experiments are carried out in experimental devices localised in the reactor core or in periphery (reflector). Available physics simulation tools only treat, most of the time, one physics field in a very precise way. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments therefore require a sequential use of several calculation codes and data exchanges between these codes: this corresponds to problems coupling. In order to facilitate multi-physic simulations, this thesis sets up a data model based on data-processing objects, called Technological Entities. This data model is common to all of the physics fields. It permits defining the geometry of an irradiation device in a parametric way and to associate information about materials to it. Numerical simulations are encapsulated into interfaces providing the ability to call specific functionalities with the same command (to initialize data, to launch calculations, to post-treat, to get results,... ). Thus, once encapsulated, numerical simulations can be re-used for various studies. This data model is developed in a SALOME platform component. The first application case made it possible to perform neutronic simulations (OSIRIS reactor and RJH) coupled with fuel behavior simulations. In a next step, thermal hydraulics could also be taken into account. In addition to the improvement of the calculation accuracy due to the physical phenomena coupling, the time spent in the development phase of the simulation is largely reduced and the possibilities of uncertainty treatment are under consideration. (author)

  3. Space-time reactor kinetics for heterogeneous reactor structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1969-11-15

    An attempt is made to formulate time dependent diffusion equation based on Feinberg-Galanin theory in the from analogue to the classical reactor kinetic equation. Parameters of these equations could be calculated using the existing codes for static reactor calculation based on the heterogeneous reactor theory. The obtained kinetic equation could be analogues in form to the nodal kinetic equation. Space-time distribution of neutron flux in the reactor can be obtained by solving these equations using standard methods.

  4. Estimation of radioactivity in structural materials of ETRR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imam, M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Precise knowledge of the thermal neutron flux in the different structural materials of a reactor is necessary to estimate the radioactive inventory in these materials that are needed in any decommissioning study of the reactor. ETRR-1 is a research reactor that went critical on 2/1691. In spite of this long age of the reactor, the effective operation time of this reactor is very short since the reactor was shutdown for long periods. Because of this long age one may think of reactor decommissioning. For this purpose, the radioactivity of the reactor structural materials was estimated. Apart from the reactor core, the important structural materials in the ETRR-1 are the reactor tank, shielding concrete, and the graphite thermal column. The thermal neutron flux was determined by the monte Carlo method in these materials and the isotope inventory and the radioactivity were calculated by the international code ORIGEN-JR. 1 fig.

  5. Fast-neutron dosimetry in the seed-irradiation facility, ASTRA reactor, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnstroem, G.; Burtscher, A.; Casta, J.

    1967-01-01

    An important part of the co-ordinated programme on the neutron irradiation of seeds has been the construction of a fast-neutron irradiation facility for swimming-pool reactors. This facility was installed around 70 cm from the core in the ASTRA reactor swimming-pool at the end of December, 1966. Also, for this programme a pair of constant potential ionization chambers have been constructed at the Institute of Biochemistry, Stockholm University. These chambes are of the type described in the technical annex and are the same size as the seed-irradiation vials to be used in the seed-irradiation container (diam. =15 mm, length = 60 mm). Some preliminary dosimetry experiments were undertaken to test the irradiation facility and the ionization chambers, and to investigate the usefulness of the dosimetry instructions in the Technical Annex. The results of these experiments are discussed in this paper. 3 refs, 6 figs, 7 tabs

  6. Mechanical components: fabrication of major reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, S.

    1985-01-01

    The paper examines the validity of criticisms of quality assurance of mechanical plant and welded products within major reactor structures, taking into account experience gained on the AGR's. Various constructive recommendations are made aimed at furthering the objectives of quality assurance in the nuclear industry and making it more cost-effective. Current levels of quality related costs in the fabrication industry are provided as a basis for discussion. (U.K.)

  7. The electron irradiation effects in different structures of diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Quanfen; Wang Jiaxu

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the different electron irradiation effects in different structures of diodes and the different results produced by different irradiation ways. From this work, we can know how to choose proper manufacture arts and comprehensive factors according to the structures of diodes and the irradiation conditions

  8. Protective guide structure for reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Minoru; Umeda, Kenji; Kubo, Noboru; Ito, Tomohiro.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved protective guide structure for control rods, which does not cause swirling of coolants and resonance even though a slit is formed on a protective tube which surrounds a control rod element in a PWR type reactor. Namely, a reactor control rod is constituted with elongated control elements collectively bundled in the form of a cluster. The protective guide structure protectively guides the collected constituent at the upper portion of a reactor container. The protective structure comprises a plurality of protective tubes each having a C-shaped cross section disposed in parallel for receiving control rod elements individually in which the corners of the opening of the cross section of the protective tube are chamfered to an appropriate configuration. With such a constitution, even if coolant flows in a circumferential direction along the protective tubes surrounding the control rod elements, no shearing stream is caused to the coolants flow since the corners of the cross sectional opening (slit) of the tube are chamfered. Accordingly, occurrence of swirlings can be suppressed. (I.S.)

  9. Irradiation testing of LEU fuels in the SILOE Reactor - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francis; Baas, Claude; Martel, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of uranium-silicide fuels has continued in the SILOE reactor during the past year. Thickness vs. fission density data from four U 3 Si plates containing 5.5 and 6.0 g U/cm 3 have been analyzed, and the results are presented. The irradiation of a full 60 g U/cm 3 U 3 Si element has begun. In addition, four U 3 Si 2 plates containing 20 to 54 g U/cm 3 are now being irradiated. These irradiations and future plans are discussed in the paper. (author)

  10. Improved SAFARI-1 research reactor irradiation position modeling in OSCAR-3 code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloko, L. E.; Belal, M. G. A. H.

    2009-01-01

    The demand on the availability of irradiation positions in the SAFARI-1 reactor is continuously increasing due to the commercial pressure to produce isotopes more efficiently. This calls for calculational techniques and modeling methods to be improved regularly to optimize irradiation services. The irradiation position models are improved using the OSCAR-3 code system, and results are compared to experimental measurements. It is concluded that the irradiation position models are essential if realistic core follow and reload studies are to be performed and most importantly, for the realization of improved agreement between experimental data and calculated results. (authors)

  11. Colloid bands in silver chloride induced by reactor irradiation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, K.; Okada, M.; Nakagawa, M.

    1978-01-01

    It is well known that no trapped electron center exists stably in irradiated silver chlorides even at low temperatures. On the other hand, irradiation by ultra-violet light at room temperature produces a broad absorption (colloid bands) on the long wavelength side of the fundamental absorption. In this report, it is shown that one of the colloid bands appears in undoped AgCl crystals by reactor irradiation at low temperature (20 K) and the other colloid band by thermal annealing after the irradiation. The relation between the bands, which correspond to two types of colloidal silver, is represented. (author)

  12. RCC-MRx: Design and construction rules for mechanical components in high-temperature structures, experimental reactors and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The RCC-MRx code was developed for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), research reactors (RR) and fusion reactors (FR-ITER). It provides the rules for designing and building mechanical components involved in areas subject to significant creep and/or significant irradiation. In particular, it incorporates an extensive range of materials (aluminum and zirconium alloys in response to the need for transparency to neutrons), sizing rules for thin shells and box structures, and new modern welding processes: electron beam, laser beam, diffusion and brazing. The RCC-MR code was used to design and build the prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) developed by IGCAR in India and the ITER Vacuum Vessel. The RCC-Mx code is being used in the current construction of the RJH experimental reactor (Jules Horowitz reactor). The RCC-MRx code is serving as a reference for the design of the ASTRID project (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration), for the design of the primary circuit in MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) and the design of the target station of the ESS project (European Spallation Source). Contents of the 2015 edition of the RCC-MRx code: Section I General provisions; Section II Additional requirements and special provisions; Section III Rules for nuclear installation mechanical components: Volume I: Design and construction rules: Volume A (RA): General provisions and entrance keys, Volume B (RB): Class 1 components and supports, Volume C (RC): Class 2 components and supports, Volume D (RD): Class 3 components and supports, Volume K (RK): Examination, handling or drive mechanisms, Volume L (RL): Irradiation devices, Volume Z (Ai): Technical appendices; Volume II: Materials; Volume III: Examinations methods; Volume IV: Welding; Volume V: Manufacturing operations; Volume VI: Probationary phase rules

  13. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  14. Determination of Cl-36 in Irradiated Reactor Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.-F.; Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T.; Hartmann, E.; Kramer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the three research reactors at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the reactors DIORIT and PROTEUS, contained reactor graphite. Whereas the former research reactor DIORIT has been dismantled completely the PROTEUS is subject to a future decommissioning. In case of the DIORIT the reactor graphite was conditioned applying a procedure developed at PSI. In this case the 36 Cl content had to be determined after the conditioning. The result is reported in this paper. The radionuclide inventory including 36 Cl of the graphite used in PROTEUS was measured and the results are reported in here. It has been proven that the graphite from PROTEUS has a radionuclide inventory near the detection limits. All determined radionuclide activities are far below the Swiss exemptions limits. The graphite from PROTEUS therefore poses no radioactive waste. In contrast, the 36 Cl content of graphite from DIORIT is well above the exemption limits. (author)

  15. Effects of CTR irradiation on the mechanical properties of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.

    1976-11-01

    Mechanical properties of CTR structural materials are important in determining the reliability and economics of fusion power. Furthermore, these properties are significantly affected by the high neutron flux experienced by components in the regions near the plasma of the fusion reactor. In general, irradiation hardens the material and leads to a reduction in ductility. An exception to this is in some complex engineering alloys where either hardening or softening can be observed depending on the alloy and the irradiation conditions. Regardless of this restriction, irradiation usually leads to a reduction in ductility. Available tensile data examined in this paper show that significant ductility reduction can be found for irradiation conditions typical of CTR operation. Consideration of these effects show that extensive work will be needed to fully establish the in-service properties of CTR structures. This information will be used by designers to develop conditions and design philosophies adapted to avoid the most deleterious conditions and minimize stresses on structures on reactor design. The information will also be used as input to alloy development programs with goals of producing materials more resistant to property degradation during irradiation. It is clear that a great deal of additional work will be required both to understand the effect of CTR irradiation on properties and to develop optimal alloys for this application

  16. Calculation of DPA in the Reactor Internal Structural Materials of Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Deong; Lee, Hwan Soo

    2014-01-01

    The embrittlement is mainly caused by atomic displacement damage due to irradiations with neutrons, especially fast neutrons. The integrity of the reactor internal structural materials has to be ensured over the reactor life time, threatened by the irradiation induced displacement damage. Accurate modeling and prediction of the displacement damage is a first step to evaluate the integrity of the reactor internal structural materials. Traditional approaches for analyzing the displacement damage of the materials have relied on tradition model, developed initially for simple metals, Kinchin and Pease (K-P), and the standard formulation of it by Norgett et al. , often referred to as the 'NRT' model. An alternative and complementary strategy for calculating the displacement damage is to use MCNP code. MCNP uses detailed physics and continuous-energy cross-section data in its simulations. In this paper, we have performed the evaluation of the displacement damage of the reactor internal structural materials in Kori NPP unit 1 using detailed Monte Carlo modeling and compared with predictions results of displacement damage using the classical NRT model. The evaluation of the displacement damage of the reactor internal structural materials in Kori NPP unit 1 using detailed Monte Carlo modeling has been performed. The maximum value of the DPA rate was occurred at the baffle side of the reactor internal where the node has the maximum neutron flux

  17. The post irradiation examination of a sphere-pac (UPu)C fuel pin irradiated in the BR-2 reactor (MFBS 7 experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.; Aerne, E.T.; Buergisser, B.; Flueckiger, U.; Hofer, R.; Petrik, F.

    1979-09-01

    A pin fuelled with Swiss made (UPu)C microspheres has been successfully irradiated to a peak burn-up of 6% fima in the Belgian BR2 Reactor. The pin, rated up to 95 kW/m, was intact after irradiation and exhibited a peak strain of just over 0.5%. The results of the post irradiation examination are reported. (Auth.)

  18. General views about specimen irradiations in reactors; Considerations generales sur'les irradiations d'echantillons dans les reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Specimen irradiation of fissile or non-fissile materials, carried out under circumstances becoming more and more severe and in reactor of increasing flux bas led to an evolution of irradiation rigs. A survey of the problems arising from irradiating under these various circumstances leads to conclude that it is possible to devise one capsule type suitable to every particular case, and that in a wide temperature range. Consequently, once the various irradiation-parameters known, a general method of calculation can be followed so as to determine the various sizes of the parts constituting the capsule. These theoretical calculations might sometimes be corrected through benefits gained from previous irradiations. Similarly, practical experimentation might allow to foresee more handy assembling of the capsule, specimen loading-and unloading being easier at the same time. (author) [French] L'irradiation d'echantillons, fissiles ou non fissiles, dans des conditions imposees de plus en plus strictes et dans des reacteurs a flux de plus en plus eleve, a eu pour consequence une evolution dans la conception des dispositifs d'irradiation. Lorsqu'on examine les problemes souleves par ces differentes irradiations, on en conclut qu'il est possible de concevoir un type de capsule capable de donner satisfaction dans chaque cas particulier, et ce, dans une tres large gamme de temperature. Par consequent, les differents parametres de l'irradiation etant connus, une methode generale de calcul peut etre suivie pour determiner les differentes cotes des pieces constitutives de la capsule. Ces calculs theoriques devront quelquefois etre corriges grace aux enseignements tires d'irradiations precedentes. De meme, l'experience acquise permettra d'envisager un montage plus aise de la capsule, tout en facilitant l'enfournement et le defournement des echantillons.

  19. Assessment of models predicting irradiation effects on tensile properties of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, L.; Landron, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis of tensile data acquired as part of the French Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program (RVSP) is produced. This program contains amongst other mechanical tests, tensile tests at 20 and 300 C degrees on non irradiated base metals and at 300 C degrees only on irradiated materials. It shows that irradiation leads to an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the strain hardening. The exploitation of tensile results has permitted to express a relationship between yield strength increase measured and fluence value, as well as between strain hardening decrease and yield strength evolution. The use of these relations in the aim at predicting evolution of tensile properties with irradiation has then permitted to propose a methodology to model entire stress-strain curves of irradiated base metal only based on the non irradiated stress-strain curve. These predictions were successfully compared with an experimental standard case. (authors)

  20. Statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric method for irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi, E-mail: takamizawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Itoh, Hiroto, E-mail: ito.hiroto@jaea.go.jp; Nishiyama, Yutaka, E-mail: nishiyama.yutaka93@jaea.go.jp

    2016-10-15

    In order to understand neutron irradiation embrittlement in high fluence regions, statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) method was performed for the Japanese surveillance and material test reactor irradiation database. The BNP method is essentially expressed as an infinite summation of normal distributions, with input data being subdivided into clusters with identical statistical parameters, such as mean and standard deviation, for each cluster to estimate shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The clusters typically depend on chemical compositions, irradiation conditions, and the irradiation embrittlement. Specific variables contributing to the irradiation embrittlement include the content of Cu, Ni, P, Si, and Mn in the pressure vessel steels, neutron flux, neutron fluence, and irradiation temperatures. It was found that the measured shifts of DBTT correlated well with the calculated ones. Data associated with the same materials were subdivided into the same clusters even if neutron fluences were increased.

  1. Characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated reactor graphite; Karakterizacija neozracenog i ozracenog reaktorskog grafita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report contains three parts: characterization of Yugoslav nuclear graphite development of methods and obtained results, characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated domestic nuclear graphite; calculation of electrical conductivity changes due to vacancies in the graphite crystal lattice.

  2. Defect production in silica glasses under gamma-irradiation at the quenched nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussaeva, M.A.; Kalanov, M.U.; Ibragimova, E.M.; Sandalov, V.N.; Muminov, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Radiation defect production in oxides is highly interesting for atom and solar energy, and also for burying nuclear waste. Combine effect of neutron and gamma-radiation on materials was studied extensively and only neutrons are believed to displace atoms, although 60 Co-gamma quanta were proved to displace light anions (O, F) by inelastic mechanism. On the example of polished plates of pure fused quartz and barium-silica glasses containing nano-crystalline inclusions, and also nano-porous glass, the effect of gamma-radiation of the quenched reactor was studied in the energy range of 0.2-7 MeV. The time period was selected when practically constant current ∼10-20 nA is maintained in the ionizing chamber, corresponding to the average gamma-flux of 15-30 Gy/s. Optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra and also structure of the grasses were studied. It turned out, that the charged oxygen vacancies accumulation rate is higher in Barium glass than in the pure one, because for SiO 2 with small Z the photoelectric effect is weak, while the Compton scattering and photonuclear reactions prevail, and for Barium - just the opposite. The radiation-induced growth of the crystalline precipitates was noticed in the both glasses, which before had been attributed to the elastic atom displacements by fast neutrons. The density of Ba-glass increases with irradiation. The efficiency of defect production by the gamma-component even of the quenched reactor turned out much higher than that under irradiation with 60 Co gamma-source of ∼1.25 MeV to the equivalent dose at the current dose rate of ∼ 7 Gy/s (and before at 45 Gy/s). A 100-times increase of the surface proton conductivity was discovered in the porous glasses under gamma-irradiation due to water vapor radiolysis on the pore surface. The irradiated porous glass is recommended as an active electrode in the hydrogen fuel element. The work was done under the grant F2.1.2 from Center of Science and Technology

  3. Tests for removal of Co-60 and Eu-154 from irradiated graphite in the TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsene, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The irradiated graphite in Romania is mainly generated in the thermal columns of TRIGA and WWER-S research reactors (about 9 tones). It was found that the radionuclide content of the graphite irradiated in the TRIGA research reactor is mainly due to C-14 (103 Bq/g), Eu-152 (600-700 Bq/g) and Co-60 (130-150 Bq/g) and low amounts of Eu-154 and Cs-137, depending on location in the thermal column and on irradiation history. In order to minimize the waste inventory and volume in view of their final disposal, in the present paper we show the results of experiments performed for developing and optimizing methods for the chemical decontamination of the irradiated graphite. These procedures are based on strong alkaline solutions for Eu-152 and strong acid solutions for Co-60. The influence of the process parameters on the decontamination factor is investigated. (authors)

  4. New temperature monitoring devices for high-temperature irradiation experiments in the high flux reactor Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, M.; Futterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fourrez, S. [THERMOCOAX SAS, BP 26, Planquivon, 61438 Flers Cedex (France); Morice, R. [Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75724 Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Within the European High Temperature Reactor Technology Network (HTR-TN) and related projects a number of HTR fuel irradiations are planned in the High Flux Reactor Petten (HFR), The Netherlands, with the objective to explore the potential of recently produced fuel for even higher temperature and burn-up. Irradiating fuel under defined conditions to extremely high burn-ups will provide a better understanding of fission product release and failure mechanisms if particle failure occurs. After an overview of the irradiation rigs used in the HFR, this paper sums up data collected from previous irradiation tests in terms of thermocouple data. Some research and development work for further improvement of thermocouples and other on-line instrumentation will be outlined. (authors)

  5. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This publication is the fifth in a series of annual publications issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to public information requests regarding the Commission's regulation of shipments of irradiated reactor fuel. This publication contains basically three kinds of information: (1) routes recently approved (18 months) by the Commission for the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel; (2) information regarding any safeguards-significant incidents that may be (to date none have) reported during shipments along such routes; and (3) cumulative amounts of material shipped

  6. Preliminary Options Assessment of Versatile Irradiation Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the work undertaken at INL from April 2016 to January 2017 and aimed at analyzing some options for designing and building a versatile test reactor; the scope of work was agreed upon with DOE-NE. Section 2 presents some results related to KNK II and PRISM Mod A. Section 3 presents some alternatives to the VCTR presented in [ ] as well as a neutronic parametric study to assess the minimum power requirement needed for a 235U metal fueled fast test reactor capable to generate a fast (>100 keV) flux of 4.0 x 1015 n /cm2-s at the test location. Section 4 presents some results regarding a fundamental characteristic of test reactors, namely displacement per atom (dpa) in test samples. Section 5 presents the INL assessment of the ANL fast test reactor design FASTER. Section 6 presents a summary.

  7. Irradiation experience of IPEN fuel at IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, Jose A.; Neto, Adolfo; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Souza, Jose A.B. de; Frajndlich, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    IPEN/CNEN-SP produces, for its IEA-R1 Research Reactor, MTR fuel assemblies based on U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel type. Since 1985 a qualification program on these fuel assemblies has been performed. Average 235 U burnup of 30% and peak burnup of 50% was already achieved by these fuel assemblies. This paper presents some results acquire, by these fuel assemblies, under irradiation at IEA-R1 Research Reactor. (author)

  8. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Robbins, J.M.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  9. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. 2. Replacement of upper core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushiki, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiromichi; Okuda, Eiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Jun; Oota, Katsu; Kawahara, Hirotaka; Takamatsu, Misao; Nagai, Akinori; Okawa, Toshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, it was confirmed that the top of the irradiation test sub-assembly of MARICO-2 (material testing rig with temperature control) had bent onto the in-vessel storage rack as an obstacle and had damaged the upper core structure (UCS) in 2007. As a part of the restoration work, UCS replacement was begun at March 24, 2014 and was completed at December 17. In-vessel repair (including observation) for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) is distinct from that for light water reactors and necessitates independent development. Application of developed in-vessel repair techniques to operation and maintenance of SFRs enhanced their safety and integrity. There is little UCS replacement experience in the world and this experience and insights, which were accumulated in the replacement work of in-vessel large structure (UCS) used for more than 30 years, are expected to improve the in-vessel repair techniques in SFRs. (author)

  10. Structural dynamics in fast reactor accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fistedis, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Analyses and codes are under development combining the hydrodynamics and solid mechanics (and more recently the bubble dynamics) phenomena to gage the stresses, strains, and deformations of important primary components, as well as the overall adequacy of primary and secondary containments. An arbitrary partition of the structural components treated evolves into (1) a core mechanics effort; and (2) a primary system and containment program. The primary system and containment program treats the structural response of components beyond the core, starting with the core barrel. Combined hydrodynamics-solid mechanics codes provide transient stresses and strains and final deformations for components such as the reactor vessel, reactor cover, cover holddown bolts, as well as the pulses for which the primary piping system is to be analyzed. Both, Lagrangian and Eulerian two-dimensional codes are under development, which provide greater accuracy and longer durations for the treatment of HCDA. The codes are being augmented with bubble migration capability pertaining to the latter stages of the HCDA, after slug impact. Recent developments involve the adaptation of the 2-D Eulerian primary system code to the 2-D elastic-plastic treatment of primary piping. Pulses are provided at the vessel-primary piping interfaces of the inlet and outlet nozzles, calculation includes the elbows and pressure drops along the components of the primary piping system. Recent improvements to the primary containment codes include introduction of bending strength in materials, Langrangian mesh regularization techniques, and treatment of energy absorbing materials for the slug impact. Another development involves the combination of a 2-D finite element code for the reactor cover with the hydrodynamic containment code

  11. Mitigating IASCC of Reactor Core Internals by Post-Irradiation Annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-06-02

    This final report summarizes research performed during the period between September 2012 and December 2016, with the objective of establishing the effectiveness of post-irradiation annealing (PIA) as an advanced mitigation strategy for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). This was completed by using irradiated 304SS control blade material to conduct crack initiation and crack growth rate (CGR) experiments in simulated BWR environment. The mechanism by which PIA affects IASCC susceptibility will also be verified. The success of this project will provide a foundation for the use of PIA as a mitigation strategy for core internal components in commercial reactors.

  12. Mitigating IASCC of Reactor Core Internals by Post-Irradiation Annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Gary

    2017-01-01

    This final report summarizes research performed during the period between September 2012 and December 2016, with the objective of establishing the effectiveness of post-irradiation annealing (PIA) as an advanced mitigation strategy for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). This was completed by using irradiated 304SS control blade material to conduct crack initiation and crack growth rate (CGR) experiments in simulated BWR environment. The mechanism by which PIA affects IASCC susceptibility will also be verified. The success of this project will provide a foundation for the use of PIA as a mitigation strategy for core internal components in commercial reactors.

