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Sample records for irradiated ebr-ii driver

  1. Eutectic penetration times in irradiated EBR-II driver fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.R.; Bottcher, J.H.; Seidel, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental test procedure employed the use of a high-temperature furnace which heated pre-irradiated elements to temperature and maintained the environment until element-cladding breach occurred. Pre-irradiated elements of the Mark-II design were first encapsulated in a close-fitting sealed tube that was instrumented with a pressure transducer at the top of the tube and a thermocouple at the element's top-of-fuel axial location. The volume of the capsule was evacuated in order to better identify the pressure pulse which would occur on breach and to minimize contaminants. Next, a three-zone fast-recovery furnace was heated and an axial temperature profile, similar to that experienced in the EBR-II core, was established. The encapsulated element was then quickly inserted into the furnace and remained there until clad breach occurred. The element was then removed from the furnace immediately. Visual and metallurgical examination of the rupture site was done later. A total of seven elements were tested in the above manner

  2. Characterization of spent EBR-II driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    Operations and material control and accountancy requirements for the Fuel Conditioning Facility demand accurate prediction of the mass flow of spent EBR-II driver fuel into the facility. This requires validated calculational tools that can predict the burnup and isotopic distribution in irradiated Zr-alloy fueled driver assemblies. Detailed core-follow depletion calculations have been performed for an extensive series of EBR-II runs to produce a database of material inventories for the spent fuel to be processed. As this fuel is processed, comparison of calculated values with measured data obtained from samples of this fuel is producing a growing set of validation data. A more extensive set of samples and measurements from the initial processing of irradiated driver fuel has produced valuable estimates of the biases and uncertainties in both the measured and calculated values. Results of these comparisons are presented herein and indicate the calculated values adequately predict the mass flows

  3. Experience with EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Porter, D.L.; Walters, L.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The exceptional performance of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) metallic driver fuel has been demonstrated by the irradiation of a large number of elements under steady-state, transient overpower, and loss-of-flow conditions. High burnup with high reliability has been achieved by a close coupling of element design and materials selection. Quantification of reliability has allowed full utilization of element lifetime. Improved design and duct materials currently under test are expected to increase the burnup from 8 to 14 at.%

  4. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR

  5. Transient performance of EBR-II driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzzell, J.A.; Hudman, G.D.; Porter, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The first phases of qualification of the EBR-II driver fuel for repeated transient overpower operation have recently been completed. The accomplishments include prediction of the transient fuel and cladding performance through ex-core testing and fuel-element modeling studies, localized in-core power testing during steady-state operation, and whole-core multiple transient testing. The metallic driver fuel successfully survived 56 transients, spaced over a 45-day period, with power increases of approx. 160% at rates of approx. 1%/s with a 720-second hold at full power. The performance results obtained from both ex-core and n-core tests indicate that the fuel is capable of repeated transient operation

  6. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several metallic fuel element designs which have been tested and used as driver fuel in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The most recent advanced designs have all performed acceptably in EBR-H and can provide reliable performance to high burnups. Fuel elements tested have included use of U-l0Zr metallic fuel with either D9, 316 or HT9 stainless steel cladding; the D9 and 316-clad designs have been used as standard driver fuel. Experimental data indicate that fuel performance characteristics are very similar for the various designs tested. Cladding materials can be selected that optimize performance based on reactor design and operational goals

  7. Safety aspects of advanced fuels irradiations in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.

    1975-09-01

    Basic safety questions such as MFCI, loss-of-Na bond, pin behavior during design basis transients, and failure propagation were evaluated as they pertain to advanced fuels in EBR-II. With the exception of pin response to the unlikely loss-of-flow transient, the study indicates that irradiation of significant numbers of advanced fueled subassemblies in EBR-II should pose no safety problems. The analysis predicts, however, that Na boiling may occur during the postulated design basis unlikely loss-of-flow transient in subassemblies containing He-bonded fuel pins with the larger fuel-clad gaps. The calculations indicate that coolant temperatures at top of core in the limiting S/A's, containing the He bonded pins, would reach approximately 1480 0 F during the transient without application of uncertainty factors. Inclusion of uncertainties could result in temperature predictions which approach coolant boiling temperatures (1640 0 F). Further analysis of He-bonded pins is being done in this potential problem area, e.g., to apply best estimates of uncertainty factors and to determine the sensitivity of the preliminary results to gap conductance

  8. Off-normal performance of EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Batte, G.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Fryer, R.M.; Koenig, J.F.; Hofman, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The off-normal performance of EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel has been more than satisfactory as demonstrated by robust reliability under repeated transient overpower and undercooled loss-of-flow tests, by benign run-beyond-cladding-breach behavior, and by forgiving response to fabrication defects including lack of bond. Test results have verified that the metallic driver fuel is very tolerant of off-normal events. This behavior has allowed EBR-II to operate in a combined steady-state and transient mode to provide test capability without limitation from the metallic driver fuel

  9. Degradation of EBR-II driver fuel during wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization data are reported for sodium bonded EBR-II reactor fuel which had been stored underwater in containers since the 1981--1982 timeframe. Ten stainless steel storage containers, which had leaked water during storage due to improper sealing, were retrieved from the ICPP-603 storage basin at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. In the container chosen for detailed destructive analysis, the stainless steel cladding on the uranium alloy fuel had ruptured and fuel oxide sludge filled the bottom of the container. Headspace gas sampling determined that greater than 99% hydrogen was present. Cesium 137, which had leached out of the fuel during the aqueous corrosion process, dominated the radionuclide source term of the water. The metallic sodium from the fuel element bond had reacted with the water, forming a concentrated caustic solution of NaOH

  10. Irradiation of microphones in the EBR-II core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Bobis, J.P.

    1976-06-01

    Six ANL developed high temperature microphone (acoustic detectors) have been exposed in flowing sodium in the In-Core Instrument Test Facility (INCOT) in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for seven months without any indications of serious degradation of signal output due to the exposure. The YY05 experiment (EBR-II INCOT experiment designation) was performed to obtain data which would be useful in evaluating the ability of the microphones whose active elements are lithium niobate to serve as sensors for acoustic surveillance of fast breeder reactors. The reactor was at full power for 136 days of the experiment exposure period. The microphone temperatures varied from 371 0 C (700 0 F) to 621 0 C (1150 0 F). Neutron exposure varied from 2.64 x 10 22 nvt for the microphone at the elevation of the bottom of the EBR-II core to 0.24 x 10 22 nvt for the microphone at the elevation of the top of an EBR-II fuel assembly. The maximum gamma dose was 5 x 10 12 rads

  11. Microstructural comparison of HT-9 irradiated in HFIR and EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A series of specimens of HT-9 heat 91354 have been examined following irradiation in HFIR to 39 dpa at 300, 400, 500 and 600 0 C and following irradiation in EBR-II to 29 dpa at 390 and 500 0 C. HFIR irradiation was found to have promoted helium bubble formation at all temperatures and voids at 400 0 C. Cavitation had not been observed at lower fluence, nor was it found in EBR-II irradiated specimens. The onset of void swelling in HFIR is attributed to helium generation. The observations provide an explanation for saturation of ductile-brittle transition temperature shifts with increasing fluence

  12. Comparison of measured and calculated composition of irradiated EBR-II blanket assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K. N.

    1998-01-01

    In anticipation of processing irradiated EBR-II depleted uranium blanket subassemblies in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at ANL-West, it has been possible to obtain a limited set of destructive chemical analyses of samples from a single EBR-II blanket subassembly. Comparison of calculated values with these measurements is being used to validate a depletion methodology based on a limited number of generic models of EBR-II to simulate the irradiation history of these subassemblies. Initial comparisons indicate these methods are adequate to meet the operations and material control and accountancy (MC and A) requirements for the FCF, but also indicate several shortcomings which may be corrected or improved

  13. Proof tests of irradiated and unirradiated EBR-II subassembly ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Chopra, P.S.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1977-01-01

    A series of dynamic pressure tests have been conducted within EBR-II subassembly ducts. The tests were designed to simulate bursting of a driver-fuel element in a cluster of such elements at their burnup limit during off-normal conditions in EBR-II. The major objective of the tests was to assure that such failure, which might cause rapid release of stored fission gas, would not deform or otherwise damage subassembly ducts in a way that would hinder movement of a control rod. The test results are described

  14. Whole-core damage analysis of EBR-II driver fuel elements following SHRT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Koenig, J.F.; Porter, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    In the Shutdown Heat Removal Testing (SHRT) program in EBR-II, fuel element cladding temperatures of some driver subassemblies were predicted to exceed temperatures at which cladding breach may occur. A whole-core thermal analysis of driver subassemblies was performed to determine the cladding temperatures of fuel elemnts, and these temperatures were used for fuel element damage calculation. The accumulated cladding damage of fuel element was found to be very small and fuel element failure resulting from SHRT transients is unlikely. No element breach was noted during the SHRT transients. The reactor was immediately restarted after the most severe SHRT transient had been completed and no driver fuel breach has been noted to date. (orig.)

  15. In-reactor cladding breach of EBR-II driver-fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Einziger, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Knowledge of performance and minimum useful element lifetime of Mark-II driver-fuel elements is required to maintain a high plant operating capacity factor with maximum fuel utilization. To obtain such knowledge, intentional cladding breach has been obtained in four run-to-cladding-breach Mark-II experimental driver-fuel subassemblies operating under normal conditions in EBR-II. Breach and subsequent fission-product release proved benign to reactor operations. The breaches originated on the outer surface of the cladding in the root of the restrainer dimples and were intergranular. The Weibull distribution of lifetime accurately predicts the observed minimum useful element lifetime of 10 at.% burnup, with breach ensuing shortly thereafter

  16. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Leman, J.D.; Lentz, G.L.; Longua, K.J.; Olson, W.H.; Shields, J.A.; Wolz, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's

  17. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700/sup 0/C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625/sup 0/C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities.

  18. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700 0 C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625 0 C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities

  19. Tensile properties of vanadium alloys irradiated at 390{degrees}C in EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Tsai, H.C.; Nowicki, L.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Vanadium alloys were irradiated in Li-bonded stainless steel capsules to {approx}390{degrees}C in the EBR-II X-530 experiment. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of two large-scale (100 and 500 kg) heats of V-4Cr-Ti and laboratory (15-30 kg) heats of boron-doped V-4Cr-4Ti, V-8Cr-6Ti, V-5Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys. Tensile specimens, divided into two groups, were irradiated in two different capsules under nominally similar conditions. The 500-kg heat (No. 832665) and the 100-kg heat (VX-8) of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in one of the subcapsules exhibited complete loss of work-hardening capability, which was manifested by very low uniform plastic strain. In contrast, the 100-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in another subcapsule exhibited good tensile properties (uniform plastic strain 2.8-4.0%). A laboratory heat of V-3Ti-1Si irradiated in the latter subcapsule also exhibited good tensile properties. These results indicate that work-hardening capability at low irradiation temperatures varies significantly from heat to heat and is influenced by nominally small differences in irradiation conditions.

  20. Tensile properties of helium-injected V-15Cr-5Ti after irradiation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Miniature specimens of V-15Cr-5Ti were prepared in the annealed condition and with 10, 20, and 30% cold work. The annealed specimens were cyclotron injected with helium and irradiated in sodium in EBR-II. The cold-worked specimens were irradiated in EBR-II but not helium injected. The specimens were irradiated at 400, 525, 625, and 700 0 C and received a fluence of 4.1 to 5.5 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 meV). Tensile testing revealed very significant embrittlement as a result of the neutron irradiation but a much smaller change, mostly at 400 0 C, resulting from helium injection. 5 references, 9 figures, 2 tables

  1. Swelling and tensile properties of EBR-II-irradiated tantalum alloys for space reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The tantalum alloys T-111, ASTAR-811C, Ta-10 W, and unalloyed tantalum were examined following EBR-II irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 650 to 950 K. Swelling was found to be negligible for all alloys; only tantalum was found to exhibit swelling, 0.36%. Tensile testing revealed that irradiated T-111 and Ta-10 W are susceptible to plastic instability, but ASTAR-811C and tantalum were not. The tensile properties of ASTAR-811C appeared adequate for current SP-100 space nuclear reactor designs. Irradiated, oxygen-doped T-111 exhibited no plastic deformation, and the abrupt failure was intergranular in nature. The absence of plastic instability in ASTAR-811C is encouraging for alloys containing carbide precipitates. These fine precipitates might prevent dislocation channeling, which leads to plastic instability in many bcc metals after irradiation. 10 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Use of EBR-II as a principal fast breeder reactor irradiation test facility in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staker, R.G.; Seim, O.S.; Beck, W.N.; Golden, G.H.; Walters, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    The EBR-II as originally designed and operated by the Argonne National Laboratory was successful in demonstrating the operation of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle. Subsequent operation has been as an experimental facility where thousands of irradiation tests have been performed. Conversion to this application entailed the design and fabrication of special irradiation subassemblies for in-core irradiations, additions to existing facilities for out-of-core irradiations, and additions to existing facilities for out-of-core experiments. Experimental subassemblies now constitute about one third of the core, and changes in the core configuration occur about monthly, requiring neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses and monitoring of the reactor dynamic behavior. The surveillance programs provided a wealth of information on irradiation induced swelling and creep, in-reactor fracture behavior, and the compatibility of materials with liquid sodium. (U.S.)

  3. Microchemical and microstructural evolution of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II at PWR-relevant dpa rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Sencer, B.H. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Marquis, E.A., E-mail: emarq@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    AISI 304 stainless steel was irradiated at 416 °C and 450 °C at a 4.4 × 10{sup −9} and 3.05 × 10{sup −7} dpa/s to ∼0.4 and ∼28 dpa, respectively, in the reflector of the EBR-II fast reactor. Both unirradiated and irradiated conditions were examined using standard and scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography on very small specimens produced by focused ion beam milling. These results are compared with previous electron microscopy examination of 3 mm disks from essentially the same material. By comparing a very low dose specimen with a much higher dose specimen, both derived from a single reactor assembly, it has been demonstrated that the coupled microstructural and microchemical evolution of dislocation loops and other sinks begins very early, with elemental segregation producing at these sinks what appears to be measurable precursors to fully formed precipitates found at higher doses. The nature of these sinks and their possible precursors are examined in detail.

  4. Microchemical and microstructural evolution of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II at PWR-relevant dpa rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Sencer, B. H.; Garner, F. A.; Marquis, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel was irradiated at 416 °C and 450 °C at a 4.4 × 10-9 and 3.05 × 10-7 dpa/s to ∼0.4 and ∼28 dpa, respectively, in the reflector of the EBR-II fast reactor. Both unirradiated and irradiated conditions were examined using standard and scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography on very small specimens produced by focused ion beam milling. These results are compared with previous electron microscopy examination of 3 mm disks from essentially the same material. By comparing a very low dose specimen with a much higher dose specimen, both derived from a single reactor assembly, it has been demonstrated that the coupled microstructural and microchemical evolution of dislocation loops and other sinks begins very early, with elemental segregation producing at these sinks what appears to be measurable precursors to fully formed precipitates found at higher doses. The nature of these sinks and their possible precursors are examined in detail.

  5. Elevated-temperature tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel irradiated in the EBR-II, AD-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Vitek, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of irradiated on the tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel was determined for specimens irradiation in EBR-II at 390 to 550 0 C. Unirradiated control specimens and specimens aged for 5000 h at the irradiation temperatures were also tested. Irradiation to approximately 9 dpa at 390 0 C increased the strength and decreased the ductility compared with the unirradiated and aged specimens. Softening occurred in samples irradiated and tested at 450, 500, and 550 0 C

  6. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y., E-mail: yina.huang@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wiezorek, J.M.K. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, 2003 Howell Ave., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Freyer, P.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Okita, T. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Allen, T.R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void

  7. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.; Garner, F. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Okita, T.; Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y.; Allen, T. R.

    2015-10-01

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void swelling

  8. Experience with automatic reactor control at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Christensen, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    Satisfactory operation of the ACRDS has extended the capabilities of EBR-II to a transient test facility, achieving automatic transient control. Test assemblies can now be irradiated in transient conditions overlapping the slower transient capability of the TREAT reactor

  9. The influence of mechanical deformation on the irradiation creep of AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated in the EBR-II and FFTF fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Gilbert, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation creep of stainless steels is thought not to be very responsive to material and environmental variables. To test this perception earlier unpublished experiments conducted in the EBR-II reactor on AISI 316 have been analyzed. While swelling is dependent on the cold-work level at 400-480 o C, the post-transient irradiation creep rate, often called the creep compliance B0, is not dependent on cold-work level. If the tube reaches pressures on reactor start-up that generate above-yield stresses in unirradiated steel, then plastic strains occur prior to significant irradiation, but the post-transient strain rate is identical to that of material that did not exceed the yield stress on start-up. It is shown that both stress-free and stress-affected swelling are isotropic and that the Soderberg relationship is maintained. At temperatures above ∼540 o C thermal creep and stored energy begin to assert themselves, with creep rates accelerating with cold-work and becoming non-linear with stress. These results are in agreement with a similar study on titanium-modified 316 steel in FFTF. (author)

  10. Microsegregation observed in Fe-35.5Ni-7.5Cr irradiated in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    At 593 0 C one alloy, Fe-35.5Ni-7.5Cr, which was particularly resistant to swelling in EBR-II, increased in density 0.9% at 7.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Examination by energy dispersive x-ray analysis revealed that substantial oscillations occur in the nickel content of the alloy, varying from 25 to 53% about the nominal level of 35.5%. These oscillations exhibit a period of approx.200 nm. Regions enriched in nickel are depleted in chromium and iron, and the reverse is true in regions of low nickel content. This spinodal-like process produces a net densification and also appears to eventually destroy the swelling resistance of the alloy. Once voids form in the nickel-poor chromium-rich regions, further segregation of nickel to void surfaces is expected to accelerate the loss of swelling resistance

  11. LMFBR operational safety: the EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Allen, N.L.; Dean, E.M.; Fryer, R.M.; Larson, H.A.; Lehto, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    The mission of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has evolved from that of a small LMFBR demonstration plant to a major irradiation-test facility. Because of that evolution, many operational-safety issues have been encountered. The paper describes the EBR-II operational-safety experience in four areas: protection-system design, safety-document preparation, tests of off-normal reactor conditions, and tests of elements with breached cladding

  12. Postirradiation results and evaluation of helium-bonded uranium--plutonium carbide fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, T.W.; Barner, J.O.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Green, J.L.

    1976-02-01

    An evaluation was made of the performance of 74 helium-bonded uranium-plutonium carbide fuel elements that were irradiated in EBR-II at 38-96 kW/m to 2-12 at. percent burnup. Only 38 of these elements have completed postirradiation examination. The higher failure rate found in fuel elements which contained high-density (greater than 95 percent theoretical density) fuel than those which contained low-density (77-91 percent theoretical density) fuel was attributed to the limited ability of the high-density fuel to swell into the void space provided in the fuel element. Increasing cladding thickness and original fuel-cladding gap size were both found to influence the failure rates for elements containing low-density fuel. Lower cladding strain and higher fission-gas release were found in high-burnup fuel elements having smear densities of less than 81 percent. Fission-gas release was usually less than 5 percent for high-density fuel, but increased with burnup to a maximum of 37 percent in low-density fuel. Maximum carburization in elements attaining 5-10 at. percent burnup and clad in Types 304 or 316 stainless steel and Incoloy 800 ranged from 36-80 μm and 38-52 μm, respectively. Strontium and barium were the fission products most frequently found in contact with the cladding but no penetration of the cladding by uranium, plutonium, or fission products was observed

  13. EBR-II Data Digitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sackett, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  14. Evolution of thermal-hydraulics testing in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, G.H.; Planchon, H.P.; Sackett, J.I.; Singer, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulics testing and modeling program has been underway at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for 12 years. This work culminated in two tests of historical importance to commercial nuclear power, a loss of flow without scram and a loss of heat sink wihout scram, both from 100% initial power. These tests showed that natural processes will shut EBR-II down and maintain cooling without automatic control rod action or operator intervention. Supporting analyses indicate that these results are characteristic of a range of sizes of liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs), if these reactors use metal driver fuel. This type of fuel is being developed as part of the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory. Work is now underway at EBR-II to exploit the inherent safety of metal-fueled LMRs with regard to development of improved plant control strategies. (orig.)

  15. Demonstration of passive safety features in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchon, H.P. Jr.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    Two tests of great importance to the design of future commercial nuclear power plants were carried out in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II on April 3, 1986. These tests, (viewed by about 60 visitors, including 13 foreign LMR specialists) were a loss of flow without scram and a loss of heat sink without scram, both from 100% initial power. In these tests, inherent feedback shut the reactor down without damage to the fuel or other reactor components. This resulted primarily from advantageous characteristics of the metal driver fuel used in EBR-II. Work is currently underway at EBR-II to develop a control strategy that promotes inherent safety characteristics, including survivability of transient overpower accidents. In parallel, work is underway at EBR-II on the development of state-of-the-art plant diagnostic techniques

  16. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P. [and others

    1997-12-31

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

  17. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D ampersand D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively open-quotes solderclose quotes components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible

  18. Experience with lifetime limits for EBR-II core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Smith, R.N.; Golden, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory and is located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory where most types of American reactor were originally tested. EBR-II is a complete electricity-producing power plant now in its twenty-fourth year of successful operation. During this long history the reactor has had several concurrent missions, such as demonstration of a closed Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel cycle (1964-69); as a steady-state irradiation facility for fuels and materials (1970 onwards); for investigating effects of operational transients on fuel elements (from 1981); for research into the inherent safety aspects of metal-fueled LMR's (from 1983); and, most recently, for demonstration of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept using U-Pu-Zr fuels. This paper describes experience gained at EBR-II in defining lifetime limits for LMR core components, particularly fuel elements

  19. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.; Wells, P.B.; Zahn, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D and D plan has necessitated this current action

  20. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J A; Earle, O K; Henslee, S P; Wells, P B; Zahn, T P

    1996-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D and D plan has necessitated this current action.

  1. The physics design of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.

    1962-01-01

    The physics design oi EBR-II. Calculations of the static, dynamic and long-term reactivity behaviour of EBR-II are reported together with results and analysis of EBR-II dry critical and ZPR-III mock-up experiments. Particular emphasis is given to reactor-physics design problems which arise after the conceptual design is established and before the reactor is built or placed into operation. Reactor-safety analyses and hazards-evaluation considerations are described with their influence on the reactor design. The manner of utilizing the EBR-II mock-up on ZPR-III data and the EBR-II dry critical data is described. These experiments, their analysis and theoretical predictions are the basis for predetermining the physics behaviour of the reactor system. The limitations inherent in applying the experimental data to the performance of the power-reactor system are explored in some detail. This includes the specification of reactor core size and/or fuel-alloy enrichment, provisions for adequate operating and shut-down reactivity, determination of operative temperature and power coefficients of reactivity, and details of power- and flux-distribution as a function of position within the reactor structure. The overall problem of transferring information from simple idealized analytical or experimental geometry to actual hexagonal reactor geometry is described. Nuclear performance, including breeding, of the actual reactor system is compared with that of the idealized conceptual system. The long-term reactivity and power behaviour of the reactor blanket is described within the framework of the proposed cycling of the fuel and blanket alloy. Safety considerations, including normal and abnormal rates of reactivity-insertion, the implication of postulated reactivity effects based on the physical behaviour of the fuel alloy and reactor structure as well as extrapolation of TREAT experiments to the EBR-II system are analysed. The EBR-II core melt-down problem is reviewed. (author

  2. The EBR-II fuel cycle story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    This volume on the history of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) program and the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) offers both the historical perspective and ''reasons why'' the project was so successful. The operation of the FCF in conjunction with the EBR-II was prepared because of the unique nature of the pyrmetallurgical processing system that was demonstrated at the time. Following brief descriptions and histories of the EBR-I and EBR-II reactors, the FCF and its process requirements are described. The seven principal process steps are presented, including for each one, the development, equipment used, operating procedures, results, problems and other data. Scrap and waste disposition, analytical control, safety, management, and cost of the FCF are also included

  3. Performance of advanced oxide fuel pins in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Jensen, S.M.; Hales, J.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Makenas, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of design and operating parameters on mixed-oxide fuel pin irradiation performance were established for the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) advanced oxide EBR-II test series. Fourteen fuel pins breached in-reactor with reference 316 SS cladding. Seven of the breaches are attributed to FCMI. Of the remaining seven breached pins, three are attributed to local cladding over-temperatures similar to the breach mechanism for the reference oxide pins irradiated in EBR-II. FCCI was found to be a contributing factor in two high burnup, i.e., 11.7 at. % breaches. The remaining two breaches were attributed to mechanical interaction of UO 2 fuel and fission products accumulated in the lower cladding insulator gap, and a loss of cladding ductility possibly due to liquid metal embrittlement. Fuel smear density appears to have the most significant impact on lifetime. Quantitative evaluations of cladding diameter increases attributed to FCMI, established fuel smear density, burnup, and cladding thickness-to-diameter ratio as the major parameters influencing the extent of cladding strain

  4. A transient overpower experiment in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.P.; Tsai, H.; Dean, E.M.; Aoyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    1994-01-01

    The TOPI-IE test was a transient overpower test on irradiate mixed-oxide fuel pins in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The test, the fifth in a series, was part of a cooperative program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan to conduct operational transient testing on mixed-oxide fuel pins in the metal-fueled EBR-II. The principle objective of the TOPI-1E test was to assess breaching margins for irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins over the Plant Protection System (PPS) thresholds during a slow, extended overpower transient. This paper describes the effect of the TOPI-1E experiment on reactor components and the impact of the experiment on the long-term operability of the reactor. The paper discusses the role that SASSYS played in the pre-test safety analysis of the experiment. The ability of SASSYS to model transient overpower events is detailed by comparisons of data from the experiment with computed reactor variables from a SASSYS post-test simulation of the experiment

  5. EBR-II high-ramp transients under computer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, R.J.; Larson, H.A.; Christensen, L.J.; Booty, W.F.; Dean, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    During reactor run 122, EBR-II was subjected to 13 computer-controlled overpower transients at ramps of 4 MWt/s to qualify the facility and fuel for transient testing of LMFBR oxide fuels as part of the EBR-II operational-reliability-testing (ORT) program. A computer-controlled automatic control-rod drive system (ACRDS), designed by EBR-II personnel, permitted automatic control on demand power during the transients

  6. EBR-II: search for the lost subassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Buschman, H.W.; Poloncsik, J.; Remsburg, J.S.; Sine, H.W.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has been operating for nearly 20 years as part of the foundation of the US Department of Energy's LMFBR development program. During that time, the EBR-II fuel-handling system has performed extremely well, especially considering the conditions under which much of the system operates and the reliability required to maintain the high plant factor routinely demonstrated by EBR-II. Since EBR-II is a pool-type reactor, much of the fuel handling is done remotely within the sodium-filled primary tank at 371 0 C. Activities involved in locating a misplaced fuel subassembly in the primary tank are described

  7. Metal waste forms from treatment of EBR-II spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Demonstration of Argonne National Laboratory's electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel is currently being conducted on irradiated, metallic driver fuel and blanket fuel elements from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in Idaho. The residual metallic material from the electrometallurgical treatment process is consolidated into an ingot, the metal waste form (MWF), by employing an induction furnace in a hot cell. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analyses have been performed on irradiated cladding hulls from the driver fuel, and on samples from the alloy ingots. This paper presents the microstructures of the radioactive ingots and compares them with observations on simulated waste forms prepared using non-irradiated material. These simulated waste forms have the baseline composition of stainless steel - 15 wt % zirconium (SS-15Zr). Additions of noble metal elements, which serve as surrogates for fission products, and actinides are made to that baseline composition. The partitioning of noble metal and actinide elements into alloy phases and the role of zirconium for incorporating these elements is discussed in this paper

  8. Systematic variation of threshold reaction rates in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippincott, E.P.; Combs, B.L.; Davis, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    Characterization of neutron flux, fluence, and spectra in fast reactor irradiation environments is presently being carried out at HEDL utilizing the multiple foil technique. These fluences and spectra are then used to correlate damage effects data to produce damage functions or equations to predict materials effects under future irradiation conditions. The neutron flux and spectrum, then, act as a transfer function to relate present observations to future effects in the same or different environments and thus consistent fluence evaluations are of utmost importance. As part of a continuing program to establish the data base to meet consistency requirements, a systematic correlation of data from a recent dosimetry test in EBR-II is being made. The paper presents preliminary results of some of these correlations involving threshold reactions

  9. EBR-II rotating plug seal maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The EBR-II rotating plug seals require frequent cleaning and maintenance to keep the plugs from sticking during fuel handling. Time consuming cleaning on the cover gas and air sides of the dip ring seal is required to remove oxidation and sodium reaction products that accumulate and stop plug rotation. Despite severely limited access, effective seal cleaning techniques have removed 11 800 lb (5 352 kg) of deposits from the seals since 1964. Temperature control modifications and repairs have also required major maintenance work. Suggested seal design recommendations could significantly reduce maintenance on future similar seals

  10. EBR-II and TREAT Digitization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, George W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Digitizing the technical drawings for EBR-II and TREAT provides multiple benefits. Moving the scanned or hard copy drawings to modern 3-D CAD (Computer Aided Drawing) format saves data that could be lost over time. The 3-D drawings produce models that can interface with other drawings to make complex assemblies. The 3-D CAD format can also include detailed material properties and parametric coding that can tie critical dimensions together allowing easier modification. Creating the new files from the old drawings has found multiple inconsistencies that are being flagged or corrected improving understanding of the reactor(s).

  11. EBR-II and TREAT Digitization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, George W.; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Digitizing the technical drawings for EBR-II and TREAT provides multiple benefits. Moving the scanned or hard copy drawings to modern 3-D CAD (Computer Aided Drawing) format saves data that could be lost over time. The 3-D drawings produce models that can interface with other drawings to make complex assemblies. The 3-D CAD format can also include detailed material properties and parametric coding that can tie critical dimensions together allowing easier modification. Creating the new files from the old drawings has found multiple inconsistencies that are being flagged or corrected improving understanding of the reactor(s).

