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Sample records for irradiated immature mouse

  1. Inherited effects from mouse immature oocytes following low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.; Khan, R.; Raabe, O.G.; Walsh, K.J.; Wiley, L.M.

    1992-07-01

    Immature oocytes represent the genetic pool in female mice as well as in women and therefore are principal cells of concern for genetic studies. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic effects in female mice can be masked by the hypersensitive plasma membrane lethality target of immature oocytes. Studies have also shown that genetic effects can be detected when the plasma mambrane is sufficiently spared. Here, new data obtained using the mouse preimplantation embryo chimera assay are presented and discussed in light of previous findings for irradiated mouse oocytes

  2. Inherited effects from irradiated mouse immature oocytes detected in aggregation embryo chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.; Raabe, O.G.; Walsh, K.J.; Wiley, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained using the mouse-preimplantation-embryo-chimera assay are presented that show a transmitted effect following low-dose irradiation of immature oocytes in vivo. Six-week-old female mice were irradiated using 137 Cs-γ-rays (0.05 Gy, 0.15 Gy, and unexposed controls). At 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 weeks post exposure, the mice were mated and aggregation chimeras made from the 4-cell embryos. Three independent experiments have now been carried out, all showing a significant embryonic cell-proliferation disadvantage of the embryos obtained from the females treated 7 weeks previously, i.e., embryos from oocytes that were immature at the time of radiation exposure. No effect was detected at 1-6 weeks when embryos were obtained from maturing oocytes. Also, the effect was not seen at 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 weeks post exposure. The implications of these results are discussed in the light of previous studies on mouse oocytes

  3. Mouse immature oocytes irradiated in vivo at 14-days of age and evaluated for transmitted effects using the aggregation embryo chimera assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.; Raabe, O.G.; Walsh, K.J.; Wiley, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    A previous study using the mouse-preimplantation-embryo-chimera assay demonstrated a reproducible transmitted effect (proliferation disadvantage observed in early embryos) from females irradiated as 49-day-old adults using 0.15 Gy of gamma rays and then mated seven weeks later, i.e., embryos were from oocytes that were immature at time of irradiation. Because mouse immature oocytes are known to be much more radiosensitive to cell killing in juveniles than in adults, a follow-on study was performed here using 14-day-old juvenile mice. In contrast to adults, the exposure of juveniles to 0.15 Gy of gamma rays did not result in a detectable transmitted proliferation disadvantage when animals were mated 7 or 12 weeks later. This observation is discussed in light of previous studies on mouse immature oocytes and embryo chimeras

  4. Effects of follicle stimulationg hormone on {gamma}-ray irradiated immature mouse ovarian follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Chang Joo; Lee, Young Keun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kang Won; Yoon, Yong Dal [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    To assess the radioprotective effects of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) on ovarian follicles, 3 week-old female mice were irradiated with 8.33 Gy of {gamma}-ray (group R) and followed by 5 IU ip-injection of FSH (group RF). For control groups, 5 IU of saline (group C) or 5 IU of FSH (group F) was ip-injected. Ovaries were collected 0h, 6h, 12h, 1d, 2d, 4d, and 8d after irradiation or saline/FSH injection, and followed by fixation in neutral buffered formalin for routine histochemistry. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the status of follicles and DNA fragmentation was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for total DNA. Staining specific for apoptotic follicles showed high intensity at 6h and 12h in group R and RF. On the other hand, staining specific for proliferating follicles showed noticeably high intensity at 8d in group R and RF. DNA fragmentation of 185bp increased with time in all experimental groups. Especially 370bp appeared at 6h in group R, then disappeared after 1d. In case of group RF, it appeared at 12h and disappeared after 1d. From the above results, the irradiated antral follicles become completely disappeared from 4d to 8d, and then new follicles started to grow again at 8d. FSH had delaying or suppressing effects on follicular atresia after irradiation. In addition, it became clear that radiation-induced follicular atresia was mediated by granulosa cell apoptosis.

  5. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  6. The immature dentate gyrus represents a shared phenotype of mouse models of epilepsy and psychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Rick; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Hagihara, Hideo; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Walton, Noah M; Gross, Adam K; Heusner, Carrie L; Chen, Qian; Tamura, Kouichi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2013-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, share common etiologies, pathophysiologies, genetics, and drug responses with many of the epilepsies. Here, we explored overlaps in cellular/molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotypes between putative mouse models of bipolar disorder/schizophrenia and epilepsy. We tested the hypothesis that an immature dentate gyrus (iDG), whose association with psychosis in patients has recently been reported, represents a common phenotype of both diseases. Behaviors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (α-CaMKII) heterozygous knock-out (KO) mice, which are a representative bipolar disorder/schizophrenia model displaying iDG, and pilocarpine-treated mice, which are a representative epilepsy model, were tested followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)/immunohistochemistry for mRNA/protein expression associated with an iDG phenotype. In vitro electrophysiology of dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs) was examined in pilocarpine-treated epileptic mice. The two disease models demonstrated similar behavioral deficits, such as hyperactivity, poor working memory performance, and social withdrawal. Significant reductions in mRNA expression and immunoreactivity of the mature neuronal marker calbindin and concomitant increases in mRNA expression and immunoreactivity of the immature neuronal marker calretinin represent iDG signatures that are present in both mice models. Electrophysiologically, we have confirmed that DG GCs from pilocarpine-treated mice represent an immature state. A significant decrease in hippocampal α-CaMKII protein levels was also found in both models. Our data have shown iDG signatures from mouse models of both bipolar disorder/schizophrenia and epilepsy. The evidence suggests that the iDG may, in part, be responsible for the abnormal behavioral phenotype, and that the underlying pathophysiologies in epilepsy

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on Callus formation and regeneration of wheat immature embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, O.M.

    2007-01-01

    Four Egyptian bread wheat cultivars; G164, G168, SK61 and Sids1, were tested for their response to six gamma irradiation treatments; 1, 2, 3 Gy (as low doses) and 10, 20, 30 Gy (as high doses) in addition to 0 Gy (as a control) in terms of callus formation and regeneration of immature embryos. Low doses of gamma irradiations ( 1, 2 and 3 Gy) showed favourable effects on both traits; number of regenerated calli and number of shoots per callus comparing with the control (0 Gy), while high doses; 10, 20 and 30 Gy, had the worst effect comparing with the control (0 Gy). G164 cultivar was shown to get the best response in terms of callus formation and regeneration when exposed to low doses of gamma irradiation. In conclusion, gamma irradiation can serve in increasing regeneration efficiency of Egyptian bread wheat cells when used in low doses

  8. Sertoli cell death by apoptosis in the immature rat testis following x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, D.J.; Gobe, G.C.; Harmon, B.V.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of the morphological study of cell death has recently been emphasized by the recognition that the ultrastructural features of dying cells allow categorization of the death as either apoptosis or necrosis. This classification enables inferences to be drawn about the mechanism and biological significance of the death occurring in a particular set of circumstances. In this study, Sertoli cell death induced in the immature testis of three and four day old rats by 5 Gy (500 rads) x-irradiation was described by light and transmission electron microscopy with the objective of categorizing the death as apoptosis or necrosis. The testes were examined 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 24 h after irradiation. Following irradiation, there was a wave of apoptosis of the Sertoli cells starting in three to four hours and reaching a peak between four and eight hours. At 24 hours, only 61% of the expected number of Sertoli cells remained. These findings are in accord with recent ultrastructural reports that ionizing radiation induces cell death by apoptosis in rapidly proliferating cell populations. New insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cell death might thus be expected to stem from future elucidation of the general molecular events involved in triggering apoptosis

  9. Late effects of irradiation in mouse jejunum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, A.; Travis, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The response of mouse jejunum at intervals up to 1 year after single 'priming' doses of X-rays has been assessed by crypt survival after retreatment with single doses of X-rays and morphometric analysis of changes in the intestinal submucosa. The crypt dose-survival curves in mice re-irradiated at 2, 6, or 12 months after priming irradiation were displaced to higher doses in pre-treated than in non-pre-treated mice and were characterized by higher D 0 values. Misonidazole given before the test exposure reversed this effect so that the dose survival curve for crypts in pre-treated mice were superimposed on that for mice not previously irradiated, suggesting that the increase in isoeffect dose and the change in the D 0 in previously exposed mice was due to crypt hypoxia. Quantifications of the area of the submucosa showed that its area was increased at all three times after the priming doses and was a result of collagen deposition and oedema. Thus, the hypoxia in the crypts was probably secondary to these changes. Deaths began at 6-7 months after priming irradiation and were due to intestinal obstruction and stenosis. Thus, as in other tissues, two phases of injury can be assayed in the intestine of experimental animals. (author)

  10. Cytogenetics of Post-Irradiation Mouse Leukaemia

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    Wald, N.; Pan, S.; Upton, A.; Brown, R. [Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1969-11-15

    The interrelationship between radiation, cytogenetic abnormalities, and viruses in leukaemogenesis has been studied in the RF/Un mouse which develops a high incidence of granulocytic leukaemia on radiation exposure. A virus-like agent has been demonstrated in such leukaemic animals and the disease has been transmitted by passage of apparently acellular materials from irradiated primary animals to normal recipients. Pilot cytogenetic studies revealed consistent abnormal chromosome markers and modal shifts in both irradiated leukaemic animals and in non-irradiated animals developing leukaemia after passage injection. To define better the relationship between consistent bone-marrow chromosome aberrations and postirradiation primary and passaged leukaemia, 100 RF/Un mice were studied which were irradiated with 300 R of 250-kVp X-rays at 100 weeks of age and subsequently developed leukaemia. Eighty-seven had granulocytic leukaemia and in 72 of these, bone-marrow cytogenetic abnormalities were found. The distribution of-numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in 3225 cells studied are reviewed in derail. The correlation of specific aberrations to clinical and histopathologic findings has been attempted: Sequential passages of apparently cell-free material from the post-irradiation leukaemic mice into unirradiated RE/Un recipients and subsequent passages from leukaemic recipients were performed to observe the evolution of any initial chromosome markers and shifts in modal chromosome number in the passage generations. Two-hundred-thirty-six mice were inoculated with the material obtained either from primary post-irradiation leukaemic mice or from serially-passaged leukaemia cases. In the most extensive passaged line, 22 transfer generations containing 129 leukaemic mice were examined by clinical, histopathologic, -haematologic and cytogenetic procedures. Evolution of abnormal chromosome modes from 41 in the early passages to 39 chromosomes consistently after the 4

  11. Combination radiation-adriamycin therapy: renoprival growth, functional and structural effects in the immature mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, S.S.; Moskowitz, P.S.; Canty, E.L.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    The normal tissue effects of radiation-adriamycin combination therapy were studied in the renoprival weanling mouse in an attempt to determine whether compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation and chemotherapy could be associated with structural or functional abnormalities. Weanling BLc/sub Fl/ mice underwent unilateral nephrectomy, then single fraction renal irradiation, LD 1/21 doses of adriamycin in 5 daily doses, or combination therapy with radiation and adriamycin. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 12, and 24 weeks. Compensatory renal growth, body growth, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and renal morphology by light microscopy were evaluated. Significant compensatory renal growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy exceeded that produced by adriamycin alone and radiation alone, at all time periods (p < 0.005). Body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy or adriamycin alone significantly exceeded that produced by radiation alone (p < 0.005). Kidney and body growth inhibition from radiation-adriamycin therapy was proportionately severe. Kidney growth inhibition proportionately exceeded body growth inhibition with radiation alone; body growth inhibition proportionately exceeded kidney growth inhibition with adriamycin alone. Comparable azotemia developed by 24 weeks in both the radiation alone (p < .005) and radiation-adriamycin animals (p < 0.005), but not in the adriamycin only animals. Morphologic alterations consisting of increased glomerular density, tubular atrophy, and stromal fibrosis occurred with greater severity in the radiation-adriamycin animals than in the radiation only animals by 24 weeks; no alterations were seen in the adriamycin only animals. Using histologic criteria 750 rad plus adriamycin produced comparable injury as seen with 1000 rad alone, thus adriamycin produced an apparent dose-modifying factor of 1.33

  12. Interaction of X-irradiated mouse cells in heterokaryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmanova, J.; Spurna, V.

    1985-01-01

    The frequency of heterokaryon formation and the ability of DNA synthesis in the system of mouse X-irradiated L fibroblasts and non-irradiated or irradiated LS/BL lymphosarcoma cells were studied. The frequency of heterokaryons after fusion of one or both irradiated parental cells was 3 to 6 times higher than in the non-irradiated cell cultures. In these heterokaryons we found 1.5 to 3 times more nuclei of irradiated L cells capable of DNA synthesis than in the population of non-fused irradiated cells. (author)

  13. Chromosomal aberrations induced by 12C6+ ions and 6Co γ-rays in mouse immature oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Duan Xin; Yuan Zhigang; Li Wenjian; Zhou Guangming; Zhou Qingming; Bing Liu; Min Fengling; Li Xiaoda; Xie Yi

    2006-01-01

    The ovaries of Kun-Ming strain mice (3 weeks) were irradiated with different doses of 12 C 6+ ion or 6 Co γ-ray. Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed in metaphase II oocytes at 7 weeks after irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 12 C 6+ ion was calculated with respect to 6 Co γ-ray for the induction of chromosomal aberrations. The 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray dose-response relationships for chromosomal aberrations were plotted by linear quadratic models. The data showed that there was a dose-related increase in frequency of chromosomal aberrations in all the treated groups compared to controls. The RBE values for 12 C 6+ ions relative to 6 Co γ-rays were 2.49, 2.29, 1.57, 1.42 or 1.32 for the doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 or 6.0 Gy, respectively. Moreover, a different distribution of the various types of aberrations has been found for 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray irradiations. The dose-response relationships for 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray exhibited positive correlations. The results from the present study may be helpful for assessing genetic damage following exposure of immature oocytes to ionizing radiation

  14. UV irradiation to mouse skin decreases hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic protein expression via HPA axis activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mira; Ban, Jae-Jun; Bae, Jung-Soo; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-11-14

    The skin senses external environment, including ultraviolet light (UV). Hippocampus is a brain region that is responsible for memory and emotion. However, changes in hippocampus by UV irradiation to the skin have not been studied. In this study, after 2 weeks of UV irradiation to the mouse skin, we examined molecular changes related to cognitive functions in the hippocampus and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. UV exposure to the skin decreased doublecortin-positive immature neurons and synaptic proteins, including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2 A and postsynaptic density protein-95, in the hippocampus. Moreover, we observed that UV irradiation to the skin down-regulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and ERK signaling in the hippocampus, which are known to modulate neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. The cutaneous and central HPA axes were activated by UV, which resulted in significant increases in serum levels of corticosterone. Subsequently, UV irradiation to the skin activated the glucocorticoid-signaling pathway in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Interestingly, after 6 weeks of UV irradiation, mice showed depression-like behavior in the tail suspension test. Taken together, our data suggest that repeated UV exposure through the skin may negatively affect hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity along with HPA axis activation.

  15. Growth regulation in X-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgjo, K.; Devik, F.

    1978-01-01

    Extracts of hairless mouse skin were tested for their content of epidermal G 1 inhibitor and G 2 inhibitor at daily intervals after X-irradiation with 4 500 or 2 250 rad. After either dose the skin extracts lacked G 1 inhibitory activity on days 5 and 6 respectively after irradiation. This coincided with the time when the epidermal mitotic rate again became normal and started a period of over-shoot. The time interval of 5 to 6 days corresponds to the turnover time of the differentiating cells in hairless mouse back epidermis. The findings indicate that the proliferating cells in epidermis can respond to changes in local chalone concentration, even after X-irradiation at the tested doses, and that the irradiated epidermal cell population still retains some important properties inherent in a cybernetically regulated system. The local G 2 -inhibitory activity also varied after irradiation, but these variations could not be directly related to the corresponding mitotic rates. (author)

  16. Cell cycle evaluation of granulosa cells in the {gamma}-irradiated mouse ovarian follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Jin Kyu; Lee, Chang Joo; Lee, Young Keun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kang Won; Yoon, Yong Dal [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the biochemical and morphological effects of ionizing radiation on mouse ovarian follicles. Immature mice (ICR, 3 week-old) were irradiated with a dose of LD{sub 80(30)} at KAERI. The ovaries were collected after 6 hours, 12 hours, 1 day, and 2 days post irradiation. With the morphological basis of the histological staining with hematoxylin-eosin, immunohistochemical preparation using in situ 3'-end labeling was evaluated. Flow cytometric evaluation of DNA extracted from the whole ovary was performed. The percentage of A{sub 0} (subpopulation of cells with degraded DNA and with lower DNA fluorescence than G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cells), apoptotic, cells in the cell cycle was significantly higher in the irradiated group than in the control group. The number of in situ 3'-end labeled follicles increased at 6 hours post irradiation. All the analyses represented that the ionizing radiation-induced follicular atresia was taken place via an apoptotic degeneration. Such a degeneration underwent very fast and acutely. Therefore, it is concluded that the radiation-induced follicular degeneration is, like the spontaneous atresia, mediated by an acute apoptosis of follicular granulosa cells. Flow cytometric evaluation of cell cycles can make the role for quantifying the atretic follicles and understanding the mechanism of the radiation-induced cell death.

  17. Obtaining apple haploid plants (Malus X domestica Borkh.) from in situ parthenogenesis induced by irradiated pollen and in vitro culture of immature seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.X.; Lespinasse, Y.; Chevreau, E.

    1988-01-01

    Two apple varieties, ''Erovan'' and ''Lodi'', have been pollinated with pollen carrying the marker gene R irradiated by gamma rays from Cobalt 60 with doses of 500, 1000 and 1500 Gy. By in vitro cultures of the immature seeds removed 7 to 13 weeks after pollination, haploid plants (2n=x=17) have been obtained from ''Erovan'' [fr

  18. Assessment of estradiol-induced gene regulation and proliferation in an immortalized mouse immature Sertoli cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narender; Srivastava, Swati; Burek, Malgorzata; Förster, Carola Y; Roy, Partha

    2016-03-01

    The number of Sertoli cells during proliferative phase determines the fate of the germ cells in male reproductive system. A well-characterized cell line may help in better understanding of Sertoli cell biology. Hence, the present study assessed estradiol signaling in a mouse immature Sertoli cell line (MSC-1) as an alternative model in place of primary culture of Sertoli cells. In this study, we used MSC-1 cell line, derived from 10-day old mice. The cell cycle parameters were assessed, and the expression and regulation of Sertoli cell-specific secretory genes (ABP; androgen-binding protein) and tight junction genes (claudin-5, occludin, and vimentin) in response to estradiol was studied. The results obtained suggested the presence of both estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) in MSC-1 cells. In vitro scratch assay and cell-cycle analysis suggested the proliferative effects of estradiol in both time- and dose-dependent manner. The gene expression profiles of ABP, claudin-5, and occludin showed biphasic regulation at low and high doses of estradiol. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway with significantly increased pERK/ERK ratio (p<0.05). The results also suggested down regulation in the expression of mir-17 family members (mir-17, mir-20b, and mir-106a) (p<0.05). Considering the limited number of Sertoli cell lines and long-term survival inability of primary culture of Sertoli cells, MSC-1 cells could be a potential cell line for understanding the mechanisms of various cellular events in Sertoli cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The skin of the mouse foot was used to study the effects of previous irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 degrees C), to irradiation, or to irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 degrees C or 44 degrees C). Hyperthermia was applied by immersing the mouse foot into a hot waterbath and

  20. Gene expression profiles of mouse spermatogenesis during recovery from irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Fozia J; Tanaka, Masami; Nielsen, John E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Irradiation or chemotherapy that suspend normal spermatogenesis is commonly used to treat various cancers. Fortunately, spermatogenesis in many cases can be restored after such treatments but knowledge is limited about the re-initiation process. Earlier studies have described the cell......BACKGROUND: Irradiation or chemotherapy that suspend normal spermatogenesis is commonly used to treat various cancers. Fortunately, spermatogenesis in many cases can be restored after such treatments but knowledge is limited about the re-initiation process. Earlier studies have described...... the cellular changes that happen during recovery from irradiation by means of histology. We have earlier generated gene expression profiles during induction of spermatogenesis in mouse postnatal developing testes and found a correlation between profiles and the expressing cell types. The aim of the present...... work was to utilize the link between expression profile and cell types to follow the cellular changes that occur during post-irradiation recovery of spermatogenesis in order to describe recovery by means of gene expression. METHODS: Adult mouse testes were subjected to irradiation with 1 Gy...

  1. In-vitro secretion of inhibin-like activity by Sertoli cells from normal and prenatally irradiated immature rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultee-van Gessel, A.M.; Leemborg, F.G.; Jong, F.H. de; Molen, H.J. van der

    1986-01-01

    The influence of in-vitro conditions on the production of inhibin by Sertoli cells from 21-day-old normal and prenatally irradiated rat testes was studied by measuring inhibin activity in culture media, using the suppression of the release of FSH from cultured rat pituitary cells. Sertoli cells secreted inhibin-like activity during at least 21 days of culture, and cells cultured at 37 0 C produced significantly more inhibin than those cultured at 32 0 C. The presence of fetal calf serum had no significant effect on inhibin production at 32 0 C, while at 37 0 C the production was decreased. The presence of ovine FSH stimulated inhibin secretion, while inhibin concentrations in Sertoli cell culture media were decreased after the addition of testosterone. Testosterone, added together with ovine FSH, suppressed inhibin secretion when compared with the levels found in the presence of FSH alone. The presence of spermatogenic cells decreased the release of inhibin. From these results it was concluded that both Sertoli cells isolated from normal immature rat testes and those from testes without spermatogenic cells can secrete inhibin-like activity in culture. A number of discrepancies with in-vivo observations was observed. (author)

  2. Functional State of Haemopoietic Stem Cells in the Irradiated Mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silini, G.; Pozzi, Laura V. [Laboratorio di Radiobiologica Animale, Centro Studi Nucleari, Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    1968-08-15

    The repopulation kinetics of bone marrow in irradiated (C3H x C57BL) F{sub 1} hybrid mice were followed at different time intervals after a single whole-body dose of 150 rad X -rays. The changes in the number of total nucleated cells and of colony-forming cells were estimated and expressed as number of cells per femur shaft of fixed length. For the evaluation of the progenitor cell compartment an exogenous test of transplantation into heavily irradiated hosts followed by spleen colony counts was employed. In an attempt to distinguish between cycling and dormant cells in the progenitor pool, vinblastine was also administered under various schedules of treatment with respect to time and dosage to follow the changes induced by this drug in the irradiated recovering marrow. The depopulation of total bone-m arrow cells caused by vinblastine proceeded at a comparable rate in both the irradiated and the normal mouse. On the other hand, depopulation of the colony-formers is faster in animals irradiated 1 -2 days previously as compared with normal animals or mice irradiated 1 week or 2 weeks earlier. The data were interpreted to show that in the marrow of a newly-irradiated animal more cells are in a fast cycle than in a normal or a recovering animal. Data are finally presented and discussed concerning the use of vinblastine for studies of stem cell kinetics in haemopoietic tissues. (author)

  3. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn S. Knibbe-Hollinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization.

  4. Modulation of accelerated repopulation in mouse skin during daily irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.-R.; Shirazi, A.; Heasman, F.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: The timing of acceleration of repopulation in the epidermis during daily irradiation is related to the development of skin erythema and epidermal hypoplasia. Therefore, the relationship between impairment of the epidermal barrier function, the dermal inflammatory response and epidermal hypoplasia with the acceleration of repopulation was investigated.Materials and purpose: Skin fields of approximately 1 cm 2 on the thighs of TUC mice were given five daily fractions of 3 Gy in each week followed by top-up doses at the end of the first, the second, or the third week to determine residual epidermal tolerance and to calculate repopulation rates in weeks 1, 2, or 3. Systemic modulation of repopulation was attempted by daily indomethacine during fractionated irradiation whereas tape stripping or UV-B exposure before the start of fractionated irradiation attempted local modulation. In parallel experiments, the water permeability coefficient of the epidermis was determined ex vivo by studying transepidermal transport of tritiated water.Results: Without modulation, no repopulation was found in the first week of daily fractionation but repopulation compensated 30% of the dose given in week two and 70% of the dose given in week three. Only tape stripping before the start of fractionated irradiation accelerated repopulation in week one. UV-B had no effect on repopulation although it stimulated proliferation as much as tape stripping. Indomethacin did not suppress acceleration of repopulation. A significant increase in transepidermal water loss was found but only after repopulation had already accelerated.Conclusions: Acceleration of repopulation in mouse epidermis during daily-fractionated irradiation is not related to the simultaneous development of an inflammatory response. Also, the loss of the epidermal barrier function is not involved in the development of the acceleration response, which rather seems to be triggered directly by the decreased

  5. Differential expression of growth factors in irradiated mouse testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauduit, Claire; Siah, Ahmed; Foch, Marie; Chapet, Olivier; Clippe, Sebastien; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Benahmed, Mohamed

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: By using as an experimental model the male mouse gonad, which contains both radiosensitive (germ) and radioresistant (somatic) cells, we have studied the growth factor (and/or receptor) expression of transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβ RI), stem cell factor (SCF), c-kit, Fas-L, Fas, tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF R55), and leukemia inhibiting factor receptor (LIF-R) after local irradiation. Methods and Materials: Adult male mice were locally irradiated on the testes. Induction of apoptosis in the different testicular cell types following X-ray radiation was identified by the TdT-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) approach. Growth factor expression was evidenced by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Apoptosis, identified through the TUNEL approach, occurred in radiosensitive testicular (premeotic) germ cells with the following kinetics: the number of apoptotic cells increased after 24 h (p<0.001) and was maximal 48 h after a 2-Gy ionizing radiation (p<0.001). Apoptotic cells were no longer observed 72 h after a 2-Gy irradiation. The number of apoptotic cells increased with the dose of irradiation (1-4 Gy). In the seminiferous tubules, the growth factor expression in premeiotic radiosensitive germ cells was modulated by irradiation. Indeed Fas, c-kit, and LIF-R expression, which occurs in (radiosensitive) germ cells, decreased 24 h after a 2-Gy irradiation, and the maximal decrease was observed with a 4-Gy irradiation. The decrease in Stra8 expression occurred earlier, at 4 h after a 2-Gy irradiation. In addition, a significant (p<0.03) decrease in Stra8 mRNA levels was observed at the lowest dose used (0.5 Gy, 48 h). Moreover, concerning a growth factor receptor, such as TGFβ RI, which is expressed both in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, we observed a differential expression depending on the cell radiosensitivity after irradiation. Indeed, TGFβ RI expression was increased after irradiation in

  6. Early Gelatinase Activity Is Not a Determinant of Long-Term Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury in the Immature Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgette D Semple

    Full Text Available The gelatinases, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9, are thought to be key mediators of secondary damage in adult animal models of brain injury. Moreover, an acute increase in these proteases in plasma and brain extracellular fluid of adult patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and mortality. Nonetheless, their involvement after TBI in the pediatric brain remains understudied. Using a murine model of TBI at postnatal day 21 (p21, approximating a toddler-aged child, we saw upregulation of active and pro-MMP-9 and MMP-2 by gelatin zymography at 48 h post-injury. We therefore investigated the role of gelatinases on long-term structural and behavioral outcomes after injury after acute inhibition with a selective gelatinase inhibitor, p-OH SB-3CT. After systemic administration, p-OH SB-3CT crossed the blood-brain barrier at therapeutically-relevant concentrations. TBI at p21 induced hyperactivity, deficits in spatial learning and memory, and reduced sociability when mice were assessed at adulthood, alongside pronounced tissue loss in key neuroanatomical regions. Acute and short-term post-injury treatment with p-OH SB-3CT did not ameliorate these long-term behavioral, cognitive, or neuropathological deficits as compared to vehicle-treated controls, suggesting that these deficits were independent of MMP-9 and MMP-2 upregulation. These findings emphasize the vulnerability of the immature brain to the consequences of traumatic injuries. However, early upregulation of gelatinases do not appear to be key determinants of long-term recovery after an early-life injury.

  7. Early Gelatinase Activity Is Not a Determinant of Long-Term Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury in the Immature Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Gooyit, Major; Tercovich, Kayleen G.; Peng, Zhihong; Nguyen, Trung T.; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Suckow, Mark A.; Chang, Mayland; Raber, Jacob; Trivedi, Alpa

    2015-01-01

    The gelatinases, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, are thought to be key mediators of secondary damage in adult animal models of brain injury. Moreover, an acute increase in these proteases in plasma and brain extracellular fluid of adult patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and mortality. Nonetheless, their involvement after TBI in the pediatric brain remains understudied. Using a murine model of TBI at postnatal day 21 (p21), approximating a toddler-aged child, we saw upregulation of active and pro-MMP-9 and MMP-2 by gelatin zymography at 48 h post-injury. We therefore investigated the role of gelatinases on long-term structural and behavioral outcomes after injury after acute inhibition with a selective gelatinase inhibitor, p-OH SB-3CT. After systemic administration, p-OH SB-3CT crossed the blood-brain barrier at therapeutically-relevant concentrations. TBI at p21 induced hyperactivity, deficits in spatial learning and memory, and reduced sociability when mice were assessed at adulthood, alongside pronounced tissue loss in key neuroanatomical regions. Acute and short-term post-injury treatment with p-OH SB-3CT did not ameliorate these long-term behavioral, cognitive, or neuropathological deficits as compared to vehicle-treated controls, suggesting that these deficits were independent of MMP-9 and MMP-2 upregulation. These findings emphasize the vulnerability of the immature brain to the consequences of traumatic injuries. However, early upregulation of gelatinases do not appear to be key determinants of long-term recovery after an early-life injury. PMID:26588471

  8. Effect of low-dose irradiation on pregnant mouse haemopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, S.R.; McCarthy, E.G.; MacVittie, T.J.; Baum, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of low-dose gamma radiation to haemopoietic progenitor cell compartments of the marrow and spleen of virgin female mice and pregnant mice were studied. Microplasma clot cultures were used to assess burst-forming uniterythroid (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) activity, and double-layer agar cultures were established to evaluate granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) and macrophage colony-forming cell (M-CFC). The apparent shift in maternal erythropoiesis from the bone marrow to the enlarged spleen was reflected by an increase in CFU-E and BFU-E per spleen and a concomitant decrease in CFU-E and BFU-E per femur. Whereas maternal GM-CFC values per femur increased 36%, maternal GM-CFC per spleen increased by 172% compared to virgin values. Total-body irradiation to the day-10.5 pregnant mouse caused a further suppression of day-14.5 medullary erythropoiesis (i.e. decreased CFU-E values) compared to the virgin female mouse. An ability of the maternal spleen to support further compensatory erythropoiesis following increasing doses of radiation was demonstrated. Four days after 1.0 Gy exposure, maternal values for GM-CFC per femur or spleen decreased to nonirradiated virgin mice values. M-CFC per maternal femur decreased to nonirradiated virgin mice values. M-CFC per maternal femur decreased following 1.5 Gy, but M-CFC per spleen appeared to be unaffected with doses from 0.5 to 2.0 Gy. (author)

  9. Reduced developmental competence of immature, in-vitro matured and postovulatory aged mouse oocytes following IVF and ICSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trounson Alan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study highlights basic physiological differences associated with oocyte maturation and ageing. The study explores the fertilizing capacity and resistance to injury of mouse oocytes at different stages of maturation and ageing following IVF and ICSI. Also, the study examines the developmental competence of embryos obtained from these oocytes. The outcome of the study supports views that the mouse can be a model for human IVF suggesting that utilizing in-vitro matured and failed fertilized oocytes to produce embryos mainly when limited number of oocytes is retrieved in a specific cycle, should be carefully considered. Methods Hybrid strain mouse oocytes were inseminated by in-vitro fertilization (IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Oocytes groups that were used were germinal vesicle (GV in-vitro matured metaphase II (IVM-MII, freshly ovulated MII (OV-MII, 13 hrs in-vitro aged MII (13 hrs-MII and 24 hrs in-vitro aged MII (24 hrs-MII. Fertilization and embryo development to the blastocyst stage were monitored up to 5 days in culture for IVF and ICSI zygotes. Sperm head decondensation and pronuclear formation were examined up to 9 hrs in oocytes following ICSI. Apoptotic events in blocked embryos were examined using the TUNNEL assay. Differences between females for the number and quality of GV and OV-MII oocytes were examined by ANOVA analyses. Differences in survival after ICSI, fertilization by IVF and ICSI and embryo development were analysed by Chi-square test with Yates correction. Results No differences in number and quality of oocytes were identified between females. The findings suggest that inability of GV oocytes to participate in fertilization and embryo development initiates primarily from their inability to support initial post fertilization events such as sperm decondensation and pronuclei formation. These events occur in all MII oocytes in similar rates (87–98% for IVF and ICSI. Following

  10. Quality assurance of {sup 137}Cs Photons for Vivo Mouse Irradiation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, S. J. [Inje Univ., Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H. J.; Jeong, D. H.; Yang, K. M.; Son, T. G.; Kang, Y. R. [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The multi-purpose irradiation apparatus using a {sup 137}Cs, which can be used for the blood test, can be affected by the other components of the experiments such as the size and shape of the beaker and the maximum variation of more than 35% has been reported. The mount of the absorbed dose is determined by the distance between irradiation target and the source and the irradiation time with the irradiator (Gamma Irradiator, Chiyoda Technol Co, Japan) for this experiment. The low-dose irradiation has been used in this study is advantageous for irradiating the cell culture vessel or the small animal. However, radiation is performed by placing the 3-5 mice in each mouse cage (polycarbonate cage). In this case, overlapping often happens to the target during irradiation. Irradiating without considering the geometrical aspect of the irradiation device can occur as well. To solve the problems, the mouse apartment with the 45 mouse cages is built and the device is assessed by being compared with the conventional method in 2 different ways. Firstly, the glass dosimeters were inserted into the head and the body of the lab mice for 2 methods. Secondly, MCNP simulation was performed for absorbed dose and air kerma measurements in each mouse apartment chamber. In this study, the system that allows the accurate irradiation using the {sup 137}Cs gamma irradiator mainly used in Radiation Biology was developed and the accuracy of the system has been confirmed by the experiments. The dose delivery using the conventional system had the variation of 42% at most whereas the variation was less than 6% for the mouse apartment. From the MCNP simulation, the difference between each chamber was less than 0.1% and 0.4% for the air kerma and the absorbed dose respectively. Considering the statistical error of MCNP and the assumption from the simulation, the accuracy of the simulation was matched well with the measurements with the glass dosimeters.

  11. Quality assurance of 137Cs Photons for Vivo Mouse Irradiation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Jeong, D. H.; Yang, K. M.; Son, T. G.; Kang, Y. R.; Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-purpose irradiation apparatus using a 137 Cs, which can be used for the blood test, can be affected by the other components of the experiments such as the size and shape of the beaker and the maximum variation of more than 35% has been reported. The mount of the absorbed dose is determined by the distance between irradiation target and the source and the irradiation time with the irradiator (Gamma Irradiator, Chiyoda Technol Co, Japan) for this experiment. The low-dose irradiation has been used in this study is advantageous for irradiating the cell culture vessel or the small animal. However, radiation is performed by placing the 3-5 mice in each mouse cage (polycarbonate cage). In this case, overlapping often happens to the target during irradiation. Irradiating without considering the geometrical aspect of the irradiation device can occur as well. To solve the problems, the mouse apartment with the 45 mouse cages is built and the device is assessed by being compared with the conventional method in 2 different ways. Firstly, the glass dosimeters were inserted into the head and the body of the lab mice for 2 methods. Secondly, MCNP simulation was performed for absorbed dose and air kerma measurements in each mouse apartment chamber. In this study, the system that allows the accurate irradiation using the 137 Cs gamma irradiator mainly used in Radiation Biology was developed and the accuracy of the system has been confirmed by the experiments. The dose delivery using the conventional system had the variation of 42% at most whereas the variation was less than 6% for the mouse apartment. From the MCNP simulation, the difference between each chamber was less than 0.1% and 0.4% for the air kerma and the absorbed dose respectively. Considering the statistical error of MCNP and the assumption from the simulation, the accuracy of the simulation was matched well with the measurements with the glass dosimeters

  12. Plastic reorganization in the inferior colliculus of the immature mouse studied by 14C$deoxyglucose method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Ikuo; Saito, Nozomu

    1978-01-01

    Plastic reinnervation was observed in the mouse by means of autoradiography with [ 14 C]deoxyglucose (DG). It is possible that the ipsilateral inhibitory pathway for input from the cochlea to the inferior colliculus (IC) switches to excitation or disinhibition following unilateral cochlear destruction. Autoradiographs of the brains of mice exposed to sound stimuli exhibited high optical densities in activated regions due to the increased uptake of DG. IC revealed essentially the same optical density on both sides. No bilateral asymmetry appeared in autoradiographs of IC in 46-day-old normal animals with binaural hearing, indicating glucose consumption at the same rate bilaterally at the level of IC in normal animals. On the 1st and 4th days after destruction of the left cochles, the contralateral IC exhibited less labeling than the ipsilateral IC. However, optical density in the contralateral IC increase. On the 11th day, it was apparently reduced in bilateral asymmetry. Autoradiographs on the 18th day demonstrated essentially an equal uptake of DG on both sides and almost the same pattern as in normal animals. These changes suggested postoperative reorganization possible occurred as a result of reinnervation of the input fibers to IC via the commissure of inferior colliculi (COM) or the lateral lemniscus ipsilaterally. COM was transectioned 31 days after destruction of the left cochlea. IC demonstrated symmetrical uptake of DG on both sides. (J.P.N.)

  13. Expression of extracellular matrix components is disrupted in the immature and adult estrogen receptor β-null mouse ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zalewski

    mouse ovary.

  14. Study on changes of sperm count and testis tissue in black mouse after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ki Jung; Seo, Won Sook [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hwa Young [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    For the purpose of the biological effect in black mouse by neutron irradiation, mice were irradiated with 16 or 32 Gy neutron (flux: 1.036739E+09) by lying flat pose at BNCT facility on HANARO Reactors. And 90 days later of irradiation, physical changes of testis and testis tissue were examined. There were no weight changes but a little bit volume changes and sperm counts in the tests. Atrophy of seminiferous tubules irradiated with 32 Gy neutron is increased in number and severity and those in stage VI showed depletion of spermatogonia and pachytene spermatocytes compared to the non-irradiated control group. Testis damage of black mouse was not recovered after long time by 32 Gy neutron irradiation.

  15. Study on changes of sperm count and testis tissue in black mouse after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ki Jung; Seo, Won Sook; Son, Hwa Young

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of the biological effect in black mouse by neutron irradiation, mice were irradiated with 16 or 32 Gy neutron (flux: 1.036739E+09) by lying flat pose at BNCT facility on HANARO Reactors. And 90 days later of irradiation, physical changes of testis and testis tissue were examined. There were no weight changes but a little bit volume changes and sperm counts in the tests. Atrophy of seminiferous tubules irradiated with 32 Gy neutron is increased in number and severity and those in stage VI showed depletion of spermatogonia and pachytene spermatocytes compared to the non-irradiated control group. Testis damage of black mouse was not recovered after long time by 32 Gy neutron irradiation

  16. Residual activation events functional after irradiation of mouse splenic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.D.; Lawrence, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    We have sought to identify the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes by determining the extent of activation of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes previously exposed to growth-inhibiting doses of radiation. Mouse splenic lymphocytes were exposed to 0-15 Gy 137Cs radiation, and structural and functional damage were assayed. Although damage to cellular thiols and nonprotein thiols was modest, there was a significant loss of viability by 6 h as determined by uptake of propidium iodide (PI). Since cells did not die immediately after irradiation, the activation events which remained were evaluated. Growth-inhibiting doses of radiation left cells partially responsive to mitogen, in that cells were able to exit G0 phase, but they could progress no further into the cell cycle than G1a phase. It is important to note that assessment of viability by uptake of PI indicated substantial cell death after 15 Gy (45%, 6 h; 90%, 24 h); however, cell cycle analysis at 24 h indicated no significant decrease in progression from G0 to G1a phase. The LPS-stimulated response of B cells was more radiosensitive than the Con A-stimulated response of T cells. Further analysis of the Con A response indicated that production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was unaffected, but expression of the IL-2 receptor was inhibited. Inhibition of poly-ADP-ribosylation and damage to lipids did not prevent the lack of mitogen responsiveness, since neither the ADP-ribose transferase inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide nor lipid radical scavengers had restorative effects on the mitogenic response. Nor was Con A-stimulated incorporation of [3H]thymidine restored with inhibitors of prostaglandin or leukotriene synthesis, suggesting that inhibition was due to direct effects on the Con A responders, and not indirect effects mediated by arachidonate metabolites

  17. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K; Chen, Y J; Ohira, C; Nojima, K; Ando, S; Kobayashi, N; Ohbuchi, T; Shimizu, W [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S; Kanai, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  18. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W.; Koike, S.; Kanai, T.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  19. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of previous x-irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 0 C), x-irradiation, and irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 0 C or 44 0 C) was studied in mouse foot skin. Irradiation of mice feet 90 days before, with 20 Gy, increased the subsequent response to heat alone, or combined with irradiation, as well as to irradiation alone. It had little effect on the thermal enhancement ratios for both acute and late skin reactions. Memory of the previous irradiation treatment could be masked when the temperature of the subsequent heat treatment alone, or combined with irradiation, was 44 0 C. Priming heat treatment induced resistance to a subsequent heat treatment and to a subsequent combined irradiation-heat treatment in normal as well as previously irradiated skin. When late skin reaction was considered, a larger 'memory' of the previous irradiation treatment was always evident, compared to acute skin reaction: the 'remembered' dose in the late skin reaction was about twice the 'remembered' dose in the acute reaction. (U.K.)

  20. Radioprotection by dipyridamole in the aging mouse. Effects on lipid peroxidation in mouse liver, spleen and brain after whole-body X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Noritaka

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the radioprotective effect of dipyridamole in the aging mouse, the lipid peroxide content in aging mouse liver, spleen and brain irradiated by X-ray were measured both before and after injection of dipyridamole. The lipid peroxide content increased with aging from 2 months old to 16 months old in the mouse liver, spleen and brain. The content of lipid peroxide in the liver and spleen of the aging mouse was significantly increased in 7 days after whole-body irradiation with 8 Gy, but was unchanged in the brain. Dipyridamole, given before irradiation, significantly inhibited the increase of lipid peroxide after irradiation. These results suggest that dipyridamole may have radioprotective effects on aging mouse liver and spleen as well as on young mouse, and that inhibition of lipid peroxidation is a possible factor in the radioprotective effect of dipyridamole. (author)

  1. Suppression of mouse-killing in rats following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Boyle, M.

    1976-01-01

    Suppression of mouse-killing was produced following pairings of mouse-presentations (CS) with 96 roentgens of ionizing radiation (US) at 0 (less than 2 min.) and 30 min. US-CS interstimulus intervals. No suppression was found at CS-US intervals of 30 min., 1 hr., and 2 hr., or at US-CS intervals of 1 hr. and 2 hr

  2. Interferon synthesis in mouse peritoneal cells damaged by x irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolgay, E; T' alas, M

    1976-01-01

    NDV-induced interferon of peritoneal cells of irradiated (x-rays, 400 R) and control mice was investigated in vitro. Irradiation or treatment with hydroxyurea (10(-5) M) and mitomycin C (25 microng/ml) did not change interferon synthesis in spite of an 80 to 90% inhibition of 3H-thymidine incorporation. Increased doses of mitomycin C and treatment with actinomycin D and puromycin blocked interferon production. De novo interferon synthesis occurred in cells with damaged replicative activity of DNA caused by irradiation or by treatment with antimetabolites.

  3. Chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa after 137Cs γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Hirokazu; Kamiguchi, Yujiroh

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrated that freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa possess strong resistance to 137 Cs γ-ray irradiation at doses of up to 8 Gy. Freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa were rehydrated and injected into mouse oocytes with an intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technique. Most oocytes can be activated after ICSI by using spermatozoa irradiated with γ-rays before and after freeze-drying. Sperm chromosome complements were analyzed at the first cleavage metaphase. Chromosome aberrations increased in a dose-dependent manner in the spermatozoa irradiated before freeze-drying. However, no increase in oocytes with chromosome aberrations was observed when fertilized by spermatozoa that had been irradiated after freeze-drying, as compared with freeze-dried spermatozoa that had not been irradiated. These results suggest that both the chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried spermatozoa, as well as their ability to activate oocytes, were protected from γ-ray irradiation at doses at which chromosomal damage is found to be strongly induced in spermatozoa suspended in solution

  4. Localized irradiation of mouse legs using an image-guided robotic linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufeld, Markus; Escobar, Helena; Marg, Andreas; Pasemann, Diana; Budach, Volker; Spuler, Simone

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the potential of human satellite cells in muscle regeneration small animal models are useful to evaluate muscle regeneration. To suppress the inherent regeneration ability of the tibialis muscle of mice before transplantation of human muscle fibers, a localized irradiation of the mouse leg should be conducted. We analyzed the feasibility of an image-guided robotic irradiation procedure, a routine treatment method in radiation oncology, for the focal irradiation of mouse legs. After conducting a planning computed tomography (CT) scan of one mouse in its customized mold a three-dimensional dose plan was calculated using a dedicated planning workstation. 18 Gy have been applied to the right anterior tibial muscle of 4 healthy and 12 mice with immune defect in general anesthesia using an image-guided robotic linear accelerator (LINAC). The mice were fixed in a customized acrylic mold with attached fiducial markers for image guided tracking. All 16 mice could be irradiated as prevised without signs of acute radiation toxicity or anesthesiological side effects. The animals survived until scarification after 8, 21 and 49 days as planned. The procedure was straight forward and the irradiation process took 5 minutes to apply the dose of 18 Gy. Localized irradiation of mice legs using a robotic LINAC could be conducted as planned. It is a feasible procedure without recognizable side effects. Image guidance offers precise dose delivery and preserves adjacent body parts and tissues.

  5. Differential effects of fractionated X irradiation on mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Y.; Huiskamp, R.; Davids, J. A.; de rooij, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The response of spermatogonial stem cells to fractionated X irradiation was studied in the various stages of the spermatogenic cycle of the CBA mouse. Fractionated doses of 2 + 2, 1 + 3, and 3 + 1 Gy with a 24-h interval between the doses were compared with a single dose of 4 Gy. The numbers of

  6. SU-F-T-668: Irradiating Mouse Brain with a Clinical Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Torres, C [N Rancilio Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To design and construct a “mouse jig” device that would allow for irradiation of the mouse brain with a clinical Varian 6 MeV Linear Accelerator. This device must serve as a head immobilizer, gaseous anesthesia delivery, and radiation bolus concurrently. Methods: The mouse jig was machined out of nylon given that it is inexpensive, easy to machine, and has similar electron density to water. A cylindrical opening with diameter of 16 mm and 40 mm depth was drilled into a nylon block sized 56×56×50 mm (width, length, depth). Additional slots were included in the block for ear bars and a tooth bar to serve as a three-point immobilization device as well as for anesthesia delivery and scavenging. For ease of access when loading the mouse into the holder, there is a removable piece at the top of the block that is 15 mm in depth. This serves a dual purpose, as with the proper extra shielding, the mouse jig could be used with lower linear energy transfer photons with this piece removed. A baseplate was then constructed with five square slots where the mouse jig can securely be inserted plus additional slots that would allow the baseplate to be mounted on a standard lock bar in the treatment couch. This maximizes the reproducibility of placement between imaging and treatment and between treatment sessions. Results: CT imaging and radiation treatment planning was performed that showed acceptable coverage and uniformity of radiation dose in the mouse brain while sparing the throat and eyes. Conclusion: We have designed and manufactured a device that fulfills our criteria allowing us to selectively irradiate the mouse brain with a clinical linear accelerator. This setup will be used for generating mouse models of radiation-induced brain injury.

  7. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  8. Collagen synthesis in CBA mouse heart after total thoracic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.C.; Parkins, C.S.; Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton

    1988-01-01

    CBA mice were irradiated to the whole thorax with single doses of 240 kVp X-rays in the dose range 8-16 Gy. Collagen and total protein synthesis rates in the heart were measured at 2-monthly intervals using a radio-isotope incorporation techniques. Doses of 10 Gy or greater caused a slight increase in collagen synthesis, followed by significantly reduced collagen synthesis by 16 weeks or longer after treatment. The depression in synthesis appeared correspondingly earlier with increasing dose. Total protein synthesis in heart followed similar patterns although changes were not statistically significant, indicating that the changes reflected alterations to collagen synthesis specifally, and not protein synthesis in geneal. Total hydroxyproline measurements showed no significant changes in heart collagen at any time as a result of X-irradiation. 18 refs.; 7 figs

  9. Curcumin Stimulates the Antioxidant Mechanisms in Mouse Skin Exposed to Fractionated γ-Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Chandra Jagetia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractionated irradiation is one of the important radiotherapy regimens to treat different types of neoplasia. Despite of the immense therapeutic gains accrued by delivering fractionated irradiation to tumors, the radiation burden on skin increases significantly. Low doses of irradiation to skin adversely affect its molecular and metabolic status. The use of antioxidant/s may help to alleviate the radiation-induced changes in the skin and allow delivering a higher dose of radiation to attain better therapeutic gains. Curcumin is an antioxidant and a free radical scavenging dietary supplement, commonly used as a flavoring agent in curries. Therefore, the effect of 100 mg/kg body weight curcumin was studied on the antioxidant status of mice skin exposed to a total dose of 10, 20 and 40 Gy γ-radiation below the rib cage delivered as a single fraction of 2 Gy per day for 5, 10 or 20 days. Skin biopsies from both the curcumin treated or untreated irradiated groups were collected for the biochemical estimations at various post-irradiation times. The irradiation of animals caused a dose dependent decline in the glutathione concentration, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities and increased the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated skin. Curcumin treatment before irradiation resulted in a significant rise in the glutathione concentration and activities of both the glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in mouse skin, whereas lipid peroxidation declined significantly. The present study indicates that curcumin treatment increased the antioxidant status of mouse exposed to different doses of fractionated γ-radiation.

  10. The anti-tumor effect of ACNU and x-irradiation on mouse glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hidemitsu; Hori, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Mogami, Heitaro; Hayakawa, Toru.

    1979-01-01

    Anti-tumor activities of 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride (ACNU) and x-irradiation on methylcholanthrene induced glioma in C 57 BL mice were studied in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments using cultured glioma cells (MGB cells), the synchronization of cell cycle was done by excess addition of thymidine, and the anti-tumor cell effect were investigated by mean of determinations of DNA synthesis, mitotic index and the number of the living cells following the treatments. As the results, it appeared obvious that ACNU was most effective on MGB cells in S phase and x-irradiation in M phase. As to the combined therapy of ACNU and x-irradiation, the anti-tumor effect was most remarkable when the cells were treated by x-irradiation in the G 2 , M phase, which were hervested by addition of ACNU 44 hours before irradiation. However simultaneous treatment of ACNU and x-irradiation on the cells in G 1 phase was not so remarkable. In vivo experiments the anti-tumor effect of ACNU and x-irradiation on subcutaneously or intracranially transplanted glioma in mice was investigated. Either ACNU 10 mg/kg or local x-irradiation 1240 rads showed inhibitory effect on the tumor growth and prolonged the survival time of the tumor bearing mice. The combination therapy was more effective than ACNU or x-irradiation alone, particularly combination therapy of ACNU and repeated small doses irradiation of x-ray was remarkably effective. Evidence obtained indicated that the combination therapy of ACNU and x-irradiation have synergistic anti-tumor effect on experimental mouse glioma. (author)

  11. X-irradiation improves mdx mouse muscle as a model of myofiber loss in DMD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, S.; Watt, D.J.; Partridge, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    The mdx mouse, although a genetic and biochemical homologue of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), presents a comparatively mild histopathological and clinical phenotype. These differences are partially attributable to the greater efficacy of regeneration in the mdx mouse than in DMD muscle. To lessen this disparity, we have used a single dose of X-irradiation (16 Gy) to inhibit regeneration in one leg of mdx mice. The result is an almost complete block of muscle fiber regeneration leading to progressive loss of muscle fibers and their replacement by loose connective tissue. Surviving fibers are mainly peripherally nucleated and, surprisingly, of large diameter. Thus, X-irradiation converts mdx muscle to a model system in which the degenerative process can be studied in isolation from the complicating effect of myofiber regeneration. This system should be of use for testing methods of alleviating the myofiber degeneration which is common to mdx and DMD

  12. X-irradiation improves mdx mouse muscle as a model of myofiber loss in DMD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeford, S.; Watt, D.J.; Partridge, T.A. (Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London (England))

    1991-01-01

    The mdx mouse, although a genetic and biochemical homologue of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), presents a comparatively mild histopathological and clinical phenotype. These differences are partially attributable to the greater efficacy of regeneration in the mdx mouse than in DMD muscle. To lessen this disparity, we have used a single dose of X-irradiation (16 Gy) to inhibit regeneration in one leg of mdx mice. The result is an almost complete block of muscle fiber regeneration leading to progressive loss of muscle fibers and their replacement by loose connective tissue. Surviving fibers are mainly peripherally nucleated and, surprisingly, of large diameter. Thus, X-irradiation converts mdx muscle to a model system in which the degenerative process can be studied in isolation from the complicating effect of myofiber regeneration. This system should be of use for testing methods of alleviating the myofiber degeneration which is common to mdx and DMD.

  13. Characteristic lesions in mouse retina irradiated with accelerated iron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malachowski, M.J.; Philpott, D.E.; Corbett, R.L.; Tobias, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    A program is underway to determine the radiation hazards of HZE particles using the Bevalac, a heavy-ion accelerator at LBL. Our earlier work with helium, carbon, neon, and argon particles, and exposure to rats to HZE particles in space flight demonstrated some deleterious biological effects. TEM studies have shown that some visual cells were missing and dislocated; these were termed channel lesions. Recently obtained is evidence that a single iron HZE particle may affect a series of cells. Mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.3, 1, 10, or 25 rad of 590 MeV/amu initial kinetic energy iron particles in groups of 10 animals per dose point. Irradiated and control animals were sacrificed at intervals from one week to two years postirradiation. The eye samples were dehydrated, critical points dried with freon, fractured, and Au-Pd coated for SEM, or plastic embedded, sectioned, and stained for TEM. Additionally, dry fractured samples viewed with the SEM were embedded in plastic, sectioned, and stained for the TEM. Characteristic tunnel shaped lesions were observed with the SEM. Stereo pairs showed tunnels of various lengths up to 100 μm. Light microscopy of serially cut sections from the same material had vacuoles (V) extending the same length. TEM of the same specimen and specimens prepared only for TEM exhibited large vacuoles, greater than or equal to 2 μm, in the inner segment (IS) and outer segment (OS) layers. Severe membrane disruption was found bordering the vacuoles and gross nuclear degeneration (ND) and loose tissue (LT) were seen in the outer nuclear layer (ONL). The number of lesions increased with increasing dose. Microscopy of the control retina failed to demonstrate similar lesions

  14. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. The decrease in the values of the labeling indices 1 week after charged particle irradiation was dose- and ion-dependent. Mitotic indices 1 week after 10 and 25 Gy helium and after 10 Gy neon were the same as those seen in the control mice. Analysis of cell kinetics 1 week after 10 Gy helium and 10 Gy neon irradiation suggests the presence of a progenitor subpopulation that is proliferating with a shorter cell cycle. Comparison of the responses to the different charged particle beams indicates that neon ions are more effective in producing direct cellular damage than the helium ions, but the surviving proliferating cells several divisions later continue to maintain active cell renewal. Based on the 1 week post-irradiation H 3 -TdR labeling indices, a rough estimate of the RBE for neon ions is at least 2.5 when compared to helium ions

  15. The kinetics of repair in mouse lung after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, E.L.; Thames, H.D.; Watkins, T.L.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lung was studied after fractionated doses of 137 Cs γ-rays. A wide range of doses per fraction (1.7-12 Gy) was given with interfraction intervals ranging from 0.5 to 24 h. Data were analysed by a direct method of analysis using the incomplete repair model. The half-time of repair (Tsub(1/2)) was 0.76 h for the pneumonitis phase of damage (up to 8 months) and 0.65 h for the later phase of damage up to 12 months. Rate of repair was dependent on fraction size for both phases of lung damage and was faster after large dose fractions than after small fractions. Tsub(1/2) was 0.6 h (95% c.1. 0.53, 0.69) for doses per fraction greater than 5 Gy and 0.83 h (95% c.1. 0.76, 0.92) for doses per fraction of 2 Gy. Repair was nearly complete by 6 h at least for the pneumonitis phase of damage. If extrapolated to humans, these results imply that treatments with multiple fractions per day involving the lung will not be limited by the necessity for interfraction intervals much longer than 6 h. (author)

  16. Response of maternal immune cells of irradiation of mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, E.M.; Markovic, B.

    1988-01-01

    This work began as an attempt to explain the paradox of pregnancy - the survival and growth of the semi-allogenic embryo in an immunologically hostile environment. In 1982 and 1983 we reported the tracing of quinacrine labelled maternal leukocytes (WBC) in maternal, placental and embryonic mouse tissues by fluorescence microscopy. We found that cells in the placenta phagocytose labelled WBC, so that after 1-2 hours the labelled nuclear DNA is found as brightly fluorescing particles in the cytoplasm of the phagocytes with no evidence of it in the nuclei. Identical cells were observed in slide preparations of embryos which had been carefully separated from their placentas. We also found a small population of intact labelled lymphocytes, clearly maternal in origin, in the embryos. This seems to be another paradox - placental phagocytes are observed to be phagocytosing maternal WBC in the placenta and embryo, but there are also free maternal cells in the placenta and embryo. A theoretical explanation is that maternal lymphocytes alloreactive against the embryo will attempt to react with placental cells and in the process be phagocytosed, while other maternal cells will be able to enter the embryo where they could have a surveillance function, removing dead or mutant embryonic cells. To test this theory a series of experiments were carried out and are reported

  17. Induction and repair of strand breaks and 3'-hydroxy terminals in the DNA of mouse brain following gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, K.; Furuno, I.; Yada, T.; Matsudaira, H.