  13. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO 2 -PuO 2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  14. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  15. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors: A model for irradiation induced enhancement by local radiolysis in the porous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaignan, C; Salot, R [CEA/DRN/DTP, CENG-SECC, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    An analysis has been undertaken of the various cases of local enhancement of corrosion rate of zirconium alloys under irradiation. It is observed that in most cases a strong emission of energetic {beta}{sup -} is present leading to a local energy deposition rate higher than the core average. This suggests that the local transient radiolytic oxidizing species produced in the coolant by the {beta}{sup -} particles could contribute to corrosion enhancement, by increasing the local corrosion potential. This process is applicable to the local enhanced corrosion found in front of stainless steels structural parts, due to the contribution of Mn, and in front of Pt inserts or Cu-rich cruds. It explains also the irradiation corrosion enhancement of Cu-Zr alloys. Enhanced corrosion around neutron absorbing material is explained similarly by pair production from conversion of high energy capture photons in the cladding, leading to energetic electrons. The same process was found to be active with other highly ionizing species like {alpha} from Ni-rich alloys and fission products in homogeneous reactors. Due to the changes induced by the irradiation intensity on the concentration of the radiolytic species, the coolant chemistry, that controls the boundary conditions for oxide growth, has to be analyzed with respect to the local value of the energy deposition rate. An analysis has been undertaken which shows that, in a porous media, the water is exposed to a higher intensity than bulk water. This leads to a higher concentration of oxidizing radiolytic species at the root of the cracks of the porous oxide, and increases the corrosion rate under irradiation. This mechanism, deduced from the explanation proposed for localized irradiation enhanced corrosion, can be extended to the whole reactor core, where the general enhancement of Zr alloys corrosion under irradiation could be attributed to the general radiolysis in the porous zirconia. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  16. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  17. Design Studies for a Multiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation Experiments (MATRIX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Michael A.; Gougar, Hans D.; Ryskamp, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Should unforeseen circumstances lead to the decommissioning of ATR, the U.S. Government would be left without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. A survey was conducted in order to catalogue the anticipated needs of potential customers. Then, concepts were evaluated to fill the role for this reactor, dubbed the Multi-Application Thermal Reactor Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX). The baseline MATRIX design is expected to be capable of longer cycle lengths than ATR given a particular batch scheme. The volume of test space in In-Pile-Tubes (IPTs) is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. Furthermore, MATRIX has more locations of greater volume having high fast neutron flux than ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the lead MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design is developed further.

  18. Caramel fuel for research reactors: experience acquired in the fabrication, monitoring and irradiation of Osiris core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contenson, Ghislain de; Foulquier, Henri; Trotabas, Maria; Vignesoult, Nicole; Cerles, J.-M.; Delafosse, Jacques.

    1981-06-01

    A plate type nuclear fuel (Caramel fuel) has been developed in France in the framework of the various activities pursued in the design, fabrication and development of nuclear fuels by the CEA. This fuel can be adapted to various different categories of water cooled reactor (power reactors, marine propulsion reactors, urbain heating reactors, research reactors). The successful work conducted in this field led the realization of a complete core and reloads for the high performance research reactor, Osiris, at Saclay. The existing highly enriched U-Al alloy fuel was replaced by a non-proliferating low enrichment (7%) caramel fuel. This new core has been operating successfully since january 1980. A brief description of Caramel and its main advantages is given. The way in which it is fabricated is described together with the quality controls to which it is subjected. The qualification program and the main results deduced from it are also presented. The program used to monitor its in-pile behavior is described. The essential purpose of this program is to ensure the high performance of the fuel under irradiation. The successful operation of Osiris, which terminated 11 irradiation cycles on the 21st of April 1981 confirmed the correctness of the decisions made and the excellent performance that could be achieved with these fuel elements under the severe conditions encountered in a high performance research reactor [fr

  19. The development of fuel pins and material specimens mixed loading irradiation test rig in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. The development of the fuel-material hybrid rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, Yasuko; Someya, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, there were many tests using the irradiation rigs that it was possible to be set irradiation conditions for each compartment independently. In case of no alternative fuel element to irradiate after unloading the irradiated compartments, the irradiation test was restarted with the dummy compartment which the fuel elements was not mounted. If the material specimens are mounted in this space, it is possible to use the irradiation space effectively. For these reasons, the irradiation rig (hybrid rig) is developed that is consolidated with material specimens compartment and fuel elements compartment. Fuel elements and material specimens differ greatly with heat generation, so that the most important issue in developing of hybrid rig is being able to distribute appropriately the coolant flow which satisfies irradiation conditions. The following is described by this report. (1) It was confirmed that the flow distribution of loading the same irradiation rig with the compartment from which a flow demand differs could be satisfied. (2) It was confirmed that temperature setting range of hybrid rig could be equivalent to that of irradiation condition. (3) By standardizing the coolant entrance structure of the compartment lower part, the prospect which can perform easily recombination of the compartment from which a type differs between irradiation rigs was acquired. (author)

  20. RF structure design of the China Material Irradiation Facility RFQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxing; He, Yuan; Xu, Xianbo; Zhang, Zhouli; Wang, Fengfeng; Dou, Weiping; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Tieshan

    2017-10-01

    The radio frequency structure design of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the front end of China Material Irradiation Facility (CMIF), which is an accelerator based neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor material qualification, has been completed. The RFQ is specified to accelerate 10 mA continuous deuteron beams from the energies of 20 keV/u to 1.5 MeV/u within the vane length of 5250 mm. The working frequency of the RFQ is selected to 162.5 MHz and the inter-vane voltage is set to 65 kV. Four-vane cavity type is selected and the cavity structure is designed drawing on the experience of China Initiative Accelerator Driven System (CIADS) Injector II RFQ. In order to reduce the azimuthal asymmetry of the field caused from errors in fabrication and assembly, a frequency separation between the working mode and its nearest dipole mode is reached to 17.66 MHz by utilizing 20 pairs of π-mode stabilizing loops (PISLs) distributed along the longitudinal direction with equal intervals. For the purpose of tuning, 100 slug tuners were introduced to compensate the errors caused by machining and assembly. In order to obtain a homogeneous electrical field distribution along cavity, vane cutbacks are introduced and output endplate is modified. Multi-physics study of the cavity with radio frequency power and water cooling is performed to obtain the water temperature tuning coefficients. Through comparing to the worldwide CW RFQs, it is indicated that the power density of the designed structure is moderate for operation under continuous wave (CW) mode.

  1. Whole-Pin Furnace system: An experimental facility for studying irradiated fuel pin behavior under potential reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.C.; Donahue, D.A.; Pushis, D.O.; Savoie, F.E.; Holland, J.W.; Wright, A.E.; August, C.; Bailey, J.L.; Patterson, D.R.

    1990-05-01

    The whole-pin furnace system is a new in-cell experimental facility constructed to investigate how irradiated fuel pins may fail under potential reactor accident conditions. Extensive checkouts have demonstrated excellent performance in remote operation, temperature control, pin breach detection, and fission gas handling. The system is currently being used in testing of EBIR-II-irradiated Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel pins; future testing will include EBR-II-irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins. 7 refs., 4 figs

  2. 75 FR 62695 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The... nuclear fuel in transit? H. Why require a telemetric position monitoring system or an alternative tracking... nuclear fuel in transit. The interim final rule added 10 CFR 73.37, ``Requirements for Physical Protection...

  3. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection of Special Nuclear Material in Transit § 73.37 Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. (a) Performance objectives. (1...

  4. Formation of the high-spin Hf-179m2 isomer in reactor irradiations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.; Adam, Jindřich; Kulagin, EN.; Shabalin, EP.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2004), s. 438-441 ISSN 1054-660X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 134 Keywords : reactor irradiation * high-spin Hf-179m2 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.836, year: 2004

  5. Tensile properties and microstructure of helium injected and reactor irradiated V-20 Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.P.; Bloom, E.E.; Horak, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of preinjected helium followed by neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties and microstructure of V-20% Ti. These results will be used for the evaluation of the potential use of V-20% Ti in fusion reactor service

  6. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel and nuclear waste. 71.97 Section 71.97 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a) As specified in paragraphs (b), (c... advance notification of transportation of nuclear waste was published in the Federal Register on June 30...

  7. Using TRIGA Mark II research reactor for irradiation with thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolšek, Aljaž, E-mail: aljaz.kolsek@gmail.com; Radulović, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.radulovic@ijs.si; Trkov, Andrej, E-mail: andrej.trkov@ijs.si; Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code was used to design and perform calculations. • Characterization of the TRIGA Mark II ex-core irradiation facilities was performed. • The irradiation device was designed in the TRIGA irradiation channel. • The use of the device improves the fraction of thermal neutron flux by 390%. - Abstract: Recently a series of test irradiations was performed at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor for the Fission Track-Thermoionization Mass Spectrometry (FT-TIMS) method, which requires a well thermalized neutron spectrum for sample irradiation. For this purpose the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5) was used to computationally support the design of an irradiation device inside the TRIGA model and to support the actual measurements by calculating the neutron fluxes inside the major ex-core irradiation facilities. The irradiation device, filled with heavy water, was designed and optimized inside the Thermal Column and the additional moderation was placed inside the Elevated Piercing Port. The use of the device improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to the sum of epithermal and fast neutron flux inside the Thermal Column Port by 390% and achieves the desired thermal neutron fluence of 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2} in irradiation time of 20 h.

  8. Preparations for the shipment of RA-3 reactor irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Adrian; Novara, Oscar; Lafuente, Jose

    2002-01-01

    During the last quarter of 2000, in the Radioactive Waste Management Area of the Argentine National Commission of Atomic Energy (CNEA), located at Ezeiza Atomic Center (CAE), activities associated to the shipment of 207 MTR spent fuels containing high enrichment uranium were carried out within the Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Program launched by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The MTR spent fuel shipped to Savannah River Site (SRS) was fabricated in Argentina with 90% enriched uranium of US origin and it was utilized in the operation of the research and radioisotope production reactor RA-3 from 1968 until 1987. After a cooling period at the reactor, the spent fuel was transferred to the Central Storage Facility (CSF) located in the waste management area of CAE for interim storage. The spent fuel (SF) inventory consisted of 166 standard assemblies (SA) and 41 control assemblies (CA). Basically, the activities performed were the fuel conditioning operations inside the storage facility (remote transference of the assemblies to the operation pool, fuel cropping, fuel re-identification, loading in transport baskets, etc.) conducted by CNEA. The loading of the filled baskets in the transport casks (NAC-LWT) by means of intermediate transfer systems and loaded casks final preparations were conducted by NAC personnel (DOE's contractor) with the support of CNEA personnel. (author)

  9. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  10. NRC data base for power reactor surveillance programs and for irradiation experiments results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation damage of pressure vessel materials in nuclear reactors depends on many different factors, primarily fluence, fluence spectrum, fluence rate, irradiation temperature, and chemistry. These factors and, possibly, others such as heat treatment and type of flux used in weldments must be considered to reliably predict the pressure vessel embrittlement and to assure the safe operation of the reactor. Based on embrittlement predictions, decisions must be made concerning operating parameters, low-leakage fuel management, possible life extension, and the need for annealing of the pressure vessel. Large numbers of data obtained from surveillance capsules and test reactor experiments are needed, comprising many different materials and different irradiation conditions, to develop generally applicable damage prediction models that can be used for industry standards and regulatory guides. The US Nuclear Regulatory Agency has, therefore, sponsored a project to construct an Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) for a comprehensive collection of data concerning changes in material properties of pressure vessel steels due to neutron irradiation. A first version containing data from surveillance capsules of commercial power reactors, the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) Version 1, has been completed and is available to authorized users from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document provides a discussion of the features of the current database. 1 fig

  11. The irradiation test program for transmutation in the French Phenix fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.; Chaucheprat, P.; Fontaine, B.; Brunon, E.

    2004-01-01

    Put on commercial operation in July 1974, the French fast reactor Phenix reached a 100 000 hours operation time in september 2003. When the French law relative to long lived radioactive waste management was promulgated on December 1991, priority was given to Phenix to be run as a research reactor and to carry on a wide irradiation program dedicated to study transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products. After a major renovation program required to extend the reactor lifetime, Phenix power buildup took place in 2003. Experimental irradiations have been loaded in the core, involving components for heterogeneous and homogeneous transmutation modes, americium targets, technetium 99 metal pins and isolated isotopes for integral cross-sections measurements. Associated post- irradiated examination programs are already underway or planned. With new experiments to be loaded in the core in 2006 the Phenix reactor remains to be a powerful tool providing an important experimental data on fast reactors and on transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products, as well as it will contribute to gain further experience in the framework of the GENERATION IV International Forum. (authors)

  12. IRRADIATION CREEP AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoriashin, A. M.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.; Loltukhovsky, A. G.; Bochvar, A. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Russian ferritic/martensitic steels EP-450 and EP-823 were irradiated to 20-60 dpa in the BN-350 fast reactor in the form of pressurized creep tubes and small rings used for mechanical property tests. Data derived from these steels serves to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. It appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation-related densification. The irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F/M steels is about one-half that of austenitic steels, and that the loss of strength at test temperatures above 500 degrees C is a problem generic to all F/M steels. This conclusion is supported by post-irradiation measurement of short-term mechanical properties. At temperatures below 500 degrees C both steels retain their high strength (yield stress 0.2=550-600 MPa), but at higher test temperatures a sharp decrease of strength properties occurs. However, the irradiated steels still retain high post-irradiation ductility at test temperatures in the range of 20-700 degrees C.

  13. BNFL's experience in the sea transport of irradiated research reactor fuel to the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, I.A.; Porter, I.

    2000-01-01

    BNFL provides worldwide transport for a wide range of nuclear materials. BNFL Transport manages an unique fleet of vessels, designed, built, and operated to the highest safety standards, including the highest rating within the INF Code recommended by the International Maritime Organisation. The company has some 20 years of experience of transporting irradiated research reactor fuel in support of the United States' programme for returning US obligated fuel from around the world. Between 1977 and 1988 BNFL performed 11 shipments of irradiated research reactor fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the US. Since 1997, a further 3 shipments have been performed as part of an ongoing programme for Japanese research reactor operators. Where possible, shipments of fuel from European countries such as Sweden and Spain have been combined with those from Japan for delivery to the US. (author)

  14. Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy's Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006

  15. Calibration of the enigma code for Finnish reactor fuel with support from experimental irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelppe, S; Ranta-Puska, K [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-08-01

    Assessment by VTT of the ENIGMA fuel performance code, the original version by Nuclear Electric plc of the UK amended by a set of WWER specific materials correlations, is described. The given examples of results include analyses for BWR 9 x 9 fuel, BWR fuel irradiated in the reinstrumented test of an international Riso project, pre-characterized commercial WWER fuel irradiated in Loviisa reactor in Finland, and instrumented WWER test fuel irradiations in the MR reactor in Russia. The effects of power uncertainty and some model parameters are discussed. Considering the fact that the described cases all mean prototypic application of the code, the results are well encouraging. The importance of the accuracy in temperature calculations is emphasized. (author). 2 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab.

  16. Specific features of reactor or cyclotron {alpha}-particles irradiated beryllium microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomutov, A M [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Gromov, B F; Karabanov, V N [and others

    1998-01-01

    Studies were carried out into microstructure changes accompanying helium swelling of Be reactor neutron irradiated at 450degC or {alpha}-particles implanted in cyclotron to reach the same volume accumulation of He (6-8 ncm{sup 3} He/cm{sup 3} Be). The microstructures of reactor irradiated and implanted samples were compared after vacuum anneal at 600-800degC up to 50h. The irradiated samples revealed the etchability along the grain boundaries in zones formed by adequately large equilibrium helium pores. The width of the zones increased with the annealing time and after 50h reached 30{mu}. Depleted areas 2-3{mu} dia were observed in some regions of near grain boundary zones. The roles of grain boundaries and manufacturing pores as vacancies` sources and helium sinks are considered. (author)

  17. Tensile properties and microstructure of helium-injected and reactor-irradiated V-20 Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.P.; Bloom, E.E.; Horak, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructure of vanadium-20% titanium were examined following helium-injection and reactor irradiation. Helium was injected at ambient temperature to concentrations of 90 and 200 at. ppM; neutron irradiation was at 400, 575, 625, and 700 0 C to fluence of 3 x 10 26 n/m 2 , E > 0.1 MeV. Cavities representing negligible volume swelling were observed in all helium-injected specimens. Degradation of mechanical properties, especially loss of ductility due to helium, occurred at temperatures of 625 and 700 0 C. The levels of helium produced in the fusion spectrum can be expected to alter the response of vanadium alloys from that observed in fast reactor irradiations

  18. Tensile properties and microstructure of helium-injected and reactor-irradiated V-20 Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, M.P.; Bloom, E.E.; Horak, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructure of vanadium-20% titanium were examined following helium-injection and reactor irradiation. Helium was injected at ambient temperature to concentrations of 90 and 200 at. ppM; neutron irradiation was at 400, 575, 625, and 700/sup 0/C to fluence of 3 x 10/sup 26/ n/m/sup 2/, E > 0.1 MeV. Cavities representing negligible volume swelling were observed in all helium-injected specimens. Degradation of mechanical properties, especially loss of ductility due to helium, occurred at temperatures of 625 and 700/sup 0/C. The levels of helium produced in the fusion spectrum can be expected to alter the response of vanadium alloys from that observed in fast reactor irradiations.

  19. Characterisation of the epithermal neutron irradiation facility at the Portuguese research reactor using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, D G; Fernandes, A C; Santos, J P; Ramos, A R; Marques, J G; King, A

    2015-05-01

    The radiation field at the epithermal beamline and irradiation chamber installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear of Instituto Superior Técnico was characterised in the context of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) applications. Radiographic films, activation foils and thermoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neutron fluence and photon dose rates in the irradiation chamber. A fixed-source MCNPX model of the beamline and chamber was developed and compared to measurements in the first step towards planning a new irradiation chamber. The high photon background from the reactor results in the saturation of the detector and the current facility configuration yields an intrinsic insensitivity to various elements of interest for PGNAA. These will be addressed in future developments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study on the behavior of irradiated light water reactor fuel during out-of-pile annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Uno, Hisao; Sasajima, Hideo

    1988-11-01

    Using the pre-irradiated light water reactor fuel (burnup: 35 MWd/kgU) and the slightly irradiated NSRR fuel (burnup: 5.6 x 10 -6 MWd/kgU), FP gas release rate up to the temperature of 2273 K was measured through out-of-pile annealing test. Results of this experiment were compared with those of ORNL annealing test (SFD/HI-test series) performed in USA. Obtained conclusions are: (1) Maximum release rate of Kr gas in light water reactor fuel was 6.4 % min -1 at temperature of 2273 K. This was in good agreement with ORNL data. FP gas release rate during annealing test was increased greatly with increasing fuel burnup and annealing temperature. (2) No FP was detected in NSRR slightly irradiated fuel up to the temperature of 1913 K. (author)

  1. Determination of melting point of mixed-oxide fuel irradiated in a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Toshimichi

    1985-01-01

    The melting point of fuel is important to set its in-reactor maximum temperature in fuel design. The fuel melting point measuring methods are broadly the filament method and the capsule sealing method. The only instance of measuring the melting point of irradiated mixed oxide (U, Pu)O 2 fuel by the filament method is by GE in the United States. The capsule sealing method, while the excellent means, is difficult in weld sealing the irradiated fuel in a capsule within the cell. In the fast reactor development program, the remotely operated melting point measuring apparatus in capsule sealing the mixed (U, Pu)O 2 fuel irradiated in the experimental FBR Joyo was set in the cell and the melting point was measured, for the first time in the world. (Mori, K.)

  2. Positron annihilation studies on structural materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaraman, R.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Structural steels for nuclear reactors have renewed interest owing to the future advanced fission reactor design with increased burn-up goals as well as for fusion reactor applications. While modified austenitic steels continue to be the main cladding materials for fast breeder reactors, Ferritic/martensitic steels and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels are the candidate materials for future reactors applications in India. Sensitivity and selectivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy to open volume type defects and nano clusters have been extensively utilized in studying reactor materials. We have recently reviewed the application of positron techniques to reactor structural steels. In this talk, we will present successful application of positron annihilation spectroscopy to probe various structural materials such as D9, ferritic/martensitic, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and related model alloys, highlighting our recent studies. (author)

  3. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation

  4. Analysis on the post-irradiation examination of the HANARO miniplate-1 irradiation test for Kijang research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Man; Tahk, Young Wook; Jeong, Yong Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-08-15

    The construction project of the Kijang research reactor (KJRR), which is the second research reactor in Korea, has been launched. The KJRR was designed to use, for the first time, U–Mo fuel. Plate-type U–7 wt.% Mo/Al–5 wt.% Si, referred to as U–7Mo/Al–5Si, dispersion fuel with a uranium loading of 8.0 gU/cm{sup 3}, was selected to achieve higher fuel efficiency and performance than are possible when using U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}/Al dispersion fuel. To qualify the U–Mo fuel in terms of plate geometry, the first miniplates [HANARO Miniplate (HAMP-1)], containing U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel (8 gU/cm{sup 3}), were fabricated at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and recently irradiated at HANARO. The PIE (Post-irradiation Examination) results of the HAMP-1 irradiation test were analyzed in depth in order to verify the safe in-pile performance of the U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel under the KJRR irradiation conditions. Nondestructive analyses included visual inspection, gamma spectrometric mapping, and two-dimensional measurements of the plate thickness and oxide thickness. Destructive PIE work was also carried out, focusing on characterization of the microstructural behavior using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electron probe microanalysis was also used to measure the elemental concentrations in the interaction layer formed between the U–Mo kernels and the matrix. A blistering threshold test and a bending test were performed on the irradiated HAMP-1 miniplates that were saved from the destructive tests. Swelling evaluation of the U–Mo fuel was also conducted using two methods: plate thickness measurement and meat thickness measurement.

  5. Analysis on the post-irradiation examination of the HANARO miniplate-1 irradiation test for kijang research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Man Park

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The construction project of the Kijang research reactor (KJRR, which is the second research reactor in Korea, has been launched. The KJRR was designed to use, for the first time, U–Mo fuel. Plate-type U–7 wt.% Mo/Al–5 wt.% Si, referred to as U–7Mo/Al–5Si, dispersion fuel with a uranium loading of 8.0 gU/cm3, was selected to achieve higher fuel efficiency and performance than are possible when using U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel. To qualify the U–Mo fuel in terms of plate geometry, the first miniplates [HANARO Miniplate (HAMP-1], containing U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel (8 gU/cm3, were fabricated at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and recently irradiated at HANARO. The PIE (Post-irradiation Examination results of the HAMP-1 irradiation test were analyzed in depth in order to verify the safe in-pile performance of the U–7Mo/Al–5Si dispersion fuel under the KJRR irradiation conditions. Nondestructive analyses included visual inspection, gamma spectrometric mapping, and two-dimensional measurements of the plate thickness and oxide thickness. Destructive PIE work was also carried out, focusing on characterization of the microstructural behavior using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electron probe microanalysis was also used to measure the elemental concentrations in the interaction layer formed between the U–Mo kernels and the matrix. A blistering threshold test and a bending test were performed on the irradiated HAMP-1 miniplates that were saved from the destructive tests. Swelling evaluation of the U–Mo fuel was also conducted using two methods: plate thickness measurement and meat thickness measurement.