  12. Response to annealing and reirradiation of AISI 304L stainless steel following initial high-dose neutron irradiation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, D.L.; McVay, G.L.; Walters, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    The object of this study was to measure the stability of irradiation-induced microstructure upon annealing and, by selectively annealing out some of these features and reirradiating the material, it was expected that information could be gained concerning the role of microstructural changes in the void swelling process. Transmission electron microscopic examinations of isochronally annealed (200 to 1050 0 C) AISI 304L stainless steel, which had been irradiated at approximately 415 0 C to a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) neutron fluence of approximately 5.1 x 10 26 n/m 2 , verified that the two-stage hardness recovery with temperatures was related to a low temperature annealing of dislocation structures and a higher temperature annealing of voids and solute redistribution

  13. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II

  14. EBR-II: twenty years of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.; Buschman, H.W.; Smith, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. For the last 20 years EBR-II has operated safely, has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, has shown excellent performance of its sodium components, and has had an excellent plant factor. These years of operating experience provide a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future liquid metal fast reactors. This report provides a brief description of the EBR-II plant and its early operating experience, describes some recent problems of interest to the nuclear community, and also mentions some of the significant operating achievements of EBR-II. Finally, a few words and speculations on EBR-II's future are offered. 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Reliability and extended-life potential of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although the longlife potential of liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs) has been only partially demonstrated, many factors point to the potential for exceptionally long life. EBR-II has the opportunity to become the first LMR to achieve an operational lifetime of 30 years or more. In 1984 a study of the extended-life potential of EBR-II identified the factors that contribute to the continued successful operation of EBR-II as a power reactor and experimental facility. Also identified were factors that could cause disruptions in the useful life of the facility. Although no factors were found that would inherently limit the life of EBR-II, measures were identified that could help ensure continued plant availability. These measures include the implementation of more effective surveillance, diagnostic, and control systems to complement the inherent safety and reliability features of EBR-II. An operating lifetime of well beyond 30 years is certainly feasible

  16. Sodium technology at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.T.; Smith, C.R.F.; Olson, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Since the installation of purity monitoring systems in 1967, the control of the purity of the primary and secondary sodium and cover gas systems at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has been excellent. A rigorous monitoring program is being used to assure that operating limits for more than 25 chemical and radioactive impurities are not exceeded. The program involves the use of sophisticated sampling and analysis techniques and on-line monitors for both sodium and cover gas systems. Sodium purity control is accomplished by essentially continuous cold trapping of a small side stream of the total circulating sodium. The cold traps have been found to be very effective for the removal of the major chemical impurities (oxygen and hydrogen) and tritium but are almost ineffective for 131 I and 137 Cs that enter the sodium from fuel cladding breaks. Purging with pure argon maintains the cover gas purity

  17. Simulation and operation of the EBR-II automatic control rod drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.; Christensen, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic control rod drive system (ACRDS) installed at EBR-II produces shaped power transients from 40% to full reactor power at a linear ramp rate of 4 MWt/s. A digital computer and modified control-rod-drive provides this capability. Simulation and analysis of ACRDS experiments establish the safety envelope for reactor transient operation. Tailored transients are required as part of USDOE Operational Reliability Testing program for prototypic fast reactor fuel cladding breach behavior studies. After initial EBR-II driver fuel testing and system checkout, test subassemblies were subjected to both slow and fast transients. In addition, the ACRDS is used for steady-state operation and will be qualified to control power ascent from initial critical to full power

  18. Simulation and operation of the EBR-II automatic control rod drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.; Christensen, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic control rod drive system (ACRDS) installed at EBR-II produces shaped power transients from 40% to full reactor power at a linear ramp rate of 4 MWt/s. A digital computer and modified control-rod-drive provides this capability. Simulation and analysis of ACRDS experiments establish the safety envelope for reactor transient operation. Tailored transients are required as part of USDOE Operational Reliability Testing program for prototypic fast reactor fuel cladding breach behavior studies. After initial EBR-II driver fuel testing and system checkout, test subassemblies were subjected to both slow and fast transients. In additions, the ACRDS is used for steady-state operation and will be qualified to control power ascent from initial critical to full power

  19. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Carmack; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; H. Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR II as part of the Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few MA bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide, and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the effect of the MAs on fuel cladding chemical interaction and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995–1996 and, currently, represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This report provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  20. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Holland, J.W.; Kramer, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Three furnace heating tests were conducted with irradiated, HT9-clad and U-19wt%Pu-10wt%Zr-alloy, EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements to evaluate the behavior that could be expected during a loss-of-flow event in the reactor. In general, very significant safety margins for cladding breaching have been demonstrated in these tests, under conditions that would envelop a bounding unlikely loss-of-flow event in EBR-II. Highlights of the test results are presented, as are discussions of the cladding breaching mechanisms, axial fuel motion, and fuel surface liquefaction that were found in these tests. (orig.)

  1. Component configuration control system development at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, L.R.; Stratton, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    One ofthe major programs being pursued by the EBR-II Division of Argonne National Laboratory is to improve the reliability of plant control and protection systems. This effort involves looking closely at the present state of the art and needs associated with plant diagnostic, control and protection systems. One of the areas of development at EBR-II involves a component configuration control system (CCCS). This system is a computerized control and planning aid for the nuclear power operator

  2. Operating and test experience of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    EBR-II has operated for 27 years, the longest for any Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) power plant. During that time, much has been learned about successful LMR operation and design. The basic lesson is that conservatism in design can pay significant dividends in operating reliability. Furthermore, such conservatism need not mean high cost. The EBR-II system emphasizes simplicity, minimizing the number of valves in the heat transport system, for example, and simplifying the primary heat-transport-system layout. Another lesson is that emphasizing reliability of the steam generating system at the sodium-water interface (by using duplex tubes in the case of EBR-II) has been well worth the higher initial costs; no problems with leakage have been encountered in EBR-II's operating history. Locating spent fuel storage in the primary tank and providing for decay heat removal by natural connective flow have also been contributors to EBR-II's success. The ability to accommodate loss of forced cooling or loss of heat sink passively has resulted in benefits for simplification, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and in not requiring the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. Also, the 'piped-pool' arrangement minimizes thermal stress to the primary tank and enhances natural convective flow. These benefits have been realized through a history of operation that has seen EBR-II evolve through four major phases in its test programs, culminating in its present mission as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype. (author)

  3. EBR-II spent fuel treatment demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    For approximately 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory was developed a fast reactor fuel cycle based on dry processing. When the US fast reactor program was canceled in 1994, the fuel processing technology, called the electrometallurgical technique, was adapted for treating unstable spent nuclear fuel for disposal. While this technique, which involves electrorefining fuel in a molten salt bath, is being developed for several different fuel categories, its initial application is for sodium-bonded metallic spent fuel. In June 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved a radiation demonstration program in which 100 spent driver assemblies and 25 spent blanket assemblies from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) will be treated over a three-year period. This demonstrated will provide data that address issues in the National Research Council's evaluation of the technology. The planned operations will neutralize the reactive component (elemental sodium) in the fuel and produce a low enriched uranium product, a ceramic waste and a metal waste. The fission products and transuranium elements, which accumulate in the electrorefining salt, will be stabilized in the glass-bonded ceramic waste form. The stainless steel cladding hulls, noble metal fission products, and insoluble residues from the process will be stabilized in a stainless steel/zirconium alloy. Upon completion of a successful demonstration and additional environmental evaluation, the current plans are to process the remainder of the DOE sodium bonded fuel

  4. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable.

  5. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk

    2016-01-01

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable

  6. Planning for closure and deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; Poland, H.F.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    In January 1994, DOE terminated the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program. Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a detailed plan to put Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a safe condition, including removal of irradiated fueled subassemblies from the plant, transfer of subassemblies, and removal and stabilization of primary and secondary sodium liquid heat transfer metal. The goal of deactivation is to stabilize the EBR-II complex until decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) is implemented, thereby minimizing maintenance and surveillance. Deactivation of a sodium cooled reactor presents unique concerns. Residual sodium in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude concerns with explosive sodium-air reactions. Also, residual sodium on components will effectively solder these items in place, making removal unfeasible. Several special cases reside in the primary system, including primary cold traps, a cesium trap, a cover gas condenser, and systems containing sodium-potassium alloy. The sodium or sodium-potassium alloy in these components must be reacted in place or the components removed. The Sodium Components Maintenance Shop at ANL-W provides the capability for washing primary components, removing residual quantities of sodium while providing some decontamination capacity. Considerations need to be given to component removal necessary for providing access to primary tank internals for D ampersand D activities, removal of hazardous materials, and removal of stored energy sources. ANL-W's plan for the deactivation of EBR-II addresses these issues, providing for an industrially and radiologically safe complex, requiring minimal surveillance during the interim period between deactivation and D ampersand D. Throughout the deactivation and closure of the EBR-II complex, federal environmental concerns will be addressed, including obtaining the proper permits for facility condition and waste processing

  7. Tightly coupled transient analysis of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Lehto, W.K.; Sackett, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    A Tightly Coupled transient analysis system for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is currently being tested. The system consists of a faster than real time high fidelity reactor simulation, advanced graphics displays, expert system coupling, and real time data coupling via the EBR-II data acquisition system to and from the plant and the control system. The base, first generation software has been developed and is presently being tested. Various subsystem couplings and the total system integration are being checked out. This system should enhance the diagnostic and prognostic capability of EBR-II in the near term and provide automatic control during startup and power maneuvering in the future, as well as serve as a testbed for new control system development for advanced reactors

  8. System modeling and simulation at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, E.M.; Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    The codes being developed and verified using EBR-II data are the NATDEMO, DSNP and CSYRED. NATDEMO is a variation of the Westinghouse DEMO code coupled to the NATCON code previously used to simulate perturbations of reactor flow and inlet temperature and loss-of-flow transients leading to natural convection in EBR-II. CSYRED uses the Continuous System Modeling Program (CSMP) to simulate the EBR-II core, including power, temperature, control-rod movement reactivity effects and flow and is used primarily to model reactivity induced power transients. The Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants (DSNP) allows a whole plant, thermal-hydraulic simulation using specific component and system models called from libraries. It has been used to simulate flow coastdown transients, reactivity insertion events and balance-of-plant perturbations

  9. EBR-II experience with sodium cleaning and radioactivity decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-01-01

    The EBR-II is now in Its 13th year of operation. During that period more than 2400 subassemblies have been cleaned of sodium without a serious incident of any kind by a two-step process developed at Argonne. Sodium cleaning and decontamination of other reactor components has been performed only on the relatively few occasions in which a repair or replacement has been required. A summary of the EBR-II experience will be presented. A new facility will be described for the improved cleaning and maintenance of sodium-wetted primary components

  10. EBR-II experience with sodium cleaning and radioactivity decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruther, W E; Smith, C R.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    1978-08-01

    The EBR-II is now in Its 13th year of operation. During that period more than 2400 subassemblies have been cleaned of sodium without a serious incident of any kind by a two-step process developed at Argonne. Sodium cleaning and decontamination of other reactor components has been performed only on the relatively few occasions in which a repair or replacement has been required. A summary of the EBR-II experience will be presented. A new facility will be described for the improved cleaning and maintenance of sodium-wetted primary components.

  11. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Veith, D.J.; Giorgis, G.C.; Walker, D.E.; Seim, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF) is the latest in a series of special EBR-II instrumented in-core test facilities. A flow control valve in the facility is programmed to vary the coolant flow, and thus the temperature, in an experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it and coupled to it. In this way, thermal transients can be simulated in that subassembly without changing the temperatures in surrounding subassemblies. The FPTF also monitors sodium flow and temperature, and detects delayed neutrons in the sodium effluent from the experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it. This facility also has an acoustical detector (high-temperature microphone) for detecting sodium boiling

  12. Bowing-reactivity trends in EBR-II assuming zero-swelling ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.

    1994-01-01

    Predicted trends of duct-bowing reactivities for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are correlated with predicted row-wise duct deflections assuming use of idealized zero-void-swelling subassembly ducts. These assume no irradiation induced swellings of ducts but include estimates of the effects of irradiation-creep relaxation of thermally induced bowing stresses. The results illustrate the manners in which at-power creeps may affect subsequent duct deflections at zero power and thereby the trends of the bowing component of a subsequent power reactivity decrement

  13. System modeling of spent fuel transfers at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The unloading of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for interim storage and subsequent processing in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is a multi-stage process, involving complex operations at a minimum of four different facilities at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) site. Each stage typically has complicated handling and/or cooling equipment that must be periodically maintained, leading to both planned and unplanned downtime. A program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. Routine operation of the reactor for fuels performance and materials testing occurred simultaneously in FY 1994 with the blanket unloading. In the summer of 1994, Congress dictated the October 1, 1994 shutdown of EBR-2. Consequently, all blanket S/As and fueled drivers will be removed from the reactor tank and replaced with stainless steel assemblies (which are needed to maintain a precise configuration within the grid so that the under sodium fuel handling equipment can function). A system modeling effort was conducted to determine the means to achieve the objective for the blanket and fuel unloading program, which under the current plan requires complete unloading of the primary tank of all fueled assemblies in 2 1/2 years. A simulation model of the fuel handling system at ANL-W was developed and used to analyze different unloading scenarios; the model has provided valuable information about required resources and modifications to equipment and procedures. This paper reports the results of this modeling effort

  14. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 4: Results of SURV-4 and SURV-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Hayner, G.O.; Carlson, B.G.; Ebersole, E.R.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. For both the irradiated and thermally aged samples, one half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In addition to the fifteen types of metal samples, graphite blocks were irradiated in the SURV subassemblies to determine the effect of irradiation on the graphite neutron shield. In this report, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 2.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (over 2,994 days) are compared with those of similar specimens thermally aged at 370 C for 2,994 days in the storage basket of the reactor. The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, impact strength, and creep

  15. The EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Results and insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.; Roglans, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the recently completed EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1. 6 10 -6 yr -1 , even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The probability of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquake) is 3.6 10 -6 yr -1 . overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double, vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability

  16. Operating limits for subassembly deformation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The deformation of a subassembly in response to the core environment is frequently the life limiting factor for that component in an LMFBR. Deformation can occur as diametral and axial growth or bowing of the subassembly. Such deformation has caused several handling problems in both the core and the storage basket of EBR-II and may also have contributed to reactivity anomalies during reactor operation. These problems generally affect plant availability but the reactivity anomalies could lead to a potential safety hazard. Because of these effects the deformation mechanisms must be understood and modeled. Diametral and axial growth of subassembly ducts in EBR-II is due to swelling and creep and is a function of temperature, neutron fluence and stress. The source of stress in a duct is the hydraulic pressure difference across the wall. By coupling the calculated subassembly growth rate to the available clearance in the core or storage basket a limiting neutron fluence, or exposure, can be established

  17. Operating experience of the EBR-II steam generating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschman, H.W.; Penney, W.H.; Quilici, M.D.; Radtke, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) with integrated power producing capability. Superheated steam is produced by eight natural circulation evaporators, two superheaters, and a conventional steam drum. Steam throttle conditions are 438 C (820 F) and 8.62 MPa (1250 psi). The designs of the evaporators and superheaters are essentially identical; both are counterflow units with low pressure nonradioactive sodium on the shell side. Safety and reliability are maximized by using duplex tubes and tubesheets. The performance of the system has been excellent and essentially trouble free. The operating experience of EBR-II provides confidence that the technology can be applied to commercial LMFBR's for an abundant supply of energy for the future. 5 refs

  18. Recent operating experiences and programs at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) is a pool-type, unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt and an electrical generation capability of 20 MW. It has been operated by Argonne National Laboratory for the US government for almost 20 years. During that time, it has operated safely and has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, high availability, and excellent performance of its sodium components. The 20 years of operating experience of EBR-II is a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future LMFBR's. Since past operating experience has been extensively reported, this report will focus on recent programs and events

  19. Advances in criticality predictions for EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, R.W.; Imel, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    Improvements to startup criticality predictions for the EBR-II reactor have been made. More exact calculational models, methods and data are now used, and better procedures for obtaining experimental data that enter into the prediction are in place. Accuracy improved by more than a factor of two and the largest ECP error observed since the changes is only 18 cents. An experimental method using subcritical counts is also being implemented

  20. EBR-II water-to-sodium leak detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrightson, M.M.; McKinley, K.; Ruther, W.E.; Holmes, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    The water-to-sodium leak detection system installed at EBR-II in April, 1975, is described in detail. Topics covered include operational characteristics, maintenance problems, alarm functions, background hydrogen level data, and future plans for refinements to the system. Particular emphasis is given to the failures of eight of the ten leak detectors due to sodium-to-vacuum leakage, and the program anticipated for complete recovery of the system

  1. System modelling to support accelerated fuel transfer rate at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.; Planchon, H.P.; Cutforth, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) ia a 62.5 MW(th) liquid metal reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory for The United States Department of Energy. The reactor is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the Argonne-West site (ANL-W). Full power operation was achieved in 1964,- the reactor operated continuously since that time until October 1994 in a variety of configurations depending on the programmatic mission. A three year program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. It was intended to operate the reactor during the three year blanket unloading program, followed by about a half year of driver fuel unloading. However, in the summer of 1994, Congress dictacted that EBR-II be shut down October 1, and complete defueling without operation. To assist in the planning for resources needed for this defueling campaign, a mathematical model of the fuel handling sequence was developed utilizing the appropriate reliability factors and inherent mm constraints of each stage of the process. The model allows predictions of transfer rates under different scenarios. Additionally, it has facilitated planning of maintenance activities, as well as optimization of resources regarding manpower and modification effort. The model and its application is described in this paper

  2. Experimental studies of U-Pu-Zr fast reactor fuel pins in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Hofman, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a generic reactor concept under development by Argonne National Laboratory. Much of the technology for the IFR is being demonstrated at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) on the Department of Energy site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The IFR concept relies on four technical features to achieve breakthroughs in nuclear power economics and safety: (1) a pool-type reactor configuration, (2) liquid sodium cooling, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle with on-site reprocessing. The purpose of this paper will be to summarize our latest results of irradiation testing uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) fuel in the EBR-II. 10 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  3. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 5: Results of SURV-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, B.G.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. One half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In this work, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 3.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 were determined. These materials are the fifth set of irradiated subassemblies to be examined as part of the SURV program (SURV-5). The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, and fracture resistance. Of all the alloys examined in SURV-5, only Berylco-25 showed any significant weight loss. Stainless steel (both 304 and 347) had the largest density decrease, although the density decrease from irradiation for all alloys was less than 0.4 percent. The microstructure of both Berylco-25 and the aluminum-bronze alloy was altered significantly. Iron- and nickel-base alloys showed little change in microstructure. Austenitic steels (304 and 347) harden with irradiation. The hardness of Inconel X750 did not change significantly with irradiation. The ultimate tensile strength of Inconel X750, 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel and welded 304 changed little due to a fluence increase from 2.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (the maximum fluence of the SURV-4 samples) to 3.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2

  4. Performance of commercially produced mixed-oxide fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, J.W.; Lawrence, L.A.

    1980-11-01

    Commercially produced fuels for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) were irradiated in EBR-II under conditions of high cladding temperature (approx. 700 0 C) and low power (approx. 200 W/cm) to verify that manufacturing processes did not introduce variables which significantly affect general fuel performance. Four interim examinations and a terminal examination were completed to a peak burnup of 5.2 at. % to provide irradiation data pertaining to fuel restructuring and dimensional stability at low fuel temperature, fuel-cladding reactions at high cladding temperature and general fuel behavior. The examinations indicate completely satisfactory irradiation performance for low heat rates and high cladding temperatures to 5.2 at. % burnup

  5. Response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow during power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Mohr, D.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.; Dean, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow followed by a PPS-activated scram are presented. The experimental results clearly indicate a smooth transition to natural convective flow with a quite modest incore temperature transient. The accompanying calculations using the NATDEMO code agree quite well with the measured temperatures and flow rates throughout the primary system. The only region of the plant where a significant discrepancy between the measurements and calculations occurred was in the IHX. The reasons for this result could not be definitively determined, but it is speculated that the one-dimensional assumptions used in the modeling may not be valid in the IHX during buoyancy driver flows

  6. Parametric investigation of fracture of EBR-II ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Moustakakis, B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of preliminary static and dynamic finite element fracture mechanics analyses that were conducted to analytically simulate the dynamic fracture behavior of EBR-II ducts are presented. The loads considered are those that may arise because of rapid release of fission gases from a failed fuel element inside a duct, obtained from some previous tests and a recent analytical model. In spite of the motivation for the present work, the analytical procedures described may have a wider general application in the fail-safe design of structures

  7. Data systems in FFTF and EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrick, R.P.; Ritter, W.M.

    1980-02-01

    This paper describes the Data System used to monitor operation and collect experimental data in FFTF. This data system has evolved since initial inception from a relatively simple, single computer system monitoring a relatively few (approx. 1000) instrument channels important for operation to one which has increased capability to support the long-range testing needs in FFTF. The system, while still relatively simple, now contains multiple computers which normally perform independent functions. The computers, however, provide backup processing for certain simple tasks. Operator interfacing is provided through CRT's. The output capabilities of the system are described. A description of the Data System in EBR-II is also included

  8. Water treatment in the EBR-II steam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.A.; Hurst, H.

    1975-01-01

    Boiler-water treatment in the EBR-II steam system consists of demineralizing makeup water and using hydrazine to remove traces of oxygen and morpholine to adjust pH to 8.8-9.2. This treatment is called a ''zero-solids'' method, because the chemical agents and reaction products are either volatile or form water and do not contribute solids to the boiler water. A continuous blowdown is cooled, filtered, and deionized to remove impurities and maintain high purity of the water. If a cooling-water leak occurs, phosphate is added to control scaling, and the ''zero-solids'' eatment is suspended until the leak is repaired. Water streams are sampled at six points to control water purity. Examination of the steam drum and an evaporator show the metal surfaces to be in excellent condition with minimal corrosion. The EBR-II steam-generating plant has accumulated over 85,000 hours of in-service operation and has operated successfully for over ten years with the ''zero-solids'' treatment. (auth)

  9. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.; Heintzelman, J.; Squires, L.; Meservey, R.

    2009-01-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in about 100,000 gallons of wash water. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to evaluate alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. A brainstorming session was held to identify possible alternative treatment methods that would meet the primary functions and criteria of neutralizing the hazards, maximizing byproduct removal and minimizing waste generation. An initial list of some 20 probable alternatives was evaluated and refined down

  10. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  11. Operational reliability testing of FBR fuel in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaga, Takeo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Nomura, Shigeo; Shikakura, Sakae

    1991-01-01

    The operational reliability testing of FBR fuel has been conducting in EBR-II as a DOE/PNC collaboration program. This paper reviews the achieved summary of Phase-I test as well as outline of progressing Phase-II test. In Phase-I test, the reliability of FBR fuel pins including 'MONJU' fuel was demonstrated at the event of operational transient. Continued operation of the failed pins was also shown to be feasible without affecting the plant operation. The objectives of the Phase-II test is to extend the data base relating with the operational reliability for long life fuel, and to supply the highly quantitative evaluation. The valuable insight obtained in Phase-II test are considerably expected to be useful toward the achievement of commercial FBR. (author)

  12. EBR-II fuel handling console digital upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.G.; Wiege, D.D.; Christensen, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    The main fuel handling console and control system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are being upgraded to a computerized system using high-end workstations for the operator interface and a programmable logic controller (PLC) for the control system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics will be provided for the operator which will show the relative position of under-sodium fuel handling equipment. This equipment is operated remotely with no means of directly viewing the transfer. This paper describes various aspects of the modification including reasons for the upgrade, capabilities the new system provides over the old control system, philosophies and rationale behind the new design, testing and simulation work, diagnostic features, and the advanced graphics techniques used to display information to the operator

  13. Computer imaging of EBR-II handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.H.; Peters, G.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional graphics application used to visualize the positions of remotely operated fuel handling equipment in the EBR-II reactor. The system described in this paper uses actual signals to move a three-dimensional graphics model in real-time in response to movements of equipment in the plant. A three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique is necessary to simulate direct visual observation of the transfers of fuel and experiments into and out of the reactor because the fuel handling equipment is submerged in liquid sodium and therefore is not visible to the operator. This paper will present details on how the 3D model was created and how real-time dynamic behavior was added to each of the moving components

  14. Computer imaging of EBR-II fuel handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.G.; Hansen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional graphics application used to visualize the positions of remotely operated fuel handling equipment in the EBR-II reactor. A three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique is necessary to simulate direct visual observation of the transfers of fuel and experiments into and out of the reactor because the fuel handling equipment is submerged in liquid sodium and therefore is not visible to the operator. The system described in this paper uses actual signals to drive a three-dimensional computer-generated model in real-time in response to movements of equipment in the plant This paper will present details on how the 3D model of the intank equipment was created and how real-time dynamic behavior was added to each of the moving components

  15. Review process and quality assurance in the EBR-II probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans, J.; Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Within the scope of the ANL QA Programs, a QA Plan specifically for the EBR-II PRA was developed. The QA Plan covered all aspects of the PRA development, with emphasis on the procedures for document and software control, and the internal and external review process. The effort spent in the quality assurance tasks for the EBR-II PRA has reciprocated by providing acceptance of the work and confidence in the quality of the results

  16. Pattern-recognition system application to EBR-II plant-life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Radtke, W.H.; Mott, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-based pattern-recognition system, the System State Analyzer (SSA), is being used as part of the EBR-II plant-life extension program for detection of degradation and other abnormalities in plant systems. The SSA is used for surveillance of the EBR-II primary system instrumentation, primary sodium pumps, and plant heat balances. Early results of this surveillance indicate that the SSA can detect instrumentation degradation and system performance degradation over varying time intervals, and can provide derived signal values to replace signals from failed critical sensors. These results are being used in planning for extended-life operation of EBR-II

  17. Nuclear instrumentation system operating experience and nuclear instrument testing in the EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yingling, G.E.; Curran, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    In March of 1972 three wide range nuclear channels were purchased from Gulf Atomics Corporation and installed in EBR-II as a test. The three channels were operated as a test until April 1975 when they became a permanent part of the reactor shutdown system. Also described are the activities involved in evaluating and qualifying neutron detectors for LMFBR applications. Included are descriptions of the ANL Components Technology Division Test Program and the EBR-II Nuclear Instrument Test Facilities (NITF) used for the in-reactor testing and a summary of program test results from EBR-II

  18. Data handling at EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] for advanced diagnostics and control work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, R.W.; Schorzman, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    Improved control and diagnostics systems are being developed for nuclear and other applications. The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Division of Argonne National Laboratory has embarked on a project to upgrade the EBR-II control and data handling systems. The nature of the work at EBR-II requires that reactor plant data be readily available for experimenters, and that the plant control systems be flexible to accommodate testing and development needs. In addition, operational concerns require that improved operator interfaces and computerized diagnostics be included in the reactor plant control system. The EBR-II systems have been upgraded to incorporate new data handling computers, new digital plant process controllers, and new displays and diagnostics are being developed and tested for permanent use. In addition, improved engineering surveillance will be possible with the new systems

  19. Safety and operating experience at EBR-II: lessons for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Golden, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    EBR-II is a small LMFBR power plant that has performed safely and reliably for 16 years. Much has been learned from operating it to facilitate the design, licensing, and operation of large commercial LMFBR power plants in the US. EBR-II has been found relatively easy to keep in conformity with evolving safety requirements, largely because of inherent safety features of the plant. Such features reduce dependence on active safety systems to protect against accidents. EBR-II has experienced a number of plant-transient incidents, some planned, others inadvertent; none has resulted in any significant plant damage. The operating experience with EBR-II has led to the formulation of an Operational Reliability Test Program (ORTP), aimed at showing inherently safe performance of fuel and plant systems

  20. Technical assessment of continued wet storage of EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Franklin, E.M.; Ebner, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A technical assessment of the continued wet storage of EBR-II fuel has been made. Previous experience has shown that in-basin cladding failure occurs by intergranular attack of sensitized cladding, likely assisted by basin water chlorides. Subsequent fuel oxidation is rapid and leads to loss of configuration and release of fission products. The current inventory of EBR-II fuel stored in the ICPP basins is at risk from similar corrosion reactions

  1. Application of PCT to the EBR II ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.; Johnson, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    We are evaluating the use of the Product Consistency Test (PCT) developed to monitor the consistency of borosilicate glass waste forms for application to the multiphase ceramic waste form (CWF) that will be used to immobilize waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical conditioning of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR II). The CWF is a multiphase waste form comprised of about 70% sodalite, 25% borosilicate glass binder, and small amounts of halite and oxide inclusions. It must be qualified for disposal as a non-standard high-level waste (HLW) form. One of the requirements in the DOE Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) for HLW waste forms is that the consistency of the waste forms be monitored.[1] Use of the PCT is being considered for the CWF because of the similarities of the dissolution behaviors of both the sodalite and glass binder phases in the CWF to borosilicate HLW glasses. This paper provides (1) a summary of the approach taken in selecting a consistency test for CWF production and (2) results of tests conducted to measure the precision and sensitivity of the PCT conducted with simulated CWF

  2. Automated start-up of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are undertaking a joint project to develop control philosophies, strategies, and algorithms for computer control of the start-up mode of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The major objective of this project is to show that advanced liquid-metal reactor (LMR) plants can be operated from low power to full power using computer control. Development of an automated control system with this objective in view will help resolve specific issues and provide proof through demonstration that automatic control for plant start-up is feasible. This paper describes the approach that will be used to develop such a system and some of the features it is expected to have. Structured, rule-based methods, which will provide start-up capability from a variety of initial plant conditions and degrees of equipment operability, will be used for accomplishing mode changes during plant start-up. Several innovative features will be incorporated such as signal, command, and strategy validation to maximize reliability, flexibility to accommodate a wide range of plant conditions, and overall utility. Continuous control design will utilize figures of merit to evaluate how well the controller meets the mission requirements. The operator interface will have unique ''look ahead'' features to let the operator see what will happen next. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  3. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Kramer, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The next step in the development of metal fuels for the integral fast reactor (IFR) is the conversion of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) core to one containing the ternary U-20 Pu-10 Zr alloy clad with HT-9 cladding, i.e., the Mk-V core. This paper presents results of three hot-cell furnace simulation tests on irradiated Mk-V-type fuel elements (U-19 Pu-10 Zr/HT-9), which were performed to support the safety case for the Mk-V core. These tests were designed to envelop an umbrella (bounding) unlikely loss-of-flow (LOF) event in EBR-II during which the calculated peak cladding temperature would reach 776 degree C for < 2 min. The principal objectives of these tests were (a) demonstration of the safety margin of the fuel element, (b) investigation of cladding breaching behavior, and (c) provision of data for validation of the FPIN2 and LIFE-METAL codes