    1978-01-01

    DNA was isolated from mouse brain after in vivo γ-ray irradiation, treated with endonuclease S 1 from Aspergillus oryzae if necessary, and analysed further by alkaline and neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation. In parallel, its template activity was determined by DNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.7, enzyme A of Klenow from Escherichia coli) assay as described previously. Similar experiments were performed with cultured mouse leukaemia cells (L5178Y) irradiated in vitro at 0 0 C. (Auth.)

  18. Epithelial cell kinetics in mouse and rat skin irradiated with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster-Schuyler, L.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the kinetic responses of mouse and rat epidermal cells in vivo after single doses of ionizing radiation including responses of hair follicles at times after irradiation. The labeling indices in both species were reduced to 30 to 50% of control values immediately following irradiation at all the doses. In the rat, the labeling indices recovered and overshot control values within the first three days after 300 to 1200 rads. The mouse labeling indices continued to be suppressed for up to 10 days after 300 to 2400 rads. This indicated that rat G 1 phase epidermal cells recovered three times faster than those of the mouse with respect to the ability to maintain or increase control level cell proliferation after irradiation. After 1800 and 2400 rads, doses which produce skin ulceration, both species showed a reduction in their labeling indices for up to 7 days, indicating that a dose-dependent mechanism of recovery may be operable in the rat. 99 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Optimization of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow Derived Immature Dendritic Cells: A Comparative Analysis of Flask Culture Method and Mouse CD11c Positive Selection Kit Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Ashok Gosavi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available 12–14 days of culturing of bone marrow (BM cells containing various growth factors is widely used method for generating dendritic cells (DCs from suspended cell population. Here we compared flask culture method and commercially available CD11c Positive Selection kit method. Immature BMDCs’ purity of adherent as well as suspended cell population was generated in the decreasing concentration of recombinant-murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF in nontreated tissue culture flasks. The expression of CD11c, MHCII, CD40, and CD86 was measured by flow cytometry. We found significant difference (P<0.05 between the two methods in the adherent cells population but no significant difference was observed between the suspended cell populations with respect to CD11c+ count. However, CD11c+ was significantly higher in both adhered and suspended cell population by culture method but kit method gave more CD11c+ from suspended cells population only. On the other hand, using both methods, immature DC expressed moderate level of MHC class II molecules as well as low levels of CD40 and CD86. Our findings suggest that widely used culture method gives the best results in terms of yield, viability, and purity of BMDCs from both adherent and suspended cell population whereas kit method works well for suspended cell population.

  20. Studies on hematopoietic cell apoptosis and the relative gene expression in irradiated mouse bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ruiyun; Wang Dewen; Xiong Chengqi; Gao Yabing; Yang Hong; Cui Yufang; Wang Baozhen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study apoptosis and expressions bcl-2 and p53 in irradiated mouse bone marrow. Methods: LACA mice were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays. By means of in situ terminal labelling, in situ hybridization and image analysis, the authors studied radiation-induced apoptosis of hematopoietic cells and the expressions of bcl-2 and p53. Results: The characteristics of apoptosis appeared in hematopoietic cells at 6 hrs after irradiation. The expression of bcl-2 was obviously decreased when apoptosis of hematopoietic cells occurred, whereas it increased in the early recovery phase; p53 protein increased during both apoptosis of hematopoietic cells and the recovery phase, and mutant type p53 DNA was positive only in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Radiation may induced apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in a dose-dependent manner; Both bcl-2 and p53 genes play an important role in apoptosis and recovery phase

  1. The response of mouse skin to re-irradiation with x-rays or fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Egawa, Sunao; Kumazawa, Akiyoshi; Iino, Yuu.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of neutrons and x-rays on mouse skin which had been previously irradiated with x-rays were investigated. Two tattoo marks were placed in the hairless legs of mice at intervals of 15 mm. The legs were exposed to various doses of x-ray and neutrons to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) using the contraction of the skin as an index. The RBE was 0.93 - 1.73. The legs of the mice were preexposed to 25 Gy of x-ray, and exposed 4 months later. The contraction of the skin began earlier than after the first irradiation. RBE was 2.18 - 2.47. This RBE was higher than that in untreated mice. These results suggest that previously irradiated normal tissues are much more sensitive to neutrons than to x-rays. (author)

  2. Studies on the termination of immunological tolerance in the mouse thymus cell population after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagai, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    Immunological tolerance in the mouse thymus cell population induced by the intravenous injection of deaggregated bovine gamma globulin was terminated by whole body irradiation. After irradiation, the weight of the thymus recovered biphasically, and the termination of tolerance occurred as early as in the first phase. Both Thy-1 antigen expression and helper activity of the thymus cell population in irradiated mice recovered in parallel with the recovery of the thymus weight. Sensitivity of the regenerating thymus cells to the tolerogen was not different from that of the normal thymus cells. The first phase of thymus regeneration may be caused by the proliferation and differentiation of relatively radioresistant and tolerogen insensitive precursors residing in the thymus. Tolerogen and/or immunogen reactive thymus cells may originate from the precursor. (author)

  3. Quantitative measurements of oxidative stress in mouse skin induced by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Cuiping; Tanaka, Ryoko; Okuda, Yohei; Ikota, Nobuo; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Anzai, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Haruhiko; Urano, Shiro

    2005-01-01

    To find efficient methods to evaluate oxidative stress in mouse skin caused by X-ray irradiation, several markers and methodologies were examined. Hairless mice were irradiated with 50 Gy X-rays and skin homogenates or skin strips were prepared. Lipid peroxidation was measured using the skin homogenate as the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The level of lipid peroxidation increased with time after irradiation and was twice that of the control at 78 h. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of skin strips showed a clear signal for the ascorbyl radical, which increased with time after irradiation in a manner similar to that of lipid peroxidation. To measure levels of glutathione (GSH) and its oxidized forms (GSSG) simultaneously, two high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, sample derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and detection with a UV detector (method A) and no derivatization and detection with an electrochemical detector (method B), were compared and the latter was found to be better. No significant change was observed within 24 h after irradiation in the levels of GSH and GSSG measured by method B. The GSH/GSSG ratio may be a less sensitive parameter for the evaluation of acute oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation in the skin. Monitoring the ascorbyl radical seems to be a good way to evaluate oxidative stress in skin in vivo. (author)

  4. Strain-dependent Damage in Mouse Lung After Carbon Ion Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritake, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Fujita, Hidetoshi; Yanagisawa, Mitsuru; Nakawatari, Miyako; Imadome, Kaori; Nakamura, Etsuko; Iwakawa, Mayumi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Imai, Takashi, E-mail: imait@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether inherent factors produce differences in lung morbidity in response to carbon ion (C-ion) irradiation, and to identify the molecules that have a key role in strain-dependent adverse effects in the lung. Methods and Materials: Three strains of female mice (C3H/He Slc, C57BL/6J Jms Slc, and A/J Jms Slc) were locally irradiated in the thorax with either C-ion beams (290 MeV/n, in 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak) or with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays as a reference beam. We performed survival assays and histologic examination of the lung with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, we performed immunohistochemical staining for hyaluronic acid (HA), CD44, and Mac3 and assayed for gene expression. Results: The survival data in mice showed a between-strain variance after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. The median survival time of C3H/He was significantly shortened after C-ion irradiation at the higher dose of 12.5 Gy. Histologic examination revealed early-phase hemorrhagic pneumonitis in C3H/He and late-phase focal fibrotic lesions in C57BL/6J after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. Pleural effusion was apparent in C57BL/6J and A/J mice, 168 days after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. Microarray analysis of irradiated lung tissue in the three mouse strains identified differential expression changes in growth differentiation factor 15 (Gdf15), which regulates macrophage function, and hyaluronan synthase 1 (Has1), which plays a role in HA metabolism. Immunohistochemistry showed that the number of CD44-positive cells, a surrogate marker for HA accumulation, and Mac3-positive cells, a marker for macrophage infiltration in irradiated lung, varied significantly among the three mouse strains during the early phase. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a strain-dependent differential response in mice to C-ion thoracic irradiation. Our findings identified candidate molecules that could be implicated in the between-strain variance to early

  5. Autoradiographic study of gamma-irradiated mouse spleen during primary immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitsov, L.G.; Kyncheva, L.S.; Burneva, V.G.; Martinova, J.Sh.; Viklichka, S.

    1978-01-01

    Study on the kinetics of the cells in the mouse spleen during the primary immune response against thymusdependent antigen after sublethal irradiation was carried out. For this purpose the animals were immunized with sheep erythrocytes one day after their irradiation with 700 r gamma rays. On the 5th day after the immunization, tritium labelled thymidine was injected three times at two hourly intervals. Mice were killed two hours after the third injection for preparation of routine histological samples and autoradiographs. Immunized, but not irradiated mice were utilized as controls. Extensive zones of lymphocyte destruction were observed in the spleen of the irradiated mice - accumulation of picnotic lymphocyte nuclei, surrounded by reticulo-histocyte elements. The number of the labelled cells and the intensity of labelled are lower than that of the germinal centres in control animal. There is no marked cell destruction in the periarteriolar zone nor labelled cells, whereas in the controls there is a considerable number of labelled blast cells. In the red pulp of the irradiated animals islands of erythroblasts were found, whereas in the controls - parallely to the erythroblast islands, there are islands of proliferating lymphocytes and plasmocytes. The decrease of lymphocyte number in irradiated mice is connected with their destruction and with the altered lymphocytopoiesis in the red pulp. It is assumed that the observed preservation of the periarteriolar lymphatic sheaths in an expression of a higher radioresistance of the T-cells as compared to the B-cells in the white pulp. This study contributes for elucidation of the irradiation immunosuppressive effect. It points out also that the post-irradiation lymphopaenia is due not only to the cell death but also to the exclusion of part of the T-lymphocytes from the circulation and their selective deposition in the thymus-dependent zones of the peripheral lymphoid organs. (A.B.)

  6. Antigen-specific immature dendritic cell vaccine ameliorates anti-dsDNA antibody-induced renal damage in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Jiang, Shan; Weng, Shenhong; Lv, Xiaochun; Cheng, Hong; Fang, Chunhong

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can inhibit immune response by clonal anergy when immature. Recent studies have shown that immature DCs (iDCs) may serve as a live cell vaccine after specific antigen pulse based on its potential of blocking antibody production. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of nuclear antigen-pulsed iDCs in the treatment of lupus-like renal damages induced by anti-dsDNA antibodies. iDCs were generated from haemopoietic stem cells in bone marrow and then pulsed in vitro with nuclear antigen. The iDC vaccine and corresponding controls were injected into mice with lupus-like renal damages. The evaluation of disease was monitored by biochemical parameters and histological scores. Anti-dsDNA antibody isotypes and T-lymphocyte-produced cytokines were analysed for elucidating therapeutic mechanisms. RESULTS; The mice treated with antigen-pulsed iDCs had a sustained remission of renal damage compared with those injected with non-pulsed iDCs or other controls, including decreased anti-dsDNA antibody level, less proteinuria, lower blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine values, and improved histological evaluation. Analysis on isotypes of anti-dsDNA antibody showed that iDC vaccine preferentially inhibited the production of IgG3, IgG2b and IgG2a. Furthermore, administration of antigen-treated iDCs to mice resulted in significantly reduced IL-2, IL-4 and IL-12 and IFN-γ produced by T-memory cells. Conversely, the vaccination of antigen-pulsed mature DCs led to increased anti-dsDNA antibody production and an aggravation of lupus-like disease in the model. CONCLUSIONS; These results suggested the high potency of iDC vaccine in preventing lupus-like renal injuries induced by pathogenic autoantibodies.

  7. Reduction in sperm levels after testicular irradiation of the mouse: a comparison with man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meistrich, M.L.; Samuels, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The potential and limitations of applying extrapolation factors (EFs) to the results of animal studies to predict effects of toxic agents on human male fertility were evaluated using radiation data. The EF is the ratio of the dose to produce a given effect in the mouse to that necessary to produce the same effect in man. Sperm counts in mouse testes were compared to those in the ejaculates of human males. Sperm counts performed at times at which the sperm develop from irradiated stem cells in both species yielded EFs between 11 and 44. However, if sufficient time was allowed for maximum recovery in both species, the EF was less than 1.7. These results indicate that man appears to be much more sensitive than the mouse to the testicular effects of irradiation at 2 to 9 months postexposure, but both species are comparable in their sensitivity to irreversible damage. The use of EFs may be appropriate, but since the EF is very dependent on the time at which the comparison was made, different values must be used for prompt and permanent testicular injury

  8. Cell cycle of spermatogonial colony forming stem cells in the CBA mouse after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bootsma, A.L. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Davids, J.A.G. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands))

    1988-03-01

    In the CBA mouse testis, about 10% of the stem cell population is highly resistant to neutron irradiation (D/sub 0/, 0.75 Gy). Following a dose of 1.50 Gy these cells rapidly increase their sensitivity towards a second neutron dose and progress fairly synchronously through their first post-irradiation cell cycle. From experiments in which neutron irradiation was combined with hydroxyurea, it appeared that in this cycle the S-phase is less radiosensitive (D/sub 0/, 0.43 Gy) than the other phases of the cell cycle (D/sub 0/, 0.25 Gy). From experiments in which hydroxyurea was injected twice after irradiation, the speed of inflow of cells in S and the duration of S and the cell cycle could be calculated. Between 32 and 36 hr after irradiation cells start to enter the S-phase at a speed of 30% of the population every 12 hr. At 60 hr 50% of the population has already passed the S-phase while 30% is still in S. The data point to a cell cycle time of about 36 hr, while the S-phase lasts 12 hr at the most. (author).

  9. Early morphologic and quantitative changes in mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes after low dose gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitsov, L.; Byrneva, V.; Goranov, I.

    1979-01-01

    The study was undertaken in an effort to establish differences in the radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes, as a possible test for evaluation of early and discrete radiation injury. Sexually mature mice of BAIB/c line were X-irradiated with doses of 50 and 250 rad. The animals were sacrificed by blood letting 24 hours after irradiation, but 30 minutes before this each mouse was heparinized. Smears were prepared from the enriched pooled leucocyte suspensions, obtained by dextran sedimentation of the red cells. The preparations were stained with toluidin blue by the methods of Smetana and Pappenheim. Cell size, clasmatosis, nucleolar structure and degree of cytoplasmic metachromasia were determined. It was found that the lymphocytogram of animals irradiated with 50 rad was characterized by high percentage of small lymphocytes, most of them with dispersed nuclear ribonucleoproteins and minimal clasmatose activity. Irradiation with 100 rad induced a characteristical rise in lymphocyte clasmatose activity and decrease in the number of small lymphocytes. The nucleoli were bright and well delineated. The lymphocytogram of animals irradiated with higher doses (150 and 250 rad) was characterized by predomination of large lymphocytes and hyperbasophilic forms with well preserved bright nucleoli. The percentage of lymphocates with clasmatosis was below the control value. (A.B.)

  10. Effect of gamma-irradiation on mouse pancreatic islet-allograft survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, T.; Porter, J.; Gotoh, M.; Monaco, A.P.; Maki, T.

    1989-01-01

    Elimination or inactivation of lymphoid tissue in the pancreatic islet preparation achieves prolongation of islet-allograft survival. In this study we examined the effect of gamma-irradiation on mouse islet-allograft survival. In a B6AF1 isograft model, irradiation up to 2400 rad did not induce deterioration of islet function over 200 days, but greater doses caused cessation of graft function between 83 and 186 days. When DBA/2 crude islets were transplanted into B6AF1 recipients, all nonirradiated allografts were acutely rejected. Marked prolongation of allograft survival was achieved by islet irradiation with doses between 800 and 12,000 rad. With higher doses, significant numbers of allografts survived beyond the controls, but many lost function between 78 and 180 days, with none surviving greater than 200 days. Irradiation with 16,000 rad caused acute radiation damage. Because most secondary islet allografts in recipient mice that lost primary islet-graft function between 84 and 195 days survived greater than 100 days, late functional loss was probably due to the radiation injury. Combined use of recipient treatment with cyclosporin A and graft irradiation (2400 rad) achieved prolongation of DBA/2 islets in B6AF1 mice

  11. Radioprotective effects of hawthorn fruit extract against gamma irradiation in mouse bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinimehr, S.J.; Azadbakht, M.; Mousavi, S.M.; Mahmoudzadeh, A.; Akhlaghpoor, S.

    2007-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation has been investigated in mouse bone marrow cells. A single intraperitoneal (ip) administration of hawthorn extract at doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg 1 h prior to gamma irradiation (2 Gy) reduced the frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs). All four doses of hawthorn extract significantly reduced the frequencies of MnPCEs and increased the PCE/PCE+NCE ratio (polychromatic erythrocyte/polychromatic erythrocyte+normochromatic erythrocyte) in mice bone marrow compared with the non drug-treated irradiated control (p<0.02-0.00001). The maximum reduction in MnPCEs was observed in mice treated with extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Administration of amifostine at dose 100 mg/kg and hawthorn at dose 200 mg/kg reduced the frequency of MnPCE almost 4.8 and 5.7 fold; respectively, after being exposed to 2 Gy of gamma rays, compare with the irradiated control group. Crataegus extract exhibited concentration-dependent activity on 1, 1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl free radical showing that Crataegus contained high amounts of phenolic compounds and the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis determined that it contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It appeared that hawthorn extract with antioxidant activity reduced the genotoxicity induced by gamma irradiation in bone marrow cells. (author)

  12. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amory Koch

    Full Text Available Acute radiation sickness (ARS following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male TBI model (6-14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1, which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated, 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors. In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2-4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies.

  13. Unscheduled DNA synthesis after β-irradiation of mouse skin in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuyama, Akira; Tanooka, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    The skin of ICR mouse was irradiated with β-rays from 90 Sr- 90 Y with surface doses up to 30 krad. Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured by autoradiography after labeling the skin with radioactive thymidine using the forceps-clamping method. The level of UDS in epithelial cells of the skin was detected as an increasing function of radiation dose. Fibroblastic cells, compared with epithelial cells and hair follicle cells at the same depth of the skin, showed a lower level of UDS, indicating a lower DNA repair activity in fibroblasts. Cancer risk of the skin was discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Exogenous iron and γ-irradiation induce NO-synthase synthesis in mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikoyan, V.D.; Voevodskaya, N.V.; Kubrina, L.N.; Malenkova, I.V.; Vanin, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    Protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide, CHI) and exogenous antioxidant (phenazan) suppress the synthesis of NO in mouse liver in vivo which is induced by administration to the animals of γ-irradiation, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or Fe 2+ -citrate together with LPS. Biosynthesis of NO was monitored by the ESR signal of paramagnetic mononitrosyl iron complexes with the exogenous ligand diethyldithiocarbamate (MNIC-DETC) 30 min after addition of the ligand. The complexes arise from NO binding to DETC complexes with exogenous and endogenous Fe 2+ , which act as selective NO traps. The enhancement of NO biosynthesis after γ-irradiation or LPS or LPS + Fe 2+ -citrate is apparently due to the induction of the synthesis of NO-synthase, which is inhibited by cycloheximide. This process is triggered by reactive oxygen species, presumably through the activation of the transcription factor protein NFkB. The accumulation of free radical oxygen species is inhibited by the antioxidant phenazan

  15. Automatic analysis of flow cytometric DNA histograms from irradiated mouse male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampariello, F.; Mauro, F.; Uccelli, R.; Spano, M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic procedure for recovering the DNA content distribution of mouse irradiated testis cells from flow cytometric histograms is presented. First, a suitable mathematical model is developed, to represent the pattern of DNA content and fluorescence distribution in the sample. Then a parameter estimation procedure, based on the maximum likelihood approach, is constructed by means of an optimization technique. This procedure has been applied to a set of DNA histograms relative to different doses of 0.4-MeV neutrons and to different time intervals after irradiation. In each case, a good agreement between the measured histograms and the corresponding fits has been obtained. The results indicate that the proposed method for the quantitative analysis of germ cell DNA histograms can be usefully applied to the study of the cytotoxic and mutagenic action of agents of toxicological interest such as ionizing radiations.18 references

  16. Restoring efficiency of hemopoietic cell transplantation in a mouse lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Gino

    1959-10-01

    This research thesis reports the study of possibility of treatments (or restoration) of a mouse which has been submitted to a lethal dose of X rays. More particularly, the author compared the restoring efficiency of bone marrow and fetal liver injected in a mouse which had been lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays. He also studied the functional status of the hemopoietic graft, and the emergence of the secondary disease in mice which had been as well lethally irradiated and then restored by injection of bone marrow and fetal liver. The author then addressed the influence of the induction of immune tolerance of the host with respect to the donor on the survival of a mouse lethally irradiated and restored by homologue bone marrow [fr

  17. Effect of low dose X-ray irradiation on apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of mouse testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangwei; Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Gong Shouliang

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of low dose radiation (LDR) with different doses of X-rays on the apoptosis in spermatogenic cells of male Kunming mouse testes. The time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in the different stages of spermatogenic cell cycles of mouse testis after LDR with different doses of X-rays were studied with light microscope using the methods of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and HE staining. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR had a remarkable regularity in cell types. When the dose was 0.025 Gy, spermatogonium apoptosis was taken as main. With the dose increase of irradiation (0.025-0.2 Gy), spermatocytes also showed an apoptotic change, but the apoptotic rate of spermatogonia was significantly higher than that of spermatocytes. Moreover, the apoptosis of spermatids and spermatozoa scarcely occurred after irradiation with low dose. The apoptosis of spermatogenic cells induced by LDR has a regular change, which provides a further experimental evidence for the mechanism study of hormesis by LDR

  18. Novel technique for high-precision stereotactic irradiation of mouse brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, J.; Woelfelschneider, J.; Derer, A.; Fietkau, R.; Gaipl, U.S.; Bert, C.; Frey, B. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Stache, C.; Buslei, R.; Hoelsken, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Neuropathology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Schwarz, M.; Baeuerle, T. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Radiology, Preclinical Imaging Platform Erlangen (PIPE), Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Small animal irradiation systems were developed for preclinical evaluation of tumor therapy closely resembling the clinical situation. Mostly only clinical LINACs are available, so protocols for small animal partial body irradiation using a conventional clinical system are essential. This study defines a protocol for conformal brain tumor irradiations in mice. CT and MRI images were used to demarcate the target volume and organs at risk. Three 6 MV photon beams were planned for a total dose of 10 fractions of 1.8 Gy. The mouse position in a dedicated applicator was verified by an X-ray patient positioning system before each irradiation. Dosimetric verifications (using ionization chambers and films) were performed. Irradiation-induced DNA damage was analyzed to verify the treatment effects on the cellular level. The defined treatment protocol and the applied fractionation scheme were feasible. The in-house developed applicator was suitable for individual positioning at submillimeter accuracy of anesthetized mice during irradiation, altogether performed in less than 10 min. All mice tolerated the treatment well. Measured dose values perfectly matched the nominal values from treatment planning. Cellular response was restricted to the target volume. Clinical LINAC-based irradiations of mice offer the potential to treat orthotopic tumors conformably. Especially with respect to lateral penumbra, dedicated small animal irradiation systems exceed the clinical LINAC solution. (orig.) [German] Kleintierbestrahlungsanlagen wurden entwickelt um praeklinische Studien in der Tumortherapie unter moeglichst klinischen Bedingungen durchzufuehren. Da an den meisten Instituten nur klinische LINACs zur Verfuegung stehen, werden Standardprotokolle zur Kleintierbestrahlung benoetigt, die konventionelle Systeme nutzen. In dieser Studie wird ein solches Protokoll fuer tumorkonforme Hirnbestrahlung von Maeusen definiert. CT- und MRT-Bilder wurden aufgenommen, um Zielvolumen und

  19. Effects of continuous low-dose prenatal irradiation on neuronal migration in mouse cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yuji; Hirobe, Tomohisa; Fushiki, Shinji; Kinoshita, Chikako.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous exposure to γ-rays during corticogenesis on the migration of neuronal cells in developing cerebral cortex. Pregnant mice were injected with 0.5 mg of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on day 14 of gestation to label cells in the S phase. The mice were then exposed to 137 Cs γ-rays (dose rates of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.94 Gy/day) continuously for 3 days. Brains from 17-day-old embryos and from offspring at 3 and 8 weeks after birth were processed immunohistochemically to track the movements of BrdU-labeled cells. Comparative analyses of the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells in the cerebral cortex revealed that the migration of neurons was delayed during the embryonic period in mice irradiated at 0.94 Gy/day, in 3-week-old mice, there was a significant difference in the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells in the cerebral cortex between the mice irradiated prenatally and control, and in 8-week-old mice, there were no differences in the distribution pattern of BrdU-labeled cells between control and animals irradiated with 0.1 and 0.3 Gy/day. In contrast, in the animals irradiated with 0.94 Gy/day, the significant difference in the distribution pattern of the labeled cells relative to control was maintained. These results suggest that the migration of neuronal cells in mouse cerebral cortex is disturbed by continuous prenatal irradiation at low-dose and some modificational process occurred during the postnatal period. (author)

  20. STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Ling; Shinohara, Eric T.; Kim, Dong; Tan Jiahuai; Osusky, Kate; Shyr, Yu; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain neoplasm that is essentially incurable. Although radiation therapy prolongs survival, GBMs progress within areas of irradiation. Recent studies in invertebrates have shown that STI571 (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ) enhances the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effectiveness of STI571 in combination with radiation was studied in mouse models of GBM. Methods and Materials: Murine GL261 and human D54 GBM cell lines formed tumors in brains and hind limbs of C57BL6 and nude mice, respectively. GL261 and D54 cells were treated with 5 μmol/L of STI571 for 1 h and/or irradiated with 3 Gy. Protein was analyzed by Western immunoblots probed with antibodies to caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, phospho-Akt, Akt, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α and β. Tumor volumes were assessed in mice bearing GL261 or D54 tumors treated with 21 Gy administered in seven fractionated doses. Histologic sections from STI571-treated mice were stained with phospho-Akt and phospho-PDGFR β antibodies. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to study the response of mice bearing intracranial implants of GL261. Results: STI571 penetrated the blood-brain barrier, which resulted in a reduction in phospho-PDGFR in GBM. STI571-induced apoptosis in GBM was significantly enhanced by irradiation. STI571 combined with irradiation induced caspase 3 cleavage in GBM cells. Glioblastoma multiforme response to therapy correlated with an increase in tumor growth delay and survival when STI571 was administered in conjunction with daily irradiation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that STI571 has the potential to augment radiotherapy and thereby improve median survival

  1. Effect of low dose x irradiation on the succinate dehydrogenase activity of guinea pig, rat and mouse tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V C; Bhatavdekar, J M; Aravinda Babu, K [Gujarat Univ., Ahmedabad (India). Dept. of Zoology

    1976-07-01

    The histochemical changes in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) were investigated in pectoralis major muscle of guinea pig, rat and mouse after level X-irradiation (72 R and 240 R) and compared with control animals. Biochemical studies were carried out on liver, kidney, muscle (pectoralis major), adrenal and spleen of these animals after low dose local X-irradiation and compared with control animals. Changes in SDH activity were studied up to 72-h post-irradiation, which shows that low dose local X-irradiation leads to increased enzymic activity. The increase in enzymic activity was remarkable in mouse tissues as compared with guinea pig and rat. Adrenals of all the three animals showed significant activation after all the doses of radiation studied. The significance of these results, with special reference to oxidative metabolism, has been discussed.

  2. Recovery of the spermatogenetic epithelium in the mouse after irradiation with 1-MeV fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aardweg, G.J.M.J. van den.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis the recovery of the spermatogenetic epithelium in the mouse is studied after damage with 1-MeV fission neutrons. A severe depletion of A-spermatogonia and radiosensitive stem cells occurs after neutron irradiation. Recovery of the epithelium is initiated by surviving radioresistant stem cells giving rise to colonies, which grow into the empty seminiferous tubules. After discussing properties of normal and irradiated spermatogenetic epithelium, the growth and the differentiation of spermatogenetic colonies in the mouse testis after irradiation, as well as response and kinetics of colony-forming spermatogonial stem cells in CBA mice up to 30 weeks after a first neutron dose and recovery of the epithelium after a second irradiation are investigated. These four subjects are dealt with in separate papers. Finally, a discussion and a summary of these studies is presented. (Auth.)

  3. Combined effects of x-irradiation and bleomycin on the proliferation of isoproterenol-stimulated mouse parotid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoju, Masumi

    1977-01-01

    Effects of x-irradiation and bleomycin (BLM) on DNA synthesis in isoproterenol (IPR)-stimulated mouse parotid glands were investigated. The incorporation of thymidine- 3 H into DNA in parotid glands increased remarkably in 16 hours with a peak at 22 hours after the injection of IPR. When x-irradiation (250 rads) was given at 1 hour after IPR (early G 1 phase), the stimulation of DNA synthesis was inhibited by about 50%, and the beginning of DNA synthesis was delayed nearly 6 hours. BLM injected in the early G 1 phase was also effective in inhibiting DNA synthesis. However, the injection of BLM in the late G 1 or S phase did not interfere with DNA synthesis. Combined x-irradiation and BLM inhibited DNA synthesis and delayed the beginning of the S phase far more strikingly than did x-irradiation alone. When BLM was injected at various intervals before and after x-irradiation, the greatest inhibition was found just after irradiation. Therefore, a longer interval between x-irradiation and BLM injection had a tendency to decrease the rate of inhibiting DNA synthesis. These findings were confirmed by measuring the labeling index and the mitotic index in the acinar cells of the mouse parotid gland. These results suggest that simultaneous application of x-irradiation and BLM has the greatest effect. (Evans, J.)

  4. In vitro and in vivo studies on the cytotoxicity of irradiated silk fibroin against mouse melanoma tumor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Kwon, Sun-Kyu; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-il; Hwang, Han-Joon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of proteins can be altered by irradiation. But, it is rarely that the researches on the functional properties of irradiated proteins have been reported. Fibroin is a fibrous protein derived from silkworm Bombyx mori and has been suggested as a biomaterial for biomedical application. Therefore, fibroin was selected as a model protein and was examined with the irradiation effects on the cytotoxicity of fibroin on tumor cell. The cytotoxicity of fibroin against mouse melanoma cell (B16BL6) showed a significant increase dependent upon the increase of irradiation dose. And also, the splenocyte proliferation activities of fibroin were increased by gamma irradiation. In addition, the oral administration of irradiated fibroin significantly increased the inhibition rate of tumor growth in tumor-bearing mouse model. The reason might be due to the change of protein structure by gamma irradiation and is being studied. From these result, it could be concluded that the irradiated fibroin might be a potential candidate as a valuable product in food and medical industry.

  5. In vitro and in vivo studies on the cytotoxicity of irradiated silk fibroin against mouse melanoma tumor cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Eui-Baek [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Bioresources and Biosciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Graduate school of Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Sung, Nak-Yun [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sun-Kyu [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate school of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Jochiwon 339-800 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-il [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Han-Joon [Graduate school of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Jochiwon 339-800 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    The physicochemical properties of proteins can be altered by irradiation. But, it is rarely that the researches on the functional properties of irradiated proteins have been reported. Fibroin is a fibrous protein derived from silkworm Bombyx mori and has been suggested as a biomaterial for biomedical application. Therefore, fibroin was selected as a model protein and was examined with the irradiation effects on the cytotoxicity of fibroin on tumor cell. The cytotoxicity of fibroin against mouse melanoma cell (B16BL6) showed a significant increase dependent upon the increase of irradiation dose. And also, the splenocyte proliferation activities of fibroin were increased by gamma irradiation. In addition, the oral administration of irradiated fibroin significantly increased the inhibition rate of tumor growth in tumor-bearing mouse model. The reason might be due to the change of protein structure by gamma irradiation and is being studied. From these result, it could be concluded that the irradiated fibroin might be a potential candidate as a valuable product in food and medical industry.

  6. The co-application effects of fullerene and ascorbic acid on UV-B irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shinobu; Itoga, Kazuyoshi; Yamato, Masayuki; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Okano, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    The role of fullerene as a pro-oxidant or anti-oxidant in Ultraviolet B ray (UV-B)-induced disorders in mouse skin was investigated. Fullerene gave no photo-toxic effect to UV-B-irradiated mouse skin. Since erythema was concentrated at the pore circumference in a UV-B irradiation experiment in mouse skin, the sebaceous gland pairs was strongly implicated as a site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In a histological evaluation of the skin stained with CH 3 MDFDA (ROS index) and YO-Pro-1 (apoptosis index), the fluorescence intensity of a sebaceous gland significantly increased with UV-B irradiation. With the application of fullerene to UV-irradiated mouse skin, no toxicity was recognized in comparison with the control, and erythema, the ROS index, and the apoptosis index decrease with the application of fullerene. Ascorbyl radical (AA·) increased with the application of ascorbate (AA) to UV-B-irradiated mouse skin, and AA· decreased with the application of fullerene. The co-application of AA and fullerene, which suppressed AA· in vitro, significantly suppressed erythema, and also suppressed both the ROS index and apoptosis index in mouse skin after UV-B irradiation. In both mouse skin at 48 h after UV-B irradiation and in an attempt to reproduce this phenomenon artificially in vitro, a similar high AA· peak (AA·/H· > 4) was observed in electron spin resonance (ESR) charts. The binding of fullerene with AA impairs the Fenton reaction between AA and Fe-protein based on the observation of ascorbate-specific UV absorption and a linear equation for the calibration curve. Therefore, fullerene may impair the intercalation of AA to a heme pocket by binding with AA. These results suggest that the co-application of AA and fullerene is effective against oxidative skin damage caused by UV-B irradiation, and the development of an AA· inhibitor such as fullerene should be useful for reducing organ damage associated with Fe-protein oxidation.

  7. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. The proliferative activity of testicular cell types and the effect of postnatal X-irradiation in the developing mouse testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Huiskamp, R.; Davids, J.A.G.; Rooij, D.G. de

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the effects of x-irradiation on the developing mouse testis, particularly in relation to A spermatogonia, Sertoli cells, Leydig cells and mesenchymal cells commonly regarded as Leydig precursors. It was concluded that radiosensitivity is highest during the first week after birth and decreases thereafter, with the exception of A spermatogonia which are radiosensitive at all ages. (UK)

  9. An increase in immature β-cells lacking Glut2 precedes the expansion of β-cell mass in the pregnant mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A Beamish

    Full Text Available A compensatory increase in β-cell mass occurs during pregnancy to counter the associated insulin resistance, and a failure in adaptation is thought to contribute to gestational diabetes. Insulin-expressing but glucose-transporter-2-low (Ins+Glut2LO progenitor cells are present in mouse and human pancreas, being predominantly located in extra-islet β-cell clusters, and contribute to the regeneration of the endocrine pancreas following induced ablation. We therefore sought to investigate the contribution of Ins+Glut2LO cells to β-cell mass expansion during pregnancy. Female C57Bl/6 mice were time mated and pancreata were collected at gestational days (GD 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18, and postpartum D7 (n = 4/time-point and compared to control (non-pregnant animals. Beta cell mass, location, proliferation (Ki67+, and proportion of Ins+Glut2LO cells were measured using immunohistochemistry and bright field or confocal microscopy. Beta cell mass tripled by GD18 and β-cell proliferation peaked at GD12 in islets (≥6 β-cells and small β-cell clusters (1-5 β-cells. The proportion and fraction of Ins+Glut2LO cells undergoing proliferation increased significantly at GD9 in both islets and clusters, preceding the increase in β-cell mass and proliferation, and their proliferation within clusters persisted until GD15. The overall number of clusters increased significantly at GD9. Quantitative PCR showed a significant increase in Pdx1 presence at GD9 vs. GD18 or control pancreas, and Pdx1 was visualized by immunohistochemistry within both Ins+Glut2LO and Ins+Glut2HI cells within clusters. These results indicate that Ins+Glut2LO cells are likely to contribute to β-cell mass expansion during pregnancy.

  10. Type C virus activation in nontransformed mouse cells by uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampar, B.; Hatanaka, M.; Aulakh, G.; Derge, J.G.; Lee, L.; Showalter, S.

    1977-01-01

    Infection of nontransformed mouse cells with uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus (uv-HSV) resulted in the activation of an endogenous xenotropic (x-tropic) type C virus. Synthesis of type C virus persisted for only a few days, with most of the virus remaining cell associated. The levels of type C virus activated by uv-HSV varied depending on the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) and the uv dose. At low uv doses, where cell killing occurred, little or no type C virus synthesis was observed. Maximum levels of type C virus synthesis were observed with the minimum uv dose which eliminated cell killing by HSV. Synthesis of type C virus, albeit at lower levels, was still observed at uv doses beyond those required to prevent cell killing

  11. Type C virus activation in nontransformed mouse cells by uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampar, B. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD); Hatanaka, M.; Aulakh, G.; Derge, J.G.; Lee, L.; Showalter, S.

    1977-02-01

    Infection of nontransformed mouse cells with uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus (uv-HSV) resulted in the activation of an endogenous xenotropic (x-tropic) type C virus. Synthesis of type C virus persisted for only a few days, with most of the virus remaining cell associated. The levels of type C virus activated by uv-HSV varied depending on the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) and the uv dose. At low uv doses, where cell killing occurred, little or no type C virus synthesis was observed. Maximum levels of type C virus synthesis were observed with the minimum uv dose which eliminated cell killing by HSV. Synthesis of type C virus, albeit at lower levels, was still observed at uv doses beyond those required to prevent cell killing.

  12. Crypt cell population kinetics in mouse jejunum under continuous beta irradiation from tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.L.; Gupta, M.L.; Saharan, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    The behaviour of crypt cell population in mouse jejunum under continuous beta irradiation from tritiated water (HTO) has been studied. Adult mice were maintained on tritiated drinking water of the activity of 1.25 μCi/ml, after priming injection. The crypts were studied at 1, 5, 7, 15 and 30 days after the initiation of treatment. It is observed that there is a partial recovery in proliferative activity after the first day of the treatment. Again there is a decrease in the crypt cells on the 7th day, after which this population appears to achieve a near-steady-state level at about 8% below normal at the last interval studied. Crypt cell population and mitotic figures showed a simultaneous dip and recovery, while dead cells showed inverse relationship. (orig.) [de

  13. Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated mouse thymic lobes. Kinetics and phenotype of progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangrude, G.J.; Scollay, R.

    1990-01-01

    To define cell populations which participate in the very early stages of T cell development in the mouse thymus, we enriched hematopoietic stem cells from mouse bone marrow and injected them into thymic lobes of irradiated Ly-5 congenic recipients. The progeny of the stem cells were identified and their phenotypes were determined by two-color flow cytometry for the expression of various cell surface differentiation Ag during the course of their subsequent intrathymic development. The majority of the differentiation which occurred in the first 10 days after intrathymic cell transfer was myeloid in nature; hence, this study demonstrates that the irradiated thymus is not strictly selective for T cell development. Further, the maximum rate of T cell development was observed after intrathymic injection of 200 stem cells. Donor-derived cells which did not express Ag characteristic of the myeloid lineage could be detected and their phenotypes could be determined by flow cytometry as early as 7 days after intrathymic injection. At this time, the cells were still very similar phenotypically to the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Exceptions to this were the expression of stem cell Ag 2 and a decrease in the level of MHC class I Ag expression. After 9 days, the donor-derived cells expressed high levels of the Thy-1 Ag and proceeded to change in cell surface phenotype as differentiation continued. These cell phenotypes are described for the time frame ending 18 days after injection, when most donor-derived cells were phenotypically small CD4+ CD8+ (double-positive) thymocytes

  14. Post-irradiation regeneration of early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in mouse bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.-H.; Osmond, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the sequential development of early B-cell precursors in mouse bone marrow, B-lineage cells have been examined during a wave of post-irradiation regeneration. Cell phenotypes have been defined for (i) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT); (ii) B220 glycoprotein, (iii) μ heavy chains in the cytoplasm (cμ) and at the cell surface (sμ). Three populations of μ - cells (TdT + 14.8 - ; TdT + 14.8 + ; TdT - 14.8 + ) have been proposed to be early B-cell precursors which would give rise to cμ + sμ - pre-B cells and to sμ + B lymphocytes. The timing, cell-size shifts and progressive amplification of the waves of regeneration accord with a dynamic model in which the TdT + 14.8 - , TdT + 14.8 + and TdT - 14.8 + cells form three successive stages in B-cell differentiation before the expression of μ chains, presumptively including the stage of μ chain gene rearrangement. In addition, the results provide an experimental system for the enrichment of early B-cell precursors in mouse bone marrow. (author)

  15. The effects of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on cytoplasmic microtubules of mouse macrophages and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qianqian; Mao Zijun; Yin Zhiwei; Hu Yumin

    1989-05-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ-ray irradiation on cytoplasmic microtubules of mouse macrophages and lymphocytes were investigated by immunofluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscope. The results indicated. (1) microtubule organization of the irradiated cells remarkably differed from that of the control since the doses over 4 Gy; (2) 144 hours after irradiation the alterations of microtubules have been shown to be basically r epaired ; (3) the cytoplasmic microtubules and centrioles disappeared under transmission electron microscope, the membranes irradiated and microvilli showed changes under scanning electron microscope too. From these observations and those of other workers who studied the radiation effect on extracted microtubule proteins in vitro, the authors support that 60 Co γ-ray irradiation can inhabits cytoplasmic microtubule assembling

  16. Survival of mouse testicular stem cells after γ or neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.C.; Meistrich, M.L.; Thames, H.D. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The survival of mouse testicular stem cells after γ or neutron irradiation was measured by counts of repopulated tubular cross sections and by the numbers of differentiated spermatogenic cells produced. The numbers of such cells were determined either by sperm head counts of the X-isozyme of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme levels. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with all three assays. The results have confirmed that, with C3H mice, stem-cell survival is higher when the γ-radiation dose is fractionated by a 24-h interval. Single-dose γ-radiaton survival curves for the stem cell had large shoulders and also showed the presence of a radioresistant subpopulation which predominated after doses greater than 600 rad. Part of the shoulder must have resulted from repair of sublethal damage since neutron irradiation produced survival curves with smaller shoulders. The relative biological effectiveness for stem-cell killing for these neutrons (mean energy, 22 MeV) varied from about 2.9 at 10 rad of γ radiation to 2.2 at 600 rad

  17. Fragmentation of chromatin DNA in mouse thymus cells after whole body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Kang; Liu Xueying; Zhu Xuefen

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of soluble chromatin in mouse thymus nuclei after whole body γ-irradiation were investigated by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After deproteinization and electrophoresis eight regular DNA bands were revealed. The molecular weights of these bands were estimated by comparing their migration rates with those of the standard fragments obtained from PBR 322 digested completely by restrictive endonuclease Hae III. The molecular weight of the first band was calculated to be 186 base pairs corresponding approximately to the size of DNA fragment from a single nucleosome, and those of other bands appeared to be its multiples. The results suggested that the disintegration of chromatin DNA after γ-irradiation might have occurred at the linkage regions of chromatin. The autolysis product of normal thymus chromatin under sterile condition were also analyzed and its electrophoretic pattern was found to be just the same as that of the postirradiation product. It seems, therefore, that the endonuclease existing in normal tissues might be responsible for the postirradiation chromatin degradation. The mechanism of this kind of enzymatic digestion remains to be elucidated in further investigation. (author)

  18. Accelerated repopulation of mouse tongue epithelium during fractionated irradiations or following single doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.; Kummermehr, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mouse tongue mucosa was established as an animal model to study repopulation after large single doses or during continuous irradiation. A top-up irradiation technique was used employing priming doses or fractionated treatment to the whole snout (300 kV X-rays) followed by local test doses (25 kV X-rays) to elicit denudation in a confined field of the inferior tongue surface. Clearcut quantal dose-response curves of ulcer incidence were obtained to all protocols; animal morbidity, i.e. body weight loss was minimal. Repopulation following priming doses of 10 and 13 Gy started with a delay of at least 3 days and then progressed rapidly to nearly restore original tissue tolerance by day 11. During continuous fractionation over 1 to 3 weeks with 5 fractions/week and doses per fraction of 2.5, 3 and 3.5 Gy, repopulation was small in week one but subsequently increased to fully compensate the weekly dose at all dose levels. Additional measurements of cell density during a 4 weeks course of 5 x 3 Gy or 5 x 4 Gy per week showed only moderate depletion to 67% of the control figures. The fact that rapid repopulation is achieved at relatively moderate damage levels should be taken into account when the timing of a treatment split is considered. (author). 18 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Validity of reciprocity rule on mouse skin thermal damage due to CO2 laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, P.; Dehghanpour, H. R.; Moghadam, M. S.; Daneshafrooz, V.

    2013-07-01

    CO2 laser (10.6 μm) is a well-known infrared coherent light source as a tool in surgery. At this wavelength there is a high absorbance coefficient (860 cm-1), because of vibration mode resonance of H2O molecules. Therefore, the majority of the irradiation energy is absorbed in the tissue and the temperature of the tissue rises as a function of power density and laser exposure duration. In this work, the tissue damage caused by CO2 laser (1-10 W, ˜40-400 W cm-2, 0.1-6 s) was measured using 30 mouse skin samples. Skin damage assessment was based on measurements of the depth of cut, mean diameter of the crater and the carbonized layer. The results show that tissue damage as assessed above parameters increased with laser fluence and saturated at 1000 J cm-2. Moreover, the damage effect due to high power density at short duration was not equivalent to that with low power density at longer irradiation time even though the energy delivered was identical. These results indicate the lack of validity of reciprocity (Bunsen-Roscoe) rule for the thermal damage.

  20. Radiobiological effects on transcriptome in mouse thyroid after irradiation with AT-211

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudqvist, N.; Parris, T.; Nemes, S.; Helou, K.; Forssell-Aronsson, E.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. At-211 is an alpha particle emitting halogen used in radiation therapy, and is accumulated in the thyroid gland. Knowledge of biological processes that occur after irradiation is of high value in radiation therapy. Also, the behavior of thyrocytes after At-211 irradiation is to a high degree unknown. Female BALB/c nude mice were i.v. injected with At-211; absorbed dose to the thyroid was 0.05-32 Gy. Total RNA was extracted from pooled thyroids that were removed 24 hours after injection and processed in triplicate using Illumina Mouse Ref-8 Whole-Genome Expression Bead-chips. Nexus Expression 2.0 was used for data analysis. Compared with non-irradiated controls, 1225 (887 Down, 338 Up), 1636 (1156 Down, 480 Up), 544 (260 Down, 284 Up), 575 (163 Down, 412 Up) and 425 (132 Down, 293 Up) transcripts were affected for 0.05, 0.5, 1.4, 11 and 32 Gy, respectively. A total of 130 transcripts were altered in all groups (40 Down, 46 Up). For apoptosis, 36, 56, 11, 17 and 10 transcripts were differently regulated for 0.05, 0.5, 1.4, 11 and 32 Gy, respectively. Overall, 20, 23, 26, 21 and 14 biological processes were affected for 0.05, 0.5, 1.4, 11 and 32 Gy, respectively. Of these, only 2 were shared by all irradiated groups. Many similarities were obtained between 0.05 and 0.5 Gy and between 11 and 32 Gy, while the effects at 1.4 Gy deviated more from the other groups. Conclusively, high absorbed doses that mediate larger DNA damages altered genes involved in cytoskeleton reorganization. In contrast, low doses which produce few DNA damages altered more genes involved in cellular maintenance and metabolism. Interestingly, there seemed to be a transition phase around 1.4 Gy in the type of cellular response to DNA damages. Further work is needed in order to gain a complete understanding of the processes involved. (authors)

  1. Transgenerational developmental effects and genomic instability after X-irradiation of preimplantation embryos: Studies on two mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P.; Buset, J.; Neefs, M.; Vankerkom, J.; Benotmane, M.A.; Derradji, H.; Hildebrandt, G.; Baatout, S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent results have shown that irradiation of a single cell, the zygote or 1-cell embryo of various mouse strains, could lead to congenital anomalies in the fetuses. In the Heiligenberger strain, a link between the radiation-induced congenital anomalies and the development of a genomic instability was also suggested. Moreover, further studies showed that in that strain, both congenital anomalies and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation. The aim of the experiments described in this paper was to investigate whether such non-targeted transgenerational effects could also be observed in two other radiosensitive mouse strains (CF1 and ICR), using lower radiation doses. Irradiation of the CF1 and ICR female zygotes with 0.2 or 0.4 Gy did not result in a decrease of their fertility after birth, when they had reached sexual maturity. Moreover, females of both strains that had been X-irradiated with 0.2 Gy exhibited higher rates of pregnancy, less resorptions and more living fetuses. Additionally, the mean weight of living fetuses in these groups had significantly increased. Exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in CF1 fetuses issued from control and X-irradiated females. In the control group of that strain, polydactyly and limb deformity were also found. The yields of abnormal fetuses did not differ significantly between the control and X-irradiated groups. Polydactyly, exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in fetuses issued from ICR control females. In addition to these anomalies, gastroschisis, curly tail and open eye were observed at low frequencies in ICR fetuses issued from X-irradiated females. Again, the frequencies of abnormal fetuses found in the different groups did not differ significantly. In both CF1 and ICR mouse strains, irradiation of female zygotes did not result in the development of a genomic instability in the next generation embryos. Overall, our results suggest that, at the moderate doses used, developmental defects

  2. Transgenerational developmental effects and genomic instability after X-irradiation of preimplantation embryos: Studies on two mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P., E-mail: pjacquet@sckcen.be [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Buset, J.; Neefs, M. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vankerkom, J. [Division of Environmental Research, VITO, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Benotmane, M.A.; Derradji, H. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Hildebrandt, G. [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 9a, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Baatout, S. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-05-01

    Recent results have shown that irradiation of a single cell, the zygote or 1-cell embryo of various mouse strains, could lead to congenital anomalies in the fetuses. In the Heiligenberger strain, a link between the radiation-induced congenital anomalies and the development of a genomic instability was also suggested. Moreover, further studies showed that in that strain, both congenital anomalies and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation. The aim of the experiments described in this paper was to investigate whether such non-targeted transgenerational effects could also be observed in two other radiosensitive mouse strains (CF1 and ICR), using lower radiation doses. Irradiation of the CF1 and ICR female zygotes with 0.2 or 0.4 Gy did not result in a decrease of their fertility after birth, when they had reached sexual maturity. Moreover, females of both strains that had been X-irradiated with 0.2 Gy exhibited higher rates of pregnancy, less resorptions and more living fetuses. Additionally, the mean weight of living fetuses in these groups had significantly increased. Exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in CF1 fetuses issued from control and X-irradiated females. In the control group of that strain, polydactyly and limb deformity were also found. The yields of abnormal fetuses did not differ significantly between the control and X-irradiated groups. Polydactyly, exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in fetuses issued from ICR control females. In addition to these anomalies, gastroschisis, curly tail and open eye were observed at low frequencies in ICR fetuses issued from X-irradiated females. Again, the frequencies of abnormal fetuses found in the different groups did not differ significantly. In both CF1 and ICR mouse strains, irradiation of female zygotes did not result in the development of a genomic instability in the next generation embryos. Overall, our results suggest that, at the moderate doses used, developmental defects

  3. Studies of early effects of ultraviolet B irradiation on hairless mouse epidermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    The present study describes various early biochemical and cell kinetic aspects of the acute response of hairless epidermis with irradiation of narrow-banded wavelengths in the ultraviolet B region of the spectrum (280-320 nm), and their possible relationship to ultraviolet carcinogenicity. In vivo exposure of hairless mouse skin to a single dose of various narrow-banded wavelengths of ultraviolet B light demonstrated that 280, 290, 297 and 302 nm had a carcinogenic potency according to the tetrazolium test. No induction of DT-diaphorase was observed, which may signify that the actions of ultraviolet B light and chemical skin carcinogens differ at the cellular level, even though the nuclear effect on DNA may in principle be the same, e.g. mutation events, activation or amplication of oncogens, inhibition of anti-oncogens, etc. The early epidermal cell kinetic after a biologically relevant dose of ultraviolet B irradiation at a wavelength of 297 nm could be divided into two periods: the initial inhibition in the uptake of tritiated thymidine and the mitotic rate were followed by a long-lasting depression in the DNA synthesis rate combined with rapid cell proliferation. This shows that the acute vascular response (erythema and edema) to ultraviolet B lights is also associated with epidermal perturbations similar to the carcinogen-associated delay in cell cycle passage seen after chemical skin carcinogens like 7,12-dimethylbenz(α)anthracene and methylnitrosourea, as well as to the regenerative proliferation observed after chemical skin irritants like cantharidin. 93 refs., 6 figs

  4. Effect of prenatal gamma irradiation on the different gestation days on mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskar, R.; Uma Devi, P.

    1993-01-01

    Pregnant Swiss albino mice were given a single local (abdomen) exposure of 50 cGy gamma radiation on days 1.5 to 17.5 post coitus (p.c.). The animals were sacrificed on 18th day of gestation and the fetuses were dissected out and examined for mortality, growth retardation, sex ratio, changes in body weight and length, head length and width, brain weight and incidence of microphthalmia. Preimplantation exposures (days 1.5 and 3.5 p.c.) resulted in a significant increase in embryonic and fetal mortality, while exposure during the postimplantation period (days 5.5 to 12.5 p.c.) produced a significant increase in the number of growth retarded fetuses. A high incidence of growth retarded fetuses was also observed by irradiation at the late fetal period (17.5 days p.c.). Brain weight was significantly affected by exposure on some days during all the three phases of development, i.e. preimplantation (3.5 days p.c.), mager organogenesis (9.5 to 12.5 days p.c.) and fetal (14.5 and 17.5 days p.c.) periods, though the period of sensitiveness was larger during organogenesis period. Eye development was sensitive to radiation effect mainly during the late organogenesis (9.5 to 12.5 days p.c.). It is concluded that the radiosensitivity of mouse embryos to radiation lethality at low dose is confirmed to the preimplantation period, while growth retardation is a prominent effect of irradiation at the early postimplantation embryos. The late organogenesis, especially from 9.5 to 12.5 days p.c. appears to be a particularly sensitive period in the development of brain and eye, though the sensitivity of brain may continue during the fetal life. (author). 9 refs

  5. Electronmicroscopic study of gamma irradiated mouse spleen during primary immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burneva, V.G.; Gitsov, L.G.; Boyadzhieva-Mikhajlova, A.; Kyncheva, L.S.; Viklichka, St.

    1978-01-01

    An electronmicroscopic study of the mouse spleen immunocompetent cells during the productive phase of the primary immune response after sublethal gamma ray irradiation is carried out. For this purpose the animals were immunized with sheep red blood cells 24 hours after irradiation and sacrified on the 5th day after immunization. The number of small lymphocytes is reduced in all zones of the spleen. Only in the periarteriolar area the lymphoid sheaths are well outlines and the ultrastructure of the cells preserved. Three types of reticulohistocytic elements, according to their radiosensitivity are observed. The most radioresistant cells are the fixed ''dark'' reticular cells which do not complete phagocytosis. The ultrastructure of their nucleus and cytoplasm is not damaged. The macrophages are also quite resistant. The ''light'' reticular cells are the most radiosensitive. The chromatine of their nuclei is dispersed. The mitochondria are imbibed, with a reduced number of cristae. The cytoplasm contains many electron light vesicles, different in size. The changes in the processes of the dendridic cells in the spleen lymph follicles are of particular interest. Compared with the control animals the processes of dendritic reticular cells are markedly reduced. The postirradiation ultrastructural changes of the spleen cells indicate that parallel with the basic factor (the death of a considerable part of the small lymphocytes, precursors of the antibody-synthetizing cells) the reduced antibody-formation is due also to the limited capacity for ''traping'' the antigen on the processes of the dendritic follicular cells and to the reduced capacity of the reticulo-histocytic cells for antigen phagocytosis. The later is determined both by the damage of a considerable part of the phagocytes (radiosensitive ''light'' reticulo-histocytic cells) and by the blocking of the functionally undamaged phagocytes from ingested debris. (K.M.)

  6. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome.

  7. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarghami, Niloufar, E-mail: nzargham@uwo.ca; Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Talluri, Srikanth; Dick, Frederick A. [Department of Biochemistry, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Foster, Paula J. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chambers, Ann F. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. Methods: A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using CAD software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Results: Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2° ± 1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. Conclusions: The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs.

  8. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarghami, Niloufar; Jensen, Michael D.; Talluri, Srikanth; Dick, Frederick A.; Foster, Paula J.; Chambers, Ann F.; Wong, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. Methods: A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using CAD software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Results: Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2° ± 1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. Conclusions: The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs

  9. Induction of micronuclei in human and mouse lymphocytes irradiated with gamma radiation and effect of panax ginseng C. A. Meyer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Oh, Heon; Lee, Song Eun [Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Sil; Kim, Tae Hwan [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyu Sik [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Si Yun [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    The frequencies of {gamma}-ray-induced micronuclei (MN) in Cytokinesis-Blocked (CB) lymphocytes at several doses were measured in three donors of human and C57BL/6 mice. Measurements performed after irradiation showed a dose-related increases in MN frequency in each of the donors studied. The relative sensitivity of mouse in Spleen Lymphocytes (SLs) compared with human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes (PBLs) was estimated by best fitting linear-quadratic model based on the radiation-induced MN data over the range from 0 cGy to 400 cGy. In the case of MN frequency with 0.2 per CB cell, the relative sensitivity of mouse SLs was 1.67. Compared with the radiation-induced MN formation in the PBLs of human, the SLs of mouse were more radiosensitive. Using this MN assay with human PBLs and mouse SLs, studies were performed to determine whether the water fraction of ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A.Meyer)against radiation-induced MN in human PBLs after in vitro irradiation (3Gy) and in SLs of C57BL/6 mice after in vivo irradiation (3Gy). The frequency of MN in human PBLs was reduced by water fraction of ginseng (0.5mg/ml of medium) both pre-and post treatment (p<0.01) in vitro. In addition, the frequency of MN in mouse SLs was also reduced by pretreatment of ginseng (2mg/ml of drinking water for 7 days) in vivo.