  6. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    ) and the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM), the NRC/Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) raised numerous safety-related issues regarding elevated-temperature structural integrity criteria. Most of these issues remained unresolved today. These critical licensing reviews provide a basis for the evaluation of underlying technical issues for future advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Major materials performance issues and high temperature design methodology issues pertinent to the ARR are addressed in the report. The report is organized as follows: the ARR reference design concepts proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory and four industrial consortia were reviewed first, followed by a summary of the major code qualification and licensing issues for the ARR structural materials. The available database is presented for the ASME Code-qualified structural alloys (e.g. 304, 316 stainless steels, 2.25Cr-1Mo, and mod.9Cr-1Mo), including physical properties, tensile properties, impact properties and fracture toughness, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, microstructural stability during long-term thermal aging, material degradation in sodium environments and effects of neutron irradiation for both base metals and weld metals. An assessment of modified versions of Type 316 SS, i.e. Type 316LN and its Japanese version, 316FR, was conducted to provide a perspective for codification of 316LN or 316FR in Subsection NH. Current status and data availability of four new advanced alloys, i.e. NF616, NF616+TMT, NF709, and HT-UPS, are also addressed to identify the R&D needs for their code qualification for ARR applications. For both conventional and new alloys, issues related to high temperature design methodology are described to address the needs for improvements for the ARR design and licensing. Assessments have shown that there are significant data gaps for the full qualification and licensing of the ARR structural materials. Development and evaluation of

  7. Seed irradiation facilities at TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najzer, M.

    1972-01-01

    Fast neutrons and gamma-rays with their high and low LET respectively are excellent complementary tools for investigation of the effect of different types of mutations. TRIGA Irradiation Facility and Thermal Column Irradiation Facility were designed and installed for the first time in the TRIGA tank and thermal column respectively. The basic idea of design was the use of depleted uranium as gamma-ray and thermal neutron shield and simultaneously as thermal to fast neutron converter. Low LET radiation, due to direct and thermal neutron capture gamma-rays, is strongly attenuated while fast neutron flux is increased. GIF is made of a cadmium tube inserted in a graphite block. It is located in the central thermal column channel. The basic idea is to convert thermal neutrons to gamma-rays by capture in the cadmium

  8. Database of Samples Irradiated at Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhd Husamuddin Abdul Khalil; Mohd Amin Sharifuldin Salleh; Julia Abdul Karim

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation has been made to data of irradiated samples for the type of sample requested for activation at RTP. Sample types are grouped with percentage of total throughputs to rule out the weight percent of every respective group. The database consists of radionuclide inventory of short and long half-life and high activity radionuclides such as Br and Au have been identified and that database has been constructed using a user-friendly Microsoft Access. Through this, trend of gamma exposure will easily be evaluated at experimental facilities and could ensure radiological effect towards safety and health is limited per Radiation Protection (Basic Safety Standard) Regulation 1988. This database places an important parameter to improve management system in acquiring information of the samples irradiated at RTP and will enhance the safety assurance and reliability of the experimental design basis. (author)

  9. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A., E-mail: paul.demkowicz@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Ploger, Scott A. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Harp, Jason M.; Winston, Philip L. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States); Rooyen, Isabella J. van [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Montgomery, Fred C.; Silva, Chinthaka M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Post-irradiation examination was performed on AGR-1 coated particle fuel. • Cesium release from the particles was very low in the absence of failed SiC layers. • Silver release was often substantial, and varied considerably with temperature. • Buffer and IPyC layers were found to play a key role in TRISO coating behavior. • Fission products palladium and silver were found in the SiC layer of particles. - Abstract: The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.6% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of {sup 110m}Ag from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocarbon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1 × 10{sup −4} to 5 × 10{sup −4} for {sup 154}Eu and 8 × 10{sup −7} to 3 × 10{sup −5} for {sup 90}Sr. The average {sup 134}Cs fractional release from compacts was <3 × 10{sup −6} when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98 × 10{sup 5} in the experiment experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving {sup 134}Cs fractional release in two capsules to approximately 10{sup −5}. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into

  10. Verification of Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internal Structures of Liquid Metal Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-02-01

    The reactor internal structures and components of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures and components. Reactor internals of LMR can not be visually examined due to opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing techniques using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the visual inspection of reactor internals. Recently, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium inspection. In this study, visualization technique, ranging technique and monitoring technique have been suggested for the remote inspection of reactor internals by using the waveguide sensor. The feasibility of these remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been evaluated by an experimental verification

  11. Verification of Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internal Structures of Liquid Metal Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-02-15

    The reactor internal structures and components of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures and components. Reactor internals of LMR can not be visually examined due to opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing techniques using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the visual inspection of reactor internals. Recently, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium inspection. In this study, visualization technique, ranging technique and monitoring technique have been suggested for the remote inspection of reactor internals by using the waveguide sensor. The feasibility of these remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been evaluated by an experimental verification.

  12. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    The reliability of nuclear power plants depends on the proper functioning of complex components over the whole life on the plant. Particular concern for reliability is directed to the primary pressure boundary. This report focuses on the portion of the primary system exposed to and significantly affected by neutron radiation. Experimental evidence from research programmes and from reactor surveillance programmes has indicated radiation embrittlement of a magnitude sufficient to raise doubts about reactor pressure vessel integrity. The crucial nature of the primary vessel function heightens the need to be alert to this problem, to which, fortunately, there are positive aspects: for example, steels have been developed which are relatively immune to radiation embrittlement. Further, awareness of such embrittlement has led to designs which can accomodate this factor. The nature of nuclear reactors, of the steels used in their construction, and of the procedures for interpreting embrittlement and minimizing the effects are reviewed with reference to the reactors that are expected to play a major role in electric power production from now to about the turn of the century. The report is intended as a manual or guidebook; the aim has been to make each chapter or major sub-division sufficiently comprehensive and self-contained for it to be understood and read independently of the rest of the book. At the same time, it is hoped that the whole is unified enough to make a complete reading useful and interesting to the several classes of reader that are involved with only specific aspects of the topic

  13. Present status of irradiation tests on tritium breeding blanket for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futamura, Yoshiaki; Sagawa, Hisashi; Shimakawa, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Kawamura, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    To develop a tritium breeding blanket for a fusion reactor, irradiation tests in fission reactors are indispensable for obtaining data on irradiation effects on materials, and neutronics/thermal characteristics and tritium production/recovery performance of the blanket. Various irradiation tests have been conducted in the world, especially to investigate tritium release characteristics from tritium breeding and neutron multiplier materials, and materials integrity under irradiation. In Japan, VOM experiments at JRR-2 for ceramic breeders and experiments at JMTR for ceramic breeders and beryllium as a neutron multiplier have been performed. Several universities have also investigated ceramic breeders. In the EC, the EXOTIC experiments at HFR in the Netherlands and the SIBELIUS, the LILA, the LISA and the MOZART experiments for ceramic breeders have carried out. In Canada, NRU has been used for the CRITIC experiments. The TRIO experiments at ORR(ORNL), experiments at RTNS-II, FUBR and ATR have been conducted in the USA. The last two are experiments with high neutron fluence aiming at investigating materials integrity under irradiation. The BEATRIX-I and -II experiments have proceeded under international collaboration of Japan, Canada, the EC and the USA. This report shows the present status of these irradiation tests following a review of the blanket design in the ITER CDA(Conceptual Design Activity). (author)

  14. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Kale J., E-mail: kalejs@umich.edu; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Dislocation loops were the prominent defect, but neutron irradiation caused higher loop density. • Grain boundaries had similar amounts of radiation-induced segregation. • The increment in hardness and yield stress due to irradiation were very similar. • Relative IASCC susceptibility was nearly identical. • The effect of dislocation channel step height on IASCC was similar. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni–Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed

  15. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels; Dano por radiacion en materiales estructurales de vasijas de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A{sup 2}). (Author)

  16. Austin: austenitic steel irradiation E 145-02 Irradiation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, F.; Konrad, J.

    1987-01-01

    Safety measures for nuclear reactors require that the energy which might be liberated in a reactor core during an accident should be contained within the reactor pressure vessel, even after very long irradiation periods. Hence the need to know the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity of structure materials that have received irradiation damage due to their utilization. The stainless steels used in the structures of reactors undergo damage by both thermal and fast neutrons, causing important changes in the mechanical properties of these materials. Various austenitic steels available as structural materials were irradiated or are under irradiation in various reactors in order to study the evolution of the mechanical properties at high deformation velocity as a function of the irradiation damage rate. The experiment called AUSTIN (AUstenitic STeel IrradiatioN) 02 was performed by the JRC Petten Establishment on behalf of Ispra in support of the reactor safety programme

  17. Evaluation of neutron irradiation embrittlement in the Korean reactor pressure vessel steels (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J. H.; Lee, B. S.; Chi, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Yoon, J. H.; Kwon, S. C.; Park, D. G.; Kang, Y. H.; Choo, K. N.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. K.; Shin, Y. T.; Cho, M. S.; Sohn, J. M.; Kim, D. S.; Choo, Y. S.; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Reactor pressure vessel materials, which were produced by a domestic company, Doosan Heavy Industries and construction Co., Ltd., have been evaluated using the neutron irradiation facility HANARO. For this evaluation, instrumented capsules were used for neutron irradiation of various kinds of specimens made of different heats of steels, which are VCD(Y4), VCD+Al(U4), Si+Al(Y5), U4 weld metal, and U4 HAZ, respectively. The fast neutron fluence levels ranged 1 to 5 (x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E>1MeV) depending on the specimens and the irradiation temperature was controlled within 290{+-}10 deg C. The test results showed that, in the ranking of the material properties of the base metals, both before and after neutron irradiation, Y5 is the best, U4 the next and Y4 the last. Y4 showed a substantial change by neutron irradiation as well as the properties was worse than others in the unirradiated state. However, Y5, which showed the best properties in unirradiated state, was also the best in the resistance for irradiation embrittlement and one can hardly detect the property change after irradiation. The weldment showed a reasonably good resistance to irradiation embrittlement while the unirradiated properties were worse than base metals. The RPV steels are all expected to meet the screening criteria of the USNRC codes and regulations during the end of plant life. 39 refs., 42 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  18. Qualification of the on-line power determination of fuel elements in irradiation devices in the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeeren, L.; Dekeyser, J.; Gouat, P.; Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Verwimp, A.; Weber, M.

    2005-01-01

    Fuel irradiation tests require an on-line monitoring of the fuel power. In the BR2 reactor, this is performed by continuously measuring the enthalpy change in the coolant of the irradiation device and complementing this information with data on power losses, heating of structure parts and spatial power profiles from mock-up test experiments and from calculations. Since a few years Monte Carlo codes (MCNP) are used, describing the BR2 core in great detail for every reactor cycle with its specific core load, yielding not only reliable relative values, but also calculated absolute local power values in agreement with data from PIE analyses. Several methods were conceived to combine the experimental and calculated data for the on-line calculation of the local linear power in the fuel elements; their internal consistency and the consistency with gamma spectroscopy data and data from radiochemical fission product analysis was checked. The data show that fuel irradiations in BR2 can be performed in a well-controlled way, with an accurate and reliable on-line follow-up of the fuel power. (author)

  19. RPV-1: a first virtual reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, St.

    2005-01-01

    The presented work was aimed at building a first VTR (virtual test reactor) to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels of nuclear reactor. It mainly consisted in: - modeling the formation of the irradiation induced damage in such steels, as well as their plasticity behavior - selecting codes and models to carry out the simulations of the involved mechanisms. Since the main focus was to build a first tool (rather than a perfect tool), it was decided to use, as much as possible, existing codes and models in spite of their imperfections. - developing and parameterizing two missing codes: INCAS and DUPAIR. - proposing an architecture to link the selected codes and models. - constructing and validating the tool. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or transmit data. A user friendly Python interface facilitates the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 relies on many simplifications and approximations and has to be considered as a prototype aimed at clearing the way. According to the functionalities targeted for RPV-1, the main weakness is a bad Ni and Mn sensitivity. However, the tool can already be used for many applications (understanding of experimental results, assessment of effects of material and irradiation conditions,....). (O.M.)

  20. U.S. fast reactor materials and structures program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, W.O.; Purdy, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. DOE has sponsored a vigorous breeder reactor materials and structures program for 15 years. Important contributions have resulted from this effort in the areas of design (inelastic rules, verified methods, seismic criteria, mechanical properties data); resolution of licensing issues (technical witnessing, confirmatory testing); construction (fabrication/welding procedures, nondestructive testing techniques); and operation (sodium purification, instrumentation and chemical analysis, radioactivity control, and in-service inspection. The national LMFBR program currently is being restructured. The Materials and Structures Program will focus its efforts in the following areas: (1) removal of anticipated licensing impediments through confirmation of the adequacy of structural design methods and criteria for components containing welds and geometric discontinuities, the generation of mechanical properties for stainless steel castings and weldments, and the evaluation of irradiation effects; (2) qualification of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and tribological coatings for design flexibility; (3) development of improved inelastic design guidelines and procedures; (4) reform of design codes and standards and engineering practices, leading to simpler, less conservative rules and to simplified design analysis methods; and (5) incorporation of information from foreign program

  1. A description of the Canadian irradiation-research facility proposed to replace the NRU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A G; Lidstone, R F; Bishop, W E; Talbot, E F; McIlwain, H [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-31

    To replace the aging NRU reactor, AECL has developed the concept for a dual-purpose national Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) that tests fuel and materials for CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactors and performs materials research using extracted neutron beams. The IRF includes a MAPLE reactor in a containment building, experimental facilities, and support facilities. At a nominal reactor power of 40 MW{sub t}, the IRF will generate powers up to 1 MW in natural-uranium CANDU bundles, fast-neutron fluxes up to 1.4 x 10{sup 18} n{center_dot}m{sup -2}{center_dot}s{sup -1} in Zr-alloy specimens, and thermal-neutron fluxes matching those available to the NRU beam tubes. (author). 9 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  2. Oxide glass structure evolution under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, C.; Peuget, S.; Charpentier, T.; Moskura, M.; Caraballo, R.; Bouty, O.; Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Jegou, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Structure of SHI irradiated glass is similar to the one of a hyper quenched glass. • D2 Raman band associated to 3 members ring is only observed in irradiated glass. • Irradiated state seems slightly different to an equilibrated liquid quenched rapidly. - Abstract: The effects of ion tracks on the structure of oxide glasses were examined by irradiating a silica glass and two borosilicate glass specimens containing 3 and 6 oxides with krypton ions (74 MeV) and xenon ions (92 MeV). Structural changes in the glass were observed by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a multinuclear approach ( 11 B, 23 Na, 27 Al and 29 Si). The structure of irradiated silica glass resembles a structure quenched at very high temperature. Both borosilicate glass specimens exhibited depolymerization of the borosilicate network, a lower boron coordination number, and a change in the role of a fraction of the sodium atoms after irradiation, suggesting that the final borosilicate glass structures were quenched from a high temperature state. In addition, a sharp increase in the concentration of three membered silica rings and the presence of large amounts of penta- and hexacoordinate aluminum in the irradiated 6-oxide glass suggest that the irradiated glass is different from a liquid quenched at equilibrium, but it is rather obtained from a nonequilibrium liquid that is partially relaxed by very rapid quenching within the ion tracks

  3. Structural changes of polytetrafluoroethylene during irradiation in oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuling; Fu, Congli; Gu, Aiqun; Yu, Zili

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of irradiation on PTFE structure and prepare modified PTFE micropowder, PTFE was irradiated with dose up to 4 MGy in oxygen at room temperature. The structures of both irradiated and unirradiated PTFE samples were comparatively characterized by IR, XPS, Raman spectra and XRD measurement. The results showed that new groups of acyl fluoride (COF), carboxylic acid (COOH) and trifluoromethyl (CF 3 ) were formed under heavy radiation exposure in oxygen. In addition, the expansion of crystallite size or crystal lattice was first reported for the irradiated PTFE. The formation of new chemical groups and the expansion of crystallite size were elucidated by structural changes occurring in irradiation. - Highlights: • The structural change of PTFE irradiated in O 2 is different from that in vacuum. • The double bond is not found in PTFE after irradiation in oxygen. • The new groups like COF, COOH and CF 3 are formed in PTFE after irradiation. • The expansion of crystallite size is observed in the irradiated PTFE

  4. A study on the irradiation effect of reactor materials using a cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Joon Hwa; Ji, Se Hwan; Kang, Yung Hwan; Park, Duk Keun; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    The objectives of the present study are to develop the simulation techniques of neutron irradiation through ion irradiation using a Cyclotron and small specimen techniques and to evaluate radiation effects of reactor materials. Effects of proton or neutron irradiation on domestic 12Cr-1MoV and SA508-3 steels were evaluated by small scale specimen test techniques, i.e, small punch and miniaturized tensile test. In order to study the radiation damage mechanism, irradiation effects of the steels were investigated by means of property change tests such as microstructure, physical and thermal properties. Feasibility study on application of a magnetic non-destructive methods to evaluate radiation effects on RPV materials was performed. 109 figs, 12 tabs, 102 refs. (Author).

  5. A study on the irradiation effect of reactor materials using a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Joon Hwa; Ji, Se Hwan; Kang, Yung Hwan; Park, Duk Keun; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung

    1994-12-01

    The objectives of the present study are to develop the simulation techniques of neutron irradiation through ion irradiation using a Cyclotron and small specimen techniques and to evaluate radiation effects of reactor materials. Effects of proton or neutron irradiation on domestic 12Cr-1MoV and SA508-3 steels were evaluated by small scale specimen test techniques, i.e, small punch and miniaturized tensile test. In order to study the radiation damage mechanism, irradiation effects of the steels were investigated by means of property change tests such as microstructure, physical and thermal properties. Feasibility study on application of a magnetic non-destructive methods to evaluate radiation effects on RPV materials was performed. 109 figs, 12 tabs, 102 refs. (Author)

  6. Interfacial degradation of organic composite material by irradiation in reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Shigehiro; Nishiura, Tetsuya; Okada, Toichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research

    1996-04-01

    Glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) with many kinds of matrix resins were made of E glass treated with silane as the reinforced material. Degradation of shearing strength of GFRP irradiated at low temperature was determined. It was clear from the results of comparing the degradation process with the fractured surface that the degradation was very affected by the radiation resistance of the bonded part between resin and coupling agents. It means that we had to be careful in the choice of interfacial treatments and epoxy matrices corresponded to it. (S.Y.)

  7. Evaluation of the french test reactors irradiation embrittlement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.; Dussarte, D.; Soulat, P.

    1988-07-01

    The shifts of CV 41J energy index temperatures due to irradiation measured in France have been stored in a data bank and are analysed. According to a simple physically based model which is here-after verified, correlations are proposed for Base Metal (BM) and Weld Metal (WM). The achemical and phosphorus components of the chemical factor are equivalent. However, nickel and copper play a leading part in BM and WM respectively. The copper nickel interaction is not evident. These correlations are for cleavage fracture and not for intergranular fracture. This work is subject to revision and extension

  8. Accurate analysis of pins irradiated in fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnaud, F.; Guichard, C.

    1976-01-01

    A device was developed for the chemical analysis of fissile materials in a whole fuel pin in order to determine U and Pu with an accuracy of about 0.1% in samples from 100 to 200g, irradiated at burn-up between 50 and 100.000MWd/t. This unit is provided with two shielded α hot cells. A dissolving device was developed which enables the dissolution of residues. Pu is determined by oxydation-reduction titration and U by the isotopic dilution method [fr

  9. Biological samples positioning device for irradiations on a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Gual, Maritza; Mas Milian, Felix; Deppman, Airton; Pinto Coelho, Paulo Rogerio

    2010-01-01

    For the demand of an experimental device for biological samples positioning system for irradiations on a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor in operation was constructed and started up a device for the place and remove of the biological samples from the irradiation channels without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The economical valuations are effected comparing with another type of device with the same functions. This work formed part of an international project between Cuba and Brazil that undertook the study of the induced damages by various types of ionizing radiation in DNA molecules. Was experimentally tested the proposed solution, which demonstrates the practical validity of the device. As a result of the work, the experimental device for biological samples irradiations are installed and operating in the radial beam hole No3(BH3) for more than five years at the IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor according to the solicited requirements the device. The designed device increases considerably the type of studies can be conducted in this reactor. Its practical application in research taking place in that facility, in the field of radiobiology and dosimetry, and so on is immediate

  10. The behavior of 131I in polymetatelluric acid irradiated in the nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilovski, C.

    1966-01-01

    Polymetarelluric acid, whose composition is (H 2 TeO 4 ) n , is successfully used at he Institute as a target for obtaining 131 I in the reactor. It is prepared by hearing orthotelluric acid in air at 160 deg C of in a steam of water vapor at 208 deg C. Analysis of the valency states of 131 I in irradiated (H 2 TeO 4 ) n prepared in either of the above ways shows a variable ratio of reduced and oxidized forms. A considerable increase of the reduced forms with increasing integral thermal neutron flux during irradiation in the reactor in the given interval has also been observed. In order to explain the above phenomenon (H 2 TeO 4 ) n was irradiated in the reactor under different conditions, with measurement of the wall temperature of the quartz ampoules containing the target material. Yields of reduced and oxidized form of 131 I were determined immediately after irradiation and after annealing of the target at temperatures from 60 deg C to 150 deg C. A considerable decrease in the yield of the reduced forms of 131 I on target annealing above 100 deg C was observed (author)

  11. The behavior of {sup 131}I in polymetatelluric acid irradiated in the nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilovski, C [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Hot Laboratory Department, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1966-01-15

    Polymetarelluric acid, whose composition is (H{sub 2}TeO{sub 4}){sub n}, is successfully used at the Institute as a target for obtaining {sup 131}I in the reactor. It is prepared by hearing orthotelluric acid in air at 160 deg C of in a steam of water vapor at 208 deg C. Analysis of the valency states of {sup 131}I in irradiated (H{sub 2}TeO{sub 4}){sub n} prepared in either of the above ways shows a variable ratio of reduced and oxidized forms. A considerable increase of the reduced forms with increasing integral thermal neutron flux during irradiation in the reactor in the given interval has also been observed. In order to explain the above phenomenon (H{sub 2}TeO{sub 4}){sub n} was irradiated in the reactor under different conditions, with measurement of the wall temperature of the quartz ampoules containing the target material. Yields of reduced and oxidized form of {sup 131}I were determined immediately after irradiation and after annealing of the target at temperatures from 60 deg C to 150 deg C. A considerable decrease in the yield of the reduced forms of {sup 131}I on target annealing above 100 deg C was observed (author)

  12. Irradiation performance of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' MK-1 driver fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itaki, Toshiyuki; Kono, Keiichi; Tachi, Hirokatsu; Yamanouchi, Sadamu; Yuhara, Shunichi; Shibahara, Itaru

    1985-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' completed it's breeder core (MK-I) operation in January 1982. The MK-I driver fuel assemblies were removed from the core sequencially in order of burnup increase and have been under postirradiation examination (PIE). The PIE has almost been completed for 30 assemblies including the highest burnup assemblies of 48,000 MWD/MTM. It has been confirmed that all fuel assemblies have exhibited satisfactory performance without detrimental assembly deformation or without any indications of fuel pin breach. The irradiation conditions of the MK-I core were somewhat more moderate than those conditions envisioned for prototypic reactor. However the results of the examination revealed the typical irradiation behavior of LMFBR fuels, although such characteristics were benign as compared with those anticipated in high burnup fuels. Systematic performance data have been accumulated through the fuel fabrication, irradiation and postirradiation examination processes. Based on these data, the MK-I fuel designing and fabrication techniques were totally confirmed. This technical experience and the associated insight into irradiation behavior have established a milestone to the next step of fast reactor fuel development. (author)

  13. Reactor structure and superconducting magnet system of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1993-01-01

    Fusion Experimental Reactors are one of the major steps toward realization of the fusion energy and the key objective are to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility prior to the Demo Fusion Reactor. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is one of experimental reactors and the conceptual design has been completed by the united efforts of USA, USSR, EC and Japan. In parallel with the conceptual design, key technology development in various areas has being conducted. This paper describes the overall design concepts and the latest technological achievements of the ITER reactor structure and superconducting magnet system. (author)

  14. Evolution of precipitation in reactor pressure vessel steel welds under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Kristina, E-mail: kristina.lindgren@chalmers.se [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Boåsen, Magnus [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Stiller, Krystyna [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Efsing, Pål [Department of Solid Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Vattenfall Ringhals AB, SE-430 22 Väröbacka (Sweden); Thuvander, Mattias [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Reactor pressure vessel steel welds are affected by irradiation during operation. The irradiation results in nanometre cluster formation, which in turn affects the mechanical properties of the material, e.g. the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is shifted to higher levels. In this study, cluster formation is characterised in high Ni (1.58%) low Cu (0.04%) steel welds identical to Ringhals R4 welds, using atom probe tomography in both surveillance material and in material irradiated at accelerated dose rates. Clusters containing mainly Ni and Mn, but also some Si and Cu were observed in all of the irradiated materials. Their evolution did not change drastically during irradiation; the clusters grew and new clusters were nucleated. Hence, both the cluster number density and the average size increased with irradiation time. Some flux effects were observed when comparing the high flux material and the surveillance material. The surveillance material has a lower cluster number density, but larger clusters. The resulting impact on the mechanical properties of these two effects cancel out, resulting in a measured hardness that seems to be on the same trend as the high flux material. The dispersed barrier hardening model with an obstacle strength factor of 0.15 was found to reproduce the increase in hardness. In the investigated high flux materials, the clusters' Cu content was higher. - Highlights: •Clustering in a low Cu, high Ni reactor pressure vessel steel weld is studied. •The clusters nucleate and grow during irradiation, and consist of Ni, Mn, Si, and Cu. •High flux neutron irradiated material is compared to surveillance material. •High flux was found to result in smaller clusters with a larger number density. •Hardness follows the same dependence on fluence, independent of flux.