  4. The physics design of EBR-II; Physique du reacteur EBR-II; Fizicheskij raschet ehksperimental'nogo reaktora - razmnozhitelya EVR-II; Aspectos fisicos del reactor EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenstein, W. B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1962-03-15

    The physics design oi EBR-II. Calculations of the static, dynamic and long-term reactivity behaviour of EBR-II are reported together with results and analysis of EBR-II dry critical and ZPR-III mock-up experiments. Particular emphasis is given to reactor-physics design problems which arise after the conceptual design is established and before the reactor is built or placed into operation. Reactor-safety analyses and hazards-evaluation considerations are described with their influence on the reactor design. The manner of utilizing the EBR-II mock-up on ZPR-III data and the EBR-II dry critical data is described. These experiments, their analysis and theoretical predictions are the basis for predetermining the physics behaviour of the reactor system. The limitations inherent in applying the experimental data to the performance of the power-reactor system are explored in some detail. This includes the specification of reactor core size and/or fuel-alloy enrichment, provisions for adequate operating and shut-down reactivity, determination of operative temperature and power coefficients of reactivity, and details of power- and flux-distribution as a function of position within the reactor structure. The overall problem of transferring information from simple idealized analytical or experimental geometry to actual hexagonal reactor geometry is described. Nuclear performance, including breeding, of the actual reactor system is compared with that of the idealized conceptual system. The long-term reactivity and power behaviour of the reactor blanket is described within the framework of the proposed cycling of the fuel and blanket alloy. Safety considerations, including normal and abnormal rates of reactivity-insertion, the implication of postulated reactivity effects based on the physical behaviour of the fuel alloy and reactor structure as well as extrapolation of TREAT experiments to the EBR-II system are analysed. The EBR-II core melt-down problem is reviewed. (author

  5. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Holland, J.W.; Kramer, J.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses three furnace heating tests which were conducted with irradiated, HT9-clad and U-19wt.%Pu-l0wt.%Zr-alloy fuel, Mk-V-type fuel elements in the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois. In general, very significant safety margins for fuel-element cladding breaching have been demonstrated in these tests, under conditions that would envelop a bounding unlikely loss-of-flow event in EBR-II. Highlights of the test results will be given, as well as discussions of the cladding breaching mechanisms, axial fuel motion, and fuel surface liquefaction found in high-temperature testing of irradiated metallic fuel elements

  6. Current status of experimental breeder reactor-II [EBR-II] shutdown planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, M. D.; Griffin, C. D.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Earle, O. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor--II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory--West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was shutdown in September, 1994 as mandated by the US Department of Energy. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the Sodium Process Facility. The sodium environment and the EBR-II configuration, combined with the radiation and contamination associated with thirty years of reactor operation, posed problems specific to liquid metal reactor deactivation. The methods being developed and implemented at EBR-II can be applied to other similar situations in the US and abroad

  7. Remote, under-sodium fuel handling experience at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Planchon, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The EBR-II is a pool-type design; the reactor fuel handling components and entire primary-sodium coolant system are submerged in the primary tank, which is 26 feet in diameter, 26 feet high, and contains 86,000 gallons of sodium. Since the reactor is submerged in sodium, fuel handling operations must be performed blind, making exact positioning and precision control of the fuel handling system components essential. EBR-II operated for 30 years, and the fuel handling system has performed approximately 25,000 fuel transfer operations in that time. Due to termination of the IFR program, EBR-II was shut down on September 30, 1994. In preparation for decommissioning, all fuel in the reactor will be transferred out of EBR-II to interim storage. This intensive fuel handling campaign will last approximately two years, and the number of transfers will be equivalent to the fuel handling done over about nine years of normal reactor operation. With this demand on the system, system reliability will be extremely important. Because of this increased demand, and considering that the system has been operating for about 32 years, system upgrades to increase reliability and efficiency are proceeding. Upgrades to the system to install new digital, solid state controls, and to take advantage of new visualization technology, are underway. Future reactor designs using liquid metal coolant will be able to incorporate imaging technology now being investigated, such as ultraviolet laser imaging and ultrasonic imaging

  8. The EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment: lessons learned regarding passive safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.; Roglans, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1.6 10 -6 yr -1 , even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The annual frequency of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquakes) is 3.6 10 -6 yr -1 and the contribution of seismic events is 1.7 10 -5 yr -1 . Overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability

  9. The EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment: lessons learned regarding passive safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D J; Ragland, W A; Roglans, J

    1998-11-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1.6 10{sup -6} yr{sup -1}, even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The annual frequency of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquakes) is 3.6 10{sup -6} yr{sup -1} and the contribution of seismic events is 1.7 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1}. Overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability.

  10. The EBR-II probabilistic risk assessment lessons learned regarding passive safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.; Roglans, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the recently completed EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1.6 10 -6 yr -1 , even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The annual frequency of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquakes) is 3.6 10 -6 yr -1 and the contribution of seismic events is 1.7 10 -5 yr -1 . Overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability

  11. Modification of EBR-II plant to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messick, N C; Betten, P R; Booty, W F; Christensen, L J; Fryer, R M; Mohr, D; Planchon, H P; Radtke, W H

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the details of and the philosophy behind changes made to the EBR-II plant in order to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests. No changes were required to conduct loss-of-heat-sink-without-scram tests.

  12. Modification of EBR-II plant to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, N.C.; Betten, P.R.; Booty, W.F.; Christensen, L.J.; Fryer, R.M.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.; Radtke, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the details of and the philosophy behind changes made to the EBR-II plant in order to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests. No changes were required to conduct loss-of-heat-sink-without-scram tests. (orig.)

  13. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  14. Analysis of carbon transport in the EBR-II and FFTF primary sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, R.B.; Natesan, K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the carburization-decarburization behavior of austenitic stainless steels in the primary heat-transport systems of the EBR-II and FFTF has been made that is based upon a kinetic model for the diffusion process and the surface area of steel in contact with flowing sodium at various temperatures in the two systems. The analysis was performed for operating conditions that result in sodium outlet temperatures of 474 and 566 0 C in the FFTF and 470 0 C in the EBR-II. If there was no external source of carbon to the system, i.e., other than the carbon initially present in the steel and the sodium, the dynamic-equilibrium carbon concentrations calculated for the FFTF primary sodium were approximately 0.025 and approximately 0.065 ppm for the 474 and 566 0 C outlet temperatures, respectively, and approximately 0.018 ppm for the EBR-II primary system. The analysis indicated that a carbon-source rate of approximately 250 g/y would be required to increase the carbon concentration of the EBR-II sodium to the measured range of approximately 0.16--0.19 ppm. An evaluation of possible carbon sources and the amount of carbonaceous material introduced into the reactor cover gas and sodium suggests that the magnitude of the calculated contamination rate is reasonable. For a 566 0 C outlet temperature, carbonaceous material would have to be introduced into the FFTF primary system at a rate approximately 4--6 times higher than in EBR-II to achieve the same carbon concentration in the sodium in the two systems. Since contamination rates of approximately 1500 g/y are unlikely, high-temperature fuel cladding in the FFTF should exhibit decarburization similar to that observed in laboratory loop systems, in contrast to the minimal compositional changes that result after exposure of Type 316 stainless steel to EBR-II sodium at temperatures between approximately 625 and 650 0 C

  15. The roles of EBR-II and TREAT [Transient Reactor Test] in establishing liquid metal reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lehto, W.K.; Solbrig, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the role of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) and Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facilities in contributing to the understanding and resolution of key safety issues in liquid metal reactor safety during the decade of the 80's. Fuels and materials testing has been carried out to address questions on fuels behavior during steady-state and upset conditions. In addition, EBR-II has conducted plant tests to demonstrate passive response to ATWS events and to develop control and diagnostic strategies for safe operation of advanced LMRs. TREAT and EBR-II complement each other and between them provide a transient testing capability that covers the whole range of concerns during overpower conditions. EBR-II, with use of the special Automatic Control Rod Drive System, can generate power change rates that overlap the lower end of the TREAT capability. 21 refs

  16. Results and implications of the EBR-II inherent safety demonstration tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchon, H.P.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.; Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    On April 3, 1986 two milestone tests were conducted in Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-II). The first test was a loss of flow without scram and the second was a loss of heat sink without scram. Both tests were initiated from 100% power and in both tests the reactor was shut down by natural processes, principally thermal expansion, without automatic scram, operator intervention or the help of special in-core devices. The temperature transients during the tests were mild, as predicted, and there was no damage to the core or reactor plant structures. In a general sense, therefore, the tests plus supporting analysis demonstrated the feasibility of inherent passive shutdown for undercooling accidents in metal-fueled LMRs. The results provide a technical basis for future experiments in EBR-II to demonstrate inherent safety for overpower accidents and provide data for validation of computer codes used for design and safety analysis of inherently safe reactor plants

  17. SASSYS-1 computer code verification with EBR-II test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.; Dunn, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The EBR-II natural circulation experiment, XX08 Test 8A, is simulated with the SASSYS-1 computer code and the results for the latter are compared with published data taken during the transient at selected points in the core. The SASSYS-1 results provide transient temperature and flow responses for all points of interest simultaneously during one run, once such basic parameters as pipe sizes, initial core flows, and elevations are specified. The SASSYS-1 simulation results for the EBR-II experiment XX08 Test 8A, conducted in March 1979, are within the published plant data uncertainties and, thereby, serve as a partial verification/validation of the SASSYS-1 code

  18. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required

  19. Analysis of EBR-II neutron and photon physics by multidimensional transport-theory techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacqmin, R.P.; Finck, P.J.; Palmiotti, G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a review of the challenges specific to the EBR-II core physics, a description of the methods and techniques which have been developed for addressing these challenges, and the results of some validation studies relative to power-distribution calculations. Numerical tests have shown that the VARIANT nodal code yields eigenvalue and power predictions as accurate as finite difference and discrete ordinates transport codes, at a small fraction of the cost. Comparisons with continuous-energy Monte Carlo results have proven that the errors introduced by the use of the diffusion-theory approximation in the collapsing procedure to obtain broad-group cross sections, kerma factors, and photon-production matrices, have a small impact on the EBR-II neutron/photon power distribution

  20. Evidence of fast non-linear feedback in EBR-II rod-drop measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-06-01

    Feedback reactivities determine the time dependence of a reactor during and after a transient initiating event. Recent analysis of control-rod drops in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Reactor has indicated that some relatively fast feedback may exist which cannot be accounted for by the linear feedback mechanisms. The linear and deduced non-linear feedback reactivities from a control-rod drop in EBR-II run 93A using detailed temperature coefficients of reactivity in the EROS kinetics code have been reported. The transient analyses have now been examined in more detail for times close to the drop to ascertain if additional positive reactivity is being built-in early in the drop which could be gradually released later in the drop

  1. Operational-safety advantages of LMFBR's: the EBR-II experience and testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lindsay, R.W.; Golden, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    LMFBR's contain many inherent characteristics that simplify control and improve operating safety and reliability. The EBR-II design is such that good advantage was taken of these characteristics, resulting in a vary favorable operating history and allowing for a program of off-normal testing to further demonstrate the safe response of LMFBR's to upsets. The experience already gained, and that expected from the future testing program, will contribute to further development of design and safety criteria for LMFBR's. Inherently safe characteristics are emphasized and include natural convective flow for decay heat removal, minimal need for emergency power and a large negative reactivity feedback coefficient. These characteristics at EBR-II allow for ready application of computer diagnosis and control to demonstrate their effectiveness in response to simulated plant accidents. This latter testing objective is an important part in improvements in the man-machine interface

  2. Transforming criticality control methods for EBR-II fuel handling during reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, C.S.; Dean, E.M.; Angelo, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the Department of Energy (DOE) request to decommission the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was conducted in order to develop a scope of work and analysis method for performing the safety review of the facility. Evaluation of the current national standards, DOE orders, EBR-II nuclear safeguards and criticality control practices showed that a decommissioning policy for maintaining criticality safety during a long term fuel transfer process did not exist. The purpose of this research was to provide a technical basis for transforming the reactor from an instrumentation and measurement controlled system to a system that provides both physical constraint and administrative controls to prevent criticality accidents. Essentially, this was done by modifying the reactor core configuration, reactor operations procedures and system instrumentation to meet the safety practices of ANS-8.1-1983. Subcritical limits were determined by applying established liquid metal reactor methods for both the experimental and computational validations

  3. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

  4. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

  5. Thermal-structural response of EBR-II major components under reactor operational transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the LMFBR safety research has been focused primarily on severe but highly unlikely accident, such as hypothetical-core-disruptive accidents (HCDA's), and not enough attention has been given to accident prevention, which is less severe but more likely sequence. The objective of the EBR-II operational reliability testing (ORT) is to demonstrate that the reactor can be designed and operated to prevent accident. A series of mild duty cycles and overpower transients were designed for accident prevention tests. An assessment of the EBR-II major plant components has been performed to assure structural integrity of the reactor plant for the ORT program. In this paper, the thermal-structural response and structural evaluation of the reactor vessel, the reactor-vessel cover, the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and the superheater are presented

  6. Studies related to emergency decay heat removal in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Mohr, D.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.; Dean, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies related to emergency decay heat removal by natural circulation in the EBR-II heat transport circuits are described. Three general categories of natural circulation plant transients are discussed and the resultant reactor flow and temperature response to these events are presented. these categories include the following: (1) loss of forced flow from decay power and low initial flow rates; (2) reactor scram with a delayed loss of forced flow; and (3) loss of forced flow with a plant protective system activated scram. In all cases, the transition from forced to natural convective flow was smooth and the peak in-core temperature rises were small to moderate. Comparisons between experimental measurements in EBR-II and analytical predictions of the NATDEMO code are included

  7. EBR-II argon cooling system restricted fuel handling I and C upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Start, S.E.; Carlson, R.B.; Gehrman, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The instrumentation and control of the Argon Cooling System (ACS) restricted fuel handling control system at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is being upgraded from a system comprised of many discrete components and controllers to a computerized system with a graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes the aspects of the upgrade including reasons for the upgrade, the old control system, upgrade goals, design decisions, philosophies and rationale, and the new control system hardware and software

  8. IFR fuel cycle demonstration in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Rigg, R.H.; Benedict, R.W.; Carnes, M.D.; Herceg, J.E.; Holtz, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase which includes completion of facility modifications, and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the design and construction of the facility, the design and fabrication of the process equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation. (author)

  9. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II subassembly types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-01-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel

  10. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] subassembly types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-09-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel

  11. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II subassembly types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-01-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel. (author)

  12. IFR fuel cycle demonstration in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Rigg, R.H.; Benedict, R.W.; Carnes, M.D.; Herceg, J.E.; Holtz, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase which includes completion of facility modifications, and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the design and construction of the facility, the design and fabrication of the process equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation. 5 refs., 4 figs

  13. Zr-rich layers electrodeposited onto stainless steel cladding during the electrorefining of EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Mariani, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing an electrometallurgical treatment for spent nuclear fuels. The initial demonstration of this process is being conducted on U-Zr alloy fuel elements irradiated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II). We report the first metallographic characterization of cladding hull remains for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent metallic fuel. During the electrorefining process, Zr-rich layers, with some U, deposit on all exposed surfaces of irradiated cladding segments (hulls) that originally contained the fuel alloy that was being treated. In some cases, not only was residual Zr (and U) found inside the cladding hulls, but a Zr-rind was also observed near the interior cladding hull surface. The Zr-rind was originally formed during the fuel casting process on the fuel slug. The observation of Zr deposits on all exposed cladding surfaces is explained with thermodynamic principles, when two conditions are met. These conditions are partial oxidation of Zr and the presence of residual uranium in the hulls when the electrorefining experiment is terminated. Comparisons are made between the structure of the initial irradiated fuel before electrorefining and the morphology of the material remaining in the cladding hulls after electrorefining. (orig.)

  14. Experimental confirmation of the design to minimize vibration and wear in 61-pin wire-spaced EBR-II subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, S.K.

    1978-05-01

    Examinations of HEDL 61-pin subassemblies comprised of 5.84 mm (0.230) inch diameter mixed-oxide fuel pins with 1.02 mm (0.040'') diameter spacer wire (PNL-9, -10, -11, HEDL-N-E, -N-F), showed severe cladding and spacer wire wear after irradiation in EBR-II. A comparison of a large number of design, fabrication, and irradiation parameters for all of the HEDL subassemblies indicated that the porosity per ring of fuel pins correlated significantly with the occurrence of wear on the fuel pins. The porosity per ring is the clearance between the flat-to-flat pin bundle dimension and the inner hex can dimension divided by the number of hexagonal fuel pin rings in the subassembly. The porosity per ring for PNL-9, -10, -11 and HEDL-N-E was 0.15 mm/ring (6 mils/ring) and 0.18 mm/ring (7 mils/ring) for the HEDL-N-F subassembly. Since the original FTR subassembly design had a porosity/ring spread of 0.04 mm/ring to 0.16 mm/ring (1.67 to 6.11 mils/ring) an additional series of irradiation tests was conducted to confirm that a tighter fuel pin bundle would eliminate the wear

  15. The EBR-II steam generating system - operation, maintenance, and inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschman, H.W.; Penney, W.H.; Longua, K.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has operated for 20 years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls. EBR-II is a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) with integrated power producing capability. EBR-II has operated at a capacity factor over 70% in the past few years. Superheated steam is produced by eight natural circulation evaporators, two superheaters, and a conventional steam drum. Steam throttle conditions are 438 C and 8.62 MPa. The designs of the evaporators and superheaters are essentially identical; both are counterflow units with low pressure nonradioactive sodium on the shell side. During the 20 years of operation, components of the steam generator have been subjected to a variety of inspections including visual, dimensional, and ultrasonic. One superheater was removed from service because of anomalous performance and was replaced with an evaporator which was removed, examined, and converted into a superheater. Overall operating experience of the system has been excellent and essentially trouble free. Inspections have not revealed any conditions that are performance or life limiting. (author)

  16. Assessment calculation of MARS-LMR using EBR-II SHRT-45R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.; Ha, K.S.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior predicted by MARS-LMR is validated with EBR-II SHRT-45R test data. • Decay heat model of ANS-94 give better prediction of the fission power. • The core power is well predicted by reactivity feedback during initial transient, however, the predicted power after approximately 200 s is over-estimated. The study of the reactivity feedback model of the EBR-II is necessary for the better calculation of the power. • Heat transfer between inter-subassemblies is the most important parameter, especially, a low flow and power subassembly, like non-fueled subassembly. - Abstract: KAERI has designed a prototype Gen-IV SFR (PGSFR) with metallic fuel. And the safety analysis code for the PGSFR, MARS-LMR, is based on the MARS code, and supplemented with various liquid metal related features including sodium properties, heat transfer, pressure drop, and reactivity feedback models. In order to validate the newly developed MARS-LMR, KAERI has joined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) coordinated research project (CRP) on “Benchmark Analysis of an EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)”. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has technically supported and participated in this program. One of benchmark analysis tests is SHRT-45R, which is an unprotected loss of flow test in an EBR-II. So, sodium natural circulation and reactivity feedbacks are major phenomena of interest. A benchmark analysis was conducted using MARS-LMR with original input data provided by ANL. MARS-LMR well predicts the core flow and power change by reactivity feedbacks in the core. Except the results of the XX10, the temperature and flow in the XX09 agreed well with the experiments. Moreover, sensitivity tests were carried out for a decay heat model, reactivity feedback model, inter-subassembly heat transfer, internal heat structures and so on, to evaluate their sensitivity and get a better prediction. The decay heat model of ANS-94 shows

  17. Assessment calculation of MARS-LMR using EBR-II SHRT-45R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.; Ha, K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior predicted by MARS-LMR is validated with EBR-II SHRT-45R test data. • Decay heat model of ANS-94 give better prediction of the fission power. • The core power is well predicted by reactivity feedback during initial transient, however, the predicted power after approximately 200 s is over-estimated. The study of the reactivity feedback model of the EBR-II is necessary for the better calculation of the power. • Heat transfer between inter-subassemblies is the most important parameter, especially, a low flow and power subassembly, like non-fueled subassembly. - Abstract: KAERI has designed a prototype Gen-IV SFR (PGSFR) with metallic fuel. And the safety analysis code for the PGSFR, MARS-LMR, is based on the MARS code, and supplemented with various liquid metal related features including sodium properties, heat transfer, pressure drop, and reactivity feedback models. In order to validate the newly developed MARS-LMR, KAERI has joined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) coordinated research project (CRP) on “Benchmark Analysis of an EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)”. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has technically supported and participated in this program. One of benchmark analysis tests is SHRT-45R, which is an unprotected loss of flow test in an EBR-II. So, sodium natural circulation and reactivity feedbacks are major phenomena of interest. A benchmark analysis was conducted using MARS-LMR with original input data provided by ANL. MARS-LMR well predicts the core flow and power change by reactivity feedbacks in the core. Except the results of the XX10, the temperature and flow in the XX09 agreed well with the experiments. Moreover, sensitivity tests were carried out for a decay heat model, reactivity feedback model, inter-subassembly heat transfer, internal heat structures and so on, to evaluate their sensitivity and get a better prediction. The decay heat model of ANS-94 shows

  18. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5Fs) are presented. The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations to the measurements shows quantitative agreement with both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content

  19. Considerations for advanced reactor design based on EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The long-term success of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) provides several insights into fundamental characteristics and design features of a nuclear generating station that enhance safety, operability, and maintainability. Some of these same characteristics, together with other features, offer the potential for operational lifetimes well beyond the current licensing time frame, and improved reliability that could potentially reduce amortized capital costs as well as overall operation and maintenance costs if incorporated into advanced plant designs. These features and characteristics are described and the associated benefits are discussed

  20. EBR-II facility for cleaning and maintenance of LMR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cleaning and maintenance of EBR-II sodium wetted components is accomplished in a separate hands-on maintenance facility known as the Sodium Components Maintenance Shop (SCMS). Sodium removal is mostly done using alcohol but steam or water is used. The SCMS has three alcohol cleaning systems: one for small nonradioactive components, one for small radioactive components, and one for large radioactive components. The SCMS also has a water-wash station for the removal of sodium with steam or water. An Alcohol Recovery Facility removes radioactive contaminants from the alcohol and reclaims the alcohol for reuse. Associated with the large components cleaning system is a major component handling system

  1. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade process control system structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Staffon, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; describes the main control computer hardware and system software features in more detail; and, then, describes the real-time control tasks, and how they interact with each other, and how they interact with the operator interface task

  2. Reactivity-induced time-dependencies of EBR-II linear and non-linear feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1988-01-01

    Time-dependent linear feedback reactivities are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a kinetic code analysis of an experiment in which the change in power resulted from the dropping of a control rod. Shown with these linear reactivities are the reactivity associated with the control-rod shaft contraction and also time-dependent non-linear (mainly bowing) component deduced from the inverse kinetics of the experimentally measured fission power and the calculated linear reactivities. (author)

  3. Criticality safety requirements for transporting EBR-II fuel bottles stored at INTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R. M.; Pope, C. L.

    2000-01-01

    Two carrier/shipping cask options are being developed to transport bottles of EBR-II fuel elements stored at INTEC. Some fuel bottles are intact, but some have developed leaks. Reactivity control requirements to maintain subcriticality during the hypothetical transport accident have been examined for both transport options for intact and leaking bottles. Poison rods, poison sleeves, and dummy filler bottles were considered; several possible poison materials and several possible dummy filler materials were studied. The minimum number of poison rods or dummy filler bottles has been determined for each carrier for transport of intact and leaking bottles

  4. Fail-safety of the EBR-II steam generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Stone, C.C.; Hutter, E.; Barney, W.K.; Staker, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fail-safe analyses of the EBR-II steam-generator system show that a postulated non-instantaneous leak of water or steam into sodium, through a duplex tube or a tubesheet, at credible leak rates will not structurally damage the evaporators and superheaters. However, contamination of the system and possible shell wastage by sodium-water reaction products may render the system inoperable for a period exceeding six months. This period would be shortened to three months if the system were modified by adding a remotely operated water dump system, a steam vent system, a secondary sodium superheater relief line, and a tubesheet leak-detection system

  5. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software

  6. Dynamic modeling and simulation of EBR-II steam generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkan, R.C.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a low order dynamic model of the Experimental breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) steam generator system. The model development includes the application of energy, mass and momentum balance equations in state-space form. The model also includes a three-element controller for the drum water level control problem. The simulation results for low-level perturbations exhibit the inherently stable characteristics of the steam generator. The predictions of test transients also verify the consistency of this low order model

  7. Safety philosophy in upgrading the EBR-II plant protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1976-01-01

    The EBR-II plant protection system (PPS) has been substantially modified, upgrading its performance to more fully comply with modern safety philosophy and criteria. The upgrading effort required that the total reactor system be evaluated for possible faults and that a PPS be designed to accommodate them. The result was deletion of a number of existing trip functions and upgrading of others. Particular attention was given to loss of primary pumping power and reactivity insertion events. The design and performance criteria for the PPS has been more firmly established, understanding of the PPS function has been improved and the reactor has been subjected to fewer spurious trips, improving operational reliability

  8. Tightly coupled transient analysis of EBR-II: An INEL [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory] Engineering Simulation Center Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Barber, D.G.; Dean, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    A ''Tightly Coupled'' transient analysis system for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (FBR-II) is presently under development. The system consists of a faster-than-real-time high fidelity reactor simulation, advanced graphics displays, expert system coupling, and real-time data coupling via the EBR-II data acquisition system to and from the plant and the control system. The first generation software has been developed and tested. Various subsystem couplings and the total system integration have been checked out. A ''Lightly Coupled'' EBR-II reactor startup was conducted in August of 1988 as a demonstration of the system. This system should enhance the diagnostic and prognostic capability of EBR-II in the near term and provide automatic control during startup and power maneuvering in the future, as well as serve as a testbed for new control system development for advanced reactors. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  9. Feasibility of processing the experimental breeder reactor-II driver fuel from the Idaho National Laboratory through Savannah River Site's H-Canyon facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magoulas, V. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to evaluate the potential to receive and process the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) uranium (U) recovered from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) driver fuel through the Savannah River Site’s (SRS) H-Canyon as a way to disposition the material. INL recovers the uranium from the sodium bonded metallic fuel irradiated in the EBR-II reactor using an electrorefining process. There were two compositions of EBR-II driver fuel. The early generation fuel was U-5Fs, which consisted of 95% U metal alloyed with 5% noble metal elements “fissium” (2.5% molybdenum, 2.0% ruthenium, 0.3% rhodium, 0.1% palladium, and 0.1% zirconium), while the later generation was U-10Zr which was 90% U metal alloyed with 10% zirconium. A potential concern during the H-Canyon nitric acid dissolution process of the U metal containing zirconium (Zr) is the explosive behavior that has been reported for alloys of these materials. For this reason, this evaluation was focused on the ability to process the lower Zr content materials, the U-5Fs material.