  10. In situ PCR detection and significance of IL-3 gene expression in irradiated hematopoietic cells of mouse bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ruiyun; Wang Dewen; Xiong Chengqi; Gao Yabing; Li Yanping; Yang Hong; Cui Yufang

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the significance of endogenous interleukin 3(IL-3) gene expression in repair of irradiated mouse bone marrow. Methods: Seventy-eight LACA mice were subjected to total body irradiation with 60 Co γ-rays and were sacrificed within 4 weeks after irradiation. The bone marrow histopathological sections were stained with HE, and the expression of endogenous IL-3 gene was detected by means of immunocytochemistry,in situ hybridization(ISH) and in situ reverse transcription PCR(IS RT-PCR). Results: Obvious injury of bone marrow occurred after irradiation and then recovered within 4 weeks. IL-3 protein was obviously increased in the cytoplasm of recovering hematopoietic cells(HCs), especially on day 21 after irradiation, while its mRNA was poorly positive by ISH on days 10-21, especially day 15.IS RT-PCR showed that IL-3 mRNA was strongly positive in recovering HCs cytoplasm, especially on days 10 to 15. Conclusion: In situ RT-PCR can objectively reflect the regulation of IL-3 gene expression in bone marrow after irradiation, and the expression of endogenous IL-3 gene may play an important role in hematopoietic reconstruction of irradiated bone marrow

  11. Excision of pyrimidine dimers from epidermal DNA and nonsemiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis following ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G.T.; Trosko, J.E.; Shapas, B.G.; Boutwell, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimer production and excision in epidermal DNA were studied at five different dose levels of ultraviolet light in the skin of intact mice. Dimer production increased with dose up to 50,400 ergs/sq mm. Approximately 30 percent of the thymine-containing dimers were excised by 24 hr after irradiation at three lower dose levels of ultraviolet light. Nonsemiconservative DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated mouse skin was shown to continue for at least 18 hr. The rate of nonsemiconservative replication decreased with time, but did so slowly. The initial rates of nonsemiconservative replication increased with ultraviolet light dose levels up to about 4200 ergs/sq mm, after which the initial rates were decreased. Semiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis was shown to be inhibited by hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea had no effect on ultraviolet light-induced nonsemiconservative DNA replication. The observed pyrimidine dimer excision and nonsemiconservative DNA replication suggest that in the intact mouse the cells of the epidermis are capable of DNA excision repair after ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

  12. Effects of whole-body and partial-body x irradiation upon epidermal mitotic activity during wound healing in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1977-01-01

    Mitotic activity of normal (unwounded) and wounded skin was measured in the control (nonirradiated) and whole-body or partial-body x-irradiated mouse. Higher mitotic activity in the anterior than in the posterior region of the body was found in both the normal and the wounded skin of the control mouse. Whole-body irradiation (500 R) depressed completely the mitotic activity of normal skin 2 to 4 days after irradiation. In spite of this depression in mitotic activity, a surgical incision made 1 to 3 days after irradiation could induce a burst of proliferation after an inhibition of an initial mitosis increase. When the animals were partially irradiated with 500 R 3 days before wounding, it was shown that mitosis at 24 hr after wounding was inhibited markedly by the local effect of irradiation and that mitosis also could be inhibited diversely by the abscopal effect of irradiation. Because of a close similarity of sequential mitotic patterns between whole-body-irradiated and flapped-skin-only-irradiated groups (direct irradiation), the effect of irradiation upon mitosis was considered to be primarily local. Some discussions were made concerning the possible reasons which made a difference in mitotic patterns between the head-only-irradiated group, the irradiated group including the head and other parts of the body except for the skin flap

  13. Proliferative kinetics of the haematopoietic stem cells of the mouse after several weeks of reconvalescence of an irradiation attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The 125 IDU(iodo-deoxyuridine) tracer-technique was applied for investigating proliferative kinetics. The intention was to reveal a possible persistent irradiation damage in the haematopoietic stem-cells of the mouse. The three following methodically differing arrangements were made: 1. 35 days after irradiation with 450 rad no difference is found between the measured turnover of incorporated 125 IUD in the bone marrow and not irradiated mice. However, there is a splenic cell population which unambiguously transfers its activity slowlier. A dose-response relationship exists to a limited extent. 2. By four transplantations at different instants the donors were marked first, and then the turnover of the early haematopoietic precursor cells in the bone marrow was detected. It resulted that 35 days after irradiation with 450 rad the turnover takes place slightly slowlier than in not irradiated early precursor cells. Iodised water, which is administered before the tracer technique is applied, seems to have a stimulating effect, particularly on the turnover of irradiated stem cells; the marking with a specific activity of 2000 Ci/mol seems to have a slightly toxic effect. 3. A test was developed, by which the proliferation velocity of stem cells and their descendants is measured when there is a very high proliferation stimulus. Differing amounts of bone marrow cells are transfused to lethally irradiated receivers. Within the logarithmic phase of the 125 IDU incorporation the relative cellular proliferation, originating in the stem cells being in the spleen, is determined for the interval between day 3 and day 5. It results very clearly that the descendants of those stem cells irradiated with 450 rad after a reconvalescence time of 35 days present a lower degree of rapid proliferative ability than the not irradiated cells. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Stromal damage in the mouse small intestine after Co60 gamma or D-T neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.; Boyle, F.C.; Fife, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Stromal constituents have been examined in mouse small intestine 3 1/2 days after irradiation with either 18-20 Gy gamma rays or 10 Gy neutrons. These doses were chosen for their equivalent effect on the number of intestinal crypts found after treatment. Despite the fact that the topography of the villi, as imaged by scanning electron microscopy, was altered by treatment, with gamma irradiated villi showing lateral or horizontal collapse while neutron irradiation produced conical villi, few changes were seen in the villous stromal compartments. There were, however, ultrastructural changes observed in the stroma of the pericryptal plate. Changes common to both radiation schedules included disorganisation of the subepithelial stroma and an increase in the number of irregular processes. Some changes after irradiation, however, were not identical in the two groups. Gamma irradiation resulted in pale, foamy cytoplasmic vesicles, the separation of smooth muscle cells and changes in the structure of the luminal aspect of arterial blood vessels while neutron irradiation produced dense cytoplasmic vesicles and electron dense bodies within the substance of peripheral nerve twigs. The fact that the variation in the topography of villi after the two types of radiation is matched by changes in the deep stroma rather than within the villi themselves indicates that the stromal pericryptal plate is of importance in the structure of the villus and the extent to which the villi have varied from the normal finger shaped structure

  15. Decreased weight, DNA, RNA and protein content of the brain after neutron irradiation of the 18-day mouse embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, S.; Fonagy, A.; Hidvegi, E.J.; Fueloep, Z.; Vogel, H.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Pregnant mice were irradiated with 0.5 Gy fission neutrons on the eighteenth day of gestation. Average litter size at birth was unchanged but mortality increased 5-6 fold in the first 3 days. Irradiated mice were the same weight as control mice at birth but showed a progressively increasing weight deficiency up to at least 36 days compared to controls. Brain weight was 37, 45 and 25% less in 2-, 3- and 52-week old irradiated animals; the ratio of brain weight to body weight was 25, 27 and 13% less. The concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein (mg/g wet tissue) were the same in irradiated and control mice in brain and liver at all three ages. Total DNA, RNA and protein contents of whole brain after irradiation were 56-75% of control levels. No definite decrease was observed in liver. Histological study at 6 hours after irradiation showed nuclear pyknosis in the central nervous system from definite to very severe according to the part examined. It is concluded that damage to the central nervous system of the 18-day mouse foetus is mainly due to killing and/or inhibition of the differentiation of neuroblasts. (author)

  16. Gene Expression Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton or Gamma-Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda; Nie, Ying; Gridley, Daila; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Seidel, Derek V.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Crew members face potential consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment including acute radiation syndrome and cancer. The space radiation environment is ample with protons, and numerous studies have been devoted to the understanding of the health consequences of proton exposures. In this project, C57BL/6 mice underwent whole-body exposure to 250 MeV of protons at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2 and 6 Gy and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation. Standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes in the tissue showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. Results of gene expression changes showed consistent up- or down- regulation, up to 10 fold, of a number of genes across exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced oxidative stress including Gpx2. A separate study in C57BL/6 mice using the same four hour time point but whole-body gamma-irradiation showed damage to the small intestine with lesions appearing at the smallest dose of 0.05 Gy and increasing with increasing absorbed dose. Expressions of genes associated with oxidative stress processes were analyzed at four hours and twenty-four hours after exposure to gamma rays. We saw a much greater number of genes with significant up- or down-regulation twenty-four hours post-exposure as compared to the four hour time point. At both four hours and twenty-four hours post-exposure, Duox1 and Mpo underwent up-regulation for the highest dose of 6 Gy. Both protons and gamma rays lead to significant variation in gene expressions and these changes may provide insight into the mechanism of injury seen in the GI tract following radiation exposure. We have also completed experiments using a BALB/c mouse model undergoing whole-body exposure to protons. Doses of 0, 0.1, 1 and 2 Gy were used and results will be compared to the work mentioned

  17. Kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa during fractionated irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.K.; Xu, F.X.; Landuyt, W.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa have been investigated. To assess the rate of repair 2 and 5 irradiations have been given with intervals ranging from 1 to 24 hours. It was found that the sublethal damage induced by a dose of approximately 10 Gy was fully recovered in approximately 4 hr. After a dose of 5-6 Gy, cellular repair was completed within 3 hr. The half time of repair (T1/2) was estimated to be approximately 72 min for 10 Gy and approximately 54 min for 5-6 Gy. Although these results suggest that the rate of repair is dependent on the fraction size, the possible influence of the amount of repair of sublethal radiation damage with the various fraction sizes used can not be ruled out. To evaluate the capacity of repair, a single dose, 2, 4 and 10 fractions have been given in a maximal overall time of 3 days in order to minimize the influence of repopulation. The slope of the isoeffective curve was 0.32 and the alpha/beta ratio was 8.5 Gy. This indicates that the capacity of cellular repair of lip mucosa is similar to those of other rapidly proliferating tissues but smaller than those of late responding tissues. The results of the present and other studies demonstrate that there are considerable differences in the repair characteristics between acutely and late responding tissues. These features have to be dealt with when fractionation schedules are markedly altered

  18. Effects of low-dose irradiation of X-rays on IUdR incorporation into mouse tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misonoh, J.; Ishii, K.; Yoshida, M.; Okumura, Y.; Kodama, S.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that biological responses get smaller when a radiation dose gets lower, and it makes it difficult to detect them with significant differences from background levels. Therefore we know little about biological effects arisen from very low-dose radiation in mammals and mammalian cells. Feinendegen et al. detected a significant reduction of 125 I-UdR uptake in bone marrow cells at doses below 0.01 Gy. Using this extremely sensitive biological response, they also indicated that cells of mice irradiated twice with an interval of 4 hours did not show any reaction after the second irradiation. This meant that cells became radio-resistant after whole-body irradiation with low-doses. This phenomenon, an acquired radio-resistance after low-dose irradiation, is explained as an adaptive response to radiation , which is recently well documented in cytogenic studies. In order to confirm that whether it is common in the cell renewal systems, IUdR incorporation into mouse spleen and the other tissues were studied after whole-body irradiation. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  19. Organ dose conversion coefficients based on a voxel mouse model and MCNP code for external photon irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Cheng, Jie; Ning, Jing; Yuan, Yong; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2012-01-01

    A set of conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to the organ absorbed dose for external photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV are presented based on a newly developed voxel mouse model, for the purpose of radiation effect evaluation. The voxel mouse model was developed from colour images of successive cryosections of a normal nude male mouse, in which 14 organs or tissues were segmented manually and filled with different colours, while each colour was tagged by a specific ID number for implementation of mouse model in Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Monte Carlo simulation with MCNP was carried out to obtain organ dose conversion coefficients for 22 external monoenergetic photon beams between 10 keV and 10 MeV under five different irradiation geometries conditions (left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic). Organ dose conversion coefficients were presented in tables and compared with the published data based on a rat model to investigate the effect of body size and weight on the organ dose. The calculated and comparison results show that the organ dose conversion coefficients varying the photon energy exhibits similar trend for most organs except for the bone and skin, and the organ dose is sensitive to body size and weight at a photon energy approximately <0.1 MeV.

  20. Assay using embryo aggregation chimeras for the detection of nonlethal changes in X-irradiated mouse preimplantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Miller, L.; Samuels, S.J.; Chang, R.J.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed a short-term in vitro assay for the detection of sublethal effects produced by very low levels of ionizing radiation. The assay utilizes mouse embryo aggregation chimeras consisting of one irradiated embryo paired with an unirradiated embryo whose blastomeres have been labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). X irradiation (from 0.05 to 2 Gy) and chimera construction were performed with four-cell stage embryos, and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h to the morula stage. The morulae were partially dissociated with calcium-free culture medium and viewed under phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution of irradiated (unlabeled) and control (FITC labeled) embryos per chimera. In chimeras where neither embryo was irradiated, the ratio of the unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.50 (17.8 +/- 5.6 cells per unlabeled embryo and 17.4 +/- 5.5 cells per FITC-labeled partner embryo). However, in chimeras formed after the unlabeled embryos were irradiated with as little as 0.05 Gy, the ratio of unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.43 (P less than 0.01). The apparent decreases in cell proliferation were not observed in irradiated embryos that were merely cocultured with control embryos, regardless of whether the embryos were zona enclosed or zona free. We conclude that very low levels of radiation induce sublethal changes in cleaving embryos that are expressed as a proliferative disadvantage within two cell cycles when irradiated embryos are in direct cell-to-cell contact with unirradiated embryos

  1. Alkaline phosphatase role in bone marrow and spleen hemopoietic cells recovery after mouse whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mouhamad, K.; Al Sheikh, F.

    2013-04-01

    Hematopoietic tissue is consisted of two distinctly different tissues, the first part is the hematopoietic stem cells and the second tissue is a mixture of many supportive cells which the most important one of them is alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-secreted-fibroblastic cells (FBCs). It was thought that FBCs play an important role in the hematopoiesis through ALP secretion. Our previous studies indicated that the ALP secretion in bone marrow (BM) increased after a whole mouse body irradiation when the BM cellular component is completely destroyed and, then it was decreased when the BM regain its cellular component. We performed some experiences to verify if there is any role to the ALP in the hematopoiesis. We irradiated three groups of mice to non-lethal dose, the first one was injected by Tetramizole (anti-ALP) 24 hours before irradiation, and the second was injected by Lisinopril (anti-hematopoiesis) 24 hours before irradiation and the third left without any injection. The fourth left as control. Many histological sections were taken from BM and spleen on 1, 3, 7 and 30 days after irradiation to perform ALP-histological detection. These experiences were repeated to count BM cells. ALP secretion level in the BM was reached the maximum 3 days after irradiation without any injection when the cell number was in minimum then, the level of ALP start to decrease and the cell number start to increase. ALP secretion delayed when the mice were injected by Tetramizole and BM cell population also delayed to return to its normal position. But, the ALP secretion increased directly after irradiation when the mice were injected by Lisinopril which, the ALP secretion, normally reached the maximum by the third day. These results may indicate a role to the ALP in BM and spleen hematopoietic cell recovery (author).

  2. Effects of hyperthermia and X-irradiation on mouse stromal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wondergem, J.; Begg, A. C.; Haveman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of normal stroma to heat, irradiation and heat combined with irradiation has been studied using the tumour bed effect (TBE) assay. Irradiation before implantation led to a TBE. This TBE was dose dependent below 15 Gy, the TBE remaining relatively constant above 15 Gy. The interval

  3. Effects of hyperthermia and X-irradiation on mouse stromal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of normal stroma to heat, irradiation and heat combined with irradiation, was studied using the tumour bed effect (TBE) assay. Irradiation before implantation led to a TBE, dose dependent below 15 Gy, but remaining relatively constant above. The interval (0-90 days) between irradiation and tumour implantation did not influence the magnitude of the TBE. Hyperthermia with large heat doses (45-60 min at 44 0 C) before implantation may lead to a TBE. The interval between hyperthermia and tumour implantation was very important. Results showed that the recovery from heat-induced stromal damage is very rapid. When the interval between hyperthermia and tumour implantation was 10 days or longer, no TBE could be observed. Irradiation combined with large heat doses (30-60 min at 44 0 C) decreased the radiation-induced TBE. The combination of irradiation with mild heat treatments (15 min at 44 0 C) could lead to a larger TBE then after irradiation alone. When hyperthermia was given prior to irradiation, the interval between heat and irradiation proved to be very important. With large intervals (21 days or longer), TBE values were about the same as with irradiation alone. When heat was given after irradiation, irradiation-induced TBE was always reduced. (UK)

  4. Effects of high-frequency near-infrared diode laser irradiation on the proliferation and migration of mouse calvarial osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimatsu, Ryo; Gunji, Hidemi; Tsuka, Yuji; Yoshimi, Yuki; Awada, Tetsuya; Sumi, Keisuke; Nakajima, Kengo; Kimura, Aya; Hiraki, Tomoka; Abe, Takaharu; Naoto, Hirose; Yanoshita, Makoto; Tanimoto, Kotaro

    2018-01-04

    Laser irradiation activates a range of cellular processes and can promote tissue repair. Here, we examined the effects of high-frequency near-infrared (NIR) diode laser irradiation on the proliferation and migration of mouse calvarial osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured and exposed to high-frequency (30 kHz) 910-nm diode laser irradiation at a dose of 0, 1.42, 2.85, 5.7, or 17.1 J/cm 2 . Cell proliferation was evaluated with BrdU and ATP concentration assays. Cell migration was analyzed by quantitative assessment of wound healing using the Incucyt ® ZOOM system. In addition, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-amino-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2) after laser irradiation was examined with western blotting. Compared to the control, cell proliferation was significantly increased by laser irradiation at a dose of 2.85, 5.7, or 17.1 J/cm 2 . Laser irradiation at a dose of 2.85 J/cm 2 induced MC3T3-E1 cells to migrate more rapidly than non-irradiated control cells. Irradiation with the high-frequency 910-nm diode laser at a dose of 2.85 J/cm 2 induced phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK1/2 15 and 30 min later. However, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK was not changed by NIR diode laser irradiation at a dose of 2.85 J/cm 2 . Irradiation with a high-frequency NIR diode laser increased cell division and migration of MT3T3-E1 cells, possibly via MAPK/ERK signaling. These observations may be important for enhancing proliferation and migration of osteoblasts to improve regeneration of bone tissues.

  5. Repair capacity of mouse lung after total body irradiation alone or combined with cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, Akmal; Bentzen, Soeren M.; Nielsen, Ole S.; Mahmoud, Hossam K.; Overgaard, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Purpose. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) combined with fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) is frequently used in the conditioning of patients prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). This study was performed to investigate the effect of CTX on the repair capacity of lung tissue after TBI in a mouse model for BMT. Materials and methods. TBI was given as a single fraction, 3 fractions in 3 days (Fx 3) or 9 fractions in 3 days (Fx 9) either alone or 24 h after a single dose of CTX. The single fraction TBI was given at either high dose rate (HDR) of 0.71 Gy/min or low dose rate (LDR) of 0.08 Gy/min. All mice were transplanted 4-6 h after the last TBI fraction. Lung damage was assessed using ventilation rate (VR) and lethality between 28 and 180 days. The repair capacity of lung tissue was estimated using the direct analysis method with the probability of reaching the end point described by a logistic formulation of the linear quadratic model. Results. The VR data confirmed the high repair capacity of lung tissue with an α/β ratio of 4.4 Gy though with a wide 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.03-10.5). Giving CTX before fractionated TBI marked reduced the doses needed to cause response in 50% of the animals. The sparing effect of using fractionated TBI was still evident in the combined CTX-TBI schedules. The estimated α/β ratio was 1.6 Gy (CI = 0.01-4.7) which is within the range of values reported after thoracic radiation only. On the other hand, the sparing effect seen in going from single fraction HDR to LDR was completely abolished when CTX was given 24 h before TBI. The same pattern was repeated when lethality between 28-180 days was used. Yet, the use of lethality to estimate lung damage in a TBI model, markedly underestimated the repair capacity. Conclusions. These results confirm the high repair capacity of lung tissue after TBI and emphasize the value of using a specific end point in testing lung damage after TBI. It also shows that there can be a negative

  6. Effects of caffeine on protein phosphorylation and cell cycle progression in X-irradiated two-cell mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Th.; Streffer, C.

    1992-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of the caffeine-induced uncoupling of mitosis and the cellular reactions to DNA-damaging agents, the authors studied the effects of caffeine treatment on cell cycle progression and protein phosphorylation in two-cell mouse embryos after X-irradiation. Caffeine alone had no effect on timing of and changes in phosphorylation associated with the embryonic cell cycle. In combination with X-rays, caffeine was able to override the radiation induced G 2 block and restored normal timing of these phosphorylation changes after X-irradiation. New additional changes in protein phosphorylation appeared after the combined treatment. Isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX), a substance chemically related to caffeine but a more specific inhibitor of the phosphodiesterase that breaks down cyclic AMP, reduced radiation induced G 2 block from 4 to 5 h to about 1 h and restored the cell cycle associated changes in protein phosphorylation. (author)

  7. Effects of caffeine on protein phosphorylation and cell cycle progression in X-irradiated two-cell mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Th. (AFRC Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics Research, Babraham (United Kingdom)); Streffer, C. (Essen Univ (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiolgie)

    1992-08-01

    To understand the mechanism of the caffeine-induced uncoupling of mitosis and the cellular reactions to DNA-damaging agents, the authors studied the effects of caffeine treatment on cell cycle progression and protein phosphorylation in two-cell mouse embryos after X-irradiation. Caffeine alone had no effect on timing of and changes in phosphorylation associated with the embryonic cell cycle. In combination with X-rays, caffeine was able to override the radiation induced G[sub 2] block and restored normal timing of these phosphorylation changes after X-irradiation. New additional changes in protein phosphorylation appeared after the combined treatment. Isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX), a substance chemically related to caffeine but a more specific inhibitor of the phosphodiesterase that breaks down cyclic AMP, reduced radiation induced G[sub 2] block from 4 to 5 h to about 1 h and restored the cell cycle associated changes in protein phosphorylation. (author).

  8. G/sub 2/ arrest in mouse zygotes after X-irradiation: reversion by caffeine and influence of chromosome abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinfeld, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of caffeine was studied on mouse zygotes blocked in the G/sub 2/ phase of the first cell cycle after X-irradiation. Caffeine (2 mM) effectively reversed the G/sub 2/ arrest when zygotes were incubated in its presence at the time when first mitosis normally takes place. This effect of caffeine was inhibited by cycloheximide (5 ..mu..g ml/sup -1/). In embryos escaping the G/sub 2/ arrest the frequencies of chromosome aberrations varied as a function of the time of irradiation, showing a clear relationship with the varying rates of lethality occurring from the morula stage. Blocked zygotes suffered major chromosome damage: however, this did not appear to be the only cause of the G/sub 2/ arrest. Triploid zygotes were preferentially blocked, suggesting that nuclei contain the target for this X-ray effect.

  9. Acute response of mouse kidney clonogens to fractionated irradiation in situ and then assayed in primary culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeemin Jen; Hendry, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells after in situ single-dose, 2, 8, and 16 fraction X-irradiations was measured in primary culture using a clonogenic assay. The assay was made 12 h after single doses or 12 h after the last dose of the multifraction regimens. When analysed using the linear-quadratic model, as predicted the individual α components for all the different fractionation schedules were not significantly different, and the changes in the β values were consistent with those expected on the basis of the reciprocal fraction numbers. When all four data sets were integrated to derive a common α/β ratio, the result was 4.4±1.3 (1SE) Gy, or 2.8±0.9 Gy (a better fit) if the single-dose data set was excluded. These values fall into the range reported for kidney using assays of tissue function at long times after irradiation. (author)

  10. Migration inhibition of immune mouse spleen cells by serum from x-irradiated tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroson, H.

    1978-01-01

    Tumor-specific antigens of the chemically induced MC 429 mouse fibrosarcoma were detected in a 3 M KCl extract of tumor by the inhibition of migration of specifically immune spleen cells. Using this assay with serum from tumor-bearing mice no tumor antigen was detected in serum of mice bearing small tumors, unless the tumor was exposed to local x irradiation (3000 R) 1 day prior to collection of serum. It was concluded that local x irradiation of tumor caused increased concentration of tumor antigen in the serum. When the tumor was allowed to grow extremely large, with necrosis, then host serum did cause migration inhibition of both nonimmune and immune spleen cells. This migration-inhibition effect was not associated with tumor antigen, but with a nonspecific serum factor

  11. Effects of fast neutron irradiation on the development of the mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Hisao

    1977-01-01

    Mice on the 4th to 11th day of pregnancy were irradiated with 14.1 MeV fast neutron at a dose of 100 rad and their fetuses were examined macroscopically and histologically on the 9th to the 19th day of gestation. Sixty-one cases out of 73 malformed fetuses (20.3%) were arbitrarily chosen and examined. Two cases of exencephaly were observed by irradiation on the 7th day of pregnancy, 2 cases of microcephaly by irradiation on the 9th day, 2 cases of hydrocephaly by irradiation on the 6th day and 3 cases of hydrocephaly by irradiation on the 11th day. Three cases of tumor were observed by irradiation on the 7th day of pregnancy and one case of tumor by irradiation on the 10th day. One case each of abnormal folding of the pallium was detected by irradiation on the 7th day and 10th day of pregnancy. After irradiation, penetration of blood vessels into the developing brain resembles to that of the control group. In some cases, invasion of fibroblast-like cells was observed. In cases with tumor formation, the tumors consisted of homogeneous ventricular cells without any sign of malignancy. Three to four days after irradiation on the 10th or 11th day of pregnancy, rosette formation was observed in the pallium which later disappeared. It appears that slight damages of brain tissue could be repaired without resulting in any external morphological abnormalities. (auth.)

  12. Transition pattern and mechanism of B-lymphocyte precursors in regenerated mouse bone marrow after subtotal body irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deping Han

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of ionizing radiation on the transition and the related signal transduction of progenitor B cells in the bone marrow. Thus, using an NIH Swiss mouse model, we explored the impact of ionizing radiation on the early stage of B-cell development via an examination of the transition of CLP to pro-B to pre-B cells within bone marrow as a function of radiation doses and times. Our results showed that while the total number of bone marrow lymphoid cells at different stages were greatly reduced by subtotal body irradiation (sub-TBI, the surviving cells continued to transition from common lymphoid progenitors to pro-B and then to pre-B in a reproducible temporal pattern. The rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy chain increased significantly 1-2 weeks after irradiation, but no change occurred after 3-4 weeks. The rearrangement of the immunoglobulin light chain decreased significantly 1-2 weeks after sub-TBI but increased dramatically after 3-4 weeks. In addition, several key transcription factors and signaling pathways were involved in B-precursor transitions after sub-TBI. The data indicate that week 2 after irradiation is a critical time for the transition from pro-B cells to pre-B cells, reflecting that the functional processes for different B-cell stages are well preserved even after high-dose irradiation.

  13. Embryonic death, dwarfism and fetal malformations after irradiation of embryos at the zygote stage. Studies on two mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P.; Saint-Georges, L. de; Baugnet-Mahieu, L.; Vankerkom, J.

    1995-01-01

    Female mice of the BALB/c and CF1 strains were mated and irradiated with various doses of X-rays 7 h after presumed fertilization. 18 days later, females were killed and their uteri examined for prenatal mortality at the different stages of development. Living fetuses were weighed and examined for the presence of external malformations. A number of them were also examined for skeletal anomalies. Radiation induced mainly a dose-dependent increase of the preimplantation loss in the BALB/c strain and of the early postimplantation loss in the CF1 strain. Embryos of the BALB/c strain were refractory to the induction of teratogenic effects after such preimplantation irradiation. In CF1 mice, the frequency of malformed fetuses increased regularly after irradiation, the difference with controls being significant for the doses of 10, 50 and 100 cGy. Dwarfism occurrence also appeared to be increased by irradiation in this strain, although the importance of this effect varied depending on the criterion chosen for the assessment of dwarfs. With the definition proposed in the present paper, the increase in the frequency of dwarfs paralleled that of malformed fetuses, being significant after doses of 50 and 100 cGy. Irradiation did not increase the frequency of skeletal anomalies. A careful examination of the various data obtained to date led us to conclude that radiation may possibly be teratogenic in several mouse strains, when administered as early as during the one-cell stage and, to a lesser extent, during the following preimplantation stages. However, early prenatal mortality will remain by far the greatest risk associated with an exposure to radiation during this period. Moreover, the relativity of the risk of abnormality due to such irradiation should be considered in the context of the high prevalence of developmental defects spontaneously occurring during human pregnancy

  14. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D.; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M. S.; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  15. Embryonic death, dwarfism and fetal malformations after irradiation of embryos at the zygote stage. Studies on two mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P.; Saint-Georges, L. de; Baugnet-Mahieu, L. [Laboratory of Radiobiology, Department of Radioprotection, CEN/SCK, Mol (Belgium); Vankerkom, J. [Division of Environmental Research, VITO, Mol (Belgium)

    1995-11-01

    Female mice of the BALB/c and CF1 strains were mated and irradiated with various doses of X-rays 7 h after presumed fertilization. 18 days later, females were killed and their uteri examined for prenatal mortality at the different stages of development. Living fetuses were weighed and examined for the presence of external malformations. A number of them were also examined for skeletal anomalies. Radiation induced mainly a dose-dependent increase of the preimplantation loss in the BALB/c strain and of the early postimplantation loss in the CF1 strain. Embryos of the BALB/c strain were refractory to the induction of teratogenic effects after such preimplantation irradiation. In CF1 mice, the frequency of malformed fetuses increased regularly after irradiation, the difference with controls being significant for the doses of 10, 50 and 100 cGy. Dwarfism occurrence also appeared to be increased by irradiation in this strain, although the importance of this effect varied depending on the criterion chosen for the assessment of dwarfs. With the definition proposed in the present paper, the increase in the frequency of dwarfs paralleled that of malformed fetuses, being significant after doses of 50 and 100 cGy. Irradiation did not increase the frequency of skeletal anomalies. A careful examination of the various data obtained to date led us to conclude that radiation may possibly be teratogenic in several mouse strains, when administered as early as during the one-cell stage and, to a lesser extent, during the following preimplantation stages. However, early prenatal mortality will remain by far the greatest risk associated with an exposure to radiation during this period. Moreover, the relativity of the risk of abnormality due to such irradiation should be considered in the context of the high prevalence of developmental defects spontaneously occurring during human pregnancy.

  16. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  17. Evaluation of cell regeneration of bone marrow after fractionated irradiation of mouse in toto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisin, H.; Evercoren, A. van; Anckaert, M.A.; Coster, B.M. de

    1979-01-01

    We have studied the recovery for mice bone marrow cells after fractionated irradiation of the whole body. The additional dose (Dr) to obtain a given biological effect if the irradiation is split in two equal subfractions (2 Di) separated by a short interval of time (i) is 40 rad per day when the interval of time between the two irradiations is lenghtened of one day [fr

  18. Surface damage in the small intestine of the mouse after X - or neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.E.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1981-01-01

    Damage after X-irradiation includes lateral villous collapse, progressing after 3 - 5 days to villi which sometimes show signs of vertical collapse. After neutron irradiation vertical villous collapse is established earlier, with less swelling of villous tips. It seems, therefore, that at radiobiologically equivalent doses, neutron and X-irradiation produce different levels of surface damage, with neutron irradiation being the more destructive. Early villous tip damage may perhaps be due to disruption of susceptible cells already at the extrusion zone, or to stromal damage

  19. EPR detection of free radicals in UV-irradiated skin: mouse versus human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, B.A.; Buettner, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation produces free radicals in Skh-1 mouse skin, contributing to photoaging and carcinogenesis. If a mouse model is a general indicator of free radical processes in human skin photobiology, then radical production observed in mouse and human skin should be directly comparative. In this work we show that UV radiation (λ > 300 nm, 14 μW/cm 2 UVB; 3.5 mW/cm 2 UVA) increases the ascorbate free radical (Asc) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal in both Skh-1 mouse skin (45%) and human facial skin biopsies (340%). Visible light (λ > 400 nm; 0.23 mW/cm 2 UVA) also increased the Ascsignal in human skin samples (45%) but did not increase baseline mouse Asc, indicating that human skin is more susceptible to free radical formation and that a chromophore for visible light may be present. Using EPR spin-trapping techniques, UV radiation produced spin adducts consistent with trapping lipid alkyl radicals in mouse skin (α-[4-pyridyl 1-oxide]-N-tert-butyl nitrone/alkyl radical adduct; a N = 15.56 G and a H 2.70 G) and lipid alkoxyl radicals in human skin (5,5-dimethylpyrroline -1-oxide/alkoxyl radical adduct; a N = 14.54 G and a H = 16.0 G). Topical application of the iron chelator Desferal to human skin significantly decreases these radicals (∼50%), indicating a role for iron in lipid peroxidation. (Author)

  20. Detection of irradiation-induced, membrane heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in mouse tumors using Hsp70 Fab fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangl, Stefan; Themelis, George; Friedrich, Lars; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Molls, Michael; Skerra, Arne; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The major stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently overexpressed in highly aggressive tumors, and elevated intracellular Hsp70 levels mediate protection against apoptosis. Following therapeutic intervention, such as ionizing irradiation, translocation of cytosolic Hsp70 to the plasma membrane is selectively increased in tumor cells and therefore, membrane Hsp70 might serve as a therapy-inducible, tumor-specific target structure. Materials and methods: Based on the IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) cmHsp70.1, we produced the Hsp70-specific recombinant Fab fragment (Hsp70 Fab), as an imaging tool for the detection of membrane Hsp70 positive tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Results: The binding characteristics of Hsp70 Fab towards mouse colon (CT26) and pancreatic (1048) carcinoma cells at 4 deg. C were comparable to that of cmHsp70.1 mAb, as determined by flow cytometry. Following a temperature shift to 37 deg. C, Hsp70 Fab rapidly translocates into subcellular vesicles of mouse tumor cells. Furthermore, in tumor-bearing mice Cy5.5-conjugated Hsp70 Fab, but not unrelated IN-1 control Fab fragment (IN-1 ctrl Fab), gradually accumulates in CT26 tumors between 12 and 55 h after i.v. injection. Conclusions: In summary, the Hsp70 Fab provides an innovative, low immunogenic tool for imaging of membrane Hsp70 positive tumors, in vivo.

  1. Diffusion chamber culture of mouse bone marrow cells, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigeta, Chiharu; Tanaka, Kimio; Kawakami, Masahito; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ohkita, Takeshi

    1980-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells were cultured in diffusion chambers (DC) implanted in the peritoneal cavity of host mice. Host mice were subjected to (1) irradiation ( 60 Co 800 rad) and/or (2) phenylhydrazine induced anemia and then receiving irradiation ( 60 Co 600 rad). After culture periods of 3-7 days, the total number of cells in DC was increased. A marked increase in DC is due to the proliferation of granulocyte series. When host mice were subjected to anemia and irradiation, the start of cell proliferation in DC was delay about two days. On the whole, anemia and irradiation host reduced a little cell growth in DC. The number of immature granulocytes grown in DC in irradiated hosts or anemia and irradiated hosts increased and reached a plateu at day 5. During the plateu period, the proportions between immature and mature granulocytes in DC were kept constantly. The number of macrophages showed a two-phase increasing. Erythroid cells and lymphocytes rapidly disappeared from the chambers during 3 days. The number of erythroid cells was not significantly influenced even in anemia and irradiation hosts. (author)

  2. The proliferative response of mouse intestinal crypts during fractionated irradiation of carbon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo, M.; Abe, Y.; Mariya, Y.; Ando, K.

    2000-01-01

    Clonogenic assay of jejunal crypt during carbon beam and X-ray irradiations was performed. Fractionation with top-up dose assay revealed carbon beam irradiations caused more damage than X-ray did. To clarify this problem is urgent. (author)

  3. Differential proteiomic analysis of mouse intestinal epithelium irradiated by γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bo; Su Yongping; Liu Xiaohong; Ai Guoping; Ran Xinze; Wei Yongjiang; Wang Junping; Cheng Tianmin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: For elucidating the molecular mechanism of reconstruction of intestinal epithelium damaged by ionizing radiation, the proteomes of murine intestinal epithelium from normal and irradiated mice were compared by 2-D electrophoresis. Methods: Histopathologic sections of whole small intestine made from BALB/c mice 3 h and 72 h after total-body irradiation were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Intestinal epithelial cells were isolated from normal and irradiated mice. The total protein samples prepared by one-step method were used in 2-D electrophoresis, the protein maps were compared and the differential spots were detected with PDQuest analysis software. Twenty-eight different spots were cut off from the gels, digested in gel with trypsin, measured with MALDI-TOF-MS and searched in database. Results: Small intestinal epithelium was damaged as early as 3 h after irradiation, and reconstructed 72 h later. After Coomassie-staining, the 2-DE image analysis by PDQuest software detected 638 ± 39 protein spots in normal mice group, 566 ± 32 spots in 3 hours post irradiation group, and 591 ± 29 spots in 3 days post irradiation group. The 2-DE images showed that proteomes of intestinal epithelium were altered with γ-irradiation. The proteins identified by peptide mass fingerprinting involved in cellular events, including signal transduction, metabolism and oxidative stress responses. Conclusions: Gamma-irradiation can induce the protein expression of intestinal epithelium. The technique of 2-D electrophoresis is a useful tool in the study of molecular mechanism of radiation damage

  4. Influence of a sublethal irradiation on the immune response of the mouse against sheep erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumariage, M.L.; Hiesche, K.; Moeller, E.; Revesz, L.; Haot, J.

    1975-01-01

    In the CBA mice, the immunological response of the spleen cells (RFC and PFC direct and indirect) against the sheep erythrocytes is highly depressed by a 400R dose of X rays. The recovery is not complete at the 30th day after irradiation. The response of the bone marrow cells either irradiated or unirradiated to the antigenic stimulation is very low [fr

  5. Effects of irradiation on the biology of the infective larvae of Toxocara canis in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, O.O.; Myser, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    Mice were infected with either 2000 normal or irradiated embryonated eggs of Toxocara canis and the number of larvae in their livers, lungs, brains, and carcasses investigated at 5, 20, and 33 days of infection. Mortality of mice infected with normal eggs was 33% between day 4 and 8 postinfection but there was no mortality among mice infected with irradiated eggs. Irradiation with 60, 90, or 150 kr of X-rays inhibited the migration of larvae from the livers and lungs and their accumulation in brain and carcass in proportion to the irradiation dose. By day 33 of infection, the ratio of larvae in liver and lungs to larvae in brain and carcass was 0.16 in normal mice, 0.42 in 60-kr mice, 0.98 in 90-kr mice, and 23.3 in 150-kr mice. Irradiated larvae, particularly those migrating through the peritoneal cavity, died faster than normal larvae until day 20. Irradiation favored survival after day 20. By days 20 and 33 postinfection the total parasite load was 29% and 8%, respectively, of the administered dose in control mice, 18% and 12% in 60-kr mice, 8% and 4% in 90-kr mice, and 0.9% and 0.3% in 150-kr mice. Irradiation of infective T. canis larvae, then, reduces their pathogenicity, inhibits their migration from liver and lungs, kills some of the parasites during the first 3 weeks of infection, but favors their late survival in the host.

  6. The electrocorticograms of the aged mouse x-irradiated at juvenile or young adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamisawa, Takeru; Sasaki, Shunsaku.

    1984-01-01

    The electrocorticograms (ECoGs) of the (C57BL/6 x C3H)F 1 mice irradiated at juvenile or young adult were studied when they attained the age of 24-26 months. One group of mice was irradiated 35 days post partum (35-DPP) and another 105 days (105-DPP). All the animals were irradiated with 300 R of X-rays to whole body. The ECoGs were recorded from the freely moving animals with the permanently implanted electrodes fixed over the visual cortical surface. The resulted ECoGs were divided into 3 patterns: wakefulness (W), slow wave sleep (SWS), and paradoxical sleep (PS). Six parameters of the 3 patterns were compared among the 2 irradiated groups and the non-irradiated control group. The mean SWS- and PS-cycle times, and mean SWS length were significantly longer in the 35-DPP group than in the control group. Changes in the ECoGs were less profound in the 105-DPP group than those in the 35-DPP group: only a significant change due to irradiation at 105-DPP was a decrease in the ratio of the total PS time to the total sleep time (TST = total SWS time + total PS time). There was no difference in the body weight and brain weight among the 2 irradiated groups and the control group. (author)

  7. Low-dose carbon ion irradiation effects on DNA damage and oxidative stress in the mouse testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Long, Jing; Zhang, Luwei; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Weiping; Wu, Zhehua

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low-dose carbon ion irradiation on reproductive system of mice, the testes of outbred Kunming strain mice were whole-body irradiated with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 Gy, respectively. We measured DNA double-strand breaks (DNA DSBs) and oxidative stress parameters including malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and testis weight and sperm count at 12 h, 21 d and 35 d after irradiation in mouse testis. At 12 h postirradiation, a significant increase in DNA DSB level but no pronounced alterations in MDA content or SOD activity were observed in 0.5 and 1 Gy groups compared with the control group. At 21 d postirradiation, there was a significant reduction in sperm count and distinct enhancements of DSB level and MDA content in 0.5 and 1 Gy groups in comparison with control. At 35 d postirradiation, the levels of DNA DSBs and MDA, and SOD activity returned to the baseline except for the MDA content in 1 Gy (P sperm count were still observed in 0.5 (P sperm count. Furthermore, these data suggest that the deleterious effects may be chronic or delayed in reproductive system after whole-body exposure to acute high-dose carbon ions.

  8. Development of a new mouse palate organ culture system and effect of X-irradiation on palatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiranuma, Hiroko; Jikko, Akitoshi; Maeda, Takashi; Furukawa, Souhei

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of an already established suspension system of organ culture for mouse palate explants, we developed a new culture system, which has several advantages over the previous methods. We used a 48-well culture plate in which the explants can be cultured individually, and only 300 μl of medium is needed for each well. In order to optimize the culture results, we systematically studied the influence of main ''culture conditions'' such as tilt degree of the culturing palate, rotation speed, and addition of ascorbic acid to the medium. This system allows culturing of palates from day 13.5 of gestation to day 16.5 under serum-free conditions using a chemically defined medium, which resulted in 78% of the palates growing fused. Utilizing this culture system, the direct effect of X-irradiation on palataogesis was analyzed. A 4 Gy dose of X-irradiation was administrated at the beginning of culture period. The incidence of palatal fusion was not significantly different from that of the non-irradiated group. (author)

  9. Effect of Thai banana (Musa AA group) in reducing accumulation of oxidation end products in UVB-irradiated mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerach, Nontaphat; Yakaew, Swanya; Phimnuan, Preeyawass; Soimee, Wichuda; Nakyai, Wongnapa; Luangbudnark, Witoo; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2017-03-01

    Chronic UVB exposure causes skin disorders and cancer through DNA strand breaks and oxidation of numerous functional groups of proteins and lipids in the skin. In this study, we investigated the effects of Thai banana (Musa AA group, "Khai," and Musa ABB group, "Namwa") on the prevention of UVB-induced skin damage when fed to male ICR mice. Mice were orally fed banana (Khai or Namwa) fruit pulps at dose of 1mg/g body weight/day for 12weeks. The shaved backs of the mice were irradiated with UVB for 12weeks. The intensity dose of UVB-exposure was increased from 54mJ/cm 2 /exposure at week 1 to 126mJ/cm 2 /exposure at week 12. A significant increase in skin thickness, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation end products, and expression of MMP-1 was observed in UVB-irradiated mouse skin. A reduction in the accumulation of oxidation end products was found in the skin of UVB-irradiated mice receiving Khai. This occurred in conjunction with a reduction in MMP-1 expression, inhibition of epidermal thickening, and induction of γ-GCS expression. The dietary intake of Khai prevented skin damage from chronic UVB exposure by increased γ-GCS expression and reduced oxidation end products included carbonyls, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide level in dimethylsulfate-treated or UV-irradiated mouse epidermis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balard, B.; Giacomoni, P.U.

    1989-01-01

    The level of nicotinamide (NAD) has been determined in the epidermis of 30 mice. Its value is 0.63+-0.15 μg/mg protein. Upon treatment with dimethylsulfate (DMS), the level of NAD drops in a dosedependent fashion. This diminution is reversible when low doses of DMS are used. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, the level of NAD drops in the irradiated epidermis, the treshold of saturation being below 1200 J/m 2 . There is also a drop in the level of NAD in the epidermis protected against irradiation with a black rubber sheet. (author). 17 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Replication confers β cell immaturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sapna; Roy, Nilotpal; Russ, Holger A; Leonhardt, Laura; French, Esra K; Roy, Ritu; Bengtsson, Henrik; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F; Hebrok, Matthias

    2018-02-02

    Pancreatic β cells are highly specialized to regulate systemic glucose levels by secreting insulin. In adults, increase in β-cell mass is limited due to brakes on cell replication. In contrast, proliferation is robust in neonatal β cells that are functionally immature as defined by a lower set point for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Here we show that β-cell proliferation and immaturity are linked by tuning expression of physiologically relevant, non-oncogenic levels of c-Myc. Adult β cells induced to replicate adopt gene expression and metabolic profiles resembling those of immature neonatal β that proliferate readily. We directly demonstrate that priming insulin-producing cells to enter the cell cycle promotes a functionally immature phenotype. We suggest that there exists a balance between mature functionality and the ability to expand, as the phenotypic state of the β cell reverts to a less functional one in response to proliferative cues.

  12. PSK, a biological response modifier, modifies p53 expression, mitosis and apoptosis in X-ray irradiated mouse embryos. Possible cellular mechanism of the anti-teratogenic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagohashi, Yukiko; Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that PSK, a biological response modifier, suppressed X-ray irradiation induced ocular anomalies in mouse embryos. In the present study, in mouse embryos irradiated at E7.5, PSK, when administered immediately after irradiation, suppressed mitosis and increased apoptosis as compared with embryos not treated with PSK at 12 hrs after irradiation. In the irradiated embryos, p53, which is normally expressed at a high level in early embryos, increased at 6 hrs and decreased at 12 hrs after irradiation. In the irradiated and PSK-treated embryos, the p53 level did not change at 6 hrs, increased at 12 hrs and decreased at 24 hrs after irradiation. This timing of PSK-induced delayed increase of p53 coincided with that of the PSK-induced decrease in mitosis and increase in apoptosis. These results suggested that PSK modified the p53 level and affected cell proliferation and apoptosis, which might contribute to the suppression of teratogenesis. (author)

  13. Preconditioning With Low-Level Laser Irradiation Enhances the Therapeutic Potential of Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells in a Mouse Model of Photoaged Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xuan; Li, Sheng-Hong; Xie, Guang-Hui; Xie, Shan; Xiao, Li-Ling; Song, Jian-Xing; Liu, Hong-Wei

    2018-02-19

    This study was conducted to explore the therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) irradiated with a low-level laser (LLL). Cultured ADSCs were treated with 650-nm GaAlAs laser irradiation at 2, 4 and 8 J cm -2 . Cell proliferation was quantified by MTT assays, cytokine secretion was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and adipogenic differentiation was examined by oil red O staining. Additionally, the expression profiles of putative ADSC surface markers were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, a mouse photoaged skin model was established by UVB irradiation. Effects of GaAlAs laser-treated ADSCs on the thicknesses of the epidermis and dermis were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The results showed that GaAlAs laser treatment of cells at a radiant exposure of 4 J cm -2 enhanced ADSC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation and increased secretion of growth factors. Furthermore, GaAlAs laser irradiation upregulated the expression of putative ADSC surface markers. In the mouse model of photoaged skin, ADSCs treated with GaAlAs laser irradiation had markedly decreased the epidermal thickness and increased the dermal thickness of photoaged mouse skin. Our data indicate that LLL irradiation is an effective biostimulator of ADSCs and might enhance the therapeutic potential of ADSCs for clinical use. © 2018 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Gene expression profiles of irradiated lung tissue in three mouse strains

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The aim of our research is to clarify the mechanisms generating heterogeneity in response to C-ion irradiation that arise from individual genetic variations in...

  15. Effect of whole-body irradiation by fast neutrons on mouse tissues. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotb, M.A.; Abdel-Mawla, A.; El-Khatib, A.; Ramadan, M.I.A.; El-Bassiouni, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Groups of male Swiss albino mice were irradiated by single doses of either 7 rem or 14 rem of fast neutrons with 14 MeV average energy, corresponding to fluences of 1.27x10 8 n/cm 2 and 2.54x10 8 n/cm 2 , respectively. The activities of acid phosphatase (ACP) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) in kidney, lung and liver were determined at different time point up to seven days after irradiation. Lysosomal affection was represented by statistically significant increase of ACP activity in all cell types of the three tested organs immediately after irradiation with either of the doses used. The effect of SDH was represented by reduction in activity in all three organs. The activities of both enzymes showed tendencies to return to pre-irradiation levels with time in most cell types especially after the 7 rem dose. (orig.) [de

  16. Hepatic catalase activity after whole-body irradiation of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neveux, Y.; Drouet, J.; Guillouzo, A.; Rault, H.; Picard, G.

    Using biochemical techniques, the effect of irradiation on catalase rate of different tissues is studied. With cytochemistry, the decrease of catalase activity is studied in situ, after exposure to great ionizing radiation doses [fr

  17. ALK1 heterozygosity delays development of late normal tissue damage in the irradiated mouse kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Floot, Ben; Korlaar, Regina; Russell, Nicola S.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor, which is mainly expressed in endothelial cells regulating proliferation and migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Endothelial cells also express the co-receptor endoglin, which modulates ALK1 effects on endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that mice with reduced endoglin levels develop less irradiation-induced vascular damage and fibrosis, caused by an impaired inflammatory response. This study was aimed at investigating the role of ALK1 in late radiation toxicity. Material and Methods: Kidneys of ALK +/+ and ALK1 +/- mice were irradiated with 14 Gy. Mice were sacrificed at 10, 20, and 30 weeks after irradiation and gene expression and protein levels were analyzed. Results: Compared to wild type littermates, ALK1 +/- mice developed less inflammation and fibrosis at 20 weeks after irradiation, but displayed an increase in pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic gene expression at 30 weeks. In addition, ALK1 +/- mice showed superior vascular integrity at 10 and 20 weeks after irradiation which deteriorated at 30 weeks coinciding with changes in the VEGF pathway. Conclusions: ALK1 +/- mice develop a delayed normal tissue response by modulating the inflammatory response and growth factor expression after irradiation.

  18. Function of skeletal muscle tissue formed after myoblast transplantation into irradiated mouse muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernig, A; Zweyer, M; Irintchev, A

    2000-01-15

    1. Pretreatment of muscles with ionising radiation enhances tissue formation by transplanted myoblasts but little is known about the effects on muscle function. We implanted myoblasts from an expanded, male-donor-derived, culture (i28) into X-ray irradiated (16 Gy) or irradiated and damaged soleus muscles of female syngeneic mice (Balb/c). Three to 6 months later the isometric contractile properties of the muscles were studied in vitro, and donor nuclei were visualised in muscle sections with a Y chromosome-specific DNA probe. 2. Irradiated sham-injected muscles had smaller masses than untreated solei and produced less twitch and tetanic force (all by about 18 %). Injection of 106 myoblasts abolished these deficiencies and innervation appeared normal. 3. Cryodamage of irradiated solei produced muscle remnants with few (1-50) or no fibres. Additional myoblast implantation led to formation of large muscles (25 % above normal) containing numerous small-diameter fibres. Upon direct electrical stimulation, these muscles produced considerable twitch (53 % of normal) and tetanic forces (35 % of normal) but innervation was insufficient as indicated by weak nerve-evoked contractions and elevated ACh sensitivity. 4. In control experiments on irradiated muscles, reinnervation was found to be less complete after botulinum toxin paralysis than after nerve crush indicating that proliferative arrest of irradiated Schwann cells may account for the observed innervation deficits. 5. Irradiation appears to be an effective pretreatment for improving myoblast transplantation. The injected cells can even produce organised contractile tissue replacing whole muscle. However, impaired nerve regeneration limits the functional performance of the new muscle.

  19. Lethal effect after whole-body irradiation on mouse with various photon radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Shizuo

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of mortality on the quality of radiation was investigated in ICR mice after wholebody irradiation with 200 kV x-ray, 60 Co γ-ray, or 10 MV x-ray. With respect to the 30 day mortality, LD 50 values were estimated as 606 rad for 200 kV x-ray and as 713 rad both for 60 Co γ-ray and for 10 MV x-ray. Hence, the value of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to that for 200 kV x-ray was 0.850, while the value decreased with increasing the mortality rate. The value extrapolated to 100% mortality was estimated as 0.6. These results were valid for either 7 or 8 week mice, but the life span of 7 week mice after the irradiation was 3 days shorter than that of 8 week mice. These findings resulted in following conclusions: 1) There are no qualitative differences between 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations. 2) The biological effects after 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations are reduced with increased killing rate, compared with that after 200 kV x-ray irradiations. (Evans, J.)

  20. Effects of misonidazole, irradiation and hyperthermia on lysosomal enzyme activity in mouse tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barratt, G.M.; Wills, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Male C3H mice bearing transplanted tumours were treated with hyperthermia, gamma radiation and the radiosensitising drug misonidazole. The activity of tumour lysosomal acid phosphatase and β-glucuronidase was determined using quantitative cytochemical techniques which measure both lysosomal membrane permeability and enzyme activity. Misonidazole had no effect on the membrane permeability or enzyme activity of tumour lysosomes 1 hr after injection; but 25 hr after the drug treatment the permeability of the lysosomal membrane to the substrate was increased to 1.7 times control. Increases in the lysosomal enzyme activity and membrane permeability were observed 1 hr after combined treatment with misonidazole and irradiation, although neither the drug nor irradiation given alone affected the lysosomes 1 hr after treatment. Twenty-five hours after treatment of tumours with misonidazole given 25 minutes before irradiation of tumours, permeability of the lysosomal membrane had increased to 2.3 times the control. The effects of the irradiation and the radio-sensitisers were thus synergistic. Hyperthermic treatment of tumours increased and misonidazole decreased the lysosomal membrane permeability and enzyme activity measured immediately after exposure. Thus misonidazole and irradiation act synergistically to cause increased lysosomal activity but misonidazole depresses the effect of hyperthermia on lysosomes. (author)

  1. Inhibition of polymerases-alpha and -beta completely blocks DNA repair induced by UV irradiation in cultured mouse neuronal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licastro, F.; Sarafian, T.; Verity, A.M.; Walford, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hydroxyurea, aphidicolin and dideoxythymidine on UV-induced DNA repair of mouse neuronal granular cells were studied. Aphidicolin, which is considered a specific inhibitor of polymerase-alpha, decreased spontaneous DNA synthesis by 93% and totally suppressed DNA repair. Dideoxythymidine, an inhibitor of polymerase-beta, was more potent in decreasing scheduled DNA synthesis than aphidicolin, and also completely blocked the UV-induced DNA repair. Hydroxyurea, a specific inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, inhibited scheduled DNA synthesis, but unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV irradiation was always well detectable. Our data suggest that in neuronal cells from 5 to 10 days old mice both polymerases-alpha and -beta are required for both DNA synthesis and repair. These two enzymes may act jointly in filling up the gaps along the DNA molecule and elongating the DNA chain

  2. Developmental abnormalities of the optic nerve head in mouse fetuses caused by simultaneous irradiation of x-rays and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Shoichiro; Yuguchi, Shuji; Majima, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Eye abnormalities in mouse fetuses caused by irradiation of X-rays alone, or simultaneous irradiation of X-rays and ultrasound on day 7 of gestation were histologically studied on day 18 of gestation. Developmental abnormalities of the optic nerve head were examined in the present experiment, and the following results were obtained: 1. Developmental abnormalities of the optic nerve head associated with developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were detected in 4 fetuses (5 eyes). In all cases, excessive mesenchymal tissue of components of the primary vitreous was found from the optic nerve head to the vitreous cavity. It was impossible to distinguish between the neuroectodermal tissue of Bergmeister's papilla and the mesodermal tissue of components of the primary vitreous. 2. In 3 fetuses (4 eyes), the fetal fissure involving the optic nerve head was open. At the peripapillary region, the inner layer of the optic cup was everted and hyperplastic. The inner neuroblastic layer of the everted portion contacted the outer coat of the eyeball, directly. In these cases, the optic nerve entrance was very wide. 3. The relation between the congenital optic nerve head anomalies encountered clinically and those observed experimentally in the mouse fetuses was discussed. It was considered that the pathogenesis of congenital optic nerve head anomalies consists of the malformation of the primitive epithelial papilla, the faulty closure of the proximal end of the fetal fissure, the anomalies of Bergmeister's papilla, the anomalies of the hyaloid system, or the abnormal differentiation and growth of the neuroectodermal cells of the optic cup. (author)

  3. Cell Survival in irradiation mouse intestine is increased by DNA-Binding radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coultas, P.; Martin, R.

    1996-01-01

    Crypt survival in the mouse intestine has been used to examine effects of bisbenzimide radioprotectors. Intravenous delivery has been used for the present study in which the effects of methyl proamine (MP), a second generation Hoechst 33342 analogue have been examined. Recent results using the lung model suggest that MP is both more potent as a protector and less toxic than H 33342. The rapid nature of the crypt microcolony survival assay in mouse intestine provides an efficient way to examining factors which could impinge on the extent of radioprotection, for example, the interval between protector administration and radiation exposure. The data clearly show that for MP at 100 mg/kg, there is substantially increased crypt survival equivalent to a dose modification of about 1.33. The crypt scoring methods used indicate that protection is throughout the small intestine and preliminary data indicate that colon is also protected to a similar or slightly greater extent

  4. Age-related effects of X-ray irradiation on mouse hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casciati, Arianna; Dobos, Katalin; Antonelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic irradiation of pediatric and adult patients can profoundly affect adult neurogenesis, and cognitive impairment manifests as a deficit in hippocampal-dependent functions. Age plays a major role in susceptibility to radiation, and younger children are at higher risk of cognitive decay w...

  5. Influence of cysteamine and a mixture of radioprotectors on polynucleates and lymphocytes in irradiated mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatome, M.; Bernard, P.