  15. Irradiation experiment on fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides up to 7 at.% burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T.; Ogata, T.; Inoue, T.; Ougier, M.; Glatz, J.P.; Fontaine, B.; Breton, L.

    2007-01-01

    Fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides (MAs: Np, Am, Cm) and rare earths (REs) have been irradiated in the fast reactor PHENIX. In this experiment, four types of fuel alloys, U-19Pu-10Zr, U-19Pu-10Zr-2MA-2RE, U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA-5RE and U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA (wt.%), are loaded into part of standard metal fuel stacks. The postirradiation examinations will be conducted at ∼2.4, ∼7 and ∼11 at.% burnup. As for the low-burnup fuel pins, nondestructive postirradiation tests have already been performed and the fuel integrity was confirmed. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment for the intermediate burnup goal of ∼7 at.% was completed in July 2006. For the irradiation period of 356.63 equivalent full-power days, the neutron flux level remained in the range of 3.5-3.6 x 10 15 n/cm 2 /s at the axial peak position. On the other hand, the maximum linear power of fuel alloys decreased gradually from 305-315 W/cm (beginning of irradiation) to 250-260 W/cm (end of irradiation). The discharged peak burnup was estimated to be 6.59-7.23 at.%. The irradiation behavior of MA-containing metal fuels up to 7 at.% burnup was predicted using the ALFUS code, which was developed for U-Pu-Zr ternary fuel performance analysis. As a result, it was evaluated that the fuel temperature is distributed between ∼410 deg. C and ∼645 deg. C at the end of the irradiation experiment. From the stress-strain analysis based on the preliminarily employed cladding irradiation properties and the FCMI stress distribution history, it was predicted that a cladding strain of not more than 0.9% would appear. (authors)

  16. Preliminary conceptual design and analysis on KALIMER reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Bum

    1996-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to perform preliminary conceptual design and structural analyses for KALIMER (Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor) reactor structures to assess the design feasibility and to identify detailed analysis requirements. KALIMER thermal hydraulic system analysis results and neutronic analysis results are not available at present, only-limited preliminary structural analyses have been performed with the assumptions on the thermal loads. The responses of reactor vessel and reactor internal structures were based on the temperature difference of core inlet and outlet and on engineering judgments. Thermal stresses from the assumed temperatures were calculated using ANSYS code through parametric finite element heat transfer and elastic stress analyses. While, based on the results of preliminary conceptual design and structural analyses, the ASME Code limits for the reactor structures were satisfied for the pressure boundary, the needs for inelastic analyses were indicated for evaluation of design adequacy of the support barrel and the thermal liner. To reduce thermal striping effects in the bottom are of UIS due to up-flowing sodium form reactor core, installation of Inconel-718 liner to the bottom area was proposed, and to mitigate thermal shock loads, additional stainless steel liner was also suggested. The design feasibilities of these were validated through simplified preliminary analyses. In conceptual design phase, the implementation of these results will be made for the design of the reactor structures and the reactor internal structures in conjunction with the thermal hydraulic, neutronic, and seismic analyses results. 4 tabs., 24 figs., 4 refs. (Author)

  17. The irradiation creep in reactor graphites for HTR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veringa, H.J.; Blackstone, R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of restrained shrinkage experiments on a number of graphites in the temperature range 400 to 1400 0 C is described. A description is given of the experimental method and method of data evaluation. The results are compared with data from other sources. Analysis of data confirms that the creep coefficient, which is defined as the radiation induced creep strain per unit stress per unit neutron fluence, is inversely proportional to the pre-irradiation value of the Young's modulus of the material. The radiation creep coefficient increases with temperature in the range 400 to 1400 0 C. It can be represented by the sum of two temperature dependent functions, one of which is inversely proportional to the neutron flux density, the other independent of the neutron flux density. When the data are analysed in this way it is found that the graphites investigated in the present work, although made from widely different starting materials and by different processes, show the same dependence of the irradiation creep coefficient on the temperature and the neutron flux density. (author)

  18. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  19. Calandria cooling structure in pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyugaji, Takenori; Sasada, Yasuhiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To contrive the structure of a heavy water distributing device in a pressure tube reactor thereby to reduce the variation in the cooling function thereof due to the welding deformation and installation error. Constitution: A heating water distributing plate is provided at the lower part of the upper tubular plate of a calandria tank to form a heavy water distributing chamber between both plates and a plurality of calandria tubes. Heavy water which has flowed in the upper part of the heavy water distributing plate from the heavy water inlet nozzle flows down through gaps formed around the calandria tubes, whereby the cooling of the calandria tank and the calandria tubes is carried out. In the above described calandria cooling structure, a heavy water distributing plate support is provided to secure the heavy water distributing plate and torus-shaped heavy water distributing rings are fixed to holes formed in the heavy water distributing plate penetrating through the calandria tubes thereby to form torus-shaped heavy water outlet ports each having a space. (Seki, T.)

  20. Guidelines for prediction of irradiation embrittlement of operating WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This TECDOC has been developed under an International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled Evaluation of Radiation Damage of WWER Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) using Database on RPV Materials to develop the guidelines for prediction of radiation damage to WWER-440 PRVs. The WWER-440 RPV was designed by OKB Gidropress, Russian Federation, the general designer. Prediction of irradiation embrittlement of RPV materials is usually done in accordance with relevant codes and standards that are based on the large amounts of information from surveillance and research programmes. The existing Russian code (standard for strength calculations of components and piping in NPPs - PNAE G 7-002-86) for the WWER RPV irradiation embrittlement assessment was approved more than twenty years ago and based mostly on the experimental data obtained in research reactors with accelerated irradiation. Nevertheless, it is still in use and generally consistent with new data. The present publication presents the analyses using all available data required for more precise prediction of radiation embrittlement of WWER-440 RPV materials. Based on the fact that it contains a large amount of data from surveillance programmes as well as research programmes, the IAEA International Database on RPV Materials (IDRPVM) is used for the detailed analysis of irradiation embrittlement of WWER RPV materials. Using IDRPVM, the guideline is developed for assessment of irradiation embrittlement of RPV ferritic materials as a result of degradation during operation. Two approaches, i.e. transition temperatures based on Charpy impact notch toughness, as well as based on static fracture toughness tests, are used in RPV integrity evaluation. The objectives of the TECDOC are the analysis of irradiation embrittlement data for WWER- 440 RPV materials using IDRPVM database, evaluation of predictive formulae depending on chemical composition of the material, neutron fluence, flux, and

  1. Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams

  2. Irradiation tests on PHWR type fuel elements in TRIGA research reactor of INR Pitesti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horhoianu, Grigore [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). Nuclear Fuel Engineering Lab.; Sorescu, Ion [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). TRIGA Reactor Loop Facility; Parvan, Marcel [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania). Hot Cells Lab.

    2012-12-15

    Nine PHWR type fuel elements with reduced length were irradiated in loop A of the TRIGA Research Reactor of INR Pitesti. The primary objective of the test was to determine the performance of nuclear fuel fabricated at INR Pitesti at high linear powers in pressurized water conditions. Six fuel elements were irradiated with a ramp power history, achieving a maximum power of 45 kW/m during pre-ramp and of 64 kW/m in the ramp. The maximum discharge burnup was of 216 MWh/kgU. Another three fuel elements with reduced length were irradiated with declining power history. At the beginning of irradiation the fuel elements achieved a maximum linear power of 66 kW/m. The maximum fuel power was about 1.3 times the maximum expected in PHWR. The maximum discharge burnup was 205 MWh/kgU. The elements were destructively examined in the hot cells of INR Pitesti. Temperature-sensitive parameters such as UO{sub 2} grain growth, fission-gas release and sheath deformations were examined. The tests proved the feasibility of irradiating PHWR type fuel elements at linear powers up to 66 kW/m under pressurized water conditions and demonstrated the possibility of more flexible operation of this fuel in power reactors. This paper presents the results of the investigation. (orig.)

  3. Review of recent studies on neutron irradiation embrittlement in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Akira; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1983-06-01

    Recent studies in foreign countries (USA, France, FRG and UK) on neutron irradiation embrittlement have been reviewed. These studies are classified into four areas, such as 1) effect of chemical composition on irradiation embrittlement sensitivity, 2) postirradiation heat treatment for embrittlement relief, 3) fracture toughness evaluation of irradiated materials based on fracture mechanics analysis, and 4) effect of irradiation on fatigue crack propagation behavior. The first area mainly includes the studies related to the effects of copper, phosphorus impurities and nickel alloying and synergistic effect of these components, and furthermore, evaluation of Regulatory Guide 1.99 Rev.l. Studies in the second area show the effects of annealing condition (temperature and time) and metallugical condition on embrittlement relief, and evaluation of periodic annealing in the period of irradiation as a promising method for embrittlement control. Studies in the third area show the correlation between fracture toughness and Cv notch ductility changes with neutron irradiation, and J-R curves of irradiated materials based on the elasto-plastic fracture mechanics. In the forth area, most of studies are investigated in air condition but a few studies in reactor-grade water at high temperature and pressure. (author)

  4. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ?JOYO? fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor "JOYO" to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597°C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens.

  5. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ''JOYO'' fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597 C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni-Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed after proton and reactor irradiation, providing additional evidence that proton irradiation is a useful tool for accelerated testing of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steel.

  7. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration

  8. Doping of monocrystalline silicon with phosphorus by means of neutron irradiation at the IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonari, A.W.; Puget, M.A.C.

    1990-11-01

    The first neutron irradiation experiments with monocrystal silicon in the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN are related. The silicon is irradiated with phosphorus producing a N type semiconductor with a very small resistivity variation throughout the crystal volume. The neutrons induce nuclear reactions in Si-30 isotope and these atoms are then transformed in to phosphorous atoms. This process is known as Neutron Transmutation Doping. In order to irradiate the silicon crystals in the reactor, a specific device has been constructed, and it permits the irradiation of up to 2.5'' diameter monocrystals. (author)

  9. Study of optical radiation from SiO2 during reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Narui, Minoru; Kakuta, Tsunemi; Kayano, Hideo; Sagawa, Tsutomu; Sanada, Kazuo

    1994-01-01

    Optical radiations were observed from optical fibers under irradiation in a fission reactor, JMTR. A major part of the observed optical radiations is thought to be composed of broad optical radiation in the whole wavelength range studied in the present experiment. This broad optical radiation will be generated by the process of so-called Cherenkov radiation. Also, a sharp optical radiation peak was found at 1270 nm on a F-doped fiber. This peak is thought to relate with doped fluorine ions and ionizing gamma-ray irradiation. ((orig.))

  10. Simple computational modeling for human extracorporeal irradiation using the BNCT facility of the RA-3 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Ruben; Gonzalez, S.J.; Bellino, A.; Sztenjberg, M.; Pinto, J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Gadan, M.; Pozzi, Emiliano; Schwint, Amanda E.; Heber, Elisa M.; Trivillin, V.A.; Zarza, Leandro G.; Estryk, Guillermo; Miller, M.; Bortolussi, S.; Soto, M.S.; Nigg, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple computational model of the reactor RA-3 developed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The model parameters are adjusted in order to reproduce experimental measured points in air and the source validation is performed in an acrylic phantom. Performance analysis is carried out using computational models of animal extracorporeal irradiation in liver and lung. Analysis is also performed inside a neutron shielded receptacle use for the irradiation of rats with a model of hepatic metastases.The computational model reproduces the experimental behavior in all the analyzed cases with a maximum difference of 10 percent. (author)

  11. Correlation methodology for predicting in-service irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure steels is the consequence of altered microstructure due to both irradiation and time-at-temperature. Relatively poor characterisation of the initial microstructure and chemistry, and inaccurate dosimetry and temperature control, as well as failure properly to correlate these variables, have all contributed to a very large scatter in the experimental embrittlement data base. This has made improvement of the basic understanding of embrittlement very difficult. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a more realistic approach to utilising the data base. This is discussed, and proposals are made. (author)

  12. Effects of nickel on irradiation embrittlement of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This TECDOC was developed under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled Effects of Nickel on Irradiation Embrittlement of Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels. This CRP is the sixth in a series of CRPs to determine the influence of the mechanism and quantify the influence of nickel content on the deterioration of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels of the Ni-Cr-Mo-V or Mn-Ni-Cr-Mo types. The scientific scope of the programme includes procurement of materials, determination of mechanical properties, irradiation and testing of specimens in power and/or test reactors, and microstructural characterization. Eleven institutes from eight different countries and the European Union participated in this CRP and six institutes conducted the irradiation experiments of the CRP materials. In addition to the irradiation and testing of those materials, irradiation experiments of various national steels were also conducted. Moreover, some institutes performed microstructural investigations of both the CRP materials and national steels. This TECDOC presents and discusses all the results obtained and the analyses performed under the CRP. The results analysed are clear in showing the significantly higher radiation sensitivity of high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%) compared with the lower nickel base metal (1.2 wt%). These results are supported by other similar results in the literature for both WWER-1000 RPV materials, pressurized water reactor (PWR) type materials, and model alloys. Regardless of the increased sensitivity of WWER-1000 high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%), the transition temperature shift for the WWER-1000 RPV design fluence is still below the curve predicted by the Russian code (standard for strength calculations of components and piping in NPPs - PNAE G 7-002-86). For higher fluence, no data were available and the results should not be extrapolated. Although manganese content was not incorporated directly in this CRP

  13. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

  14. Direct digital control of furnaces irradiated in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joumard, R.

    1969-01-01

    An experimental direct digital control system has been realised in the 'C.E.N.G.', in order to verify that a computer makes easier the control of the experiments done in the nuclear reactors and to solve the theoretical and technical difficulties. The regulation is applied to thermal processes. The sampled data systems theory permits to choose the type of an efficient and simple digital compensator, and to establish a diagram which gives the values of the correcting parameters (obtained by minimizing the difference between the output and the input when perturbations occur). The programme execute, in simultaneity, supervision and regulation. Complex possibilities of printing out measures and alarms existed. The computer works out an incremental correction which makes step motors to turn. These motors act on the heating organs. The theoretical values and answers have been confirmed. The accuracy was limited essentially by the input quantification (1/1000 th). The comfort of such a system has been noticeable. (author) [fr

  15. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment

  16. Irradiations under magnetic field. Measurement of resistivity sample irradiations between 100 and 500 deg C in a swimming-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauleve, J.; Marchand, A.; Blaise, A.

    1964-01-01

    An oven is described which enables the irradiation of small samples in the maximum neutron flux of a swimming-pool reactor of 15 MW (Siloe), at temperatures of between 100 and 500 deg.C defined to ± 0,5 deg.C, The oven is very simple from the technological point of view, and has a diameter of only 27 mm, This permits resistivity measurements to be carried out under irradiation in the reactor, or as another example, it enables irradiations in a magnetic field of 5000 oersteds, created by an immersed solenoid. (authors) [fr

  17. Present status of SiCf/SiC composites as low-activation structural materials of fusion reactor in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Hasegawa, A.; Noda, T.

    2001-01-01

    The outline of research subjects on SiCf/SiC composites to apply to the structural components of fusion reactors are described and present status on material development of SiCf/SiC composites in Japan is reviewed. Irradiation experiments of the composites using fission reactors conducted by international collaborations to clarify their radiation response and to optimize the fabrication processes are introduced. (author)

  18. Determination of irradiated reactor uranium in soil samples in Belarus using 236U as irradiated uranium tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladislav P; Matusevich, Janna L; Kudrjashov, Vladimir P; Boulyga, Sergei F; Becker, J Sabine

    2002-12-01

    This work presents experimental results on the distribution of irradiated reactor uranium from fallout after the accident at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in comparison to natural uranium distribution in different soil types. Oxidation processes and vertical migration of irradiated uranium in soils typical of the 30 km relocation area around Chernobyl NPP were studied using 236U as the tracer for irradiated reactor uranium and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as the analytical method for uranium isotope ratio measurements. Measurements of natural uranium yielded significant variations of its concentration in upper soil layers from 2 x 10(-7) g g(-1) to 3.4 x 10(-6) g g(-1). Concentrations of irradiated uranium in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers at the investigated sampling sites varied from 5 x 10(-12) g g(-1) to 2 x 10(-6) g g(-1) depending on the distance from Chernobyl NPP. In the majority of investigated soil profiles 78% to 97% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still contained in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers. The physical and chemical characteristics of the soil do not have any significant influence on processes of fuel particle destruction. Results obtained using carbonate leaching of 236U confirmed that more than 60% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still in a tetravalent form, ie. it is included in the fuel matrix (non-oxidized fuel UO2). The average value of the destruction rate of fuel particles determined for the Western radioactive trace (k = 0.030 +/- 0.005 yr(-1)) and for the Northern radioactive trace (k = 0.035 + 0.009 yr(-1)) coincide within experimental errors. Use of leaching of fission products in comparison to leaching of uranium for study of the destruction rate of fuel particles yielded poor coincidence due to the fact that use of fission products does not take into account differences in the chemical properties of fission products and fuel matrix (uranium).

  19. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    In this conference are presented papers dealing with swelling of metals and alloys, (and specially ferritic steels), structural evolution and stability under irradiation, modifications of mechanical properties, consequences on the behaviour of fuel elements and the optimization of materials selection, and irradiation creep [fr

  20. Changes in plasma membrane structure upon irradiation on thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreval', V.I.

    1993-01-01

    Thymocytes were irradiated with doses of 4 to 10 4 Gy. The binding of 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulphonate and Ca 2+ to plasma membranes; viscosity and lipid peroxidation; Stern-Folmer constant; and the number of Sh-groups of membrane proteins were determined. The structural changes in plasma membranes after irradiation of thymocytes were found to be cooperative

  1. Progress in the development of the blanket structural material for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.L.; Bloom, E.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Wiffen, F.W.; Gold, R.E.; Holmes, J.J.; Reuther, P.C. Jr.; Rosenwasser, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    The Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance Program has become more focused since the last Fusion Reactor Technology Conference two years ago. Since austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels are candidate structural materials for the near-term reactors ETF and INTOR and austenitic stainless steel is also the preferred structural material for the steady-state commercial fusion reactor, STARFIRE, a vigorous experimental program is under way to identify the best alloy from each of these alloy classes and to provide the engineering data base in a timely manner. In addition the comprehensive program that includes high-strength Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, reactive and refractory metals, and advanced concepts continues in an orderly fashion

  2. Neutron Spectrum Parameters In Inner Irradiation Channel Of The Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) For Use In Absolute And KO-NAA Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, S.A; Balogun, G.I; Mayaki, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    In Nigeria, the first Nuclear Reactor achieved critically on February 03, 2004 at about 11:35 GMT and has been commissioned or training and research. It is a Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR), code-named Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1). NIRR-1 has a tan-in-pool structural configuration and a nominal thermal power rating of 30 Kw. With a built-in clean old core excess reactivity of 3.77 mk determined during the on-site zero and critically experimental, the reactor can operate for a n.cm-2 .s-1 in the inner irradiation channels). Under these conditions, the reactor can operate with the same fuel loading for over ten years with a burn-up of <1%. A detailed description of operating characteristics for NIRR-1, measured during the on-site zero-power and criticality experiments has been given elsewhere. In order to extend its utilization to include absolute and ko-NAA methods, the neutron spectrum parameters in the irradiation channels: power and critically experiments has been given elsewhere. In order to extend it's the irradiation channels: thermal-to-epithermal flux ration, F; and epithermal flux shape factor, a in both the inner and outer irradiation channels must be determined experimentally. In this work, we have developed and experimental procedure for monitoring the neutron spectrum parameters in an inner irradiation channel based on irradiation and gamma-ray counting of detector foils via (n,y), (n,p) and (n,a) dosimetry reactions. Results obtained indicate that a thermal neutron flux of (5.14+-0.02) x 1011 n/c m2.s determined by foil activation method in the inner irradiation channel, B2, at a power level of 15.5 kw corresponds to the flux indicators on the control console and the micro-computer control system respectively. Other parameters of the neutron spectrum determined for inner irradiation channel B2, are: a -0.0502+0.003; 18.92+-0.14; F = 3.87=0.23. The method was validated through the comparison of our result with published neutron spectrum

  3. Impact on breeding rate of different Molten Salt reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiwei; Mei Longwei; Cai Xiangzhou; Chen Jingen; Guo Wei; Jiang Dazhen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has several advantages over the other Generation IV reactor. Referred to the French CNRS research and compared to the fast reactor, super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor type is slightly lower and beading rate reaches 1.002. Purpose: The aim is to explore the best conversion zone layout scheme in the super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor. This study can make nuclear fuel as one way to solve the energy problems of mankind in future. Methods: Firstly, SCALE program is used for molten salt reactor graphite channel, molten salt core structure, control rods, graphite reflector and layer cladding structure. And the SMART modules are used to record the important actinides isotopes and their related reaction values of each reaction channel. Secondly, the thorium-uranium conversion rate is calculated. Finally, the better molten salt reactor core optimum layout scheme is studied comparing with various beading rates. Results: Breading zone layout scheme has an important influence on the breading rate of MSR. Central graphite channels in the core can get higher neutron flux irradiation. And more 233 Th can convert to 233 Pa, which then undergoes beta decay to become 233 U. The graphite in the breading zone gets much lower neutron flux irradiation, so the life span of this graphite can be much longer than that of others. Because neutron flux irradiation in the uranium molten salt graphite has nearly 10 times higher than the graphite in the breading zone, it has great impact on the thorium-uranium conversion rates. For the super epithermal neutron spectrum molten salt reactors, double salt design cannot get higher thorium-uranium conversion rates. The single molten salt can get the same thorium-uranium conversion rate, meanwhile it can greatly extend the life of graphite in the core. Conclusions: From the analysis of calculation results, Blanket breeding area in different locations in the core can change the breeding rates of thorium

  4. Exchange method for reactor inner structural member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Koichi; Ono, Shigeki; Uozumi, Hiroto; Takada, Ko; Watanabe, Yoshio; Ito, Masato; Yoshie, Yutaka [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nihei, Ken-ichi

    1996-09-13

    A dryer and a shroud head are removed from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of a BWR type reactor, and they are stacked in a dryer and steam separator pool (DSP). Next, fuel assemblies, fuel support fittings, control rods and control rode guide tubes are successively removed and stored in an exclusive storage vessel. Then, guide rods are removed by cutting and temporarily placed in the DSP. Then, an upper lattice plate and a reactor core support plate are successively removed and temporarily placed in the DSP. Reactor core spray pipes are removed by cutting and temporarily placed in the DSP. Then, a shroud support cylinder is cut, and the shroud is removed and temporarily placed in the DSP. Subsequently, reactor water is drained, and a reactor core shroud to which the upper lattice plate and the reactor core support plate are previously disposed is suspended in the RPV, and the existent shroud support cylinder and the new reactor core shroud are welded. (I.N.)