  10. Seismic response of the EBR-II to the Mt. Borah earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.G.; Lehto, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    On October 28, 1983, an earthquake of magnitude 7.3 occurred in the mountains of central Idaho at a distance of 114-km from the ANL-West site. The earthquake tripped the seismic sensors in the EBR-II reactor shutdown system causing a reactor scram. Visual and operability checks of structures, components, and systems showed no indication of damage or system abnormalities and reactor restart was initiated. As a result of the earthquake, questions arose as to the magnitude of the actual stress levels in critical components and what value of ground acceleration could be experienced without damage to reactor structures. EBR-II was designed prior to implementation of present day requirements for seismic qualification and appropriate analyses had not been conducted. A lumped-mass, finite element model of the primary tank, support structure, and the reactor was generated and analyzed using the response spectrum technique. The analysis showed that the stress levels in the primary tank system were very low during the Mount Borah earthquake and that the system could experience seismic loadings three to four times those of the Mount Borah earthquake without exceeding yield stresses in any of the components

  11. Breached fuel pin contamination from Run Beyond Cladding Breach (RBCB) tests in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colburn, R.P.; Strain, R.V.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Ukai, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1988-09-01

    Studies indicate there may be a large economic incentive to permit some continued reactor operation with breached fuel pin cladding. A major concern for this type of operation is the potential spread of contamination in the primary coolant system and its impact on plant maintenance. A study of the release and transport of contamination from naturally breached mixed oxide Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel pins was performed as part of the US Department of Energy/Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (DOE/PNC) Run Beyond Cladding Breach (RBCB) Program at EBR-II. The measurements were made using the Breached Fuel Test Facility (BFTF) at EBR-II with replaceable deposition samplers located approximately 1.5 meters from the breached fuel test assemblies. The effluent from the test assemblies containing the breached fuel pins was routed up through the samplers and past dedicated instrumentation in the BFTF before mixing with the main coolant flow stream. This paper discusses the first three contamination tests in this program. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. On-line sodium and cover as purity monitors gas operating tools at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.; Richardson, W.J.; Holmes, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Plugging temperature indicators, electrochemical oxygen meters and hydrogen diffusion meters are the on-line sodium purity monitors now in use at EBR-II. On-line gas chromatographs are used to monitor helium, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen impurities in the argon cover gases. Monitors for tritium-in-sodium and for hydrocarbons-in-cover gas have been developed and are scheduled for installation in the near future. An important advantage of on-line monitors over the conventional grab-sampling techniques is the speed of response to changing reactor conditions. This helps us to identify the source of the impurity, whether the cause may be transient or constant, and take corrective action as necessary. The oxygen meter is calibrated monthly against oxygen in sodium determined by the vanadium wire equilibration method. The other instruments either do not require calibration or are self-calibrating. The ranges, sensitivity and response times of all of the on-line purity monitors has proven satisfactory under EBR-II operating conditions

  13. SASSYS validation with the EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    SASSYS is a coupled neutronic and thermal hydraulic code developed for the analysis of transients in liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs). The code is especially suited for evaluating of normal reactor transients -- protected (design basis) and unprotected (anticipated transient without scram) transients. Because SASSYS is heavily used in support of the IFR concept and of innovative LMR designs, such as PRISM, a strong validation base for the code must exist. Part of the validation process for SASSYS is analysis of experiments performed on operating reactors, such as the metal fueled Experimental Breeder Reactor -- II (EBR-II). During the course of a series of historic whole-plant experiments, EBR-II illustrated key safety features of metal fueled LMRs. These experiments, the Shutdown Heat Removal Tests (SHRT), culminated in unprotected loss of flow and loss of heat sink transients from full power and flow. Analysis of these and earlier SHRT experiments constitutes a vital part of SASSYS validation, because it facilitates scrutiny of specific SASSYS models and of integrated code capability. 12 refs., 11 figs

  14. Simulation of LMFBR pump transients and comparison to LOF that occurred at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, F.F.; Dean, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    In a large LMFBR plant design, a number of pumps in parallel will feed the core. It must be demonstrated that the plant can continue to operate with the loss of one of the primary pumps. It is desirable not to have check valves in the loop from a reliability and economic standpoint. Simulations have been made to determine the consequences of a loss of one pump in a four-loop pool plant in which no plant protection action is taken. This analysis would be used to determine the required power rundown that would accompany pump loss. The two primary centrifugal pumps in EBR-II feed the core and blanket plenums in two parallel flow paths. The loss of one pump will result in decrease core flow and reverse flow through the down pump since no check valves are present in the system. For a large pool plant with four primary pumps, the loss of one pump will also result in reverse flow through the down pump if check valves of flow diodes are not included. The resulting flow transient has been modeled for EBR-II and the large plant using the DNSP program

  15. Simulation and verification of the EBR-II automatic control rod drive system with continuous system modeling codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The two computer programs are successful in modeling the EBR-II ACRDS. In fact, this is very convenient for a presampling of the consequences of a desired power movement. The ACRDS is to be modified so that the error signal is a comparison between demand position and measured position. Purpose of this change is to permit pseudo-random binary types of reactivity transfer function experiments at EBR-II. Questions asked about the computer software and hardware to accommodate this change can be quickly answered with either of the verified codes discussed here

  16. Power and power-to-flow reactivity transfer functions in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity transfer functions are important in determining the reactivity history during a power transient. Overall nodal transfer functions have been calculated for different subassembly types in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Steady-state calculations for temperature changes and, hence, reactivities for power changes have been separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent terms. Axial nodal transfer functions separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent components are reported in this paper for a typical EBR-II fuel pin. This provides an improved understanding of the time dependence of these components in transient situations

  17. Review of behavior of mixed-oxide fuel elements in extended overpower transient tests in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    From a series of five tests conducted in EBR-II, a substantial data base has been established on the performance of mixed-oxide fuel elements in a liquid-metal-cooled reactor under slow-ramp transient overpower conditions. Each test contained 19 preirradiated fuel elements with varying design and prior operating histories. Elements with aggressive design features, such as high fuel smear density and/or thin cladding, were included to accentuate transient effects. The ramp rates were either 0.1 or 10% ΔP/P/s and the overpowers ranged between ∼60 and 100% of the elements' prior power ratings. Six elements breached during the tests, all with aggressive design parameters. The other elements, including all those with moderate design features for the reference or advanced long-life drivers for PNC's prototype fast reactor Monju, maintained their cladding integrity during the tests. Posttest examination results indicated that fuel/cladding mechanical interaction (FCMI) was the most significant mechanism causing the cladding strain and breach. In contrast, pressure loading from the fission gas in the element plenum was less important, even in high-burnup elements. During an overpower transient, FCMI arises from fuel/cladding differential thermal expansion, transient fuel swelling, and, significantly, the gas pressure in the sealed central cavity of elements with substantial centerline fuel melting. Fuel performance data from these tests, including cladding breaching margin and transient cladding strain, are correlatable with fuel-element design and operating parameters. These correlations are being incorporated into fuel-element behavior codes. At the two tested ramp rates, fuel element behavior appears to be insensitive to transient ramp rate and there appears to be no particular vulnerability to slow ramp transients as previously perceived

  18. Dynamic response of the EBR-II secondary sodium system to postulated leaks of steam and water into sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, S.; Chopra, P.S.; Stone, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents evaluations of the dynamic response of a steam generator system to postulated leaks of steam and water into sodium. This work is part of a comprehensive fail-safe analysis of the EBR-II steam generator system

  19. EBR-II blanket fuel leaching test using simulated J-13 well water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J. E.

    1998-05-15

    A pulsed-flow leaching test is being conducted using three EBR-II blanket fuel segments. These samples are immersed in simulated J-13 well water. The samples are kept at a constant temperature of 90 C. Leachate is exchanged weekly and analyzed for various nuclides which are of interest from a mobility and longevity point of view. Our primary interest is in the longer-lived species such as {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am. In addition, the behavior of U, Pu, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs are being analyzed. During the course of this experiment, an interesting observation has been made involving one of the samples which could indicate the possible rapid ''anoxic'' oxidation of uranium metal to UO{sub 2}.

  20. Potential safety enhancements to nuclear plant control: proof testing at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, R.W.; Chisholm, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Future changes in nuclear plant control and protective systems will reflect an evolutionary improvement through increased use of computers coupled with a better integration of man and machine. Before improvements can be accepted into the licensed commercial plant environment, significant testing must be accomplished to answer safety questions and to prove the worth of new ideas. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is being used as a test-bed for both in-house development and testing for others in a DOE sponsored Man-Machine Integration program. The ultimate result of the development and testing would be a control system for which safety credit could be taken in the licensing process

  1. EBR-II Static Neutronic Calculations by PHISICS / MCNP6 codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paolo Balestra; Carlo Parisi; Andrea Alfonsi

    2016-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Shutdown Heat Removal Tests (SHRT) performed in the '80s at the Experimental fast Breeder Reactor EBR-II, USA. The scope of the CRP is to improve and validate the simulation tools for the study and the design of the liquid metal cooled fast reactors. Moreover, training of the next generation of fast reactor analysts is being also considered the other scope of the CRP. In this framework, a static neutronic model was developed, using state-of-the art neutron transport codes like SCALE/PHISICS (deterministic solution) and MCNP6 (stochastic solution). Comparison between both solutions is briefly illustrated in this summary.

  2. Expert system applications in support of system diagnostics and prognostics at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Gross, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Expert systems have been developed to aid in the monitoring and diagnostics of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Systems have been developed for failed fuel surveillance and diagnostics and reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostics. A third project is being done jointly by ANL-W and EG ampersand G Idaho to develop a transient analysis system to enhance overall plant diagnostic and prognostic capability. The failed fuel surveillance and diagnosis system monitors, processes, and interprets information from nine key plant sensors. It displays to the reactor operator diagnostic information needed to make proper decisions regarding technical specification conformance during reactor operation with failed fuel. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Seventeen years of LMFBR experience: Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Lentz, G.L.; Richardson, W.J.; Wolz, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Operating experience at EBR-II over the past 17 years has shown that a sodium-cooled pool-type reactor can be safely and efficiently operated and maintained. The reactor has performed predictably and benignly during normal operation and during both unplanned and planned plant upsets. The duplex-tube evaporators and superheaters have never experienced a sodium/water leak, and the rest of the steam-generating system has operated without incident. There has been no noticeable degradation of the heat transfer efficiency of the evaporators and superheaters, except for the one superheater replaced in 1981. There has been no need to perform any chemical cleaning of steam-system components

  4. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) upgrade graphical interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffon, J.D.; Peters, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    Technology advances in the past few years have prompted an effort at Argonne National Laboratory to replace existing equipment with high performance digital computers and color graphic displays. Improved operation of process systems can be achieved by utilizing state-of-the-art computer technology in the areas of process control and process monitoring. The Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) at EBR-II is the first system to be upgraded with high performance digital equipment. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper describes the main control computer and the operator interface control software

  5. Software engineering for the EBR-II data acquisition system conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorzman, W.

    1988-01-01

    The original data acquisition system (DAS) for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) was placed into service with state-of-the-art computer and peripherals in 1970. Software engineering principles for real-time data acquisition were in their infancy, and the original software design was dictated by limited hardware resources. The functional requirements evolved from creative ways to gather and display data. This abstract concept developed into an invaluable tool for system analysis, data reporting, and as a plant monitor for operations. In this paper the approach is outlined to the software conversion project with the restraints of operational transparency and 6 weeks for final conversion and testing. The outline is then compared with the formal principles of software engineering to show the way that bridge the gap can be bridged between the theoretical and real world by analyzing the work and listing the lessons learned

  6. EBR-II secondary sodium loop Plugging Temperature Indicator control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Gehrman, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary sodium coolant loop Plugging Temperature Indicator (PTI) control system was upgraded in 1993 to a real-time computer based system. This was done to improve control, to remove obsolete and high maintenance equipment, and to provide a graphical CRT based operator interface. A goal was to accomplish this inexpensively using small, reliable computer and display hardware with a minimum of purchased software. This paper describes the PTI system, the upgraded control system and its operator interface, and development methods and tools. The paper then assesses how well the system met its goals, discusses lessons learned and operational improvements noted, and provides some recommendations and suggestions on applying small real-time control systems of this type

  7. Comparisons of PRD [power-reactivity-decrements] components for various EBR-II configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Comparison of detailed calculations of contributions by region and component of the power-reactivity-decrements (PRD) for four differing loading configurations of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) are given. The linear components and Doppler components are calculated. The non-linear (primarily subassembly bowing) components are deduced by differences relative to measured total PRD values. Variations in linear components range from about 10% to as much as about 100% depending upon the component. The deduced non-linear components differ both in magnitude and sign as functions of reactor power. Effects of differing assumptions of the nature of the fuel-to-clad interactions upon the PRD components are also calculated

  8. EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor-II] system surveillance using pattern recognition software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mott, J.E.; Radtke, W.H.; King, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    The problem of most accurately determining the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) reactor outlet temperature from currently available plant signals is investigated. Historically, the reactor outlet pipe was originally instrumented with 8 temperature sensors but, during 22 years of operation, all these instruments have failed except for one remaining thermocouple, and its output had recently become suspect. Using pattern recognition methods to compare values of 129 plant signals for similarities over a 7 month period spanning reconfiguration of the core and recalibration of many plant signals, it was determined that the remaining reactor outlet pipe thermocouple is still useful as an indicator of true mixed mean reactor outlet temperature. Application of this methodology to investigate one specific signal has automatically validated the vast majority of the 129 signals used for pattern recognition and also highlighted a few inconsistent signals for further investigation

  9. EBRPOCO - a program to calculate detailed contributions of power reactivity components of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The EBRPOCO program has been developed to facilitate the calculations of the power coefficients of reactivity of EBR-II loadings. The program enables contributions of various components of the power coefficient to be delineated axially for every subassembly. The program computes the reactivity contributions of the power coefficients resulting from: density reduction of sodium coolant due to temperature; displacement of sodium coolant by thermal expansions of cladding, structural rods, subassembly cans, and lower and upper axial reflectors; density reductions of these steel components due to temperature; displacement of bond-sodium (if present) in gaps by differential thermal expansions of fuel and cladding; density reduction of bond-sodium (if present) in gaps due to temperature; free axial expansion of fuel if unrestricted by cladding or restricted axial expansion of fuel determined by axial expansion of cladding. Isotopic spatial contributions to the Doppler component my also be obtained. (orig.) [de

  10. Safety related considerations for operation with defected elements in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, R.M.; Sackett, J.I.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Traditionally, EBR-II has employed the 'shutdown and remove' philosophy when breached fuel elements are encountered. This mode of operation maintained in-plant inventories of fission products at low levels and allowed certain fission product detection systems to be employed as automatic plant shutdown devices. Information from fuel failure propagation studies and fast reactor operation indicates that shutdown under these conditions is unwarranted. Analytical studies, as well as fast reactor experience, further indicate that failure propagation, if it occurs at all, will not cross adjacent subassembly boundaries. Therefore, the 'shutdown and remove' philosophy can be liberalized to allow the demonstration of safety during a run-beyond-clad-breach mode of operation. This mode of operation is essential to the demonstration of the economics of commercial LMFBR systems

  11. Benchmark analyses for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyasu, E-mail: mochizki@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Muranaka, Kohmei; Asai, Takayuki [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Rooijen, W.F.G. van, E-mail: rooijen@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The IAEA EBR-II benchmarks SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R are analyzed with a 1D system code. • The calculated result of SHRT-17 corresponds well to the measured results. • For SHRT-45R ERANOS is used for various core parameters and reactivity coefficients. • SHRT-45R peak temperature is overestimated with the ERANOS feedback coefficients. • The peak temperature is well predicted when the feedback coefficient is reduced. - Abstract: Benchmark problems of several experiments in EBR-II, proposed by ANL and coordinated by the IAEA, are analyzed using the plant system code NETFLOW++ and the neutronics code ERANOS. The SHRT-17 test conducted as a loss-of-flow test is calculated using only the NETFLOW++ code because it is a purely thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data were made available to the benchmark participants after the results of the blind benchmark calculations were submitted. Our work shows that major parameters of the plant are predicted with good accuracy. The SHRT-45R test, an unprotected loss of flow test is calculated using the NETFLOW++ code with the aid of delayed neutron data and reactivity coefficients calculated by the ERANOS code. These parameters are used in the NETFLOW++ code to perform a semi-coupled analysis of the neutronics – thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data are compared with our calculated results. In our work, the peak temperature is underestimated, indicating that the reactivity feedback coefficients are too strong. When the reactivity feedback coefficient for thermal expansion is adjusted, good agreement is obtained in general for the calculated plant parameters, with a few exceptions.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Uncertainty Parameter based on MARS-LMR Code on SHRT-45R of EBR II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seok-Ju; Kang, Doo-Hyuk; Seo, Jae-Seung [System Engineering and Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sung-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hae-Yong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to assess the uncertainty quantification of the MARS-LMR code, the code has been improved by modifying the source code to accommodate calculation process required for uncertainty quantification. In the present study, a transient of Unprotected Loss of Flow(ULOF) is selected as typical cases of as Anticipated Transient without Scram(ATWS) which belongs to DEC category. The MARS-LMR input generation for EBR II SHRT-45R and execution works are performed by using the PAPIRUS program. The sensitivity analysis is carried out with Uncertainty Parameter of the MARS-LMR code for EBR-II SHRT-45R. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, dominant parameters with large sensitivity to FoM are picked out. Dominant parameters selected are closely related to the development process of ULOF event.

  13. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user`s perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ``comfort parameters`` and ``perspective reality`` of the user`s model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator`s perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne`s Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting.

  14. Software engineering for the EBR-II data acquisition system conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorzman, W.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline how EBR-II engineering approached the data acquisition system (DAS) software conversion project with the restraints of operational transparency and six weeks for final implementation and testing. Software engineering is a relatively new discipline that provides a structured philosopy for software conversion. The software life cycle is structured into six basic steps: 1) initiation, 2) requirements definition, 3) design, 4) programming, 5) testing, and 6) operations. These steps are loosely defined and can be altered to fit specific software applications. DAS software is encompassed from three sources: 1) custom software, 2) system software, and 3) in-house application software. A data flow structure is used to describe the DAS software. The categories are: 1) software used to bring signals into the central processer, 2) software that transforms the analog data to engineering units and then logs the data in the data store, and 3) software used to transport and display the data. The focus of this paper is to describe how the conversion team used a structured engineering approach and utilized the resources available to produce a quality system on time. Although successful, the conversion process provided some pit falls and stumbling blocks. Working through these obstacles enhanced our understanding and surfaced in the form of LESSONS LEARNED, which are gracefully shared in this paper

  15. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user's perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ''comfort parameters'' and ''perspective reality'' of the user's model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator's perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne's Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting

  16. EBR-II blanket fuel leaching test using simulated J-13 well water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a pulsed-flow leaching test using simulated J-13 well water leachant. This test was performed on three blanket fuel segments from the ANL-W EBR-II nuclear reactor which were originally made up of depleted uranium (DU). This experiment was designed to mimic conditions which would exist if, upon disposal of this material in a geological repository, it came in direct contact with groundwater. These segments were contained in pressure vessels and maintained at a constant temperature of 90 C. Weekly aliquots of leachate were taken from the three vessels and replaced with an equal volume of fresh leachant. These weekly aliquots were analyzed for both 90 Sr and 137 Cs. The results of the pulsed-flow leach test showed the formation of uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and uranium hydride (UH 3 ) particulate with rapid release of the 137 Cs and 90 Sr to the leachant. On the fifth week of sampling, one of the vessels became over pressurized and vented gas when opened. The most reasonable explanation for the presence of gas in this vessel is that the unoxidized uranium metal in the blanket segment could have reacted with the surrounding water leachant to form hydrogen. However, an investigation is currently being undertaken to both qualify and quantify H 2 formation during uranium spent nuclear fuel corrosion in water

  17. Interaction of CREDO [Centralized Reliability Data Organization] with the EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] PRA [probabilistic risk assessment] development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.S.; Ragland, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences review of US Department of Energy (DOE) class 1 reactors recommended that the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), operated by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), develop a level 1 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and make provisions for level 2 and level 3 PRAs based on the results of the level 1 PRA. The PRA analysis group at ANL will utilize the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to support the PRA data needs. CREDO contains many years of empirical liquid-metal reactor component data from EBR-II. CREDO is a mutual data- and cost-sharing system sponsored by DOE and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuels Development Corporation of Japan. CREDO is a component based data system; data are collected on components that are liquid-metal specific, associated with a liquid-metal environment, contained in systems that interface with liquid-metal environments, or are safety related for use in reliability/availability/maintainability (RAM) analyses of advanced reactors. The links between the EBR-II PRA development effort and the CREDO data collection at EBR-II extend beyond the sharing of data. The PRA provides a measure of the relative contribution to risk of the various components. This information can be used to prioritize future CREDO data collection activities at EBR-II and other sites

  18. Experimental study of the transition from forced to natural circulation in EBR-II at low power and flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, J.L.; Singer, R.M.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests have been conducted in EBR-II which studied the dynamics of the transition from forced to natural circulation flow in a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Each test was initiated by abruptly tripping an electromagnetic pump which supplies 5 to 6% of the normal full operational primary flow rate. The ensuing flow coast-down reached a minimum value after which the flow increased as natural circulation was established. The effects of secondary system flow through the intermediate heat exchanger and reactor decay power level on the minimum in-core flow rates and maximum in-core temperatures were examined

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the dynamic response of EBR-II ducts under pressure pulse loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Srinivas, S.

    1975-01-01

    In order to assess the potential damage to hexagonal subassembly ducts (cans) that may result from rapid gas release from a failed element the EBR-II project has conducted experiments and analyses. Additional experimental and analytical investigations are now being conducted to assure fail-safety of the ducts. Fail-safety is defined as the ability of a duct to withstand pressure pulses from failed elements during all reactor conditions without damage to adjacent ducts or any other problems in fuel handling. The results of 93 EBR-II duct tests conducted primarily by Koenig have been reported previously. The results of empirical correlations of some of these tests to determine the influence of several variables on the pressure pulse experienced by a duct and on the duct deformation are presented. The variables include the type of gas contained in the simulated element (tube), the element and duct materials, the presence or absence of flow restrictors in the element, and the way gas was released. 8 references. (auth)

  20. Feedback components of a U20Pu10Zr-fueled compared to a U10Zr-fueled EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Calculated feedback components of the regional contributions of the power reactivity decrements (PRDs) and of the temperature coefficients of reactivity of a U20Pu10Zr-fueled and of a U10Zr-fueled Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are compared. The PRD components are also separated into power-to-flow dependent and solely power dependent parts. The effects of these values upon quantities useful for indicating the comparative potential inherent safety characteristics of these EBR-II loadings are presented

  1. Direct electrical heating of irradiated metal fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.; Johanson, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept proposed by Argonne National Laboratory utilizes a metal fuel core. Reactor safety analysis requires information on the potential for fuel axial expansion during severe thermal transients. In addition to a comparatively large thermal expansion coefficient, metallic fuel has a unique potential for enhanced pre-failure expansion driven by retained fission gas and ingested bond sodium. In this paper, the authors present preliminary results from three direct electrical heating (DEH) experiments performed on irradiated metal fuel to investigate axial expansion behavior. The test samples were from Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) driver fuel ML-11 irradiated to 8 at.% burnup. Preliminary analysis of the results suggest that enhanced expansion driven by trapped fission gas can occur

  2. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5 wt. % Fs) are presented. (The symbol 'Fs' designates fissium, a 'pseudo-element' which, in reality, is an alloy whose composition is representative of fission products that remain in reprocessed fuel). The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations with the measurements shows quantitative agreement in both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content. (orig.)

  3. Alternate form and placement of short lived reactor waste and associated fuel hardware for decommissioning of EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planchon, H.P.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Upon the termination of EBR-II operation in 1994, the mission has progressed to decommissioning and waste cleanup of the facility. The simplest method to achieve this goal is to bury the raw fuel and activated steel in an approved burial ground or deep geologic repository. While this might be simple, it could be very expensive, consume much needed burial space for other materials, and leave large amounts of fissile easily available to future generations. Also, as with any operation, an associated risk to personnel and the public from the buried waste exists. To try and reduce these costs and risks, alternatives to burial are sought. One alternative explored here for EBR-II is to condition the fuel and store the fission products and steel either permanently or temporarily in the sealed primary boundary of the decommissioned reactor. The first problem is to identify which subassemblies are going to be conditioned and their current composition and decay time. The next problem is to identify the conditioning process and determine the composition and form of the waste streams. The volume, mass, heat, and curie load of the waste streams needs to be determined so a waste-assembly can be designed. The reactor vessel and internals need to be analyzed to determine if they can handle these loads. If permanent storage is the goal, then mechanisms for placing the waste-assembly in the reactor vessel and sealing the vessel are needed. If temporary storage is the goal, then mechanisms for waste-assembly placement and retrieval are needed. This paper answers the technical questions of volume, mass, heat, and curie loads while just addressing the other questions found in a safety analysis. The final conclusion will compare estimated risks from the burial option and this option.

  4. Status of RBCB testing of LMR oxide fuel in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain, R.V.; Bottcher, J.H.; Gross, K.C.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Ukai, S.; Nomura, S.; Shikakura, S.; Katsuragawa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The status is given of the the American-Japanese collaborative program in Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 to determine the run-beyond-cladding-breach performance of (UPu)O 2 fuel pins for liquid-metal cooled reactors. Phase 1 of the collaboration involved eighteen irradiation tests over 1981--86 with 5.84-mm pins in 316 or D9 stainless steel. Emphasis in Phase 2 tests from 1989 onwards is with larger diameter (7.5mm) pins in advanced claddings. Results include delayed neutron and fission gas release data from breached pins, the impact of fuel-sodium reaction product formation on pin performance, and fuel and fission product contamination from failures. 13 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  5. Development of a graphical user interface allowing use of the SASSYS LMR systems analysis code as an EBR-II interactive simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, P.L.; Briggs, L.L.; Gross, K.C.; Ku, J.Y.; Staffon, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The SASSYS computer program for safety analyses of liquid-metal- cooled fast reactors has been adapted for use as the simulation engine under the graphical user interface provided by the GRAFUN and HIST programs and the Data Views software package under the X Window System on UNIX-based computer workstations to provide a high fidelity, real-time, interactive simulator of the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number II (EBR-II) plant. In addition to providing analysts with an interactive way of performing safety case studies, the simulator can be used to investigate new control room technologies and to supplement current operator training

  6. BMFT-CEA-US-DOE Exchange on KNK II-Rapsodie-EBR II operating experience, German contributions for the second expert meeting at Idaho Falls, USA, October 27 and 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The meeting at Idaho Falls was the follow-up meeting of the first expert meeting on EBR II- Rapsodie- KNK II operating experience, which took place at the Karlsruhe Research Center in March 1980. The present report compiles the ten German papers presented at the Idaho Falls meeting, discussing various aspects of experience gained by the operation of KNK II

  7. Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

  8. Irradiation performance of full-length metallic IFR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.

    1992-07-01

    An assembly irradiation of 169 full-length U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel pins was successfully completed in FFTF to a goal burnup of 10 at.%. All test fuel pins maintained their cladding integrity during the irradiation. Postirradiation examination showed minimal fuel/cladding mechanical interaction and excellent stability of the fuel column. Fission-gas release was normal and consistent with the existing data base from irradiation testing of shorter metallic fuel pins in EBR-II

  9. Stability of lithium niobate on irradiation at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.; Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Monahan, E.

    1977-01-01

    In contrast to results obtained for neutron irradiation in a thermal reactor near room temperature, lithium niobate plates irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) did not become metamict. This is attributed to the elevated temperature of the EBR-II. Ion bombardment experiments indicate that to avoid disordering of lithium niobate on irradiation, its temperature should be maintained above 673 K. Evidence for ionic conductivity was found at 873 K, indicating that it would be inadvisable to permit the temperature to rise that high, particularly with voltage across the plate. In reactor application as a microphone transducer, it is tentatively recommended that the lithium niobate be maintained in the middle of this temperature range for a major portion of reactor operating time

  10. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  11. EBR-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-07-01

    Operation of the EBR-2 reactor is presented concerning the performance of the heat removal system; reactor materials; fuel handling system; sodium purification and sampling system; cover-gas purification; plant diagnostics and instrumentation; recent improvements in identifying fission product sources in EBR-2; and EBR-2 safety

  12. Whole-Pin Furnace system: An experimental facility for studying irradiated fuel pin behavior under potential reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.C.; Donahue, D.A.; Pushis, D.O.; Savoie, F.E.; Holland, J.W.; Wright, A.E.; August, C.; Bailey, J.L.; Patterson, D.R.

    1990-05-01

    The whole-pin furnace system is a new in-cell experimental facility constructed to investigate how irradiated fuel pins may fail under potential reactor accident conditions. Extensive checkouts have demonstrated excellent performance in remote operation, temperature control, pin breach detection, and fission gas handling. The system is currently being used in testing of EBIR-II-irradiated Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel pins; future testing will include EBR-II-irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins. 7 refs., 4 figs

  13. Advanced disassembling technique of irradiated driver fuel assembly for continuous irradiation of fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Shoichi; Haga, Hiroyuki; Katsuyama, Kozo; Maeda, Koji; Nishinoiri, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    It was necessary to carry out continuous irradiation tests in order to obtain the irradiation data of high burn-up fuel and high neutron dose material for FaCT (Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development) project. There, the disassembling technique of an irradiated fuel assembly was advanced in order to realize further continuous irradiation tests. Although the conventional disassembling technique had been cutting a lower end-plug of a fuel pin needed to fix fuel pins to an irradiation vehicle, the advanced disassembling technique did not need cutting a lower end-plug. As a result, it was possible to supply many irradiated fuel pins to various continuous irradiation tests for FaCT project. (author)

  14. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the LAMPF irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Davidson, D.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Differential and total displacement and helium-production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760-MeV protons at LAMPF. The calculations are performed using the SPECTOR and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation-damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in the experimental breeder reactor (EBR-II) at the Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho, and in the rotating target neutron source (RTNS-II) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The neutron energy spectra for LAMPF, EBR-II, and RTNS-II and the displacement and helium-production cross sections are shown

  15. Irradiation performance of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' MK-1 driver fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itaki, Toshiyuki; Kono, Keiichi; Tachi, Hirokatsu; Yamanouchi, Sadamu; Yuhara, Shunichi; Shibahara, Itaru

    1985-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' completed it's breeder core (MK-I) operation in January 1982. The MK-I driver fuel assemblies were removed from the core sequencially in order of burnup increase and have been under postirradiation examination (PIE). The PIE has almost been completed for 30 assemblies including the highest burnup assemblies of 48,000 MWD/MTM. It has been confirmed that all fuel assemblies have exhibited satisfactory performance without detrimental assembly deformation or without any indications of fuel pin breach. The irradiation conditions of the MK-I core were somewhat more moderate than those conditions envisioned for prototypic reactor. However the results of the examination revealed the typical irradiation behavior of LMFBR fuels, although such characteristics were benign as compared with those anticipated in high burnup fuels. Systematic performance data have been accumulated through the fuel fabrication, irradiation and postirradiation examination processes. Based on these data, the MK-I fuel designing and fabrication techniques were totally confirmed. This technical experience and the associated insight into irradiation behavior have established a milestone to the next step of fast reactor fuel development. (author)

  16. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  17. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs

  18. An overview of microstructural and experimental factors that affect the irradiation growth behavior of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidleris, V.; Tucker, R.P.; Adamson, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of factors affecting irradiation growth of zirconium alloys. Recent data obtained from irradiation programs in EBR-II, ATR, and NRU reactors are used to illustrate the effects of various microstructural and experimental factors on the growth of Zircaloy, zirconium, and zirconium-biobium alloys irradiated to fluences up to 2 X 10 26 nm -2 (E > 1 MeV) over the temperature range 330 to 720 K. Open literature results are also used to confirm or illustrate various effects. Important factors are texture, grain boundary parameters, residual stresses, original dislocation density, microstructure evolution, temperature during irradiation, solute effects, and fluence

  19. Fast neutron irradiation results on Li2O, Li4SiO4, Li2ZrO3 and LiA102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    Several ceramic solid breeder materials were irradiated in the fast neutron flux of EBR-II to a burnup of 3 x 10 20 captures/cm 3 in the 500 0 C to 900 0 C temperature range. Performance data were obtained on structural integrity, lithium transport, pellet swelling, and grain growth. The data provide a basis for more accurately forecasting the feasibility and performance limitations for these materials

  20. The Design of Sample Driver System for Gamma Irradiator Facility at Thermal Column of Kartini Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyamto; Tasih Mulyono; Setyo Atmojo

    2007-01-01

    The design and construction of sample driver system for gamma irradiator facility at thermal column of Kartini reactor post operation has been carried out. The design and construction is based on the space of thermal column and the sample speed rotation which has to as low as possible in order the irradiation process can be more homogeneity. The electrical and mechanical calculation was done after fixation the electrical motor and transmission system which will be applied. By the assumption that the maximum sample weight is 50 kg, the electric motor specification is decided due to its rating i.e. single phase induction motor, run capacitor type, 0.5 HP; 220 V; 3.61 A, CCW and CW, rotation speed 1430 rpm. To achieve the low load rotation speed, motor speed was reduced twice using the conical reduction gear with the reduction ratio 3.9 and thread reduction gear with the reduction ratio 60. From the calculation it is found that power of motor is 118.06 watt, speed rotation of load sample is 6.11 rpm due to the no load rotation of motor 1430 rpm. From the test by varying weight of load up to 75 kg it is known that the device can be operated in a good condition, both in the two direction with the average speed of motor 1486 rpm and load 6.3 rpm respectively. So that the slip is 0.268 % and 0.314 % for no load and full load condition. The difference input current to the motor during no load and full load condition is relative small i.e. 0.14 A. The safety factor of motor is 316 % which is correspond to the weight of load 158 kg. (author)

  1. Interaction of irradiation creep and swelling in the creep disappearance regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine the relationship between applied stresses and irradiation-induced dimensional changes in structural metals for fusion applications. Reanalysis of an earlier data set derived from irradiation of long creep tubes in EBR-II at 550 C has shown that the creep-swelling coupling coefficient is relatively independent of temperature at ∼0.6 x 10 -2 MPa -1 , but falls with increases in the swelling rate, especially at high stress levels. The action of stress-affected swelling and carbide precipitation exert different influences on the derivation of this coefficient

  2. The deformation analysis of the KALIMER breakeven core driver fuel pin based on the axial power profile during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Kim, Young Kyun; Hong, Ser Gi; Chang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bok; Kim, Young Il

    2003-03-01

    In this study, material properties such as coolant specific heat, film heat transfer coefficient, cladding thermal conductivity, surface diffusion coefficient of the multi-bubble are improved in MACSIS-Mod1. The axial power and flux profile module was also incorporated with irradiation history. The performance and feasibility of the driver fuel pin have been analyzed for nominal parameters based on the conceptual design for the KALIMER breakeven core by MACSIS-MOD1 code. The fuel slug centerline temperature takes the maximum at 700mm from the bottom of the slug in spite of the nearly symmetric axial power distribution. The cladding mid-wall and coolant temperatures take the maximum at the top of the pin. Temperature of the fuel slug surface over the entire irradiation life is much lower than the fuel-clad eutectic reaction temperature. The fission gas release of the driver fuel pin at the End Of Life(EOL) is predicted to be 68.61% and plenum pressure is too low to cause cladding yielding. The probability that the fuel pin would fail is estimated to be much less than that allowed in the design criteria. The maximum radial deformation of the fuel pin is 1.928%, satisfying the preliminary design criterion (3%) for fuel pin deformation. Therefore the conceptual design parameters of the driver fuel pin for the KALIMER breakeven core are expected to satisfy the preliminary criteria on temperature, fluence limit, deformation limit etc.