    The diminution of the number of peripheral blood white elements is one of the consequences of ionizing radiation action on organism, even at sublethal doses. The drop of these white elements and their possible recovery in irradiated animal, which have received before a radioprotective substance, are studied. The results ontained are compared with these found in non-protected animal [fr

  6. Immunological activity of the mouse splencytes at a later period after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlovich, M.P.; Klimovich, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    CBA and A/Sn mice that had lived for 2-20 months after sublethal irradiation and intact species of the same age were immunized intravenously with the male sheep erythrocytes. The quantity of the antibody forming cells (AFC) in the spleen decreased in 2 or 3.5 months after the irradiation; in 5 or 8 months it did not differ from the normal and in 13 months it decreased again advancing against the similar age shift in the intact group. The same dynamics was observed when investigating the immune response of a standard number of the experimental mice spleen cells in the adaptive transfer system. In periods, when the immune response of irradiated (2 and 200 months after exposure) or intact (aged 20 or 24 months) mice diminished, the quantity of the AFC cells generated adaptively by transferred spleen cells did not practically depend on the quantity of the transplant's cells. The transplantation of the spleen cells of old irradiated or intact mice in a mixture with splenocytes of young intact donors led to the suppression of immune reactions of normal cells. On the basis of the data obtained the conclusion was made that the late radiation immunodepression was primarily caused by functional defects of the immunocompetent cells and not by their numeric deficit

  7. Schistosoma mansoni: migration and attrition of irradiated and challenge schistosomula in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastin, A.J.; Wilson, R.A. (York Univ. (UK)); Bickle, Q.D. (Winches Farm Field Station, St. Albans (UK))

    1983-08-01

    The fate of irradiated, immunizing cercariae and challenge schistosomula was investigated in mice using a quantitative, histological technique which would appear to be more efficient in estimating parasite numbers in skin and lungs than does the tissue mincing and incubation recovery technique used previously by other workers. There was evidence for slight retardation of irradiated parasite migration in skin, but death of schistosomula in the skin appeared negligible. The majority of irradiated parasites remained in the lungs until at least day 21 after infection, and that most schistosomula observed at this time were dead. In mice immunized with irradiated cercariae there was no evidence of attrition of the challenge infection in the skin. The migration profile of challenge parasites in the lungs of immunized animals was not significantly different from that of normal parasites in the lungs of naive animals. Dead challenge parasites were observed in the lungs but their numbers were not considered great enough to account for the final attrition measured by perfusion. It is suggested that the remainder of the attrition of challenge schistosomula may occur in the systemic and/or hepatic portal circulation.

  8. Schistosoma mansoni: migration and attrition of irradiated and challenge schistosomula in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastin, A.J.; Wilson, R.A.; Bickle, Q.D.

    1983-01-01

    The fate of irradiated, immunizing cercariae and challenge schistosomula was investigated in mice using a quantitative, histological technique which would appear to be more efficient in estimating parasite numbers in skin and lungs than does the tissue mincing and incubation recovery technique used previously by other workers. There was evidence for slight retardation of irradiated parasite migration in skin, but death of schistosomula in the skin appeared negligible. The majority of irradiated parasites remained in the lungs until at least day 21 after infection, and that most schistosomula observed at this time were dead. In mice immunized with irradiated cercariae there was no evidence of attrition of the challenge infection in the skin. The migration profile of challenge parasites in the lungs of immunized animals was not significantly different from that of normal parasites in the lungs of naive animals. Dead challenge parasites were observed in the lungs but their numbers were not considered great enough to account for the final attrition measured by perfusion. It is suggested that the remainder of the attrition of challenge schistosomula may occur in the systemic and/or hepatic portal circulation. (author)

  9. Response of mouse lung to irradiation at different dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Groups of LAF1 mice were given thoracic irradiation using 60 Co γ-rays at dose-rates of 0.05 Gy/min (LDR) or 1.1 Gy/min (HDR) and the death of the animals was monitored as a function of time. It was found that the time pattern of animal deaths was similar for the two different dose-rates. Dose response curves for animals dying at various times up to 500 days after irradiation were calculated and the LD 50 values determined. The curves for the LD 50 values, plotted as a function of the time at analysis for treatment at HDR or LDR, were essentially parallel to each other but separated by a factor (LDR/HDR) of about 1.8. This indicates that the sparing effect of LDR treatment is the same for deaths occurring during the early pneumonitis phase or during the late fibrotic phase of lung damage. The available information on the response of patients to whole thoracic irradiation, given for either palliation or piror to bone marrow transplantation, suggests that for similar dose-rates to those studied here the ratio (LDR/HDR) is only 1.2 to 1.3. This difference between the animal and human data may reflect the modifying effect of the large doses of cytotoxic drugs used in combination with the irradiation of bone marrow transplant patients

  10. Quantitative study of late injury in the irradiated mouse lung using computer graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Masahiro; Furuse, Takeshi; Rapachietta, D.R.; Kallman, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    It is reported that quantitative histological analysis using current imaging technology and computer graphics is useful in studying late injury in the irradiated lung (with and without added chemotherapy), and that it correlated closely with results of the functional breathing rate test. (author). 7 refs.; 1 fig

  11. Effects of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse) induced by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Haagen, J.; Noack, R.; Siegemund, A.; Gabriel, P.; Doerr, W.

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a severe and dose limiting early side effect of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. This study was initiated to determine the effect of bone marrow- and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse tongue model) induced by fractionated irradiation. Daily fractionated irradiation (5 x 3 Gy/week) was given over 1 (days 0-4) or 3 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11, 14-18). Each protocol was terminated (day 7 or 21) by graded test doses (5 dose groups, 10 animals each) in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. The incidence of mucosal ulceration, corresponding to confluent mucositis grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC), was analyzed as the primary, clinically relevant endpoint. Bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted intravenously at various time points within these fractionation protocols. Transplantation of 6 x 10 6 , but not of 3 x 10 6 bone marrow stem cells on day -1, +4, +8, +11 or +15 significantly increased the ED 50 values (dose, at which an ulcer is expected in 50% of the mice); transplantation on day +2, in contrast, was ineffective. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on day -1, 2 or +8 significantly, and on day +4 marginally increased the ED 50 values. Transplantation of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells has the potential to modulate radiation-induced oral mucositis during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect is dependent on the timing of the transplantation. The mechanisms require further investigation. (orig.)

  12. Histological examination of the effect of differently fractionated irradiations in rat and mouse organs. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, E.

    1984-01-01

    The spleen of rats was irradiated with 50 Gy dose local X-rays in two different fractionation rhythms, i.e. twice a week given high and daily applied lower fractions of radiation. According to the results of 3 H-thymidine autoradiography made after the last irradiation 24 hours later both in the white and the red pulp the labelling index was less on the effect of twice in a week applied high radiation fractions than in case of daily given lower fractions. This indicate in correlation with the results of earlier analogous histological experiments that the damaging effect of rarely given higher fractions of radiation in the spleen is especially obvious. (orig.) [de

  13. Late vascular effects of whole brain X-irradiation in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Y [Tsukuba Univ., Sakma, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Phillips, T L [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1982-01-01

    The whole brains of mice were irradiated with 250kVp X-rays at 120 rads min/sup -1/ (1.6 mm Cu HVL, TSD 50 cm), and a histological study was carried out. The dose range of X-irradiation was from 1,300 to 2,500 rads, i.e., 1,300, 1,500, 1,750, 2,000, and 2,500 rads. Eighty-six mice were used for histological examination. For microscopic examination, the mice were killed at regular postirradiation intervals between 15 and 20, 31 and 40, 41 and 50, 51 and 60, 61 and 70, 71 and 80, 81 and 90, 139 and 177 weeks. The brains were removed immediately thereafter, fixed in Bouin's solution, and embedded in paraffin. A histological examination was performed by a morphometric estimation of vascular lesions, in which the degree of the damage to the arterial system was scored in whole serial brain section. Necrosis (encephalomalacia), atrophy, cell infiltration, and telangiectactic vascular change of the brain, caused as a result of the fibrinoid necrosis of the large arteries, were observed. Dose-dependent incidence of the fibrinoid necrosis increased between 41 and 87 weeks after irradiation. Mean score of fibrinoid necrosis increased dose dependently approximately 60 weeks after irradiation. It is suggested that scores of large vessel damage do relate to dose at 41 to 87 weeks, and can be used to quantify the vessel injury, and that fibrinoid necrosis of the large vessels may relate to the incidence of radionecrosis.

  14. Late vascular effects of whole brain X-irradiation in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Y.; Phillips, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    The whole brains of mice were irradiated with 250kVp X-rays at 120 rads min -1 (1.6 mm Cu HVL, TSD 50 cm), and a histological study was carried out. The dose range of X-irradiation was from 1,300 to 2,500 rads, i.e., 1,300, 1,500, 1,750, 2,000, and 2,500 rads. Eighty-six mice were used for histological examination. For microscopic examination, the mice were killed at regular postirradiation intervals between 15 and 20, 31 and 40, 41 and 50, 51 and 60, 61 and 70, 71 and 80, 81 and 90, 139 and 177 weeks. The brains were removed immediately thereafter, fixed in Bouin's solution, and embedded in paraffin. A histological examination was performed by a morphometric estimation of vascular lesions, in which the degree of the damage to the arterial system was scored in whole serial brain section. Necrosis (encephalomalacia), atrophy, cell infiltration, and telangiectactic vascular change of the brain, caused as a result of the fibrinoid necrosis of the large arteries, were observed. Dose-dependent incidence of the fibrinoid necrosis increased between 41 and 87 weeks after irradiation. Mean score of fibrinoid necrosis increased dose dependently approximately 60 weeks after irradiation. It is suggested that scores of large vessel damage do relate to dose at 41 to 87 weeks, and can be used to quantify the vessel injury, and that fibrinoid necrosis of the large vessels may relate to the incidence of radionecrosis. (Author)

  15. The re-establishment of hypersensitive cells in the crypts of irradiated mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, K.; Potten, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Two doses of γ-radiation separated by various time intervals have been used to investigate when after irradiation the cell population susceptible to acute cell death is re-established. Dead cells were scored 3 or 6 h after the second dose. Within 1-2 days of small doses (0.5 Gy) the sensitive cells, recognized histologically as apoptotic cells, are re-established at the base of the crypt (around cell position 6). After higher doses (9.0 Gy) they are not re-established until about the fourth day after irradiation. Even in the enlarged regenerating crypts the sensitive cells are found at the same position at the crypt base. It has been estimated that the crypt contains five or six cells that are susceptible to low doses (0.5 Gy) (hypersensitive cells) and up to a total of only seven or eight susceptible cells that can be induced by any dose to enter the sequence of changes implicit in apoptosis. Between 4 and 10 days after an intitial irradiation of 9.0 Gy the total number of susceptible cells increased from seven to eight to about 10 to 13 per crypt. (author)

  16. Optimization of monoclonal antibody production in mouse ascites by single whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, S.; Ziegler, B.; Kloeting, I.; Ziegler, M.; Nadrowitz, R.; Schmidt, W.

    1987-01-01

    Hybridoma cells injected intraperitoneally into mice induce formation of ascites tumors producing ascites fluid with high levels of monoclonal antibodies. Several parameters affect the growth of the immunoglobulin-producing tumors in vivo. In 10 different hybridomas the average ascites tumor formation rate could be increased from 32% (n = 338 mice) to 77% (n = 112 mice) by only one whole-body irradiation of paraffin-pretreated Balb/c mice. Production of monoclonal antibodies was better in males because of the significantly (p < 0.01) increased volume of ascites fluid. From the increased tumor formation rate in irradiated mice it is suggested that in non-irradiated recipients the tumor growth rate was lowered by immunological reactions against hybridoma cells provoked by cell surface neoantigens revealed by cell fusion and/or tumor-associated antigens of the myeloma parent cells as well as by altered antigen pattern caused by possible mutations in the myeloma cell line and/or Balb/c/K strain. (author)

  17. Differential effects of whole-body {gamma}-irradiation on antinociception induced by morphine and {beta}-endorphin administered intracerebroventricularly in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.M.; Park, T.W.

    2000-05-01

    Two separate lines of evidence suggested the present study. First, intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered morphine (a {mu}-opioid receptor agonist) and {beta}-endorphin (an {epsilon}-opioid receptor agonist) produce antinociception by activating different descending pain inhibitory systems. Second, {gamma}-irradiation attenuates the acute antinociceptive action of i.c.v. injected morphine, but not DPLPE (a {delta}-opioid receptor agonist), in mice. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the antinociception produced by i.c.v. injected morphine and {beta}-endorphin in male ICR mice. In one group, mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy from a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-source and the antinociceptive effects were tested 5, 30, 60,90 and 180 min after irradiation using the 1% acetic acid-induced writhing test (10 ml/kg). The antinociceptive effect was produced time-dependently and reached its maximum at 90 min after irradiation. Thus, time was fixed in the following studies. In another group, mice were irradiated with 5 Gy and tested 90 minutes later for antinociception produced by i.c.v. administration of morphine (50 and 100 ng/mouse) or {beta}-endorphin (31 ng/mouse). Irradiation significantly potentiated the antinociception produced by {beta}-endorphin. However, the antinociception produced by morphine was not affected by irradiation. These results demonstrate a differential sensitivity of {mu}- and {epsilon}-opioid receptors to {gamma}-irradiation, in addition, support the hypothesis that morphine and {beta}-endorphin administered supraspinally produce antinociception by different neuronal mechanisms. (author)

  18. Differential effects of whole-body γ-irradiation on antinociception induced by morphine and β-endorphin administered intracerebroventricularly in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.K.; Chung, K.M.; Park, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    Two separate lines of evidence suggested the present study. First, intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered morphine (a μ-opioid receptor agonist) and β-endorphin (an ε-opioid receptor agonist) produce antinociception by activating different descending pain inhibitory systems. Second, γ-irradiation attenuates the acute antinociceptive action of i.c.v. injected morphine, but not DPLPE (a δ-opioid receptor agonist), in mice. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of γ-irradiation on the antinociception produced by i.c.v. injected morphine and β-endorphin in male ICR mice. In one group, mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy from a 60 Co γ-source and the antinociceptive effects were tested 5, 30, 60,90 and 180 min after irradiation using the 1% acetic acid-induced writhing test (10 ml/kg). The antinociceptive effect was produced time-dependently and reached its maximum at 90 min after irradiation. Thus, time was fixed in the following studies. In another group, mice were irradiated with 5 Gy and tested 90 minutes later for antinociception produced by i.c.v. administration of morphine (50 and 100 ng/mouse) or β-endorphin (31 ng/mouse). Irradiation significantly potentiated the antinociception produced by β-endorphin. However, the antinociception produced by morphine was not affected by irradiation. These results demonstrate a differential sensitivity of μ- and ε-opioid receptors to γ-irradiation, in addition, support the hypothesis that morphine and β-endorphin administered supraspinally produce antinociception by different neuronal mechanisms. (author)

  19. Response of developing mouse liver irradiated in utero and its modification by 2-mercaptopropionylglycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareek, B.P.; Mehta, G.; Bhartiya, H.C.; Dev, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant Swiss albino mice were exposed at gestation days 14.25, 16.25 and 18.25 to 1.5 Gy gamma radiation from 60 Co in the presence or absence of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG). Liver was taken from the litters born to these mothers at different post-partum intervals. The maximum sensitivity was found in 4-week-old animals irradiated at gestation day 14.25. In the MPG treated groups, the number of total cells was higher than in the controls but less than in normals. The increase in pyknotic nuclei and necrotic and binucleate cells was significantly lowered by MPG. (Auth.)

  20. Photocarcinogenesis and persistent hyperplasia in UV-irradiated SENCAR mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickland, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    Susceptibility to photocarcinogenesis has been examined in several mouse strains and stocks including SENCAR, CD-1, BALB/c, C3H, C57Bl, and NZB. SENCAR mice are hypersusceptible to tumorigenesis caused by single high dose exposures to ultraviolet (UV) radiation but not by chronic low-dose exposures. SENCAR mice also exhibit an exaggerated and persistent epidermal hyperplasia in response to UV-induced tissue damage. The persistent hyperplasia is apparently due to a sustained proliferation of the epithelial basal cells, rather than to delayed cell differentiation. SENCAR mice did not exhibit persistent hyperplasia following other forms of tissue damage (surgical or thermal). In related studies, the levels of thymine dimers induced in SENCAR epidermis by UV radiation were comparable to those observed in BALB/c epidermis. In addition, no differences were found in the tissue distribution or persistence of thymine dimers in SENCAR and BALB/c skin

  1. Dominant lethal mutations and histological changes produced in mouse oocytes by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.; Baev, I.; Rupova, I.; Kusheva, R.

    1976-01-01

    Mouse female were exposed to a total dose of 500 or 1000 rad 137 Cs gamma rays delivered at 0.01 rad/min. Effects were scored at 1, 5, 7, and 10 weeks after cessation of treatment. Histologically, ovaria in the 500 rad group showed a decrease up to 11% in follicle numbers as compared to controls; with the prolongation of the time after exposure, a further fall in follicle numbers is observed. In the 1000 rad group, depopulation of ovaria was complete. With the 500 rad dose, total dominant lethality was found to be increased for any of the time intervals between radiation exposure and conception; postimplantation dominant lethality was comparatively low, with similar scores between the weeks investigated. (author)

  2. Low-dose ionizing irradiation triggers a 53BP1 response to DNA double strand breaks in mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Qi, Lixin; Li, Jiaxuan; Wu, DengIong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and reveal the underlying pathways for the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Eighteen one-month-old mice were divided into 6 groups and sacrificed separately at 45 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after 0.1Gy X-ray irradiation (mice without receiving ionizing irradiation served as control). After perfusion fixation, testes were removed, sectioned, and followed by staining of γH2AX, 53BP1, Caspase 3, and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF) for analysis among the different groups. The staining was observed by immunofluorescence visualized by confocal laser scanning. After low-dose irradiation, only 53BP1, but not Caspase3 or γH2AX was upregulated in PLZF positive SSCs within 45 minutes. The expression level of 53BP1 gradually decreased 24 hours after irradiation. Moreover, low-dose irradiation had no effect on the cell number and apoptotic status of SSCs. However other spermatogenic cells highly expressed γH2AX shortly after irradiation which was dramatically reduced following the events of DNA repair. It appears that low-dose ionizing irradiation may cause the DNA DSB of mouse spermatogenic cells. 53BP1, but not γH2AX, is involved in the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Our data indicates that 53BP1 plays an important role in the pathophysiological repair of DNA DSB in SSCs. This may open a new avenue to understanding the mechanisms of DNA repair of SSCs and male infertility.

  3. Proliferation studies of the endothelial and smooth muscle cells of the mouse mesentery after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirst, D.G.; Denekamp, J.; Hobson, B.

    1980-01-01

    A continuous tritium labelling technique was employed to study the effects of external β-radiation on the proliferation of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in the mesenteric arterioles of mice. Calculations showed very long turnover times for the two cell populations in control animals (> 2 years for endothelium and > 3 years for smooth muscle). After single doses of 20 and 45 Gy, no significant increase in endothelial proliferation was seen except at 3 weeks. No significant increase in labelling was observed in smooth muscle up to 48 weeks after irradiation. These labelling data have been compared with the pattern of cell depletion of the irradiated endothelium. It was concluded that the depletion was much earlier than expected for a slowly proliferating tissue, if all the cells were cycling very slowly. Such an early depletion is, however, consistent with cell death resulting from a small proportion of the cells having a short cell cycle. The recovery of the endothelial cell numbers between 9 and 12 months was not accompanied by a rise in the fraction of labelled cells. It is suggested that repopulation may occur from outside the treated area. (author)

  4. Prenatal death and malformations after irradiation of mouse zygotes with neutrons or X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pampfer, S.; Streffer, C.

    1988-01-01

    Female mice (strain: Heiligenberger Stamm) were irradiated with neutrons (7 MeV) or X-rays when embryos were at the early zygote stage; uterine contents were examined on gestation day 19 for prenatal mortality and malformed fetuses. For both radiation qualities, the dose-dependent survival curve fitted well to a simple exponential equation; the neutron relative biological efficiency (RBE) value was 2.3. The major fraction of deaths induced by exposure to neutrons or X-rays occurred before implantation. Aside from dead embryos, malformed fetuses were observed 19 days p.c. (postconception). The number of malformed fetuses increased with a linear-quadratic function of neutron or X-ray dose. Malformations were mainly gastroschisis, although omphaloceles and anencephalies were also observed. The neutron RBE value for the induction of malformations varied from 2.0 to 2.8 in the dose range tested. Except after 75-cGy neutrons, no significant increase in the proportion of stunted or skeletally malformed fetuses was noted. Our results indicated that the reaction of preimplantation embryos to irradiation could be more complex than the simple all-or-none response considered so far

  5. Focused microwave irradiation-assisted immunohistochemistry to study effects of ketamine on phospho-ERK expression in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alda; Li, Yu-Wen

    2017-09-01

    Ketamine produces rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects in depressive patients. Preclinical studies demonstrate that ketamine stimulates AMPA receptor transmission and activates BDNF/TrkB-Akt/ERK-mTOR signaling cascades, leading to a sustained increase in synaptic protein synthesis and strengthening of synaptic plasticity, a potential mechanism underlying the antidepressant effects. The purpose of this study was to develop an immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay to map the distribution of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in the mouse brain in response to systemic ketamine treatment. We established a focused microwave irradiation-assisted IHC assay to detect phosphorylated (phospho) proteins including phospho-ERK, phospho- cAMP-response- element-binding protein (CREB), phospho- glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) and phospho- calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) with greater sensitivity and reproducibility in comparison to conventional IHC methods. A single dose of ketamine produced a robust, dose- and time-dependent increase in phospho-ERK immunoreactive (phospho-ERK-ir) neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the central nucleus of the amygdala. Phospho-ERK-ir neurons in the mPFC were primarily located in the prelimbic and anterior cingulate subregions with the morphology resembling pyramidal neurons. An increase in phospho-ERK-ir was also observed in the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus. The NMDA GluN2B subtype receptor antagonist Ro 25-6981 increased phospho-ERK expression in the brain in a similar pattern as ketamine. In summary, we have established a sensitive and reliable focused microwave irradiation-assisted IHC assay, and defined the activation pattern of ERK, in response to systemic ketamine and Ro 25-6981 treatment, in brain regions that are potentially responsible for mediating the antidepressant effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Developmental abnormalities of the vitreous in mouse fetuses caused by simultaneous irradiation of x-rays and ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, S; Yuguchi, S; Majima, A [Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-10-01

    Eye abnormalities in mouse fetuses caused by irradiation of X-rays alone, or simultaneous irradiation of X-rays and ultrasound on day 7 of gestation were histologically studied on day 18 of gestation. Developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were examined in the present experiment, and the following results were obtained. 1. Developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were observed in 23 fetuses, and unilateral cases were 15 of 23 fetuses. In 31 eyes with these abnormalities, much more abundant mesenchymal tissue of components of primary vitreous was found in the retrolental vitreous cavity than in the normal eyes. 2. The above 31 eyes were also accompanied by a variety of ocular abnormalities such as microphthalmia, faulty closure of the fetal fissure, aplasia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve, goniodysgenesis, and corneolenticular adhesion. Complications observed to be associated with developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were lens abnormalities, retinal traction and fold, fibrovascular anastomosis between mesenchymal tissues of the chamber angle and vitreous cavity, retinal rosette, and anomalies of the optic nerve head. 3. The histological findings of 17 eyes corresponded to anterior persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) encountered clinically, those of 3 eyes to posterior PHPV, those of 6 eyes to mixed type of both anterior and posterior types, and those of 5 eyes to PHPV of the optic nerve head. In 3 bilateral cases, the type was different for either eye. 4. From these results, it was considered that the pathogenesis of PHPV of Reese and congenital retinal fold of Mann consists of the maldevelopment of the components of the primary vitreous, and that the type of defect depends on the portion involved and the degree depends on the time at which the maldevelopment occurs.

  7. Developmental abnormalities of the vitreous in mouse fetuses caused by simultaneous irradiation of x-rays and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Shoichiro; Yuguchi, Shuji; Majima, Akio

    1980-01-01

    Eye abnormalities in mouse fetuses caused by irradiation of X-rays alone, or simultaneous irradiation of X-rays and ultrasound on day 7 of gestation were histologically studied on day 18 of gestation. Developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were examined in the present experiment, and the following results were obtained. 1. Developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were observed in 23 fetused, and unilateral cases were 15 of 23 fetuses. In 31 eyes with these abnormalities, much more abundant mesenchymal tissue of components of primary vitreous was found in the retrolental vitreous cavity than in the normal eyes. 2. The above 31 eyes were also accompanied by a variety of ocular abnormalities such as microphthalmia, faulty closure of the fetal fissure, aplasia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve, goniodysgenesis, and corneolenticular adhesion. Complications observed to be associated with developmental abnormalities of the vitreous were lens abnormalities, retinal traction and fold, fibrovascular anastomosis between mesenchymal tissues of the chamber angle and vitrious cavity, retinal rosette, and anomalies of the optic nerve head. 3. The histological findings of 17 eyes corresponded to anterior persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) encountered clinically, those of 3 eyes to posterior PHPV, those of 6 eyes to mixed type of both anterior and posterior types, and those of 5 eyes to PHPV of the optic nerve head. In 3 bilateral cases, the type was different for either eye. 4. From these results, it was considered that the pathogenesis of PHPV of Reese and congenital retinal fold of Mann consists of the maldevelopment of the components of the primary vitreous, and that the type of defect is depends on the portion involved and the degree depends on the time at which the maldevelopment occurs. (author)

  8. Biosynthesis of collagen in the lung of the mouse after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walklin, C.M.; Law, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Increases in the activities of both prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P-4-Hase) and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) were observed as early as 1 month after 5-9 Gy. Maximal increases were observed at 6-7 months after 9 Gy and persisted up to 15 months after exposure. Increases after 5 and 7.5 Gy were more gradual but by 1 year after irradiation they had reached levels similar to those after 9 Gy. Collagen types were analysed at 2, 7.5 and 15 months. Results are shown for 7.5 and 15 months after 9 Gy. Although the total collagen content was increased, the ratio of collagen type I to III was normal. (UK)

  9. The development and characterization of two types of chronic responses in irradiated mouse colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis to be tested is that there are two distinct types of chronic responses in irradiated normal tissues, each resulting from damage to different cell populations in the tissue. The first is a sequela of chronic epithelial depletion in which the tissue's integrity cannot be maintained. The other response is due to cell loss in the connective tissue and/or vascular stroma, i.e. a 'primary' chronic response. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis in the murine colon by first, establishing a model of each chronic response and then, by determining whether the responses differed in timing of expression, histology, and expression of specific collagen types. The model of late damage used was colonic obstructions/strictures induced by a single dose of 27 Gy ('consequential' response) and two equal doses of 14.75 Gy (t = 10 days) ('primary' response). 'Consequential' lesions appeared as early as 5 weeks after 27 Gy and were characterized by a deep mucosal ulceration and a thickened fibrotic serosa containing excessive accumulations of collagen types I and III. Both types were commingled in the scar at the base of the ulcer. Fibroblasts were synthesizing pro-collagen types I and III mRNA 10 weeks prior to measurable increases in collagen. A significant decrease in the ratio of collagen types I:III was associated with the 'consequential' response at 4-5 months post-irradiation. The 'primary' response, on the other hand, did not appear until 40 weeks after the split dose even though the total dose delivered was approximately the same as that for the 'consequential' response. The 'primary' response was characterized with an intact mucosa and a thickened fibrotic submucosa which contained excessive amounts of only collagen type I. An increased number of fibroblasts were synthesizing pro-collagen type I mRNA nearly 25 weeks before collage type I levels were increased

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of mouse intestinal mucosa after cobalt 60 and D-T neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.R.; Toner, P.G.; Nias, A.H.W.

    1976-01-01

    The stem-cell population of the intestinal crypt is an important model system in experimental radiobiology. Standardized techniques have been developed to allow quantitation of the response of crypt cells to radiation injury following doses of 0 to 2 krad of D-T neutrons or 60 Co γ rays. These techniques rely on the identification of regenerating crypt cells three-and-a-half days after irradiation. The results were expressed as the number of regenerating crypts per circumference of small intestine, as determined by conventional histological examination; the more profound the injury, the smaller the the crypt count. The practical relevance of crypt-counting techniques to clinical radiotherapy is limited by their relative insensitivity; the dose levels commonly used in fractionated radiotherapy produced no detectable response. Scanning electron microscopy of the mucosal surface provided a more sensitive measure of radiation injury. The earliest detectable changes occurred at the level of 300 rad of γ radiation, well below the threshold of the crypt-counting technique. At around 1,000 rad, where the first drop in crypt counts occurred, there were well-marked morphological changes which became more severe with increasing dose levels. Some differences have been observed between the morphological effects of γ and neutron irradiation at points of radiobiological equivalence in terms of crypt counts (using RBE value of about 2). The changes observed may reflect more than the disruption of epithelial cell kinetics. Mucosal morphology is the total expression of many different biological parameters of which the regenerative ability of the crypt cells is only one. The surface microanatomy of the gut may be the most sensitive indicator of radiation injury which is conveniently available for study. (author)

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of mouse intestinal mucosa after cobalt 60 and D-T neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, R [Belvidere Hospital, Glasgow (UK). Institute of Radiotherapeutics and Oncology; Carr, K R; Toner, P G; Nias, A H.W.

    1976-07-01

    The stem-cell population of the intestinal crypt is an important model system in experimental radiobiology. Standardized techniques have been developed to allow quantitation of the response of crypt cells to radiation injury following doses of 0 to 2 krad of D-T neutrons or /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. These techniques rely on the identification of regenerating crypt cells three-and-a-half days after irradiation. The results were expressed as the number of regenerating crypts per circumference of small intestine, as determined by conventional histological examination; the more profound the injury, the smaller the the crypt count. The practical relevance of crypt-counting techniques to clinical radiotherapy is limited by their relative insensitivity; the dose levels commonly used in fractionated radiotherapy produced no detectable response. Scanning electron microscopy of the mucosal surface provided a more sensitive measure of radiation injury. The earliest detectable changes occurred at the level of 300 rad of ..gamma.. radiation, well below the threshold of the crypt-counting technique. At around 1,000 rad, where the first drop in crypt counts occurred, there were well-marked morphological changes which became more severe with increasing dose levels. Some differences have been observed between the morphological effects of ..gamma.. and neutron irradiation at points of radiobiological equivalence in terms ofCrypt counts (using RBE value of about 2). The changes observed may reflect more than the disruption of epithelial cell kinetics. Mucosal morphology is the total expression of many different biological parameters of which the regenerative ability of the crypt cells is only one. The surface microanatomy of the gut may be the most sensitive indicator of radiation injury which is conveniently available for study.

  12. Reduction in sperm count and increase in abnormal sperm in the mouse following x-irradiation or injection of 22Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, A.; Moore, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    The accumulated reduction in sperm count and increase in the number of aberrant sperm in the mouse were used to compare acute X-irradiation with protracted radiation from an injection of 22 Na. The effects per unit of absorbed dose of acute and protracted radiation were similar on sperm count, but in respect of numbers of abnormal sperm the 22 Na induced a significantly greater maximum than X-rays. (author)

  13. Effect of radiation dose rate and cyclophosphamide on pulmonary toxicity after total body irradiation in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safwat, Akmal; Nielsen, Ole S.; El-Badawy, Samy; Overgaard, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is still a major complication after total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). It is difficult to determine the exact role of radiation in this multifactorial complication, especially because most of the experimental work on lung damage was done using localized lung irradiation and not TBI. We have thus tested the effect of radiation dose rate and combining cyclophosphamide (CTX) with single fraction TBI on lung damage in a mouse model for BMT. Methods and Materials: TBI was given as a single fraction at a high dose rate (HDR, 0.71 Gy/min) or a low dose rate (LDR, 0.08 Gy/min). CTX (250 mg/kg) was given 24 h before TBI. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed 4-6 h after the last treatment. Lung damage was assessed using ventilation rate (VR) and lethality between 28 and 180 days (LD (50(28))-180 ). Results: The LD 50 for lung damage, ± standard error (SE), increased from 12.0 (± 0.2) Gy using single fraction HDR to 15.8 (± 0.6) Gy using LDR. Adding CTX shifted the dose-response curves towards lower doses. The LD 50 values for the combined treatment were 5.3 (± 0.2) and 3.5 (± 0.2) Gy for HDR and LDR, respectively. This indicates that the combined effect of CTX and LDR was more toxic than that of combined CTX and HDR. Lung damage evaluated by VR demonstrated two waves of VR increase. The first wave of VR increase occurred after 6 weeks using TBI only and after 3 weeks in the combined CTX-TBI treatment, irrespective of total dose or dose rate. The second wave of VR elevation resembled the IP that follows localized thoracic irradiation in its time of occurrence. Conclusions: Lung damage following TBI could be spared using LDR. However, CTX markedly enhances TBI-induced lung damage. The combination of CTX and LDR is more toxic to the lungs than combining CTX and HDR

  14. WE-EF-BRA-10: Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Reduces the Incidence of Brain Metastasis in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancerr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D; Debeb, B; Larson, R; Diagaradjane, P; Woodward, W [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is a clinical technique used to reduce the incidence of brain metastasis and improve overall survival in select patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and small-cell lung cancer. We examined whether PCI could benefit breast cancer patients at high risk of developing brain metastases. Methods: We utilized our mouse model in which 500k green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled breast cancer cells injected into the tail vein of SCID/Beige mice resulted in brain metastases in approximately two-thirds of untreated mice. To test the efficacy of PCI, one set of mice was irradiated five days after cell injection with a single fraction of 4-Gy (two 2-Gy opposing fields) whole-brain irradiation on the XRAD 225Cx small-animal irradiator. Four controls were included: a non-irradiated group, a group irradiated two days prior to cell injection, and two groups irradiated 3 or 6 weeks after cell injection. Mice were sacrificed four and eight weeks post-injection and were evaluated for the presence of brain metastases on a fluorescent stereomicroscope. Results: The incidence of brain metastasis in the non-irradiated group was 77% and 90% at four and eight weeks, respectively. The PCI group had a significantly lower incidence, 20% and 30%, whereas the other three control groups had incidence rates similar to the non-treated control (70% to 100%). Further, the number of metastases and the metastatic burden were also significantly lower in the PCI group compared to all other groups. Conclusion: The timing of irradiation to treat subclinical disease is critical, as a small dose of whole-brain irradiation given five days after cell injection abrogated tumor burden by greater than 90%, but had no effect when administered twenty-one days after cell injection. PCI is likely to benefit breast cancer patients at high risk of developing brain metastases and should be strongly considered in the clinic.

  15. Enzymatic method for the sensitive demonstration of postnatal effects caused by prenatal X-irradiation in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, L.W.D.; Schmahl, W.G.; Kriegel, H.

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the activities (per gram of wet tissue) of mouse brain acetylcholinesterase and Na, K-ATPase, with respect to the effects brought about by a prenatal X-ray dose. Pregnant NMRI mice received an X-ray dose of 0.24, 0.49, 0.95 or 1.9 Gy each on the 12th day of gestation. Investigations on the offspring were performed on the day of birth and the postnatal days 2, 5, 8, 12, 16, 23, 34, 48 and 64, respectively. The brain weights were reduced by the X-ray treatment dose - dependently and without recovery. This was well discernible after 0.24 Gy and reached about 40% reduction after 1.9 Gy. There were significant differences between irradiated and control enzyme activities on most of the days examined. On the 48th postnatal day both enzymes' activities were thoroughly elevated after 0.24 and 0.49 Gy. This could be reproduced in another test series with 0.49 Gy, but vanished when enzyme activities were related to the brain protein contents. As a more reliable parameter of the developmental age brain weights were compared to the corresponding enzyme activities. (orig./MG)

  16. Biochemical transformation of deoxythymidine kinase-deficient mouse cells with uv-irradiated equine herpesvirus type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.P.; McGowan, J.J.; Gentry, G.A.; Randall, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    A line of 3T3 mouse cells lacking deoxythymidine kinase (dTK - ) was stably transformed to the dTK + phenotype after exposure to uv-irradiated equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1). Biochemical transformants were isolated in a system selective for the dTK + phenotype (Eagle minimal essential medium containing 10 -4 M hypoxanthine, 6 x 10 -7 M aminopterin, and 2 x 10 -5 M deoxythymidine). Transformation was accompanied by the acquisition of a dTK activity with immunological, electrophoretic, and biochemical characteristics identical to those of the dTK induced by EHV-1 during productive infection. The transformed cells have been maintained in selective culture medium for more than 50 passages and have retained the capacity to express EHV-1-specific antigens. Spontaneous release of infectious virus has not been detected in the transformed lines, and the cells were not oncogenic for athymic nude mice. In contrast to normal dTK + 3T3 cells, EHV-1 transformants were unable to grow in the presence of arabinosylthymine, a drug selectively phosphorylated by herpesvirus-coded dTK's. These results indicate that a portion of the EHV-1 genome is able to persist in the transformed cells for many generations and be expressed as an enzymatically active viral gene product

  17. Studies on induction of apoptosis in mouse Peyer's patches by whole body X-irradiation and its mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of apoptosis-related genes in mouse Peyer's patches and its molecular mechanism after whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays. Methods: Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to observe the morphology and structure of Peyer's patches and flow cytometry (FCM) was used to detect the changes of Bcl-x L and Fas-L proteins. Results: The apoptosis in Peyer's patches was increased after 2 Gy X-rays and decreased after 75 mGy X-rays. The expression of Bcl-x L protein was decreased and the expression of Fas-L protein was increased in Peyer's patches after WBI with 2 Gy X-rays, whereas the former increased and the latter decreased after WBI with 75 mGy. Conclusion: Apoptosis-related genes such as Bcl-x L , Fas-L might play an important role in regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis in Peyer's patches

  18. Effect of time between x-irradiation and chemotherapy on the growth of three solid mouse tumors. V. Bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twentyman, P.R.; Kallman, R.F.; Brown, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the effect of different time intervals between the administration of x-radiation (1200 rad) and bleomycin (20 mg/kg) on the growth delay produced in three mouse tumors. The tumors used were the EMT6 tumor in BALB/c mice and the KHT and RIF-1 sarcomas in C3H mice. All tumors were grown intramuscularly in the gastrocnemius muscle and treatment was carried out at a mean tumor weight of 450 mg. Time to reach 2X (for KHT) or 4X (for EMT6 and RIF-1) treatment volume was used as the endpoint of response. The drug was administered by the intraperitoneal route either 24, 6, or 2 hr before radiation, immediately before the start of radiation, or 3, 6, or 24 hr after radiation. All irradiations were carried out in unanesthetized mice. For a single administration at this dose level, bleomycin alone did not produce a significant growth delay in any of the tumors. In the RIF-1 tumor, growth delays following combination treatments were equal to the addition of the single agent growth delays. In two experiments with EMT6, contrary results were obtained, one producing longer delays following combination treatments than predicted and the other producing shorter delays. This is apparently due to the variability in the growth delay after treatment with radiation alone for this tumor. For the KHT tumor, only small differences from the addition of single agent delays were seen

  19. Pathologic characteristics of gut-associated lymphoid tissues and lymphocyte apoptosis in mouse intestine after neutron-and γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Kaifei; Peng Ruiyun; Gao Yabing; Wang Dewen; Chen Haoyu; Wu Xiaohong; Yang Yi; Hu Wenhua; Ma Junjie

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the pathologic characteristics of gut-associated lymphoid tissues and lymphocyte apoptosis in neutron-irradiated mouse small intestines with those in γ-irradiated ones. Methods: Altogether 350 BALB/c mice were irradiated with different doses of neutrons or γ-rays, and were sacrificed on 6 h,12 h,125 d, 7 d, 14 d, 21 d and 28 d after irradiation and their total intestines were removed. Then the pathologic changes and death mode of lymphocytes in gut-associated lymphoid tissues were studied comparatively with light microscopy, electron microscopy and in situ terminal labeling method. Results: The basic pathologic changes of gut-associated lymphoid tissues after neutron irradiation included degeneration, apoptosis and necrosis of lymphocytes. The number of lymphocytes also decreased. There was no obvious regeneration after 4.0 and 5.5 Gy neutron irradiation, while after 2.5 Gy regeneration and recovery appeared, which were, there fore, dose-dependent. In the 2.5 Gy neutron group, the numbers of lymphocytes of intramucosal and submucous lymphoid tissues decreased, and karyopyknosis and a great quantity of nuclear fragments could also be observed at 6 h-3 d after irradiation. However, on the 3rd day regeneration of crypt epithelial cells appeared. On the 5th day hyperplasia of submucous lymphocytic tissues appeared, but recovery to normal level was not achieved till 14 d after irradiation. The basic pathologic changes after γ-irradiation were similar to that of neutron irradiation. Regeneration and recovery appeared in the 5.5 Gy group while no obvious regeneration in the 12.0 Gy group. The results of in situ terminal labeling indicated that at 6 h after irradiation the number of apoptotic cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues of each group increased obviously, while in 4.0 Gy neutron group and 12.0 Gy γ-ray group it was more abundant. Conclusion: Both 2.5-5.5 Gy neutron and 5.5-12.0 Gy γ-ray irradiation can induce obvious injuries in gut

  20. Differences in susceptibility among mouse strains to infection with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA clone) sporozoites and its relationship to protection by gamma-irradiated sporozoites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, R.I.; Lowell, G.H.; Gordon, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Three inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6 (H-2b), A/J (H-2a), and BALB/c (H-2d), and 1 outbred strain, CD-1, demonstrated differences in susceptibility to iv challenge with the ANKA clone of Plasmodium berghei. Mice were challenged with 100, 1,000, or 10,000 sporozoites, then evaluated daily beginning on day 4 for patency. CD-1 mice were further evaluated at challenge doses of 12,500, 25,000, and 50,000 sporozoites. C57BL/6 mice were the easiest to infect, with 90% becoming infected with 100 sporozoites. The outbred strain CD-1 was the most difficult to infect, requiring a challenge dose of 25,000 sporozoites/mouse in order to achieve a 100% infection rate. Mouse strains also demonstrated differences in their ability to be protected by intravenous immunization with gamma-irradiated sporozoites. A/J mice needed a minimum of 3 doses of irradiated sporozoites for protection against a challenge with 10,000 sporozoites. In contrast, BALB/c mice immunized with a single dose of 1,000 irradiated sporozoites are protected against a 10,000 sporozoite challenge. These data suggest that both infectivity and protection are genetically restricted and that susceptibility to infection may be inversely related to protection

  1. A Comparison of Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton- or Gamma-Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgason, Ashley; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    There are many consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment which can adversely affect the health of a crew member. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) involving nausea and vomiting, damage to radio-sensitive tissue such as the blood forming organs and gastrointestinal tract, and cancer are some of these negative effects. The space radiation environment is ample with protons and contains gamma rays as well. Little knowledge exists to this point, however, regarding the effects of protons on mammalian systems; conversely several studies have been performed observing the effects of gamma rays on different animal models. For the research presented here, we wish to compare our previous work looking at whole-body exposure to protons using a mouse model to our studies of mice experiencing whole-body exposure to gamma rays as part of the radio-adaptive response. Radio-adaptation is a well-documented phenomenon in which cells exposed to a priming low dose of radiation prior to a higher dose display a reduction in endpoints like chromosomal aberrations, cell death, micronucleus formation, and more when compared to their counterparts receiving high dose-irradiation only. Our group has recently completed a radio-adaptive experiment with C57BL/6 mice. For both this study and the preceding proton research, the gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest doses of 0.1 Gy of protons and 0.05 Gy of gamma rays, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. A smaller percentage of crypts showed 3 or more apoptotic lesions in animals that received 6 Gy of gamma-irradiation compared to mice

  2. Lack of correlation between villus and crypt damage in irradiated mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.W.; Watt, C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been observed that scanning electron microscopy is a more sensitive indicator of mucosal damage at low radiation dose levels than conventional quantitative crypt counting techniques. Three different fractionation schedules were subjected to investigation by both of these methods to try and elucidate some features of irradiation damage to the whole of the intestinal mucosa, at dose levels commonly used in clinical practice. Despite variations in the qualitative observations, there was a marked difference in two of the schedules between damage expressed as crypt counts and that described by the qualitative techniques. In the first case high crypt numbers were associated with severe mucosal damage, whereas the second schedule produced a reduced crypt count in association with low damage to the surface mucosa. A third schedule produced results in which there was a general agreement between low crypt numbers and considerable surface mucosal damage. However, observations were made of mucosal formations not previously seen on damaged mucosa; surfaces. These resembled the appearance normally associated with the gut of patients suffering from coeliac disease. Variations in the qualitative observations were seen in the schedules so that their interpretation in terms of perturbation of cellular kinetics is difficult. (author)

  3. Dysplasia of the temporo-maxillary joint of mouse embryos due to x-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Shigeo

    1974-01-01

    On the 9-13 pregnant days of ddN mice 200-300 R of X-ray was daily irradiated, and observations were made on the formation of micro-mandible and changes in the temporo-maxillary joint in the embryos on the 18th pregnant day using skeletal and H-E stain specimens. Gross observation revealed the emergence of observable micro-mandible in groups exposed to 200 R on the 10th and 11th pregnant days and in groups exposed to 300 R on the 11th and 12th pregnant days. By skeletal specimens also, micro-mandible was observed in groups exposed on and after the 10th pregnant day, and anomaly of the malar arch was frequently associated with anomaly of the mandibular branches and growth inhibition of the anterior region of the mandible. Histologically, there were observed embryos totally lacking the temporo-maxillary joint composing elements, resulting in fusion with the temporal bone, or embryos lacking the elements partially or complicated by anomaly of cartilagious tissue of the mandibular head. (Mukohata, S.)

  4. Effects of ACNU and cranial irradiation on the mouse immune system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Ryuya; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Takeda, Norio; Satoh, Mitsuya [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.

    1993-02-01

    The effects of 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)-methyl- 3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea (ACNU) and cranial irradiation on the immune system were studied in three groups of 90 mice: Group A, intraperitoneal injection of ACNU (30 mg/kg); Group B, single exposure of 10 Gy to the head; and Group C, intraperitoneal injection of ACNU (30 mg/kg) and single exposure of 10 Gy to the head. Peripheral white blood cell counts, spleen cell subsets, natural killer (NK) cell activity, lymphocyte blastogenesis, and production of interferon (IFN)-[gamma] were analyzed once a week for 6 weeks after treatment. In Group A, NK cell activity decreased between weeks 4-5, concanavalin A blastogenesis decreased during weeks 1-5, and the levels of L3T4 (CD4) and Lyt2 cells (CD8) and IFN-[gamma] production decreased during weeks 2-5. However, all tested parameters returned to the normal range at 6 weeks. In Group B, all parameters except for the L3T4 cell level and the IFN-[gamma] production decreased during week 1, and returned to the normal range thereafter. The concentration of L3T4 cells decreased during week 2 and between weeks 5-6. The IFN-[gamma] production increased during week 1, decreased during week 2, and returned to the normal range thereafter. In Group C, the suppressive effects were severe and continued for a longer period than in either Group A or B. Concanavalin A blastogenesis, L3T4 cell concentration, and IFN-[gamma] production were still suppressed after 6 weeks. Therefore, intensive radiochemotherapy for brain tumor may suppress the immunological function. (author).

  5. Analysis of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations at the first and second mitosis after X irradiation of two-cell mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenborn, U.; Streffer, C.

    1989-01-01

    Two-cell mouse embryos were X-irradiated in the late G2 phase in vivo. The first and second postradiation mitoses were analyzed for chromosomal anomalies. The majority of structural aberrations visible at the first mitosis after irradiation were chromatid breaks and chromatid gaps; only a few interchanges and dicentrics were observed. The aberration frequency resulted in a dose-effect relationship which was well described by a linear model. At the second mitosis 29% of the structural aberrations of the first mitosis were counted; the aberration quality changed only slightly. It is discussed whether these aberrations are to be considered new, derived, or unchanged transmitted aberrations. Contrary to the results obtained after irradiation of one-cell embryos, little chromosome loss was induced by radiation in two-cell embryos

  6. Induction of a Radio-Adaptive Response by Low-dose Gamma Irradiation in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Christian M.; Seawright, John W.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) 137Cs gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive response that mitigates the reduction in genetic expression associated with single high-dose gamma radiation exposure. This radio-adaptive response may serve as a potential countermeasure to radiation-induced myocardial remodeling and preserve the cardiovascular health of

  7. Radiotherapy-induced anti-tumor immunity contributes to the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation and can be augmented by CTLA-4 blockade in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Yoshimoto

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is growing evidence that tumor-specific immune responses play an important role in anti-cancer therapy, including radiotherapy. Using mouse tumor models we demonstrate that irradiation-induced anti-tumor immunity is essential for the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation and can be augmented by modulation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity. METHODS AND MATERIALS: C57BL/6 mice, syngeneic EL4 lymphoma cells, and Lewis lung carcinoma (LL/C cells were used. Cells were injected into the right femurs of mice. Ten days after inoculation, tumors were treated with 30 Gy of local X-ray irradiation and their growth was subsequently measured. The effect of irradiation on tumor growth delay (TGD was defined as the time (in days for tumors to grow to 500 mm3 in the treated group minus that of the untreated group. Cytokine production and serum antibodies were measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. RESULTS: In the EL4 tumor model, tumors were locally controlled by X-ray irradiation and re-introduced EL4 cells were completely rejected. Mouse EL4-specific systemic immunity was confirmed by splenocyte cytokine production and detection of tumor-specific IgG1 antibodies. In the LL/C tumor model, X-ray irradiation also significantly delayed tumor growth (TGD: 15.4 days and prolonged median survival time (MST to 59 days (versus 28 days in the non-irradiated group. CD8(+ cell depletion using an anti-CD8 antibody significantly decreased the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation (TGD, 8.7 days; MST, 49 days. Next, we examined whether T cell modulation affected the efficacy of radiotherapy. An anti-CTLA-4 antibody significantly increased the anti-tumor activity of radiotherapy (TGD was prolonged from 13.1 to 19.5 days, while anti-FR4 and anti-GITR antibodies did not affect efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that tumor-specific immune responses play an important role in the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation. Immunomodulation, including CTLA-4

  8. Radiotherapy-Induced Anti-Tumor Immunity Contributes to the Therapeutic Efficacy of Irradiation and Can Be Augmented by CTLA-4 Blockade in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Yuya; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Mimura, Kousaku; Ando, Ken; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Takanori; Izawa, Shinichiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Fujii, Hideki; Kono, Koji; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose There is growing evidence that tumor-specific immune responses play an important role in anti-cancer therapy, including radiotherapy. Using mouse tumor models we demonstrate that irradiation-induced anti-tumor immunity is essential for the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation and can be augmented by modulation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Methods and Materials C57BL/6 mice, syngeneic EL4 lymphoma cells, and Lewis lung carcinoma (LL/C) cells were used. Cells were injected into the right femurs of mice. Ten days after inoculation, tumors were treated with 30 Gy of local X-ray irradiation and their growth was subsequently measured. The effect of irradiation on tumor growth delay (TGD) was defined as the time (in days) for tumors to grow to 500 mm3 in the treated group minus that of the untreated group. Cytokine production and serum antibodies were measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results In the EL4 tumor model, tumors were locally controlled by X-ray irradiation and re-introduced EL4 cells were completely rejected. Mouse EL4-specific systemic immunity was confirmed by splenocyte cytokine production and detection of tumor-specific IgG1 antibodies. In the LL/C tumor model, X-ray irradiation also significantly delayed tumor growth (TGD: 15.4 days) and prolonged median survival time (MST) to 59 days (versus 28 days in the non-irradiated group). CD8(+) cell depletion using an anti-CD8 antibody significantly decreased the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation (TGD, 8.7 days; MST, 49 days). Next, we examined whether T cell modulation affected the efficacy of radiotherapy. An anti-CTLA-4 antibody significantly increased the anti-tumor activity of radiotherapy (TGD was prolonged from 13.1 to 19.5 days), while anti-FR4 and anti-GITR antibodies did not affect efficacy. Conclusions Our results indicate that tumor-specific immune responses play an important role in the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation. Immunomodulation, including CTLA-4 blockade, may be a

  9. Late division kinetics in relation to modification of protein synthesis in mouse eggs blocked in the G2 phase after X-irradiation; and comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinfeld, S.; Gilles, J.; Jacquet, P.; Baugnet-Mahieu, L.; Rowley, R.

    1987-01-01

    Mouse zygotes (BALB/c blocked in the G 2 phase of the first cell cycle after X-irradiation were allowed to develop in culture medium. Delayed cleavage occurred at the same time in embryos exposed to 1 or 2 Gy and late division coincided with the second division in controls. Two dimensional electrophoresis showed that blocked irradiated embryos underwent the same modifications in protein synthesis as control embryos of the same age, except during first mitosis, for three polypeptide sets of 30, 35 and 45 kilodaltons molecular weight. The most remarkable difference between them was the appearance in cleaving controls of three spots at 35 kilodaltons that were absent in blocked irradiated embryos. It is assumed that blocked embryos 'missed' some signal necessary for cell division, but remained ready to cleave when a second signal occurred. Eggs from the BALB/c strain were particularly susceptible to this effect of X-irradiation but it was also found in eggs from other strains, irradiated with much higher doses. The accompanying comment by Rowley discusses the point of interruption of the control mechanism and the nature of the lesions involved. (author)

  10. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasinska, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. α/β coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction α/β for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). α/β coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method α/β for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of α/β coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F r ) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50% for early and 63% for late effects. In case of

  11. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  12. A study on relation between nitroxyl radical reduction potency and X-ray irradiation on mouse lung using L-band electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneike, Makoto; Sho, Keizen; Morita, Rikushi

    1999-01-01

    Changes in nitroxy radical reduction potency (''reduction potency''), caused by different doses and different number of fractions of X-ray irradiation were studied using a L-band electron spin resonance system on mouse lungs into which 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (hydroxy-TEMPO) was introduced through the trachea. The ''reduction potency'' lineally decreased as the irradiation dose increased from 1.0 to 5.0 Gy, but no further decrease was observed at higher doses of 7.5 and 10 Gy. The reduction potency'' dropped at 20 min after each irradiation, but it recovered to the control levels after 1 week in all 3 groups of single dose of 10 Gy, 3 fractions and 5 fractions in a similar manner. Although the levels of the ''reduction potency'' were kept high in the groups of fractionated irradiation through 1-4 weeks after irradiation, the levels dropped again in the single dose group at 1 week and the levels were kept significantly low until 4 weeks after irradiation. suggesting that the fractionation of X-ray irradiation would also be effective to prevent the deterioration of the ''reduction potency''. Pre-treatment with sufficient ascorbic acid inhibited the lowering effects of radiation on the ''reduction potency'' in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore the levels of the reduction potency'' ever elevated higher than those of controls with the large amount of ascorbic acid of 750 mg/kg or more, suggesting that the large amounts of ascorbic acid could prevent the adverse effects associated with radiation therapy for the lung malignancy. (author)

  13. The influence of mouse vaccination with endogenous retrovirus on the development of tumor incluced by γ-irradiation or 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthrocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurenko, N.P.; Yakovleva, L.S.; Shcherbak, N.P.; Pavlovskaya, A.I.; Zueva, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    Mouse vaccination with alive endogenous N-tropic virus OA-3 inhibited and decreased the development of the Rauscher leukemia in C57B1/6 mice (B-type) and SWR mice (N-type) as well as development 7,12-dimethyl benzanthracene (DMBA) induced tumours in mouse hybrides (neither N-, nor B-types). The effect of vaccination was DMBA- or MLV-P-dose-dependent. Vaccination with the same virus did not affect the incidence of γ-irradiaton-induced leukemia in CBA mice (N-type) and C57B1/6 mice while it increased twice the incidence of radiation leukemia in DBA mice (N-type). However, the incidence of thymomas lowered in radiaton leukemia-bearing vaccinated mice of all the 3 strains, which may result from inhibition of murine thymotropic endogenous virus reproduction. The data obtained indicate the participation of murine own endogenous viruses in DMBA- or γ-irradiation induced carcinogenesis

  14. The effect of x-ray irradiation on proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira

    1980-01-01

    To elucidate radiation injuries and the recovery mechanism of epithelial cells exposed to 150 R or 450 R of x-ray, the epidermal proliferative unit (EPU) in the backs of mice was analysed histologically and dynamically by measuring the labelled index of cells with 3 H-thymidine and measuring differentiation index of cells. EPU was normal for 6 days after irradiation with both 150 R and 450 R. However, partial hyperplasia and EPU disorders in a range consistent with hyperplasia appeared in segmented preparations 7 days after irradiation. Both doses inhibited cell differentiation for 5 days after irradiation. Cell proliferation, which was higher than the normal rate, peaked 7 days after irradiation with 150 R and 9 days after irradiation with 540 R. Cell proliferation returned to normal 10 days after irradiation. DNA synthesis was inhibited one day after irradiation with both 150 R and 450 R, but it returned to normal 3 days after irradiation. There was an overshoot of DNA synthesis, but synthesis returned to normal 9 days after irradiation with 150 R and 12 days after irradiation with 450 R. EPU disorders returned to normal according to normalization of cell differentiation and DNA synthesis. (Tsunoda, M.)

  15. Up-regulation of calreticulin in mouse liver tissues after long-term irradiation with low-dose-rate gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lan; Hu, Nan; Yin, Jie; Sun, Jing; Mu, Hongxiang; Dai, Keren; Ding, Dexin

    2017-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation on normal tissues has attracted attention. Based on previous research, we observed the morphology of liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice that received irradiation dose rates increased. Additionally, differential protein expression in liver tissues was analyzed using a proteomics approach. Compared with the matched group in the 2D gel analysis of the irradiated groups, 69 proteins had ≥ 1.5-fold changes in expression. Twenty-three proteins were selected based on ≥2.5-fold change in expression, and 22 of them were meaningful for bioinformatics and protein fingerprinting analysis. These molecules were relevant to cytoskeleton processes, cell metabolism, biological defense, mitochondrial damage, detoxification and tumorigenesis. The results from real-time PCR and western blot (WB) analyses showed that calreticulin (CRT) was up-regulated in the irradiated groups, which indicates that CRT may be relevant to stress reactions when mouse livers are exposed to low-dose irradiation and that low-dose-rate ionizing radiation may pose a cancer risk. The CRT protein can be a potential candidate for low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation early-warning biomarkers. However, the underlying mechanism requires further investigation.