  5. Using activation method to measure neutron spectrum in an irradiation chamber of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xuemei; Liu Guimin; Wang Xiaohe; Li Da; Meng Lingjie

    2014-01-01

    Neutron spectrum should be measured before test samples are irradiated. Neutron spectrum in an irradiation chamber of a research reactor was measured by using activation method when the reactor is in normal operation under 2 MW. Sixteen kinds of non-fission foils (19 reaction channels) were selected, of which 10 were sensitive to thermal and intermediate energy regions, while the others were of different threshold energy and sensitive to fast energy regions. By measuring the foil radioactivity, the neutron spectrum was unfolded with the iterative methods SAND-II and MSIT. Finally, shielding corrections of group cross-section and main factors affecting the calculation accuracy were studied and the uncertainty of solution was analyzed using the Monte Carlo method in the process of SAND-II. (authors)

  6. Description of the PIE facility for research reactors irradiated fuels in CNEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisca, A.; Coronel, R.; Homberger, V.; Quinteros, A.; Ratner, M.

    2002-01-01

    The PIE Facility (LAPEP), located at the Ezeiza Atomic Center (CAE), was designed to carry out destructive and non-destructive post-irradiation examinations (PIE) on research and power reactor spent fuels, reactor internals and other irradiated materials, and to perform studies related with: Station lifetime extension; Fuel performance; Development of new fuels; and Failures and determination of their causes. LAPEP is a relevant facility where research and development can be carried out. It is worth mentioning that in this facility the PIE corresponding to the Surveillance Program for the Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant (CNA-1) were successfully performed. Materials testing during the CNA-1 repair and the study of failures in fuel element plugs of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE) were also performed. (author)

  7. Influence of neutron energy on formation of radioisotopes during the irradiation of targets in reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Vorona

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Method of calculation of nuclear transformations in irradiated targets is realized for selection of optimal conditions for accumulation of radioisotopes in reactor, taking into account contributions of different energy neutrons (thermal, resonance and fast. Wide potentialities of program complex MCNP-4C based on the method of statistical testing (Monte Carlo method were used. Positive in proposed method is that all calculations starting from spectra and fluxes of neutrons in reactor and completing by quantity of accumulating nuclei carry out within the framework of the same methodological approach. It was shown by the example of radioactive 98Mo production in Mo98Mo(n, γ99Mo reaction that for achievement of maximal yield of target radionuclide. it is necessary to irradiate start targets of Molybdenum in hard spectrum with essential contribution of resonance neutrons.

  8. Application of advanced irradiation analysis methods to light water reactor pressure vessel test and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, R.; Dudey, N.; McElroy, W.; Wullaert, R.; Fabry, A.

    1977-01-01

    Inaccurate characterization and inappropriate application of neutron irradiation exposure variables contribute a substantial amount of uncertainty to embrittlement analysis of light water reactor pressure vessels. Damage analysis involves characterization of the irradiation environment (dosimetry), correlation of test and surveillance metallurgical and dosimetry data, and projection of such data to service conditions. Errors in available test and surveillance dosimetry data are estimated to contribute a factor of approximately 2 to the data scatter. Non-physical (empirical) correlation procedures and the need to extrapolate to the vessel may add further error. Substantial reductions in these uncertainties in future programs can be obtained from a more complete application of available damage analysis tools which have been developed for the fast reactor program. An approach to reducing embrittlement analysis errors is described, and specific examples of potential applications are given. The approach is based on damage analysis techniques validated and calibrated in benchmark environments

  9. Reference equilibrium core with central flux irradiation facility for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israr, M.; Shami, Qamar-ud-din; Pervez, S.

    1997-11-01

    In order to assess various core parameters a reference equilibrium core with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel for Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) was assembled. Due to increased volume of reference core, the average neutron flux reduced as compared to the first higher power operation. To get a higher neutron flux an irradiation facility was created in centre of the reference equilibrium core where the advantage of the neutron flux peaking was taken. Various low power experiments were performed in order to evaluate control rods worth and neutron flux mapping inside the core. The neutron flux inside the central irradiation facility almost doubled. With this arrangement reactor operation time was cut down from 72 hours to 48 hours for the production of the required specific radioactivity. (author)

  10. The dangers of irradiate uranium in nuclear reactors; Les dangers de l'uranium irradie dans les reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammet, H; Joffre, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The danger of the uranium cans sur-activated by the use in the nuclear reactors is triple: - Irradiation from afar, during manipulations of the cans. - Contamination of air when decladding. - Contamination of air by fire of uranium in a reactor in function The first two dangers are usual and can be treated thanks to the rules of security in use in the atomic industry. The third has an accidental character and claimed for the use of special and exceptional rules, overflowing the industrial setting, to reach the surrounding populations. (authors) [French] Le danger des cartouches d'uranium suractive par utilisation dans les reacteurs nucleaires est triple: - Irradiation a distance, lors des manipulations des cartouches. - Contamination de l'air au moment de leur degainage. - Contamination de l'air par incendie d'uranium dans un reacteur en fonctionnement. Les deux premiers dangers sont habituels et peuvent etre traites grace aux regles de securite en usage dans l'industrie atomique. Le troisieme revet un caractere accidentel et reclame l'emploi de regles speciales et exceptionnelles, debordant le cadre industriel, pour atteindre celui des populations environnantes. (auteurs)

  11. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Département Matériaux et Mécanique des Composants, Les Renardières, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a “grey alloy” approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe–C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe–C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  12. Structural mechanisms of the flux effect for VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Zabusov, O.; Frolov, A.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    To justify the lifetime extension of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessels (RPV) up to 60 years and more it is necessary to expand the existing surveillance samples database to beyond design fluence by means of accelerated irradiation in a research reactor. Herewith since the changes in mechanical properties of materials under irradiation are due to occurring structural changes, correct analysis of the data obtained at accelerated irradiation of VVER-1000 RPV materials requires a clear understanding of the structural mechanisms that are responsible for the flux effect in VVER-1000 RPV steels. Two mechanisms are responsible for radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels: the hardening one (radiation hardening due to formation of radiation-induced Ni-based precipitates and radiation defects) and non-hardening one (due to formation of impurities segregations at grain boundaries - reversible temper brittleness). In this context for an adequate interpretation of the mechanical tests results when justifying the lifetime extension of existing units a complex of comparative structural studies (TEM, SEM and AES) of VVER-1000 RPV materials irradiated in different conditions (in research reactor IR-8 and within surveillance samples) was performed. It is shown that the flux effect is observed for materials with high nickel content (weld metals with Ni content > 1.35%) and it is mostly due to the contribution of non-hardening mechanism of radiation embrittlement (the difference in the accumulation kinetics of grain boundary phosphorus segregation) and somewhat contribution of the hardening mechanism (the difference in density of radiation-induced precipitates). Therefore when analyzing the results obtained from the accelerated irradiation of VVER-1000 WM the correction for the flux effect should be made. (authors)

  13. Growth of optical transmission loss at 850 nm in silica core optical fibers during fission reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, T.; Narui, M.; Sagawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    Pure, OH-doped and F-doped silica core optical fibers were irradiated in a fission reactor at 400±10 K using an electric heater at a reactor power greater than 10 MW (20% of the full power). The temperature was not controlled well at the early stage of the reactor startup, when the temperature was about 320-340 K. The optical fibers were irradiated with a fast neutron (E>1 MeV) flux of 3.2 x 10 17 n/cm 2 s and a gamma dose rate of 3 x 10 3 Gy/s for 527 h. Optical transmission loss at 850 nm was measured in situ during irradiation. A prompt increase in optical transmission loss was observed as irradiation started, which was probably due to dynamic irradiation effects caused by short-lived and transient defects and is probably recoverable when irradiation ceases. After the prompt increase in optical transmission loss, a so-called radiation hardening was observed in fibers containing OH. Radiation hardening was also observed in 900 ppm OH-doped fiber at the second startup. The optical transmission loss increased linearly with irradiation dose, denoted as the accumulated loss, which we believe is due to irradiation-induced long-lived defects. Accumulated loss dominates radiation-induced optical transmission loss in a fission reactor irradiation. (orig.)

  14. Influence of geometrical parameters of the VVER-1000 reactor construction elements to internals irradiation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. M. Pugach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations to determine the influences of geometrical parameters of the calculational VVER-1000 reactor model to the results of internal irradiation condition determination are carried out. It is shown that the values of appropriate sensitivity matrix elements are not dependent on a height coordinate for any core level, but there is their azimuthal dependence. Maximum possible relative biases of neutron fluence due to inexact knowledge of internal geometrical parameters are obtained for the baffle and the barrel.

  15. Ion irradiation studies of the origins of pressurized water reactor fuel assembly deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengstler-Eger, Rosmarie Martina

    2012-01-01

    The presented thesis studies ion irradiation damage in Zr-based alloys for pressurized water reactors to explain the origins of unexpectedly high fuel assembly growth in some plants. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the effects of temperature, dose, hydrogen content of the alloy and tensile stress. A clear correlation between the stress orientation towards the crystal lattice and the density of the dislocation loops which are responsible for increased growth was found.

  16. NRX and NRU reactor research facilities and irradiation and examination charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-08-01

    This report details the irradiation and examination charges on the NRX and NRU reactors at the Chalk River Nuclear Labs. It describes the NRX and NRU research facilities available to external users. It describes the various experimental holes and loops available for research. It also outlines the method used to calculate the facilities charges and the procedure for applying to use the facilities as well as the billing procedures.

  17. Safety assessment of U–Mo fuel mini plates irradiated in HANARO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Daeseong; Kim, Haksung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses of U–Mo fuel irradiated in HANARO reactor. • A mock-up irradiation target was designed and tested to measure the flow rate. • During normal operation, boiling does not occur. • During limiting accidents, boiling occurs. However, fuel integrity is maintained. - Abstract: Neutronic and thermal hydraulic characteristics of U–Mo fuel mini plates irradiated in the HANARO reactor were analyzed for the safety assessment of these plates. A total of eight fuel plates were double-stacked; each stack contained three 8.0 gU/cc U–7Mo fuel plates and one 6.5 gU/cc U–7Mo fuel plate. The neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses were carried out using the MCNP code and TMAP code, respectively. The core status used in the study was the equilibrium core, and four Control Absorber Rod (CAR) locations were considered: 350 mm, 450 mm, 550 mm, and 650 mm away from the bottom of the core. For the fuels in the lower stack, the maximum heat flux was found at the CAR located at 450 mm. For the fuels in the upper stack, the maximum heat flux was found at the CAR located at 650 mm. The axial power distributions for the upper and lower stacks were selected on the basis of thermal margin analyses. A mock-up irradiation target assembly was designed and tested at the out-of-pile test facility to measure the flow rate through the irradiation site, given that the maximum flow rate through the irradiation site at the HANARO reactor is limited to 12.7 kg/s. For conservative analyses, measurement and correlation uncertainties and engineering hot channel factors were considered. During normal operation, the minimum ONB temperature margins for the lower and upper stacks are 41.6 °C and 31.8 °C, respectively. This means that boiling does not occur. However, boiling occurs during the limiting accidents. Nevertheless, the fuel integrity is maintained since the minimum DNBR are 1.96 for the Reactivity Insertion Accident (RIA) and 2

  18. Thermal-hydraulic safety aspects related to irradiation capabilities in MTR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khedr, A.

    2009-01-01

    MTR research reactor such as ETRR-2 is an open pool type reactor that has a capability for irradiation into a number of irradiation boxes (IBs) installed at different positions on a separate grid called irradiation grid (I G). The I B has a lower removable plug to open or close its lower nozzle according to the I B is used or not.Increasing the used No. of I Bs in irradiation means that a valuable change in the flow distribution on the I G will occur. This paper is focused on the optimum number of I Bs that could be used without deterioration the cooling of I G components and avoiding the formation of hot spots. RELAP5 system code is used for thermal hydraulic analysis of the I G cooling system. Mathematical models and fortran program is developed to calculate the heat distribution in the I G components and the equivalent nozzle diameter that compensate the I B pressure drop due to the irradiated material (I M). This equivalent diameter simulates the used I B nozzle in the RELAP5 input deck. The results show that, the internal flow into the I Bs has significant effect on the coolability of the I G components. The number of I Bs that can be used is inversely proportional with the reactor power, the IM's void fraction and directly proportional with the PCS flow rate. Different cases of operating power and void fraction at two values for PCS flow are studied. In all of the cases considered limited number of the I Bs is permissible to use in order to avoid the excessive heating of the I G components

  19. Irradiation of Wrought FeCrAl Tubes in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Nuclear Technology Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is seeking to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are one of the leading candidate materials for fuel cladding to replace traditional zirconium alloys because of the superior oxidation resistance of FeCrAl. However, there are still some unresolved questions regarding irradiation effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of FeCrAl at end-of-life dose levels. In particular, there are concerns related to irradiation-induced embrittlement of FeCrAl alloys due to secondary phase formation. To address this issue, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a new experimental design to irradiate shortened cladding tube specimens with representative 17×17 array pressurized water reactor diameter and thickness in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures (300–350°C). Post-irradiation examination will include studies of dimensional change, microstructural changes, and mechanical performance. This report briefly summarizes the capsule design concept and the irradiation test matrix for six rabbit capsules. Each rabbit contains two FeCrAl alloy tube specimens. The specimens include Generation I and Generation II FeCrAl alloys with varying processing conditions, Cr concentrations, and minor alloying elements. The rabbits were successfully assembled, welded, evaluated, and delivered to the HFIR along with a complete quality assurance fabrication package. Pictures of the rabbit assembly process and detailed dimensional inspection of select specimens are included in this report. The rabbits were inserted into HFIR starting in cycle 472 (May 2017).

  20. Thermal analysis of LEU modified Cintichem target irradiated in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, A; Toma, C.

    2009-01-01

    Actions conceived during last years at international level for conversion of Molybdenum fabrication process from HEU to LEU targets utilization created opportunities for INR to get access to information and participating to international discussions under IAEA auspices. Concrete steps for developing fission Molybdenum technology were facilitated. Institute of Nuclear Research bringing together a number of conditions like suitable irradiation possibilities, direct communication between reactor and hot cell facility, handling capacity of high radioactive sources, and simultaneously the existence of an expanding internal market, decided to undertake the necessary steps in order to produce fission molybdenum. Over the course of last years of efforts in this direction we developed the steps for fission Molybdenum technology development based on modified Cintichem process in accordance with the Argonne National Laboratory proved methodology. Progress made by INR to heat transfer computations of annular target using is presented. An advanced thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to estimate the heat removal capability for an enriched uranium (LEU) foil annular target irradiated in TRIGA reactor core. As a result, the present analysis provides an upper limit estimate of the LEU-foil and external target surface temperatures during irradiation in TRIGA 14 MW reactor. (authors)

  1. Nanostructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels: Revised Object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Messina, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Olsson, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    This work presents a revised set of parameters to be used in an Object kinetic Monte Carlo model to simulate the microstructure evolution under neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C). Within a “grey-alloy” approach, a more physical description than in a previous work is used to translate the effect of Mn and Ni solute atoms on the defect cluster diffusivity reduction. The slowing down of self-interstitial clusters, due to the interaction between solutes and crowdions in Fe is now parameterized using binding energies from the latest DFT calculations and the solute concentration in the matrix from atom-probe experiments. The mobility of vacancy clusters in the presence of Mn and Ni solute atoms was also modified on the basis of recent DFT results, thereby removing some previous approximations. The same set of parameters was seen to predict the correct microstructure evolution for two different types of alloys, under very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy, neutron irradiated at a relatively high flux, and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel from the Swedish Ringhals reactor surveillance program. In both cases, the predicted self-interstitial loop density matches the experimental solute cluster density, further corroborating the surmise that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures form by solute enrichment of immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope.

  2. Methods and instrumentation for investigating Hall sensors during their irradiation in nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R.; Makido, E.; Marusenkov, A.; Shurygin, F.; Yerashok, V.; Moreau, P. J.; Vayakis, G.; Duran, I.; Stockel, J.; Chekanov, V.; Konopleva, R.; Nazarkin, I.; Kulikov, S.; Leroy, C.

    2009-01-01

    Present work discusses the issues of creating the instrumentation for testing the semiconductor magnetic field sensors during their irradiation with neutrons in nuclear reactors up to fluences similar to neutron fluences in steady-state sensor locations in ITER. The novelty of the work consists in Hall sensor parameters being investigated: first, directly during the irradiation (in real time), and, second, at high irradiation levels (fast neutron fluence > 10 18 n/cm 2 ). Developed instrumentation has been successfully tested and applied in the research experiments on radiation stability of magnetic sensors in IBR-2 (JINR, Dubna) and VVR-M (PNPI, Saint-Petersburg) reactors. The 'Remote-Rad' bench consists of 2 heads (head 1 and head 2) bearing investigated sensors put in a ceramic setting, of electronic unit, of personal computer and of signal lines. Each head contains 6 Hall sensors and a coil for generating test magnetic field. Moreover head 1 contains thermocouples for temperature measurement while the temperature of head 2 is measured by thermo-resistive method. The heads are placed in the reactor channel

  3. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  4. Conceptual design of nuclear fusion power reactor DREAM. Reactor structures and remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Seki, Yasushi; Ueda, Shuzo; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Adachi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fusion reactors are required to be able to compete another energy sources in economy, reliability, safety and environmental integrity for commercial use. In the DREAM (DRastically EAsy Maintenance) reactor, a very low activated material of SiC/SiC composite has been introduced for the structural material, a reactor configuration for very easy maintenance and the helium gas of a high temperature for the cooling system, and hence DREAM has been proven to be very attractively as the commercial power reactor due to the high availability and efficiency of the plant and minimization of radioactive wastes. (author)

  5. Irradiated graphite studies prior to decommissioning of G1, G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonal, J.P.; Vistoli, J.Ph.; Combes, C.

    2005-01-01

    G1 (46 MW th ), G2 (250 MW th ) and G3 (250 MW th ) are the first French plutonium production reactors owned by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). They started to be operated in 1956 (G1), 1959 (G2) and 1960 (G3); their final shutdown occurred in 1968, 1980 and 1984 respectively. Each reactor used about 1200 tons of graphite as moderator, moreover in G2 and G3, a 95 tons graphite wall is used to shield the rear side concrete from neutron irradiation. G1 is an air cooled reactor operated at a graphite temperature ranging from 30 C to 230 C; G2 and G3 are CO 2 cooled reactors and during operation the graphite temperature is higher (140 C to 400 C). These reactors are now partly decommissioned, but the graphite stacks are still inside the reactors. The graphite core radioactivity has decreased enough so that a full decommissioning stage may be considered. Conceming this decommissioning, the studies reported here are: (i) stored energy in graphite, (ii) graphite radioactivity measurements, (iii) leaching of radionuclide ( 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 60 Co, 3 H) from graphite, (iv) chlorine diffusion through graphite. (authors)

  6. Long-term irradiation effects on reactor-pressure vessel steels. Investigations on the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Arne

    2017-06-01

    The exposure of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels to neutron irradiation gives rise to irradiation-enhanced diffusion, a rearrangement of solute atoms and, consequently, a degradation of the mechanical properties. The increasing age of existing nuclear power plants raises new questions specific to long-term operation. Two of them are addressed in this thesis: flux effects and the late-blooming effect. Can low-flux irradiations up to a given fluence be reproduced by more rapid high-flux irradiations up to the same fluence? Can the irradiation response of RPV steels be extrapolated to higher fluences or are there unexpected ''late-blooming'' effects. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), atom-probe tomography (APT) and Vickers-hardness testing were applied. A novel Monte-Carlo based fitting algorithm for SANS data was implemented in order to derive statistically reliable characteristics of irradiation-induced solute-atom clusters. APT was applied in selected cases to gain additional information on the composition and the shape of clusters. Vickers hardness testing was performed on the SANS samples to link the nanometer-scale changes to irradiation hardening. The investigations on flux effects show that clusters forming upon high-flux irradiation are smaller and tend to have a higher number density compared to low-flux irradiations at a given neutron fluence. The measured flux dependence of the cluster-size distribution is consistent with the framework of deterministic growth (but not with coarsening) in combination with radiation-enhanced diffusion. Since the two effects on cluster-size and volume fraction partly cancel each other out, no significant effect on the hardening is observed. The investigations of a possible late-blooming effect indicate that the very existence (yes or no) of such an effect depends on the irradiation conditions. Irradiations at lower fluxes and a lower temperature (255 C) give rise to a significant increase of the

  7. Optimization of the irradiation beam in the BNCT research facility at IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Vinicius Alexandre de

    2014-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapeutic technique for the treatment of some types of cancer whose useful energy comes from a nuclear reaction that occurs when thermal neutron impinges upon a Boron-10 atom. In Brazil there is a research facility built along the beam hole number 3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN, which was designed to perform BNCT research experiments. For a good performance of the technique, the irradiation beam should be mostly composed of thermal neutrons with a minimum as possible gamma and above thermal neutron components. This work aims to monitor and evaluate the irradiation beam on the sample irradiation position through the use of activation detectors (activation foils) and also to propose, through simulation using the radiation transport code, MCNP, new sets of moderators and filters which shall deliver better irradiation fields at the irradiation sample position In this work, a simulation methodology, based on a MCNP card, known as wwg (weight window generation) was studied, and the neutron energy spectrum has been experimentally discriminated at 5 energy ranges by using a new set o activation foils. It also has been concluded that the BNCT research facility has the required thermal neutron flux to perform studies in the area and it has a great potential for improvement for tailoring the irradiation field. (author)

  8. Transmutation of waste actinides in thermal reactors: survey calculations of candidate irradiation schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1978-11-01

    Actinide recycle and transmutation calculations were made for twelve specific thermal reactor environments. The calculations included H 2 O-moderated reactor lattices with enriched U, recycled Pu, and 233 ' 235 U-Th. In addition two D 2 O reactor cases were calculated. When all actinides were recycled into 235 U-enriched fuel, about 10 percent of the transuranic actinides were fissioned per 3-year fuel cycle. About 9 percent of the actinides were fissioned per 3-year fuel cycle when waste actinides (no U or Pu) were irradiated in separate target rods in a U-fuel assembly. When actinides were recycled in separate target assemblies, the fission rate was strongly dependent on the specific loading of the target. Fission rates of 5 to 10 percent per 3-year fuel cycle were observed

  9. Technical specification: Mixed-oxide pellets for the light-water reactor irradiation demonstration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.

    1997-06-01

    This technical specification is a Level 2 Document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. It is patterned after the pellet specification that was prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, for use by Los Alamos National Laboratory in fabrication of the test fuel for the Parallex Project, adjusted as necessary to reflect the differences between the Canadian uranium-deuterium reactor and light-water reactor fuels. This specification and the associated engineering drawing are to be utilized only for preparation of test fuel as outlined in the accompanying Request for Quotation and for additional testing as directed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the Department of Energy

  10. Build-up of actinides in irradiated fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Naguib, K.; Morcos, H.N

    2001-09-01

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% {sup 235}U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% {sup 235}U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Single and Dual Irradiation Pass of Deep Burn High Temperature Reactor Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Jo, Chang Keun; Noh, Jae Man

    2012-01-01

    A concept of a deep-burn (DB) of trans uranic (TRU) elements in a high temperature reactor (HTR) has been proposed and studied with a single irradiation pass. However, there is still a significant amount of TRU after burn in an HTR. Therefore, it is necessary to burn more TRU in a fast reactor (FR) with repeated reprocessing such as a pyro-process. In this study, the fuel cycle calculations are performed and the results are compared for a singlepass DB-HHR scenario and a dual-pass sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) scenario. For the analysis, front-end and back-end parameters are compared. The calculations were performed by the DANESS (Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies), which is an integrated system dynamic fuel cycle analysis code

  12. The metrological problems of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodenicharov, S.; Kamenova, Ts.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels increases the T k -values of transition temperature from ductile to brittle fracture. This effect is very important in emergency situations, when the water cooling injection in the reactor results in high thermal gradients. In such cases there is a risk from the appearance of a brittle fracture with catastrophic crack propagation speed at relatively low stresses. That is why the T k -value determination is very important for the safe operation of the reactor systems. Some advanced experimental methods for T k -testing and control have been discussed in the present article and the standards of different countries have been compared. The methods applying subsize specimens and welding-restored specimens have been reviewed. (author)

  13. The Effect of Topaz Irradiation to the Quality of Cooling Water Reactor GA Siwabessy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elisabeth Ratnawati; Kawkab Mustofa; Arif Hidayat

    2012-01-01

    Topaz irradiation which applied both inside and outside the reactor core is one utilization of the reactor GA Siwabessy. Topaz consists of silicon clusters containing a combination of aluminum, fluorine and hydroxyl, and impurities. The results of the qualitative analysis of the topaz before irradiation detected europium (Eu-152), potassium (K-40) and sodium (Na-24). While the post-irradiation of topaz detected europium (Eu), cobalt (Co), cesium (Cs), tantalum (Ta), scandium (Sc), iron (Fe), Selenium (Se) and potassium (K). These elements might affect the quality of the cooling water. But the results of the qualitative analysis that were carried out to the primary cooling water did not reveal any elements similar to the elements contained in topaz impurities. Most likely this is because most impurities have been caught by the resin trap in purification systems, because of the results of the analysis of the dirt on the resin trap contained elements similar to the impurities Fe and Co topaz. The purification system makes quality primary cooling water is maintained. From the result shows that chemically the quality of primary cooling water is not affected by the topaz irradiation. (author)

  14. Modeling of Microstructure Evolution in Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated Under Light Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, J.; Stoller, R.E.; Was, G.S.