  3. The deformation analysis of the KALIMER breakeven core driver fuel pin based on the axial power profile during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Kim, Young Kyun; Hong, Ser Gi; Chang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bok; Kim, Young Il

    2003-03-01

    In this study, material properties such as coolant specific heat, film heat transfer coefficient, cladding thermal conductivity, surface diffusion coefficient of the multi-bubble are improved in MACSIS-Mod1. The axial power and flux profile module was also incorporated with irradiation history. The performance and feasibility of the driver fuel pin have been analyzed for nominal parameters based on the conceptual design for the KALIMER breakeven core by MACSIS-MOD1 code. The fuel slug centerline temperature takes the maximum at 700mm from the bottom of the slug in spite of the nearly symmetric axial power distribution. The cladding mid-wall and coolant temperatures take the maximum at the top of the pin. Temperature of the fuel slug surface over the entire irradiation life is much lower than the fuel-clad eutectic reaction temperature. The fission gas release of the driver fuel pin at the End Of Life(EOL) is predicted to be 68.61% and plenum pressure is too low to cause cladding yielding. The probability that the fuel pin would fail is estimated to be much less than that allowed in the design criteria. The maximum radial deformation of the fuel pin is 1.928%, satisfying the preliminary design criterion (3%) for fuel pin deformation. Therefore the conceptual design parameters of the driver fuel pin for the KALIMER breakeven core are expected to satisfy the preliminary criteria on temperature, fluence limit, deformation limit etc

  4. Irradiation performance of metallic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Porter, D.L.; Batte, G.L.; Hofman, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has been working for the past five years to develop and demonstrate the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. The concept involves a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, both designed specifically around the use of metallic fuel. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel for all of its 25-year life. In 1985, tests were begun to examine the irradiation performance of advanced-design metallic fuel systems based on U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr fuels. These tests have demonstrated the viable performance of these fuel systems to high burnup. The initial testing program will be described in this paper. 2 figs

  5. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650 0 C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys

  6. Correlation of fracture toughness with tensile properties for irradiated 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-08-01

    A correlation has been developed which allows an estimate to be made of the toughness of austenitic alloys using more easily obtained tensile data. Tensile properties measured on 20% cold-worked AISI 316 specimens made from ducts and cladding irradiated in EBR-II were used to predict values for the plane strain fracture toughness according to a model originally developed by Krafft. Some microstructural examination is required to determine a parameter designated as the process zone size. In contrast to the frequently employed Hahn-Rosenfeld model, this model gives results which agree with recent experimental determinations of toughness performed in the transgranular failure regime

  7. Effect of material variables on the irradiation performance of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Boron carbide pellets were fabricated with variations in material parameters. These pellets were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) to determine the effect of these variations on the performance. Helium release from the material and swelling of the pellets are the primary measures of performance. It was determined that material with a smaller grain size released more helium and swelled less. The pellets with boron-to-carbon ratios greater than 4 to 1 did not perform well. Iron additions improved the performance of the material while density variations had little effect

  8. Swelling in neutron-irradiated titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.T.

    1982-04-01

    Immersion density measurements have been performed on a series of titanium alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a fluence of 5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 450 and 550 0 C. The materials irradiated were the near-alpha alloys Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S, the alpha-beta alloy Ti-64, and the beta alloy Ti-38644. Swelling was observed in all alloys with the greater swelling being observed at 550 0 C. Microstructural examination revealed the presence of voids in all alloys. Ti-38644 was found to be the most radiation resistant. Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S also displayed good radiation resistance, whereas considerable swelling and precipitation were observed in Ti-64 at 550 0 C

  9. Helium diffusion in irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    Boron carbide has been internationally adopted as the neutron absorber material in the control and safety rods of large fast breeder reactors. Its relatively large neutron capture cross section at high neutron energies provides sufficient reactivity worth with a minimum of core space. In addition, the commercial availability of boron carbide makes it attractive from a fabrication standpoint. Instrumented irradiation experiments in EBR-II have provided continuous helium release data on boron carbide at a variety of operating temperatures. Although some microstructural and compositional variations were examined in these experiments most of the boron carbide was prototypic of that used in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The density of the boron carbide pellets was approximately 92% of theoretical. The boron carbide pellets were approximately 1.0 cm in diameter and possessed average grain sizes that varied from 8 to 30 μm. Pellet centerline temperatures were continually measured during the irradiation experiments

  10. SP-100 Fuel Pin Performance: Results from Irradiation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makenas, Bruce J.; Paxton, Dean M.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Marietta, Martin; Hoth, Carl W.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pins are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

  11. The precipitation response of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel to simulated fusion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The precipitation response of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel has been examined after irradiation in HFIR at 380-600 0 C, after irradiation in EBR-II at 500 0 C, and after thermal aging at 600 to 750 0 C. Eta phase forms during exposure to all environments. It constitutes a major portion of the precipitation response, and is rich in Ni, Si and Mo relative to M 23 C 6 after thermal aging. It is not normally reported in 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel. The eta, M 23 C 6 , Laves, sigma, and chi precipitate phases appear at similar temperatures after HFIR, EBR-II, or thermal exposure. There are, however, some differences in relative amounts, size, and distribution of phases among the various environments. Eta phase is the only carbide-type phase observed after irradiation in HFIR from 380-550 0 C. The large cavities associated with it at 380 0 C contribute significantly to swelling. Re-solution of fine M 23 C 6 , eta, and Laves particles and re-precipitation of massive particles of sigma, M 23 C 6 and chi are observed after recrystallization in HFIR. (orig.)

  12. Irradiation performance of U-Pu-Zr metal fuels for liquid-metal-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Cohen, A.B.; Billone, M.C.; Neimark, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses a fuel system utilizing metallic U-Pu-Zr alloys which has been developed for advanced liquid metal-cooled reactors (LMRs). Result's from extensive irradiation testing conducted in EBR-II show a design having the following key features can achieve both high reliability and high burnup capability: a cast nominally U-20wt %Pu-10wt %Zr slug with the diameter sized to yield a fuel smear density of ∼75% theoretical density, low-swelling tempered martensitic stainless steel cladding, sodium bond filling the initial fuel/cladding gap, and an as-built plenum/fuel volume ratio of ∼1.5. The robust performance capability of this design stems primarily from the negligible loading on the cladding from either fuel/cladding mechanical interaction or fission-gas pressure during the irradiation. The effects of these individual design parameters, e.g., fuel smear density, zirconium content in fuel, plenum volume, and cladding types, on fuel element performance were investigated in a systematic irradiation experiment in EBR-II. The results show that, at the discharge burnup of ∼11 at. %, variations on zirconium content or plenum volume in the ranges tested have no substantial effects on performance. Fuel smear density, on the other hand, has pronounced but countervailing effects: increased density results in greater cladding strain, but lesser cladding wastage from fuel/cladding chemical interaction

  13. Effect of irradiation on the tensile properties of niobium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Heestand, R.L.; Atkin, S.D.

    1986-11-01

    The alloys Nb-1Zr and PWC-11 (Nb-1Zr-0.1C) were selected as prime candidate alloys for the SP-100 reactor. Since the mechanical properties of niobium alloys irradiated to end-of-life exposure levels of about 2 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures above 1300 K were not available, an irradiation experiment (B-350) in EBR-II was conducted. Irradiation creep, impact properties, bending fatigue, and tensile properties were investigated; however, only tensile properties will be reported in this paper. The tensile properties were studied since they easily reveal the common irradiation phenomena of hardening and embrittlement. Most attention was directed to testing at the irradiation temperature. Further testing was conducted at lower temperatures in order to scope the behavior of the alloys in cooldown conditions

  14. Uniform irradiation of adjustable target spots in high-power laser driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiujuan; Li Jinghui; Li Huagang; Li Yang; Lin Zunqi

    2011-01-01

    For smoothing and shaping the on-target laser patterns flexibly in high-power laser drivers, a scheme has been developed that includes a zoom lens array and two-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). The size of the target pattern can be controlled handily by adjusting the focal length of the zoom lens array, while the profile of the pattern can be shaped by fine tuning the distance between the target and the focal plane of the principal focusing lens. High-frequency stripes inside the pattern caused by beamlet interference are wiped off by spectral dispersion. Detailed simulations indicate that SSD works somewhat differently for spots of different sizes. For small spots, SSD mainly smooths the intensity modulation of low-to-middle spatial frequency, while for large spots, SSD sweeps the fine speckle structure to reduce nonuniformity of middle-to-high frequency. Spatial spectra of the target patterns are given and their uniformity is evaluated.

  15. Dielectric changes in neutron-irradiated rf window materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, H.M.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics used for windows in ECRH heating systems for magnetically-confined fusion reactors must retain adequate properties during and after intense neutron irradiation. Of particular concern is a decrease in transmissivity, a parameter inversely related to the product of dielectric constant K and loss tangent tanδ. Samples of polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 and BeO were irradiated to 1 x 10 26 n/m 2 at 660K in the EBR-II fission reactor, and the above properties subsequently measured at 95 GHz. It was found that ktanδ for both materials doubled, implying a doubling of thermal stresses and a consequent reduction of time-to-failure from an assumed one year to 20 min for beryllia and 2 s for alumina. In the case of BeO, a large increase in reflectance of the incident millimeter-wave power results from dielectrically uncompensated swelling. This phenomenon could significantly degrade source performance

  16. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the LAMPF irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Differential and total displacement and helium production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760 MeV protons at LAMPF. The calculations are performed using the SPECTER and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in EBR-II and RTNS-II. The results indicate substantial contributions to the displacement and helium production rates due to neutrons in the high-energy tail (above 40 MeV) of the LAMPF spallation neutron spectrum. Still higher production rates are calculated for irradiations in the direct proton beam. These results will provide useful background information for research to be conducted at a new irradiation facility at LAMPF

  17. Precipitation response of annealed type 316 stainless steel in HFIR irradiations at 550 to 6800C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    Precipitation in annealed type 316 stainless steel after HFIR irradiation at 550--680 0 C to fluences producing 2000--3300 at. ppM He and 30--47 dpa is changed relative to fast reactor or thermal aging exposure to similar temperatures and times. The phases observed after HFIR irradiation are the same as those observed after aging to temperatures 70--200 0 C higher or for much longer times. There is a similar temperature shift in addition to different phases observed for HFIR irradiation compared with EBR-II. The changes observed are coincident with including simultaneous helium production to high levels in the irradiation damage products of the material

  18. Microstructural interpretation of the fluence and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of irradiated AISI 316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Fish, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of annealed and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 irradiated in EBR-II were determined for the temperature regime of 370 to 760 0 C for fluences up to 8.4 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). At irradiation temperatures below about 500 0 C, both annealed and cold-worked material exhibit a substantial increase in the flow stress with increasing fluence. Furthermore, both materials eventually exhibit the same flow stress, which is independent of fluence. At temperatures in the range of 538 to 650 0 C, the cold-worked material exhibits a softening with increasing fluence. Annealed AISI 316 in this temperature regime exhibits hardening and at a fluence of 2 to 3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) reaches the same value of flow stress as the cold-worked material

  19. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Davidson, D.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    CT: Differential and total displacement and helium production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760 MeV protons at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The calculations are performed using the SPECTER and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in EBR-II and RTNS-II. The results indicate substantial contributions to the displacement and helium production rates due to neutrons in the high-energy tail (above 20 MeV) of the LAMPF spallation neutron spectrum. Still higher production rates are calculated for irradiations in the direct proton beam. These results will provide useful background information for research to be conducted at a new irradiation facility at LAMPF

  20. Mechanical behavior of AISI 304SS determined by miniature test methods after neutron irradiation to 28 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabenberg, Ellen M.; Jaques, Brian J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Sencer, Bulent H. [Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Garner, Frank A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, 2003 Howell Ave., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Freyer, Paula D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Okita, Taira [Research Into Artifacts Dept., Center for Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated for over a decade in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) were measured using miniature mechanical testing methods. The shear punch method was used to evaluate the shear strengths of the neutron-irradiated steel and a correlation factor was empirically determined to predict its tensile strength. The strength of the stainless steel slightly decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and significantly increased with increasing dose until it saturated above approximately 5 dpa. An effective tensile strain hardening exponent was also obtained from the data which shows a relative decrease in ductility of steel with increased irradiation damage. Ferromagnetic measurements were used to observe and deduce the effects of the stress-induced austenite to martensite transformation as a result of shear punch testing.

  1. Investigations of fuel cladding chemical interaction in irradiated LMFBR type oxide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roake, W.E.; Adamson, M.G.; Hilbert, R.F.; Langer, S.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding and controlling the chemical attack of fuel pin cladding by fuel and fission products are major objectives of the U.S. LMFBR Mixed Oxide Irradiation Testing Program. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been recognized as an important factor in the ability to achieve goal peak burnups of 8% (80.MWd/kg) in FFTF and in excess of 10% (100.MWd/kg) in the LMFBR demonstration reactors while maintaining coolant bulk outlet temperatures up to ∼60 deg. C (1100 deg. F). In this paper we review pertinent parts of the irradiation program and describe recent observation of FCCI in the fuel pins of this program. One goal of the FCCI investigations is to obtain a sufficiently quantitative understanding of FCCI such that correlations can be developed relating loss of effective cladding thickness to irradiation and fuel pin fabrication parameters. Wastage correlations being developed using different approaches are discussed. Much of the early data on FCCI obtained in the U.S. Mixed Oxide Fuel Program came from capsule tests irradiated in both fast and thermal flux facilities. The fast flux irradiated encapsulated fuel pins continue to provide valuable data and insight into FCCI. Currently, however, bare pins with prototypic fuels and cladding irradiated in the fast flux Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as multiple pin assemblies under prototypic powers, temperatures and thermal gradients are providing growing quantities of data on FCCI characteristics and cladding thickness losses from FCCI. A few special encapsulated fuel pin tests are being conducted in the General Electric Test Reactor (GETR) and EBR-II, but these are aimed at providing specific information under irradiation conditions not achievable in the fast flux bare pin assemblies or because EBR-II Operation or Safety requirements dictate that the pins be encapsulated. The discussion in this paper is limited to fast flux irradiation test results from encapsulated pins and multiple pin

  2. Investigations of fuel cladding chemical interaction in irradiated LMFBR type oxide fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roake, W E [Westinghouse-Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Adamson, M G [General Electric Company, Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States); Hilbert, R F; Langer, S

    1977-04-01

    Understanding and controlling the chemical attack of fuel pin cladding by fuel and fission products are major objectives of the U.S. LMFBR Mixed Oxide Irradiation Testing Program. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been recognized as an important factor in the ability to achieve goal peak burnups of 8% (80.MWd/kg) in FFTF and in excess of 10% (100.MWd/kg) in the LMFBR demonstration reactors while maintaining coolant bulk outlet temperatures up to {approx}60 deg. C (1100 deg. F). In this paper we review pertinent parts of the irradiation program and describe recent observation of FCCI in the fuel pins of this program. One goal of the FCCI investigations is to obtain a sufficiently quantitative understanding of FCCI such that correlations can be developed relating loss of effective cladding thickness to irradiation and fuel pin fabrication parameters. Wastage correlations being developed using different approaches are discussed. Much of the early data on FCCI obtained in the U.S. Mixed Oxide Fuel Program came from capsule tests irradiated in both fast and thermal flux facilities. The fast flux irradiated encapsulated fuel pins continue to provide valuable data and insight into FCCI. Currently, however, bare pins with prototypic fuels and cladding irradiated in the fast flux Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as multiple pin assemblies under prototypic powers, temperatures and thermal gradients are providing growing quantities of data on FCCI characteristics and cladding thickness losses from FCCI. A few special encapsulated fuel pin tests are being conducted in the General Electric Test Reactor (GETR) and EBR-II, but these are aimed at providing specific information under irradiation conditions not achievable in the fast flux bare pin assemblies or because EBR-II Operation or Safety requirements dictate that the pins be encapsulated. The discussion in this paper is limited to fast flux irradiation test results from encapsulated pins and multiple pin

  3. High burnup, high power irradiation behavior of helium-bonded mixed carbide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, P.J.; Nayak, U.P.; Boltax, A.

    1983-01-01

    Large diameter (9.4 mm) helium-bonded mixed carbide fuel pins were successfully irradiated in EBR-II to high burnup (12%) at high power levels (100 kW/m) with peak cladding midwall temperatures of 550 0 C. The wire-wrapped pins were clad with 0.51-mm-thick, 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel and contained hyperstoichiometric (Usub(0.8)Pusub(0.2))C fuel covering the smeared density range from 75-82% TD. Post-irradiation examinations revealed: extensive fuel-cladding mechanical interaction over the entire length of the fuel column, 35% fission gas release at 12% burnup, cladding carburization and fuel restructuring. (orig.)

  4. Irradiation induced precipitation in tungsten based, W-Re alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. K.; Wiffen, F. W.; Bentley, J.; Stiegler, J. O.

    1983-03-01

    Tungsten-base alloys containing 5, 11, and 25 pct Re were irradiated in the EBR-II reactor. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 600 to 1500 °C. All compositions were irradiated to fluences in the range 4.3 to 6.1 X 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), and three 25 pct Re samples were also irradiated to 3.7 X 1026 n/m2 at temperatures 700 to 900 °C. Postirradiation examination included measurement of electrical resistivity at room temperature and lower temperatures, X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, microprobe analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation induced resistivity decreases observed in most of the samples suggested second-phase precipitation. Complete results confirmed the precipitate formation in all samples, in disagreement with existing phase diagrams for the W-Re system. Electron diffraction showed the precipitates to be consistent with the cubic, Re-rich X-phase and inconsistent with the σ-phase. Large variations in precipitate morphology and distribution were observed between the different compositions and irradiation conditions. For the 5 and 11 pct Re-alloys, spherically symmetric strain fields surrounded the equiaxed precipitate particles, and were observed even where no particles were visible. These strain fields are believed to arise from local Re enrichment. Thermoelectric data show that the precipitation can lead to decalibration of W/Re thermocouples.

  5. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  6. Steady-state irradiation testing of U-Pu-Zr fuel to >18% burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Wisner, R.S.; Billone, M.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Tests of austenitic stainless steel clad U-xP-10Zr fuel (x=o, 8, 19 wt. %) to peak burnups as high as 18.4 at. % have been completed in the EBR-II. Fuel swelling and fractional fission gas release are slowly increasing functions of burnup beyond 2 at. % burnup. Increasing plutonium content in the fuel reduces swelling and decreases the amount of fission gas which diffuses from fuel to plenum. LIFE-METAL code modelling of cladding strains is consistent with creep by fission gas loading and irradiation-induced swelling mechanisms. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction involves the ingress of rare-earth fission products. Constituent redistribution in the fuel had not limited steady-state performance. Cladding breach behavior at closure welds, in the gas plenum, and in the fuel column region have been benign events. 3 refs., 5 figs

  7. Comparison of compression properties and swelling of beryllium irradiated at various temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.; Wood, E.L. Jr.; Moir, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    A beryllium cylinder irradiated in Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) for four years at 700 to 760 K to a neutron fluence of 8.13 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (total) or 1 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV) was cut into samples and tested. Yield strength and plastic strain was determined in compression tests at 300, 723, 823 K and after annealing at 1173 K for one hour. The immersion density and helium content were measured on samples. An equation for swelling was derived from the data by regression analysis. The microstructure showed agglomeration of helium in voids or bubbles at the grain boundaries.

  8. The EBR-II spent fuel treatment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for demonstrating a high-temperature electrometallurgical process for treating spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-11. Two waste forms will be produced and qualified for geologic disposal of the fission and activation products. Relatively pure uranium will be separated for storage. Following additional development, transuranium elements will be blended into one of the high-level waste streams. The spent fuel treatment program will help assess the viability of electrometallurgical technology as a spent fuel management option

  9. Benchmark Analysis of EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    This publication presents the results and main achievements of an IAEA coordinated research project to verify and validate system and safety codes used in the analyses of liquid metal thermal hydraulics and neutronics phenomena in sodium cooled fast reactors. The publication will be of use to the researchers and professionals currently working on relevant fast reactors programmes. In addition, it is intended to support the training of the next generation of analysts and designers through international benchmark exercises

  10. Applications of the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans, J.: Ragland, W.A.; Hill, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A research reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and has been performed with close collaboration between PRA analysts and engineering and operations staff. A product of this Involvement of plant personnel has been a excellent acceptance of the PRA as a tool, which has already resulted In a variety of applications of the EBR-11 PRA. The EBR-11 has been used in support of plant hardware and procedure modifications and In new system design work. A new application in support of the refueling safety analysis will be completed in the near future

  11. Adaptive robust control of the EBR-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M.A.; Edwards, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation results are presented for an adaptive H ∞ controller, a fixed H ∞ controller, and a classical controller. The controllers are applied to a simulation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II primary system. The controllers are tested for the best robustness and performance by step-changing the demanded reactor power and by varying the combined uncertainty in initial reactor power and control rod worth. The adaptive H ∞ controller shows the fastest settling time, fastest rise time and smallest peak overshoot when compared to the fixed H ∞ and classical controllers. This makes for a superior and more robust controller

  12. Time series analysis of nuclear instrumentation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Results of a time series analysis of the scaler count data from the 3 wide range nuclear detectors in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II are presented. One of the channels was replaced, and it was desired to determine if there was any statistically significant change (ie, improvement) in the channel's response after the replacement. Data were collected from all 3 channels for 16-day periods before and after detector replacement. Time series analysis and statistical tests showed that there was no significant change after the detector replacement. Also, there were no statistically significant differences among the 3 channels, either before or after the replacement. Finally, it was determined that errors in the reactivity change inferred from subcritical count monitoring during fuel handling would be on the other of 20-30 cents for single count intervals

  13. EBR-II Reactor Physics Benchmark Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Chad L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Lum, Edward S [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Stewart, Ryan [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Byambadorj, Bilguun [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Beaulieu, Quinton [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2017-12-28

    This report provides a reactor physics benchmark evaluation with associated uncertainty quantification for the critical configuration of the April 1986 Experimental Breeder Reactor II Run 138B core configuration.

  14. Multifrequency tests in the EBR-II reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, E.E.; Mohr, D.; Gross, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    A series of eight multifrequency tests was conducted on the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. In half of the tests a control rod was oscillated and in the other half the controller input voltage to the intermediate-loop-sodium pump was perturbed. In each test the input disturbance consisted of several superimposed single-frequency sinusoidal harmonics of the same fundamental. The tests are described along with the theoretical and practical aspects of their development and design. Samples of measured frequency responses are also provided for both the reactor and the power plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Operating and test experience of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    EBR-2 has operated for 27 years, the longest for any Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) power plant. During that time, much has been learned about successful LMR operation and design. The basic lesson is that conversatism in design can pay significant dividends in operating reliability. Furthermore, such conservatism need not mean high cost. The EBR-2 system emphasizes simplicity, minimizing the number of valves in the heat transport system, for example, and simplifying the primary heat-transport-system layout. Another lesson is that emphasizing reliability of the steam generating system at the sodium-water interface (by using duplex tubes in the case of EBR-2) has been well worth the higher initial costs; no problems with leakage have been encountered in EBR-2's operating history. Locating spent fuel storage in the primary tank and providing for decay heat removal by natural connective flow have also been contributors to EBR-2's success. The ability to accommodate loss of forced cooling or loss of heat sink passively has resulted in benefits for simplification, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and in not requiring the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. Also, the ''piped-pool '' arrangement minimizes thermal stress to the primary tank and enhances natural convective flow. These benefits have been realized through a history of operation that has seen EBR-2 evolve through four major phases in its test programs, culminating in its present mission as the Integral Fast Rector (IFR) prototype. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-01-01

    of around 72% for a single tube layer at 10 kHz/cm 2 irradiation rate. A second proposal for a New Small Wheel detector technology are Micromegas detectors. These highly segmented planar gaseous detectors are capable of very high rate particle tracking with single plane angular resolution or track reconstruction. The ATLAS community has decided in 2013 in favor of this technology for precision tracking in the New Small Wheels. A prototype Micromegas detector will be installed in summer 2014 on the present ATLAS Small Wheel to serve as test case of the technology and as template for the necessary changes to the ATLAS hardware and software infrastructure. To fully profit from this installation, an ATLAS compatible Read Out Driver (ROD) had to be developed, that allows to completely integrate the prototype chamber into the ATLAS data acquisition chain. This device contains state-of-the-art FPGAs and is based on the Scalable Readout System (SRS) of the RD51 collaboration. The system design, its necessary functionalities and its interfaces to other systems are presented at use of APV25 frontend chips. Several initial issues with the system have been solved during the development. The new ROD was integrated into the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube Readout and into a VME based readout system of the LMU Cosmic Ray Facility. Additional successful operation has been proven meanwhile in several test cases within the ATLAS infrastructure. The whole data acquisition chain is ready for productive use in the ATLAS environment.

  17. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-06-06

    reconstruction efficiency of around 72% for a single tube layer at 10 kHz/cm{sup 2} irradiation rate. A second proposal for a New Small Wheel detector technology are Micromegas detectors. These highly segmented planar gaseous detectors are capable of very high rate particle tracking with single plane angular resolution or track reconstruction. The ATLAS community has decided in 2013 in favor of this technology for precision tracking in the New Small Wheels. A prototype Micromegas detector will be installed in summer 2014 on the present ATLAS Small Wheel to serve as test case of the technology and as template for the necessary changes to the ATLAS hardware and software infrastructure. To fully profit from this installation, an ATLAS compatible Read Out Driver (ROD) had to be developed, that allows to completely integrate the prototype chamber into the ATLAS data acquisition chain. This device contains state-of-the-art FPGAs and is based on the Scalable Readout System (SRS) of the RD51 collaboration. The system design, its necessary functionalities and its interfaces to other systems are presented at use of APV25 frontend chips. Several initial issues with the system have been solved during the development. The new ROD was integrated into the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube Readout and into a VME based readout system of the LMU Cosmic Ray Facility. Additional successful operation has been proven meanwhile in several test cases within the ATLAS infrastructure. The whole data acquisition chain is ready for productive use in the ATLAS environment.

  18. Effect of fast-neutron irradiation on plastic deformation of Type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.