  16. The effect of caffeine on p53-dependent radioresponses in undifferentiated mouse embryonal carcinoma cells after X-ray and UV-irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taga, Masataka; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Shimura, Tsutomu; Uematsu, Norio; Kato, Tomohisa; Niwa, Ohtsura; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Aizawa, Shinichi; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2000-01-01

    The effect of caffeine was studied on the radioresponses of undifferentiated mouse embryonal carcinoma cells (EC cells) with or without the functional p53. The radioresponses studied included radiosensitivity, the activation of p53, apoptosis with characteristic DNA ladder formation and cell cycle progression. An undifferentiated mouse EC cell line, ECA2, and a newly established p53-deficient EC cell line, p53δ, were used in the present study. The status of the p53 gene did not significantly affect the colony survivals of undifferentiated EC cells to X-rays and UV. Although a post-irradiation treatment with caffeine sensitized both lines to X-rays marginally, the sensitization was prominent for UV regardless of the p53 status of the cells. The activation of a p53 responsible lacZ reporter construct was observed in stably transfected ECA2 cells after X-ray and UV irradiations. Caffeine suppressed the X-ray induced activation of the lacZ reporter, while it drastically enhanced the activation after UV irradiation. X-rays and UV readily triggered the apoptosis of ECA2 cells with the characteristic DNA ladder. Although UV-induced DNA ladder formation was enhanced by caffeine, that induced by X-rays was unaffected. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on the p53-dependent radioresponses were found to be agent specific: suppression for the X-ray induced and augmentation for the UV induced. In contrast to p53-proficient ECA2 cells, smear-like DNA degradation was observed for irradiated p53δ cells, suggesting the presence of a mode of cell death without DNA ladder formation. UV induction of the smear-like DNA degradation was enhanced in the presence of caffeine. Regardless of the state of the p53 gene, G1/S arrest was not observed in X-ray and UV irradiated EC cells. X-rays induced G2/M arrest in both lines, which was abrogated by caffeine, while G2/M arrest after UV was unaffected by a caffeine treatment. These results indicate that the radioresponses of undifferentiated

  17. The effect of caffeine on p53-dependent radioresponses in undifferentiated mouse embryonal carcinoma cells after X-ray and UV-irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taga, Masataka; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Shimura, Tsutomu; Uematsu, Norio; Kato, Tomohisa; Niwa, Ohtsura [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Radiation Biology Center; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Aizawa, Shinichi; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2000-09-01

    The effect of caffeine was studied on the radioresponses of undifferentiated mouse embryonal carcinoma cells (EC cells) with or without the functional p53. The radioresponses studied included radiosensitivity, the activation of p53, apoptosis with characteristic DNA ladder formation and cell cycle progression. An undifferentiated mouse EC cell line, ECA2, and a newly established p53-deficient EC cell line, p53{delta}, were used in the present study. The status of the p53 gene did not significantly affect the colony survivals of undifferentiated EC cells to X-rays and UV. Although a post-irradiation treatment with caffeine sensitized both lines to X-rays marginally, the sensitization was prominent for UV regardless of the p53 status of the cells. The activation of a p53 responsible lacZ reporter construct was observed in stably transfected ECA2 cells after X-ray and UV irradiations. Caffeine suppressed the X-ray induced activation of the lacZ reporter, while it drastically enhanced the activation after UV irradiation. X-rays and UV readily triggered the apoptosis of ECA2 cells with the characteristic DNA ladder. Although UV-induced DNA ladder formation was enhanced by caffeine, that induced by X-rays was unaffected. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on the p53-dependent radioresponses were found to be agent specific: suppression for the X-ray induced and augmentation for the UV induced. In contrast to p53-proficient ECA2 cells, smear-like DNA degradation was observed for irradiated p53{delta} cells, suggesting the presence of a mode of cell death without DNA ladder formation. UV induction of the smear-like DNA degradation was enhanced in the presence of caffeine. Regardless of the state of the p53 gene, G1/S arrest was not observed in X-ray and UV irradiated EC cells. X-rays induced G2/M arrest in both lines, which was abrogated by caffeine, while G2/M arrest after UV was unaffected by a caffeine treatment. These results indicate that the radioresponses of

  18. Immature dengue virus: a veiled pathogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela A Rodenhuis-Zybert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells infected with dengue virus release a high proportion of immature prM-containing virions. In accordance, substantial levels of prM antibodies are found in sera of infected humans. Furthermore, it has been recently described that the rates of prM antibody responses are significantly higher in patients with secondary infection compared to those with primary infection. This suggests that immature dengue virus may play a role in disease pathogenesis. Interestingly, however, numerous functional studies have revealed that immature particles lack the ability to infect cells. In this report, we show that fully immature dengue particles become highly infectious upon interaction with prM antibodies. We demonstrate that prM antibodies facilitate efficient binding and cell entry of immature particles into Fc-receptor-expressing cells. In addition, enzymatic activity of furin is critical to render the internalized immature virus infectious. Together, these data suggest that during a secondary infection or primary infection of infants born to dengue-immune mothers, immature particles have the potential to be highly infectious and hence may contribute to the development of severe disease.

  19. Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia A. Casari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Larva and pupa of Eutrypanus dorsalis (Germar, 1928, collected in trunks of Pinus elliottii Engelm., and Paratenthras martinsi Monné, 1998, collected in spathes of Scheelea phalerata (Mart. ex Spreng. Burret, are described and illustrated. Larva and pupa of Lophopoeum timbouvae Lameere, 1884, collected in Hymenaea corbaril L., Enterolobium contortisiliquum (Vell. Morong and Pterogyne nitens Tul., are redescribed and illustrated. A table with all described immatures of Lamiinae, and a comparison among the immatures of Acanthocinini are presented. Biological notes and new records are also included.

  20. Effect of vitamin E on preovulatory stage irradiated female mouse expressed as chromosomal abnormalities in generated embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, M.; Mozdarani, H.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has been carried out to investigate the effects of preovulatory stage gamma-irradiation of female mice in the absence or presence of vitamin E on numerical chromosome abnormalities in 8-cell embryos after mating with non- irradiated males. Materials and Methods: The 8-11 weeks adult female NMRl mice were whole body irradiated at preovulatory stage (post PMSG injection and about 12-18 hours before Injecting HCG) with 4 Gy gamma-rays generated from a cobalt-60 source alone or in combination with 200 IU/kg vitamin E, intraperitoneally administered one hour prior to irradiation. Soon after HCG injection super ovulated irradiated females were mated with non-irradiated males. About 68-h post coitus (p.c), 8-cell embryos were flushed from the oviducts of pregnant mice and were fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for metaphase spreads and numerical chromosome abnormalities. Results: In control embryos, 8% of metaphase plates were aneuploidy whereas in preovulatory stage irradiated female mice, about 50% of metaphase plates of embryos showed numerical chromosome aberrations (P nd meiotic division. Reduction of the frequency of chromosome aberrations in the presence of vitamin E is probably due to antioxidant effects of this vitamin, and scavenging free radicals induced by gamma-rays in mice oocytes' environment

  1. Effect of time between x-irradiation and chemotherapy on the growth of three solid mouse tumors. IV. Actinomycin-d

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twentyman, P.R.; Kallman, R.F.; Brown, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the effect of different intervals between the administration of x-radiation (1200 rad) and actinomycin-D (200 μg/kg) on the growth delay produced in three mouse tumors. The tumors used were the EMT6 tumor in BALB/c mice and the KHT and RIF-1 sarcomas in C3H mice. All tumors were grown intramuscularly in the gastrocnemius muscle, and treatment was carried out at a mean tumor weight of 450 mg. Time to reach 2 x (for KHT) or 4 x (for EMT6 and RIF-1) treatment volume was used as the endpoint of response. The drug was administered intraperitoneally either 24, 6, or 2 hr before radiation, immediately before the start of radiation, or 3, 6, or 24 hr after radiation. All irradiations were carried out in unanesthetized mice. For a single administration at this dose level (close to the maximum tolerated dose) actinomycin-D did not produce a significant delay in the growth of any of the tumors. For the RIF-1 and KHT tumors, the growth delays produced by drug/radiation combinations generally were not significantly greater than that produced by irradiation alone. For the EMT6 tumor, great variability in the growth delays of combined modality groups seen, with mean growth delays significantly longer than predicted by the radiation alone data. No consistent dependence on timing between irradiation and drug administration was seen

  2. Differences in replicon behavior between x-irradiation-sensitive L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells and A-T fibroblasts using DNA fiber autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ockey, C.H.

    1983-01-01

    Replicon behavior in radiosensitive Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) fibroblasts and mouse lymphoma L5178Y (LS) cells was studied by DNA fiber autoradiography. LS cells, irradiated at 13 Gy, showed a similar reduction in rate of DNA chain growth and initiation of replicons as did resistant (LR) cells. A progressive increase in the intensity of [ 3 H]TdR labeling of many replicons was observed after irradition in the LS cells, but not in LR cells. This indicated a reduced or absent endogenous dTTP supply after irradiation in the LS cells, implicating a defect in nucleoside precursor production. Irradiated normal human and A-T cells did not show this effect. After 2 Gy, the frequency of initiation of replicons into synthesis was temporarily reduced in the normal human but not in the A-T cells. After 20 Gy, the rate of DNA chain growth was preferentially reduced in the normal human cells, but an increase was observed in the A-T cells. This increased rate could be explained in terms of a normal supply of complexes involved in chain elongation being distributed over a reduced number of initiated replicon clusters in the A-T cells

  3. Morphological differences in the response of mouse small intestine to radiobiologically equivalent doses of X and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1984-01-01

    A scale has been developed to describe the effects of radiation on small intestinal villi. The scale has been used to compare the damage done to the villi in the period 0-5 days after irradiation by X-irradiation or neutron irradiation, using 10 Gy X-rays and 5 Gy neutrons, doses which are radiobiologically equivalent when assessed by the microcolony assay method. Use of the scale indicates that the damage done to the villi by neutrons is greater than that produced by X-rays. This has implications for the interpretation of radiobiological equivalent doses (R.B.E.). Resin light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.) have also been used to examine small intestinal damage after 10 Gy X-irradiation and 5 Gy neutron irradiation. Differences include variations in crypt shape, mitotic activity and the proportion of crypts which are heavily parasitised. As well as the differences in villous shape which have been reflected in the different values on the scoring system, there are also variations in the response of the constituent cells of the epithelial compartment of the villi. In general, the effect of the neutron irradiation is more severe than that of the X-rays, particularly as would be suggested by a simple quantitation of crypt regeneration

  4. Cytotoxic effect of x-irradiation of mouse tumor cells in the presence of Korean ginseng extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jin Ki; Kim, Jung Soo [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Junju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Seong [College of Medicine, Woosuck Univ., Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    We already reported the results that aqueous extract of Korean ginseng roots showed a marked cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated whether combined ginseng product with X-irradiation increase the cytotoxicity of tumor cells than X-irradiation or not. Fifty gram of Korean ginseng powder mixed with 1 L of distilled water was extracted with reflux flask under condition of 100 .deg. C for 5 hrs. This aqueous ginseng extract was filtered, centrifuged and then was freezed under condition of -90 .deg. C for 16-18 hrs. The freezing extract was dried with freeze drier, and then diluted. X-irradiation was given to tumor cells by 6 MeV linear accelerator. The cytotoxicity of ginseng in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenecity of fibrosarcoma (FSa ll) cells. In X-irradiation alone group, each 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy was given to tumor cells. In X-irradiation with ginseng group, 0.2 mg/mL or ginseng extract was exposed to tumor cells for 1 hour before X-irradiation. The yield for 50 g of ginseng extract which was treated with freezing drier was 3.13 g(6.3%). Cytotoxicity in vitro was measured as survival fraction which was judged from the curve, at ginseng concentration of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg/ml were 0.89{+-}0.04, 0.86{+-}0.06, 0.73{+-}0.01 and 0.09{+-}0.02, respectively. Survival fraction at X-irradiation alone of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy were 0.81{+-}0.07, 0.42{+-}0.08, 0.15{+-}0.02, 0.03{+-}0.01, respectively. But, survival fraction in combined group of X-irradiation and ginseng (0.2mg/mL) at each same radiation dose were 0.28{+-}0.01, 0.18{+-}0.03, 0.08{+-}0.02, 0.006{+-}0.002, respectively (p<0.05). The yield for ginseng extract which was treated with freezing drier was 6.3%. Cytotoxicity of Fsa II in combined ginseng with X-irradiation group was increased than that at X-irradiation alone group, and its enhancing effect seemed to be added.

  5. Cytotoxic effect of x-irradiation of mouse tumor cells in the presence of Korean ginseng extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jin Ki; Kim, Jung Soo; Choi, Dong Seong

    2000-01-01

    We already reported the results that aqueous extract of Korean ginseng roots showed a marked cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated whether combined ginseng product with X-irradiation increase the cytotoxicity of tumor cells than X-irradiation or not. Fifty gram of Korean ginseng powder mixed with 1 L of distilled water was extracted with reflux flask under condition of 100 .deg. C for 5 hrs. This aqueous ginseng extract was filtered, centrifuged and then was freezed under condition of -90 .deg. C for 16-18 hrs. The freezing extract was dried with freeze drier, and then diluted. X-irradiation was given to tumor cells by 6 MeV linear accelerator. The cytotoxicity of ginseng in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenecity of fibrosarcoma (FSa ll) cells. In X-irradiation alone group, each 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy was given to tumor cells. In X-irradiation with ginseng group, 0.2 mg/mL or ginseng extract was exposed to tumor cells for 1 hour before X-irradiation. The yield for 50 g of ginseng extract which was treated with freezing drier was 3.13 g(6.3%). Cytotoxicity in vitro was measured as survival fraction which was judged from the curve, at ginseng concentration of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg/ml were 0.89±0.04, 0.86±0.06, 0.73±0.01 and 0.09±0.02, respectively. Survival fraction at X-irradiation alone of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy were 0.81±0.07, 0.42±0.08, 0.15±0.02, 0.03±0.01, respectively. But, survival fraction in combined group of X-irradiation and ginseng (0.2mg/mL) at each same radiation dose were 0.28±0.01, 0.18±0.03, 0.08±0.02, 0.006±0.002, respectively (p<0.05). The yield for ginseng extract which was treated with freezing drier was 6.3%. Cytotoxicity of Fsa II in combined ginseng with X-irradiation group was increased than that at X-irradiation alone group, and its enhancing effect seemed to be added

  6. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Epithelial Damage by the TLR5 Agonist Entolimod in a Mouse Model of Fractionated Head and Neck Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshkov, Ilia A; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Mett, Vadim L; Hutson, Alan D; Singh, Anurag K; Gudkov, Andrei V; Burdelya, Lyudmila G

    2017-05-01

    Radiation treatment of head and neck cancer frequently causes severe collateral damage to normal tissues including mouth mucosa, salivary glands and skin. This toxicity limits the radiation dose that can be delivered and affects the patient's quality of life. Previous studies in mice and nonhuman primates showed that entolimod, a toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist derived from bacterial flagellin, effectively reduced radiation damage to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues in both total-body and local irradiation scenarios, with no protection of tumors. Here, using a mouse model, we analyzed the efficacy of entolimod administered before or after irradiation in reducing damage to normal tissues. Animals received local fractionated radiation to the head and neck area, thus modeling radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Tissue damage was evaluated through histomorphological examination of samples collected at different time points up to four weeks, mice were exposed locally to five daily fractions of 5, 6 or 7 Gy. A semiquantitative scoring system was used to assess the severity of observed pathomorphological changes. In this model, radiation damage was most severe in the lips, tongue and skin, moderate in the upper esophagus and minor in salivary glands. The kinetics of injury appearance and recovery of normal morphology varied among tissues, with maximal damage to the tongue, esophagus and salivary glands developing at earlier times (days 8-11 postirradiation) relative to that of lip and skin mucosa (days 11-15 postirradiation). While both tested regimens of entolimod significantly reduced the extent of radiation damage and accelerated restoration of normal structure in all tissues analyzed, administration of entolimod 1 h after each irradiation was more effective than treatment 30 min before irradiation. These results support the potential clinical use of entolimod as an adjuvant for improving the therapeutic index of head and neck cancer radiotherapy by

  7. Radioprotective Effect of Propolis on the Blood Corpuscle of a Mouse by SEM after X-irradiation on the Whole Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Tae Jeong

    2008-01-01

    After x-ray 5 Gy radiation on the whole body of a mouse using a linear accelerator, its leucocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet were observed by SEM. Also, after injecting propolis into the abdominal cavity, the radio-protective effect of blood corpuscles was studied. The observation of micromorphology in blood corpuscles revealed that the number of leukocyte, erythrocyte, and thrombocyte decreased in the experimental group and the lump got together in blood corpuscles after 10 and 20 days. In RBC, crack or break on the surface and poikilosperocytes were observed. In the irradiation group, the size of leucocytes was smaller than that in control group and the number of villus at the verge substantially decreased. The blood corpuscles in the propolis group, however, had the similar results to control group.

  8. Radioprotective Effect of Propolis on the Blood Corpuscle of a Mouse by SEM after X-irradiation on the Whole Body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Tae Jeong [Dept. of Radiological Science, Kaya University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    After x-ray 5 Gy radiation on the whole body of a mouse using a linear accelerator, its leucocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet were observed by SEM. Also, after injecting propolis into the abdominal cavity, the radio-protective effect of blood corpuscles was studied. The observation of micromorphology in blood corpuscles revealed that the number of leukocyte, erythrocyte, and thrombocyte decreased in the experimental group and the lump got together in blood corpuscles after 10 and 20 days. In RBC, crack or break on the surface and poikilosperocytes were observed. In the irradiation group, the size of leucocytes was smaller than that in control group and the number of villus at the verge substantially decreased. The blood corpuscles in the propolis group, however, had the similar results to control group.

  9. Immature doublecortin-positive hippocampal neurons are important for learning but not for remembering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Jana; Borlikova, Gilyana G; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Robinson, Gregory J; Sullivan, Robert K P; Walker, Tara L; Bartlett, Perry F

    2013-04-10

    It is now widely accepted that hippocampal neurogenesis underpins critical cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. To assess the behavioral importance of adult-born neurons, we developed a novel knock-in mouse model that allowed us to specifically and reversibly ablate hippocampal neurons at an immature stage. In these mice, the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is expressed under control of the doublecortin (DCX) promoter, which allows for specific ablation of immature DCX-expressing neurons after administration of diphtheria toxin while leaving the neural precursor pool intact. Using a spatially challenging behavioral test (a modified version of the active place avoidance test), we present direct evidence that immature DCX-expressing neurons are required for successful acquisition of spatial learning, as well as reversal learning, but are not necessary for the retrieval of stored long-term memories. Importantly, the observed learning deficits were rescued as newly generated immature neurons repopulated the granule cell layer upon termination of the toxin treatment. Repeat (or cyclic) depletion of immature neurons reinstated behavioral deficits if the mice were challenged with a novel task. Together, these findings highlight the potential of stimulating neurogenesis as a means to enhance learning.

  10. The effects of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on the cytoskeleton of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaomei; Guo Yuhua; Yin Zhiwei; Mao Zijun

    1990-03-01

    The whole mount cell electron microscopy in combination with selective extraction method for preparing cytoskeletal framework was applied. Cy toskeleton prepared by Triton X-100 treatment of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes appeared in electron microscopy as a highly organized and interconnected three-dimensional matrix of different fibrous elements. Since such cytoskeletons are open membrane-free system, individual fibrous organizations can be identified by specific antibodies. An indirect immunogold procedure using monoclonal anti-tubulin or anti-actin antibodies was applied to visualize tubulin-or actin-containing structures. The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons had been used to demonstrate that different doses of 60 Co γ-ray caused a distinctive and reproducible alterations of the cytoskeletons of intact mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The results showed that there were some similar alterations with those caused by cytochalasin B and by colchicine. From these observations and other workers' studies, it's likely that 60 Co γ-ray irradiation may inhibit cytoplasmic microtubule and microfilament assembling

  11. Differentiation of strains of yellow fever virus in γ-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgeorge, R.; Bradish, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The mouse sensitized by optimal, sub-lethal γ-irradiation has been used for the differentiation of strains of yellow fever virus and for the resolution of their immunogenicity and pathogenicity as distinct characteristics. For different strains of yellow fever virus, the patterns of antibody-synthesis, regulatory immunity (pre-challenge) and protective immunity (post-challenge) are differentially sensitive to γ-irradiation. These critical differentiations of strains of yellow fever virus in γ-irradiated mice have been compared with those shown in normal athymic and immature mice in order to elucidate the range of quantifiable in vivo characteristics and the course of the virus-host interaction. This is discussed as a basis for the comparisons of the responses of model and principal hosts to vaccines and pathogens. (author)

  12. Partial synchronization of spermatogenesis in the immature Djungarian hamster, but not in the immature Wistar rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaster, L. H.; de rooij, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    The frequencies of the cellular associations of the seminiferous epithelium were determined at various ages after birth in immature Djungarian hamsters and Wistar rats. The frequencies of the cellular associations present in immature animals were then compared with the frequencies of the

  13. Protection of mouse hematopoietic stem cells by a preparation of herb mixture (hemoHIM) against whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, W. H.; Park, H. R.; Oh, H.; Jung, I. Y.; Cho, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    A preparation of herb mixture (HemoHIM) was designed from three medicinal herbs including Angelica gigantis Radix to protect gastrointestine, hematopoietic organs and immune system against radiation damage. In the present study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of HemoHIM on hematopoietic stem cells in γ-irradiated mice and the underlying mechanisms. The administration of HemoHIM significantly increased the formation of endogenous spleen colony and reduced apoptosis of bone marrow cells in γ-irradiated mice. These results showed that HemoHIM protected hematopoietic stem cells from irradiation. To investigate the mechanism of the protection, the effects of HemoHIM on expression of radioprotective cytokines was examined. HemoHIM increased the mRNA levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, SCF and IL-6 in bone marrow cells and peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In vivo administration of HemoHIM increased the mRNA levels of IL-1β, TNF-α in spleen. The examination of radical scavenging activity of HemoHIM as another mechanism revealed that HemoHIM was effective at scavenging DPPH radicals and hydroxyl radicals. From these results, it is suggested that HemoHIM exerts these radioprotective effects through the induction of radioprotective cytokines and/or through directly scavenging radicals produced by γ-irradiation

  14. Protection of mouse hematopoietic stem cells by a preparation of herb mixture (hemoHIM) against whole body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, W. H.; Park, H. R.; Oh, H.; Jung, I. Y.; Cho, S. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    A preparation of herb mixture (HemoHIM) was designed from three medicinal herbs including Angelica gigantis Radix to protect gastrointestine, hematopoietic organs and immune system against radiation damage. In the present study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of HemoHIM on hematopoietic stem cells in {gamma}-irradiated mice and the underlying mechanisms. The administration of HemoHIM significantly increased the formation of endogenous spleen colony and reduced apoptosis of bone marrow cells in {gamma}-irradiated mice. These results showed that HemoHIM protected hematopoietic stem cells from irradiation. To investigate the mechanism of the protection, the effects of HemoHIM on expression of radioprotective cytokines was examined. HemoHIM increased the mRNA levels of IL-1{beta}, TNF-{alpha}, SCF and IL-6 in bone marrow cells and peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In vivo administration of HemoHIM increased the mRNA levels of IL-1{beta}, TNF-{alpha} in spleen. The examination of radical scavenging activity of HemoHIM as another mechanism revealed that HemoHIM was effective at scavenging DPPH radicals and hydroxyl radicals. From these results, it is suggested that HemoHIM exerts these radioprotective effects through the induction of radioprotective cytokines and/or through directly scavenging radicals produced by {gamma}-irradiation.

  15. Sequential appearance of thymocyte subpopulations and T cell antigen receptor gene messages in the mouse thymus after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomooka, S.; Matsuzaki, G.; Kishihara, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yoshikai, Y.; Taniguchi, K.; Himeno, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The sequential differentiation patterns of thymocyte were observed with cell surface phenotypes and the expression of T cell antigen receptor in 800 rad irradiated adult mice. Thymus was severely reduced in size and cell number by day 5 after whole body irradiation and rapidly recovered from day 7 to day 14. Surface marker analysis on day 5 after irradiation showed thymocytes with Thy-1low L3T4+/Lyt-2- dominantly existed and suggested that these cells were radioresistant-survived cells. On the other hand, thymocytes on day 7 were composed of a large number of Thy-1high L3T4+/Lyt-2+ blast-like cells and a relatively high proportion of Thy-1high L3T4-/Lyt-2- cells which expressed a large amount of gamma-chain gene messages but scarcely any alpha- and beta-chain gene messages similar to the fetal thymocytes. On day 14, thymocytes were composed mostly of Thy-1high H-2low L3T4+/Lyt-2+ subpopulation which expressed a remarkably low level of gamma-chain gene messages, and high levels of alpha- and beta-chain transcripts analogous to those of normal adult thymus. Taken together, intrathymic radioresistent stem cells for T thymocytes seem to proliferate and differentiate after irradiation with the same pattern as was seen in a fetal thymus development

  16. Expression and localization of Smad4 protein in mouse testis after whole-body X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Huaping; Zhang Yuanqiang; Zhao Jie; Zhao Yong; Ma Jing; Hou Wugang; Qi Yuhong

    2005-01-01

    The work is to determine whether and where Transforming growth factor-betas downstream Signaling molecule Smad4 is expressed in the testes after whole-body X-ray irradiation and shed light on the mechanisms of Transforming growth factor-betas/Smad signal pathway mediates cell fate decisions following X-ray exposure. Five groups of adult BALB/c mice, with ten mice in each group, received whole-body of X-ray at dose levels of 0.1 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy and 2.0 Gy. They were sacrificed at 16 hour, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 4 weeks after the irradiation. Cellular localization and expression changes were examined by immunohistochemical ABC method. Quantitative analysis of the immunostaining was made by an image analysis system. In the seminiferous tubules, the expression of Smad4 was modulated by irradiation. The immunostaining showed that 16 hour post-irradiation, there was a significant decline in the Leydig cell, and it was dose and time depended. In addition, the immunolocalization showed that Smad4 was not exclusively localized in the cytoplasm of Leydig cells, but also localized in various Stages of spermatogenesis after the exposure, especially in premeiotic spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes. There was just a little expression in the 2.0 Gy group 16 h after the irradiation and the 1.0 Gy and 1.5 Gy groups at 2 weeks after the irradiation. Therefore in the 0.1 Gy to 2.0 Gy groups at 3 weeks after the irradiation, the immunostaining positive cells were significantly increased in spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes. There was no significant change in sertoli cells with different doses and different times after the exposure. The different expression patterns and change by dose and time of Smad4, suggest that TGF-β/Smad signal pathway may affect aspect after X-ray impairment and Smad4 may play an important role during these periods. (authors)

  17. Inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis in UV-irradiated mouse skin by 2-difluoromethylornithine, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaepyaho, K.; Lauharanta, J.; Jaenne, J.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure of mouse skin to UVB irradiation greatly enhanced the biosynthesis and accumulation of putrescine and spermidine before or concomitantly with stimulation of epidermal macromolecular (DNA and protein) synthesis. Topical treatment of UV-exposed skin with 2 inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) prevented the enhanced epidermal accumulation of polyamines, especially spermidine, and also inhibited the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA and protein. When applied in combination, these 2 antimetabolites of polyamines produced an inhibition of macromolecular synthesis that was at least additive: (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation decreased by 80% and (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation by 44% as compared with the UVB-irradiated control mice. A slight decrease in the ratio of (/sup 3/H)histidine/(/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation indicated that protein synthesis of the differentiating cell layers was also affected by the inhibitors. The effects of the combined DFMO and MGBG treatment were partially reversed by concomitant topical application of spermidine.

  18. Inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis in UV-irradiated mouse skin by 2-difluoromethylornithine, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaepyaho, K.; Lauharanta, J.; Jaenne, J.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of mouse skin to UVB irradiation greatly enhanced the biosynthesis and accumulation of putrescine and spermidine before or concomitantly with stimulation of epidermal macromolecular (DNA and protein) synthesis. Topical treatment of UV-exposed skin with 2 inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis, 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) prevented the enhanced epidermal accumulation of polyamines, especially spermidine, and also inhibited the incorporation of radioactive precursors into DNA and protein. When applied in combination, these 2 antimetabolites of polyamines produced an inhibition of macromolecular synthesis that was at least additive: [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation decreased by 80% and [ 14 C]leucine incorporation by 44% as compared with the UVB-irradiated control mice. A slight decrease in the ratio of [ 3 H]histidine/[ 14 C]leucine incorporation indicated that protein synthesis of the differentiating cell layers was also affected by the inhibitors. The effects of the combined DFMO and MGBG treatment were partially reversed by concomitant topical application of spermidine

  19. Simultaneous establishment of monoclonal antibodies specific for either cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer or (6-4)photoproduct from the same mouse immunized with ultraviolet irradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Toshio; Nakane, Misa; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Nikaido, Osamu; Ihara, Makoto

    1991-01-01

    Six new monoclonal antibodies (TDM-2, TDM-3, 64M-2, 64M-3 64M-4 and 64M-5) specific for ultraviolet (UV) induced DNA damage have been established. In the antibody characterization experiments, two TDM antibodies were found to show a dose-dependent binding to UV-irradiated DNA (UV-DNA), decrease of binding to UV-DNA after cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoreactivation, binding to DNA containing cyclobutane thymine dimers, and unchanged binding to UV-DNA after photoisomerization of (6-4)photoproducts to Dewar photoproducts. These results indicated that the epitope of TDM monoclonal antibodies was the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in DNA. On the other hand, four 64M antibodies were found to show a dose-dependent binding to UV-DNA, unchanged binding to UV-DNA after cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoreactivation, undetectable binding to DNA containing thymine dimers, and decrease of binding to UV-DNA after photoisomerization of (6-4)photoproducts. These results indicated that the epitope of 64M antibodies was the (6-4)photoproduct in DNA. This is the first report of the simultaneous establishment of monoclonal antibodies against the two different types of photolesions from the same mouse. By using these monoclonal antibodies, we have succeeded in measuring both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4)photoproducts in the DNA from human primary cells irradiated with physiological UV doses. (author)

  20. Scanning microscopic evaluation on the development of the cerebral cortex in embryonic mouse subjected to γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xuezhi; Inouye, Minoru; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Yamamura, Hideki

    1995-01-01

    Morphological events occurring in the developing cerebral hemispheres of mice exposed to a single dose of 60 Co γ-irradiation 1.5 Gy on embryonic day 13 (E13) were evaluated by scanning microscope. Twenty-four hr after the exposure, both cell debris and surviving cells had poured out into the ventricular lumen. Radial glial fibers were more crumpled than in the controls. By day E15, proliferating cells in different stages of the cell cycle appeared in the ventricular zone. The glial fibers formed a network through the brain mantle. By E17 many migrating cells attached to the disorderly glial fibers appeared in the different layers of the thin cerebral mantle. These findings suggest that development of the glial fibers was interrupted as early as 24 hr after the single exposure, implying that irradiation on the developing brain may disrupt neuronal migration. (author)

  1. Use of dexpanthenol and aloe vera to influence the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane (mouse)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlichting, S.; Spekl, K.; Doerr, W.

    2004-01-01

    In summarising the outcome of the present study it can be said spraying the agent on the oral mucous membrane once a day had an effect on the incidence of mucous membrane ulceration in the case of both placebo and dexpanthenol treatment. However, there was no significant difference between placebo and dexpanthenol treatment, the only finding being a slight prolongation of latency time through aloe vera. These experimental findings give good reason to critically reconsider the clinical use of dexpanthenol as a supportive treatment for the prevention of radiogenic mucositis enoralis following irradiation of tumours in the head and neck region. However thorough oral lavage is an effective means of moderating the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane [de

  2. Recovery of immune competence following sublethal irradiation: the role of the mouse strains, thymic function and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The bone marrow, thymus and lymphohematopoietic microenvironments are determining factors in recovery of immune competence following sublethal irradiation. Because of age-related degenerative changes in all of these parameters it was anticipated that immune competence of irradiated old mice would show an altered pattern of recovery. Therefore, three age groups (3-7, 15, and 23-34-months) of C57BL/6J mice were treated with either 250R, 500R or 600R. At various intervals thereafter their spleen cells were assessed for recovery of humoral and cell-mediated immunologic activity and for thymus derived (T-), bone marrow derived (B-) and stem-cell compartments. Two age groups (3-7 and 23-months) of C3H/Anf Cum mice were also treated with the two highest doses or irradiation and their spleen cells tested only for recovery of T- and B-cell compartments. The results showed that recovery of immune competence following 250R was independent of age

  3. Stage specificity and dose-response relationships for chromosome aberrations induced in mouse primary spermatocytes following X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Y.; Tobari, I.; Utsugi, T.

    1986-05-01

    In this study, dose-response relationships were examined for chromosome aberrations observed at diakinesis-metaphase I of spermatocytes with X-irradiation at various stages of meiosis (diplotene, mid-pachytene, zygotene and leptotene). The frequencies of cells with X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations increased with dose at all stages in the applied range of 0.5-3.0 Gy and tended to increase as the irradiated stages descended after leptotene stage. In three stages, the frequencies increased exponentially with dose, but the rates of induction of chromosome breaks were markedly different depending on the stages at which spermatocytes were irradiated with X-rays. The rate of induction was the highest at diplotene and the lowest at leptotene, suggesting that diplotene spermatocytes had the highest radiosensitivity to the induction of chromosome breaks, followed by pachytene, zygotene and leptotene spermatocytes in that order. The dose-response relationships fitted well to linear equations for deletion-type aberrations at each stage, and to linear-quadratic equations for exchange-type aberrations at all stages except for leptotene. At leptotene, the chromatid exchanges were hardly observed, the aberrations being mainly consisted of iso-chromatid fragments. On the contrary, chromatid exchanges and iso-chromatide deletions were mainly observed at later stages (zygotene-diplotene).

  4. Methylation changes of H19 gene in sperms of X-irradiated mouse and maintenance in offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bin; Huang Xinghua; Chen Jindong; Lu Yachao; Chen Ying; Zhao Jingyong

    2006-01-01

    The nature of imprinting is just differential methylation of imprinted genes. Unlike the non-imprinted genes, the methylation pattern of imprinted genes established during the period of gametogenesis remains unchangeable after fertilization and during embryo development. It implies that gametogenesis is the key stage for methylation pattern of imprinted genes. The imprinting interfered by exogenous factors during this stage could be inherited to offspring and cause genetic effect. Now many studies have proved that ionizing irradiation could disturb DNA methylation. Here we choose BALB/c mice as a research model and X-ray as interfering source to further clarify it. We discovered that the whole-body irradiation of X-ray to male BALB/c mice could influence the methylation pattern of H 19 gene in sperms, which resulted in some cytosines of partial CpG islands in the imprinting control region could not transform to methylated cytosines. Furthermore, by copulating the interfered male mice with normal female, we analyzed the promoter methylation pattern of H 19 in offspring fetal liver and compared the same to the pattern of male parent in sperms. We found that the majority of methylation changes in offspring liver were related to the ones in their parent sperms. Our data proved that the changes of the H 19 gene methylation pattern interfered by X-ray irradiation could be transmitted and maintained in First-generation offspring

  5. The effect of low exposure-rate gamma irradiation on T and B lymphocyte function in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, C.E.; Gengozian, N.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of chronic irradiation on T and B cell numbers and function was studied in mice. Cobalt 60 gamma radiation at 6 R/hour reduced the numbers of anti-SRBC PFC in the spleen, with minimal levels recorded after total exposures of 1000 to 2000 R. Recovery was incomplete after 1000 R, reaching only 40 to 50 per cent of normal in four months and remaining at that level for the animal's lifetime. The long-term deficiency in PFC formation was not due to a quantitative lack of T or B cells since normal cell numbers were observed in the spleen 60 to 144 days after 1000 R. Adoptive transfer studies with combinations of bone marrow and thymus cells, or of splenic T and B cells, from normal and irradiated mice, revealed functional defects in both cell compartments during the first two months. Normal and near normal function of T and B cells occurred 100 days postirradiation, a time when the splenic in vitro response was still only 50 per cent of the controls. The latter observation suggests that the microenvironment of the chronically irradiated spleen alters factors regulating T and B cell interactions in response to a T-dependent antigen. (author)

  6. The leukaemogenic effect of whole-body irradiation of the mouse: Experimental work at the Radiobiological Research Unit, Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, R.H.

    1960-01-01

    Mouse 'leukaemia' is a generic term which might well be replaced by the clumsier, but more accurate, 'malignant disease of reticular tissue'. There are a variety of cytologically definable types (reticulosarcoma, 'histiocytoma' or monocytic leukaemia, lymphosarcoma and lymphoid leukaemia, myeloid leukosis) and a variety of morbid anatomical patterns, but there is only an approximate correlation between morbid anatomy and cytological type. True leukaemia where the white blood cell count is raised and morphologically abnormal white cells are found in the blood) occurs but is relatively uncommon; leukaemoid blood pictures are also found. Normally the murine thymus persists for much of the reproductive life-span, atrophying only in middle age, instead of in early childhood as in man. This may be the reason why the anatomical region of the thymus is more often involved in leukaemia in younger than in older animals, and why 'thymic leukaemia' is a characteristically murine disease and does not seem to occur in man. A great deal of the experimental work on mouse leukaemia reported in the literature is concerned with 'thymic leukaemia,' and this is often considered to be synonymous with thymic lymphoma or lymphosarcoma. However, the anatomy of tumour masses in the superior mediastinum. not infrequently suggests that they are not truly thymic in origin and their cell type is often not lymphoid

  7. The leukaemogenic effect of whole-body irradiation of the mouse: Experimental work at the Radiobiological Research Unit, Harwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mole, R H

    1960-12-01

    Mouse 'leukaemia' is a generic term which might well be replaced by the clumsier, but more accurate, 'malignant disease of reticular tissue'. There are a variety of cytologically definable types (reticulosarcoma, 'histiocytoma' or monocytic leukaemia, lymphosarcoma and lymphoid leukaemia, myeloid leukosis) and a variety of morbid anatomical patterns, but there is only an approximate correlation between morbid anatomy and cytological type. True leukaemia where the white blood cell count is raised and morphologically abnormal white cells are found in the blood) occurs but is relatively uncommon; leukaemoid blood pictures are also found. Normally the murine thymus persists for much of the reproductive life-span, atrophying only in middle age, instead of in early childhood as in man. This may be the reason why the anatomical region of the thymus is more often involved in leukaemia in younger than in older animals, and why 'thymic leukaemia' is a characteristically murine disease and does not seem to occur in man. A great deal of the experimental work on mouse leukaemia reported in the literature is concerned with 'thymic leukaemia,' and this is often considered to be synonymous with thymic lymphoma or lymphosarcoma. However, the anatomy of tumour masses in the superior mediastinum. not infrequently suggests that they are not truly thymic in origin and their cell type is often not lymphoid.

  8. Method for the cultivation of dispersed epithelial cells from mouse palatal mucosa and the effects of X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, K.W.

    1976-01-01

    Cultivation of adult oral epithelium in vitro has been previously reported for limited periods of time. The present research work describes a method for establishing pure cultures of adult palatal epithelial cells which were viable for extended periods of time. In contrast with most published work, we utilized a cell dispersion technique to obtain suspensions consisting of epithelial cells grown in monolayers. Cultures were maintained by subculturing for continuous periods up to 72 days. The fibroblastic overgrowth which has been previously reported by others in their attempts to culture oral epithelium was prevented in the present culture system as shown by phase microscopy and preliminary electron microscopy studies. The cells in vitro mainly displayed the normal morphologic characteristics of cultured epithelial cells. As demonstrated by labelling with tritiated thymidine, the monolayers of palatal epithelial cells possessed a high rate of DNA synthesis. Karyotypes of the cultured cells showed a high percentage of normal displays of chromosomal morphology. The number of spontaneous aberrations observed in our in vitro system were most likely the result of labilities induced by the conditions of cell culture rather than a reflection of the situation in vivo. Another part of the research dealt with the effects of exposure levels of 1R, 5R, and 10R of X-irradiation (within the clinical range for the dental patient) on the palatal epithelial cells grown in vitro over a short period of time. Our studies reveal that higher percentages of heteroploidy occur in comparison to normal non-irradiated cultures. A significant increase in the number of induced chromosomal aberrations as a result of low level exposure to X-rays was also observed in such cultures in comparison to those seen in non-irradiated control samples

  9. Migration of polypotent hemopoietic stem cells from mouse bone marrow shielded during irradiation after hemorrhage and transfusion of syngeneic erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, V.A.; Lozovoj, V.P.; Zhuravkin, I.N.

    1977-01-01

    CBA mice have been X-irradiated with a lethal dose of 850 R. The rate of migration of hemopoietic stem cells has been studied at varying times after hemorrhage and administration of syngeneic erythrocytes. Hemorrhage has been shown to enhance markedly the stem cell migration. Administration of syngeneic erythrocytes decreases considerably the rate of stem cell migaration. It is suggested that the erythropoiesis stimulation is responsible for the increased yield of stem cells from the bone marrow, and that the suppression of erythropoiesis inhibits migration of the stem cells

  10. In vivo UVA irradiation of mouse is more efficient in promoting pulmonary melanoma metastasis than in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously shown in vitro that UVA increases the adhesiveness of mouse B16-F1 melanoma cells to endothelium. We have also shown in vivo that UVA exposure of C57BL/6 mice, i.v. injected with B16-F1 cells, increases formation of pulmonary colonies of melanoma. The aim of the present animal study was to confirm the previously observed in vivo UVA effect and to determine whether in vitro UVA-exposure of melanoma cells, prior the i.v. injection, will have an enhancing effect on the pulmonary colonization capacity of melanoma cells. As a second aim, UVA-derived immunosuppression was determined. Methods Mice were i.v. injected with B16-F1 cells into the tail vein and then immediately exposed to UVA. Alternatively, to study the effect of UVA-induced adhesiveness on the colonization capacity of B16-F1 melanoma, cells were in vitro exposed prior to i.v. injection. Fourteen days after injection, lungs were collected and the number of pulmonary nodules was determined under dissecting microscope. The UVA-derived immunosuppression was measured by standard contact hypersensitivity assay. Results and Discussion Obtained results have confirmed that mice, i.v. injected with B16-F1 cells and thereafter exposed to UVA, developed 4-times more of melanoma colonies in lungs as compared with the UVA non-exposed group (p UVA-induced changes in the adhesive properties of melanoma cells do not alone account for the 4-fold increase in the pulmonary tumor formation. Instead, it suggests that some systemic effect in a mouse might be responsible for the increased metastasis formation. Indeed, UVA was found to induce moderate systemic immunosuppression, which effect might contribute to the UVA-induced melanoma metastasis in mice lungs. PMID:21645404

  11. Biochemical and technological properties of immature grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabrodskii, A G; Polozhishnik, A F

    1958-01-01

    Corn and rye seed, of different maturities were investigated. The immature seeds were found to contain more sugars and amino acids. The yield of EtOH per 100 g of starch increased on ripening. Low yield in the mashes of unripe seeds was ascribed to the intensive amino acid-sugar reaction (Maillard reaction).

  12. Immature ovarian teratoma in a postmenopausal woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornvold, K; Detlefsen, G U; Horn, T

    1987-01-01

    We report the first case of immature ovarian teratoma occurring after menopause in a 57-year-old, 3 years postmenopausal woman. Within one year after resection of the teratoma she developed peritoneal botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma, which probably originated from initially unrecognized rhabdomyoblasts...

  13. Focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose irradiation down-regulated organ development-related functions and up-regulated the immune response in mouse pulmonary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jin, Hee; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kang, Ga-Young; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2016-01-27

    Despite the emergence of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of medically inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer patients, the molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose radiation have not been fully characterized. This study was designed to identify molecular changes induced by focal high-dose irradiation using a mouse model of SBRT. Central areas of the mouse left lung were focally-irradiated (3 mm in diameter) with a single high-dose of radiation (90 Gy). Temporal changes in gene expression in the irradiated and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions were analyzed by microarray. For comparison, the long-term effect (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation on a diffuse region of lung was also measured. The majority of genes were down-regulated in the focally-irradiated lung areas at 2 to 3 weeks after irradiation. This pattern of gene expression was clearly different than gene expression in the diffuse region of lungs exposed to low-dose radiation. Ontological and pathway analyses indicated these down-regulated genes were mainly associated with organ development. Although the number was small, genes that were up-regulated after focal irradiation were associated with immune-related functions. The temporal patterns of gene expression and the associated biological functions were also similar in non-irradiated neighboring lung regions, although statistical significance was greatly reduced when compared with those from focally-irradiated areas of the lung. From network analysis of temporally regulated genes, we identified inter-related modules associated with diverse functions, including organ development and the immune response, in both the focally-irradiated regions and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions. Focal exposure of lung tissue to high-dose radiation induced expression of genes associated with organ development and the immune response. This pattern of gene expression was also observed in non-irradiated

  14. Effect of dose rate on residual γ-H2AX levels and frequency of micronuclei in X-irradiated mouse lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, H C; Shuryak, I; Taveras, M; Bertucci, A; Perrier, J R; Chen, C; Elliston, C D; Johnson, G W; Smilenov, L B; Amundson, S A; Brenner, D J

    2015-03-01

    The biological risks associated with low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation exposures are not yet well defined. To assess the risk related to DNA damage, we compared the yields of two established biodosimetry end points, γ-H2AX and micronuclei (MNi), in peripheral mouse blood lymphocytes after prolonged in vivo exposure to LDR X rays (0.31 cGy/min) vs. acute high-dose-rate (HDR) exposure (1.03 Gy/min). C57BL/6 mice were total-body irradiated with 320 kVP X rays with doses of 0, 1.1, 2.2 and 4.45 Gy. Residual levels of total γ-H2AX fluorescence in lymphocytes isolated 24 h after the start of irradiation were assessed using indirect immunofluorescence methods. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay was used to determine apoptotic cell frequency in lymphocytes sampled at 24 h. Curve fitting analysis suggested that the dose response for γ-H2AX yields after acute exposures could be described by a linear dependence. In contrast, a linear-quadratic dose-response shape was more appropriate for LDR exposure (perhaps reflecting differences in repair time after different LDR doses). Dose-rate sparing effects (P effect across the dose range 24 h or 7 days post exposure. In conclusion, the γ-H2AX biomarker showed higher sensitivity to measure dose-rate effects after low-dose LDR X rays compared to MNi formation; however, confounding factors such as variable repair times post exposure, increased cell killing and cell cycle block likely contributed to the yields of MNi with accumulating doses of ionizing radiation.

  15. Induction of mouse mammary tumor virus RNA in mammary tumors of BALB/c mice treated with urethane, x-irradiation, and hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalides, R.; van Deemter, L.; Nusse, R.; Hageman, P.

    1979-01-01

    The involvement of mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) in the development of mammary tumors of nonviral etiology in BALB/c mice was studied by measuring the levels of MTV RNA, MTV DNA, and MTV proteins in spontaneously arising and hormally, chemically, and/or physically induced mammary tumors of BALB/c females. The following results were obtained: (1) spontaneous mammary tumors contained very low levels of MTV RNA; 4 x 10 -6 % of the cytoplasmic RNA was MTV RNA. No MTV proteins could be demonstrated by using sensitive radioimmunoassays for MTV proteins p27 and gp52. (2) Mammary tumors induced by treatments with urethane or x-irradiation alone contained higher levels of MTV RNA; these tumors contained 3- and 19-fold more MTV RNA, respectively, compared with spontaneous mammary tumors. (3) Mammary tumors induced by combined treatment with urethane and x-irradiation expressed high levels of MTV RNA in the mammary tumors; a 1,724-fold increase in MTV RNA content compared with spontaneous mammary tumors was observed. However, very low levels of MTV proteins gp52 and p27 were detected, suggesting some kind of impairment at the translation of MTV RNA. MTV RNA was also induced by this treatment in mammary glands and spleens, but not in the livers of tumor-bearing animals. (4) BALB/c females continuously exposed to prolactin contained high levels of MTV RNA and MTV proteins in stimulated mammary glands and in the hormonally induced mammary tumors. These findings suggest that MTV is not responsible for the maintenance and probably also not for the development of all murine mammary cancers

  16. A Rare Case of Immature Ovarian Teratoma with Gliomatosis Peritonei

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEY WORDS: Glial tissue, gliomatosis peritonei, immature teratoma, India, ovary. Case Report .... astrocytes in the fetal nerve tissue. GFAP immunostain confirms ... Immature teratoma of the ovary: A clinicopathology study of 28 cases. Indian.

  17. Repair of mouse haemopoiesis at later times after long-term external (137Cs) and internal (3H) irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzanov, V.M.; Murzina, L.D.; Kirillova, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    In experiments on CBA mice it was shown that the haemopoiesis recovery was incomplete during 18 months after termination of internal exposure to tritium oxide or external γ-irradiation in the equivalent daily and cumulative doses. in mice given the radionuclide, the increment of CFUsub(s) and bone marrow nucleate cells was accompanied by leuko- and thrombocytopenia. In mice externally exposed to γ-rays, cytopenia did not develop at a lower content of CFUsub(s) and myelocaryocytes. It is suggested that the revealed diversions in the pattern of recovery of the haemopoiesis of mice of the compared groups are conditioned by the changes in functional activity of haemopoietic stem cells

  18. Developmental defects and genomic instability after x-irradiation of wild-type and genetically modified mouse pre-implantation and early post-implantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P

    2012-01-01

    Results obtained from the end of the 1950s suggested that ionizing radiation could induce foetal malformations in some mouse strains when administered during early pre-implantation stages. Starting in 1989, data obtained in Germany also showed that radiation exposure during that period could lead to a genomic instability in the surviving foetuses. Furthermore, the same group reported that both malformations and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation foetuses after exposure of zygotes to relatively high doses of radiation. As such results were of concern for radiation protection, we investigated this in more detail during recent years, using mice with varying genetic backgrounds including mice heterozygous for mutations involved in important cellular processes like DNA repair, cell cycle regulation or apoptosis. The main parameters which were investigated included morphological development, genomic instability and gene expression in the irradiated embryos or their own progeny. The aim of this review is to critically reassess the results obtained in that field in the different laboratories and to try to draw general conclusions on the risks of developmental defects and genomic instability from an exposure of early embryos to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. Altogether and in the range of doses normally used in diagnostic radiology, the risk of induction of embryonic death and of congenital malformation following the irradiation of a newly fertilised egg is certainly very low when compared to the ‘spontaneous’ risks for such effects. Similarly, the risk of radiation induction of a genomic instability under such circumstances seems to be very small. However, this is not a reason to not apply some precaution principles when possible. One way of doing this is to restrict the use of higher dose examinations on all potentially pregnant women to the first ten days of their menstrual cycle when conception is very unlikely to have occurred

  19. A comparison of the survival (LD/sub 50/30/) of a number of inbred mouse strains after X and 60Co gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacha, J.; Znojil, V.; Hola, J.; Sikulova, J.

    1984-01-01

    The value of LD/sub 50/30/ for X and 60 Co gamma radiation was ascertained for several inbred mouse strains and the significance of interstrain differences in these parameters determined. The rank order of strains according to LD/sub 50/30/ differs as between the two types of radiation with the exception of the strains BALB/c and B10.LP/Ph, which are the least resistant to radiation-induced lethality with both types of radiation. The strain C57BL/10ScSnPh is highly resistant to X irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness of 60 Co gamma radiation as compared with X-radiation from the point of view of lethality fluctuates between 0.748 and 0.952 in individual strains, with a mean value of 0.866 +- 0.033. The RBE values do not correlate with the radiosensitivity of the strain, but they do correlate with the relative contribution to erythropoiesis of the spleen. (author)

  20. Greater sparing of stromal progenitor cells than of haemopoietic stem cells in γ-irradiated mouse marrow using low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.H.; Wang, S.B.; Testa, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Do value fibroblastoid colony-forming units in mouse bone-marrow increased from 1.7 Gy using γ-rays at 4.2 Gy/minute, to 2.6 Gy at 4.5 cGy/minute. In contrast, the sensitivity of bone-marrow stem cells was very little changed (Do approximately 0.9 Gy). At 7.5 Gy acute single dose, the dose sparing achieved for CFU-F using 4.5 cGy/minute was a factor of 1.4, inbetween the values reported for lung of 1.8 and for haemopoiesis of 1.2. Although the role of CFU-F in the haemopoietic environment has not been established, the content of CFU-F can predict the ability of irradiated marrow to sustain haemopoiesis in the long term. Hence the data imply that the haemopoiesis environment, as well as the dose-limiting lung, benefits from the use of low dose-rates for haemopoietic ablations in the treatment of leukaemia. No significant further sparing of CFU-F was achieved using a lower dose-rate of 1.4 cGy per minute

  1. Comparison of the survival (LD/sub 50/30/) of a number of inbred mouse strains after X and /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacha, J.; Znojil, V.; Hola, J.; Sikulova, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Biofysikalni Ustav)

    1984-01-01

    The value of LD/sub 50/30/ for X and /sup 60/Co gamma radiation was ascertained for several inbred mouse strains and the significance of interstrain differences in these parameters determined. The rank order of strains according to LD/sub 50/30/ differs as between the two types of radiation with the exception of the strains BALB/c and B10.LP/Ph, which are the least resistant to radiation-induced lethality with both types of radiation. The strain C57BL/10ScSnPh is highly resistant to X irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation as compared with X-radiation from the point of view of lethality fluctuates between 0.748 and 0.952 in individual strains, with a mean value of 0.866 +- 0.033. The RBE values do not correlate with the radiosensitivity of the strain, but they do correlate with the relative contribution to erythropoiesis of the spleen.

  2. Replacement of serum with ocular fluid for cryopreservation of immature testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothana, Lavanya; Devi, Lalitha; Venna, Naresh Kumar; Pentakota, Niharika; Varma, Vivek Phani; Jose, Jedy; Goel, Sandeep

    2016-12-01

    Cryopreservation of immature testis is a feasible approach for germplasm preservation of male animals. Combinations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and foetal bovine serum (FBS) are used for testis cryopreservation. However, an alternative to FBS is needed, because FBS is expensive. Buffalo ocular fluid (BuOF), a slaughter house by-product, could be an economical option. The objective of the present study was to assess whether BuOF can replace FBS for cryopreservation of immature mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), and buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) testes. Results showed that rodent and buffalo testes frozen in DMSO (10% for rodents and 20% for buffalo) with 20% FBS or BuOF had similar numbers of viable and DNA-damaged cells (P > 0.05). The expression of cell proliferation- (PCNA) and apoptosis-specific proteins (Annexin V and BAX/BCL2 ratio) were also comparable in mouse and buffalo testes frozen in DMSO with FBS or BuOF (P > 0.05). Interestingly, rat testis frozen in DMSO with BuOF had lower expression of Annexin V protein than testis frozen in DMSO with FBS (P  0.05). These findings provide evidence that BuOF has potential to replace FBS for cryopreservation of immature rodent and buffalo testis. Further investigation is needed to explore whether BuOF can replace FBS for testis cryopreservation of other species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation of mouse skin and the factors affecting the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, S.G.; Coggle, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Several problems regarding acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation were investigated in order to clarify protection problems of localised doses to the skin. A study into the acute biological effects of different energy beta emitters and the effects of energy and area on the response showed direct relationships between these criteria for a range of different acute responses with different time courses. Three different types of acute response were found and these are described as 'moist desquamation', 'acute ulceration' and 'acute epidermal necrosis'. An unexpected finding was that the lower energy beta emitter 170 Tm was as efficient at inducing scab formation as the higher energy 90 Sr sources for the same area of exposure. Experiments using 2x4 cm 2 exposures to 224 Cm alpha particles showed that the response to this poorly penetrating radiation was minimal after doses as high as 180 Gy measured at 10 μm into the skin. In comparison, large area exposure to 170 Tm produced areas of prolonged scabbing after doses up to 100 Gy. However, the intensity of the reaction varied between strains. (author)

  4. Early changes in blood flow of the mouse skin after irradiation as measured by the 133Xe clearance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Irie, Goro

    1983-01-01

    The early effects of radiation on the local blood flow in the skin of mice were evaluated by measuring the local clearance rate of 133 Xe after its subcutaneous injection; this was done at four to five weeks after irradiation during the animals' normal resting conditions. The fractionation schedules employed were single fractions, two fractions in 15 days and four fractions in 15 days. The dose effect curves with these schedules showed a two-component pattern. There was a uniform reduction in flood flow after 10 to 30 Gy, and a steady increase in flood flow after doses more than 40 Gy. The blood flow after higher-fractionated doses was always lower than less-fractionated doses. It was considered that radiation doses causing higher severity of acute skin reactions might have predominated a degree of acute vasodilatation over fibrotic changes, thus resulting in increased blood flow. A steady increase in early blood flow was observed with increasing severity of acute skin reactions, but the early blood flow was not a good indicator for predicting late skin reactions, except for a severe leg deformity which was accompanied with a significant increase in early blood flow. (author)

  5. Morphologic changes reflecting early and late effects of irradiation of the distal lung of the mouse: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penney, D.P.; Siemann, D.W.; Rubin, P.; Shapiro, D.L.; Finkelstein, J.; Cooper, R.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    In radiation of the thorax, the lung has been shown to be a major dose-limiting organ. The early and late responses of the lung to radiation has been reviewed, with primary emphasis on the following cell types: type II pneumocyte, type I pneumocyte, pulmonary endothelial cell and macrophage. The earliest observable and quantifiable cellular response to radiation is exhibited by the type II pneumocytes as a decrease in lamellar bodies and a corresponding increase in surfactant content of the alveolar lavage. By 18-63 weeks following exposure, several type II cells, restored in their lamellar body population, undergo degeneration and sloughing into alveolar spaces. Type I pneumocytes generally exhibit little change, although some investigators describe alveolar denudation due to degenerating type I cells. Macrophages decrease in numbers following irradiation, returning to normal populations by 4 weeks. These changes correspond closely to the changes in alveolar lavage phospholipid phosphorus. Descriptions of radiation-induced damage to endothelial cells are variable. However, blebbing and vacuolation appear to be late developing responses, although altered permeability may be earlier in its expression. Radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are the two major clinical and experimental responses of the lung to radiation following exposures of greater than 12 Gy. The former appears to involve type II cells, macrophages and pulmonary endothelial cells, and for the latter macrophages, fibroblasts, type II pneumocytes and the pulmonary endothelial cells are involved. The two events are not interdependent, and may not necessarily be interrelated

  6. PSEUDARTHROSIS OF THE SCAPHOID IN IMMATURE SKELETONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Bentes, Ádria Simone Ferreira; Neto, Miguel Flores do Amaral; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Lech, Osvandré

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature on pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid in skeletally immature individuals, taking into consideration its epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment, as well as its controversies. Knowledge of this subject makes it possible for patients to be given appropriate treatment immediately. Pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid in skeletally immature patients is a rare condition that results from error or lack of diagnosis of a fracture. Thus, careful clinical and radiographic examination should be performed in order to confirm or rule out this diagnosis. Several treatment methods have been reported and have shown good results. These include conservative plaster cast treatment, bone graft without osteosynthesis, bone graft with Kirschner wires, percutaneous screws and bone graft with compression screws. The treatment performed depends on the characteristics of the pseudarthrosis and the surgeon's experience. PMID:27042636

  7. PSEUDARTHROSIS OF THE SCAPHOID IN IMMATURE SKELETONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Bentes, Ádria Simone Ferreira; Neto, Miguel Flores do Amaral; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Lech, Osvandré

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature on pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid in skeletally immature individuals, taking into consideration its epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment, as well as its controversies. Knowledge of this subject makes it possible for patients to be given appropriate treatment immediately. Pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid in skeletally immature patients is a rare condition that results from error or lack of diagnosis of a fracture. Thus, careful clinical and radiographic examination should be performed in order to confirm or rule out this diagnosis. Several treatment methods have been reported and have shown good results. These include conservative plaster cast treatment, bone graft without osteosynthesis, bone graft with Kirschner wires, percutaneous screws and bone graft with compression screws. The treatment performed depends on the characteristics of the pseudarthrosis and the surgeon's experience.