    1998-01-01

    A model for the development of microstructure during irradiation in fast reactors has been adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275 approximately 325 C, up to approximately10 dpa). The original model was based on the rate-theory, and included descriptions of the evolution of both dislocation loops and cavities. The model was modified by introducing in-cascade interstitial clustering, a term to account for the dose dependence of this clustering, and mobility of interstitial clusters. The purpose of this work was to understand microstructural development under LWR irradiation with a focus on loop nucleation and saturation of loop density. It was demonstrated that in-cascade interstitial clustering dominates loop nucleation in neutron irradiation in LWRS. Furthermore it was shown that the dose dependence of in-cascade interstitial clustering is needed to account for saturation behavior as commonly observed. Both quasi-steady-state (QSS) and non-steady-state (NSS) solutions to the rate equations were obtained. The difference between QSS and NSS treatments in the calculation of defect concentration is reduced at LWR temperature when in-cascade interstitial clustering dominates loop nucleation. The mobility of interstitial clusters was also investigated and its impact on loop density is to reduce the nucleation term. The ultimate goal of this study is to combine the evolution of microstructure and microchemistry together to account for the radiation damage in austenitic stainless steels

  15. Design of small-animal thermal neutron irradiation facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.B.

    1996-01-01

    The broad beam facility (BBF) at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) can provide a thermal neutron beam with flux intensity and quality comparable to the beam currently used for research on neutron capture therapy using cell-culture and small-animal irradiations. Monte Carlo computations were made, first, to compare with the dosimetric measurements at the existing BBF and, second, to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes and doses expected at the proposed BBF. Multiple cell cultures or small animals could be irradiated simultaneously at the so-modified BBF under conditions similar to or better than those individual animals irradiated at the existing thermal neutron irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the BMRR. The flux intensity of the collimated thermal neutron beam at the proposed BBF would be 1.7 x 10 10 n/cm 2 ·s at 3-MW reactor power, the same as at the TNIF. However, the proposed collimated beam would have much lower gamma (0.89 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n th ) and fast neutron (0.58 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n th ) contaminations, 64 and 19% of those at the TNIF, respectively. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed

  16. Influence of reactor irradiation on the protons intercalation and stability of barium cerates and strontium cerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenova, T.I.; Khromushin, I.V.; Zhotabaev, Zh.R.; Kornienko, P.A.; Munasbaeva, K.K.

    2005-01-01

    The work is devoted to study of reactor irradiation influence on the gas-solid exchange processes in the high-temperature proton semiconductors on the base of cerates and strontium. A number of new regularities of influence of content of some proton semiconductors on the gas-solid exchange processes was established. It is shown, that increase of rate of cation doping rate leads to considerable lowering in its of carbonic gas content, and therefore to improvement their tribological properties. It is revealed, that irradiation of polycrystalline samples leads to growth of oxygen amount desorbed from samples, whereas irradiation of monocrystalline samples practically does not has effect on the desorbed oxygen amount. It was found, that character of relation of intercalated in the sample protons depend on sample doping rate

  17. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.; Leonard, Keith J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  18. Nuclear reactor having an inflatable vessel closure seal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An improved type of closure head seal for the rotatable plugs of the reactor vessel of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor is described. The seal prevents the release of radioactive particles while allowing the plug to be rotated without major manipulation of the seal structure. (UK)

  19. Structural investigation on gamma-irradiated polyacrylamide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultraviolet (UV)–visible spectroscopictechniques are used to investigate the microstructural changes in polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels on gamma irradiation. SANS measurements have revealed the presence of inhomogeneities in nanometre scale and reduction of their size ...

  20. Structural investigation on gamma-irradiated polyacrylamide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels; small-angle neutron scattering; UV–visible spectra; gamma ... dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy techniques and also by equilibrium swelling theory [10,11]. Here, for the first time, we report the effect of γ-irradiation on inhomogeneities and cor- ... The solid lines are guides to the eye.

  1. Effect of reactor irradiation on long-term strength and creep of 0Kh16N15M3B steel under plane stressed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristov, G.P.; Kosov, B.D.

    1982-01-01

    The paper deals with analysis of results of experimental studies in creep of the austenitic OKh16n15m3b steel with various size of initial-structure grain under conditions of high-intensity reactor irradiation and control tests. It is suggested to consider the material initial structure effect on intensity of minimum creep rates both under ordinary and intrareactor conditions of loading by means of the function grain size effect on the equivalent stress. It is shown that the criterial expression previously suggested by the authors is invariant to the type of stressed and structural states and relative to intensity of minimal creep rates. It is established that the creep rate of the irradiated steel may be calculated from dependence for nonirradiated steel using as an argument a certain reduced equivalent stress which is a function of the acting stress and irradiation parameter

  2. Irradiation of electronic components and circuits at the Portuguese Research Reactor: Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, J.G.; Ramos, A.R.; Fernandes, A.C.; Santos, J.P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    The behavior of electronic components and circuits under radiation is a concern shared by the nuclear industry, the space community and the high-energy physics community. Standard commercial components are used as much as possible instead of radiation hard components, since they are easier to obtain and allow a significant reduction of costs. However, these standard components need to be tested in order to determine their radiation tolerance. The Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) is a 1 MW pool-type reactor, operating since 1961. The irradiation of electronic components and circuits is one area where a 1 MW reactor can be competitive, since the fast neutron fluences required for testing are in most cases well below 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}. A program was started in 1999 to test electronics components and circuits for the LHC facility at CERN, initially using a dedicated in-pool irradiation device and later a beam line with tailored neutron and gamma filters. Neutron filters are essential to reduce the intensity of the thermal neutron flux, which does not produce significant defects in electronic components but produces unwanted radiation from activation of contacts and packages of integrated circuits and also of the printed circuit boards. In irradiations performed within the line-of-sight of the core of a fission reactor there is simultaneous gamma radiation which complicates testing in some cases. Filters can be used to reduce its importance and separate testing with a pure gamma radiation source can contribute to clarify some irradiation results. Practice has shown the need to introduce several improvements to the procedures and facilities over the years. We will review improvements done in the following areas: - Optimization of neutron and gamma filters; - Dosimetry procedures in mixed neutron / gamma fields; - Determination of hardness parameter and 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence; - Temperature measurement and control during irradiation; - Follow-up of reactor

  3. Structural materials for the next generation nuclear reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charit, I.; Murty, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Generation-IV reactors need to withstand much higher temperatures, greater neutron doses, severe corrosive environment and above all, a substantially higher life time (60 years or more). Hence for their successful deployment, a significant research in structural materials is needed. Various potential candidate materials, such as austenitic stainless steels, oxide-dispersion strengthened steels, nickel-base superalloys, refractory alloys etc. are considered. Both baseline and irradiated mechanical, thermophysical and chemical properties are important. However, due to the longer high temperature exposure involved in most designs, creep and corrosion/oxidation will become the major performance limiting factors. In this study we did not cover fabricability and weldability of the candidate materials. Pros and cons of each candidate can be summarized as following: -) for austenitic stainless steel: lower thermal creep resistance at higher temperatures but poor swelling resistance at high temperatures; -) for ferritic-martensitic steels: excellent swelling resistance at higher burnups but thermal creep strength is limited at higher temperatures and radiation embrittlement at low temperature; -) for Ni-base alloys: excellent thermal creep resistance at higher temperatures but radiation embrittlement even at moderate doses and helium embrittlement at higher temperatures; and -) for refractory alloys: adequate swelling resistance up to high burnups but fabrication difficulties, low temperature radiation hardening and poor oxidation resistance

  4. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  5. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl.3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Hong, Jun-Hwa; Kuk, Il-Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the unirradiated and irradiated microstructure. Microvickers hardness, indentation, and miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were 2 irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg. C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Band-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural. state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation(VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by

  6. External irradiation of the personnel operating the reactor RA at Vinca in the period 1963-1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M.; Minincic, Z.

    1968-06-01

    The paper first gives a survey of the characteristic operations performed on the Vinca reactor RA in which most of the personnel become irradiated. Following is a schematic diagram of the irradiations in the period 1963-1966 in which the reactor was in continual operation. The surveys are given for each month and each year separately, while the irradiated personnel are grouped in several characteristic irradiation dose ranges. In this analysis special emphasis is given to a survey of irradiation of the personnel classified according to their profession, i.e. their post. This kind of analysis is indispensable in planning work, proper disposition of the personnel and undertaking special protective measures for reducing the irradiations (author) [sr

  7. Earthquake-proof supporting structure in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Akio; Sekine, Katsuhisa; Madokoro, Manabu; Katoono, Shin-ichi; Konno, Mutsuo; Suzuki, Takuro.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional earthquake-proof structure comprises a vessel vibration stopper integrated to a reactor vessel, powder for restricting the horizontal displacements, a safety vessel surrounds the outer periphery of the reactor vessel and a safety vessel vibration stopper integrated therewith, which are fixed to buildings. However, there was a problem that a great amount of stresses are generated in the base of the reactor vessel vibration stopper due to reaction of the powders which restrict thermal expansion. In order to remarkably reduce the reaction of the powers, powders are charged into a spaces formed between each of the reactor vessel vibration stopper, the safety vessel vibration stopper and the flexible member disposed between them. According to this constitution, the reactor vessel vibration stopper does not undergo a great reaction of the powers upon thermal expansion of the reactor vessel to moderate the generated stresses, maintain the strength and provide earthquake-proof supporting function. (N.H.)

  8. Internal structure of reactor building for Madras Atomic Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit, D.P.

    1975-01-01

    The structural configuration and analysis of structural elements of the internal structure of reactor building for the Madras Atomic Power Project has been presented. Two methods of analysis of the internal structure, viz. Equivalent Plane Frame and Finite Element Method, are explained and compared with the use of bending moments obtained. (author)

  9. Post-Irradiation Examination and In-Pile Measurement Techniques for Water Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    in the 1960s when the construction of NPPs was being started. Evidently it can be assumed that infrastructure with basic unique equipments is old enough, both morally and physically, and needs to be up-graded or replaced. Thus, a sharp increase of the hydrocarbon fuel cost, green-house effect, necessity to construct more safe and efficient NPPs, justification of the lifetime prolongation of the existing NPPs, moral and physical ageing of the hot labs and research reactors equipment lead to the strong necessity to develop more perfect and more precise methods and equipment to examine irradiated components of nuclear reactors, first of all the most expensive one - nuclear fuel. Now the national hot laboratories and material testing reactors usually act as individual independent research establishments without any common and coordinated technical and business strategy towards the future needs and challenges. Even if there are not many joint programs for the development of nuclear power engineering in different countries, the method base and accumulated experience of the in- and post-reactor experiments should be widely shared so as to decrease the cost of this base in each country and to enforce its development. Thus, both problems and results of the application of new techniques to examine nuclear reactor components, as well as the conditions of separate labs should be discussed at the international level. The IAEA technical meetings are one of the most convenient means of arranging such discussion on the problems of the hot labs and research reactors development and application of new original techniques for examination of reactor materials properties. This publication represents a summary and proceedings of the two technical meetings (TMs) organized by IAEA on the subjects of Hot Cell Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) Techniques and Pool Side Inspection of Water Reactor Fuel Assemblies and Fuel Rod Instrumentation and In-Pile Measurement Techniques. The first TM was

  10. Role of temperature in the radiation stability of yttria stabilized zirconia under swift heavy ion irradiation: A study from the perspective of nuclear reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Parswajit; Ghosh, Santanu; Sattonnay, Gaël; Singh, Udai B.; Grover, Vinita; Shukla, Rakesh; Amirthapandian, S.; Meena, Ramcharan; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, Devesh K.

    2017-07-01

    The search for materials that can withstand the harsh radiation environments of the nuclear industry has become an urgent challenge in the face of ever-increasing demands for nuclear energy. To this end, polycrystalline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pellets were irradiated with 80 MeV Ag6+ ions to investigate their radiation tolerance against fission fragments. To better simulate a nuclear reactor environment, the irradiations were carried out at the typical nuclear reactor temperature (850 °C). For comparison, irradiations were also performed at room temperature. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal degradation in crystallinity for the room temperature irradiated samples. No bulk structural amorphization was however observed, whereas defect clusters were formed as indicated by transmission electron microscopy and supported by thermal spike simulation results. A significant reduction of the irradiation induced defects/damage, i.e., improvement in the radiation tolerance, was seen under irradiation at 850 °C. This is attributed to the fact that the rapid thermal quenching of the localized hot molten zones (arising from spike in the lattice temperature upon irradiation) is confined to 850 °C (i.e., attributed to the resistance inflicted on the rapid thermal quenching of the localized hot molten zones by the high temperature of the environment) thereby resulting in the reduction of the defects/damage produced. Our results present strong evidence for the applicability of YSZ as an inert matrix fuel in nuclear reactors, where competitive effects of radiation damage and dynamic thermal healing mechanisms may lead to a strong reduction in the damage production and thus sustain its physical integrity.

  11. Nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.

    1989-06-01

    The document presents the status of nuclear reaction theory concerning optical model development, level density models and pre-equilibrium and direct processes used in calculation of neutron nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. 6 refs

  12. Irradiation of Superheater Test Fuel Elements in the Steam Loop of the R2 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravndal, F

    1967-12-15

    The design, fabrication, irradiation results, and post-irradiation examination for three superheater test fuel elements are described. During the spring of 1966 these clusters, each consisting of six fuel rods, were successfully exposed in the superheater loop No. 5 in the R2 reactor for a maximum of 24 days at a maximum outer cladding surface temperature of {approx} 650 deg C. During irradiation the linear heat rating of the rods was in the range 400-535 W/cm. The diameter of the UO{sub 2} pellets was 11.5 and 13.0 mm; the wall thickness of the 20/25 Nb and 20/35 cladding was in every case 0.4 mm. The diametrical gap between fuel and cladding was one of the main parameters and was chosen to be 0.05, 0.07 and 0.10 mm. These experiments, to be followed by one high cladding temperature irradiation ({approx} 750 deg C) and one long time irradiation ({approx} 6000 MWd/tU), were carried out to demonstrate the operational capability of short superheater test fuel rods at steady and transient operational environments for the Marviken superheater fuel elements and also to provide confirmation of design criteria for the same fuel elements.

  13. Irradiation of quench protection diodes at cryogenic temperatures in a nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagedorn, D.; Schoenbacher, H.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) R ampersand D programme, CERN and the Department of Physics E21 of the Technical University Munich have established a collaboration to carry out irradiation experiments at liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures on epitaxial diodes for the superconducting magnet protection. Small diode samples of 10 mm wafer diameter from two different manufacturers were submitted to doses of up 50 kGy and neutron fluences up to 1015 n/cm 2 and the degradation of the electrical characteristics was measured versus dose. During irradiation the diodes were submitted to current pulse annealing and after irradiation to thermal annealing. After exposure some diodes show a degradation in forward voltage drop of up to 600 % which, however, can be reduced to about 15 % - 20 % by thermal annealing. The degradation at liquid helium temperature is very similar to the degradation at liquid nitrogen temperature. These degradations of electrical characteristics during the short term irradiation in a nuclear reactor are compared with degradations during long term irradiation in an accelerator environment at liquid nitrogen temperature

  14. Characterization of matrix damage in ion-irradiated reactor vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Katsuhiko; Fukuya, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Exact nature of the matrix damage, that is one of radiation-induced nano-scale microstructural features causing radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel, in irradiated commercial steels has not been clarified yet by direct characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We designed a new preparation method of TEM observation samples and applied it to the direct TEM observation of the matrix damage in the commercial steel samples irradiated by ions. The simulation irradiation was carried out by 3 MeV Ni 2+ ion to a dose of 1 dpa at 290degC. Thin foil specimens for TEM observation were prepared using the modified focused ion beam method. A weak-beam TEM study was carried out for the observation of matrix damage in the samples. Results of this first detailed observation of the matrix damage in the irradiated commercial steel show that it is consisted of small dislocation loops. The observed and analyzed dislocation loops have Burgers vectors b = a , and a mean image size and the number density are 2.5 nm and about 1 x 10 22 m -3 , respectively. In this experiment, all of the observed dislocation loops were too small to determine the vacancy or interstitial nature of the dislocation loops directly. Although it is an indirect method, post-irradiation annealing was used to infer the loop nature. Most of dislocation loops were stable after the annealing at 400degC for 30 min. This result suggests that their nature is interstitial. (author)

  15. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo, E-mail: yongskim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 10{sup 13} to 1 × 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2}. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples’ surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson–Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  16. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  17. Review of intense irradiation data and discussion on structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Jitsukawa, S.; Okubo, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Mechanical property data on austenitic stainless steels and F82H have been reviewed to discuss for developing structural integrity methodologies of intensely irradiated components such as first walls. The following have been already clarified: (1) Fracture ductility is still high even though tensile rupture elongation is reduced remarkably. (2) Strain-hardening occurs in true stress-logarithmic strain (true strain) relationship. Work-softening behavior observed in nominal stress-nominal strain curves is simply resulted from a reduction of work hardening rate accompanied by the increase of flow stress level by irradiation. The review lead to an innovative design concept for application to intensely irradiated components. A special consideration is given to unique feature of bending moment in developing design methodology for preventing ductile fracture of intensely irradiated materials. Another discussion is also made on how to simulate mechanical behavior of intensely irradiated components, because mechanical testing of component-wise specimens after intense irradiation is inevitable for the development of design concepts, although irradiation on such a large scale specimen seems to be almost impossible with current irradiation facilities. (authors)

  18. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  19. Irradiation Performance of HTGR Fuel in WWR-K Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, Shohei; Sakaba, Nariaki; Shaimerdenov, Asset; Gizatulin, Shamil; Chekushina, Lyudmila; Chakrov, Petr; Honda, Masaki; Takahashi, Masashi; Kitagawa, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    A capsule irradiation test with the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel is being carried out using WWR-K research reactor in the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan (INP) to attain 100 GWd/t-U of burnup under normal operating condition of a practical small-sized HTGR. This is the first HTGR fuel irradiation test for INP in Kazakhstan collaborated with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in frame of International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) project. In the test, TRISO coated fuel particle with low-enriched UO_2 (less than 10 % of "2"3"5U) is used, which was newly designed by JAEA to extend burnup up to 100 GWd/t-U comparing with that of the HTTR (33 GWd/t-U). Both TRISO and fuel compact as the irradiation test specimen were fabricated in basis of the HTTR fuel technology by Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. in Japan. A helium-gas-swept capsule and a swept-gas sampling device installed in WWR-K were designed and constructed by INP. The irradiation test has been started in October 2012 and will be completed up to the end of February 2015. The irradiation test is in the progress up to 69 GWd/t of burnup, and integrity of new TRISO fuel has been confirmed. In addition, as predicted by the fuel design, fission gas release was observed due to additional failure of as-fabricated SiC-defective fuel. (author)

  20. Irradiation induced tensile property change of SA 508 Cl. 3 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kuk, Il Hiun

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation induced tensile property change of four kinds of reactor pressure vessel steels manufactured by different steel refining process was compared based on the differences in the miniature tensile specimen tests were conducted for mechanical property measurement and optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used for microstructural characterization. Specimens were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.7 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (E ≥ 1 MeV) at 288 deg C. Investigation on the unirradiated microstructures showed largely a same microstructure in that tempered acicular bainite and ferrite with bainitic phase prevailing in the unirradiated condition. Ban-shaped segregations were also clearly observed except a kind of materials. A large difference in the unirradiated microstructure appeared in the grain size and carbide microstructure. Of carbide microstructures, noticeable differences were observed in the size and distribution of cementite, and bainitic lath microstructures. No noticeable changes were observed in the optical and thin film TEM microstructures after irradiation. Complicated microstructural state of heat treated bainitic low alloy microstructure prevents easy quantification of microstructural changes due to irradiation. Apparent differences, however, were observed in the results of mechanical testing. Results of tensile testing and hardness measurement show that a steel refined by vacuum carbon deoxidation (VCD) method exhibits the highest radiation hardening behavior. Some of mechanical testing results on irradiated materials were possible to understand based on the initial microstructure, but further investigations using a wide array of sophisticated tools (for example, SANS, APFIM) are required to understand and characterize irradiation induced defects that are responsible for irradiation hardening behavior but are not revealed by conventional TEM. (author)

  1. Structure and lyoluminescent reactions of free radicals of irradiated lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushkov, V.V.; Panasyuk, S.L.; Yudin, I.V.

    1983-01-01

    To determine mechanisms of processes, resulting in lyoluminescence the structure of fren radicals in γ-irradiated lactose was investigated by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance. Analysis of dependences of different radical content in irradiated crystals and lyoluminescent characteristics of these samples on the period of their storing enabled to confirm suggested earlier luminescence mechanism with lambdasub(max)=630 nm of irradiated carbon-hydrate in neutral and acid media. The possibility of controlling the content of different types of radicals in samples by lyoluminescent method was shown

  2. Dose rate estimates from irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, W.R.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    It is generally considered that irradiated spent fuel is so radioactive (self-protecting) that it can only be moved and processed with specialized equipment and facilities. However, a small, possibly subnational, group acting in secret with no concern for the environment (other than the reduction of signatures) and willing to incur substantial but not lethal radiation doses, could obtain plutonium by stealing and processing irradiated spent fuel that has cooled for several years. In this paper, we estimate the dose rate at various distances and directions from typical pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies as a function of cooling time. Our results show that the dose rate is reduced rapidly for the first ten years after exposure in the reactor, and that it is reduced by a factor of ∼10 (from the one year dose rate) after 15 years. Even for fuel that has cooled for 15 years, a lethal dose (LD50) of 450 rem would be received at 1 m from the center of the fuel assembly after several minutes. However, moving from 1 to 5 m reduces the dose rate by over a factor of 10, and moving from 1 to 10 m reduces the dose rate by about a factor of 50. The dose rates 1 m from the top or bottom of the assembly are considerably less (about 10 and 22%, respectively) than 1 m from the center of the assembly, which is the direction of the maximum dose rate

  3. On use of beryllium in fusion reactors: Resources, impurities and necessity of detritiation after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbasov, B.N., E-mail: b.kolbasov@yandex.ru; Khripunov, V.I., E-mail: Khripunov_VI@nrcki.ru; Biryukov, A.Yu.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Potential needs in Be for fusion power engineering may exceed Be resources. • Be recycling after its operation in a fusion power plant (FPP) seems inevitable. • U impurity in Be seriously impairs environmental properties of fusion power plants. • Upon burial of irradiated Be the main problems are caused by U and {sup 3}H impurities. • Clearance of Be extracted from a FPP is impossible due to U impurity. - Abstract: Worldwide identified resources of beryllium somewhat exceed 80 000 t. Beryllium production in all the countries of the world in 2012 was about 230 t. At the same time, some conceptual designs of fusion power reactors envisage utilization of several hundred tons of this metal. Therefore return of beryllium into the production cycle (recycling) will be necessary. The beryllium ore from some main deposits has uranium content inadmissible for fusion reactors. This fact raises a question on the need to develop and apply an economically acceptable technology for beryllium purification from the uranium. Practically any technological procedure with beryllium used in fusion reactors requires its detritiation. A study of tritium and helium release from irradiated beryllium at different temperatures and rates of temperature increase was performed at Kurchatov Institute.