    1978-01-01

    Plastic deformation of EBR-II-irradiated Type 304 stainless steel was investigated by a stress-relaxation method. The stress-strain-rate relationships for the irradiated specimens at room temperature are concave upward, which are similar to those for the unirradiated specimens. However, concave downward behavior in the stress-strain-rate relationships were observed at much lower temperatures for the irradiated specimens in contrast to the unirradiated specimens. These results were analyzed succccessfully using Hart's mechanical equation-of-state concept. It was found that the hardness sigma*, which is the minimum stress necessary for the dislocation to overcome obstacles without thermal activation, increases linearly with fast-neutron fluence. This increase in sigma* is consistent with so-called ''irradiation hardening.'' In addition, resistance to dislocation glide, which is quantitatively measured in terms of sigma 0 , was observed to decrease linearly with fast-neutron fluence. The decrease in sigma 0 can be attributed to a decrease of solute drag due to irradiation-induced solute segregation

  19. DRIVER INATTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard TAY

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Driver inattention, especially driver distraction, is an extremely influential but generally neglected contributing factor of road crashes. This paper explores some of the common behaviours associated with several common forms of driver inattention, with respect to their perceived crash risks, rates of self-reported behaviours and whether drivers regulate such behaviours depending on the road and traffic environment, and provides some policy recommendations to address issues raised.

  20. Development of the flow control irradiation facility for JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroi, Masatoshi; Miyakawa, Shun-ichi

    1998-05-01

    This report describes the present situation and problems with the development of the flow control irradiation facility (FLORA). The purpose of FLORA is to run the cladding breach (RTCB) irradiation test under loss of flow conditions in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. FLORA is a facility like FPTF (Fuel Performance Test Facility) plus BFTF (Breached Fuel Test Facility) in EBR-II, USA. The technical feature of FLORA is its annular linear induction pump (A-LIP), which was developed in response to a need identified through the experiences in the mechanical flow control of FPTF. We have already designed the basic system facility of FLORA for the JOYO MK-II core. However, to put FLORA to practical use in the future, we have to confirm the stability of the JOYO MK-III core condition, solve problems and improve the design. We are going to freeze and review the FLORA project, taking into consideration the fuel development situation and the research project of JOYO MK-III core. (J.P.N.)

  1. Fractographic examination of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo Charpy specimens irradiated in the AD-2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Fracture surface topologies have been examined using scanning electron microscopy for 20 selected half sized Charpy impact specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo in order to provide improved understanding of fracture toughness degradation as a result of irradiation for Path E alloys. The specimen matrix included unirradiated specimens and specimens irradiated in EBR-II in the AD-2 experiment. Also, hardness measurements have been made on selected irradiated Charpy specimens. The results of examinations indicate that irradiation hardening due to G-phase formation at 390 0 C is responsible for the large shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) found in HT-9. Toughness degradation in HT-9 observed following higher temperature irradiations is attributed to precipitation at delta ferrite stringers. Reductions in toughness as a consequence of irradiation in Modified 9Cr-1Mo are attributed to in-reactor precipitation of (V,Nb)C and M 23 C 6 . It is shown that crack propagation rates for ductile and brittle failure modes can be measured, that they differ by over an order of magnitude and that unexpected multiple shifts in fracture mode from ductile to brittle failure can be attributed to the effect of delta ferrite stringers on crack propagation rates

  2. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C and to a maximum fluence of 17.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400 0 C to 14.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6 C, Mo 2 C, Chi, Laves, M 23 C 6 , α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation

  3. Neutron irradiation damage in Al2O3 and Y2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Bunch, J.M.; Ranken, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    Two ceramics under consideration for use in fusion reactors, Al 2 O 3 and Y 2 O 3 , were irradiated in the EBR-II fission reactor at 650, 875, and 1025 0 K to fluences between 2 and 6 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Samples evaluated include sapphire, Lucalox, alumina, Y 2 O 3 , and Y 2 O 3 -10 percent ZrO 2 (Yttralox). All Al 2 O 3 specimens swelled significantly (1 to 3 percent), with most of the growth observed in sapphire along the c-axis at the higher temperatures. Al 2 O 3 samples irradiated at 875 to 1025 0 K contained a high density of small aligned ''pores''. Irradiated Y 2 O 3 -based ceramics exhibited dimensional stability and a defect content consisting primarily of unresolved damage and/or dislocation loops. The behavior of these ceramics under irradiation is discussed, and the relevance of fission neutron damage studies to fusion reactor applications is considered. (auth)

  4. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo , H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650°C and to a maximum fluence of 1.76 × 10 23 n/cm 2 (E >0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400°C to 1.40 × 10 23 n/cm 2. A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6C, Mo 2C, Chi, Laves, M 23C 6, α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation.

  5. Irradiation Testing Vehicles for Fast Reactors from Open Test Assemblies to Closed Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A review of irradiation testing vehicle approaches and designs that have been incorporated into past Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) or envisioned for incorporation has been carried out. The objective is to understand the essential features of the approaches and designs so that they can inform test vehicle designs for a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Fast test reactor designs examined include EBR-II, FFTF, JOYO, BOR-60, PHÉNIX, JHR, and MBIR. Previous designers exhibited great ingenuity in overcoming design and operational challenges especially when the original reactor plant’s mission changed to an irradiation testing mission as in the EBRII reactor plant. The various irradiation testing vehicles can be categorized as: Uninstrumented open assemblies that fit into core locations; Instrumented open test assemblies that fit into special core locations; Self-contained closed loops; and External closed loops. A special emphasis is devoted to closed loops as they are regarded as a very desirable feature of a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Closed loops are an important technology for irradiation of fuels and materials in separate controlled environments. The impact of closed loops on the design of fast reactors is also discussed in this report.

  6. Irradiation effects on reactor structural materials. Semi-annual progress report, August 1974--February 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudson, T.T.

    1975-03-01

    Data are reported on: effects of cold work on creep-fatigue of irradiated 304 and 316 stainless steel (ss); swelling of 304 and 316 ss irradiated with protons and fast neutrons; effects of hold time on fatigue crack propagation in neutron-irradiated 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; radiation resistance of 0.03 percent Cu A533-B steel; microstructure of irradiated Inconel 718, Incoloy 800, PH13-8Mo, Mo, and Nb; dose dependence of 2.8-MeV Ni + ion damage (swelling) in Ni; notch ductility and strength of 316 ss submerged arc weld deposits; effects of microstructure of 316 ss on its irradiation response; in-reactor deformation of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; microstructure of HFIR-irradiated 316 ss; void microstructures of V bombarded by 46-MeV Ni 6+ ions (with and without preinjected helium) or 7.5-MeV Ta 3+ ions; swelling of Mo, Mo--0.5 Ti, Nb, Nb--1 Zr, W, and W--25 Re after fast neutron irradiation; swelling of V ion-irradiated Mo; creep of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss at 850, 1000, and 1100 0 F; effects of fast neutrons on mechanical properties of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; notch effects in tensile behavior of irradiated, annealed 304 ss (EBR-II duct thimbles); equations for thermal creep in pressurized tubes of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; irradiation creep in cold-worked 316 ss; helium production cross sections in neutron-irradiated elements; and radiation effects on various alloys. (U.S.)

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation of irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  8. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation after irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  9. The influence of nickel content on microstructures of Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys irradiated with nickel ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.; Garner, F.A.

    1990-11-01

    The objectives of this effort is to identify the mechanisms involved in the radiation-induced evolution of microstructure in materials intended for fusion applications. The results of this study are useful in interpreting the results of several other ongoing experiments involving either spectral or isotopic tailoring to study the effects of helium on microstructure evolution. Ion-irradiated Fe-15Cr-XNi (X = 20, 35, 45, 60, 75) ternary alloys and a 15Cr-85Ni binary alloy were examined after bombardment at 675 degree C and compared to earlier observations made on these same alloys after irradiation in EBR-II at 510 or 538 degree C. The response of the ion-irradiated microstructures to nickel content appears to be very consistent with that of neutron irradiation even though there are four orders of magnitude difference in displacement rate and over 200 degree C difference in temperature. It appears that the transition to higher rates of swelling during both types of irradiation is related to the operation of some mechanisms that is not directly associated with void nucleation. 6 refs., 8 figs

  10. Irradiation effects on low-friction coatings for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.L.; Johnson, R.N.; Guthrie, G.L.; Aungst, R.C.

    1975-11-01

    A variety of wear-resistant low-friction materials has been irradiated in the EBR-II in order to assess their reponse to LMFBR environments. Pre- and postirradiation testing and examination efforts have concentrated on candidate materials for application to the wear pads on FTR ducts (fuel, control, and reflector assemblies), and a significant result has been qualification of a proprietary detonation-gun-applied chromium carbide coating which employs a Ni Cr binder. Additional materials such as Inconel-718, Haynes-273, aluminides, and various chromium carbide/binder combinations, and other application processes such as plasma-spray, weld-overlays, diffusion bonding and explosive bonding, have also been studied. The most detailed examinations were conducted on selected chromium carbide coatings and included visual inspection, weight and dimensional measurements, metallography, electron microprobe, epoxy-lift-off, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Chromium carbide coatings applied by the detonation-gun process have demonstrated a marked superiority to those applied by plasma-spray techniques

  11. On the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of martensitic alloys neutron irradiated to 26 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on specimens made of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo in various heat treatment conditions which were irradiated in EBR-II to 26 dpa at 390 to 500 0 C. The results are compared with previous results on specimens irradiated to 13 dpa. HT-9 base metal irradiated at low temperatures showed a small additional increase in ductile brittle transition temperature and a decrease in upper shelf energy from 13 to 26 dpa. No fluence effect was observed in 9Cr-1Mo base metal. The 9Cr-1Mo weldment showed degraded DBTT but improved USE response compared to base metal, contrary to previous findings on HT-9. Significant differences were observed in HT-9 base metal between mill annealed material and normalized and tempered material. The highest DBTT for HT-9 alloys was 50 0 C higher than for the worst case in 9Cr-1Mo alloys. Fractography and hardness measurements were also obtained. Significant differences in fracture appearance were observed in different product forms, although no dependence on fluence was observed. Failure was controlled by the preirradiation microstructure

  12. Tensile properties of vanadium alloys irradiated at <430{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Recent attention to vanadium alloys has focused on significant susceptibility to loss of work-hardening capability in irradiation experiments at <430{degrees}C. An evaluation of this phenomenon was conducted on V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti, and V-Ti-Si alloys irradiated in several conventional and helium-charging irradiation experiments in the FFTF-MOTA, HFIR, and EBR-II. Work hardening capability and uniform tensile elongation appear to vary strongly from alloy and heat to heat. A strong heat-to-heat variation has been observed in V-4Cr-4Ti alloys tested, i.e., a 500-kg heat (No. 832665), a 100-kg heat (VX-8), and a 30-kg heat (BL-47). The significant differences in susceptibility to loss of work-hardening capability from one heat to another are estimated to correspond to a difference of {approx}100{degrees}C or more in minimum allowable operating temperature (e.g., 450 versus 350{degrees}C).

  13. Tritium and helium retention and release from irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Oates, M.A.; Pawelko, R.J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental effort to anneal irradiated beryllium specimens and characterize them for steam-chemical reactivity experiments. Fully-dense, consolidated powder metallurgy Be cylinders, irradiated in the EBR-II to a fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) fluence of {approx}6 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, were annealed at temperatures from 450degC to 1200degC. The releases of tritium and helium were measured during the heat-up phase and during the high-temperature anneals. These experiments revealed that, at 600degC and below, there was insignificant gas release. Tritium release at 700degC exhibited a delayed increase in the release rate, while the specimen was at 700degC. For anneal temperatures of 800degC and higher, tritium and helium release was concurrent and the release behavior was characterized by gas-burst peaks. Essentially all of the tritium and helium was released at temperatures of 1000degC and higher, whereas about 1/10 of the tritium was released during the anneals at 700degC and 800degC. Measurements were made to determine the bulk density, porosity and specific surface area for each specimen before and after annealing. These measurements indicated that annealing caused the irradiated Be to swell, by as much as 14% at 700degC and 56% at 1200degC. Kr gas adsorption measurements for samples annealed at 1000degC and 1200degC determined specific surface areas between 0.04 m{sup 2}/g and 0.1 m{sup 2}/g for these annealed specimens. The tritium and helium gas release measurements and the specific surface area measurements indicated that annealing of irradiated Be caused a porosity network to evolve and become surface-connected to relieve internal gas pressure. (author)

  14. Effect on fast neutron irradiation to 4 dpa at 400{degrees}C on the properties of V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Alexander, D.J.; Robertson, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Tensile, Charpy impact and electrical resistivity measurements have been performed at ORNL on V-4Cr-4Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti specimens that were prepared at ANL and irradiated in the lithium-bonded X530 experiment in the EBR-II fast reactor. All of the specimens were irradiated to a damage level of about 4 dpa at a temperature of {approximately}400{degrees}C. A significant amount of radiation hardening was evident in both the tensile and Charpy impact tests. The irradiated V-4Cr-4Ti yield strength measured at {approximately}390{degrees}C was >800 MPa, which is more than three times as high as the unirradiated value. The uniform elongations of the irradiated tensile specimens were typically {approximately}1%, with corresponding total elongations of 4-6%. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of the irradiated specimens was less than the unirradiated resistivity, which suggests that hardening associated with interstitial solute pickup was minimal.

  15. Microprocessor-based stepping motor driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1979-09-01

    The Pion Generation for Medical Irradiations (PIGMI) program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory requires a versatile stepping motor driver to do beam diagnostic measurements. A driver controlled by a microprocessor that can move eight stepping motors simultaneously was designed. The driver can monitor and respond to clockwise- and counterclockwise-limit switches, and it can monitor a 0- to 10-V dc position signal. The software controls start and stop ramping and maximum stepping rates. 2 figures, 1 table

  16. The effect of low dose rate irradiation on the swelling of 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), stainless steel components are irradiated at temperatures that may reach 400 C due to gamma heating. If large amounts of swelling (>10%) occur in these reactor internals, significant swelling related embrittlement may occur. Although fast reactor studies indicate that swelling should be insignificant at PWR temperatures, the low dose rate conditions experienced by PWR components may possibly lead to significant swelling. To address these issues, JNC and ANL have collaborated to analyze swelling in 316 stainless steel, irradiated in the EBR-II reactor at temperatures from 376-444 C, at dose rates between 4.9 x 10 -8 and 5.8 x 10 -7 dpa/s, and to doses of 56 dpa. For these irradiation conditions, the swelling decreases markedly at temperatures less than approximately 386 C, with the extrapolated swelling at 100 dpa being around 3%. For temperatures greater than 386 C, the swelling extrapolated to 100 dpa is around 9%. For a factor of two difference in dose rate, no statistically significant effect of dose rate on swelling was seen. For the range of dose rates analyzed, the swelling measurements do not support significant (>10%) swelling of 316 stainless steel in PWRs

  17. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  18. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokor, C.

    2003-01-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  19. Estimates of time-dependent fatigue behavior of Type 316 stainless steel subject to irradiation damage in fast breeder and fusion power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Liu, K.C.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Cyclic lives obtained from strain-controlled fatigue tests at 593 0 C of specimens irradiated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II) to a fluence of 1 to 2.63*10 26 neutrons (n)/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) were compared with predictions based on the method of strain-range partitioning. It was demonstrated that, when appropriate tensile and creep-rupture ductilities were employed, reasonably good estimates of the influence of hold periods and irradiation damage on the fully reversed fatigue life of Type 316 stainless steel could be made. After applicability of this method was demonstrated, ductility values for 20 percent cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in a mixed-spectrum fission reactor were used to estimate fusion reactor first-wall lifetime. The ductility values used were from irradiations that simulate the environment of the first wall of a fusion reactor. Neutron wall loadings ranging from 2 to 5 MW/m 2 were used. 27 refs

  20. Microstructural examination of 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel after irradiation at elevated temperatures in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Chen-Yih; Gelles, D.S.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-06-01

    A remelted 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel (HT-9) has been examined by transmission electron microscopy before and after irradiation in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The irradiation temperatures were 365,420, 520, and 600 degree C with the fluences as high as 7.3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 34 dpa. The extracted precipitates from each specimen were identified using x-ray microanalysis and selected area diffraction. The precipitates in the unirradiated condition were primarily M 23 C 6 carbides, which formed at martensite lath and prior austenite grain boundaries. During irradiation at elevated temperatures, small amounts of other phases formed, which were tentatively identified as the chromium-rich α', the nickel-silicon rich G-phase, and the intermetallic Chi phase. Irradiation-induced voids were observed only in specimens irradiated at 420 degree C to a dose of 34 dpa; no voids were found for specimens irradiated at 365, 520, and 600 degree C (∼11, ∼34, and ∼34 dpa). These results are not in agreement with previous experiments in that voids have not been reported in this alloy at relatively high fluence level (∼67 dpa) following irradiation in another fast-spectrum reactor (EBR.II). This is, however, the first observation following FFTF irradiation. The present results indicate that cavities can form in HT-9 at modest fluence levels even without significant generation of helium. Hence, the cavity formation in this class of ferritic alloys is not simply caused by helium generation but rather more complex mechanisms. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Microstructure of irradiated Inconel 706 fuel pin cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.J.S.; Makenas, B.J.

    1983-08-01

    A fuel pin from the HEDL-P-60 experiment with a cladding of solution-annealed Inconel 706 breached in an apparently brittle manner at a position 12.7 cm above the bottom of the fuel column with a crack of 5.72 cm in length after 5.0 atomic percent burnup in EBR-II. Temperatures (time-averaged midwall) and fast fluences for the fractured area range from 447 0 C and 5.5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 to 526 0 C and 6.1 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Specimens of the fractured fuel pin section were successfully prepared and examined in both a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The fracture surfaces of the breached section showed brittle intergranular fracture characteristics for both the axial and circumferential cracks. Formation of γ' in the matrix near the breach confirmed that the irradiation temperature at the breached area was below 500 0 C, in agreement with other estimates of the temperature for the area, 447 to 526 0 C. A hexagonal eta-phase, Ni 3 (Ti,Nb), precipitated at boundaries near the breach. A more extensive eta-phase coating at grain boundaries was found in a section irradiated at 650 0 C. The eta-phase plates at grain boundaries are expected to have a detrimental effect on alloy ductility. A plane of weakness in this region along the (111) slip planes will develop in Inconel 706 because the eta-plates have a (111) habit relationship with the matrix

  2. Observation of oscillatory radiation induced segregation profiles at grain boundaries in neutron irradiated 316 stainless steel using atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Christopher M.; Felfer, Peter J.; Cole, James I.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2018-06-01

    Radiation induced segregation in austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr stainless steels is a key detrimental microstructural modification experienced in the current generation of light water reactors. In particular, Cr depletion at grain boundaries can be a significant factor in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, having a complete knowledge and mechanistic understanding of radiation induced segregation at high dose and after a long thermal history is desired for continued sustainability of existing reactors. Here, we examine a 12% cold worked AISI 316 stainless steel hexagonal duct exposed in the lower dose, outer blanket region of the EBR-II reactor, by using advanced characterization and analysis techniques including atom probe tomography and analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy. Contrary to existing literature, we observe an oscillatory w-shape Cr and M-shape Ni concentration profile at 31 dpa. The presence and characterization through advanced atom probe tomography analysis of the w-shape Cr RIS profile is discussed in the context of the localized GB plane interfacial excess of the other major and minor alloying elements. The key finding of a co-segregation phenomena coupling Cr, Mo, and C is discussed in the context of the existing solute segregation literature under irradiation with emphasis on improved spatial and chemical resolution of atom probe tomography.

  3. Structural evaluation of fast reactor core restraint with irradiation creep-swelling opposition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinowski, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiation creep and swelling correlations are derived from primary loading in-reactor experiments in which irradiation creep and swelling act in the same direction. When correlation uncertainty bands are applied in core restraint evaluations, significant variability in sub-assembly behavior is predicted. For example, sub-assemblies in the outer core region where neutron flux and duct temperature gradients are significant exhibit bowing responses ranging from a creep dominated outward bow to a swelling dominated inward bow. Furthermore, solutions based on upper bound and lower bound correlation uncertainty combinations are observed to cross-over indicating that such combinations are physically unrealistic in the assessment of creep-swelling opposition effects. In order to obtain realistic upper and lower bound sub-assembly responses, judgement must be applied in the selection of creep-swelling equation uncertainty combinations. Experimental programs have been defined which will provide the needed basic as well as prototypic creep-swelling opposition data for reference and advanced sub-assembly duct alloys. The first of these is an irradiation of cylindrical capsules subjected to a through-wall temperature gradient. This test which is presently underway in the EBR-II reactor will provide the data needed to refine irradiation creep and swelling correlations and their associated uncertainties when applied to core restraint evaluations. Restrained pin and duct bowing experiments in FFTF have also been defined. These will provide the prototypic data necessary to verify irradiated duct bowing methodology. The results of this experimental program are expected to reduce creep and swelling uncertainties and permit better definition of the design window for load plane gaps. (orig.)

  4. Irradiation-induced creep in 316 and 304L stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, L.C.; McVay, G.L.; Hudman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results are presented from the in-reactor creep experiments that are being conducted by Argonne National Laboratory. The experiments consist of four subassemblies that contain helium-pressurized as well as unstressed capsules of 316 and 304L stainless steels in several metallurgical conditions. Experiments are being irradiated in row 7 of the EBR-II sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Three of the subassemblies are being irradiated at temperatures near 400 0 C, and the fourth subassembly is being irradiated at a temperature of 550 0 C. Creep and swelling strains were determined by profilometer measurements on the full length of the capsules after each irradiation cycle. The accumulated neutron dose on the 304L capsules at 385 0 C was 45 dpa; on the 316 capsules at 400 0 C, 40 dpa; and on the 316 capsules at 550 0 C, 25 dpa. It was found that the in-reactor creep rates were linearly dependent on hoop stress, with the exception being capsules of 316 stainless steel that had been given long-term carbide aging treatment and then irradiated at 550 0 C. Those capsules exhibited much higher creep and swelling rates than their unaged counterparts. For the metallurgical conditions where significant swelling was observed (solution-annealed 304L and aged 316 stainless steels), it was found that the in-reactor creep rates were readily fit to a model that related the creep rates to accumulated swelling. Additionally, it was found that the stress-normalized creep rate for 20%-cold-worked 316 stainless steel at a temperature of 550 0 C was 1.6 times that observed at 400 0 C

  5. Grain boundary sinks in neutron-irradiated Zr and Zr-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Gilbert, R.W.; Coleman, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of annealed sponge and crystal-bar Zr and Zircaloy-2 have been examined following irradiation in EBR-II at temperatures ≅ 700 K. Loop analysis shows that there is selective denuding of interstitial loops near to some grain boundaries indicating that such boundaries are net sinks for interstitial point defects. Furthermore, in sponge Zr and Zircaloy-2, vacancy c-component loops are observed running into the grain boundaries showing that the grain boundaries are not preferred sinks for vacancies. Cavities are observed in all samples. In crystal-bar Zr and sponge Zr they are mostly observed adjacent to grain boundaries. They are also sometimes found within grains associated with precipitates. The cavities are more common in the crystal-bar Zr and this is probably because both the sponge Zr and Zircaloy-2 contain vacancy c-component loops which compete for vacancies (assuming that the cavities are vacancy sinks). Only some of the grain boundaries have cavities adjacent to them and this may be related to the orientation of the boundary. (orig.)

  6. Swelling of austenitic iron-nickelchromium ternary alloys during fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling data are now available for 15 iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys irradiated to exposures as high as 110 displacements per atom (dpa) in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) between 400 and 650 0 C. These data confirm trends observed at lower exposure levels and extend the generality of earlier conclusions to cover a broader range of composition and temperature. It appears that all austenitic iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys eventually approach an intrinsic swelling rate of about1%/dpa over a range of temperature even wider than studied in this experiment. The duration of the transient regime that precedes the attainment of this rate is quite sensitive to nickel and chromium content, however. At nickel and chromium levels typical of 300 series steels, swelling does not saturate at engineering-relevant levels. However, there appears to be a tendency toward saturation that increases with declining temperature, increasing nickel and decreasing chromium levels. Comparisons of these results are made with those of similar studies conducted with charged particles. Conclusions are then drawn concerning the validity of charged particle simulation studies to determine the compositional and temperature dependence of swelling

  7. Precipitate evolution in low-nickel austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at very low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Y.; Sagisaka, M.; Garner, F.; Okita, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Not all components of a fusion reactor will be subjected to high atomic displacement rates. Some components outside the plasma containment may experience relatively low displacement rates but data generated under long-term irradiation at low dpa rates is hard to obtain. In another study the neutron-induced microstructural evolution in response to long term irradiation at very low dose rates was studied for a Russian low-nickel austenitic stainless steel that is analogous to AISI 304. The irradiated samples were obtained from an out-of-core anti-crush support column for the BN-600 fast reactor with doses ranging from 1.5 to 22 dpa generated at 3x10 -9 to 4x10 -8 dpa/s. The irradiation temperatures were in a very narrow range of 370-375 deg. C. Microstructural observation showed that in addition to voids and dislocations, an unexpectedly high density of small carbide precipitates was formed that are not usually observed at higher dpa rates in this temperature range. These results required us to ask if such unexpected precipitation was anomalous or was a general feature of low-flux, long-term irradiation. It is shown in this paper that a similar behavior was observed in a western stainless steel, namely AISI 304 stainless steel, irradiated at similar temperatures and dpa rates in the EBR-II fast reactor, indicating that irradiation at low dpa rates for many years leads to a different precipitate microstructure and therefore different associated changes in matrix composition than are generated at higher dpa rates. One consequence of this precipitation is a reduced lattice parameter of the alloy matrix, leading to densification that increases in strength with increasing temperature and dose. A. non-destructive method to evaluate these precipitates is under development and is also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  8. Tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to a very high dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Shack, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20-100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. Our databases and mechanistic understanding of the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high doses, i.e. is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-corrosion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-II reactor after irradiation to ∼50 dpa at ∼370 deg. C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 degree sign C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at a low ECP, and this susceptibility led to a poor work-hardening capability and low ductility

  9. High-rate irradiation of 15mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zibell, Andre

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the "Small Wheel" tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of $1 \\times 10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$, and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm$^2$. This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of "New Small Wheel" detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smalle...

  10. Advanced fast reactor fuels program. Second annual progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.D.

    1978-12-01

    Results of steady-state (EBR-II) irradiation testing, off-normal irradiation design and testing, fuel-cladding compatibility, and chemical stability of uranium--plutonium carbide and nitride fuels are presented

  11. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO 2 -PuO 2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  12. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  13. ANL calculational methodologies for determining spent nuclear fuel source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last decade Argonne National Laboratory has developed reactor depletion methods and models to determine radionuclide inventories of irradiated EBR-II fuels. Predicted masses based on these calculational methodologies have been validated using available data from destructive measurements--first from measurements of lead EBR-II experimental test assemblies and later using data obtained from processing irradiated EBR-II fuel assemblies in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Details of these generic methodologies are described herein. Validation results demonstrate these methods meet the FCF operations and material control and accountancy requirements

  14. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user's perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ''comfort parameters'' and ''perspective reality'' of the user's model of the world. (author)

  15. Method for the determination of technical specifications limiting temperature in EBR-II operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Hill, D.J.; Ku, J.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The methodology and analysis procedure to qualify the Mark-V and Mark-VA fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II are summarized in this paper. Fuel performance data and design safety criteria are essential for thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety evaluations. Normal and off-normal operation duty cycles and transient classifications are required for the safety assessment of the fuels. The temperature limits of subassemblies were first determined by a steady-state thermal-structural and fuel damage analysis, in which a trial-and-error approach was used to predict the maximum allowable fuel pin temperature that satisfies the design criteria for steady-state normal operation. The steady-state temperature limits were used as the basis of the off-normal transient analysis to assess the safety performance of the fuel for anticipated, unlikely and extremely unlikely events. If the design criteria for the off-normal events are not satisfied, then the subassembly temperature limit is reduced and an iterative procedure is employed until all design criteria are met

  16. Studies of axial-leakage simulations for homogeneous and heterogeneous EBR-II core configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1985-08-01

    When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, leakage-absorption cross sections are normally used to model leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. Since the neutron flux is axially dependent, the leakages, and hence the leakage-absorption cross sections, are also axially dependent. Therefore, to obtain axial flux profiles (or reaction rates) for individual subassemblies, an XY-geometry calculation delineating each subassembly has to be done at several axial heights with space- and energy-dependent leakage-absorption cross sections that are appropriate for each height. This report discusses homogeneous and heterogeneous XY-geometry calculations at various axial locations and using several differing assumptions for the calculation of the leakage-absorption cross section. The positive (outward) leakage-absorption cross sections are modeled as actual leakage absorptions, but the negative (inward) leakage-absorption cross sections are modeled as either negative leakage absorptions (+-B 2 method) or positive downscatter cross sections [the Σ/sub s/(1 → g) method]. 3 refs., 52 figs., 10 tabs

  17. Initial results for electrochemical dissolution of spent EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S. X.

    1998-01-01

    Initial results are reported for the anode behavior of spent metallic nuclear fuel in an electrorefining process. The anode behavior has been characterized in terms of the initial spent fuel composition and the final composition of the residual cladding hulls. A variety of results have been obtained depending on the experimental conditions. Some of the process variables considered are average and maximum cell voltage, average and maximum anode voltage, amount of electrical charge passed (coulombs or amp-hours) during the experiment, and cell resistance. The main goal of the experiments has been the nearly complete dissolution of uranium with the retention of zirconium and noble metal fission products in the cladding hulls. Analysis has shown that the most indicative parameters for determining an endpoint to the process, recognizing the stated goal, are the maximum anode voltage and the amount of electrical charge passed. For the initial experiments reported here, the best result obtained is greater than 98% uranium dissolution with approximately 50% zirconium retention. Noble metal fission product retention appears to be correlated with zirconium retention

  18. Recent advances during the treatment of spent EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Mariani, R.D.; Vaden, D.E.; Sherman, S.R.; Li, S.X.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Several recent advances have been achieved for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. In anticipation of production operations at Argonne National Laboratory-West, development of both electrorefining and metal processing has been ongoing in the post-demonstration phase in order to further optimize the process. These development activities show considerable promise. This paper discusses the results of recent experiments as well as plans for future investigations

  19. Non-destructive assay of EBR-II blanket elements using resonance transmission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klann, R.T.; Poenitz, W.P.