  8. Neurosteroids exhibit anticonvulsant action in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S8 (2005), s. 115-116 ISSN 0013-9580. [Joint Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. 02.12.2005-06.12.2005, Washington, DC] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5011007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neurosteroids * anticonvulsants * immature rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  9. Influence of Radioprotectors on Regeneration of the Mucosa of the Small Intestine of the Mouse after X-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisin, J. R. [Radiobiological Department, Nuclear Energy Study Centre, Mol (Belgium)

    1968-08-15

    Intestinal death occurs in mice from the third to the fifth day after doses of 1 to 10 krad and is preceded by inhibition of cell division, destruction of the crypts, shortening of the villi and denudation of the intestinal epithelium, BALB/c mice, some of which were protected with 2-{beta}-aminoethylisothiourea (AET) or with one of the following mixtures of chemical protectors: AET+ 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), AET + 5-HT + glutathione (GSH), and AET + 5- HT + GSH + cysteine, were irradiated with doses of 1350 or 2000 R of X-rays (300 kV, 20 m A , dose rate 100 R/min). Mitotic activity, abnormal anaphases, size of nuclei, pyknosis and number of nuclei, migration of nuclei along the villi and incorporation of thymidine were investigated. In all experiments, lesions appeared later and were less pronounced in the protected than in the non-protected mice. Furthermore, AET and the associations of radioprotectors appear to protect the crypt cells of the small intestine during all phases of the mitotic cycle. The best results were obtained with a mixture of AET + 5-HT + GSH + cysteine. After such treatment and a dose of 2000 R of X-rays, a delay of 30 days is nevertheless needed to allow complete recovery of the duodenal mucosa. The diminution of incorporation of thymidine and the prolongation of the regeneration time are symptoms of a 'biochemical shock', and the importance of this in the mechanism of action of sulphydryl compounds and of mixtures of protective drugs is discussed. (author)

  10. Meniscus transplantation in skeletally immature patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Mininder S; Tepolt, Frances A; Vavken, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Meniscal pathology in skeletally immature patients includes meniscal tears and discoid lateral meniscus. Total or subtotal meniscectomy may occur in patients with discoid lateral meniscus or severe meniscal tears. Meniscal transplantation may be an option in skeletally immature patients status after total or subtotal meniscectomy with knee symptoms or dysfunction. This study focuses on the surgical technique and short-term outcomes of meniscus transplantation in skeletally immature patients. We reviewed our clinical database for skeletally immature patients who had undergone meniscus transplantation with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patients were contacted, invited for a physical exam, and asked to complete a Pedi-IKDC, Lysholm, and Tegner outcomes questionnaire. The study protocol was approved by the responsible institutional review board. Three patients (two females/one male) were eligible for the study, each of whom responded to our invitation indicating availability for physical exam and questionnaire. Two patients had undergone subtotal discoid meniscus resection, leading to early lateral compartment degeneration. One patient developed advanced degeneration after a delay in treatment for a medial bucket-handle tear associated with anterior cruciate ligament rupture. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 12.6±2.3 years. At a mean follow-up of 31±20 months, the mean Pedi-IKDC score was 68.3±4, the mean Lysholm was 55.7±22.3, and the median Tegner was 7 points. There were no indications of growth deformity during the regular postoperative radiological assessments. One patient required subsequent lysis of adhesions along the lateral mini arthrotomy and mobilization under anesthesia. The other two patients were able to return to sports at the same level as before meniscus transplantation and were able to do so within 9 months postoperatively. Over-resection of discoid menisci as well as untreated meniscus injury, the latter typically in

  11. Sublethal dose of irradiation enhances invasion of malignant glioma cells through p53-MMP 2 pathway in U87MG mouse brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Jian; Park, In-Ho; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Song-Yuan; Li, Chun-Hao; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Wen, Min; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly lethal neoplasm that frequently recurs locally after radiotherapy, and most of these recurrences originate from near the irradiated target field. In the present study, we identified the effects of radiation on glioma invasion and p53, TIMP-2, and MMP-2 expression through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The U87MG (wt p53) and U251 (mt p53) human malignant glioma cell lines were prepared, and the U2OS (wt 53) and Saos2 (del p53) osteosarcoma cell lines were used as p53 positive and negative controls. The four cell lines and p53 knock-downed U87MG cells received radiation (2–6 Gy) and were analyzed for expression of p53 and TIMP-2 by Western blot, and MMP-2 activity was detected by zymography. In addition, the effects of irradiation on directional invasion of malignant glioma were evaluated by implanting nude mice with bioluminescent u87-Fluc in vivo followed by MMP-2, p53, and TIMP-2 immunohisto-chemistry and in situ zymography. MMP-2 activity and p53 expression increased in proportional to the radiation dose in cell lines with wt p53, but not in the cell lines with del or mt p53. TIMP-2 expression did not increase in U87MG cells. MMP-2 activity decreased in p53 knock-downed U87MG cells but increased in the control group. Furthermore, radiation enhanced MMP-2 activity and increased tumor margin invasiveness in vivo. Tumor cells invaded by radiation overexpressed MMP-2 and p53 and revealed high gelatinolytic activity compared with those of non-radiated tumor cells. Radiation-induced upregulation of p53 modulated MMP-2 activity, and the imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 may have an important role in glioblastoma invasion by degrading the extracellular matrix. Bioluminescent “U87-Fluc”was useful for observing tumor formation without sacrifice after implanting tumor cells in the mouse brain. These findings suggest that the radiotherapy involved field for malignant glioma needs to be reconsidered, and that future trials should investigate

  12. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm 2 ) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E 2 production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser 473 ) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-κB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  13. Reliable activation of immature neurons in the adult hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A Mongiat

    Full Text Available Neurons born in the adult dentate gyrus develop, mature, and connect over a long interval that can last from six to eight weeks. It has been proposed that, during this period, developing neurons play a relevant role in hippocampal signal processing owing to their distinctive electrical properties. However, it has remained unknown whether immature neurons can be recruited into a network before synaptic and functional maturity have been achieved. To address this question, we used retroviral expression of green fluorescent protein to identify developing granule cells of the adult mouse hippocampus and investigate the balance of afferent excitation, intrinsic excitability, and firing behavior by patch clamp recordings in acute slices. We found that glutamatergic inputs onto young neurons are significantly weaker than those of mature cells, yet stimulation of cortical excitatory axons elicits a similar spiking probability in neurons at either developmental stage. Young neurons are highly efficient in transducing ionic currents into membrane depolarization due to their high input resistance, which decreases substantially in mature neurons as the inward rectifier potassium (Kir conductance increases. Pharmacological blockade of Kir channels in mature neurons mimics the high excitability characteristic of young neurons. Conversely, Kir overexpression induces mature-like firing properties in young neurons. Therefore, the differences in excitatory drive of young and mature neurons are compensated by changes in membrane excitability that render an equalized firing activity. These observations demonstrate that the adult hippocampus continuously generates a population of highly excitable young neurons capable of information processing.

  14. Photodynamic therapy using a novel irradiation source, LED lamp, is similarly effective to photodynamic therapy using diode laser or metal-halide lamp on DMBA- and TPA-induced mouse skin papillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakajima, Susumu; Ogasawara, Koji; Asano, Ryuji; Nakae, Yoshinori; Sakata, Isao; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is useful for superficial skin tumors such as actinic keratosis and Bowen disease. Although PDT is non-surgical and easily-performed treatment modality, irradiation apparatus is large and expensive. Using 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 12-ο-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin papilloma model, we compared the efficacy of TONS501- and ALA-PDT with a LED lamp, a diode laser lamp or a metal-halide lamp on the skin tumor regression. TONS501-PDT using 660 nm LED lamp showed anti-tumor effect at 1 day following the irradiation and the maximal anti-tumor effect was observed at 3 days following the irradiation. There was no significant difference in the anti-tumor effects among TONS501-PDT using LED, TONS501-PDT using diode laser, and 5-aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride (ALA)-PDT using metal-halide lamp. Potent anti-tumor effect on DMBA- and TPA-induced mouse skin papilloma was observed by TONS501-PDT using 660 nm LED, which might be more useful for clinical applications. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine; Ocena zaleznosci pomiedzy sposobem frakcjonowania dawki fotonow i neutronow a nasileniem popromiennego odczynu jelita grubego myszy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasinska, A. [Oncology Center, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction {alpha}/{beta} for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method {alpha}/{beta} for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F{sub r}) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50

  16. Inhibitory effect of immature dendritic cells (iDCs phagocytizing apoptotic lymphocytes on LPS-mediated activation of iDCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-xiang WEI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect of immature dendritic cells(iDCs on LPS-mediated maturation of iDCs phagocytizing allogeneic spleen lymphocytes after being treated bypsoralen plus ultraviolet A(PUVA. Methods Bone marrow-derived DCs were obtained from bone marrow cells of C57BL/6 mice by co-cultivation with recombinant mouse IL-4 and GM-CSF. Spleenlymphocytes(SLP of BALB/c mice were isolated and transformed to PUVA-SLP by treatment with 8-methoxy PUVA irradiation.The bone marrow-derived iDCs of C57BL/6 were co-cultured with PUVA-SLP of BALB/c mice to obtain PUVA¬SLPDCs. After incubation, iDCs and PUVA-SP DCs were induced to maturation by LPS(10ng/ml,24h, and then they were analyzed by flow cytometry.At the same time,the concentrations of the immunoreactive proteins IL-12p70,IL-12p40andIL-10 in cell supernatants were determined by ELISA kits according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Results PUVA-SLP DCs and iDCs were compared in terms of LPS responsiveness.The phenotype of iDCs(CD40,CD80, andCD86 was 50.58%, 66.29%, 71.20%, respectively, showed more rapid changes from immature to mature statein response to LPS stimulation compared with PUVA-SP DCs, the phenotype of which was 21.26%,38.50% and 39.78%, respectively(P0.05.PUVA-SPDCs secreted high levels of IL-10(435.6±13.9, but lowlevels of IL-12(p7018.56±1.3,p4015.22±1.2, as compared with those of iDCs (132.6±2.8, p70192.1±5.9, p40999.8±26.9, P<0.01 after LPS stimulation. Conclusions Although PUVA-SLPDCs do not express as immature phenotype, they can be readily induced to differentiate into mature DCs in the presence of antigen or LPS. It may be suitable to use iDCs clinically in autoimmune diseases and transplantation.

  17. Fibroadenoma with "immature-like" type of usual ductal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezić, Joško; Karaman, Ivana; Kunac, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of the breast fibroadenoma with foci of so-called immature variant of the conventional ductal hyperplasia. This type of usual ductal hyperplasia is histologically characterised by encircling intraductal proliferation of large cells with pale to amphophilic cytoplasm and large nuclei which vary in shape and in staining quality of the chromatin. We showed here, using the cytokeratin immunohistochemistry, that the proliferating cells were not of immature but rather mature immunohistochemical phenotype. Because of the presented discordance between immature histology and mature immunohistological profile we suggest that this rare type of usual ductal hyperplasia should be called "immature-like".

  18. Electrical injury involving the immature skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogden, J.A.; Southwick, W. O.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT

    1981-01-01

    Two patients are presented with significant problems of skeletal development and function consequent to electrical impulse propagation through the immature skeleton. Amputation stump revision in the first case allowed an opportunity to assess specific histological and morphologic changes. Electrical damage completeley destroyed portions of trabecular bone in the metaphyses and epiphyseal ossification centers. There were morphologic irregularities in the physis of the distal femur, while in the proximal tibia complete cessation of growth occurred through presumed electrical ablation of the physis. There was virtually no endosteal or periosteal callus, no intertrabecular inflammatory response, and no new bone formation well over a year following the original injury. The knee joint exhibited severe fibrous ankylosis. In the second case localized arrest of the posterolateral portion of the proximal tibial physis caused a valgus/recurvatum deformation, and probably slowed down distal growth sufficiently in the stump end to prevent irregular terminal overgrowth of the tibia, although it did occur in the fibula. (orig.)

  19. Tetramethyl-O-scutellarin isolated from peels of immature Shiranuhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of the ethanol extract of the immature fruit of a citrus, Shiranuhi, and to identify the active ingredient. Methods: The immature Shiranuhi peel was extracted with 80 % ethanol, and the extract was fractionated with solvents (n-hexane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol) to afford ...

  20. In vitro bulblet regeneration from immature embryos of Muscari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A high frequency bulblet regeneration was achieved for endemic and endangered ornamental plant Muscari azureum using immature embryos. Immature embryos of M. azureum were cultured on callus induction medium consisting of N6 mineral salts and vitamins, 400 mg/L casein + 40 g/L sucrose + 2 g/l L-proline, 2 mg/L ...

  1. Preleukemic change in the bone marrow of whole-body irradiated RFM/Up mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, F.C.; Schug, W.G.; Bostick, W.L.; Smoke, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    In the whole-body irradiated mouse, various late effects of radiation are observed after the recovery from acute radiation injury. Some of these account for the familiar proneness of certain mouse strains to develop leukemias. The two experiments described below were designed to identify such preleukemic changes in blood-forming tissues and to find ways to manipulate them experimentally with the purpose of preventing leukemia. Preleukemic change of the bone marrow appears to be a mere quantitative departure from normal in a qualitatively non-malignant tissue. It entails increased proneness of immature cells to react with latent virus. The data, received are consistent with the assumption that this prononess is enhanced (or brought about) by removal of a controlling influence exerted by the mature cells over their precursors. Re-irradiation combined with intravenous bone marrow substitution offsets the leukemogenic influence of an earlier radiation exposure. The effect of re-irradiation on bone marrow displaying preleukemic lesions corroborates conclusions from earlier experiments on the nature of these lesions. (orig./MG) [de

  2. The happy destiny of frozen haematopoietic stem cells : from immature stem cells to mature applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E; Kluin-Nelemans, JC; Mulder, NH

    Forty years ago, van Putten described in the European Journal of Cancer (see this issue) quantitative studies on the optimal storage techniques of mouse and monkey bone marrow suspensions. Survival of the animals after irradiation following injection with stored bone marrow cell suspensions was the

  3. Immaturity of Visual Fixations in Dyslexic Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIADI eBi Kuyami Guy Aimé

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, behavioral studies recording visual fixations abilities in dyslexic children are scarce. The object of this paper is to explore further the visual fixation ability in dyslexics compared to chronological age-matched and reading age-matched non-dyslexic children. Fifty-five dyslexic children from 7 to 14 years old, fifty-five chronological age-matched non-dyslexic children and fifty-five reading age-matched non-dyslexic children participated to this study. Eye movements from both eyes were recorded horizontally and vertically by a video-oculography system (EyeBrain® T2. The fixation task consisted in fixating a white-filled circle appearing in the centre of the screen for 30 seconds. Results showed that dyslexic children produced a significantly higher number of unwanted saccades than both groups of non-dyslexic children. Moreover, the number of unwanted saccades significantly decreased with age in both groups of non-dyslexic children, but not in dyslexics. Furthermore, dyslexics made more saccades during the last 15 sec of fixation period with respect to both groups of non-dyslexic children. Such poor visual fixation capability in dyslexic children could be due to impaired attention abilities, as well as to an immaturity of the cortical areas controlling the fixation system.

  4. Revascularization and Apical Plug in an Immature Molar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghanizadeh, Leyla; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2018-01-01

    Managing of necrotic permanent teeth with immature apices is a treatment challenges. Treatment of such teeth includes apexification, apical plug and more recently, revascularization technique with the probable advantage of continuation of root development. In the present case report the referred patient had discomfort with a necrotic immature mandibular first molar. Periapical radiography showed a rather large apical lesion around immature roots. Revascularization protocol using calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was indicated for the mesial root. However, in distal canal apical plug technique was applied. At 2-year follow-up, both procedures were successful in relieving patient’s symptoms. Dentin formation and increase in length of the mesial root was obvious. Apical plug and revascularization technique proved to be successful in management of necrotic immature teeth; moreover, revascularization carried the advantage of continuation of root development. PMID:29692851

  5. Recovery of the proliferative and functional integrity of mouse bone marrow in long-term cultures established after whole-body irradiation at different doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierkens, J.G.; Hendry, J.H.; Testa, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    Injury inflicted upon the bone marrow stroma following whole-body irradiation and its repair over a 1-year period has been assessed in murine long-term bone marrow cultures established at increasing time intervals after irradiation. Different doses at different dose rates (10 Gy at 0.05 cGy/min, 4.5 Gy and 10 Gy at 1.6 cGy/min, and 4 x 4.5 Gy [3 weeks between doses] at 60 cGy/min) were chosen so as to maximize differences in effect in the stroma. The cellularity of the adherent layer in long-term cultures established 1 month after irradiation was reduced by 40%-90% depending on the dose and dose rate. Simultaneous with the poor ability of the marrow to form adherent layers, the cumulative spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) production over a 7-week period was reduced to 0% and 30% of control cultures, respectively. The slow recovery of the adherent layer was paralleled by an increase in the numbers of CFU-S and GM-CFC in the supernatant. Cultures established from repeatedly irradiated mice performed poorly over the entire 1-year period. Whereas the regeneration of the stroma was near complete 1 year after irradiation, the CFU-S and GM-CFC levels reached only between 50% and 80% of control cultures, respectively. Also, the concentration of CFU-S and GM-CFC in the supernatant remained persistently lower in cultures established from irradiated mice as compared to control cultures. The levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, which have been implicated in the establishment of the functional integrity of the microenvironment, were not reduced in the adherent layers at any time after irradiation. These results indicate that the regeneration of the stroma is accompanied by an incomplete recovery of active hemopoiesis in vitro

  6. Quantitative studies of the fate of epidermal Langerhans cells after X-irradiation of guinea-pig and mouse footpad skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, S.; Fairweather, J.M.; Townsend, K.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Langerhans cell numbers, morphology and distribution were observed in cross sections of footpad epidermis from 1 to 28 days after exposure of the hind feed of CBA/H mice or albino guinea-pigs to a single absorbed dose of 20 Gy of X-rays. In mice, the number of Langerhans cells reactive with anti-macrophage F4/80 monoclonal antibody steadily declined by approximately 85% within 10 days after irradiation. Remaining Langerhans cells were exceptionally dendritic. Very few Birbeck granule-containing cells were found in murine popliteal lymph nodes before or after irradiation but damaged cells were present in superficial strata of irradiated epidermis. The morphology and number of epidermal F4/80-positive cells approached normal by 15 days after irradiation. In guinea-pigs, gradual suprabasal movement and loss of rounded, ATPase-positive Langerhans cells from the epidermis were detectable from 5 to 20 days after irradiation but the magnitude of the cell loss and redistribution was partially obscured by the simultaneous appearance of clusters of replacement Langerhans cells in the basal layer and by keratinocyte hyperplasia.

  7. Dose-incidence relationships for exencephalia, anophthalmia and prenatal mortality in mouse embryos irradiated with fission neutrons or 250 kV X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, W.; Faulkner, D.N.; Neas, B.R.; Hanneman, G.D.; Darden, E.B. Jr.; Deal, R.B. Jr.; Parker, D.E.

    1987-08-01

    Groups of pregnant mice were irradiated at selected times between 10.00 hours on gestation day 7 and 16.00 hours on day 8. Each group received 0.39 Gy of neutrons or 1.60 Gy of X-rays, or was sham irradiated. We identified a period of high susceptibility of the embryos to radiation-induced exencephalia, anophthalmia and prenatal mortality early in gestation day 8. Dose-incidence relationships in this period were investigated with 0.19-0.48 Gy of neutrons and with 0.40-2.00 Gy of X-rays.

  8. Dose-incidence relationships for exencephalia, anophthalmia and prenatal mortality in mouse embryos irradiated with fission neutrons or 250 kV X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, W.; Faulkner, D.N.; Neas, B.R.; Hanneman, G.D.; Deal, R.B. Jr.; Parker, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Groups of pregnant mice were irradiated at selected times between 10.00 hours on gestation day 7 and 16.00 hours on day 8. Each group received 0.39 Gy of neutrons or 1.60 Gy of X-rays, or was sham irradiated. We identified a period of high susceptibility of the embryos to radiation-induced exencephalia, anophthalmia and prenatal mortality early in gestation day 8. Dose-incidence relationships in this period were investigated with 0.19-0.48 Gy of neutrons and with 0.40-2.00 Gy of X-rays. (author)

  9. Effects of caffeine on X-irradiated synchronous, asynchronous and plateau phase mouse ascites cells: the importance of progression through the cell cycle for caffeine enhancement of killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Nuesse, M.

    1983-01-01

    Caffeine potentiated the killing effect of X-rays on exponentially growing cells giving rise to exponential curves (D 0 =(0.8+-0.05)Gy) at 4mM and 14 hours treatment. Irradiated plateau phase cells were less sensitive. Exponentially growing cells also became less sensitive to the effects of caffeine when they were incubated in the conditioned medium of plateau phase cells(C-medium) in which cell growth was considerably inhibited. Low caffeine concentrations(2mM) enhanced X-ray induced killing of cells irradiated in G 1 -,G 1 /S- or S-phase, but more effectively G 2 -phase cells. High caffeine concentrations (6mM) enhanced killing of cells in all phases of the cell cycle. Incubation of synchronized populations in C-medium during treatment with caffeine (2mM and 6mM) resulted in less potentiation than in cells treated in fresh medium. The expression of X-ray induced potentially lethal damage caused by 6mM caffeine in cells irradiated in various phases resulted in an exponential survival curve with a mean lethal dose of (0.8+-0.05)Gy, but the time of caffeine treatment necessary to reach this curve was different for cells irradiated in different phases. PLD repair, measured as loss of sensitivity to 6mM caffeine (4 hours treatment) was of 1-2 hours duration. (author)

  10. CT findings of overian teratomas : mature versus immature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kim, Young Wol

    1996-01-01

    To differentiate mature and immature ovarian teratomas, using CT findings. The CT findings of ten mature ovarian teratomas (in one patient, bilateral) and ten which were immature were compared, using statistical analysis. Images were evaluated for size, margins, architecture, contents (mural nodules, fat, calcification), septa, local invasion and distant metastasis. These findings were compared with pathologic findings. Of the ten mature tumors, nine were well defined and predominantly cystic in internal architecture, and one was mixed. Mural nodules were found in six tumor, fat in all, distinct calcification in seven, and regular septa in three lesions. Of the ten immature humors, eight had irregular margins. Seven were predominantly solid in internal architecture and irregularly enhanced, two were mixed, and one was mainly cystic. Fat was detected in five lesions, indistinct scattered calcification in six, irregular septa in three, and local invasion of distant metastasis in four patients. Compared with mature ovarian teratomas, those that are immature tend to show CT findings of marginal irregularity, solid mass with irregular enhacement, scattered indistinct calcifications, septal irregularity, local invasion or distant metastasis. Our experience suggests that these findings may be helpful in differentiation of mature and immature ovarian teratomas

  11. Restoring efficiency of hemopoietic cell transplantation in a mouse lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays; L'efficacite restauratrice de la greffe de cellules hemopoietiques chez la souris letalement irradiee par une exposition totale aux rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Gino

    1959-10-15

    This research thesis reports the study of possibility of treatments (or restoration) of a mouse which has been submitted to a lethal dose of X rays. More particularly, the author compared the restoring efficiency of bone marrow and fetal liver injected in a mouse which had been lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays. He also studied the functional status of the hemopoietic graft, and the emergence of the secondary disease in mice which had been as well lethally irradiated and then restored by injection of bone marrow and fetal liver. The author then addressed the influence of the induction of immune tolerance of the host with respect to the donor on the survival of a mouse lethally irradiated and restored by homologue bone marrow [French] Des resultats des recherches que nous avons conduites permettent, dans les limites de nos conditions experimentales, d'eclaircir certains aspects du probleme de la restauration des animaux irradies par la greffe de cellules hemopoietiques. On peut admettre que la moelle osseuse de 30 jours est 2 fois plus efficace que le foie foetal de 16 jours, pour ce qui concerne la survie 30 jours; ceci aussi bien en cas de restauration isologue que homologue. En outre, le foie foetal de 16 jours permet une survie d'environ 50 pc plus elevee que les foies foetaux de 13 ou 19 jours; ceci en cas de restauration isologue. On a aussi montre que les degres de capacite restauratrice des differents tissus hemopoietiques dependent du nombre de cellules souches, progenitrices des granulocytes polynucleaires. Nous avons mis en evidence, en cas de restauration par la moelle osseuse homologue, que la presence d'un greffon hemopoietique fonctionnel est necessaire et suffisante pour l'apparition de la maladie secondaire et que celle-ci est une cause suffisante et non necessaire de la mortalite tardive. La constatation experimentale que la viabilite du greffon est une cause suffisante et non necessaire de la mortalite tardive en est la preuve

  12. Effects of gamma radiation on the Mediterranean flour moth eggs and acceptability of irradiated eggs by trichogramma cacoeciae females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.

    2008-12-01

    The sensitivity of the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella, eggs in different stages of development to gamma irradiation was studied and the acceptability of irradiated eggs by Trichogramma cacoeciae females was examined. In addition, the developmental rate of immature stages (larvae and pupae), resulting from irradiated eggs, to the adult stage was examined and the acceptance of irradiated eggs to T. cacoeciae females was evaluated. Results showed that the radio-sensitivity of E. kuehniella eggs decreased with increasing age. Irradiation also negatively affected survival to the adult stage and the rate of development of immature stages (larvae and pupae) to adults. In addition, the rate of development of immature stages resulting from irradiated eggs was negatively affected. Furthermore, irradiation positively affected the degree of acceptance of eggs to parasitization; irradiated eggs were more acceptable to T. cacoeciae than cold treated ones. (Author)

  13. ZEB2 drives immature T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia development via enhanced tumour-initiating potential and IL-7 receptor signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Steven; Radaelli, Enrico; Blanchet, Odile; Durinck, Kaat; Van der Meulen, Joni; Peirs, Sofie; Taghon, Tom; Tremblay, Cedric S.; Costa, Magdaline; Ghahremani, Morvarid Farhang; De Medts, Jelle; Bartunkova, Sonia; Haigh, Katharina; Schwab, Claire; Farla, Natalie; Pieters, Tim; Matthijssens, Filip; Van Roy, Nadine; Best, J. Adam; Deswarte, Kim; Bogaert, Pieter; Carmichael, Catherine; Rickard, Adam; Suryani, Santi; Bracken, Lauryn S.; Alserihi, Raed; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Rondou, Pieter; Slowicka, Karolina; Huylebroeck, Danny; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Janzen, Viktor; McCormack, Matthew P.; Lock, Richard B.; Curtis, David J.; Harrison, Christine; Berx, Geert; Speleman, Frank; Meijerink, Jules P. P.; Soulier, Jean; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Haigh, Jody J.

    2015-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor leukaemia (ETP-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of human leukaemia that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report translocations targeting the zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor ZEB2 as a recurrent genetic lesion in immature/ETP-ALL. Using a conditional gain-of-function mouse model, we demonstrate that sustained Zeb2 expression initiates T-cell leukaemia. Moreover, Zeb2-driven mouse leukaemia exhibit some features of the human immature/ETP-ALL gene expression signature, as well as an enhanced leukaemia-initiation potential and activated Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) signalling through transcriptional activation of IL7R. This study reveals ZEB2 as an oncogene in the biology of immature/ETP-ALL and paves the way towards pre-clinical studies of novel compounds for the treatment of this aggressive subtype of human T-ALL using our Zeb2-driven mouse model. PMID:25565005

  14. The radioprotector WR-2721 reduces neutron-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in mouse splenocytes when administered prior to or following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Basic, I.

    1992-01-01

    An in vitro T-lymphocyte cloning technique has been applied to study the effects of JANUS fission-spectrum neutron irradiation and the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on the subsequent development of somatic mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in hybrid B6CF1 male mice. In control studies performed to establish an in vitro cloning technique, the mutant frequencies of splenic T-lymphocytes, as a result of exposure to a 100 cGy dose of neutrons, increased with time from a control level of 9 x 10 -7 to a maximum value of 1.7 x 10 -5 at 56 days following irradiation. Between 56 and 150 days after irradiation, mutant frequencies were observed to plateau and remain stable. All subsequent determinations were performed at 56 days following the experimental treatment of animals. WR-2721 at a dose of 400 mg/kg was effective in protecting against the induction of hprt mutants (i.e. a mutant frequency reduction factor, MFRF) following the largest dose of neutrons used (i.e. 150 cGy). The antimutagenic effectiveness of WR-2721 administered 30 min prior to irradiation was unaffected, even when the dose was reduced to 200 mg/kg. These findings confirm our earlier report using the radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,2-diaminopropane (WR-1065) under in vitro conditions, and demonstrate that these agents can be used as effective antimutagens even when they are administered up to 3 h following radiation exposure. (Author)

  15. Effects of 60Co gamma irradiation on Eimeria falciformis (Eimer 1870) Schneider 1875, a protozoan parasite of the mouse, Mus musculus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    Oocysts of an E. falciformis strain first isolated in Wuppertal, Germany were exposed to cobalt-60 gamma radiation under different conditions of oocyst age and development. In order to construct survival curves for oocysts irradiated in the unsporulated state, normalized percent sporulation was plotted as a function of radiation dose. Oocysts irradiated in the sporulated state never caused infection after receiving doses of 50 krads or more. Rarely, oocysts which had received 40 krads produced infection and completed their life cycle in susceptible hosts, but usually the doses beyond which infection did not occur ranged from 30 to 35 krads. Immunity was shown best by hosts which had received unirradiated oocysts in vaccinations prior to challenge. When irradiated sporulated oocysts were used in attempts to immunize susceptible hosts against coccidiosis, the most positive results were obtained from oocysts which had been exposed to 20 krads. Animals receiving vaccinations of oocysts exposed to 20 krads always survived the minimal infections caused by vaccination and also exhibited good immunity to challenge

  16. Follow-up study on histogenesis of microcephaly associated with ectopic gray matter induced by prenatal γ-irradiation in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xue-Zhi; Inouye, Monoru; Takagishi, Yoshiko

    1996-01-01

    Brain malformation with ectopic gray matter was visualized with magnetic resonance imaging in small-sized heads of prenatally exposed atomic bomb survivors. The identical brain malformation was reproduced in mice and its histogenesis was studied in the present experiment. Pregnant mice were exposed to 60 Co γ-irradiation at a single dose of 1.5 Gy on embryonic day 13 (E13), and then injected intraperitoneally with 30 mg/kg BrdU on E15. The extensive dead cells appeared throughout the brain mantle at 6 hours (h) after exposure. On E16 cell aggregations formed rosettes. On E18 a high proportion of BrdU-labeled cells reached the superficial layers of the cortical plate with the remaining cells located in the ectopic neuronal masses. The quantitative study showed that labeled cells in layers II to III were fewer and those in layers IV to VI more numerous in the prenatally irradiated adult mice than in controls. The anti-GFAP immunostaining revealed that the glial fibers in the irradiated mice were preserved, but disorganized. These findings suggested that the majority of migrating neurons were able to arrive at their normal layers, but some neurons remained due to the interrupted migratory pathway and eventually formed ectopic neuronal masses beneath the subcortical white matter. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. The Category of Immaturity in a Legal Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedonkina A.A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We presented psychological and legal approaches to the concept of immaturity, and the definition of the perpetrator. We analyzed the differences of age aspects of the subject of crime in different countries, the criteria for establishing a minimum age of criminal responsibility. We discuss the problem of the possibility of lowering the age of criminal responsibility in the Russian Federation from the point of view of psychological science. We considered the legal category of "mental retardation not associated with mental illness" and its psychological equivalent - "personal immaturity". We describe the main problems arising in the course of the complex judicial, psychological and psychiatric examination for the presence of a mental retardation not associated with mental illness in minor. We presented psychological approaches to the concept of "personal immaturity", described the concept of "mature personality".

  18. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) transformation using immature embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yuji; Tsunashima, Masako; Hiei, Yukoh; Komari, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Wheat may now be transformed very efficiently by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Under the protocol hereby described, immature embryos of healthy plants of wheat cultivar Fielder grown in a well-conditioned greenhouse were pretreated with centrifuging and cocultivated with A. tumefaciens. Transgenic wheat plants were obtained routinely from between 40 and 90 % of the immature embryos, thus infected in our tests. All regenerants were normal in morphology and fully fertile. About half of the transformed plants carried single copy of the transgene, which are inherited by the progeny in a Mendelian fashion.

  19. 2.45-GHz microwave irradiation adversely affects reproductive function in male mouse, Mus musculus by inducing oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, S; Mishra, V; Singh, S P; Chaturvedi, C M

    2014-05-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are reported to produce long-term and short-term biological effects, which are of great concern to human health due to increasing use of devices emitting EMR especially microwave (MW) radiation in our daily life. In view of the unavoidable use of MW emitting devices (microwaves oven, mobile phones, Wi-Fi, etc.) and their harmful effects on biological system, it was thought worthwhile to investigate the long-term effects of low-level MW irradiation on the reproductive function of male Swiss strain mice and its mechanism of action. Twelve-week-old mice were exposed to non-thermal low-level 2.45-GHz MW radiation (CW for 2 h/day for 30 days, power density = 0.029812 mW/cm(2) and SAR = 0.018 W/Kg). Sperm count and sperm viability test were done as well as vital organs were processed to study different stress parameters. Plasma was used for testosterone and testis for 3β HSD assay. Immunohistochemistry of 3β HSD and nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS) was also performed in testis. We observed that MW irradiation induced a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm viability along with the decrease in seminiferous tubule diameter and degeneration of seminiferous tubules. Reduction in testicular 3β HSD activity and plasma testosterone levels was also noted in the exposed group of mice. Increased expression of testicular i-NOS was observed in the MW-irradiated group of mice. Further, these adverse reproductive effects suggest that chronic exposure to nonionizing MW radiation may lead to infertility via free radical species-mediated pathway.

  20. Evidence for mouse Th1- and Th2-like helper T cells in vivo. Selective reduction of Th1-like cells after total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, H.; Mosmann, T.; Strober, S.

    1989-01-01

    Purified CD4+ BALB/c spleen T cells obtained 4-6 wk after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) helped normal syngeneic B cells to produce a vigorous antibody response to TNP keyhole limpet hemocyanin in adoptive cell transfer experiments. However, the same cells failed to transfer delayed-type hypersensitivity to the adoptive hosts as measured by a foot pad swelling assay. In addition, purified CD4+ cells from TLI-treated mice were unable to induce graft vs. host disease in lethally irradiated allogeneic C57BL/Ka recipient mice. In response to mitogen stimulation, unfractionated spleen cells obtained from TLI mice secreted normal levels of IL-4 and IL-5, but markedly reduced levels of IL-2 and INF-gamma. A total of 229 CD4+ clones from spleen cells of both normal and TLI-treated mice were established, and the cytokine secretion pattern from each clone was analyzed. The results demonstrate that the ratio of Th1- and Th2-like clones in the spleens of normal BALB/c mice is 1:0.6, whereas the ratio in TLI mice is approximately 1:7. These results suggest that Th2-like cells recover rapidly (at approximately 4-6 wk) after TLI treatment and account for the early return of antibody helper activity and secretion of IL-4 and IL-5, but Th1-like cells recover more slowly (in approximately 3 mo) after irradiation, and this accounts for the deficit in cell-mediated immunity and the reduced amount of IL-2 and IFN-gamma secretion

  1. Cell biological effects of total body irradiation on growth and differentiation of acute myelogenous leukemia cells compared to normal bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberger, J S; Weichselbaum, R R; Botnick, L E; Sakakeeny, M; Moloney, W C

    1979-01-01

    Radiation therapy is used as total body treatment in preparation of the acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patient for bone marrow transplantation. Many AML patients will have residual leukemia cells at the time of total body irradiation (TBI). In the present study, the effect of TBI on leukemic myeloid cells was compared to the effect on normal marrow granulocytic stem cells (CFUc) in vitro. Little difference from that of normal CFUc was found in the radiosensitivity of two mouse myeloid leukemia cell lines. The effect of TBI on growth of WEHI-3 or J774 cells in millipore diffusion chambers was stimulatory. These AML cell lines as well as others derived from Friend or Abelson virus infected in vitro long term mouse marrow cultures showed some morphologic differentiation by 7 days growth in diffusion chambers in irradiated heterologous rat hosts, but immature cells predominated by day 21. Thus, evidence in murine models of AML indicates that residual AML cells surviving chemotherapy will show no greater susceptibility to radiation killing compared to normal stem cells and will rapidly repopulate the irradiated host.

  2. Rapid maize leaf and immature ear responses to UV-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, P.; Morrow, D.; Fernandes, J.; Walbot, V.

    2011-01-01

    Plants have evolved adaptations to environmental factors, including solar radiation. In addition to acting as a developmental and physiological signal, UV-B photons also cause cellular damage. Elevated UV-B radiation has pleiotropic effects on plant development, morphology, and physiology, but the regulation of systemic responses is not well-understood. To gain a better understanding of the initial events in UV-B acclimation, we have analyzed a 10min to 1h time course of transcriptome responses in irradiated and shielded leaves, and immature maize ears to unravel the systemic physiological and developmental responses in exposed and shielded organs. To identify metabolites as possible signaling molecules, we looked for compounds that increased within 5-90 min in both irradiated and shielded leaves, to explain the kinetics of profound transcript changes within 1h. We found that myoinositol is one such candidate metabolite, and it also has support from RNA profiling: after 1h UV-B, transcripts for myoinositol-1-phosphate synthase, are decreased in both irradiated and shielded leaves suggesting down-regulation of biogenesis. We also demonstrate that if 0.1mM myoinositol is applied to leaves of greenhouse maize, some metabolites that are changed by UV-B are also changed similarly by the chemical treatment. (author)

  3. Use of dexpanthenol and aloe vera to influence the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane (mouse); Beeinflussung der Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut (Maus) durch Dexpanthenol {+-} Aloe vera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlichting, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden Univ. (Germany); Spekl, K.; Doerr, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden Univ. (Germany)]|[Experimentelles Zentrum, Medizinische Fakultaet Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden Univ. (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In summarising the outcome of the present study it can be said spraying the agent on the oral mucous membrane once a day had an effect on the incidence of mucous membrane ulceration in the case of both placebo and dexpanthenol treatment. However, there was no significant difference between placebo and dexpanthenol treatment, the only finding being a slight prolongation of latency time through aloe vera. These experimental findings give good reason to critically reconsider the clinical use of dexpanthenol as a supportive treatment for the prevention of radiogenic mucositis enoralis following irradiation of tumours in the head and neck region. However thorough oral lavage is an effective means of moderating the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane. [German] Zusammenfassend ist festzustellen, dass in den vorliegenden Versuchen mit einmal taeglichem Aufspruehen des Praeparates auf die Mundschleimhaut sowohl die Placebo - wie auch die Dexpanthenol-Behandlung die Inzidenz von Schleimhautulzerationen modifiziert hat; zwischen Placebo- und Dexpanthenol-Behandlung ergab sich jedoch kein signifikanter Unterschied. Lediglich eine geringe Verlaengerung der Latenzzeit durch Aloe vera war zu beobachten. Auf der Basis dieser experimentellen Ergebnisse muss der klinische Einsatz von Dexpanthenol im Rahmen der Supportivtherapie zur Prophylaxe der radiogenen Mucositis enoralis bei der Bestrahlung von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren kritisch ueberdacht werden. Regelmaessige, intensive Mundspuelungen sind jedoch ein probates Mittel zur Verminderung der Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut. (orig.)

  4. Induction and repair of lethal and oncogenic lesions and their relationship to cytogenetic changes in UV-irradiated mouse 10T1/2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, G.L.; Nagasawa, H.; Little, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    While bacterial system is valuable for the pragmatic purpose of screening potential environmental carcinogens, the fundamental difference between prokaryotes and mammalian cells warrant caution against the use of bacterial mutagenic mechanisms to explain the oncogenic process in mammalian cells. The 10 T1/2 cells exposed to UV light in the plateau phase and subcultured immediately to low density to assay for clonogenic survival were extremely resistant to the cytotoxic effect of UV light. Purely physical considerations such as the increased thickness of plateau phase cells and the increased cytoplasmic shielding of UV light from the nuclei were insufficient to account for this unusual resistance. The effect of caffeine on the repair processes in UV-irradiated mammalian cells appears to be exerted during the first DNA synthetic phase after the UV exposure. The daughter DNA synthesized on a UV-irradiated template is of reduced molecular weight. 10 T1/2 cells were exposed in the log phase of growth to UV light, and then they were cultured for the next 48 hours in the complete growth medium containing the specific concentration of caffeine. Parallel experiments were performed, in which cells were exposed for 48 hours to caffeine only with no prior exposure to UV light. It was found that caffeine did not potentiate the transformation by UV light. Caffeine alone induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), whereas the caffeine given after UV light had no effect. The class of UV-induced lesions which induce SCE also leads to malignant transformation. (Yamashita, S.)

  5. Asymbiotic germination of immature embryos of a medicinally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The immature embryos (28 weeks after pollination) were inoculated on M (Mitra et al., 1976), and PDA (Potato Dextrose Agar) media, with and without different growth additives. The seeds showed positive germination response in both the nutrient media but the frequency and onset of germination response and associated ...

  6. Neurotensin enhances estradiol induced DNA synthesis in immature rat uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, A.; Vijayan, E.

    1985-05-27

    Systemic administration of Neurotensin, a tridecapeptide, in immature rats treated with estradiol benzoate significantly enhances uterine DNA synthesis as reflected by the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine. The peptide may have a direct action on the uterus. Substance P, a related peptide, had no effect on uterine DNA synthesis. 18 references, 4 tables.

  7. The Extent of Immature Fish Harvesting by the Commercial Fishery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sustainability of a given fishery is a function of the number of sexually matured fish present in water. If there is intensive immature fishing, the population of fish reaching the stage of recruitment will decrease, which in turn results in lower yield and biomass. The present study was conducted to estimate the extent of ...

  8. Sexing immature Mauritius Fodies Foudia rubra using biometrics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is currently no reliable, affordable method of sexing Mauritius Fodies in their first non-breeding season. Ringed immature fodies from a released population on an offshore island were caught in April and May 2005 and sexed in later breeding seasons. Males had longer wing lengths and tarsi than females, with no ...

  9. Natural Chlorinated Auxins Labeled with Radioactive Chloride in Immature Seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1975-01-01

    Immature seeds were harvested from 15 species grown in perlite/vermiculite containing 36Cl-, but with very low levels of cold Cl-. Autoradiograms of one- and two-dimensional thin layer chromatograms of butanol extracts of lyophilized seeds indicated several radioactive compounds besides the 36Cl-...

  10. Some physical and strength properties of immature Pinus patula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine physical and strength properties of immature Pinus patula grown in Iringa and Njombe regions of Tanzania. Sample trees aged 5 to 15 years were collected from farmers' woodlots. The trees were categorized into 5 age classes: 5 - 7, 8 - 10, 11 - 12, 13 - 14 and 15 years. Four trees from ...

  11. Gamma irradiation effects on the larval stage of the mediterranean flour moth Ephestia Kuehniella (Zell.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Y.S.; Ahmed, M.Y.Y.; El-Banby, M.A.; Abdel-Baky, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Larvae of Ephestia Kuehniella Z. were irradiated with different doses of gamma radiation to study the effect of irradiation on immature stages, pupation, emergence, malformation and sex ratio of the produced insects. Mortality percent of irradiated larvae was increased progressively with increasing the dose. Sublethal doses retarded the duration of the immature stages. There was a gradual decrease in adult eclosion and adult longevity with increasing the dose. Fecundity and fertility of the resulting adults were gradually reduced with the increase of the dose. No complete sterility occurred after larval irradiation. Malformed adults of both sexes increased as the dose was increased

  12. Induction of DNA breakage in X-irradiated nucleoids selectively stripped of nuclear proteins in two mouse lymphoma cell lines differing in radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszewski, M.; Iwanenko, T.

    1998-01-01

    The role of nuclear proteins in protection of DNA against ionizing radiation and their contribution to the radiation sensitivity was examined by an alkaline version of comet assay in two L5178Y (LY) mouse lymphoma cell lines differing in sensitivity t o ionizing radiation. LY-S cells are twice more sensitive to ionizing radiation than LY-R cells (D 0 values of survival curves are 0.5 Gy and 1 Gy, respectively). Sequential removal of nuclear proteins by extraction with NaCl of different concentrations increased the X-ray induced DNA damage in LY-R nucleoids. In contrast, in the radiation sensitive LY-S cell line, depletion of nuclear proteins practically did not affect DNA damage. Although there is no doubt that the main cause of LY-S cells' sensitivity to ionizing radiation is a defect in the repair of double-strand breaks, our data support the concept that nuclear matrix organization may contribute to the cellular susceptibility to DNA damaging agents. (author)

  13. Aphidicolin synchronization of mouse L cells perturbs the relationship between cell killing and DNA double-strand breakage after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.; Broadhurst, S.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between X-ray-induced cell killing and DNA double-strand breakage was examined for synchronized mouse L cells that had entered S-phase, G2-phase, mitosis, and G1-phase following release from aphidicolin and compared to asynchronous culture response. Aphidicolin-synchronized cells showed cycle phase-dependent changes in dose-responses for both killing and DNA dsb. However, on the basis of DNA dsb per unit length of DNA required to produce a lethal lesion, aphidicolin-synchronized cells were more sensitive to X-rays than asynchronous cultures. This sensitivity peaked 2 h after release from aphidicolin treatment, and then progressively declined towards the asynchronous culture value. It is argued that results are due to deregulation of the temporal order of DNA replication following aphidicolin treatment, and can be incorporated into the critical DNA target size model by postulating that the targets for radiation action in mammalian cells are DNA-associated with potentially transcriptionally active proto-oncogenes or constitutive fragile sites. (author)

  14. Role of wild-type p53 in apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death induced by X-irradiation and heat treatment in p53-mutated mouse M10 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Nakano, Hisako; Shinohara, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    The sensitizing effects of wild-type p53 on X-ray-induced cell death and on heat-induced apoptosis in M10, a radiosensitive and Trp53 (mouse p53 gene)-mutated lymphoma cell line which dies through necrosis by X-irradiation, were investigated using three M10 derived transfectants with wild-type TP53 (human p53 gene). Cell death was determined by colony formation and/or dye exclusion test, and apoptosis was detected as the changes in nuclear morphology by Giemsa staining. Expression of wild-type p53 protein increased radiosensitivity of cell death as determined by both clonogenic and dye exclusion assays. This increase in radiosensitivity was attributable largely to apoptosis induction in addition to a small enhancement of necrosis. Interestingly neither pathway to cell death was accompanied by caspase-3 activation. On the other hand, heat-induced caspase-3 dependent apoptotic cell death without transfection was further increased by the transfection of wild-type p53. In conclusion, the introduction of wild-type p53 enhanced apoptotic cell death by X-rays or heat via different mechanisms that do or do not activate caspase-3, respectively. In addition, p53 also enhanced the X-ray-induced necrosis in M10 cells. (author)

  15. The normal mouse urinary bladder reservoir function evaluated by repeated cystometries. Early and late changes after irradiation alone and irradiation combined with cis-diamine-dichloroplatinium (II) and cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundbeck, F.

    1994-01-01

    The main aim of the present thesis was 1) to develop and investigate the feasibility of an in vivo assay in mice using repeated cystometries in a long term study, 2) to demonstrate changes in the bladder reservoir function after radiation alone or combined with cyclophosphamide (CTX) or cis-diamine-dichloroplatinium (II) (cis-DDP), and 3) to investigate the radiation sensitivity of the bladder for changes in dose per fraction, and also to investigate whether there is an association between early and late radiation-induced change in bladder reservoir function. From the results presented the following can be concluded: Bladder fillings in anesthetized mice can be performed repeatedly in long term studies. The procedure is easy to perform and well tolerated by the animals. The level of radiation dose determines the degree of early response and the time of onset of the late response. Combinations with CTX or cis-DDP increase the early radiation response, and the late response is expressed at an earlier time compared with radiation alone. The mouse urinary bladder appears to be one of the least sensitive late responding tissues to changes in dose per fraction. 93 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  16. Alpha-CaMKII deficiency causes immature dentate gyrus, a novel candidate endophenotype of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasaki Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elucidating the neural and genetic factors underlying psychiatric illness is hampered by current methods of clinical diagnosis. The identification and investigation of clinical endophenotypes may be one solution, but represents a considerable challenge in human subjects. Here we report that mice heterozygous for a null mutation of the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII+/- have profoundly dysregulated behaviours and impaired neuronal development in the dentate gyrus (DG. The behavioral abnormalities include a severe working memory deficit and an exaggerated infradian rhythm, which are similar to symptoms seen in schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric disorders. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus of these mutants revealed that the expression levels of more than 2000 genes were significantly changed. Strikingly, among the 20 most downregulated genes, 5 had highly selective expression in the DG. Whereas BrdU incorporated cells in the mutant mouse DG was increased by more than 50 percent, the number of mature neurons in the DG was dramatically decreased. Morphological and physiological features of the DG neurons in the mutants were strikingly similar to those of immature DG neurons in normal rodents. Moreover, c-Fos expression in the DG after electric footshock was almost completely and selectively abolished in the mutants. Statistical clustering of human post-mortem brains using 10 genes differentially-expressed in the mutant mice were used to classify individuals into two clusters, one of which contained 16 of 18 schizophrenic patients. Nearly half of the differentially-expressed probes in the schizophrenia-enriched cluster encoded genes that are involved in neurogenesis or in neuronal migration/maturation, including calbindin, a marker for mature DG neurons. Based on these results, we propose that an "immature DG" in adulthood might induce alterations in behavior and

  17. Long-term culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia isolated from immature and adult bovine testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyatno; Kitamura, Yuka; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Minami, Naojiro; Yamada, Masayasu; Imai, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    Undifferentiated spermatogonia eventually differentiate in the testis to produce haploid sperm. Within this cell population, there is a small number of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). SSCs are rare cells in the testis, and their cellular characteristics are poorly understood. Establishment of undifferentiated cell line would provide an indispensable tool for studying their biological nature and spermiogenesis/spermatogenesis in vitro. However, there have been few reports on the long-term culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia in species other than rodents. Here, we report the derivation and long-term in vitro culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia cell lines from immature and adult bovine testes. Cell lines from immature testes were maintained in serum-free culture conditions in the presence of glial-cell-line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) and bovine leukemia inhibitory factor (bLIF). These cell lines have embryonic stem (ES)-like cell morphology, express pluripotent-stem-cell-specific and germ-cell-specific markers at the protein and mRNA levels, and contributed to the inner cell mass (ICM) of embryos in the blastocyst stage. Meanwhile, cell lines established from adult testes were maintained in low-serum media in the presence of 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO). These cell lines have characteristics resembling those of previously reported male mouse germ cell lines as confirmed by their botryoidally aggregated morphology, as well as the expression of germ-cell-specific markers and pluripotent stem cell markers. These findings could be useful for the development of long-term culture of undifferentiated spermatogonia, which could aid in conservation of species and improvement of livestock production through genome editing technology. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Clear cell chondrosarcoma mimicking chondroblastoma in a skeletally immature patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Christopher P.; Nelson, Scott D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Eckardt, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the case of a clear cell chondrosarcoma (CCCS) occurring in the femoral head of a 14-year-old skeletally immature boy. Radiographic examination revealed a well-defined, osteolytic lesion in the epiphysis of the femoral head. Given the patient's age and the radiographic appearance of the lesion, chondroblastoma was high on the differential diagnosis. A frozen section was performed at the time of open biopsy was felt to be consistent with either chondroblastoma or CCCS. CCCS in a skeletally immature patient was felt to be unlikely, so curettage and bone grafting was performed. Final pathology review, however, confirmed the diagnosis of CCCS. The patient was taken back to surgery 4 weeks later for a wide resection and hemiarthroplasty. (orig.)

  19. Toxicity of injected radium-226 in immature dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C. [and others

    1995-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the toxicity of injected {sup 226}Ra in immature dogs and to compare the results with those from studies of injected {sup 226}Ra in young adult dogs. An historic objective of these studies, initiated at the University of Utah and continued at ITRI, was to compare the results in dogs to the population of dial painters who ingested {sup 226}Ra as young adults. Age at the time of exposure is considered to be an important factor in dosimetry and risk of developing radiation-induced disease, particularly bone cancer. In summary, dogs injected with {sup 226}Ra when immature had increased occurrences of bone tumors in a dose-related fashion.

  20. Toxicity of injected radium-226 in immature dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the toxicity of injected 226 Ra in immature dogs and to compare the results with those from studies of injected 226 Ra in young adult dogs. An historic objective of these studies, initiated at the University of Utah and continued at ITRI, was to compare the results in dogs to the population of dial painters who ingested 226 Ra as young adults. Age at the time of exposure is considered to be an important factor in dosimetry and risk of developing radiation-induced disease, particularly bone cancer. In summary, dogs injected with 226 Ra when immature had increased occurrences of bone tumors in a dose-related fashion

  1. Clear cell chondrosarcoma mimicking chondroblastoma in a skeletally immature patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Christopher P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Madigan Army Medical Center, Ft. Lewis, WA (United States); Nelson, Scott D. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, CA (United States); Seeger, Leanne L. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, CA (United States); Eckardt, Jeffrey J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    We report the case of a clear cell chondrosarcoma (CCCS) occurring in the femoral head of a 14-year-old skeletally immature boy. Radiographic examination revealed a well-defined, osteolytic lesion in the epiphysis of the femoral head. Given the patient's age and the radiographic appearance of the lesion, chondroblastoma was high on the differential diagnosis. A frozen section was performed at the time of open biopsy was felt to be consistent with either chondroblastoma or CCCS. CCCS in a skeletally immature patient was felt to be unlikely, so curettage and bone grafting was performed. Final pathology review, however, confirmed the diagnosis of CCCS. The patient was taken back to surgery 4 weeks later for a wide resection and hemiarthroplasty. (orig.)

  2. An interesting case of pyoderma gangrenosum with immature hystiocytoid neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besner Morin, Catherine; Côté, Benoit; Belisle, Annie

    2018-01-01

    We present a unique case of a 36-year-old male who developed more than 20 pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) ulcers showing on histopathology a dense inflammatory infiltrate composed of histiocytoid mononuclear immature cells with a strong positivity for myeloperoxidase and Leder stain, suggesting a myeloid lineage in the absence of a concomitant myeloproliferative disorder. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome (SS) is now recognized as a histological subtype of SS. Although PG and SS belong to the spectrum of neutrophilic diseases, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a "Histiocytoid pyoderma gangrenosum" encompassing immature granulocytes in the absence of leukemia cutis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Mouse adhalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, L; Vachon, P H; Kuang, W

    1997-01-01

    . To analyze the biological roles of adhalin, we cloned the mouse adhalin cDNA, raised peptide-specific antibodies to its cytoplasmic domain, and examined its expression and localization in vivo and in vitro. The mouse adhalin sequence was 80% identical to that of human, rabbit, and hamster. Adhalin...... was specifically expressed in striated muscle cells and their immediate precursors, and absent in many other cell types. Adhalin expression in embryonic mouse muscle was coincident with primary myogenesis. Its expression was found to be up-regulated at mRNA and protein levels during myogenic differentiation...

  4. Ethamsylate and lung permeability in ventilated immature newborn rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, M; Sun, B; Robertson, B

    1994-01-01

    The leakage of proteins in the immature neonatal lung can reduce the effect of exogenous surfactant. The effect of ethamsylate, a more specific prostaglandin inhibitor than indomethacin and aspirin-like drugs, on alveolar albumin leak was studied in a group of 27 immature newborn rabbits (gestational age 27 days). A pilot study was carried out using 4 animals and low-dose ethamsylate (10 mg/kg). A second group of animals (n = 12) received at birth, by intravenous injection, ethamsylate (50 mg/kg) and 10% human albumin (7 ml/kg). Animals not receiving ethamsylate (n = 11) served as control group. After 30 min of artificial ventilation with standard tidal volume (10 ml/kg) the lungs were lavaged and the amount of human albumin in lung lavage fluid was determined by immunodiffusion. No statistically significant differences were found in lung-thorax compliance and vascular to alveolar albumin leak between ethamsylate-treated animals and controls (p > 0.5). However, there was a statistically significant negative correlation between protein leak and lung compliance (r = -0.41; p ethamsylate administration on neonatal lung permeability in the immature neonate confirming that lung permeability is inversely related to compliance.