  4. Microdosimetric measurements in the thermal neutron irradiation facility of LENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colautti, P.; Moro, D.; Chiriotti, S.; Conte, V.; Evangelista, L.; Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Postuma, I.

    2014-01-01

    A twin TEPC with electric-field guard tubes has been constructed to be used to characterize the BNCT field of the irradiation facility of LENA reactor. One of the two mini TEPC was doped with 50 ppm of 10 B in order to simulate the BNC events occurring in BNCT. By properly processing the two microdosimetric spectra, the gamma, neutron and BNC spectral components can be derived with good precision (∼6%). However, direct measurements of 10 B in some doped plastic samples, which were used for constructing the cathode walls, point out the scarce accuracy of the nominal 10 B concentration value. The influence of the Boral ® door, which closes the irradiation channel, has been measured. The gamma dose increases significantly (+51%) when the Boral ® door is closed. The crypt-cell-regeneration weighting function has been used to measure the quality, namely the RBE µ value, of the radiation field in different conditions. The measured RBE µ values are only partially consistent with the RBE values of other BNCT facilities. - Highlights: • A counter with two mini TEPCs, both equipped with electrical-field guard tubes, has been constructed. • The microdosimetric spectrum of the LENA-reactor irradiation vane has been studied. • The radiation-field quality (RBE) assessment confirms that the D n /D tot ratio is not an accurate parameter to characterize the BNCT radiation field

  5. Computational analysis of the dose rates at JSI TRIGA reactor irradiation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrožič, K; Žerovnik, G; Snoj, L

    2017-12-01

    The JSI TRIGA Mark II, IJS research reactor is equipped with numerous irradiation positions, where samples can be irradiated by neutrons and γ-rays. Irradiation position selection is based on its properties, such as physical size and accessibility, as well as neutron and γ-ray spectra, flux and dose intensities. This paper presents an overview on the neutron and γ-ray fluxes, spectra and dose intensities calculations using Monte Carlo MCNP software and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries. The dose-rates are presented in terms of ambient dose equivalents, air kerma, and silicon dose equivalent. At full reactor power the neutron ambient dose equivalent ranges from 5.5×10 3 Svh -1 to 6×10 6 Svh -1 , silicon dose equivalent from 6×10 2 Gy/h si to 3×10 5 Gy/h si , and neutron air kerma from 4.3×10 3 Gyh -1 to 2×10 5 Gyh -1 . Ratio of fast (1MeVreactor power from 3.4×10 3 Svh -1 to 3.6×10 5 Svh -1 and γ air kerma range 3.1×10 3 Gyh -1 to 2.9×10 5 Gyh -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide and overview of the status of post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques for water cooled reactor fuel assemblies and their components with emphasis given to advanced PIE techniques applied to high burnup fuel. Papers presented at the meeting described progress obtained in non-destructive (e.g. dimensional measurements, oxide layer thickness measurements, gamma scanning and tomography, neutron and X-ray radiography, etc.) and destructive PIE techniques (e.g. microstructural studies, elemental and isotopic analysis, measurement of physical and mechanical properties, etc.) used for investigation of water reactor fuel. Recent practice in high burnup fuel investigation revealed the importance of advanced PIE techniques, such as 3-D tomography, secondary ion mass spectrometry, laser flash, high resolution transmission and scanning electron microscopy, image analysis in microstructural studies, for understanding mechanisms of fuel behaviour under irradiation. Importance and needs for in-pile irradiation of samples and rodlets in instrumented rigs were also discussed. This TECDOC contains 20 individual papers presented at the meeting; each of the papers has been indexed separately

  7. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel 20 MnMoNi55 weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneim, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical and fracture properties of an 'improved' 20 MnMoNi 55 Pressure Vessel Steel (PVS) weld was investigated. In addition to very low residual element content, especially Cu (0.035 wt.%), and relatively higher Ni content (0.9 wt.%), this steel has higher strength (30% more) than the steels used currently in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The material was irradiated to 3.5x10 19 and 7x10 19 n/cm 2 (E > 1 Mev) at 290 0 C and 2.5x10 19 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV) at 160 0 C in FRJ-1 and FRJ-2 research reactors at KFA, Juelich, F.R.G. Test methods used in the evaluation included instrumented impact testing of standard and precracked Charpy specimens, tensile, and fracture toughness testing. Instrumented impact testing provided load and energy vs. time (deflection) data in addition to energy absorption data. The results indicated that the investigated high strength improved steel is more resistant to irradiation induced embrittlement than conventional PVSs. (orig./IHOE)

  8. Inhalation radiotoxicity of irradiated thorium as a heavy water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, G.W.R.; Priest, N.D.; Richardson, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    The online refueling capability of Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), and their good neutron economy, allows a relatively high amount of neutron absorption in breeding materials to occur during normal fuel irradiation. This characteristic makes HWRs uniquely suited to the extraction of energy from thorium. In Canada, the toxicity and radiological protection methods dealing with personnel exposure to natural uranium (NU) spent fuel (SF) are well-established, but the corresponding methods for irradiated thorium fuel are not well known. This study uses software to compare the activity and toxicity of irradiated thorium fuel ('thorium SF') against those of NU. Thorium elements, contained in the inner eight elements of a heterogeneous high-burnup bundle having LEU (Low-enriched uranium) in the outer 35 elements, achieve a similar burnup to NU SF during its residence in a reactor, and the radiotoxicity due to fission products was found to be similar. However, due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as U-232 and Th-228, the radiotoxicity of thorium SF was almost double that of NU SF after sufficient time has passed for the decay of shorter-lived fission products. Current radio-protection methods for NU SF exposure are likely inadequate to estimate the internal dose to personnel to thorium SF, and an analysis of thorium in fecal samples is recommended to assess the internal dose from exposure to this fuel. (authors)

  9. Inhalation radiotoxicity of irradiated thorium as a heavy water reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, G.W.R.; Priest, N.D.; Richardson, R.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The online refueling capability of Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), and their good neutron economy, allows a relatively high amount of neutron absorption in breeding materials to occur during normal fuel irradiation. This characteristic makes HWRs uniquely suited to the extraction of energy from thorium. In Canada, the toxicity and radiological protection methods dealing with personnel exposure to natural uranium (NU) spent fuel (SF) are well-established, but the corresponding methods for irradiated thorium fuel are not well known. This study uses software to compare the activity and toxicity of irradiated thorium fuel ('thorium SF') against those of NU. Thorium elements, contained in the inner eight elements of a heterogeneous high-burnup bundle having LEU (Low-enriched uranium) in the outer 35 elements, achieve a similar burnup to NU SF during its residence in a reactor, and the radiotoxicity due to fission products was found to be similar. However, due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as U-232 and Th-228, the radiotoxicity of thorium SF was almost double that of NU SF after sufficient time has passed for the decay of shorter-lived fission products. Current radio-protection methods for NU SF exposure are likely inadequate to estimate the internal dose to personnel to thorium SF, and an analysis of thorium in fecal samples is recommended to assess the internal dose from exposure to this fuel. (authors)

  10. Support structure for reactor core constituent element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Yasuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    A connection pipe having an entrance nozzle inserted therein as a reactor core constituent element is protruded above the upper surface of a reactor core support plate. A through hole is disposed to the protruding portion of the connection pipe. The through hole and a through hole disposed to the reactor core support plate are connected by a communication pipe. A shear rod is disposed in a horizontal portion at the inside of the communication pipe and is supported by a spring horizontally movably. Further, a groove is disposed at a position of the entrance nozzle opposing to the shear rod. The shear rod is urged out of the communication pipe by the pressure of the high pressure plenum and the top end portion of the shear rod is inserted to the groove of the entrance nozzle during operation. Accordingly, the shear rod is positioned in a state where it is extended from the through hole of the communication pipe to the groove of the entrance nozzle. This can mechanically constrain the rising of the reactor core constituent elements by the shear rod upon occurrence of earthquakes. (I.N.)

  11. Simulations for irradiation of silicon-based structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagatova, A.; Pavlovic, M.; Sedlackova, K.; Necas, V.; Hybler, P.; Zatko, B.

    2013-01-01

    The software ModePEB for modelling of electron beam processing in multilayer flat objects was shown to be a very useful tool for optimization of the irradiation of silicon based structures. Except its significant help in setting-up the accelerator parameters corresponding to a desired dose, its proven reliability and consistency with the measured data makes the ModePEB an inevitable instrument for design and optimization of electron irradiation experiments. (authors)

  12. Structural elements for fast-neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blin, J.C.; Sainfort, Gerard; Silvent, Alain; Silvestres, Georges.

    1974-01-01

    These elements are characterized in that they are obtained from a nickel-alloy and at least a material M, selected from the group comprising iron and silicon, in proportions, by weight, such that irradiation by fast neutrons leads to the generation of Ni 3 -M with no noticeable swelling of said elements. This can be applied to fuel assembly cladding [fr

  13. The post irradiation examination of three fuel rods from the IFA 429 experiment irradiated in the Halden Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.

    1979-11-01

    A series of fuel rod irradiation experiments were performed in the Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Norway. These were designed to provide a range of fuel property data as a function of burn-up. One of these experiments was the IFA-429. This was designed to study the absorption of helium filling gas by the UO 2 fuel pellets, steady state and transient fission gas release and fuel thermal behaviour to high burn-up. This data was to be obtained as a function of fuel density, fuel grain size, initial fuel/cladding gap, average linear heat rating, burn-up and overpower transients. All the fuel is in the form of pressed and sintered UO 2 pellets enriched to 13 weight percent 235 U. All the rods were clad in Zircaloy 4 tube. The details of the experiment are given. The post irradiation examination included: visual examination, neutron radiography, dimensional measurements, gamma scanning, measurement of gases in fuel rods and internal free volume, burn-up analysis, metallographic examination, measurement of retained gas in UO 2 pellets, measurement of bulk density of UO 2 . The results are given and discussed. (U.K.)

  14. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  15. Cast iron for reactor technology - special structural and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janakiev, N.

    The graphitic phase, its formation and the effect on the mechanical properties of cast iron used for reactor shielding are described. Tensile strength, bending strength and Brinell hardness were studied. With the specimen wall thickness of 400 mm the average measured tensile strength was 180 N/mm 2 , which satisfies the given requirements as do the values of bending strength and material hardness. As against materials 200 mm in thickness, graphite was found by metallographic tests to be of a significantly coarser structure, which may be explained by slower cooling. Tensile strength was also tested for nodular cast irons and lamellar graphite cast irons. It was shown that compression increased with decreasing specimen diameter at constant pressure, at a constant diameter compression increased nearly in proportion to compressive stress. No significant differences were found if compressive stress was 80% of fracture stress. The modulus of elasticity was found to decrease with increasing graphite content while it was found to increase with fine graphite lamellae at the same carbon concentration. It also decreased with increasing straining. A Mo-alloyed cast iron was found to show slower creep rates at a compressive stress of up to 90 N/mm 2 (calculated to the same initial strengths) than Cu-alloyed cast iron. Upon increasing compressive stress to 140 N/mm 2 and creep time to more than 2000 hours, the creep behaviour of Cu-alloyed cast iron was better. Coarser perlite is likely to be more creep resistant than fine perlite. In neutron irradiation of cast iron a clear trend towards hardening was found due to the effect of neutrons on the cast iron structure. (J.B.)

  16. Estimation of damage by inmates of a PWR Reactor neutron irradiation. Project ZIRP; Estimacion del Dano por Irradiacion Neutronica en los Internos de un Reactor PWR. Proyecto ZIRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadenas Mendicoa, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    The study presented here focuses on the analysis of neutron and gamma irradiation damage suffered by the inmates of the JC NPP reactor metallic materials throughout its operational life. Such analysis of radiation are part of a project of great international impact, led by EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) from the MRP (Materials Reliability Program), which aims to relate the degradation of the properties of metallic materials of the inmates of the reactor, with the conditions of operation and irradiation to which have been subjected during the operational life of the plant.

  17. Independent CO2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA reactor vertical experimental channels, Task 2.50.05

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojic, M.; Pavicevic, M.

    1964-01-01

    This report contains the following volumes V and VI of the Project 'Independent CO 2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in RA reactor vertical experimental channels': Design project of the dosimetry control system in the independent CO 2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA reactor vertical experimental channels, and Safety report for the Independent CO 2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA reactor vertical experimental channels [sr

  18. Effects of irradiation on structural properties of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Hurley, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Stability of crystalline ceramic nuclear waste may be degraded by self-irradiation damage. Changes in density, strength, thermal conductivity, and lattice structure are of concern. Structural damage of ceramics under various radiation conditions is discussed and related to possible effects in nuclear waste

  19. Effects of irradiation on structural properties of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Hurley, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    Stability of crystalline ceramic nuclear waste may be degraded by self-irradiation damage. Changes in density, strength, thermal conductivity, and lattice structure are of concern. In this paper, structural damage of ceramics under various radiation conditions is discussed and related to possible effects in nuclear waste

  20. Use of EBR-II as a principal fast breeder reactor irradiation test facility in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staker, R.G.; Seim, O.S.; Beck, W.N.; Golden, G.H.; Walters, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    The EBR-II as originally designed and operated by the Argonne National Laboratory was successful in demonstrating the operation of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle. Subsequent operation has been as an experimental facility where thousands of irradiation tests have been performed. Conversion to this application entailed the design and fabrication of special irradiation subassemblies for in-core irradiations, additions to existing facilities for out-of-core irradiations, and additions to existing facilities for out-of-core experiments. Experimental subassemblies now constitute about one third of the core, and changes in the core configuration occur about monthly, requiring neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses and monitoring of the reactor dynamic behavior. The surveillance programs provided a wealth of information on irradiation induced swelling and creep, in-reactor fracture behavior, and the compatibility of materials with liquid sodium. (U.S.)

  1. Irradiation test plan of oxidation-resistant graphite in WWR-K Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Sakaba, Nariaki; Osaki, Hirotaka; Kato, Hideki; Fujitsuka, Kunihiro; Muto, Takenori; Gizatulin, Shamil; Shaimerdenov, Asset; Dyussambayev, Daulet; Chakrov, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Graphite materials are used for the in-core components of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor. In the case of air ingress accident in HTGR, SiO_2 protective layer is formed on the surface of SiC layer in TRISO CFP and oxidation of SiC does not proceed and fission products are retained inside the fuel particle. A new safety concept for the HTGR, called Naturally Safe HTGR, has been recently proposed. To enhance the safety of Naturally Safe HTGR ultimately, it is expected that oxidation-resistant graphite is used for graphite components to prevent the TRISO CFPs and fuel compacts from failure. SiC coating is one of candidate methods for oxidation-resistant graphite. JAEA and four graphite companies launched R&Ds to develop the oxidation-resistant graphite and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) partner project with JAEA and INP was launched to investigate the irradiation effects on the oxidation-resistant graphite. To determine grades of the oxidation-resistant graphite which will be adopted as irradiation test, a preliminary oxidation test was carried out. This paper described the results of the preliminary oxidation test, the plan of out-of-pile test, irradiation test and post-irradiation test (PIE) of the oxidation-resistant graphite. The results of the preliminary oxidation test showed that the integrity of the oxidation resistant graphite was confirmed and that all of grades used in the preliminary test can be adopted as the irradiation test. Target irradiation temperature was determined to be 1473 (K) and neutron fluence was determined to be from 0.54 × 10"2"5through 1.4 × 10"2"5 (/m"2, E>0.18MeV). Weight change, oxidation rate, activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in out-of-pile test and weight change, irradiation effect on oxidation rate and activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in PIE. (author)

  2. Activation and Radiation Damage Behaviour of Russian Structural Materials for Fusion Reactors in the Fission and Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.; Demin, N.; Chernov, V.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M.; Potapenko, M.

    2006-01-01

    Various structural low (reduced) activated materials have been proposed as a candidate for the first walls-blankets of fusion reactors. One of the main problems connected with using these materials - to minimise the production of long-lived radionuclides from nuclear transmutations and to provide with good technological and functional properties. The selection of materials and their metallurgical and fabrication technologies for fusion reactor components is influenced by this factor. Accurate prediction of induced radioactivity is necessary for the development of the fusion reactor materials. Low activated V-Ti-Cr alloys and reduced activated ferritic-martensitic steels are a leading candidate material for fusion first wall and blanket applications. At the present time a range of compositions and an impurity level are still being investigated to better understand the sensitive of various functional and activation properties to small compositional variations and impurity level. For the two types of materials mentioned above (V-Ti-Cr alloys and 9-12 % Cr f/m steels) and manufactured in Russia (Russia technologies) the analysis of induced activity, hydrogen and helium-production as well as the accumulation of such elements as C, N, O, P, S, Zn and Sn as a function of irradiation time was performed. Materials '' were irradiated '' by fission (BN-600, BOR-60) and fusion (Russian DEMO-C Reactor Project) typical neutron spectra with neutron fluency up to 10 22 n/cm 2 and the cooling time up to 1000 years. The calculations of the transmutation of elements and the induced radioactivity were carried out using the FISPACT inventory code, and the different activation cross-section libraries like the ACDAM, FENDL-2/A and the decay data library FENDL-2/D. It was shown that the level of impurities controls a long-term behaviour of induced activity and contact dose rate for materials. From this analysis the concentration limits of impurities were obtained. The generation of gas

  3. Fuel utilization potential in light water reactors with once-through fuel irradiation (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampolla, D.S.; Conley, G.H.; Candelore, N.R.; Cowell, G.K.; Estes, G.P.; Flanery, B.K.; Duncombe, E.; Dunyak, J.; Satterwhite, D.G.

    1979-07-01

    Current commercial light water reactor cores operate without recylce of fuel, on a once-through fuel cycle. To help conserve the limited nuclear fuel resources, there is interest in increasing the energy yield and, hence, fuel utilization from once-through fuel irradiation. This report evaluates the potential increase in fuel utilization of light water reactor cores operating on a once-through cycle assuming 0.2% enrichment plant tails assay. This evaluation is based on a large number of survey calculations using techniques which were verified by more detailed calculations of several core concepts. It is concluded that the maximum fuel utilization which could be achieved by practical once-through pressurized light water reactor cores with either uranium or thorium is about 17 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 (Megawatt Years Thermal per Short Ton of U 3 O 8 ). This is about 50% higher than that of current commercial light water reactor cores. Achievement of this increased fuel utilization would require average fuel burnup beyond 50,000 MWD/MT and incorporation of the following design features to reduce parasitic losses of neutrons: reflector blankets to utilize neutrons that would otherwise leak out of the core; fuel management practices in which a smaller fraction of the core is replaced at each refueling; and neutron economic reactivity control, such as movable fuel control rather than soluble boron control. For a hypothetical situation in which all neutron leakage and parasitic losses are eliminated and fuel depletion is not limited by design considerations, a maximum fuel utilization of about 20 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 is calculated for either uranium or thorium. It is concluded that fuel utilization for comparable reactor designs is better with uranium fuel than with thorium fuel for average fuel depletions of 30,000 to 35,000 MWD/MT which are characteristic of present light water reactor cores

  4. Comparison of HEU and LEU neutron spectra in irradiation facilities at the Oregon State TRIGA® Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schickler, R.A.; Marcum, W.R.; Reese, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The Oregon State TRIGA ® Reactor neutron spectra is characterized herein. • Neutron spectra between highly enriched uranium and low enriched uranium cores are compared. • Discussion is given as to differences between HEU and LEU core spectra results and impact on experiments. -- Abstract: In 2008, the Oregon State TRIGA ® Reactor (OSTR) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel lifetime improvement plan (FLIP) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort was driven and supported by the Department of Energy's (DoE's) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The basis behind the RERTR program's ongoing conversion effort is to reduce the nuclear proliferation risk of civilian research and test reactors. The original intent of the HEU FLIP fuel was to provide fuel to research reactors that could be utilized for many years before a necessary refueling cycle. As a research reactor, the OSTR provides irradiation facilities for a variety of applications, such as activation analysis, fission-track dating, commercial isotope production, neutron radiography, prompt gamma characterization, and many others. In order to accurately perform these research functions, several studies had been conducted on the HEU FLIP fuel core to characterize the neutron spectra in various experimental facilities of the OSTR (Tiyapun, 1997; Ashbaker, 2005). As useful as these analyses were, they are no longer valid due to the change in fuel composition and the resulting alteration of core performance characteristics. Additionally, the core configuration (fuel reconfiguration) was altered between the HEU and LEU cores. This study characterizes the neutron spectra in various experimental facilities within and around the current LEU core. It also compares the spectra to that which was yielded in the HEU core through use of Monte Carlo n-Particle 5 (MCNP5) and experimental adjustment via a least-squares technique. The quantification of

  5. Post-irradiation studies of test plates for low enriched fuel elements for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groos, E.; Buecker, H.J.; Derz, H.; Schroeder, R.

    1988-07-01

    In developing new fuels for research reactor elements that allow the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) 3 Si 2 , U 3 Si 1.5 , U 3 Si 1.3 and U 3 Si. Even up to high burnup rates (80% fifa) U 3 Si 2 was proved to be a reliable fuel that according to the test results achieved to date complies with all necessary requirements above all with respect to dimensional stability. U 3 Si showed significant changes of the fuel microstructure associated with considerably higher fuel swelling, that will probably exclude its use in research reactor operation. The irradiation of U 3 Si 1.3 and U 3 Si 1.5 plates had to be terminated untimely. Up to a burnup of 40% fifa these plates behaved quite well. An extrapolation to higher burnup rates, however only seems to be possible with reservations. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Microstructural investigations of fast reactor irradiated austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueev, V.S.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Romanueev, V.V.; Tselishev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructural changes induced in advanced fast reactor fuel claddings fabricated from Cr16Ni15Mo3NbB and Cr16Ni15Mo2Mn2TiVB austenitic stainless steels in the cold worked condition and Cr13Mo2NbVB ferritic -martensitic steel following irradiation in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors. The data are compared with the results obtained from a typical austenitic commercial cladding material, Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, in the cold worked condition. The results reveal a beneficial effect of boron and other alloying elements in reducing void swelling in 16Cr-15Ni type austenitic steels. The high resistance of ferritic-martensitic steels to void swelling has been confirmed in the Cr13Mo2NbVB steel. (author)

  7. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed

  8. Empirical relations for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in mixed-spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment has been made of available tensile property data relevant to the design of fusion reactors, especially near term devices expected to operate at lower temperatures than power reactors. Empirical relations have been developed for the tensile properties as a functions of irradiation temperature for neutron exposures of 10-15, 20, 30, and 50 dpa. It was found that yield strength depends little on the particular austenitic alloy and little on the helium concentration. Strength depends upon initial condition of the alloy only for exposures of less than 30 dpa. Uniform elongation was found to be more sensitive to alloy and condition. It was also more sensitive than strength to helium level. However, below 500deg C, helium only appeared to have an efect at 10-15 dpa. At higher temperatures, helium embrittlement was apparent, and its threshold temperature decreased with increasing neutron exposure level. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of corrosion of materials of the irradiation device in the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaric, M.; Mance, A.; Vlajic, M.