    1998-01-01

    Resonance transmission analysis utilizing a faltered reactor beam was examined as a means of determining the 239 Pu content in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II depleted uranium blanket elements. The technique uses cadmium and gadolinium falters along with a 239 Pu fission chamber to isolate the 0.3 eV resonance in 239 Pu. In the energy range of this resonance (0.1 eV to 0.5 ev), the total microscopic cross-section of 239 Pu is significantly greater than the cross-sections of 238 U and 235 U. This large difference allows small changes in the 239 Pu content of a sample to result in large changes in the mass signal response. Tests with small stacks of depleted uranium and 239 Pu foils indicate a significant change in response based on the 239 Pu content of the foil stack. In addition, the tests indicate good agreement between the measured and predicted values of 239 Pu up to approximately two weight percent

  20. Procedures and instrumentation for sodium boiling experiments in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The development of instrumentation capable of detecting localized coolant boiling in a liquid metal cooled breeder reactor (LMFBR) has a high priority in fast reactor safety. The detection must be rapid enough to allow corrective action to be taken before significant damage occurs to the core. To develop and test a method of boiling detection, it is desirable to produce boiling in a reactor and thereby introduce a condition in the reactor the original design concepts were chosen to preclude. The proposed boiling experiments are designed to safely produce boiling in the subassembly of a fast reactor and provide the information to develop boiling detection instrumentation without core damage or safety compromise. The experiment consists of the operation of two separate subassemblies, first, a gamma heated boiling subassembly which produces non-typical but highly conservative boiling and then a fission heated subassembly which simulates a prototypical boiling event. The two boiling subassemblies are designed to operate in the instrumentation subassembly test facility (INSAT) of Experiment Breeder Reactor II

  1. Validation of the REBUS-3/RCT methodologies for EBR-II core-follow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    One of the many tasks to be completed at EBR-2/FCF (Fuel Cycle Facility) regarding fuel cycle closure for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is to develop and install the systems to be used for fissile material accountancy and control. The IFR fuel cycle and pyrometallurgical process scheme determine the degree of actinide of actinide buildup in the reload fuel assemblies. Inventories of curium, americium and neptunium in the fuel will affect the radiation and thermal environmental conditions at the fuel fabrication stations, the chemistry of reprocessing, and the neutronic performance of the core. Thus, it is important that validated calculational tools be put in place for accurately determining isotopic mass and neutronic inputs to FCF for both operational and material control and accountancy purposes. The primary goal of this work is to validate the REBUS-2/RCT codes as tools which can adequately compute the burnup and isotopic distribution in binary- and ternary-fueled Mark-3, Mark-4, and Mark-5 subassemblies. 6 refs

  2. Method for the determination of technical specifications limiting temperature in EBR-II operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Hill, D.J.; Ku, J.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The methodology and analysis procedure to qualify the Mark-V and Mark-VA fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II are summarized in this paper. Fuel performance data and design safety criteria are essential for thermal-hydraulic analyses and safety evaluations. Normal and off-normal operation duty cycles and transient classifications are required for the safety assessment of the fuels. Design safety criteria for steady-state normal and transient off-normal operations were developed to ensure structural integrity of the fuel pin. The maximum allowable coolant outlet temperatures and powers of subassemblies for steady-state normal operation conditions were first determined in a row-by-row basis by a thermal-hydraulic and fuel damage analysis, in which a trial-and-error approach was used to predict the maximum subassembly coolant outlet temperatures and powers that satisfy the design safety criteria for steady-state normal operation conditions. The limiting steady-state temperature and power were then used as the initial subassembly thermal conditions for the off-normal transient analysis to assess the safety performance of the fuel pin for anticipated, unlikely and extremely unlikely events. If the design safety criteria for the off-normal events are not satisfied, then the initial steady-state subassembly temperatures and/or powers are reduced and an iterative procedure is employed until the design safety criteria for off-normal conditions are satisfied, and the initial subassembly outlet coolant temperature and power are the technical specification limits for reactor operation. (author)

  3. Surveillance application using patten recognition software at the EBR-II Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The System State Analyzer (SSA) is a software based pattern recognition system. For the past several year this system has been used at Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactor for detection of degradation and other abnormalities in plant systems. Currently there are two versions of the SSA being used at EBR-2. One version of SSA is used for daily surveillance and trending of the reactor delta-T and startups of the reactor. Another version of the SSA is the QSSA which is used to monitor individual systems of the reactor such as the Secondary Sodium System, Secondary Sodium Pumps, and Steam Generator. This system has been able to detect problems such as signals being affected by temperature variations due to a failing temperature controller

  4. EBR-II in-vessel natural circulation experiments on hot and cold pool stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragland, W.A.; Feldman, E.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II is located in a cylindrical pool of liquid sodium which is part of the cold-leg of the primary flow circuit. A vertical string of 32 thermocouples spans the 8 m tank height, at each of two diametrically opposed locations in the primary tank. Local temperatures were measured with these 64 thermocouples during dynamic tests. The instantaneous spacial temperature distribution obtained from a string of thermocouples can be viewed on a personal computer. The animation which results from displaying successive spacial distributions provide a very effective way to quickly obtain physical insights. The design of the two strings of thermocouples, the software used to create the animation, measured data from three different types of tests--two unprotected reactor transients, and one with the reactor at decay power levels and the reactor cover lifted, are discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs

  5. Effect of stress during neutron irradiation on the microstructure of type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.; Guthrie, G.L.

    1976-04-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination was performed on solution annealed and 20 percent cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel specimens stressed during irradiation at 500 0 C in EBR-II. Hoop stress levels ranged from 0 to 327 MN/m 2 (47,300 psi) and fluences between 2.0 and 3.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Data confirm that applied tensile stresses enhance swelling in the solution annealed steel. The number densities of both voids and Frank loops were sensitive to the stress environment. Total swelling in the annealed material increased with stress, but not in direct proportion to the increased void nucleation. While the effect of cold working was to suppress swelling, the nucleation and growth of Frank loops was unaffected by the cold worked microstructure. The individual planar loop densities within any one specimen were quite sensitive to the magnitude of the stress component normal to the loop plane, while the total loop number density was sensitive to a smaller degree of the magnitude of the hydrostatic stress level. The number and size distribution of the loop populations were unaffected by the planar shear stress components, but the mean loop sizes were found to be limited by the probability of loop intersection with dislocations and loops. The stress dependence of void and loop densities allowed determination of the critical nuclei sizes, approximately sixteen vacancies for voids and six atoms for loops. Many observations were made on the probable creep mechanisms. Both dislocation and void microstructures evolved in a consistent stress-dependent manner, giving support to models which predict a coupling of the swelling and irradiation creep phenomena through the stress environment. 13 figures, 3 tables

  6. Examination of Supplemental Driver Training and Online Basic Driver Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This report describes supplemental driver training programs and online basic driver education. It coves supplemental driver training that : focused on knowledge and skills beyond those normally found in traditional driver education delivered in the U...

  7. Evaluating Older Drivers' Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Research has demonstrated that older drivers pose a higher risk of involvement in fatal crashes at intersections than : younger drivers. Age-triggered restrictions are problematic as research shows that the majority of older people : have unimpaired ...

  8. Online driver's license renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Kentucky Department of Vehicle Regulation is exploring the possibility of developing and implementing online : drivers license renewal. The objective of this project was to: 1) evaluate online drivers license and REAL ID renewal : programs ...

  9. Older drivers : a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakamies-Blomqvist, L. Sirén, A. & Davidse, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The proportion of senior citizens (aged 65+) will grow from about 15 per cent in the year 2000 to about 30 per cent in the year 2050. The share of older drivers in the driver population will grow even faster because of increasing licensing rates among the ageing population. Older drivers do not have

  10. Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Efforts. An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandy, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    • ARC-AFR Program is involved in a number of knowledge preservation activities; • Recovery of Information from EBR-II, FFTF, and TREAT is very important; • Recovery of Information from Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and conversion to electronic format; • Organizing some data into electronic databases – EBR-II Plant Testing Data, FFTF Plant Testing Data, TREAT Test Data, SFR Fuels and Materials Irradiation Data, etc.; • Information is being used to support existing U.S. SFR programs along with international programs such as the IAEA CRP EBR-II Safety Benchmark

  11. Swelling and swelling resistance possibilities of austenitic stainless steels in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion reactor helium generation rates in stainless steels are intermediate to those found in EBR-II and HFIR, and swelling in fusion reactors may differ from the fission swelling behavior. Advanced titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels exhibit much better void swelling resistance than AISI 316 under EBR-II (up to approx. 120 dpa) and HFIR (up to approx. 44 dpa) irradiations. The stability of fine titanium carbide (MC) precipitates plays an important role in void swelling resistance for the cold-worked titanium-modified steels irradiated in EBR-II. Futhermore, increased helium generation in these steels can (a) suppress void conversion, (b) suppress radiation-induced solute segregation (RIS), and (c) stabilize fine MC particles, if sufficient bubble nucleation occurs early in the irradation. The combined effects of helium-enhanced MC stability and helium-suppressed RIS suggest better void swelling resistance in these steels for fusion service than under EBR-II irradiation

  12. National Driver Register (NDR) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Information regarding individuals who have had their driver licenses revoked, suspended or otherwise denied for cause, or who have been convicted of certain traffic...

  13. Young novice drivers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    In The Netherlands, young novice drivers (18-24 years of age) show a crash rate that is five times higher than that of experienced drivers (30-59 years of age). The rate of young males is even seven times as high. The main reasons are lack of driving experience and hazardous behaviour typical of

  14. Criteria for driver impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookhuis, K.A.; De Waard, D.; Fairclough, S.H

    2003-01-01

    Most traffic accidents can be attributed to driver impairment, e.g. inattention, fatigue, intoxication, etc. It is now technically feasible to monitor and diagnose driver behaviour with respect to impairment with the aid of a limited number of in-vehicle sensors. However, a valid framework for the

  15. A Simple Wave Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  16. Experimental studies of U-Pu-Zr fast reactor fuel pins in the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Hofman, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept has been under demonstration in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) since February 1985. Irradiation tests of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins to >15 at. pct burnup have demonstrated their viability as driver fuel prototypes in innovative design liquid metal reactors. A number of technically challenging irradiation effects have been observed and are now under study. Microstructural changes in the fuel are dominated early in exposure by grain boundary cavitation and fission gas bubble growth, producing large amounts of swelling. Irradiation creep and swelling of the austenitic (D9) and martensitic (HT-9) candidate cladding alloys have been measured and correlate well with property modeling efforts. Chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding alloys has been characterized to assess the magnitude of cladding wastage during steady-state irradiation. Significant interdiffusion of the uranium and zirconium occurs producing metallurgically distinct zones in the fuel

  17. Measurement of void swelling in thick non-uniformly irradiated 304 stainless steel blocks using nondestructive ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Okita, T.; Isobe, Y.; Etoh, J.; Sagisaka, M.; Matsunaga, T.; Freyer, P.D.; Huang, Y.; Wiezorek, J.M.K.; Porter, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Void swelling is of potential importance in PWR austenitic internals, especially in components that will see higher doses during plant lives beyond 40 years. Proactive surveillance of void swelling is required to identify its emergence before swelling reaches levels that cause high levels of embrittlement and distortion. Non-destructive measurements of ultrasonic velocity can measure swelling at fractions of a percent. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for PWR application we have investigated five blocks of 304 stainless steel that were irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor. These blocks were of hexagonal cross-section, with thickness of about 50 mm and lengths of about 218-245 mm. They were subjected to significant axial and radial gradients in gamma heating, temperature and dpa rate, producing complex internal distributions of swelling, reaching about 3.5% maximum at an off-center mid-core position. Swelling decreases both the density and the elastic moduli, thereby impacting the ultrasonic velocity. Concurrently, carbide precipitates form, producing increases in density and decreases in elastic moduli. Using blocks from both low and high dpa levels it was possible to separate the ultrasonic contributions of voids and carbides. Time-of-flight ultrasonic measurements were used to non-destructively measure the internal distribution of void swelling. These distributions were confirmed using non-destructive profilometry followed by destructive cutting to provide density change and electron microscopy data. It was demonstrated that the four measurement types produce remarkably consistent results. Therefore ultrasonic measurements offer great promise for in-situ surveillance of voids in PWR core internals. (authors)

  18. Estimates of time-dependent fatigue behavior of type 316 stainless steel subject to irradiation damage in fast breeder and fusion power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Liu, K.C.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    Cyclic lives obtained from strain-controlled fatigue tests at 593 0 C of specimens irraidated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II) to a fluence of 1 to 2.63 x 10 26 neutrons (n)/m 2 E > 0.1 MeV) were compared with predictions based on the method of strain-range partitioning. It was demonstrated that, when appropriate tensile and creep-rupture ductilities were employed, reasonably good estimates of the influence of hold periods and irradiation damage on the fully reversed fatigue life of Type 316 stainless steel could be made. After applicability of this method was demonstrated, ductility values for 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in a mixed-spectrum fission reactor were used to estimate fusion reactor first-wall lifetime. The ductility values used were from irradations that simulate the environment of the first wall of a fusion reactor. Neutron wall loadins ranging from 2 to 5 MW/m 2 were used. Results, although conjectural because of the many assumptions, tended to show that 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel could be used as a first-wall material meeting a 7.5 go 8.5 MW-year/m 2 lifetime goal provided the neutron wall loading does not exceed more than about 2 MW/m 2 . These results were obtained for an air environment, ant it is expected that the actual vacuum environment will extend lifetime beyond 10 MW-year/m 2

  19. A comparison of the doppler-broadened positron annihilation spectra of neutron irradiated Al 2O 3 and MgAl 2O 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. L.; Schaffer, J. P.; Cocks, F. H.; Clinard, F. W.; Hurley, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation damage studies of oxides and ceramics have become of increasing importance due to the projected use of these materials in thermonuclear fusion reactors as electronic insulators and first wall materials. In addition these materials are important in RAD waste disposal. As part of a study of the defect structure in radiation damaged ceramics Doppler-broadened positron annihilation spectra have been obtained for a series of single crystal sapphire (α-Al 2O 3) and polycrystal (1:1) and (1:2) magnesium aluminate spinel (MgO·Al 2O 3 and MgO-2Al 2O 3) samples. These samples were irradiated in EBR-II to a fluence of 3 × 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 740°C, and 2 × 10 26 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at ~ 550°C respectively. Positron annihilation spectra lineshapes for the irradiated, annealed, and as-received samples of both materials were compared using S parameter analysis. These calculations were made on deconvoluted gamma ray spectra that were free of any instrumental broadening effects. In this way, absolute S parameter changes could be calculated. The observed changes in the S parameter are consistent with independent volume swelling measurements for both the α-A1 2O 3 and the (1:2) MgAl 2O 4 samples. However, the change in S parameter measured for the (1:1) spinel is contrary to the measured volume change. This apparent anomaly indicates a predominence of interstitial as opposed to vacancy type defects in this material.

  20. Driver behavior in traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Existing traffic analysis and management tools do not model the ability of drivers to recognize their environment and respond to it with behaviors that vary according to the encountered driving situation. The small body of literature on characterizin...

  1. General oilfield driver improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.

    1997-01-01

    The general oilfield driver improvement (GODI) course was discussed. The course is offered to truckers in the oil and gas industry to help reduce accidents and injuries. Oilfield trucking is one of the most accident and injury prone sectors in the Alberta economy. This paper presented Heck's Trucking company's experience in sending its employees on the course. Drivers were taught (1) the National safety code requirements, (2) Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance requirements, (3) occupational health and safety concerns, (4) vehicle dimension and GVW restrictions, (5) hours of service regulations, (6) log book and pre-trip inspection requirements, (7) workplace hazardous material information, and (8) transportation of dangerous goods. Overall, the course was judged to provide excellent training before sending drivers into the field. The employee, the customer, and the company, all stand to benefit from having rigorous and uniform standards for all drivers in the oil and gas industry

  2. Internet driver education study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Incorporating technology through online courses, including drivers education (DE), is the wave of the future for : learning. While many states allow online DE as an accepted method of learning, Wisconsin currently only allows it on a : limited bas...

  3. VD-411 branch driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, N.V.; Karev, A.G.; Mal'tsev, Eh.I.; Morozov, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    The VD-411 branch driver for CAMAC moduli control by the SM-4 computer is described. The driver realizes data exchange with moduli disposed in 28 crates grouped in 4 branches. Data exchange can be carried out either in the program regime or in the regime of direct access to the memory. Fulfilment of 11 block regimes and one program regime is provided for. A possibility of individual programming of exchange methods in block regimes is left for users for organisation of quicker and most flexible data removal from the CAMAC moduli. In the regime of direct access the driver provides data transmission at the size up to 64 Kwords placing it in the computer memory of 2 M byte. High rate of data transmission and the developed system of interruptions ensure efficient utilization of the VD-411 branch driver at data removal from facilities in high energy physics experiments

  4. OLDER DRIVERS AND ADAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild J. DAVIDSE

    2006-01-01

    Next, based on the available literature, relevant ADAS are discussed in terms of their availability, their effects on safety and the willingness of older drivers to use and buy them. One of the conclusions is that only very few of the types of support that are thought to be most beneficial to the safety of older drivers are provided by the ADAS that are currently available.

  5. Acoustic Levitation With One Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Rudnick, I.; Elleman, D. D.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Report discusses acoustic levitation in rectangular chamber using one driver mounted at corner. Placement of driver at corner enables it to couple effectively to acoustic modes along all three axes. Use of single driver reduces cost, complexity and weight of levitation system below those of three driver system.

  6. Characteristics of Chinese Driver Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.

    2014-01-01

    The high growth rate of vehicle ownership and many novel drivers in China determine the special features of Chinese driver behavior. This thesis introduces a comparative study on driver behavior by the analysis of saturation flow at urban intersections, Driver Behavior Questionnaire surveys, focus

  7. High reliability fuel in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhold, R.J.; Leggett, R.D.; Walters, L.C.; Matthews, R.B.

    1986-05-01

    The fuels development program of the United States is described for liquid metal reactors (LMR's). The experience base, status and future potential are discussed for the three systems - oxide, metal and carbide - that have proved to have high reliability. Information is presented showing burnup capability of the oxide fuel system in a large core, e.g., FFTF, to be 150 MWd/kgM with today's technology with the potential for a capability as high as 300 MWd/kgM. Data provided for the metal fuel system show 8 at. % being routinely achieved as the EBR-II driver fuel with good potential for extending this to 15 at. % since special test pins have already exceeded this burnup level. The data included for the carbide fuel system are from pin and assembly irradiations in EBR-II and FFTF, respectively. Burnup to 12 at. % appears readily achievable with burnups to 20 at. % being demonstrated in a few pins. Efforts continue on all three systems with the bulk of the activity on metal and oxide

  8. Schoolbus driver performance can be improved with driver training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and compares the school transport driver performance with that of general motorists. Despite concerns that ... To compare Safe Travel to School Programme driver safety perfor- .... The SA government has recognised the challenges faced with.

  9. SCALE system driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    The SCALE driver was designed to allow implementation of a modular code system consisting of control modules, which determine the calculation path, and functional modules, which perform the basic calculations. The user can either select a control module and have that module determine the execution path, or the user can select functional modules directly by input

  10. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be

  11. Space Age Driver Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Walter W.

    1970-01-01

    Describes experimental Driver and Traffic Safety Education Center--a project involving a five-phase instructional program, a variety of teaching innovations, and a specially-constructed facility which includes a classroom building, multiple car driving range, simulators, communications equipment, and the most recent electronic teaching devices.…

  12. Beginning teenage drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Teen drivers have the highest crash risk of any age group. Per mile traveled, they have the highest involvement rates in all types of crashes, from those involving only property damage to those that are fatal. The problem is worst among 16 year-olds,...

  13. Negativity Bias in Dangerous Drivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chai

    Full Text Available The behavioral and cognitive characteristics of dangerous drivers differ significantly from those of safe drivers. However, differences in emotional information processing have seldom been investigated. Previous studies have revealed that drivers with higher anger/anxiety trait scores are more likely to be involved in crashes and that individuals with higher anger traits exhibit stronger negativity biases when processing emotions compared with control groups. However, researchers have not explored the relationship between emotional information processing and driving behavior. In this study, we examined the emotional information processing differences between dangerous drivers and safe drivers. Thirty-eight non-professional drivers were divided into two groups according to the penalty points that they had accrued for traffic violations: 15 drivers with 6 or more points were included in the dangerous driver group, and 23 drivers with 3 or fewer points were included in the safe driver group. The emotional Stroop task was used to measure negativity biases, and both behavioral and electroencephalograph data were recorded. The behavioral results revealed stronger negativity biases in the dangerous drivers than in the safe drivers. The bias score was correlated with self-reported dangerous driving behavior. Drivers with strong negativity biases reported having been involved in mores crashes compared with the less-biased drivers. The event-related potentials (ERPs revealed that the dangerous drivers exhibited reduced P3 components when responding to negative stimuli, suggesting decreased inhibitory control of information that is task-irrelevant but emotionally salient. The influence of negativity bias provides one possible explanation of the effects of individual differences on dangerous driving behavior and traffic crashes.

  14. Automobile Driver Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enev Miro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s automobiles leverage powerful sensors and embedded computers to optimize efficiency, safety, and driver engagement. However the complexity of possible inferences using in-car sensor data is not well understood. While we do not know of attempts by automotive manufacturers or makers of after-market components (like insurance dongles to violate privacy, a key question we ask is: could they (or their collection and later accidental leaks of data violate a driver’s privacy? In the present study, we experimentally investigate the potential to identify individuals using sensor data snippets of their natural driving behavior. More specifically we record the in-vehicle sensor data on the controllerarea- network (CAN of a typical modern vehicle (popular 2009 sedan as each of 15 participants (a performed a series of maneuvers in an isolated parking lot, and (b drove the vehicle in traffic along a defined ~ 50 mile loop through the Seattle metropolitan area. We then split the data into training and testing sets, train an ensemble of classifiers, and evaluate identification accuracy of test data queries by looking at the highest voted candidate when considering all possible one-vs-one comparisons. Our results indicate that, at least among small sets, drivers are indeed distinguishable using only incar sensors. In particular, we find that it is possible to differentiate our 15 drivers with 100% accuracy when training with all of the available sensors using 90% of driving data from each person. Furthermore, it is possible to reach high identification rates using less than 8 minutes of training data. When more training data is available it is possible to reach very high identification using only a single sensor (e.g., the brake pedal. As an extension, we also demonstrate the feasibility of performing driver identification across multiple days of data collection

  15. Driver feedback mobile APP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriguera Marti, F.; Miralles Miquel, E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper faces the human factor in driving and its consequences for road safety. It presents the concepts behind the development of a smartphone app capable of evaluating drivers’ performance. The app provides feedback to the driver in terms of a grade (between 0 and 10) depending on the aggressiveness and risks taken while driving. These are computed from the cumulative probability distribution function of the jerks (i.e. the time derivative of acceleration), which are measured using the smartphones’ accelerometer. Different driving contexts (e.g. urban, freeway, congestion, etc.) are identified applying cluster analysis to the measurements, and treated independently. Using regression analysis, the aggressiveness indicator is related to the drivers' safety records and to the probability of having an accident, through the standard DBQ - Driving Behavior Questionnaire. Results from a very limited pilot test show a strong correlation between the 99th percentile of the jerk measurements and the DBQ results. A linear model is fitted. This allows quantifying the safe driving behavior only from smartphone measurements. Finally, this indicator is translated into a normalized grade and feedback to the driver. This feedback will challenge the driver to train and to improve his performance. The phone will be blocked while driving and will incorporate mechanisms to prevent bad practices, like competition in aggressive driving. The app is intended to contribute to the improvement of road safety, one of the major public health problems, by tackling the human factor which is the trigger of the vast majority of traffic accidents. Making explicit and quantifying risky behaviors is the first step towards a safer driving. (Author)

  16. Education and driver-training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Justinek

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the driver are manifested in his/her behaviour. For safe driving one must have a driver's knowledge. The contents of educational material are determined by law, and are both theoretical and practical, yet frequently they do not suffice to meet the requirements of safe driving. In this paper, the author suggests that, in the training of drivers, more educational elements should be included, such a would have  an effective influence on the driver's moti ves and attitudes. The driver's motives - which may result in incorrect driving­ are diverse: most often, the default is overspeeding, even though the drivers always over-estimate the potential time gain. In fact, over-fast driving is a way of satisfying other, different needs; and, above all, it is a form of compensation for unsettled life problems, and at the same time an indication of the driver's personal inability to cope with stress.

  17. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  18. CSER 94-014: Storage of metal-fuel loaded EBR-II casks in concrete vault on PFP grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    A criticality safety evaluation is presented to permit EBR-2 spent fuel casks loaded with metallic fuel rods to be stored in an 8-ft diameter, cylindrical concrete vault inside the PFP security perimeter. The specific transfer of three casks with Pu alloy fuel from the Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiment from the burial grounds to the vault is thus covered. Up to seven casks may be emplaced in the casing with 30 inches center to center spacing. Criticality safety is assured by definitive packaging rules which keep the fissile medium dry and at a low effective volumetric density

  19. Effect of a time varying power level in EBR-II on mixed-oxide fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, I.Z.; Jost, J.W.; Baker, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    A refined prediction of burnup of mixed-oxide fuel in EBR-2 is compared with measured data. The calculation utilizes a time-varying power factor and results in a general improvement to previous calculations

  20. Impact properties of 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel after ten years EBR-II service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, J.A.; Server, W.L.; Sheckherd, J.W.; Longua, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    The material studied in this investigation was obtained from a 2 1 / 4 Cr--1 Mo steel superheated steam line which had been in service for approximately 90,000 hours. Of that 90,000 hours, approximately 40,000 hours were at a temperature of approximately 820 0 F and a pressure of 1250 psi, and 35,000 hours were at a temperature of 500 0 F and 1250 psi. The results of optical metallography and instrumented impact testing performed on the materials are presented

  1. Are professional drivers less sleepy than non-professional drivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anund, Anna; Ahlström, Christer; Fors, Carina; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn

    2018-01-01

    Objective It is generally believed that professional drivers can manage quite severe fatigue before routine driving performance is affected. In addition, there are results indicating that professional drivers can adapt to prolonged night shifts and may be able to learn to drive without decreased performance under high levels of sleepiness. However, very little research has been conducted to compare professionals and non-professionals when controlling for time driven and time of day. Method The aim of this study was to use a driving simulator to investigate whether professional drivers are more resistant to sleep deprivation than non-professional drivers. Differences in the development of sleepiness (self-reported, physiological and behavioral) during driving was investigated in 11 young professional and 15 non-professional drivers. Results Professional drivers self-reported significantly lower sleepiness while driving a simulator than non-professional drivers. In contradiction, they showed longer blink durations and more line crossings, both of which are indicators of sleepiness. They also drove faster. The reason for the discrepancy in the relation between the different sleepiness indicators for the two groups could be due to more experience to sleepiness among the professional drivers or possibly to the faster speed, which might unconsciously have been used by the professionals to try to counteract sleepiness. Conclusion Professional drivers self-reported significantly lower sleepiness while driving a simulator than non-professional drivers. However, they showed longer blink durations and more line crossings, both of which are indicators of sleepiness, and they drove faster.

  2. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  3. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  4. Heavy ion driver technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1988-09-01

    Major differences between fusion drivers and traditional accelerators include the following. The final beam current needed (/approximately/20 kA in a short pulse) is very much larger for a driver; such beams are dominated by repulsive space-charge effects since, even at 10 GeV, the ions are non-relativistic (v/c = 0.3). Also, the optical quality of the beams (called emittance by accelerator people) must be extremely good to ensure a suitably small focal spot at the pellet. Two schemes, one with a rf linac and storage rings, the other with a single-pass current-amplifying induction linac, are under study, the latter exclusively in the US. The induction linac approach lends itself to an examination in a sequence of scaled-down laboratory experiments since the most difficulties are expected to occur at the low energy end. Experiments and simulation have centered on a study of the transverse and longitudinal control of space-charge-dominated beams which are best described in terms of a non-neutral plasma rather than the traditional single-particle dynamics picture. An understanding of the high-current instability limits is required for arriving at a safe driver design. The final on-target beam current is so high that it must be carried in 16 separate focusing channels leading into the combustion chamber. While the energy deposition of the ions is expected to be entirely classical, there is a wealth of plasma physics phenomena to be explored (by theory and simulation) in the final propagation of these beams through the low-density gas in the chamber and in the environment of the hot target; it is important that none of these could result in a significant portion of the beam missing the focal spot. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  5. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2010-01-31

    reactors. FEAST-METAL was benchmarked against the open-literature EBR-II database for steady state and furnace tests (transients). The results show that the code is able to predict important phenomena such as clad strain, fission gas release, clad wastage, clad failure time, axial fuel slug deformation and fuel constituent redistribution, satisfactorily.

  6. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    . FEAST-METAL was benchmarked against the open-literature EBR-II database for steady state and furnace tests (transients). The results show that the code is able to predict important phenomena such as clad strain, fission gas release, clad wastage, clad failure time, axial fuel slug deformation and fuel constituent redistribution, satisfactorily.

  7. Drivers for Welfare Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Innovation has become a key goal towards which teaching and workplace learning needs to be directed. Now perceived as germane and even necessary in almost all kinds of welfare work, the innovation potential in everyday practices and ways of allowing for employer creativity have become a highly...... on the empirical material, the paper proposes a ‘driver’ model for context sensitive research of innovation in welfare workplaces. The model involves three elements which can be regarded as drivers for innovation: i) craft (i.e. professional skills and knowledge), ii) levers (i.e. experiments and adjustment...

  8. Driver Distraction in Public Transport

    OpenAIRE

    YOUNG, K; SALMON, P; REGAN MICHAEL, M

    2007-01-01

    There is converging evidence that driver distraction is a contributing factor in car crashes, in Australia and overseas. Surprisingly, no known previous research has attempted to identify and assess the potentially distracting activities undertaken by the drivers of public passenger vehicles. This paper describes research undertaken on this issue. The research was partitioned into three phases: an analysis of the functions and tasks currently undertaken by public passenger vehicle drivers; th...