  5. Possible use of calcifying nanoparticles in immature root apex treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S Alenazy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are reports in the literature, which describe different techniques and materials in the challenging management of thin dentin walls and immature root apex. It has been suggested that calcifying nanoparticles (CNPs could be used in the management of these conditions. The Hypothesis: Compositionally modified CNPs made into a paste could become efficacious in managing thin dentin walls and immature root apex. Calcium and phosphate ions when mixed with CNPs could form a synthetic nanopaste that clinicians could use to manage thin dentin walls and to get a biological seal for immature root apex. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: CNPs can replicate and could facilitate the aggregations of calcium hydroxyapatite to produce a self-surrounding shell. These characteristics of CNPs could be used through their biomineralization process as initial nidus of calcification for further calcification progression to achieve total biological apical seal. If the hypothesis could be supported by biomineralization behavior of the paste (CNPs, Ca2 + , and PO4− , a new therapeutic agent would have been added to the armamentarium of endodontists. There is need for more in vivo and in vitro investigations of modified nanopaste to manage these conditions.

  6. Dental Pulp Revascularization of Necrotic Permanent Teeth with Immature Apices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ashiry, Eman A; Farsi, Najat M; Abuzeid, Sawsan T; El Ashiry, Mohamed M; Bahammam, Hammam A

    The treatment of immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis presents challenges in endodontic and pediatric dentistry. Revascularization is a recent treatment for such cases as an alternative to conventional apexification. The purpose is to examine the effect of a pulpal revascularization procedure on immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis. Twenty patients were enrolled for pulp revascularization procedure by root canal disinfection using a triple antibiotic mixture for 1-2 weeks, followed by creating a blood clot, sealing the root canal orifice using white mineral trioxide aggregate and a coronal seal of composite resin. Patients were recalled periodically for up to 24 months. During follow-up, all patients were asymptomatic. Three cases of chronic apical periodontitis showed clinical disappearance of the sinus tract 2 weeks after treatment. Radiography revealed progressive periapical radiolucency resolution within the first 12 months. Within 12-24 months, the treated teeth showed progressive increases in dentinal wall thickness, root length and continued root development. Clinical and radiographic evidence showed successful revascularization treatments of immature necrotic permanent teeth with apical periodontitis. More studies are necessary to understand the underlying mechanisms and to perform histopathology of the pulp space contents after revascularization procedures.

  7. 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol Promotes Recovery of Immature Hematopoietic Cells Following Myelosuppressive Radiation and Synergizes With Thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts-Kaya, Fatima S.F.; Visser, Trudi P.; Arshad, Shazia [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Frincke, James; Stickney, Dwight R.; Reading, Chris L. [Harbor Therapeutics, Inc, San Diego, California (United States); Wagemaker, Gerard, E-mail: g.wagemaker@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol (5-AED) stimulates recovery of hematopoiesis after exposure to radiation. To elucidate its cellular targets, the effects of 5-AED alone and in combination with (pegylated) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and thrombopoietin (TPO) on immature hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated following total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were exposed to radiation delivered as a single or as a fractionated dose, and recovery of bone marrow progenitors and peripheral blood parameters was assessed. Results: BALB/c mice treated with 5-AED displayed accelerated multilineage blood cell recovery and elevated bone marrow (BM) cellularity and numbers of progenitor cells. The spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) assay, representing the life-saving short-term repopulating cells in BM of irradiated donor mice revealed that combined treatment with 5-AED plus TPO resulted in a 20.1-fold increase in CFU-S relative to that of placebo controls, and a 3.7 and 3.1-fold increase in comparison to 5-AED and TPO, whereas no effect was seen of Peg-G-CSF with or without 5-AED. Contrary to TPO, 5-AED also stimulated reconstitution of the more immature marrow repopulating (MRA) cells. Conclusions: 5-AED potently counteracts the hematopoietic effects of radiation-induced myelosuppression and promotes multilineage reconstitution by stimulating immature bone marrow cells in a pattern distinct from, but synergistic with TPO.

  8. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Aurel Sava

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-GFP transgenic mice (postnatal days 2-4. In 46 % of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 mM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs by 744.3 ± 93.8 % (n = 120 cells. This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 mM tetrodotoxine, 1 mM strychnine or 3 mM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX and (± R(--3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate action potentials in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors.

  9. Oxidative stress in immature brain following experimentally-induced seizures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S39-S48 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/08/0292; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : immature rats * experimentally-induced seizures * oxidative stress * mitochondrial dysfunction * antioxidant defense Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  10. Microbiota is immature in moderate and severe acute malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Globally 19 million under-five children suffer from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) while 51.5 million children have moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). These two conditions, together known as acute malnutrition, are responsible for 14.6% of all under-five deaths. Case fatality rate can be reduced with treatment of SAM, which however, is not readily available everywhere. Even with effective treatment, recovery can be slow and relapse not uncommon. Lack of nutrients is one of the causes of acute malnutrition but other factors including infections, inter- and intra-generational factors are also believed to play important roles in the etiology. The gut microbiota is another factor; however its relationship with nutritional interventions and therapeutic response is poorly understood. We studied the gut microbiota of children suffering from severe and moderate acute malnutrition in Bangladesh. Children with SAM were studied during the acute phase, nutritional rehabilitation and follow up in icddr,b Hospital, Dhaka. During the nutritional rehabilitation phase, the children were randomized to either RUTF or a combination of local diets (khichuri and halwa). Children with MAM were randomly selected from a birth cohort in a slum settlement and so were healthy controls. Gut microbiota were identified using 16S rRNA datasets generated from monthly fecal samples obtained from the healthy control children. ‘Relative microbiota maturity index’ and ‘microbiota-for-age Z-score’ were computed from a model developed from the age-discriminatory bacterial species identified in the healthy and acutely malnourished children. The index and the Z-score compare maturation of an acutely malnourished child’s fecal microbiota relative to healthy children of similar chronological age. Our results indicate that SAM is associated with relative immaturity of the gut microbiota. Moreover, treatment with either RUTF or the local diets is associated with incomplete recovery of

  11. Education to Immaturity, or from Biopolitics to Psychopower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Żychliński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantia, or immaturity, is one of the cha-racteristic “postmodern maladies”. Such a diagnosebecomes easier to comprehend if one considers an essen-tial change: while from Michel Foucalt’s perspective theclassical biopolitics comes down to biopower, exercisedover societies in order to instrumentalize them as “pro-duction machines”, from Bernard Stiegler’s point ofview biopolitics has been replaced these days in Westernsocieties with psychopower, instrumentalizing com-munities as “consuming machines”. ~e aim of mypaper is to reconstruct the main forms of the realizationand the consequences of that postmodern psychopowerand to outline ways to counteract it.

  12. Simulation analysis of radiation fields inside phantoms for neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Y.; Miyahara, N.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation fields inside phantoms have been calculated for neutron irradiation. Particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS was employed for the calculation. Energy and size dependences of neutron dose were analyzed using tissue equivalent spheres of different size. A voxel phantom of mouse was developed based on CT images of an 8-week-old male C3H/HeNs mouse. Deposition energy inside the mouse was calculated for 2- and 10-MeV neutron irradiation. (author)

  13. Micropropagation of onion (Allium cepa L.) from immature inflorescences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    In vitro plant production by direct organogenesis from immature flower heads is an ideal approach for clonal propagation of onions (Allium cepa L.). This technique ensures genetic stability, high propagation rate, and maintains donor plant of explants with an advantage over other means of in vitro regeneration. Onion micropropagation is usually applied in breeding programs, maintenance, and multiplication of cytoplasmic-male sterile lines for hybrid production, germplasm conservation, and as a tool for the application of other biotechnologies. For in vitro culture, mature onion bulbs are induced to reproductive phase by vernalization and forced to inflorescence initiation. Immature umbels are dissected from bulbs or cut directly when they appear from the pseudostem among the leaves. Disinfected inflorescences are cultivated in BDS basal medium supplemented with 30 g/L sucrose, 0.1 mg/L naphthalene acetic acid, 1 mg/L N (6)-benzyladenine, and 8 g/L agar, pH 5.5, under 16 h photoperiod white fluorescent light (PPD: 50-70 μmol/m(2)s) for 35 days. The regenerated shoot clumps are divided and subculture under the same conditions. For bulbification phase, the individual shoots are cultured in BDS basal medium containing 90 g/L sucrose, without plant growth regulators, pH 5.5, under 16 h photoperiod. Microbulbs can be directly cultivated ex vitro without acclimation.

  14. Reexamination of the immature hominid maxilla from Tangier, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minugh-Purvis, N

    1993-12-01

    Reexamination of the immature Upper Pleistocene hominid maxilla from Mugharet el-'Aliya (Tangier), Morocco is undertaken in light of new evidence on the growth and development of Upper Pleistocene hominids. Metric and qualitative comparisons were made with 17 immature Upper Pleistocene maxillae, and with a recent Homo sapiens sapiens sample. No unambiguous criteria for aligning the maxilla with Neandertals were found, although one character, the degree of maxillary flexion on the zygoma, strongly suggests that this child could be a representative of H.s. sapiens. The probable lack of a canine fossa in Mugharet el-'Aliya 1, the primary criterion used previously to align it with Neandertals, cannot be accurately extrapolated to its adult form from this juvenile. The present evidence suggests that it is inappropriate to refer to this fossil as "Neandertal-like" or as a North African "neandertaloid." Thus, the Tangier maxilla should not be cited as evidence for the presence of Neandertal facial features in North Africa during the Upper Pleistocene.

  15. Historical notes on immaturity. Part 2: surviving against the odds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Survivors of immaturity of outstanding intelligence include Fortunio Licetus, born in 1577, and Isaac Newton, born in 1643. Reliable descriptions began appearing around 1820, and over a dozen infants were born weighing under 1000 g and before World War II, who developed normally. From 1876 to 2006, the birth weight at which half of the infants survived dropped from 2200 to 600 g. Statistics depended on how abortion, stillbirth and live birth were defined, which differed greatly from country to country. WHO definitions in 1993 required the registration of all infants weighing 500 g (22 complete weeks) or above. This definition was not universally adopted, resulting in considerable underreporting. Many medical societies issued ethical recommendations concerning the obligatory or optional treatment of immature infants. The "window", at which treatment is optional has been set at 22-23 weeks (Japan, Germany), 23-24 weeks (UK, USA, Canada), or 24-26 weeks (France, Netherlands, Switzerland). Instead of assessing an infant's individual prognosis, and ignoring its gender, co-morbidities, and particular cause of premature delivery, these rules frequently relied on gestational age alone to initiate or withhold life support.

  16. Characteristics of sugar uptake by immature maize embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, S.M.; Jones, R.J.; Brenner, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Characteristics of sugar uptake by immature maize embryos were determined in vitro utilizing a 14 C-sugar solution incubation method. Hexose uptake rates were greater than those for sucrose, however, all showed biphasic kinetics. Glucose and fructose saturable components were evidence at <50 mM and sucrose at <5 mM. Chemical inhibitors (CCCP, DNP, NaCN, and PCMBS) and low temperature reduced sugar uptake. Sucrose influx was pH dependent while glucose was not. Embryos maintained a high sucrose to hexose ratio throughout development. At 25 days after pollination sucrose levels exceeded 200 mM while hexose levels remained below 5 mM. Glucose was rapidly converted to sucrose upon transport into the embryo. These circumstantial data indicate that sugar uptake by immature maize embryos is metabolically dependent and carrier mediated. Furthermore, sucrose transport appears to occur against its concentration gradient involving a H+/sucrose cotransport mechanism, while glucose influx is driven by its concentration gradient and subsequent metabolism

  17. Utility of Immature Granulocyte Percentage in Pediatric Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Eleanor K.; Griffin, Russell L.; Mortellaro, Vincent; Beierle, Elizabeth A.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Chen, Mike K.; Russell, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of abdominal surgery in children. Adjuncts are utilized to help clinicians predict acute or perforated appendicitis, which may affect treatment decisions. Automated hematologic analyzers can perform more accurate automated differentials including immature granulocyte percentages (IG%). Elevated IG% has demonstrated improved accuracy for predicting sepsis in the neonatal population than traditional immature to total neutrophil count (I/T) ratios. We intended to assess the additional discriminatory ability of IG% to traditionally assessed parameters in the differentiation between acute and perforated appendicitis. Materials and Methods We identified all patients with appendicitis from July 2012 to June 2013 by ICD-9 code. Charts were reviewed for relevant demographic, clinical, and outcome data, which were compared between acute and perforated appendicitis groups using Fischer’s exact and t-test for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. We utilized an adjusted logistic regression model utilizing clinical lab values to predict the odds of perforated appendicitis. Results 251 patients were included in the analysis. Those with perforated appendicitis had a higher white blood cell (WBC) count (p=0.0063), C-reactive protein (CRP) (pappendicitis. The c-statistic of the final model was 0.70, suggesting fair discriminatory ability in predicting perforated appendicitis. Conclusions IG% did not provide any additional benefit to elevated CRP and presence of left shift in the differentiation between acute and perforated appendicitis. PMID:24793450

  18. Immature germ cells in semen - correlation with total sperm count and sperm motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya S Patil

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Round cells in semen can be differentiated into immature germ cells and leucocytes using simple staining methods. The differential counts mentioned in a semen report give valuable and clinically relevant information. In this study, we observed a negative correlation between total count and immature germ cells, as well as sperm motility and shedding of immature germ cells. The latter was statistically significant with a P value 0.000.

  19. In vitro investigation of heat transfer phenomenon in human immature teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Maryam; Moghimi, Sahar; Shafagh, Mina; Kalani, Hadi; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element models were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the model validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth) and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth). When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling illustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are required to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth.

  20. The ability of juvenile offenders with personality immaturity to conscious leadership by their actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedonkina A.A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the characteristics of the phenomenon of personality immaturity, stand out its main features, described differences in their quantitative representation of juvenile offenders, clinical features the diagnosis of mental disorders in juvenile offenders with personality immaturity. Special attention is given to how identified characteristics of personality immaturity affects to the ability of juvenile offenders to conscious regulation of their activities, including the potential ability and current ability of minors accused to realize the significance of their actions and control them when they commit socially dangerous acts. The studied parameters are compared in samples of juvenile offenders with personality immaturity and without it.

  1. Single-mass mutations associated with mouse lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, I.; Berman, J.W.; Diamond, L.E.; Newcomb, E.W.; Villasante, A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors study the induction of mouse lymphomas after treatment with a chemical carcinogen, nitrosomethyl urea (NMU), or with gamma irradiation. The koplan fractionated gamma radiation scheme and an established protocol for NMU tumor formation were chosen as protocols for induction of mouse lymphomas. In both cases, the mice developed thymic lymphomas with up to 90% incidence. In NMU induction, the latency period is shorter than irradiation

  2. Patterns of x-radiation-induced Schwann cell development in spinal cords of immature rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Heard, J.K.; Leiting, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Schwann cells, Schwann cell myelin, and connective tissue components develop in the spinal cord of the immature rat following exposure to x-rays. For the purposes of this paper, these intraspinal peripheral nervous tissue constituents are referred to as IPNT. A series of investigations are in progress to elucidate factors related to the development of IPNT, and the present study is a light microscopic evaluation of the relationship between the amount of radiation administered (1,000-3,000R) to the lumbosacral spinal cord in 3-day-old rats and the incidence and distribution of IPNT at intervals up to 60 days postirradiation (P-I). The results showed that IPNT was present in only 33% of the rats exposed to 1,000R, whereas its presence was observed in 86% or more of those in the 2,000-, 2,500-, and 3,000R groups. The distribution of IPNT was quite limited in the 1,000R group, where it was restricted to the spinal cord-dorsal root junction and was found in only a few sections within the irradiated area. The distribution was more widespread with increasing amounts of radiation, and IPNT occupied substantial portions of the dorsal funiculi and extended into the dorsal gray matter in the 3,000R group. In all aR mals developing IPNT in the groups receiving 2,000R or more, the IPNT was present in essentially all sections from the irradiated area. Further studies will compare in detail spinal cords exposed to 1,000R in which IPNT is an infrequent, limited occurrence with those exposed to higher doses where IPNT occurs in a more widespread fashion in essentially all animals

  3. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae Immatures in Maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Corrêa Varella

    Full Text Available We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae. Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L. fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda.

  4. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  5. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K D; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda.

  6. Oxidative Stress after Surgery on the Immature Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fudulu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric heart surgery is associated with increased inflammation and the production of reactive oxygen species. Use of the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass during correction of congenital heart defects generates reactive oxygen species by various mechanisms: haemolysis, neutrophil activation, ischaemia reperfusion injury, reoxygenation injury, or depletion of the endogenous antioxidants. The immature myocardium is more vulnerable to reactive oxygen species because of developmental differences compared to the adult heart but also because of associated congenital heart diseases that can deplete its antioxidant reserve. Oxidative stress can be manipulated by various interventions: exogenous antioxidants, use of steroids, cardioplegia, blood prime strategies, or miniaturisation of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. However, it is unclear if modulation of the redox pathways can alter clinical outcomes. Further studies powered to look at clinical outcomes are needed to define the role of oxidative stress in paediatric patients.

  7. Small mammals as hosts of immature ixodid ticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Horak

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and twenty-five small mammals belonging to 16 species were examined for ticks in Free State, Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces, South Africa, and 18 ixodid tick species, of which two could only be identified to genus level, were recovered. Scrub hares, Lepus saxatilis, and Cape hares, Lepus capensis, harboured the largest number of tick species. In Free State Province Namaqua rock mice, Aethomys namaquensis, and four-striped grass mice, Rhabdomys pumilio, were good hosts of the immature stages of Haemaphysalis leachi and Rhipicephalus gertrudae, while in Mpumalanga and Limpopo Provinces red veld rats, Aethomys chrysophilus, Namaqua rock mice and Natal multimammate mice, Mastomys natalensis were good hosts of H. leachi and Rhipicephalus simus. Haemaphysalis leachi was the only tick recovered from animals in all three provinces.

  8. Effect of gamma radiation on immature winter wheat embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorova, N.; Morgun, V.; Logvinenko, V.; Karpets, A.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The aim was to study the effect of mutagenic treatment on callus initiation, shoot differentiation and enhancement of the variation frequency and spectrum. Seven winter wheat genotypes were used as donors for immature embryos. Spikes 14 days after anthesis were treated with 4 Gy gamma rays, then embryos were isolated. According to the effect of gamma rays on the callus induction frequency (CIF) the genotypes were divided into three groups, in the first group we observed GIF stimulation (Kiyanka, Stepnyak, UK-8, Ironovskaya 61) as compared with the control (C); the second group - CIF on the C level (Mironovskaya 806, Kharkovskaya II) and the third group - CIF is lower than in C (Lutescens 7). Regeneration frequency was reduced greatly in all genotypes under mutagenic treatment. Variation has been found for plant height, number of productive tillers, length of vegetation period, spike morphology and size, awn type. (author)

  9. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in an immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Christopher J; Lewandowski, Albert H; Skowronek, Anthony J

    2007-03-01

    An immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) with a history of seizure-like episodes developed signs of respiratory disease. The initial clinical diagnosis was pneumonia, and antibiotic therapy was started. The animal failed to improve after 14 days of therapy and developed unilateral, bloody nasal discharge. Endoscopic examination and radiography revealed a soft tissue mass in the nasopharynx depressing the soft palate. The tapir died 32 days after initial presentation. Histologic examination of the mass demonstrated a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with elongate nuclei forming densely packed fascicles. The neoplastic spindle cells showed prominent cross-striations. Immunohistochemistry revealed the cells to be positive for desmin and myoglobin, but negative for smooth muscle actin, confirming diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common nasopharyngeal soft tissue tumor of humans, and it has been reported infrequently in dogs, horses, and pigs. Neoplasia should be a differential diagnosis in cases of unilateral nasal discharge and inspiratory stridor, even in young animals.

  10. Root fracture in immature anterior teeth followed for 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, T; Kojima, Y; Nishioka, T; Maki, K; Kimura, M

    2005-08-01

    We report a case of injury to an immature tooth, observed over a period of 15 years. In 1987, a 9-year-old boy fell down in a schoolyard. The right central incisor demonstrated palato-version and radiographic observations revealed that the roots of both central incisors were incomplete. Further, a root fracture in the apical region of the central incisors was observed. During the first treatment visit, the right central incisor was repositioned and both teeth splinted. After confirming that the line of fracture was aligned, the fixation was continued for 2 months. The teeth were examined periodically for the next 15 years. Both teeth had favorable outcomes with continued root development of both the apical and coronal segments with good apposition of the fracture lines.

  11. Immature platelet fraction in bacterial sepsis severity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuang, M. H.; Ginting, F.; Hariman, H.

    2018-03-01

    Sepsis is an infection-induced syndrome, mostly caused by bacteria, of organ dysfunctions that caused by host response dysregulations. One of the simplest sepsis-indicator is platelet and its indexes. A new platelet parameter called immature platelet count (IPF) became theinterest in this study. The study aims to see whether IPF could assess sepsis severity by procalcitonin (PCT).Sixty-four of seventy-one patients with increased PCT were included in this cross-sectional study and separated into three groups based on their PCT levels. IPF showed no significance among the three groups (p-value>0.05) while platelet count was significant (p-valuesepsis severity based on PCT showed larger platelet count, as the result of platelet destructions caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and endotoxins.

  12. In search of better spermatogonial preservation by supplementation of cryopreserved human immature testicular tissue xenografts with N-acetylcysteine and testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan ePoels

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled slow-freezing is the procedure currently applied for immature testicular tissue cryobanking in clinical practice. Vitrification has been proposed as a promising alternative, with a view to better preserving spermatogonial stem cells for future fertility restoration by autografting in young boys suffering from cancer. It appears that besides the potential influence of the cryopreservation technique used, the transplantation procedure itself has a significant impact on spermatogonial loss observed in ITT xenografts. Eighteen immature testicular tissue pieces issuing from 6 patients aged 2-15 years were used. Fragments of fresh tissue (serving as ungrafted controls, frozen-thawed tissue, frozen-thawed tissue supplemented with N-acetylcysteine and frozen-thawed tissue supplemented with testosterone xenografted to nude mice for 5 days were compared. Upon graft removal, histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate spermatogonia, intratubular proliferation and intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. A significant decrease in the integrity of intact seminiferous tubules was found in all three grafted groups. Spermatogonia were observed by immunohistochemistry in all grafted groups, with recovery rates of 67%, 63% and 53% respectively for slow-frozen tissue, slow-frozen tissue supplemented with N-acetylcysteine and slow-frozen tissue supplemented with testosterone. Apoptosis evidenced by active caspase-3 and TUNEL was similar in all grafts. The study is limited by the low availability of immature testicular tissue samples of human origin, and no clear impact of graft supplementation was found. The mouse xenotransplantation model needs to be refined to investigate human spermatogenesis in human immature testicular tissue grafts.

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  14. Resistance of human and mouse myeloid leukemia cells to UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poljak-Blazi, M.; Osmak, M.; Hadzija, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of mouse bone marrow and myeloid leukemia cells and sensitivity of human myeloid leukemia cells to UV light was tested. Criteria were the in vivo colony-forming ability of UV exposed cells and the inhibition of DNA synthesis during post-irradiation incubation for 24 h in vitro. Mouse bone marrow cells irradiated with a small dose of UV light (5 J/m 2 ) and injected into x-irradiated animals did not form hemopoietic colonies on recipient's spleens, and recipients died. However, mouse leukemia cells, after irradiation with higher doses of UV light, retained the ability to form colonies on the spleens, and all recipient mice died with typical symptoms of leukemia. In vitro, mouse bone marrow cells exhibited high sensitivity to UV light compared to mouse myeloid leukemia cells. Human leukemia cells were also resistant to UV light, but more sensitive than mouse leukemia cells. (author)

  15. Immature germ cells in semen - correlation with total sperm count and sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Priya S; Humbarwadi, Rajendra S; Patil, Ashalata D; Gune, Anita R

    2013-07-01

    Current data regarding infertility suggests that male factor contributes up to 30% of the total cases of infertility. Semen analysis reveals the presence of spermatozoa as well as a number of non-sperm cells, presently being mentioned in routine semen report as "round cells" without further differentiating them into leucocytes or immature germ cells. The aim of this work was to study a simple, cost-effective, and convenient method for differentiating the round cells in semen into immature germ cells and leucocytes and correlating them with total sperm counts and motility. Semen samples from 120 males, who had come for investigation for infertility, were collected, semen parameters recorded, and stained smears studied for different round cells. Statistical analysis of the data was done to correlate total sperm counts and sperm motility with the occurrence of immature germ cells and leucocytes. The average shedding of immature germ cells in different groups with normal and low sperm counts was compared. The clinical significance of "round cells" in semen and their differentiation into leucocytes and immature germ cells are discussed. Round cells in semen can be differentiated into immature germ cells and leucocytes using simple staining methods. The differential counts mentioned in a semen report give valuable and clinically relevant information. In this study, we observed a negative correlation between total count and immature germ cells, as well as sperm motility and shedding of immature germ cells. The latter was statistically significant with a P value 0.000.

  16. Isolation and characterization of populations of mature and immature rat colonocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnen, D.J.; Reed, T.A.; Bozdech, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A nonenzymatic method is described for the isolation of viable populations of mature and immature rat colonocytes. Histology was used to monitor colonocyte dissociation and to systematically characterize the amount of cross-contamination between populations of mature luminal cells and immature crypt cells. The mature coloncytes were 87 ± 9% pure with respect to contamination from cells from the lower half of the colonic crypt, and the immature populations were 98% pure with respect to contamination with cells from the upper half of the colonic crypt. Neither population contained significant numbers of cells from the lamina propria. Cell viability and synthetic function were maintained from 10-12 h in short-term culture. Alkaline phosphatase activity was 1.59 ± 0.01-fold higher in the mature cells than in the immature cells, and in vivo [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation was 2.9 ± 0.4-fold greater in the immature than the mature populations. These studies demonstrate that highly enriched populations of mature and immature rat colonocytes that maintain viability and synthetic function in short-term culture can be prepared. The intrinsic rate of protein synthesis is higher in immature colonocytes, and a shift to synthesis of a higher percentage of fucoproteins occurs during colonocyte differentiation. In contrast to result in the small intestine, only modest gradients of differentiation markers and cell surface protein expression were observed between mature and immature colonocytes

  17. The retrovirus MA and PreTM proteins follow immature MVL cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Bahl

    2013-01-01

    Detergent can dissolve retrovirus, exept the immature core. Here we show that the Matrix protein (MA) and the Transmembrane protein in its immature form (PreTM) bind to the retrovirus core. These attachments explain the attachment in the virus particle and the dynamics of the ability to fuse with...

  18. Movements of immature European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus in tropical Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strandberg, Roine; Hake, Mikael; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Alerstam, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Strandberg R., Hake M., Klaassen R.H.G. & Alerstam T. 2012. Movements of immature European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus in tropical Africa. Ardea 100: 157-162. Immature European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus are believed to remain in tropical Africa during the first years of their lives. We

  19. Fracture resistance and histological findings of immature teeth treated with mineral trioxide aggregate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatibovic-Kofman, S.; Raimundo, L.; Zheng, L.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the fracture strength of calcium hydroxide and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-filled immature teeth decreased over time. Immature mandibular incisors from sheep were extracted and the pulps were extirpated using an apical approach...

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  1. Tetramethyl-O-scutellarin isolated from peels of immature Shiranuhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced RAW264.7 cells. Ju Mi Hyun1 ... IL-6 secreted by mouse macrophages was measured using RAW264.7 cell culture supernatant. Results: .... micro Tandem mass system (Waters, USA). .... It is mediated by different types of signaling.

  2. Experimental investigations into the effects of irradiation with neutron and gamma rays on the immune system, as demonstrated at the model of immunity of Salmonella typhimurium on the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1985-01-01

    Mice were irradiated with neutron and gamma rays (with a dose of 200 rad respectively 300 rad). Either 24 hours before or after the irradiation the mice were vaccinated and revaccinated with a Salmonella typhimurium vaccine. By ELISA, IHA and BTZD-test specific antibodies against Salmonella typhimurium could be found. The 200 rad irradiated animals had a lower increase in the formation of antibodies compared with mice not irradiated, if the irradiation was applied before the immunisation. On the 300 rad irradiated animals a reduction of the formation of the antibodies could be observed, too. The antibody titres, however, were higher and an earlier increase of the number of the antibodies was found in comparison with the 200 rad irradiated animals. A second antigene application after 7 days and an irradiation after the first respectively the second immunisation gave no noticeable proof of immune suppression. In our tests it was found out, that for the definition of the antibody titres of the sera the ELISA and the IHA had been more sensitive than the BTZD-test. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Vaginal orgasm is associated with less use of immature psychological defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Stuart; Costa, Rui Miguel

    2008-05-01

    Freud implied a link between inability to have a vaginal orgasm and psychosexual immaturity. Since Kinsey, many sexologists have asserted that no such link exists. However, empirical testing of the issue has been lacking. The objective was to determine the relationship between different sexual behavior triggers of female orgasm and use of immature psychological defense mechanisms. Women reported their past month frequency of different sexual behaviors and corresponding orgasm rates and completed the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40). The association between ability to have vaginal intercourse orgasm (versus clitoral orgasm) and the use of DSQ-40 immature psychological defense mechanisms (associated with various psychopathologies) was examined. In a sample of 94 healthy Portuguese women, vaginal orgasm (triggered solely by penile-vaginal intercourse) was associated with less use of DSQ-40 immature defenses. Vaginal orgasm was associated with less somatization, dissociation, displacement, autistic fantasy, devaluation, and isolation of affect. Orgasm from clitoral stimulation or combined clitoral-intercourse stimulation was not associated with less use of immature defenses, and was associated with more use of some immature defenses. In one regression analysis, more masturbation and less vaginal orgasm consistency made independent contributions to the statistical prediction of immature defenses. In another regression analysis, any use of extrinsic clitoral stimulation for intercourse orgasm, and lack of any vaginal orgasm, made independent contributions to the statistical prediction of immature defenses. Vaginally anorgasmic women had immature defenses scores comparable to those of established (depression, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) outpatient psychiatric groups. Results were not confounded by social desirability responding or relationship quality. The results linking penile-vaginal orgasm with less use of immature

  4. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  5. Effects of gamma radiation and irradiated bean seeds on the dry bean weevil, Acanthoscelides obtectus say (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatowicz, S.; Brzostek, G.

    1988-01-01

    Low dosages of gamma radiation affected the development of immature stages of the bean weevil, Acanthoscelides obtectus Say. Radiosensitivity of the bean weevils decreased during their development, and adults seemed to be the most resistant stage for gamma radiation. There were no significant differences in mortality of immature stages of the pest during their development in beans treated with gamma radiation at dosages up to 1.06 kGy. Moreover, the females showed no ovipositional preference for untreated or irradiated beans

  6. : acquired resistance in mice by implantation of young irradiated worms into the portal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcos Z. Coelho

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available In two distinct experiments, immature S. mansoni worms (LE strain, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, aged 20 days, obtained from the portal system of white outbred mice, were irradiated with 14 and 4 Krad, respectively. Afterwards, the worms were directly inoculated into the portal vein of normal mice. Inoculation was performed with 20 irradiated worms per animal. Fifty days after inoculation, the mice that received 4 and 14 Krad-irradiated worms and their respective controls were infected with S. mansoni cercariae (LE strain, by transcutaneous route. Twenty days after this challenge infection, the animals were sacrificed and perfused for mature irradiated (90-day-old and immature (20-day-old worm counts. Analysis of the results showed that statistically significant protection against cercariae occurred in both groups with irradiated worms.

  7. Effects of electron beam irradiation on cut flowers and mites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohino, Toshiyuki; Tanabe, Kazuo

    1994-01-01

    Two spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae KOCH were irradiated with electron beams (2.5MeV) to develop an alternative quarantine treatment for imported cut flowers. The tolerance of eggs increased with age (1-5-day-old). Immature stages (larva-teleiochrysalis) irradiated at 0.4-0.8kGy increased tolerance with their development. Mated mature females irradiated at 0.4kGy or higher did not produce viable eggs, although temporary recovery was observed at 0.2kGy. Adult males were sterilized at 0.4kGy because non-irradiated virgin females mated with yielded female progeny malformed and sterilized. Various effects of electron beam irradiation were observed when nine species of cut flowers were irradiated in 5MeV Dynamitron accelerator. Chrysanthemum and rose were most sensitive among cut flowers. (author)

  8. Neutralization of LINGO-1 during in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells results in proliferation of immature neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Lööv

    Full Text Available Identifying external factors that can be used to control neural stem cells division and their differentiation to neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes is of high scientific and clinical interest. Here we show that the Nogo-66 receptor interacting protein LINGO-1 is a potent regulator of neural stem cell maturation to neurons. LINGO-1 is expressed by cortical neural stem cells from E14 mouse embryos and inhibition of LINGO-1 during the first days of neural stem cell differentiation results in decreased neuronal maturation. Compared to neurons in control cultures, which after 6 days of differentiation have long extending neurites, neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies retain an immature, round phenotype with only very short processes. Furthermore, neutralization of LINGO-1 results in a threefold increase in βIII tubulin-positive cells compared to untreated control cultures. By using BrdU incorporation assays we show that the immature neurons in LINGO-1 neutralized cultures are dividing neuroblasts. In contrast to control cultures, in which no cells were double positive for βIII tubulin and BrdU, 36% of the neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies were proliferating after three days of differentiation. TUNEL assays revealed that the amount of cells going through apoptosis during the early phase of differentiation was significantly decreased in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies compared to untreated control cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role for LINGO-1 in neural stem cell differentiation to neurons and suggest a possibility to use LINGO-1 inhibitors to compensate for neuronal cell loss in the injured brain.

  9. Culinary alternatives for common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): sensory characteristics of immature seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero del Castillo, Roser; Ferreira, Juan José; Pérez-Vega, Elena; Almirall, Antoni; Casañas, Francesc

    2010-08-15

    Immature bean seeds feature in several dishes in southern Europe; however, they are not used in all traditional areas of dry beans cultivation. To determine whether differences in the use of immature seeds are due to cultural reasons or intrinsic properties of the seeds, the prestigious varieties of beans cultivated in three areas of Spain with different traditions regarding the use of immature seeds in bean dishes were studied. We found differences in the culinary and sensory traits between beans harvested when mature and those harvested when immature in the three areas. However, the degree and direction of these differences varied according to the area. Moreover, the different varieties tested within each area responded differently. The sum of the genetic, environmental and interaction effects results in complex alternatives to the mature beans; the gastronomic tradition has taken advantage of only some of these alternatives. A lack of traditional dishes using immature beans does not mean that the local beans harvested when immature lack suitable sensory traits. Specific trials in each area of cultivation can reveal alternative textures and bean flavour intensities in immature seeds. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  11. 35S induced dominant lethals in immature Oocytes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyanarayana Reddy, K.; Reddy, P.; Reddy, O.S.

    1976-01-01

    CBA female mice were injected intraperitoneally with a dose of 20 μCi of sulphur-35 on 15.5 day post conception. Another group of pregnant mice injected with normal saline was kept as control. The pregnant females were allowed to litter and the mothers were separated from their offspring 4 weeks after littering. Eight weeks after treatment i.e. at the age of 22-24 weeks, the treated mothers were mated to control C 3 H/He males. The vaginal plugs were checked everyday morning and those mated were separated. The pregnants were killed on 14th day of gestation. The uterine contents were searched for live and dead embryos and the ovaries for corpora lutea. The pre, post and total loses were calculated in the treated females and compared with those of control. The statistical tests performed indicated that all losses are significant. The results indicate that 35 S can induce chromosomal breaks in immature oocytes and lead to the induction of dominant lethals. (author)

  12. Description of the immatures of Linepithema humile Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL R SOLIS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Linepithema humile Mayr is an ant species originally native to South America that has been spread accidently throughout the globe through international trade. It is a serious urban and crop pest. Despite its economic importance, little is known about the larvae of this species apart from a brief description based on a few specimens. The present investigation is aimed at describing every immature stage of L. humile. Three larval instars were determined through the frequency distribution of the maximum width of head capsules from a sample of 525 larvae. The morphological descriptions were based on 150 eggs, 70 larvae, and 90 pupae examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. Some morphological characteristics reported to be typical of Linepithema Mayr larvae were confirmed - dolichoderoid body shape, presence of dorsal protuberance, sparse simple body hairs, presence of nine pairs of spiracles and dolichoderoid mandibles. We concluded that an earlier published description was based on queen larvae, and that the protuberance is only present in worker larvae. The information provided in this study may aid ant systematics and phylogenetics, as well provide a better understanding of the biology of this species.

  13. Sex-specific vitellogenin production in immature rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D.B.; Williams, D.E.

    1999-10-01

    Many xenobiotics interact with hormone systems of animals, potentially leading to a phenomenon commonly called endocrine disruption. Much attention has focused on steroid hormone systems and corresponding receptor proteins, particularly estrogens. Vitellogenin (Vg) was measured in sexually immature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in the diet. Mixed-sex populations of trout aged 3, 6, 12, or 18 months were maintained separately and fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 or 2.5 mg/kg for 7d. Females fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 mg/kg consistently produced three- to fourfold greater amounts of Vg than similarly aged males. Age- and sex-matched fish fed E{sub 2} at 2.5 mg/kg produced equivalent amounts of Vg. Sex differences in Vg production were apparent only at a dose of E{sub 2} (0.05 mg/kg) that results in submaximal Vg induction. Their results document the importance of considering the sex of juvenile fish when using Vg production as a marker of xenoestrogen exposure.

  14. Immature Dentate Gyrus: An Endophenotype of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Hagihara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate maturation of neurons and their integration into the hippocampal circuit is crucial for normal cognitive function and emotional behavior, and disruption of this process could cause disturbances in mental health. Previous reports have shown that mice heterozygous for a null mutation in α-CaMKII, which encodes a key synaptic plasticity molecule, display abnormal behaviors related to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. In these mutants, almost all neurons in the dentate gyrus are arrested at a pseudoimmature state at the molecular and electrophysiological levels, a phenomenon defined as “immature dentate gyrus (iDG.” To date, the iDG phenotype and shared behavioral abnormalities (including working memory deficit and hyperlocomotor activity have been discovered in Schnurri-2 knockout, mutant SNAP-25 knock-in, and forebrain-specific calcineurin knockout mice. In addition, both chronic fluoxetine treatment and pilocarpine-induced seizures reverse the neuronal maturation, resulting in the iDG phenotype in wild-type mice. Importantly, an iDG-like phenomenon was observed in post-mortem analysis of brains from patients with schizophrenia/bipolar disorder. Based on these observations, we proposed that the iDG is a potential endophenotype shared by certain types of neuropsychiatric disorders. This review summarizes recent data describing this phenotype and discusses the data’s potential implication in elucidating the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. In Vitro Investigation of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Human Immature Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Talebi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp. Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU. Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element mod-els were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the mod-el validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth. When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling il-lustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are re-quired to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth.

  16. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  17. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  18. Identification and characterization of mouse PSF1-binding protein, SLD5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Lingyu; Ueno, Masaya; Itoh, Machiko; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Although most somatic cells cannot proliferate, immature cells proliferate continuously to produce mature cells. Recently, we cloned mouse PSF1 from a hematopoietic stem cell specific cDNA library and reported that PSF1 is indispensable for the proliferation of immature cells. To identify the PSF1-binding protein, we used the yeast two-hybrid system with PSF1 as bait, and identified and cloned SLD5. SLD5 interacted with a central region of PSF1. Tissue distribution of SLD5 was quite similar to that of PSF1. When overexpressed, SLD5 protein was co-localized with PSF1. These data suggest that PSF1 and SLD5 may cooperate in the proliferation of immature cell populations

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  20. Revascularization for a necrotic immature permanent lateral incisor: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottoor, Jojo; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2013-07-01

    Revascularization is a valuable treatment in immature necrotic teeth that allows the continuation of root development. This article describes the successful revascularization treatment of an immature maxillary lateral incisor that was initially diagnosed with apical periodontitis. The tooth was asymptomatic and functional clinically and radiographically during the follow-up period of 5 years. The follow-up showed evidence of progressive thickening of the dentinal walls, development of root length and apical closure. The article also discusses the currently available literature regarding revascularization of immature permanent teeth. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, BSPD and IAPD.

  1. Intramedullary spinal immature teratoma: resolution of quadriplegia following resection in a 4-week-old infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Chambless, Lola B; Carson, Robert P; Coffin, Cheryl M; Pearson, Matthew M; Abel, Ty W

    2010-12-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord teratomas are rare entities in infants. Management of these lesions is primarily surgical, with outcome dependent on rapid surgical decompression and complete gross-total tumor resection. The lesions are typically of the mature type, with immature teratomas displaying unique pathological features. The authors report a case of an extensive intramedullary immature teratoma in an infant with resolution of quadriplegia following gross-total radical resection. At the 1-year follow-up, there was radiographic evidence of tumor, and surgical reexploration yielded portions of immature teratoma and extensive gliosis.

  2. Diagnosis and management of an immature teratoma during ovarian stimulation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douay-Hauser Nathalie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The discovery of a mature teratoma (dermoid cyst of the ovary during ovarian stimulation is not a rare event. Conversely, we could not find any reported cases of immature teratoma in such a situation. Clinical and ultrasound arguments for this immature form are scarcely or poorly evaluated. Case Presentation We describe the case of a 31-year-old Caucasian woman with primary infertility, who developed an immature teratoma during an in vitro fertilization ovarian stimulation cycle. Conclusions Ultrasound signs of an atypical cyst during ovarian stimulation allowed us to adopt a careful medical attitude and to adapt the required surgical oncological treatment.

  3. Induction by phenobarbital of aniline-p-hydroxylase in mouse liver under the influence of X-irradiation and 2,4,6-triethyleneimino-1,3,5-triazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erger, M.; Hollatz, R.; Tempel, K.

    1977-01-01

    The phenobarbital-induced activity of aniline-p-hydroxylase in livers of mice was enhanced additionally when the animals were X-irradiated 4-16 hours before the administration of the inducer. The same effect could be demonstrated after repeated irradiation with low doses. 2,4,6-triethyleneimino-1,3,5-triazine (tretamine) inhibited the induction of aniline-p-hydroxylase only when administered in extremely high doses. Lower doses resulted in 'superinduciton'. (orig.) [de

  4. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Mizuki; Tajika, Yuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  5. The Effect of Combination of Radiation with 5-Fluorouracil on Mouse Jejunal Crypt Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Charn Il

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of radiation and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on mouse jejunal crypt cells was studied using the microcolony survival assay. 150mg/kg of 5-FU was injected intraperitoneally 15 minutes before irradiation and 6 hours after irradiation. Jejunal crypt cells of mouse survived more when 5-FU was given 15 minutes before irradiation than giving it 6 hours after irradiation. The mean lethal doses (Do) of each of irradiation alone group, 5-FU injection group of 15 minutes preceding irradiation, and 5-FU injection group of 6 hours post irradiation were 135, 135, and 114 rad respectively. The dose effect factor (DEF) of each of 5-FU injection groups of 15 minutes preceding irradiation and of 6 hours post irradiation were 1.13 and 1.27

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  7. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  8. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  9. Lonidamine affects testicular steroid hormones in immature mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traina, Maria Elsa; Guarino, Maria; Natoli, Alessia; Romeo, Antonella; Urbani, Elisabetta

    2007-01-01

    The effects on the hypothalamus-pituitary-testicular axis of the well-known antispermatogenic drug lonidamine (LND) has not been elucidated so far. In the present study, the possible changes of the testicular steroid hormones were evaluated in immature mice for a better characterization of the LND adverse effects both in its use as antitumoral agent and male contraceptive. Male CD1 mice were orally treated on postnatal day 28 (PND28) with LND single doses (0 or 100 mg/kg b.w.) and euthanized every 24 h from PND29 to PND32, on PND35 and on PND42 (1 and 2 weeks after the administration, respectively). Severe testicular effects were evidenced in the LND treated groups, including: a) significant testis weight increase, 24 h and 48 h after dosing; b) sperm head counts decrease (more than 50% of the control) on PND29-32; c) damage of the tubule morphology primarily on the Sertoli cell structure and germ cell exfoliation. All these reproductive endpoints were recovered on PND42. At the same time, a significant impairment of the testicular steroid balance was observed in the treated mice, as evidenced by the decrease of testosterone (T) and androstenedione (ADIONE) and the increase of 17OH-progesterone (17OH-P4) on the first days after dosing, while the testicular content of 17β-estradiol (E2) was unchanged. The hormonal balance was not completely restored afterwards, as levels of T, ADIONE and 17OH-P4 tended to be higher in the treated mice than in the controls, on PND35 and PND42. These data showed for the first time that LND affects intratesticular steroids in experimental animals. However further data are needed both to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the impairment of these metabolic pathways and to understand if the androgens decrease observed after LND administration could be partially involved in the testicular damage

  10. Investigation of Immature Sea Turtles in the Coastal Waters of West Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To survey immature sea turtles that inhabit the Ten Thousand Islands. Program funding came from South Florida Ecosystem Restoration. This project provided base-line...

  11. Development of immature stomata: evidence for epigenetic selection of a spacing pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, M L; Sachs, T

    1991-07-01

    In Sansevieria trifasciata as many as half the potential stomata remain immature. The development of all stomatal structures started at the same time and the early stages of the development of immature stomata had no special characteristics. Statistical analysis showed that the mature stomata were more evenly spaced than all potential stomata, both mature and immature. Furthermore, the distribution of mature stomata per unit area was more predictable or orderly than comparable structures of a random model that developed in the same way. These facts indicate that a nonrandom loss of many stomata by "immaturity" is a major determinant, acting during rather than preceding development, of the distribution of the mature, functional stomata. Thus in Sansevieria there is a selection of an epidermal pattern from an excess of cells that undergo the early stages of stomatal development.

  12. AFSC/ABL: Immature chum salmon allozyme ID of mixed stocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Immature chum salmon were collected by the F/V Northwest Explorer between September 5 and October 8, during the 2002 BASIS survey across the eastern Bering Sea shelf...

  13. In Vitro Investigation of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Human Immature Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Talebi; Sahar Moghimi; Mina Shafagh; Hadi Kalani; Fatemeh Mazhari

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second ...

  14. Pecular Features of Hematopoiesis in the Liver of Mature and Immature Green Frogs (Pelophylax Esculentus Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akulenko N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristic features of the hematopoiesis in mature and immature green frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex. Quantitative differences in liver myelograms were insignificant. However, in a sample of mature animals numerous significant correlations between the number of pigment inclusions in the liver and indicators of erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis were observed. Those correlations were absent in the immature frogs. We concluded that aft er the frogs’ breeding a lack of plastic resources, in particular, hemosiderin remains up to the hibernation.

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on khapra beetle Trogoderma granarium everts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makee, H.; Saour, G.

    2002-09-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on all developmental stages of khapra beetle was examined. The results showed that when higher doses were applied and immature stages were treated the developmental time, larval and pupal mortality and adults' deformation were increased. Whereas, the fecundity and fertility of the emerged adults resulted from the treatment of immature stages, were increased when old eggs, larvae and pupae were treated with low doses. When newly emerged adults were irradiated the longevity of the male and the female was not affected, while the fecundity and fertility were declined especially when high doses were applied. The female of khapra beetle was more radiosensitive than the male, regardless of the applied dose or/and the treated developmental stage. (author)

  16. Regulation of IgE antibody production by serum molecules. I. Serum from complete Freund's adjuvant-immune donors suppresses irradiation-enhanced IgE production in low responder mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, A.S.; Chiorazzi, N.; Katz, D.H.

    1978-01-01

    Exposure of mice to low doses of x irradiation at or near the time of primary immunization with 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP)-Ascaris suum extract (ASC) results in substantial enhancement of IgE anti-DNP antibody responses; the IgG antibody responses of such mice do not increase after such manipulations. This selective enhancement of IgE antibody production occurs in mice of both high and low IgE responder phenotype, although the extent of enhancement compared to unmanipulated control animals is more striking in low IgE responder mice. The studies presented here demonstrate that the irradiation-enhanced IgE antibody responses of low responder SJL and C57BL/6 mice as well as of intermediate responder AKR mice can be effectively suppressed by passive transfer of CFA-immune serum obtained from isologous donor mice. Moreover, adoptive secondary IgE antibody responses in SJL recipients of primed syngeneic spleen cells can be totally abolished by passive transfer of CFA-immune serum or ascitic fluid from CFA-immune mice. The suppressive activity of CFA-immune serum can be diminished or eliminated by exposure of CFA-primed donor mice to low dose x irradiation at an appropriate point during the priming regimen, after a single inoculation of CFA, and before collection of serum. Low dose x irradiation was not effective in eliminating suppressive activity of CFA-induced ascites fluid obtained from donor mice inoculated repeatedly with CFA. In contrast to the capacity of CFA-immune serum from isologous donors to suppress irradiation-enhanced IgE responses of low responder mice, similar sera or ascites fluids were ineffective in suppressing irradiation-enhanced responses of high responder BALB/c or (SJL x BALB/c)F 1 hybrid mice

  17. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  18. The effects of X-irradiation on the chondrogensis of mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jong Ryeol

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that X-irradiation affects on maturing process of differentiated chondrocytes. Nevertheless, It has been remained elusively whether X-irradiation affects the process of differentiation of mesenchymal cells which differentiate into chondrocyte, fibroblast, or muscle cells. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation (with 1 to 10 Gy) on chondrogenesis using mesenchymal cells of chick limb bud. Our results show that X-irradiation dose-dependently inhibited chondrogenesis. This result suggests that immature chondroblast-like mesenchymal cells are sensitive to X-irradiation, Moreover, X-irradiation affects not only maturing process of chondrocytes, but also inhibits the chondrogenesis. Taken together, we demonstrate that the whole process of differentiation of mature chondrocytes from mesenchymal cells is affected by X-irradiation and undifferentiated cells were more affected by X-irradiation than mature cells

  19. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  20. Human CD5+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Are Functionally Immature and Their Development from CD34+ Progenitor Cells Is Regulated by Id2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maho Nagasawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs have emerged as a key cell type involved in surveillance and maintenance of mucosal tissues. Mouse ILCs rely on the transcriptional regulator Inhibitor of DNA-binding protein 2 (Id2 for their development. Here, we show that Id2 also drives development of human ILC because forced expression of Id2 in human thymic progenitors blocked T cell commitment, upregulated CD161 and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF, and maintained CD127 expression, markers that are characteristic for human ILCs. Surprisingly CD5 was also expressed on these in vitro generated ILCs. This was not an in vitro artifact because CD5 was also found on ex vivo isolated ILCs from thymus and from umbilical cord blood. CD5 was also expressed on small proportions of ILC2 and ILC3. CD5+ ILCs were functionally immature, but could further differentiate into mature CD5− cytokine-secreting ILCs. Our data show that Id2 governs human ILC development from thymic progenitor cells toward immature CD5+ ILCs.

  1. Ingestion and digestion of erythrocytes by non-irradiated and irradiated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorbrodt, A; Grabska, A; Krzyzowska-Gruca, S; Gruca, S

    1975-01-01

    The effect of x rays (1300 R) and gamma irradiation (3000 R) on phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages cultivated in vitro was studied using human glutaraldehyde-fixed red blood cells. The peroxidative activity of haemoglobin was cytochemically detected by the DAB method. The obtained results indicate that the applied dose of x irradiation does not affect the phagocytic activity of macrophages. On the contrary, the gamma irradiation (3000 R) causes acceleration of phagocytic activity of macrophages with concomitant impairment of intracellular digestion of ingested material. Weakened cytochemical reaction for acid phosphatase suggests that sufficiently high doses of irradiation cause some disturbances in the biosynthesis of lysosomal enzymes in exposed macrophages.

  2. Centralized mouse repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  3. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  5. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  6. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  7. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  8. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  9. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  10. Nutritional compositions and antioxidative capacity of the silk obtained from immature and mature corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhanan Abdul Rahman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The silks of immature and mature corn were evaluated for their variations in nutritional compositions, mineral content and antioxidant capacity. Both immature and mature silks were good source of nutritional compositions. Immature silks contained significantly higher moisture (89.31% (fresh basis, lipid (1.27% and protein (12.96% content than the mature silk. Mature silks contained higher composition of ash (5.51%, carbohydrate (29.74% and total dietary fiber (51.25 g/100 g, than the immature silk, but the difference was not significant. In mineral determination, immature silk was rich source of Ca (1087.08 μg/g, Mg (1219.17 μg/g, Cu (5.60 μg/g and Zn (46.37 μg/g than the mature silks. In contrast, other minerals such as K (35671.67 μg/g, Na (266.67 μg/g, Fe (4.50 μg/g and Mn (35.57 μg/g were found higher in the mature silk. The silks were extracted with ethyl acetate, ethanol and water using the Soxhlet extraction method to determine the polyphenol and ABTS radical scavenging capacity. From this study, the highest content of total polyphenol of immature silks was exhibited by ethanol extract (92.21 mg GAE/g while water extract (64.22 mg GAE/g had the highest polyphenol content among mature silk extracts. Total flavonoid content of both immature and mature silks was higher in the water extract at 8.40 mg CAE/g and 2.31 mg CAE/g, respectively. In the ABTS free radical assay method, all immature silk extracts had higher percentage of inhibition compared to the mature silks. Among all three crude extracts, the ethanol extract of immature (EC50 = 0.478 mg/ml and mature silk (EC50 = 0.799 mg/ml exhibited the strongest antioxidant capacity followed by the water and ethyl acetate extract.

  11. Immature granulocyte detection by the SE-9000 haematology analyser during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Suárez, A; Pascual, V T; Gimenez, M T F; Hernández, J F S

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the nature of the alarm for immature granulocytes appearing in haemograms from pregnant women, as detected by the immature cell information channel (IMI) of the SE-9000 automated haematology analyser. Of all tests run on pregnant women in a 4-month period (n = 698), the first 100 haemograms with immature granulocyte alarms (14.33%) were collected. Each of these samples was then stained with Wright-Giemsa stain. The following variables were also analysed: age of the mother, trimester and days of gestation, type of delivery, weight and sex of the baby, and Apgar score. Most pregnant women were in the third trimester of gestation (82%) when an alarm was noted on the IMI channel. Of the patients, 62% had normal deliveries. The most frequent complication was obstructed delivery (23%). Mean percentages by microscopic counts of band cells, metamyelocytes, and myelocytes were 2.99, 0.45, and 0.19%, respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation for all cell types between the SE-9000 and the manual count method. No association was observed between the presence of immature granulocytes and the clinical variables analysed. The SE-9000 analyser shows high sensitivity in the IMI channel for detection of immature forms.

  12. Production of functional sperm by subcutaneous auto-grafting of immature testes in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Sakuma, Daika; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2018-02-01

    Sexually mature individuals are indispensable for breeding programs. Salmonids require a long period before reaching sexual maturity, so we aimed to shorten the period required to obtain functional sperm by grafting immature testicular fragments into mature recipients, which we predicted would allow the grafted testicular fragments to skip the long pre-pubertal period. First, we demonstrated successful subcutaneous auto-grafting of testicular fragments in rainbow trout. Unilateral testectomy was performed, and the isolated immature testicular fragment was auto-grafted into the subcutaneous space along the back of recipient fish. The grafted testicular fragments developed synchronously with the recipients' testis remaining in its body cavity, and both eventually produced functional sperm. Next, immature testicular fragments were auto-grafted into the subcutaneous space of sexually mature males. We achieved this, without immune rejection, by isolating and cryopreserving testes from immature fish, and rearing these unilaterally testectomized fish until sexual maturity. The cryopreserved testes were then auto-grafted into the original, now spermiating fish. The grated immature testicular fragments differentiated and produced functional sperm within 5 months after grafting. By combining this grafting method with a technique to avoid immune rejection, we expect to develop a practical method for producing sperm in a shorter period in salmonids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Immature psychological defense mechanisms are associated with greater personal importance of junk food, alcohol, and television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rui Miguel; Brody, Stuart

    2013-10-30

    Immature psychological defense mechanisms are psychological processes that play an important role in suppressing emotional awareness and contribute to psychopathology. In addition, unhealthy food, television viewing, and alcohol consumption can be among the means to escape self-awareness. In contrast, engaging in, and responding fully to specifically penile-vaginal intercourse (PVI) is associated with indices of better emotional regulation, including less use of immature defense mechanisms. There was a lack of research on the association of immature defense mechanisms with personal importance of junk food, alcohol, television, PVI, and noncoital sex. In an online survey, 334 primarily Scottish women completed the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40), and rated the personal importance of junk food, alcohol, television, PVI, and noncoital sex. Immature defense mechanisms correlated with importance of junk food, alcohol, and television. Importance of PVI correlated with mature defenses, and less use of some component immature defenses. Importance of alcohol correlated with importance of junk food, television, and noncoital sex. Importance of junk food was correlated with importance of television and noncoital sex. The findings are discussed in terms of persons with poorer self-regulatory abilities having more interest in junk food, television, and alcohol, and less interest in PVI. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Response of growing bones to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.

    1980-01-01

    This thesis describes the effects of ionizing radiations on growing bones. The epiphyseal disc of growing mouse tibia was selected as a model for the experiments. An attempt has been made to obtain clinical data from irradiated bones during the childhood and to quantitate this information. Within the range of possibilities correlations have been established between the experimental and clinical data. (Auth.)

  15. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, M.

    1989-01-01

    This popular-level article emphasizes that the ultimate health effects of irradiated food products are unknown. They may include vitamin loss, contamination of food by botulism bacteria, mutations in bacteria, increased production of aflatoxins, changes in food, carcinogenesis from unknown causes, presence of miscellaneous harmful chemicals, and the lack of a way of for a consumer to detect irradiated food. It is claimed that the nuclear industry is applying pressure on the Canadian government to relax labeling requirements on packages of irradiated food in order to find a market for its otherwise unnecessary products

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecher, O.