    1963-12-01

    Devices for sample irradiation in the vertical RA reactor channels will be made of aluminium alloys. According to the regulations concerned with introducing materials into the RA reactor core, corrosion characterisation of these materials is an obligation. Corrosion properties of four aluminium alloys were investigated both in contact with stainless steel and without it. First part of this report deals with the corrosion testing of aluminium alloys in water by gravimetric and electrochemical methods. Bi-distilled water at temperatures less than 100 deg C was used. Second part is related to aluminium alloys corrosion in carbon dioxide gas under experimental conditions. The second part of research was initiated by the design of the head of the independent CO 2 loop for samples cooling [sr

  10. Characterization of the insoluble sludge from the dissolution of irradiated fast breeder reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, Haruka; Arai, Yoichi; Shibata, Atsuhiro; Nomura, K.; Takeuchi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Insoluble sludge is generated in the reprocessing of spent fuel. The sludge obtained from the dissolution of irradiated fuel from the Joyo experimental fast reactor was analyzed to evaluate its chemical form. The sludge was collected by the filtration of the dissolved fuel solution, and then washed in nitric acid. The yields of the sludge weight were less than 1% of the total fuel weight. The chemical composition of the sludge was analyzed after decomposition by alkaline fusion. Molybdenum, technetium, ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium were found to be the main constituent elements of the sludge. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sludge were attributable to Mo{sub 4}Ru{sub 4}RhPd, regardless of the experimental conditions. The concentrations of molybdenum and zirconium in the dissolved fast reactor fuel solutions were low, indicating that zirconium molybdate hydrate (ZMH) is produced in negligible amounts in the process. (authors)

  11. Graphite moderator annealing of the experimental reactor for irradiation (0.5 MW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, Carlos Alberto de; Pires, Luis Fernando Goncalves

    1995-01-01

    This work describes an operational procedure for the annealing of the graphite moderator in the 0,5 MW Experimental Reactor for Irradiation. A theoretical methodology has been developed for calculating the temperature field during the annealing process. The equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation for the coolant as well as for the energy conservation in the moderator are solved numerically. The energy stored in the graphite and released in the annealing is accounted for by the use of a modified source term in the energy conservation equation for the moderator. A good agreement has been found for comparisons of the calculations with annealing data from the BEPO reactor. The major parameters affecting annealing have also been determined. (author). 8 refs, 11 figs

  12. A reverse method for the determination of the radiological inventory of irradiated graphite at reactor scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicaise, Gregory [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Poncet, Bernard [EDF-DP2D, Lyon (France)

    2016-11-15

    Irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six gas-cooled nuclear reactors operated by Electricite De France (EDF). Determining the radionuclide content of this waste is an important legal commitment for both safety reasons and in order to determine the best suited management strategy. As evidenced by numerous studies nuclear graphite is a very pure material, however, it cannot be considered from an analytical viewpoint as a usual homogeneous material. Because of graphite high purity, radionuclide measurements in irradiated graphite exhibit very high discrepancies especially when corresponding to precursors at trace level. Therefore the assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements leads in most of cases to a gross over or under-estimation that can be detrimental to graphite waste management. A reverse method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess the radionuclide inventory as precisely as possible.

  13. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.; Ujeno, Y.; Ishida, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  14. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.; Ujeno, Y.; Ishida, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  15. Irradiation-induced creep in fuel compacts for high-temperature reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veringa, H; Blackstone, R [Stichting Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland, Petten; Loelgen, R

    1977-01-01

    Restrained shrinkage experiments at neutron fluences up to 3 x 10/sup 21/ n cm/sup -2/ DNE in the temperature range 600 to 1200/sup 0/C were performed on three different dummy coated-particle fuel compacts in the high-flux reactor at Petten. The data were evaluated to obtain the steady-state radiation creep coefficient of the compacts. It was found that, for the materials investigated, the creep coefficient is temperature dependent, but no clear relationship with Young's modulus could be established. Under certain conditions this irradiation-induced plasticity influences the elastic properties, with the concomitant increase of the creep coefficient. This effect coincides with the formation and further opening up of cracks due to stresses caused by irradiation-induced shrinkage of matrix material.

  16. Irradiation-induced creep in fuel compacts for high-temperature reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veringa, H.; Blackstone, R.; Loelgen, R.

    1977-01-01

    Restrained shrinkage experiments at neutron fluences up to 3 x 10 21 n cm -2 DNE in the temperature range 600 to 1200 0 C were performed on three different dummy coated-particle fuel compacts in the high-flux reactor at Petten. The data were evaluated to obtain the steady-state radiation creep coefficient of the compacts. It was found that, for the materials investigated, the creep coefficient is temperature dependent, but no clear relationship with Young's modulus could be established. Under certain conditions this irradiation-induced plasticity influences the elastic properties, with the concomitant increase of the creep coefficient. This effect coincides with the formation and further opening up of cracks due to stresses caused by irradiation-induced shrinkage of matrix material. (author)

  17. Mechanical strength of an ITER coil insulation system under static and dynamic load after reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Hamada, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Okuno, K.

    2002-01-01

    The insulation system proposed by the Japanese Home Team for the ITER Toroidal Field coil (TF coil) is a T-glass-fiber/Kapton reinforced epoxy prepreg system. In order to assess the material performance under the actual operating conditions of the coils, the insulation system was irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 2x10 22 m -2 (E>0.1 MeV). After measurements of swelling, all mechanical tests were carried out at 77 K. Tensile and short-beam-shear (SBS) tests were performed under static loading conditions. In addition, tension-tension fatigue experiments up to about 10 6 cycles were made. The laminate swells in the through-thickness direction by 0.86% at the highest dose level. The fatigue tests as well as the static tests do not show significant influences of the irradiation on the mechanical behavior of this composite

  18. Mechanical strength of an ITER coil insulation system under static and dynamic load after reactor irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Weber, H. W.; Hamada, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Okuno, K.

    2002-12-01

    The insulation system proposed by the Japanese Home Team for the ITER Toroidal Field coil (TF coil) is a T-glass-fiber/Kapton reinforced epoxy prepreg system. In order to assess the material performance under the actual operating conditions of the coils, the insulation system was irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 2×10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV). After measurements of swelling, all mechanical tests were carried out at 77 K. Tensile and short-beam-shear (SBS) tests were performed under static loading conditions. In addition, tension-tension fatigue experiments up to about 10 6 cycles were made. The laminate swells in the through-thickness direction by 0.86% at the highest dose level. The fatigue tests as well as the static tests do not show significant influences of the irradiation on the mechanical behavior of this composite.

  19. Warm pre-stress experiments on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landron, C.; Ait-Bachir, M.; Moinereau, D.; Molinie, E.; Garbay, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the aim to justify in-service integrity of reactor pressure vessel beyond 40 years, experimental warm pre-stress (WPS) tests were performed on irradiated materials representative of RPV steels corresponding to 40 operating years. Different types of WPS loading path have been considered to cover typical postulated accidental transients. These results confirmed the beneficial effect of WPS on the cleavage fracture resistance of the irradiated materials. No fracture occurred during the cooling phase of the loading path and the fracture toughness values are higher than that measured with conventional isothermal tests. The analyses of the experiments, conducted using either simplified engineering models or more refined fracture models based on local approach to cleavage fracture, are in agreement with the experimental results. (authors)

  20. Irradiation test of fuel containing minor actinides in the experimental fast reactor Joyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Sekine, Takashi; Wootan, David; Tanaka, Kosuke; Kitamura, Ryoichi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    The mixed oxide containing minor actinides (MA-MOX) fuel irradiation program is being conducted using the experimental fast reactor Joyo of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency to research early thermal behavior of MA-MOX fuel. Two irradiation experiments were conducted in the Joyo MK-III 3rd operational cycle. Six prepared fuel pins included MOX fuel containing 3% or 5% americium (Am-MOX), MOX fuel containing 2% americium and 2% neptunium (Np/Am-MOX), and reference MOX fuel. The first test was conducted with high linear heat rates of approximately 430 W/cm maintained during only 10 minutes in order to confirm whether or not fuel melting occurred. After 10 minutes irradiation in May 2006, the test subassembly was transferred to the hot cell facility and an Am-MOX pin and a Np/Am-MOX pin were replaced with dummy pins including neutron dosimeters. The test subassembly loaded with the remaining four fuel pins was re-irradiated in Joyo for 24-hours in August 2006 at nearly the same linear power to obtain re-distribution data on MA-MOX fuel. Linear heat rates for each pin were calculated using MCNP, accounting for both prompt and delayed heating components, and then adjusted using E/C for 10 B (n, α) reaction rates measured in the MK-III core neutron field characterization test. Post irradiation examination of these pins to confirm the fuel melting and the local concentration under irradiation of NpO 2-x or AmO 2-x in the (U, Pu)O 2-x fuel are underway. The test results are expected to reduce uncertainties on the design margin in the thermal design for MA-MOX fuel. (author)

  1. Structural changes in the regenerating rat thymus after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Tetsuo; Wang, Yu-Hsueh; Hashimoto, Noriko; Tokuda, Nobuko; Sawada, Tomoo [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-11-01

    The structural changes of the rat thymus after irradiation were examined. Thymocytes regenerate rapidly after irradiation and the mechanism responsible for this rapid regeneration was examined analyzing vascular and immunohistochemical changes in the thymus. Following results were obtained: Vascular fine mesh works in the cortex were destroyed on day 3 after 6 Gy irradiation, while on day 5 these changes appeared to be restored to almost normal. Massive macrophage accumulations were observed in the cortex on day 3-5 after irradiation. This may be due to clean up the damaged thymocytes, although other possibility, as production of cytokines which may contribute to the rapid proliferation must be intensively examined. Immunohistochemical staining with anti MHC class II molecule showed relatively strong staining in the medulla compared to the cortex in the normal thymus, while this finding was reversed and cortex stained heavily compared to the medulla on day 5-7 after irradiation suggesting the importance of the cortical MHC class II positive thymic epithelial cells in regeneration of thymocytes. Anti FTS antibody stained relatively strongly in the irradiated and recovering thymus compared to the normal. These results may partly explain the abrupt proliferation of thymocytes after irradiation and further studies on cytokine message changes and thymic epithelial characterization responsible to produce the cytokines for the effective thymocyte proliteration are on the way of analysis. (author)

  2. Structural analysis of reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of fuel-element modeling is presented that traces the development of codes for the prediction of light-water-reactor and fast-breeder-reactor fuel-element performance. It is concluded that although the mathematical analysis is now far advanced, the development and incorporation of mechanistic constitutive equations has not kept pace. The resultant reliance on empirical correlations severely limits the physical insight that can be gained from code extrapolations. Current efforts include modeling of alternate fuel systems, analysis of local fuel-cladding interactions, and development of a predictive capability for off-normal behavior. Future work should help remedy the current constitutive deficiencies and should include the development of deterministic failure criteria for use in design

  3. LAMI - a planned Brazilian facility to investigate the mechanical and physical properties of structural materials under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Lobo, Raquel M.

    2011-01-01

    The LAMI (Laboratorio de Materiais Irradiados) is a hot laboratory designed to the characterization of irradiated structural material and will constitute one of the main installations of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB). The strong points of LAMI are: to contribute, through theoretical and experimental investigations, to the development of knowledge in materials science in order to be able to predict the evolution of the physical and mechanical material properties under service conditions (irradiation, thermomechanical solicitation, influence of the environment, etc); to characterize the properties of the materials used in the nuclear industry in order to determine their performance and to be able to predict their life expectancy; to establish, maintain and make use of the database generated by these data and to provide expertise on industrial components, in particular to investigate strain or rupture mechanisms. The test materials can be irradiated or not, and originate from surveillance programs, experimental neutron irradiations or simulated irradiation with charged particles. The main line of LAMI will have 10 shielded hot cells. The building also will have an area dedicated to micro and nano structural materials analysis. The mechanical characterization to be carried out within LAMI includes mechanical tests on irradiated materials, comprehension of behavior and damage processes and the incorporation of the test data results in a data bank for capitalization of test results. Planned materials to be tested are going to be metallic alloys used in industrial and experimental reactor: pressure vessel steels, internal stainless steels, austeno-ferritic steels, zirconium alloys and aluminum alloys. (author)

  4. Thermal hydraulic modelling of the Mo and Iridium irradiation facilities of the RA10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramajo, M.; García, J.; Marcel, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    The RA-10 reactor is a multipurpose, open pool research reactor. The core consists of a rectangular array of MTR type fuel. The produced thermal power is 30 MW which is extracted by the refrigeration system via an ascendant flow through the core. The core reflector is D 2 O contained in a watertight tank. The design of the reactor includes a number of out-core facilities which are meant to be used for industrial, medical and research purposes. Among all the facilities, the most important ones are the Molybdenum and Iridium ones which we modeled in this work. During the normal operation of the reactor, the manipulation and the on-line extraction of the irradiation facilities is foreseen. Therefore the study of the head loss during the normal operation as well as during the extraction maneuvers plays a relevant role in the design and safety analysis. In this work a CFD commercial code is use dto perform the calculations needed to guarantee the design requirements.In addition, a full detailed geometric model for both, the Molybdenum and Iridium facilities,is used to perform the required simulations. The obtained results allow to evaluating the thermal-hydraulic performance of the proposed facilities designs. (author)

  5. SMART - Structure mechanical analysis in reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyris, J.H.; Faust, G.; Szimmat, J.; Warnke, E.P.; Willam, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    The programme system SMART was developed in the years 1970-75 to calculate prestressed-concrete reactor pressure vessels with finite elements. The present report outlines the course and present state of research and development work. Following the specification of SMART, a brief presentation of the analytical possibilities and of the expansions for investigating creep, ultimate load behaviour and thermodiffusion is given. In conclusion, the fields of application of SMART are illustrated by means of examples. (orig./LH) [de

  6. An estimate of radiation fields in a gamma irradiation facility using fuel elements from a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, Rajendra

    2002-01-01

    A simple gamma irradiation facility set up using a few irradiated or partially irradiated swimming pool elements can be assembled to provide a convenient facility for irradiation of small and medium sized samples for research. The paper presents results of radiation levels with an arrangement using four elements from a reactor core operating at a power of 20 MW. A maximum gamma field of higher than 1 KGy/h at locations adjacent to fuel elements with negligible neutron contamination can be achieved. (author)

  7. European experience in the transport of irradiated light-water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods of transport of irradiated fuel flasks in Europe are described. While many problems in the transport of heavy flasks have been solved some remain and new ones have appeared. Some of these problems are the accumulation of crud on the surface of fuel elements, the problems of failed fuel, stringent criticality criteria, the ''sweating out'' of contaminated flasks, the access, road or rail, to reactor sites, and the maintenance of the transport vehicles. Some future trends in the direction of heavy flasks in the range of 75 to 100 tonnes are indicated

  8. Packaging and transport case of test fuel assembly irradiated in the Creys-Malville reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffroy, J.; Vivien, J.; Pouard, M.; Dujardin, G.N.; Veron, B.; Michoux, H.

    1986-06-01

    Some irradiated fuel assemblies from the fast neutron Creys Malville reactor will be sent to hot laboratories to follow fuel behavior. These test assemblies will be examined after a limited cooling time and transport is realized at high residual power (about 10kW) and cladding temperature should not rise over 500deg C. The fuel assemblies are not dismantled and transported into sodium. The assembly is placed into a case containing sodium plugged and put into a packaging. Dimensioning, thermal behavior, radiation protection and containment are examined [fr

  9. Irradiation of inert matrix and mixed oxide fuel in the Halden test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U.

    2001-01-01

    In a new type of fuel, called Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF), plutonium is embedded in a U-free matrix. This offers advantages for more efficient plutonium consumption, higher proliferation resistance, and for inert behaviour later in a waste repository. In the fuel type investigated at PSI, plutonium is dissolved in yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation-resistant cubic phase, with addition of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ-based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden (HBWR), together with MOX fuel (Rig IFA-651.1). The experiment is described herein and results are presented of the first 120 days of irradiation with an average assembly burnup of 47 kWd/cm 3 . The results are compared with neutronic calculations performed before the experiment, and are used to model the fuel behaviour with the PSI-modified TRANSURANUS code. The measured fuel temperatures are within the expected range. An unexpectedly strong densification of the IMF during the first irradiation cycle does not alter the fuel temperatures. An explanation for this behaviour is proposed. The irradiation at higher linear heat rates during forthcoming cycles will deliver information about the fission gas release behaviour of the IMF. (author)

  10. Irradiation experiments of recycled PuO2-UO2 fuels by SAXTON reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, Ryozo; Akutsu, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    Seventy two mixed oxide fuel rods made by PNC were irradiated in Saxton Core 3. This paper generally describes the fuel specifications, the power history of the fuel and the post-irradiation examination of the PNC fuel. The specifications of the 4.0 w/o and 5.0 w/o enriched PuO 2 fuel rods with zircaloy-4 cladding are presented in a table and a figure. The positions of PNC fuel rods in the Saxton reactor are shown in a figure. Sixty eight 5.0 w/o PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods were assembled in a 9 x 9 rod array together with zircaloy-4 bars, a flux thimble, and a Sb-Be source. The power history of the Saxton Core 3 and the irradiation history of the PNC fuel rods are summarized in tables. The peak power and burnup of each fuel rod and the axial power profile are also presented. The maximum linear power rate and burnup attained were 512W/cm and 8700 MWD/T, respectively. As for the post irradiation examination, the items of nondestructive test, destructive test, and cladding test are presented together with the working flow diagram of the examination. It is concluded that the performance of all fuel rods was safe and satisfactory throughout the power history. (Aoki, K.)

  11. Predicted irradiation behavior of U3O8-Al dispersion fuels for production reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Rest, J.

    1990-01-01

    Candidate fuels for the new heavy-water production reactor include uranium/aluminum alloy and U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuels. The U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel would make possible higher uranium loadings and would facilitate uranium recycle. Research efforts on U 3 O 8 -Al fuel include in-pile irradiation studies and development of analytical tools to characterize the behavior of dispersion fuels at high-burnup. In this paper the irradiation performance of U 3 O 8 -Al is assessed using the mechanistic Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART) code. Predictions of fuel swelling and alteration of thermal conductivity are presented and compared with experimental data. Calculational results indicate good agreement with available data where the effects of as-fabricated porosity and U 3 O 8 -Al oxygen exchange reactions are shown to exert a controlling influence on irradiation behavior. The DART code is judged to be a useful tool for assessing U 3 O 8 -Al performance over a wide range of irradiation conditions

  12. Irradiation of inert matrix and mixed oxide fuel in the Halden test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U

    2001-03-01

    In a new type of fuel, called Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF), plutonium is embedded in a U-free matrix. This offers advantages for more efficient plutonium consumption, higher proliferation resistance, and for inert behaviour later in a waste repository. In the fuel type investigated at PSI, plutonium is dissolved in yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation-resistant cubic phase, with addition of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ-based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden (HBWR), together with MOX fuel (Rig IFA-651.1). The experiment is described herein and results are presented of the first 120 days of irradiation with an average assembly burnup of 47 kWd/cm{sup 3}. The results are compared with neutronic calculations performed before the experiment, and are used to model the fuel behaviour with the PSI-modified TRANSURANUS code. The measured fuel temperatures are within the expected range. An unexpectedly strong densification of the IMF during the first irradiation cycle does not alter the fuel temperatures. An explanation for this behaviour is proposed. The irradiation at higher linear heat rates during forthcoming cycles will deliver information about the fission gas release behaviour of the IMF. (author)

  13. Swelling and tensile properties of EBR-II-irradiated tantalum alloys for space reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The tantalum alloys T-111, ASTAR-811C, Ta-10 W, and unalloyed tantalum were examined following EBR-II irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 650 to 950 K. Swelling was found to be negligible for all alloys; only tantalum was found to exhibit swelling, 0.36%. Tensile testing revealed that irradiated T-111 and Ta-10 W are susceptible to plastic instability, but ASTAR-811C and tantalum were not. The tensile properties of ASTAR-811C appeared adequate for current SP-100 space nuclear reactor designs. Irradiated, oxygen-doped T-111 exhibited no plastic deformation, and the abrupt failure was intergranular in nature. The absence of plastic instability in ASTAR-811C is encouraging for alloys containing carbide precipitates. These fine precipitates might prevent dislocation channeling, which leads to plastic instability in many bcc metals after irradiation. 10 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Microstructure and grain size effects on irradiation hardening of low carbon steel for reactor tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-05-15

    Irradiation hardening of steel for reactor pressure vessels has been studied extensively during the past few years. A great number of experimental results concerning the behaviour of these steels in the radiation field and several review papers (1,2) have been published. Most of the papers deal with the effects of specific metallurgical factors or irradiation conditions (temperature, flux) on irradiation hardening and embrittlement. In addition, a number of experiments are performed to give evidence on the mechanism of irradiation hardening of these steels. However, this mechanism is still unknown due to the complexity of steel as a system. Among different methods used in radiation damage studies, the changes of mechanical properties have been mainly investigated. By using Hall-Petch's empirical relation, {sigma}{sub y}={sigma}{sub i}+k{sub y} d{sup -1/2} between lower yield stress, {sigma}{sub y}, and grain size, 2d, the information about the effect of irradiation on the parameters {sigma}{sub i} and k{sub y} is obtained. Taking as a base interpretation of {sigma}{sub i} and k{sub y} given by Petch and his co-workers it has been concluded that radiation does not change the stress to start slip but that it increase the friction that opposes the passage of free dislocations across a slip plane. In attempting to apply Hall-Petch's relation to one unirradiated ferritic steel with a carbon content higher than 0.15% some difficulties were encountered. The results obtained indicate that the influence of grain size can not be isolated from other factors introduced by the treatments used to produce different grain sizes. This paper deals with a similar problem in the case of irradiated steel. The results obtained give the changes of the mechanical properties of steel in neutron irradiation field as a function of microstructure and grain size. In addition, the mechanical properties of irradiated steel are measured after annealing at 150 deg C and 450 deg C. On the basis of

  15. Microstructure and grain size effects on irradiation hardening of low carbon steel for reactor tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milasin, N.

    1964-05-01

    Irradiation hardening of steel for reactor pressure vessels has been studied extensively during the past few years. A great number of experimental results concerning the behaviour of these steels in the radiation field and several review papers (1,2) have been published. Most of the papers deal with the effects of specific metallurgical factors or irradiation conditions (temperature, flux) on irradiation hardening and embrittlement. In addition, a number of experiments are performed to give evidence on the mechanism of irradiation hardening of these steels. However, this mechanism is still unknown due to the complexity of steel as a system. Among different methods used in radiation damage studies, the changes of mechanical properties have been mainly investigated. By using Hall-Petch's empirical relation, σ y =σ i +k y d -1/2 between lower yield stress, σ y , and grain size, 2d, the information about the effect of irradiation on the parameters σ i and k y is obtained. Taking as a base interpretation of σ i and k y given by Petch and his co-workers it has been concluded that radiation does not change the stress to start slip but that it increase the friction that opposes the passage of free dislocations across a slip plane. In attempting to apply Hall-Petch's relation to one unirradiated ferritic steel with a carbon content higher than 0.15% some difficulties were encountered. The results obtained indicate that the influence of grain size can not be isolated from other factors introduced by the treatments used to produce different grain sizes. This paper deals with a similar problem in the case of irradiated steel. The results obtained give the changes of the mechanical properties of steel in neutron irradiation field as a function of microstructure and grain size. In addition, the mechanical properties of irradiated steel are measured after annealing at 150 deg C and 450 deg C. On the basis of the experimental results obtained the relative microstructure and

  16. An approach to development of structural design criteria for highly irradiated core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of the fast breeder reactor presents novel challenges in structural design and materials engineering. For instance, the core components of these reactors experience high energy neutron irradiation at elevated temperature, which causes significant time-dependent changes in material behaviour, such as a progressive loss of ductility. New structural design criteria are needed to extend elevated temperature design-by-analysis to account for these changes. Alloys best able to cope with the demands of the core operating environment are being explored and their structural behaviour characterized. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an approach used in the development of core component structural design criteria. To do this, several design rules, plus brief rationale, from draft RDT Standards F9-7, -8 and -9 will be presented. These recently completed standards ('Structural Design Guidelines for Breeder Reactor Core Components') were prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy and represent a consensus among most organizations participating in the U.S. breeder program. (author)

  17. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.G.; Freyer, P.D.; Mager, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe field-ion microscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Mechanisms of hardening and embrittlement generally consist of a ''precipitation-type'' and a ''damage-type'' component and the potential of annealing treatments for restoring the most of the original pressure vessel material toughness is examined; its conditions and mechanisms involved are discussed. Feasibility and economic evaluation of annealing costs is also carried out. 90 refs., 4 figs

  18. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M G; Freyer, P D; Mager, T R

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe fiel