    1979-01-01

    Limitations of existing preserving methods and possibilities of improved food preservation by application of nuclear energy are explained. The latest state-of-the-art in irradiation technology in individual countries is described and corresponding recommendations of FAO, WHO and IAEA specialists are presented. The Sulzer irradiation equipment for potato sprout blocking is described, the same equipment being suitable also for the treatment of onions, garlic, rice, maize and other cereals. Systems with a higher power degree are needed for fodder preserving irradiation. (author)

  17. The impact of different ale brewer’s yeast strains on the proteome of immature beer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berner, Torben Sune; Jacobsen, Susanne; Arneborg, Nils

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that brewer’s yeast affects the taste and aroma of beer. However, the influence of brewer’s yeast on the protein composition of beer is currently unknown. In this study, changes of the proteome of immature beer, i.e. beer that has not been matured after fermentation......, by ale brewer’s yeast strains with different abilities to degrade fermentable sugars were investigated. RESULTS: Beers were fermented from standard hopped wort (13° Plato) using two ale brewer’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains with different attenuation degrees. Both immature beers had the same....... These three proteins, all derived from yeast, were identified as cell wall associated proteins, that is Exg1 (an exo-β-1,3-glucanase), Bgl2 (an endo-β-1,2-glucanase), and Uth1 (a cell wall biogenesis protein). CONCLUSION: Yeast strain dependent changes in the immature beer proteome were identified, i.e. Bgl2...

  18. Social learning of diet and foraging skills by wild immature Bornean orangutans: implications for culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Adrian V; Dunkel, Lynda P; Van Noordwijk, Maria A; Wich, Serge A; Sura, Agnes A L; Van Schaik, Carel P

    2010-01-01

    Studies of social learning in the wild are important to complement findings from experiments in captivity. In this field study, immature Bornean orangutans rarely foraged independently but consistently followed their mothers' choices. Their diets were essentially identical to their mothers' even though not all mothers had the same diet. This suggests vertical transmission of diet by enhancement. Also, immatures selectively observed their mothers during extractive foraging, which increased goal-directed practice but not general manipulation of similar objects, suggesting observational forms of learning of complex skills. Teaching was not observed. These results are consistent with the reported presence of food traditions and skill cultures in wild orangutans. We suggest that food traditions can develop wherever association commonly allows for social learning. However, the capacity for observational learning, and thus more complex culture, is more likely to evolve among extractive foragers with prolonged association between adults and immatures. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. RESULTS OF IN VITRO MATURATION OF MEIOTICALLY IMMATURE HUMAN OOCYTES IN A SIMPLE MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Kovačič

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Among oocytes obtained during aspiration of preovulatory ovarian follicles in hormonally stimulated cycles, we ascertained the percentage of immature oocytes with the nucleus in the metaphase (M I oocytes or even in the prophase (GV oocytes of the first meiotic division and their capacity to mature in vitro in a simple medium without hormonal supplements.Methods. In 818 women, stimulated by gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa and gonadotropins, aspiration of preovulatory size follicles yielded 4972 oocytes. From these we denuded cells of cumulus oophorus and corona, meiotic maturity was evaluated under a microscope. Cells in the metaphase of the second meiotic division (M II oocytes and those maturing after 5 hours were used clinically in the intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedure. Immature cells were left in the simple medium. The degree of their nuclear maturity was evaluated after one and after two days of culture. In vitro maturation was clinically used also in 14 cycles with no mature oocytes.Results. Among 4731 oocytes with denuded corona and cumulus, 4199 (88.8% were mature M II oocytes, 295 (6.2% immature M I oocytes and 237 (5% immature GV oocytes. Under in vitro conditions, 68.7% (90/131 GV oocytes attained maturity. Among M I oocytes, 63.6% (136/214 cells matured already after 5 hours and 26.6% (57/214 until the next day. In all 14 women with only immature oocytes, the embryos for embryotransfer were obtained after in vitro maturation and ICSI procedure. The result was four pregnancies and two deliveries.Conclusions. Immature oocytes, obtained in hormonally stimulated cycles, may become clinically applicable if left to mature in vitro in a simple medium without supplementation of growth factors and hormones.

  20. Immature rats show ovulatory defects similar to those in adult rats lacking prostaglandin and progesterone actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Criado Jose E

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gonadotropin-primed immature rats (GPIR constitute a widely used model for the study of ovulation. Although the equivalence between the ovulatory process in immature and adult rats is generally assumed, the morphological and functional characteristics of ovulation in immature rats have been scarcely considered. We describe herein the morphological aspects of the ovulatory process in GPIR and their response to classical ovulation inhibitors, such as the inhibitor of prostaglandin (PG synthesis indomethacin (INDO and a progesterone (P receptor (PR antagonist (RU486. Immature Wistar rats were primed with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG at 21, 23 or 25 days of age, injected with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG 48 h later, and sacrificed 16 h after hCG treatment, to assess follicle rupture and ovulation. Surprisingly, GPIR showed age-related ovulatory defects close similar to those in adult rats lacking P and PG actions. Rats primed with eCG at 21 or 23 days of age showed abnormally ruptured corpora lutea in which the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC was trapped or had been released to the ovarian interstitum, invading the ovarian stroma and blood and lymphatic vessels. Supplementation of immature rats with exogenous P and/or PG of the E series did not significantly inhibit abnormal follicle rupture. Otherwise, ovulatory defects were practically absent in rats primed with eCG at 25 days of age. GPIR treated with INDO showed the same ovulatory alterations than vehicle-treated ones, although affecting to a higher proportion of follicles. Blocking P actions with RU486 increased the number of COC trapped inside corpora lutea and decreased ovulation. The presence of ovulatory defects in GPIR, suggests that the capacity of the immature ovary to undergo the coordinate changes leading to effective ovulation is not fully established in Wistar rats primed with eCG before 25 days of age.

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  2. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  3. Vital pulp therapy in symptomatic immature permanent molars: Report of 3 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SheikhRezaie MS.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "nEndodontic treatment of immature permanent teeth accompanies with several issues. The primary goal when treating such teeth is to maintain pulp vitality so that root development can occur normally. Indications and requirements for vital pulp therapy include asymptomatic and reversible pulpitis. Also there are controversial opinions regarding the ultimate clinical treatment of the vital pulp therapy techniques. In this manuscript we report 3 cases of immature symptomatic permanent molars with irreversible pulpitis caused by caries exposure of the pulp that have been undergone vital pulp therapy successfully.

  4. Determination of reference ranges for immature platelet and reticulocyte fractions and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuri Vicente Camargo Morkis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The immature platelet and immature reticulocyte fractions represent the ratios of platelets and reticulocytes recently released into the circulation and thus with higher RNA content. They are considered early indicators of bone marrow recovery. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the reference ranges for the immature platelet and reticulocyte fractions of hematologically normal individuals in a university hospital. Methods: Venous blood samples collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid K3 were analyzed using a Sysmex XE-5000™ analyzer. Individuals with platelet and reticulocyte counts within the reference ranges, and a blood count within the laboratory's screening criteria were included. Individuals with clinical conditions that could affect hematological results were excluded. The immature platelet fraction, high, medium and low fluorescence reticulocyte fractions and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent were evaluated. The reference ranges were determined according to the recommendations of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry. Results: One hundred and thirty-two outpatients were evaluated. The mean age was 44 years (range: 13-80 years, 72 (54.5% were women treated in a university hospital. The mean platelet count was 250.8 × 109/L and the mean reticulocyte count was 0.052 × 109/L. The following reference ranges were obtained: immature reticulocyte fraction 1.6-12.1%, the high, medium and low fluorescence reticulocyte fractions were 0.0-1.7%, 1.6-11.0% and 87.9-98.4%, respectively, the reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent was 30.0-37.6% and immature platelet fraction was 0.8-5.6%. There was a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.006 between genders in respect to the immature platelet fraction with 0.8-4.7% for females and 0.7-6.1% for males. The immature reticulocyte fraction was directly correlated with the reticulocyte count. Conclusion: Determining the reference range is

  5. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  6. A study on mice exposure dose for low-dose gamma-irradiation using glass dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Son, Tae Gen; Kim, Jung Ki; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kang, Yeong Rok [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Sang Hee [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The low dose radiation is done for a long period, thus researchers have to know the exact dose distribution for the irradiated mouse. This research has been conducted in order to find out methods in transmitting an exact dose to mouse in a mouse irradiation experiment carried out using {sup 137}C{sub s} irradiation equipment installed in the DIRAMS (Dongnam Institution of Radiological and Medical Sciences) research center. We developed a single mouse housing cage and shelf with adjustable geometric factors such as distance and angle from collimator. The measurement of irradiated dose showed a maximal 42% difference of absorbed dose from the desired dose in the conventional irradiation system, whereas only 6% difference of the absorbed dose was measured in the self-developed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi mice housing showed much difference of the absorbed dose in between head and body, compared to single mouse housing in the conventional irradiation system. This research may allow further research about biological effect assessment for the low dose irradiation using the self-developed mouse apartment to provide more exact doses which it tries to transmit, and to have more reliability for the biological analysis results.

  7. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  8. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  11. Induced mutations in ornamental plants by 'in vitro' irradiation of Petunia hybrida meristems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Jimenez, J.

    1993-01-01

    In recent decades it has been observed that for the induction of mutation in ornamental plants we can obtain better results when the plants are irradiated in vegetative state and even better 'in vitro' that when its are irradiated 'in vivo'. In this work the possibilities are showed to avoid the best use of a new biotechnology: the gamma irradiations on the meristem 'in vitro'. A tissue culture method was described for the best vegetative propagation of Petunia hybrid hort through morphogenesis induction of meristem. These were planted in the Murashige and Skoog's basic medium added with BAP and ANA. The pH was adjusted to 6.5 prior autoclaving at 121 Centigrade degree and 1.1 Kg/ cm 2 for 15 minutes. Latter the meristem of plantules in immature and mature physiology stated were irradiated with gamma ray doses ranging from 1.0 at 10.0 Gy. The meristem were then subcultived aseptically with the following results: 1) The immature stage was higher radio sensibilities. 2) The LD 50 for the matured plants was to ranged from 1.0 at 9.0 Gy. and immature 1.0 at 8.0 Gy. 3) The better doses was at 7.5 Gy. 4) The meristem gamma irradiation at 7.5 Gy. showed in the first culture: the adventitious bud induced and the multi meristem formation. 5) In the second cultured the results reveals the 'variegadas' plants formations and the new purples flowers. (Author)

  12. Radiosensitivity of mouse germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Toyoko; Maemori, Mamiko; Seki, Naohiko; Tobari, Izuo

    1991-01-01

    To estimate radiosensitivity of mouse germ cells the analysis of chromosome aberrations was performed at diakinesis-metaphase I of spermatocytes and first-cleavage metaphase of one-cell embryos after exposure to radiations at various stages of primary spermatocytes and spermatids. The result provided evidence that there are two major types of DNA damage in X-irradiated sperm : (1) short-lived DNA lesions ; the lesions are subject to repair inhibition by agents added in G 1 , and are converted into chromosome-type aberrations during G 1 , and (2) long-lived DNA lesions ; the lesions persist until S phase and repair of the lesions is inhibited by caffeine, hydroxyurea and arabinofuranosyl cytosine in G 2 . The characteristic of X-ray damage induced in spermiogenic stage and repair mechanism for the damage in the fertilized egg were discussed comparing with the results with two chemicals, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and mitomycin C (MMC). (J.P.N.)

  13. Patients with previous definite stent thrombosis have a larger fraction of immature platelets and a reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Morten; Grove, Erik; Wulff, Lise Nielsen

    turnover. Key Words: aspirin; immature platelets; platelet aggregation; platelet function tests; stent thrombosis Abbreviations: ARU, aspirin reaction units; AU, aggregation units; BMS, bare-metal stent(s); DES, drug-eluting stent(s); IPF, immature platelet fraction; MEA, multiple electrode aggregometry...

  14. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  15. Neuronal degeneration induced by status epilepticus in the nucleus accumens of immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Druga, Rastislav; Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, s6 (2007), s. 19-20 ISSN 0013-9580. [Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. 31.112007-3.12.2007, Philadelphia] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/07/1137 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * neuronal degeneration * status epilepticus * immature rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Differences in Mating Propensity Between Immature Female Color Morphs in the Damselfly Ischnura elegans (Insecta : Odonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammers, Martijn; Ana Sanchez-Guillen, Rosa; Van Gossum, Hans

    Female-limited color polymorphisms occur in a variety of animal taxa where excessive male sexual harassment may explain the coexistence of multiple female color morphs. In the color polymorphic damselfly Ischnura elegans, mature and immature female color morphs coexist at the mating site where males

  17. Estrogenic activity of environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in uterus of immature Wistar rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kummer, V.; Mašková, J.; Zralý, Z.; Neča, J.; Šimečková, P.; Vondráček, Jan; Machala, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 180, č. 3 (2008), s. 212-221 ISSN 0378-4274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * rat immature uterothrophic assay * estrogen receptor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.249, year: 2008

  18. Free and sulphurized hopanoids and highly branched isoprenoids in immature lacustrine oil shales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Las Heras, F.X.C. de; Grimalt, J.O.; Lopez, J.F.; Albaiges, J.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    A study of the solvent extracts of four samples from two immature oil shales from Tertiary lacustrine basins, Ribesalbes and Campins (southern European rift system), deposited under reducing conditions, has allowed the identification of S-containing hopanoids and novel highly branched isoprenoids

  19. Occurrence of Temnocephala (Platyhelminthes: Temnocephalida in Immatures of Kempnyia reticulata (Enderlein (Insecta: Plecoptera: Perlidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Avelino-Capistrano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First register of Temnocephala (Platyhelminthes: Temnocephalida in immature of Kempnyia reticulata (Enderlein (Plecoptera: Perlidae. The insects were collected in rivers of Estação Biológica de Santa Lúcia, Santa Teresa, Espirito Santo, Brazil.

  20. Selenium protects the immature rat heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádalová, Ivana; Vobecký, Miloslav; Chvojková, Zuzana; Miková, D.; Hampl, V.; Wilhelm, J.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 300, 1-2 (2007), s. 259-267 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : selenium * immature heart * ischemia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.707, year: 2007

  1. Immaturity of human stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes in culture: fatal flaw or soluble problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Kosmidis, Georgios; Mummery, Christine L.; Casini, Simona; Verkerk, Arie O.; Bellin, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) are increasingly used to model cardiac disease, test drug efficacy and for safety pharmacology. Nevertheless, a major hurdle to more extensive use is their immaturity and similarity to fetal rather than adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we

  2. Food transfers in immature wild western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Angela A; Fletcher, Alison W

    2006-10-01

    The transfer of food items between individuals has been described in primates as serving an informative purpose in addition to supplementing the diet of immature individuals. This behaviour has yet to be described in western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), and results are presented here of observations of food transfers in immature gorillas at Mbeli Bai, Republic of Congo. The frequency of food transfers decreased with increasing immature age, while the frequency of independent feeding and processing of food increased. Transfers between mothers and infants were the most frequent, with infants attempting to take items from the mother. These attempts were not always successful and the item was relinquished on less than 50% of attempts. Mothers also took items from their offspring. The results point to the functional significance of food transfers in western lowland gorillas being informational. In a bai environment, where one species forms the majority of a visiting gorilla's diet despite other species being available, the initiation of food transfers by immatures is proposed to serve the purpose of familiarising them with which species, and which parts of those species, may be eaten.

  3. Ethogram of Immature Green Turtles: Behavioral Strategies for Somatic Growth in Large Marine Herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Junichi; Nakajima, Kana; Noda, Takuji; Kimura, Satoko; Kamihata, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Masato; Arai, Nobuaki; Kagawa, Shiro; Kawabata, Yuuki; Yamada, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Animals are assumed to obtain/conserve energy effectively to maximise their fitness, which manifests itself in a variety of behavioral strategies. For marine animals, however, these behavioral strategies are generally unknown due to the lack of high-resolution monitoring techniques in marine habitats. As large marine herbivores, immature green turtles do not need to allocate energy to reproduction but are at risk of shark predation, although it is a rare occurrence. They are therefore assumed to select/use feeding and resting sites that maximise their fitness in terms of somatic growth, while avoiding predation. We investigated fine-scale behavioral patterns (feeding, resting and other behaviors), microhabitat use and time spent on each behavior for eight immature green turtles using data loggers including: depth, global positioning system, head acceleration, speed and video sensors. Immature green turtles at Iriomote Island, Japan, spent an average of 4.8 h feeding on seagrass each day, with two peaks, between 5∶00 and 9∶00, and between 17∶00 and 20∶00. This feeding pattern appeared to be restricted by gut capacity, and thus maximised energy acquisition. Meanwhile, most of the remaining time was spent resting at locations close to feeding grounds, which allowed turtles to conserve energy spent travelling and reduced the duration of periods exposed to predation. These behavioral patterns and time allocations allow immature green turtles to effectively obtain/conserve energy for growth, thus maximising their fitness. PMID:23840367

  4. GABA-B antagonist potentiates cortical epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S6 (2005), s. 358-358 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /26./. 28.08.2005-01.09.2005, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : GAGA-B antagonist * cortical afterdischarges * immature rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  5. Evaluation of immature mosquitocidal properties of Xanthium strumarium Linn. plant extracts against Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasim Roba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate immature mosquitocidal properties of Xanthium strumarium plant extracts against Culex mosquitoes at Entomology Laboratory, Maraki Campus, University of Gondar. Methods: The immature mosquitocidal activity of plant extracts was tested by following World Health Organization recommended protocol. Acetone, methanol and water extracts were prepared at 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 mg/L concentrations and tested against third and fourth instar larvae and pupae of Culex mosquitoes. The mortality rate of immature mosquitoes was recorded after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure period continuously. Results: Third instar larvae after 24 h exposure period, maximum mortality of 77.80% was recorded at 250 mg/L concentration of acetone extract. After 48 h and 72 h exposure period, maximum mortality of 88.90% was recorded in acetone extract in all the tested concentration. The maximum mortality of fourth instar larvae was 88.90% in acetone extract at 200 and 250 mg/L concentrations. Pupal mortality was also greater in acetone extract. The percentage of mortality in all the stage of mosquitoes was higher in acetone extract followed by methanol and water extract. Conclusions: The percentage of mortality is associated with concentration of the extracts tested and exposure period. This laboratory study confirmed immature mosquitocidal activity of Xanthium strumarium leaf extracts against Culex mosquitoes. The aqueous leaf extract can be used by applying on small man-made breeding places to prevent adult emergence.

  6. Spermatogenesis is accelerated in the immature Djungarian and Chinese hamster and rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaster, L. H.; de rooij, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The rate of progression of spermatogenesis was studied in immature Djungarian and Chinese hamsters and Wistar rats by scoring the most advanced cell types present at various ages after birth. From 15 days of age onward, the most advanced cell types in the Djungarian hamsters were formed at a rate

  7. Mauritinus seferi Bondar, 1960: bionomy, description of immature stages and redescription of adult (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luís Leitão Barbosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mature larvae of Mauritinus seferi Bondar, 1960 were collected in the mesocarp of murity palm (Mauritia flexuosa Linnaeus, in the State of Pará, Brazil. Larvae were reared to pupa and adults in the laboratory. Mature larva and pupa are described and adult redescribed. Adult and immature are illustrated for the first time. Observations about bionomy are included and discussed.

  8. An improved vitrification protocol for equine immature oocytes, resulting in a first live foal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortiz-Escribano, N.; Bogado Pascottini, O.; Woelders, H.; Vandenberghe, L.; Schauwer, De C.; Govaere, J.; Abbeel, Van den E.; Vullers, T.; Ververs, C.; Roels, K.; De Velde, Van M.; Soom, van A.; Smits, K.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The success rate for vitrification of immature equine oocytes is low. Although vitrified-warmed oocytes are able to mature, further embryonic development appears to be compromised. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare two vitrification protocols, and to examine the effect of

  9. Ethogram of Immature Green Turtles: Behavioral Strategies for Somatic Growth in Large Marine Herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Okuyama

    Full Text Available Animals are assumed to obtain/conserve energy effectively to maximise their fitness, which manifests itself in a variety of behavioral strategies. For marine animals, however, these behavioral strategies are generally unknown due to the lack of high-resolution monitoring techniques in marine habitats. As large marine herbivores, immature green turtles do not need to allocate energy to reproduction but are at risk of shark predation, although it is a rare occurrence. They are therefore assumed to select/use feeding and resting sites that maximise their fitness in terms of somatic growth, while avoiding predation. We investigated fine-scale behavioral patterns (feeding, resting and other behaviors, microhabitat use and time spent on each behavior for eight immature green turtles using data loggers including: depth, global positioning system, head acceleration, speed and video sensors. Immature green turtles at Iriomote Island, Japan, spent an average of 4.8 h feeding on seagrass each day, with two peaks, between 5∶00 and 9∶00, and between 17∶00 and 20∶00. This feeding pattern appeared to be restricted by gut capacity, and thus maximised energy acquisition. Meanwhile, most of the remaining time was spent resting at locations close to feeding grounds, which allowed turtles to conserve energy spent travelling and reduced the duration of periods exposed to predation. These behavioral patterns and time allocations allow immature green turtles to effectively obtain/conserve energy for growth, thus maximising their fitness.

  10. Lethal effects of selected novel pesticides on immature stages of Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ashraf; Ruberson, John R

    2017-12-01

    Trichogramma pretiosum Riley is an important egg parasitoid and biological control agent of caterpillar pests. We studied the acute toxicity of 20 pesticides (14 insecticides/miticides, three fungicides and three herbicides) exposed to recommended field rates. Egg, larval, and pupal stages of the parasitoid in their hosts were dipped in formulated solutions of the pesticides and evaluated 10 days later for percentage of host eggs with holes, number of parasitoids emerged per egg with holes, and stage-specific mortality of immature as well as adult wasps within the host eggs. Seven insecticides (buprofezin, chlorantraniliprole, spirotetramat, flonicamid, flubendiamide) and miticides (spiromesifen, cyflumetofen), one herbicide (nicosulfuron), and three fungicides (myclobutanil, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin + tebuconazole) caused no significant mortality to immature stages or pre-emergent adult parasitoids relative to controls. By contrast, seven insecticides/miticides (abamectin, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, fipronil, novaluron, spinetoram, tolfenpyrad) adversely affected immature and pre-emergent adult T. pretiosum, with tolfenpyrad being particularly lethal. Two herbicides had moderate (glufosinate ammonium) to severe (s-metolachlor) acute lethal effects on the immature parasitoids. This study corroborates earlier findings with adult T. pretiosum. Over half of the pesticides - and all the fungicides - tested in the current study would appear to be compatible with the use of T. pretiosum in integrated pest management programs, with respect to acute parasitoid mortality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Immature truncated O-glycophenotype of cancer directly induces oncogenic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Dabelsteen, Sally; Madsen, Frey Brus

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of immature truncated O-glycans is a characteristic feature observed on virtually all epithelial cancer cells, and a very high frequency is observed in early epithelial premalignant lesions that precede the development of adenocarcinomas. Expression of the truncated O-glycan s...

  12. Functional vegetable guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub.) accessions for improving flavonoid concentrations in immature pods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. Taub) seed are primarily used to extract galactomannan gum for oil fracking, however the immature pods are used as a vegetable in India and sold in ethnic grocery stores in the Atlanta, GA area. Twenty-two guar genotypes were grown in the field at Griffin, GA, US...

  13. Productive container types for Aedes aegypti immatures in Mérida, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rejón, Julian E; López-Uribe, Mildred P; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Del Najera-Vazquez, Maria Rosario; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Beaty, Barry J; Eisen, Lars

    2011-05-01

    During 2007-2010, we examined which container types in Mérida, México, are most productive for Aedes aegypti (L.) immatures. Surveys for mosquito immatures followed routine surveillance methodology and container type classifications used by Servicios de Salud de Yucatán. Our main findings were that (1) small and larger discarded containers that serve no particular purpose and therefore can be removed from the environment contribute strongly to larval and pupal production in Mérida, and (2) the importance of different container types can vary among sets of residential premises as well as between dry and wet periods. These results may help to guide future implementation in Mérida of control efforts that target the most productive container types for Ae. aegypti immatures. Furthermore, if the Patio Limpio cleanup campaign that currently is ongoing in Mérida proves successful in removing discarded containers as important immature development sites, then we should see dramatic changes in the most productive container types in the future as the mosquito is forced to switch to other container types, which perhaps also will be easier to include in highly targeted mosquito control interventions.

  14. Behavioral consequences of the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MTEP in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichá, Kateřina; Mikulecká, Anna; Mareš, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 4 (2011), s. 619-625 ISSN 0091-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : sensorimotor performance * exploratory behavior * anxiety * learning * immature rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.532, year: 2011

  15. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  16. Enhanced regeneration potential of mobilized dental pulp stem cells from immature teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, H; Iohara, K; Hayashi, Y; Okuwa, Y; Kurita, K; Nakashima, M

    2017-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from mature teeth by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-induced mobilization method can enhance angiogenesis/vasculogenesis and improve pulp regeneration when compared with colony-derived DPSCs. However, the efficacy of this method in immature teeth with root-formative stage has never been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the stemness, biological characteristics, and regeneration potential in mobilized DPSCs compared with colony-derived DPSCs from immature teeth. Mobilized DPSCs isolated from immature teeth were compared to colony-derived DPSCs using methods including flow cytometry, migration assays, mRNA expression of angiogenic/neurotrophic factor, and induced differentiation assays. They were also compared in trophic effects of the secretome. Regeneration potential was further compared in an ectopic tooth transplantation model. Mobilized DPSCs had higher migration ability and expressed more angiogenic/neurotrophic factors than DPSCs. The mobilized DPSC secretome produced a higher stimulatory effect on migration, immunomodulation, anti-apoptosis, endothelial differentiation, and neurite extension. In addition, vascularization and pulp regeneration potential were higher in mobilized DPSCs than in DPSCs. G-CSF-induced mobilization method enhances regeneration potential of colony-derived DPSCs from immature teeth. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of the photoactivation by synchrotron irradiation on the micro vascularization and on the cerebral tissues of the sane or glioma bearer mouse. Development in bi photonic microscopy and preclinical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricard, C.

    2008-06-01

    Brain tumors are the third most frequent pathology encountered in neurology following stroke and dementia. Approximately 10 new cases are encountered each year in a population of 100.000. Glioblastoma are the most aggressive among brain tumors and despite medical progress they suffer of a poor prognosis (median survival time is 12 months; five years survival rate is 2%). One of the challenges in neuro-oncology is the development of new curative treatments against glioblastoma. One of them, the photoactivation therapy of platinum with synchrotron X-rays (PAT-Plat) was developed during the last years and has shown curative effects in rats bearing the F98 glioma. In the present study, we have attempted to characterize the effects of the PAT-Plat and its different modalities (chemotherapy with cisplatin and synchrotron radiotherapy) on healthy brain tissue and microvasculature as well as on the F98 glioma. Intra-vital multiphoton microscopy was used as the main imaging tool to investigate the effects of the PAT-Plat and many methodologies were developed (assessment of blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption, imaging of tumor microvasculature, staining of astrocytes and elastic fibers). We have shown that a 15 Gy/79 keV synchrotron irradiation does not induce short term side effects (BBB disruption, diminution of the perfusion, gliosis) in the parietal cortex of nude mice. We have also demonstrated that a synergistic effect between cisplatin and irradiation is at the origin of the effects of the PAT-Plat. Finally, we have shown that the action of the PAT-Plat is not restricted to tumor cells; a decrease in the angiogenic vessels perfusion was also observed in the peritumoral area of the F98 glioma. (author)

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beishon, J.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation has been the subject of concern and controversy for many years. The advantages of food irradiation include the reduction or elimination of dangerous bacterial organisms, the control of pests and insects which destroy certain foods, the extension of the shelf-life of many products, for example fruit, and its ability to treat products such as seafood which may be eaten raw. It can also replace existing methods of treatment which are believed to have hazardous side-effects. However, after examining the evidence produced by the proponents of food irradiation, the author questions whether it has any major contribution to make to the problems of foodborne diseases or world food shortages. More acceptable solutions, he suggests, may be found in educating food handlers to ensure that hygienic conditions prevail in the production, storage and serving of food. (author)

  19. Vinca irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, R.

    1976-10-01

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool [fr

  20. Status epilepticus in immature rats is associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava eFolbergrová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurologic disorder, particularly frequent in infants and children where it can lead to serious consequences later in life. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders including epilepsy in adults. However, their role in immature epileptic brain is unclear since there have been two contrary opinions: oxidative stress is age-dependent and does not occur in immature brain during status epilepticus and, on the other hand, evidence of oxidative stress in immature brain during a specific model of status epilepticus. To solve this dilemma, we have decided to investigate oxidative stress following status epilepticus induced in immature 12-day-old rats by three substances with a different mechanism of action, namely 4-aminopyridine, LiCl-pilocarpine or kainic acid. FluoroJade-B staining revealed mild brain damage especially in hippocampus and thalamus in each of the tested models. Decrease of glucose and glycogen with parallel rises of lactate clearly indicate high rate of glycolysis, which was apparently not sufficient in 4-AP and Li-Pilo status, as evident from the decreases of PCr levels. Hydroethidium method revealed significantly higher levels of superoxide anion (by ~60 % in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and thalamus of immature rats during status. Status epilepticus lead to mitochondrial dysfunction with a specific pronounced decrease of complex I activity that persisted for a long period of survival. Complex II and IV activities remained in the control range. Antioxidant treatment with SOD mimetic MnTMPYP or peroxynitrite scavenger FeTPPS significantly attenuated oxidative stress and inhibition of complex I activity. These findings bring evidence that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are age and model independent, and may thus be considered a general phenomenon. They can have a clinical relevance for a novel approach to the treatment of epilepsy

  1. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  2. Enhancement of radiation effect on mouse intestinal crypt survival by timing of 5-fluorouracil administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, E.; Coffey, C.; Maruyama, Y.

    1977-01-01

    There is a marked dependence of mouse crypt survival on the sequence of combined drug-radiation treatment and on the time lapse between irradiation and drug administration. When 5-fluorouracil is administered 6 hours after irradiation or later (up to 18 hours postirradiation), crypt survival drops significantly

  3. Spontaneous hair cell regeneration in the mouse utricle following gentamicin ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kohei; Izumikawa, Masahiko; Beyer, Lisa A; Atkin, Graham M; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-01-01

    Whereas most epithelial tissues turn-over and regenerate after a traumatic lesion, this restorative ability is diminished in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear; it is absent in the cochlea and exists only in a limited capacity in the vestibular epithelium. The extent of regeneration in vestibular hair cells has been characterized for several mammalian species including guinea pig, rat, and chinchilla, but not yet in mouse. As the fundamental model species for investigating hereditary disease, the mouse can be studied using a wide variety of genetic and molecular tools. To design a mouse model for vestibular hair cell regeneration research, an aminoglycoside-induced method of complete hair cell elimination was developed in our lab and applied to the murine utricle. Loss of utricular hair cells was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and corroborated by a loss of fluorescent signal in utricles from transgenic mice with GFP-positive hair cells. Regenerative capability was characterized at several time points up to six months following insult. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed that as early as two weeks after insult, a few immature hair cells, demonstrating the characteristic immature morphology indicative of regeneration, could be seen in the utricle. As time progressed, larger numbers of immature hair cells could be seen along with some mature cells resembling surface morphology of type II hair cells. By six months post-lesion, numerous regenerated hair cells were present in the utricle, however, neither their number nor their appearance was normal. A BrdU assay suggested that at least some of the regeneration of mouse vestibular hair cells involved mitosis. Our results demonstrate that the vestibular sensory epithelium in mice can spontaneously regenerate, elucidate the time course of this process, and identify involvement of mitosis in some cases. These data establish a road map of the murine vestibular regenerative process, which can be

  4. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  5. Mechanisms of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercaria- I. analysis of antibody and T-lymphocyte responses in mouse strains developing differing levels of immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, S.L.; Labine, M.; Sher, A.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of cellular and humoral responses directed against schistosomula were examined in mice of three inbred strains which demonstrate differences in the degree of resistance induced by immunization with irradiated cercariae. T-Cell reactivity was observed during the first 4 weeks after vaccination but declined to control levels thereafter. Anti-schistosomulum antibody was first detected 2 weeks after vaccination, peaked by 6 weeks, and persisted as late as 15 weeks. In sera obtained at 6 weeks, antibody activity was detected in affinity chromatography-purified fractions containing IgM, IgA, IgG 1 , IgG 2 /sub a/, and IgG 3 immunoglobulins. In general, the cellular and humoral responses observed in C57Bl/6J mice, which consistently developed a high level of immunity after vaccination, were not significantly different from those observed in C3H/HeJ or CBA/J mice, which achieved only low to moderate levels of immunity. Thus, although antibody production appears to correlate more closely than T lymphocyte responsiveness with the typical long-term resistance pattern observed in this model, the absence of striking differences in parasite-specific antibody levels between mice of these different strains suggests that additional mechanisms may be involved in the development of immunity after vaccination

  6. Fish irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Tengumnuay, C.; Juangbhanich, C.

    1970-01-01

    Chub-mackerel was chosen for the study because they are the most common fish in Thailand. Preliminary investigations were conducted to determine the maximum radiation dose of gamma-rays by organoleptic tests. The samples were subjected to radiation at various doses up to 4 Mrad. Many experiments were conducted using other kinds of fish. The results showed that 1 Mrad would be the maximum acceptable dose for fish. Later, the influence of the radiation dose from 0.1-1 Mrad was studied in order to find the optimum acceptable dose for preservation of fish without off-flavour. For this purpose, the Hedonic scale was used. It was found that 0.2 and 0.5 Mrad gave the best result on Chub mackerel. The determinations of optimum dose, organoleptic, microbiological and trimethylamine content changes were done. The results showed that Chub mackerel irradiated at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 Mrad stored at 3 0 C for 71 days were still acceptable, on the contrary the untreated samples were found unacceptable at 14 days. The trimethylamine increment was significantly higher in the untreated samples. At 15 days storage, trimethylamine in the non-irradiated Chub-mackerel was about 10 times higher than the irradiated ones. At 51 and 79 days storage, about 13 times higher in the control samples than the irradiated samples except 0.1 Mrad. Only 2 times higher was found for the 0.1 Mrad. The microbiological results showed that the irradiation above 0.2 Mrad gave favorable extension of shelf-life of fish

  7. Chapter 2: Irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 2 presents the subjects: 1) gamma irradiators which includes: Category-I gamma irradiators (self-contained); Category-II gamma irradiators (panoramic and dry storage); Category-III gamma irradiators (self-contained in water); Category-IV gamma irradiators (panoramic and wet storage); source rack for Category-IV gamma irradiators; product transport system for Category-IV gamma irradiators; radiation shield for gamma irradiators; 2) accelerators which includes: Category-I Accelerators (shielded irradiator); Category-II Accelerators (irradiator inside a shielded room); Irradiation application examples.

  8. In vivo and in vitro radiosensitivities ofnewly established mouse ascites tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Tsuboi, A.; Tsuchiya, T.

    1981-01-01

    The response of two newly established mouse mammary tumors to x irradiation in vitro and in vivo was studied by colony-forming assay in soft agar. Cells irradiated in vivo were more resistant than those irradiated in vitro. The D 0 values for in vitro irradiation were 112 rad at both exponential and stationary phases, while those for in vivo irradiation were 303 rad at exponential phase and 556 rad at stationary phase. This increase in D 0 value, which is greater than the OER, suggests that radiosensitivity in vivo cannot be explained only by hypoxia

  9. Non-stochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig and mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Hansen, L.S.; Coggle, J.E.; Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this collaborative study skin areas of various sizes were irradiated with different energy beta emitters. In the post-irradiation period fields were examined for erythema, desquamation, ulceration and dermal necrosis. The aim of the study is to determine the threshold doses for the different biological reactions as a function of the energy of the radiation and the size of skin field irradiated. At St. Bartholomew's Hospital and Oxford the irradiation of mouse and pig skin was carried out using strontium-90 and thulium-170 sources. In addition, mice were irradiated with thallium-204, a slightly lower energy beta emitter than thulium. (author)

  10. Effect of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse Peyer's patches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    The relationship of time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in mouse Peyer's patches after whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays was studied by the method of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). The results showed that the number of TUNEL positive cells in mouse Peyer's patches were significantly increased following WBI with 2 Gy irradiation, While the number of TUNEL positive cells were decreased after WBI with doses of 0.05 Gy and 0.075 Gy X-rays. the results support the view that 2 Gy irradiation promote the apoptosis of immune cells and the low doses of radiation suppress the apoptosis of immune cells

  11. Radiosensitization of mouse spermatogenic stem cells by Ro-07-0582

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, N.; Withers, R.; Hunter, N.

    1977-01-01

    The hypoxic character of the spermatogenic stem cells of the mouse testis was investigated by measuring the effect on radiosensitivity of treatment with the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, Ro-07-0582 or hyperbaric oxygen (30 psi). The D 0 values obtained were 181 (161-207) rad for irradiation alone, 140 (133-148) rad for irradiation after treatment with Ro-07-0582, and about 100 rad for irradiation in the presence of hyperbaric oxygen. Ro-07-0582 alone was slightly cytotoxic. The results demonstrate that mouse spermatogenic stem cells are radiosensitized by Ro-07-0582 or hyperbaric oxygen and are not as well oxygenated as other normal tissues

  12. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...

  13. Food irradiation: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Rosanna M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  14. Industrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Production lines for rubber gloves would not appear to have much in common with particle physics laboratories, but they both use accelerators. Electron beam irradiation is often used in industry to improve the quality of manufactured goods or to reduce production cost. Products range from computer disks, shrink packaging, tyres, cables, and plastics to hot water pipes. Some products, such as medical goods, cosmetics and certain foodstuffs, are sterilized in this way. In electron beam irradiation, electrons penetrate materials creating showers of low energy electrons. After many collisions these electrons have the correct energy to create chemically active sites. They may either break molecular bonds or activate a site which promotes a new chemical linkage. This industrial irradiation can be exploited in three ways: breaking down a biological molecule usually renders it useless and kills the organism; breaking an organic molecule can change its toxicity or function; and crosslinking a polymer can strengthen it. In addition to traditional gamma irradiation using isotopes, industrial irradiation uses three accelerator configurations, each type defining an energy range, and consequently the electron penetration depth. For energies up to 750 kV, the accelerator consists of a DC potential applied to a simple wire anode and the electrons extracted through a slot in a coaxially mounted cylindrical cathode. In the 1-5 MeV range, the Cockcroft-Walton or Dynamitron( R ) accelerators are normally used. To achieve the high potentials in these DC accelerators, insulating SF6 gas and large dimension vessels separate the anode and cathode; proprietary techniques distinguish the various commercial models available. Above 5 MeV, the size of DC accelerators render them impractical, and more compact radiofrequency-driven linear accelerators are used. Irradiation electron beams are actually 'sprayed' over the product using a magnetic deflection system. Lower energy beams of

  15. Protective effect of a non specific inflammation on bone marrow protein synthesis in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Roques, P.; Court, L.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma radiations exert a decrease in mouse bone marrow total protein synthesis. A non-specific inflammatory process induced with polyacrylamide microbeads stimulates spleen and marrow protein synthesis and protects the medullar protein synthesis in irradiated mice [fr

  16. Effect of low dose radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-ray on apoptosis in mouse spleen. Methods: Time course changes and dose-effect relationship of apoptosis in mouse spleen induced by WBI were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) qualitatively and TUNEL method semi-quantitatively. Results: Many typical apoptotic lymphocytes were found by TEM in mouse spleen after WBI with 2 Gy. No marked alterations of ultrastructure were found following WBI with 0.075 Gy. It was observed by TUNEL that the apoptosis of splenocytes increased after high dose radiation and decreased following low dose radiation (LDR). The dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis showed a J-shaped curve. Conclusion: The effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen was distinct. And the decrease of apoptosis after LDR is considered a manifestation of radiation hormesis

  17. Role of C/EBPβ-LAP and C/EBPβ-LIP in early adipogenic differentiation of human white adipose-derived progenitors and at later stages in immature adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Stefan; Mitterberger, Maria C; Mattesich, Monika; Zwerschke, Werner

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of the major isoforms of CCAAT enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ), C/EBPβ-LAP and C/EBPβ-LIP, in adipogenesis of human white adipose-derived stromal/progenitor cells (ASC). C/EBPβ gene expression was transiently induced early in adipogenesis. At later stages, in immature adipocytes, the C/EBPβ mRNA and protein levels declined. The C/EBPβ-LIP protein steady-state level decreased considerably stronger than the C/EBPβ-LAP level and the C/EBPβ-LIP half-life was significantly shorter than the C/EBPβ-LAP half-life. The turn-over of both C/EBPβ-isoforms was regulated by ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent degradation. These data suggest that the protein stability of the C/EBPβ-isoforms is differentially regulated in the course of adipogenesis and in immature adipocytes. Constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LIP had antiadipogenic activity in human ASC. C/EBPβ-LAP, which promotes adipogenesis in mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by directly activating expression of the adipogenic keyregulator PPARγ2, induced the expression of PPARγ2 and of the adipocyte differentiation gene product FABP4 in confluent ASC in the absence of adipogenic hormones. At later stages after hormone cocktail-induced adipogenesis, in immature adipocytes, constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LAP led to reduced expression of PPARγ2 and FABP4, C/EBPα expression was downregulated and the expression of the adipocyte differentiation gene products adiponectin and leptin was impaired. These findings suggest that constitutive overexpression of C/EBPβ-LAP induces adipogenesis in human ASC and negatively regulates the expression of adipogenic regulators and certain adipocyte differentiation gene products in immature adipocytes. We conclude the regulation of both C/EBPβ gene expression and C/EBPβ-LIP and C/EBPβ-LAP protein turn-over plays an important role for the expression of adipogenic regulators and/or adipocyte differentiation genes in early adipogenic differentiation of

  18. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerens, H [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Saint-Lebe, L

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment.

  19. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransohoff, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Carriers, after being loaded with product to be irradiated, are transported by an input-output conveyor system into an irradiation chamber where they are received in a horizontal arrangement on racks which may support different sizes and numbers of carriers. The racks are moved by a chamber conveyor system in an endless rectangular path about a radiation source. Packers shift the carriers on the racks to maintain nearest proximity to the radiation source. The carriers are shifted in position on each rack during successive rack cycles to produce even radiation exposure. The carriers may be loaded singly onto successive racks during a first cycle of movement thereof about the source, with loading of additional carriers, and/or unloading of carriers, onto each rack occurring on subsequent rack cycles of movement

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Food can be provided with extra beneficial properties by physical processing. These benefits include a reduced possibility of food poisoning, or an increased life of the food. We are familiar with pasteurisation of milk, drying of vegetables, and canning of fruit. These physical processes work because the food absorbs energy during treatment which brings about the changes needed. The energy absorbed in these examples is heat energy. Food irradiation is a less familiar process. It produces similar benefits to other processes and it can sometimes be applied with additional advantages over conventional processing. For example, because irradiation causes little heating, foods may look and taste more natural. Also, treatment can take place with the food in its final plastic wrappers, reducing the risk of re-contamination. (author). 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  2. Endolymphatic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, M.M.; Ianhez, L.E.; Sabbaga, E.

    1982-01-01

    The authors analysed the clinical evolution and the result of renal transplantation some years after irradiation in 24 patients (group I) who received endolymphatic 131 I as a pre-transplantation immunesuppresive measure. The control group (group II) consisted of 24 non-irradiated patients comparable to group I in age, sex, primary disease, type of donor and immunesuppressive therapy. Significant differences were observed between the two groups regarding such factors a incidence and reversibility of rejection crises in the first 60 post-transplantation days, loss of kidney due to rejection, and dosage of azathioprine. The authors conclude that this method, besides being harmless, has prolonged immunesuppressive action, its administration being advised for receptores of cadaver kidneys, mainly those who show positive cross-match against HLA antigens for painel. (Author) [pt

  3. Clear cell chondrosarcoma of the pelvis in a skeletally immature patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Motoi; Machinami, Rikuo; Goto, Takahiro; Kawano, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Aiichiro

    1999-01-01

    We report on a case of clear cell chondrosarcoma (CCCS) of the left iliac bone in a 12-year-old skeletally immature boy. Radiographic examination revealed an aggressive osteolytic lesion with areas of mineralization. Fluid-fluid levels were seen on T2-weighted MR images. Laboratory data showed slight elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase. The biopsy specimen showed histological features of CCCS with some resemblance to osteosarcoma, such as prominent irregular osteoid formation among clear tumor cells. Surgical treatment was accomplished without pre- or post-operative chemotherapy. Because of the patient's age, elevated serum alkaline phosphatase, and histopathology with prominent osteoid production, this case could be confused with osteosarcoma. Although CCCS is an extremely rare bone tumor in children, it is important to be aware that it may arise in a skeletally immature patient. CCCS, unlike osteosarcoma, is not treated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. (orig.)

  4. Giant cell tumour in the foot of a skeletally immature girl: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2009-08-01

    We present a case of delayed diagnosis of a benign giant cell tumour (GCT) of the third metatarsal in a skeletally immature girl. The patient underwent en bloc excision of the tumour. The tumour had replaced the third metatarsal and had infiltrated the surrounding soft tissue and the second and fourth metatarsal bases. Deep, lateral and medial margins were all involved. A high index of suspicion is needed when evaluating any tumours of the foot, because the compact structure of the foot may delay diagnosis. Early detection is important for avoiding amputation, as the hindfoot and midfoot are classified as one compartment and radical resection is impossible to achieve. Tumours grow faster in the foot than in other bones. GCT in this location and age-group are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a destructive bony lesion in skeletally immature patients.

  5. Multidisciplinary management of subgingival crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Zahedpasha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the multidisciplinary management of subgingival horizontal crown-root fracture of an immature permanent maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old boy. After removal of the fractured fragment, pulpotomy was performed within 48 h from the injury to promote apexogenesis. The tooth was orthodontically extruded until the fracture line was located above the alveolar bone level. Frenectomy, supracrestal fiberotomy, and crown lengthening were performed after adequate stabilization of the extruded tooth for 5 months. Finally, the tooth was restored with composite resin by using the acid etch technique. This report highlights that a multidisciplinary treatment approach with strict cooperation among specialists to manage a complicated crown-root fracture can save and restore a traumatized immature permanent tooth.

  6. Management of immature teeth with apical infections using mineral trioxide aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries to the young permanent teeth lead to devitalization of the pulp with concomitant arrest in further development of the immature root of the involved tooth. Hermetic seal of the root canal system during obturation is not possible in such cases, due to the lack of an apical constriction. The traditional management technique in such cases has been apexification involving induction of a calcific barrier at the apex using calcium hydroxide, which in turn facilitates obturation of the root canal. However this becomes complicated when there is persistent infection leading to periapical changes. This case report describes the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA for management of a periapically compromised immature tooth.

  7. Position-dependent patterning of spontaneous action potentials in immature cochlear inner hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stuart L.; Eckrich, Tobias; Kuhn, Stephanie; Zampini, Valeria; Franz, Christoph; Ranatunga, Kishani M.; Roberts, Terri P.; Masetto, Sergio; Knipper, Marlies; Kros, Corné J.; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous action potential activity is crucial for mammalian sensory system development. In the auditory system, patterned firing activity has been observed in immature spiral ganglion cells and brain-stem neurons and is likely to depend on cochlear inner hair cell (IHC) action potentials. It remains uncertain whether spiking activity is intrinsic to developing IHCs and whether it shows patterning. We found that action potentials are intrinsically generated by immature IHCs of altricial rodents and that apical IHCs exhibit bursting activity as opposed to more sustained firing in basal cells. We show that the efferent neurotransmitter ACh, by fine-tuning the IHC’s resting membrane potential (Vm), is crucial for the bursting pattern in apical cells. Endogenous extracellular ATP also contributes to the Vm of apical and basal IHCs by activating SK2 channels. We hypothesize that the difference in firing pattern along the cochlea instructs the tonotopic differentiation of IHCs and auditory pathway. PMID:21572434

  8. Immature germ cells in semen ? correlation with total sperm count and sperm motility

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Priya S.; Humbarwadi, Rajendra S.; Patil, Ashalata D.; Gune, Anita R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Current data regarding infertility suggests that male factor contributes up to 30% of the total cases of infertility. Semen analysis reveals the presence of spermatozoa as well as a number of non-sperm cells, presently being mentioned in routine semen report as "round cells" without further differentiating them into leucocytes or immature germ cells. Aim: The aim of this work was to study a simple, cost-effective, and convenient method for differentiating the round cells in se...

  9. Ontology-Based Identification of Research Gaps and Immature Research Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Beckers , Kristian; Eicker , Stefan; Faßbender , Stephan; Heisel , Maritta; Schmidt , Holger; Schwittek , Widura

    2012-01-01

    Part 1: Conference; International audience; Researchers often have to understand new knowledge areas, and identify research gaps and immature areas in them. They have to understand and link numerous publications to achieve this goal. This is difficult, because natural language has to be analyzed in the publications, and implicit relations between them have to be discovered. We propose to utilize the structuring possibilities of ontologies to make the relations between publications, knowledge ...

  10. Occurrence, characterization and management of fruit rot of immature cucumber fruits under arid greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDULLAH M AL-SADI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to characterize and manage pathogens associated with fruit rot of immature cucumber fruits in greenhouses in Oman. A survey over 5 growing seasons from 2008 to 2010 in 99 different greenhouses in Oman showed that the disease is prevalent in 91 (92% greenhouses and results in losses of 10 to 60% (avg. 33% of immature fruits per plant. Incidence of the disease was not found to be affected by growing seasons, which could be attributed to the limited fluctuations in ambient temperatures in greenhouses. Isolations from diseased cucumber fruits yielded Alternaria alternata (isolation frequency = 52%, Fusarium equiseti (40%, Cladosporium tenuissium (27%, Botrytis cinerea (6%, Fusarium solani (6%, Corynespora cassiicola (3%, Aspergillus spp. (2%, Curvularia sp. (1% and Bipolaris sp. (1%. With the exception of Curvularia and Bipolaris species, all other fungi were pathogenic on cucumber fruits, with Fusarium equiseti being the most aggressive, followed by Corynespora cassiicola, Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria alternata. Cladosporium and Aspergillus spp. were found to be weakly pathogenic. Comparing the efficacy of foliar and soil applications of carbendazim fungicide on fruit rot of cucumber showed that foliar applications significantly reduced fruit rot and increased cucumber yield when compared to soil application or to control (P < 0.01. This appears to be the first report of the association of Corynespora cassiicola and Fusarium equiseti with fruit rot of immature greenhouse cucumbers. This is also the first report in Oman for the association of Cladosporium tenuissimum with fruit rot of immature cucumbers. Findings are discussed in terms of factors affecting disease control in greenhouses using carbendazim.

  11. The immature stages of Polypedilum (Pentapedilum) nodosum (Johannsen) and Polypedilum (Tripodura) masudai (Tokunaga) (Diptera, Chironomidae, Chironominae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong-Qu; Cranston, Peter S; Zhao, Jian-Gang; Lok, Chan-Wa; Wong, Kai-Chin; Li, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-12-09

    Based on associated material collected from Macau and Guangxi, the pupae and larvae of Polypedilum (Pentapedilum) nodosum Johannsen and P. (Tripodura) masudai Tokunaga are described completely for the first time. Both species are newly recorded from China. Characters for distinguishing the immature stage of these species from other allied Polypedilum species are noted. The previously recorded Polypedilum (Pentapedilum) 'K1' of Cranston  (1996) is shown to be P. nodosum. Information is provided on distribution and ecological tolerances. 

  12. Intrahippocampal Injection of Endothelin-1: A New Model of Ischemia-induced Seizures in Immature Rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsenov, Grygoriy; Máttéffyová, Adéla; Mareš, Pavel; Otáhal, Jakub; Kubová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, Suppl.5 (2007), s. 7-13 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/0713; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/03/H148 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : endothelin-1 * epileptic seizures * immature rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.569, year: 2007

  13. Major salivary gland hypertrophy model in immature rats: morphometric and histochemical epithelial cell characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera V. Ivanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to estimate the functional state of epithelial cells of acini and ducts of major salivary glands with hypertrophy caused by repeated incisor amputations in immature rats.Materials and methods. The experiment was carried out on immature (20 days, white male rats, divided into 3 groups: intact, control and group of rats with repeated incisor amputations. Animals were taken out in 2d, 3d, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th weeks after the first incisor amputation. Morphofunctional state of rat major salivary glands was assessed by histological (hematoxylin and eosin, histochemistrical (Alcian blue, PAS-reaction, Brachet method and morphometrical (acini area, intralobular ducts volume methods.Results. Repeated incisor amputations led to the increase of acini area and the decrease of intralobular duct volume in submandibular glands in 2nd–4th weeks of the experiment. Cytoplasm pyroninophilia of submandibular gland acinar cells was less pronounced and intensity of PAS-reaction was more pronounced than in intact animals in 3rd week of the experiment. Morphological and functional changes of parotid and sublingual gland epithelial cells were not observed after repeated amputations of incisors in immature rats.Conclusion. Repeated incisor amputations in immature male rats lead to submandibular gland acinar cell hypertrophy in the early stages of the experiment (2d–4th weeks with accumulation of glycoproteins and protein synthesis weakening in these cells. Hypertrophy of acinar cells are accompanied by retardation in the development of granular convoluted tubule cells which are the source of synthesis and secretion of the endocrine biologically active factors of submandibular glands.

  14. Platelet-rich fibrin-mediated revitalization of immature necrotic tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary studies have shown that the regeneration of tissues and root elongation is possible in necrotic immature permanent teeth. The purpose of this case report is to add a new vista in regenerative endodontic therapy by using platelet rich fibrin for revitalization of immature non vital tooth. An 11year old boy with the history of trauma was diagnosed with the pulpal necrosis and symptomatic apical periodontitis in tooth #21. Intra oral periapical radiograph showed open apex and associated immature supernumerary tooth with respect to tooth #21. Access preparation and minimal instrumentation was done to remove necrotic debris under copious irrigation with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. Triple antibiotic paste was packed in the canal for four weeks. During second visit, 5 mL of whole blood was drawn from the medial cubital vein of the patient and blood was then subjected to centrifugation at 2400 rpm for 12 minutes for the preparation of Platelet rich fibrin (PRF utilizing Choukroun′s method. Triple antibiotic paste was removed and canal was dried. PRF clot was pushed to the apical region of tooth #21 using hand pluggers. Three milimetres of Mineral trioxide (MTA was placed in cervical part of the root canal and permanent restoration was done three days later. Clinical examination at 6 and 12 months revealed no sensitivity to percussion and palpation in tooth #21and it responded positively to both electric pulp and cold tests. Radiographic examination showed resolution of periapical rarefaction, further root development and apical closure of the tooth #21 and its associated supernumerary tooth. On the basis of successful outcome of the present case it can be stated that PRF clot may serve as a scaffold for regeneration of necrotic immature teeth.

  15. Toxicity of 144Ce fused clay particles inhaled by immature beagle dogs. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; McClellan, R.O.; Hahn, F.F.; Hobbs, C.H.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1974-01-01

    The metabolism, dosimetry, and biological effects of 144 Ce fused clay particles inhaled by immature Beagle dogs (approximately 3 months of age at exposure) are being investigated for comparison with studies of dogs exposed at 12 to 14 months of age and 8 to 10.5 years of age. These studies will assess possible age-related differences in the biological behavior and effects of inhaled radionuclides, differences that may be of significance in predicting the response of accidentally-exposed human populations that include individuals of different ages. Eighteen immature dogs have been entered into a radiation dose pattern study to be serially sacrificed at different intervals after inhalation exposure. During the first 2 months post-exposure, lung clearance and uptake by the tracheobronchial lymph nodes appeared to be greater in the immature dogs than in young adult dogs. Also, skeletal uptake was greater than hepatic uptake in the immature dogs. Three blocks of longevity animals, 10 per block, with graded initial lung burdens ranging from 0.004 to 120 μCi 144 Ce/kg body weight and 1 control, are currently on experiment. Three dogs with initial lung burdens of 73 to 120 μCi 144 Ce/kg body weight died at 66 to 121 days after exposure with pulmonary injury and congestive heart failure. Another dog with an initial lung burden of 70 μCi 144 Ce/kg body weight died at 511 days after exposure with pulmonary injury. Serial observations are continuing on the surviving 26 144 Ce-exposed and 3 control dogs. (U.S.)

  16. Hepatic splenosis mimicking liver metastases in a patient with history of childhood immature teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jereb, Sara; Trotovsek, Blaz; Skrbinc, Breda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatic splenosis is rare condition, preceded by splenectomy or spleen trauma, the term refers to nodular implantation of normal splenic tissue in the liver. In patients with history of malignancy in particular, it can be mistaken for metastases and can lead to unnecessary diagnostic procedures or inappropriate treatment. Case report Twenty-two-year old male was treated for immature teratoma linked to undescended right testicle after birth. On regular follow-up examination...

  17. Status Epilepticus in Immature Rats Is Associated with Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Ješina, Pavel; Kubová, Hana; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, May 26 (2016), s. 136 ISSN 1662-5102 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08565S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : immature rats * status epilepticus * oxidative stress * mitochondrial dysfunction Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.555, year: 2016

  18. Brain superoxide anion formation in immature rats during seizures: Protection by selected compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Otáhal, Jakub; Druga, Rastislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 233, č. 1 (2012), s. 421-429 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/08/0292; GA ČR GAP303/10/0999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : immature rats * DL-homocysteic acid-induced seizures * superoxide anion * SOD mimetics * protection * Fluoro-Jade B staining * brain damage Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.645, year: 2012

  19. Anticonvulsant action of GABA(B) receptor positive modulator CGP7930 in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 100, 1-2 (2012), s. 49-54 ISSN 0920-1211 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/1274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : GABA(B) receptors * cerebral cortex * epileptic afterdischarges * immature rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.241, year: 2012

  20. Derivatives of valproic acid are active against pentetrazol-induced seizures in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana; Hen, N.; Yagen, B.; Bialer, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 106, 1-2 (2013), s. 64-73 ISSN 0920-1211 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/1274; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : experimental seizures * anticonvulsant action * derivatives of valproic acid * immature rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.190, year: 2013