  9. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.

    2012-01-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS)...

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  11. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  13. Data package addendum for COBRA-1A2 life extension to 400 EFPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, S.L.; Ermi, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The COBRA-1A experiment was originally designed for irradiations up to 350 effective full power days (EFPD) in EBR-II. Three of the seven B7A test capsules were discharged after 88.6 EFPD (COBRA-1A1; EBR-II designation X516), while the remaining four capsules continued to be irradiated to a goal exposure of 300 EFPD (COBRA-1A2; EBR-II designation X516A). However, it was recently decided that COBRA-1A2 was to remain in the reactor during Run 170, giving and nominal end-of-life (EOL) exposure of 375 EFPD. Since the revised test exposure exceeds the design basis given in supporting analyses, amended analyses are provided herein, giving the technical bases for the extended irradiation. This report describes the safety analysis for the extension of the COBRA-1A2 test (X516A) to 400 effective full power days in FBR-II

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  15. Pollen and spores as biological recorders of past ultraviolet irradiance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jardine, P.E.; Fraser, W.T.; Lomax, B.H.; Sephton, M.A.; Shanahan, T.M.; Miller, C.S.; Gosling, W.D.

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance is a key driver of climatic and biotic change. Ultraviolet irradiance modulates stratospheric warming and ozone production, and influences the biosphere from ecosystem-level processes through to the largest scale patterns of diversification and extinction. Yet our

  16. Driver training in steps (DTS).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    For some years now, it has been possible in the Netherlands to follow a Driver Training in Steps (DTS) as well as the regular driver training. The DTS is a structured training method with clear training objectives which are categorized in four modules. Although the DTS is considerably better than

  17. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  19. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  20. Petrochemical industry drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedriks, W.

    1995-01-01

    Extensive analyses of profit-ability and pricing over the years have shown that the trends seen in the petrochemical industry have two dominant drivers, namely, industry experience curves (reflecting continuous process improvement and cost savings) and profitability cycles. Any outlook for the future must examine both of these facets. The author's algorithm for price projections has two primary terms: a cost-related one and a supply/demand-related one. Both are strong functions of experience curves; the latter is also a prime function of cyclicality. At SRI International. To arrive at medium-term quantitative projections, SRI typically creates a consistent base-case scenario that more or less mirrors the past but also incorporates observed directional changes. In this article the author examines in detail how these scenarios are used for projection. He describes experience curves, ethylene/gross domestic product (GDP) penetration levels, industry structure, and cyclicality as they apply to ethylene prices

  1. Drivers of Collaborative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Gudrid

    processes and behavioural dimensions is practically non-existent. This article tries to remedy the current gap in the literature by reviewing research findings on interfirm collaboration (alliances). On that basis a conceptual framework for analyzing partnership processes is developed. Finally......, the antecedents of collaborative advantage are theoretically examined, and the organizational competences contributing to collaborative success are identified. The conclusion is that operational processes and social dynamics are vital drivers of collaborative advantage. Another significant conclusion...... is that public management research can benefit from drawing upon existing alliance research. Alliance scholars have during the past couple of decades accumulated an impressive amount of knowledge on different aspects of inter-firm cooperation, and therefore the learning potential for public management scholars...

  2. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleasance, L.D.

    1979-11-01

    One objective of research on inertial confinement fusion is the development of a power generating system based on this concept. Realization of this goal will depend on the availability of a suitable laser or other system to drive the power plant. The primary laser systems used for laser fusion research, Nd 3+ : Glass and CO 2 , have characteristics which may preclude their use for this application. Glass lasers are presently perceived to be incapable of sufficiently high average power operation and the CO 2 laser may be limited by and issues associated with target coupling. These general perceptions have encouraged a search for alternatives to the present systems. The search for new lasers has been directed generally towards shorter wavelengths; most of the new lasers discovered in the past few years have been in the visible and ultraviolet region of the spectrum. Virtually all of them have been advocated as the most promising candidate for a fusion driver at one time or another

  3. A holistic perspective on corporate sustainability drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since company boards are increasingly discussing 'sustainability', it becomes necessary to examine the nature of sustainability drivers. Most approaches to corporate sustainability drivers have focused either on internal or external drivers. This paper is aimed at providing a more holistic

  4. A holistic perspective on corporate sustainability drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, Rodrigo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/36412380X

    2015-01-01

    Since company boards are increasingly discussing 'sustainability', it becomes necessary to examine the nature of sustainability drivers. Most approaches to corporate sustainability drivers have focused either on internal or external drivers. This paper is aimed at providing a more holistic

  5. Heavy-ion driver design and scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, R.; Monsler, M.; Meier, W.; Stewart, L.

    1992-01-01

    Parametric models for scaling heavy-ion driver designs are described. Scaling of target performance and driver cost is done for driver parameters including driver energy, number of beams, type of superconductor used in focusing magnets, maximum magnetic field allowed at the superconducting windings, linear quadrupole array packing fraction mass, and ion charge state. The cumulative accelerator voltage and beam currents are determined from the Maschke limits on beam current for each choice of driver energy and post-acceleration pulse duration. The heavy-ion driver is optimized over the large available driver parameter space. Parametric studies and the choice of a base driver model are described in a companion paper

  6. Correlation of creep and swelling with fuel pin performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Washburn, D.F.; Garner, F.A.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1975-09-01

    The HEDL PNL-11 experiment described was one in a series of fueled subassemblies irradiated in EBR-II to demonstrate the adequacy of the FFTF fuel pin design. The cladding material, dimensions, and fuel density are prototypic of FFTF. Because neutron flux in EBR-II is lower than in FFTF, the uranium enrichment is higher in these experimental fuel pins, irradiated in EBR-II, than the FFTF enrichment for comparable linear heat rates. Some pertinent oprating conditions for the center fuel pin in this experiment are listed. This 37-pin subassembly represents, at 110,000 MWd/MTM, the highest burnup yet attained by a prototypic FFTF subassembly. Similarly, this is the highest fluence presently attained by prototypic fuel pins. A cladding breach occurred in one fuel pin which is presently being examined. Results are presented and discussed

  7. Schoolbus driver performance can be improved with driver training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Safe Travel to School Programme was recently implemented by a national child safety agency, with a focus on driver road safety awareness, defensive ... of a vehicle telematics tracking system with regular, individual driving behaviour ...

  8. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  9. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  10. Alcohol and older drivers' crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Researchers have examined the effects of alcohol consumption : on older adults functioning, and some have : addressed alcohols effects on older drivers crash risk. : Generally, the findings have shown that alcohol is less : likely to be a fa...

  11. Research on driver fatigue detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Zhong; Ouyang, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Driver fatigue is one of the main causes of frequent traffic accidents. In this case, driver fatigue detection system has very important significance in avoiding traffic accidents. This paper presents a real-time method based on fusion of multiple facial features, including eye closure, yawn and head movement. The eye state is classified as being open or closed by a linear SVM classifier trained using HOG features of the detected eye. The mouth state is determined according to the width-height ratio of the mouth. The head movement is detected by head pitch angle calculated by facial landmark. The driver's fatigue state can be reasoned by the model trained by above features. According to experimental results, drive fatigue detection obtains an excellent performance. It indicates that the developed method is valuable for the application of avoiding traffic accidents caused by driver's fatigue.

  12. Teen driver cell phone blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This study was a randomized control intervention to measure the effectiveness of a cellular phone control device : that communicates with the vehicles of teen drivers to deny them access to their phone while driving for the : purpose of reducing dist...

  13. Consequences of metallic fuel-cladding liquid phase attack during over-temperature transient on fuel element lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II at temperatures significantly higher than design, causing liquid phase attack of the cladding, were subsequently irradiated at normal operating temperatures to first breach. The fuel element lifetime was compared to that for elements not subjected to the over-temperature transient and found to be equivalent. 1 ref., 3 figs

  14. Fabrication of ThO2, UO2, and PuO2-UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Jentzen, W.R.; McCord, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Fabrication of ThO pellets for EBR-II irradiation testing and fabrication of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets for United Kingdom Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) irradiation testing is discussed. Effect of process parameters on density and microstructure of pellets fabricated by the cold press and sinter technique is reviewed

  15. Repetitive 1 Hz fast-heating fusion driver HAMA pumped by diode pumped solid state laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Takashi; Komeda, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    We describe a repetitive fast-heating fusion driver called HAMA pumped by Diode Pumped Solid State Laser (DPSSL) to realize the counter irradiation of sequential implosion and heating laser beams. HAMA was designed to activate DPSSL for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and to realize a unified ICF machine for power plants. The details of a four-beam alignment scheme and the results of the counter irradiation of stainless plates are shown. (author)

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  17. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  18. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  19. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  1. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  2. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  3. Advancing the integration of spatial data to map human and natural drivers on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gove, Jamison M.; Walecka, Hilary R.; Donovan, Mary K.; Williams, Gareth J.; Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste; Crowder, Larry B.; Erickson, Ashley; Falinski, Kim; Friedlander, Alan M.; Kappel, Carrie V.; Kittinger, John N.; McCoy, Kaylyn; Norström, Albert; Nyström, Magnus; Oleson, Kirsten L. L.; Stamoulis, Kostantinos A.; White, Crow; Selkoe, Kimberly A.

    2018-01-01

    A major challenge for coral reef conservation and management is understanding how a wide range of interacting human and natural drivers cumulatively impact and shape these ecosystems. Despite the importance of understanding these interactions, a methodological framework to synthesize spatially explicit data of such drivers is lacking. To fill this gap, we established a transferable data synthesis methodology to integrate spatial data on environmental and anthropogenic drivers of coral reefs, and applied this methodology to a case study location–the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). Environmental drivers were derived from time series (2002–2013) of climatological ranges and anomalies of remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll-a, irradiance, and wave power. Anthropogenic drivers were characterized using empirically derived and modeled datasets of spatial fisheries catch, sedimentation, nutrient input, new development, habitat modification, and invasive species. Within our case study system, resulting driver maps showed high spatial heterogeneity across the MHI, with anthropogenic drivers generally greatest and most widespread on O‘ahu, where 70% of the state’s population resides, while sedimentation and nutrients were dominant in less populated islands. Together, the spatial integration of environmental and anthropogenic driver data described here provides a first-ever synthetic approach to visualize how the drivers of coral reef state vary in space and demonstrates a methodological framework for implementation of this approach in other regions of the world. By quantifying and synthesizing spatial drivers of change on coral reefs, we provide an avenue for further research to understand how drivers determine reef diversity and resilience, which can ultimately inform policies to protect coral reefs. PMID:29494613

  4. Driver style and driver skills – clustering drivers differing in their potential danger in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) and the Driver Skill Inventory (DSI) are two of the most frequently used measures of driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to test drivers’ insight into their own driving ability based on a combined use of the DBQ......, annual mileage and accident involvement. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. The results suggested that the drivers have good insight into their own driving ability, as the driving skill level mirrored the frequency of aberrant driving behaviors. K-means cluster analysis revealed four...... distinct clusters that differed in the frequency of aberrant driving behavior and driving skills, as well as individual characteristics and driving related factors such as annual mileage, accident frequency and number of tickets and fines. Thus, two sub-groups were identified as more unsafe than the two...

  5. Locomotor diseases among male long-haul truck drivers and other professional drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Kaerlev, Linda; Tüchsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    -249) and for other truck drivers (SHR: 130, 95% CI: 108-156) compared to bus drivers (SHR: 110, 95% CI: 79-149). All drivers had high SHR for lesions of the ulnar nerve (SHR: 159, 95% CI: 119-207), especially bus drivers (SHR: 197, 95% CI: 116-311). Long-haul truck drivers had high SHRs for synovitis and bursitis...

  6. IFE Power Plant design principles. Drivers. Solid state laser drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, S.; Andre, M.; Krupke, W.F.; Mak, A.A.; Soures, J.M.; Yamanaka, M.

    1995-01-01

    The present status of solid state laser drivers for an inertial confinement thermonuclear fusion power plant is discussed. In particular, the feasibility of laser diode pumped solid state laser drivers from both the technical and economic points of view is briefly reviewed. Conceptual design studies showed that they can, in principle, satisfy the design requirements. However, development of new solid state materials with long fluorescence lifetimes and good thermal characteristics is a key issue for laser diode pumped solid state lasers. With the advent of laser diode pumping many materials which were abandoned in the past can presently be reconsidered as viable candidates. It is also concluded that it is important to examine the technical requirements for solid state lasers in relation to target performance criteria. The progress of laser diode pumped lasers in industrial applications should also be closely watched to provide additional information on the economic feasibility of this type of driver. 15 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, M.

    1989-01-01

    This popular-level article emphasizes that the ultimate health effects of irradiated food products are unknown. They may include vitamin loss, contamination of food by botulism bacteria, mutations in bacteria, increased production of aflatoxins, changes in food, carcinogenesis from unknown causes, presence of miscellaneous harmful chemicals, and the lack of a way of for a consumer to detect irradiated food. It is claimed that the nuclear industry is applying pressure on the Canadian government to relax labeling requirements on packages of irradiated food in order to find a market for its otherwise unnecessary products

  8. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecher, O.

    1979-01-01

    Limitations of existing preserving methods and possibilities of improved food preservation by application of nuclear energy are explained. The latest state-of-the-art in irradiation technology in individual countries is described and corresponding recommendations of FAO, WHO and IAEA specialists are presented. The Sulzer irradiation equipment for potato sprout blocking is described, the same equipment being suitable also for the treatment of onions, garlic, rice, maize and other cereals. Systems with a higher power degree are needed for fodder preserving irradiation. (author)

  9. Rekindled interest in pyrometallurgical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.

    1986-01-01

    The IFR with its integral, on-site fuel recycle revived a concept pioneered at EBR-II. The reactor concept has become very attractive due to the advances in metal fuel performance over the past 15 years and in the understanding of the safety of metal-fueled reactors. The proposed fuel cycle carries out Lawroski's call for development of a low-cost fuel cycle for fast reactors to help them become economically competitive. The IFR represents a new direction in breeder developments. The next two years will be devoted to establishing experimentally the chemical feasibility of the pyrometallurgical process. Once it becomes feasible, the EBR-II fuel cycle facility can be refurbished and the process using IFR-type fuel irradiated in EBR-II

  10. Sexual behavior among truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajiv Kumar; Joshi, Hari Shankar

    2012-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on Lucknow highway in Bareilly district of Uttar Pradesh to study the knowledge of truck drivers about HIV transmission and prevention and to study the sexual behaviour of these drivers with reference to HIV/AIDS. Age, marital status, education, income, drinking alcohol, length of stay away from home, knowledge about transmission and prevention of HIV, and HIV-prone behavior of truck drivers were studied. Chi-square, mean, and SD were calculated. In all, 289 (97.6%) drivers had heard about HIV/AIDS. Only 242 (81.8%) were aware of HIV transmission by heterosexual route. Misconceptions such as HIV transmission by mosquito bites, living in same room, shaking hands, and sharing food were found. Out of 174 (58.8%) who visited Commercial Sex Workers (CSW), 146 (83.9%) used a condom. 38 (12.8%) visited more than 5 CSW in the last 3 months. Time away from home on the road, marital status, alcohol use, and income class were associated with visiting CSW. High-risk behavior was established in the study population. Safe sex and use of condoms need to be promoted among the truck drivers and better condom availability needs to be assured on highways.

  11. Examination of supplemental driver training and online basic driver education courses : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The first six months of unsupervised driving are the most : hazardous in a novice drivers driving experience. Most : States adopted graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems : to give novice drivers experience in a protective environment, : gradual...

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  14. Observations of in-reactor endurance and rupture life for fueled and unfueled FTR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, A.J.; Christensen, B.Y.; Chin, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor component endurance limits are important to nuclear experimenters and operators. This paper investigates endurance limits of 316 CW fuel pin cladding. The objective of this paper is to compare and analyze two different sets of FTR fuel pin cladding data. The first data set is from unfueled pressurized cladding irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II). This data set was generated in an assembly in which the temperature was monitored and controlled. The second data set contains observations of breached and unbreached EBR-II test fuel pins covering a large range of temperature, power and burnup conditions

  15. Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  16. A proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps -- a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  17. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  18. Key drivers of airline loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty.

  19. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  20. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  2. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  3. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E [Livermore, CA; Pratt, Garth C [Discovery Bay, CA; Haugen, Peter C [Livermore, CA; Zumstein, James M [Livermore, CA; Vigars, Mark L [Livermore, CA; Romero, Carlos E [Livermore, CA

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  4. Drivers and Limits for Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Buus; Nielsen, Thomas A. Sick; Gudmundsson, Henrik

    This report summarizes key outcomes of the study ’Drivers and Limits’ that was supported for the period 2009-2013 by a research grant from the Danish Strategic Research Council. The project investigated - for the empirical context of Denmark - key driving forces behind transport growth, as well...

  5. Modeling taxi driver anticipatory behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, Zhong; Rasouli, S.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2018-01-01

    As part of a wider behavioral agent-based model that simulates taxi drivers’ dynamic passenger-finding behavior under uncertainty, we present a model of strategic behavior of taxi drivers in anticipation of substantial time varying demand at locations such as airports and major train stations. The

  6. Driver Psychology during Automated Platooning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikoop, D.D.

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in vehicle automation technology, the call for understanding how humans behave while driving in an automated vehicle becomes more urgent. Vehicles that have automated systems such as Lane Keeping Assist (LKA) or Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) not only support drivers in their

  7. Nonmagnetic driver for piezoelectric actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekhtiari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    actuator drive is the only form-fit continuous drive solution currently available for the development of high performance nonmagnetic motors. In this research focus will be on the non magnetic compact high efficiency driver for the piezo actuators and on employing energy recovery from the capacitive...

  8. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  9. Free electron laser as a fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, D.; Schlitt, L.

    1981-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) is shown to be a potentially attractive solution to the problem of finding a suitable short wavelength fusion driver. The design of a 3 MJ, 250 nm FEL fusion driver is discussed

  10. Anthropogenic Drivers of Ecosystem Change: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald C. Nelson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of what the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA calls "indirect and direct drivers" of change in ecosystem services at a global level. The MA definition of a driver is any natural or human-induced factor that directly or indirectly causes a change in an ecosystem. A direct driver unequivocally influences ecosystem processes. An indirect driver operates more diffusely by altering one or more direct drivers. Global driving forces are categorized as demographic, economic, sociopolitical, cultural and religious, scientific and technological, and physical and biological. Drivers in all categories other than physical and biological are considered indirect. Important direct drivers include changes in climate, plant nutrient use, land conversion, and diseases and invasive species. This paper does not discuss natural drivers such as climate variability, extreme weather events, or volcanic eruptions.

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beishon, J.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation has been the subject of concern and controversy for many years. The advantages of food irradiation include the reduction or elimination of dangerous bacterial organisms, the control of pests and insects which destroy certain foods, the extension of the shelf-life of many products, for example fruit, and its ability to treat products such as seafood which may be eaten raw. It can also replace existing methods of treatment which are believed to have hazardous side-effects. However, after examining the evidence produced by the proponents of food irradiation, the author questions whether it has any major contribution to make to the problems of foodborne diseases or world food shortages. More acceptable solutions, he suggests, may be found in educating food handlers to ensure that hygienic conditions prevail in the production, storage and serving of food. (author)

  12. Vinca irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, R.

    1976-10-01

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool [fr

  13. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  14. 49 CFR 396.13 - Driver inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.13 Driver inspection. Before driving a motor vehicle, the driver shall: (a) Be satisfied that the motor vehicle is in safe operating condition; (b) Review the last driver vehicle inspection...

  15. School Bus Accidents and Driver Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Judith

    The study examines the rates and types of school bus accidents according to the age of the school bus driver. Accident rates in North Carolina for the school year 1971-72 were analyzed using three sources of data: accident reports, driver and mileage data, and questionnaires administered to a sample of school bus drivers. Data were obtained on…

  16. among Taxi Drivers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Long years of driving [AOR =4.6 (95%CI, 1.6-12.9)], involvement in a similar activity prior to becoming taxi driver .... full time taxi driver; produce a valid driving license; .... Self-employee .... professional car drivers in Dhaka city, Bangladesh.

  17. HANARO fuel irradiation test (II): revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, D. S.; Kim, H.; Chae, H. T.; Lee, C. S.; Kim, B. G.; Lee, C. B

    2001-04-01

    In order to fulfill the requirement to prove HANARO fuel integrity when irradiated at a power greater than 112.8 kW/m, which was imposed during HANARO licensing, and to verify the irradiation performance of HANARO fuel, the in-pile irradiation test of HANARO fuel has been performed. Two types of test fuel, the un-instrumented Type A fuel for higher burnup irradiation in shorter period than the driver fuel and the instrumented Type B fuel for higher linear heat rate and precise measurement of irradiation conditions, have been designed and fabricated. The test fuel assemblies were irradiated in HANARO. The two Type A fuel assemblies were intended to be irradiated to medium and high burnup and have been discharged after 69.9 at% and 85.5 at% peak burnup, respectively. Type B fuel assembly was intended to be irradiated at high power with different instrumentations and achieved a maximum power higher than 120 kW/m without losing its integrity and without showing any irregular behavior. The Type A fuel assemblies were cooled for about 6 months and transported to the IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility) for consequent evaluation. Detailed non-destructive and destructive PIE (Post-Irradiation Examination), such as the measurement of burnup distribution, fuel swelling, clad corrosion, dimensional changes, fuel rod bending strength, micro-structure, etc., has been performed. The measured results have been analysed/compared with the predicted performance values and the design criteria. It has been verified that HANARO fuel maintains proper in-pile performance and integrity even at the high power of 120 kw/m up to the high burnup of 85 at%. This report is the revision of KAERI/TR-1816/2001 on the irradiation test for HANARO fuel.

  18. Design fix for vibration-induced wear in fuel pin bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naas, D.F.; Heck, E.N.

    1976-01-01

    In summary, results at 45,000 MWd/MTM burnup from the FFTF mixed oxide fuel pin irradiation tests in EBR-II show that reduction of the initial fuel pin bundle clearance and use of 20 percent cold-worked stainless steel ducts virtually eliminate vibration and wear observed in an initial series of 61-pin tests

  19. Breached-pin testing in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahagin, D.E.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1981-04-01

    Experience gained at EBR-II by the late 1970's from a significant number of failures in experimental fuel-pin irradiations forms the basis of a program directed towards the characterization of breached pins. The questions to be answered and the issues raised by further testing are discussed

  20. Microstructure characterizaton of advanced oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Gerber, E.W.; McCord, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Preirradiation porosity, grain size, and microcomposition characteristics are presented for selected advanced oxide (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) LMFBR developmental fuels fabricated for irradiation testing in EBR-II. Quantitative microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and a recently developed quantitative autoradiographic technique are utilized to relate microstructure characteristics to fabrication parameters

  1. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  2. Irradiation tests report of the 32nd cycle in 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the operating and irradiation data of the experimental reactor 'JOYO' 32nd cycle, and estimates the 33rd cycle irradiation condition. Irradiation tests in the 31st cycle are as follows: (1) B-type irradiation rig (B9). (a) High burn up performance tests of MONJU' fuel pins, advanced austenitic steel cladding fuel pins, large diameter fuel pins, ferrite steel cladding fuel pins (in collaboration with the USA) and large diameter annular pellet fuel pins. (b) Mixed carbide and nitride fuel pins irradiation tests (in collaboration with JAERI). (2) C-type irradiation rig (C4F). (a) High burn up performance test of advanced austenitic steel cladding fuel pins (in collaboration with France). (3) C-type irradiation rig (C6D). (a) Large diameter fuel pins irradiation test. (4) Absorber Materials Irradiation Rig (AMIR-6). (a) Run to absorber pin's cladding breach. (5) Absorber Materials Irradiation Rig (AMIR-8). (a) High-temperature shroud and Na-bond elements tests. (6) Core Materials Irradiation Rig (CMIR-5-1). (a) Core materials irradiation tests. (7) Structure Materials Irradiation Rigs (SMIR). (a) Material irradiation tests (in collaboration with universities). (b) Surveillance back up tests for MONJU'. (8) MAterial testing RIg with temperature COntrol (MARICO-1). (a) Material irradiation tests (in collaboration with universities), (b) Creep rupture tests of the core materials for the demonstration reactor. (9) Upper core structure irradiation Plug Rig (UPR-1-5). (a) Upper core neutron spectrum effect and accelerated irradiation effect. The maximum burn-up driver assembly 'PFD503' reached 65,600 MWd/t (pin average). (author)

  3. Fish irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Tengumnuay, C.; Juangbhanich, C.

    1970-01-01

    Chub-mackerel was chosen for the study because they are the most common fish in Thailand. Preliminary investigations were conducted to determine the maximum radiation dose of gamma-rays by organoleptic tests. The samples were subjected to radiation at various doses up to 4 Mrad. Many experiments were conducted using other kinds of fish. The results showed that 1 Mrad would be the maximum acceptable dose for fish. Later, the influence of the radiation dose from 0.1-1 Mrad was studied in order to find the optimum acceptable dose for preservation of fish without off-flavour. For this purpose, the Hedonic scale was used. It was found that 0.2 and 0.5 Mrad gave the best result on Chub mackerel. The determinations of optimum dose, organoleptic, microbiological and trimethylamine content changes were done. The results showed that Chub mackerel irradiated at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 Mrad stored at 3 0 C for 71 days were still acceptable, on the contrary the untreated samples were found unacceptable at 14 days. The trimethylamine increment was significantly higher in the untreated samples. At 15 days storage, trimethylamine in the non-irradiated Chub-mackerel was about 10 times higher than the irradiated ones. At 51 and 79 days storage, about 13 times higher in the control samples than the irradiated samples except 0.1 Mrad. Only 2 times higher was found for the 0.1 Mrad. The microbiological results showed that the irradiation above 0.2 Mrad gave favorable extension of shelf-life of fish

  4. Factors Contributing to Crashes among Young Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndel J. Bates

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Young drivers are the group of drivers most likely to crash. There are a number of factors that contribute to the high crash risk experienced by these drivers. While some of these factors are intrinsic to the young driver, such as their age, gender or driving skill, others relate to social factors and when and how often they drive. This article reviews the factors that affect the risk of young drivers crashing to enable a fuller understanding of why this risk is so high in order to assist in developing effective countermeasures.

  5. Visualization drivers for Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretvas, Andy

    2005-01-01

    This document is on Geant 4 visualization tools (drivers), evaluating pros and cons of each option, including recommendations on which tools to support at Fermilab for different applications. Four visualization drivers are evaluated. They re OpenGL, HepRep, DAWN and VRML. They all have good features, OpenGL provides graphic output with out an intermediate file. HepRep provides menus to assist the user. DAWN provides high quality plots and even for large files produces output quickly. VRML uses the smallest disk space for intermediate files. Large experiments at Fermilab will want to write their own display. They should proceed to make this display graphics independent. Medium experiment will probably want to use HepRep because of it's menu support. Smaller scale experiments will want to use OpenGL in the spirit of having immediate response, good quality output and keeping things simple

  6. Chapter 2: Irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 2 presents the subjects: 1) gamma irradiators which includes: Category-I gamma irradiators (self-contained); Category-II gamma irradiators (panoramic and dry storage); Category-III gamma irradiators (self-contained in water); Category-IV gamma irradiators (panoramic and wet storage); source rack for Category-IV gamma irradiators; product transport system for Category-IV gamma irradiators; radiation shield for gamma irradiators; 2) accelerators which includes: Category-I Accelerators (shielded irradiator); Category-II Accelerators (irradiator inside a shielded room); Irradiation application examples.

  7. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  8. Driver competence performance indicators using OTMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan EL Rashidy, R.A.

    2016-07-01

    The current practice for assessing driver competence performance is in-cab riding by driver managers. However, this paper investigates whether real-world driving data extracted from on-train monitoring recorders data (OTMR) can be used to assess the driver performance. A number of indicators were used to evaluate the drivers’ performance. These include: their use of the emergency bypass switch, the driver's reminder appliance as well as the driver’s reaction time. A study case illustrated the applicability of OTMR data to estimate the proposed indicators, which suggests that the indicators can be useful in the driver management system in addition to the current indicators. Furthermore, the proposed indicators could be used to tailor the driver training schemes up to their individual needs and evaluate their effectiveness. They could even be used for improving driver competence performance and reducing crash involvement by revealing potentially detrimental driving performance. (Author)

  9. Food irradiation: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Rosanna M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  10. Driving fatigue in professional drivers: a survey of truck and taxi drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanxing; Li, Shuling; Cao, Lingzhi; Li, Musen; Peng, Qijia; Wang, Chunhui; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue among truck drivers has been studied extensively; however, less is known regarding the fatigue experience of taxi drivers in heavily populated metropolitan areas. This study aimed to compare the differences and similarities between truck and taxi driver fatigue to provide implications for the fatigue management and education of professional drivers. A sample of 274 truck drivers and 286 taxi drivers in Beijing was surveyed via a questionnaire, which included items regarding work characteristics, fatigue experience, accident information, attitude toward fatigue, and methods of counteracting fatigue. Driver fatigue was prevalent among professional drivers, and it was even more serious for taxi drivers. Taxi drivers reported more frequent fatigue experiences and were involved in more accidents. Among the contributing factors to fatigue, prolonged driving time was the most important factor identified by both driver groups. Importantly, the reason for the engagement in prolonged driving was neither due to the lack of awareness concerning the serious outcome of fatigue driving nor because of their poor detection of fatigue. The most probable reason was the optimism bias, as a result of which these professional drivers thought that fatigue was more serious for other drivers than for themselves, and they thought that they were effective in counteracting the effect of fatigue on their driving performance. Moreover, truck drivers tended to employ methods that require stopping to counteract fatigue, whereas taxi drivers preferred methods that were simultaneous with driving. Although both driver groups considered taking a nap as one of the most effective means to address fatigue, this method was not commonly used. Interestingly, these drivers were aware that the methods they frequently used were not the most effective means to counteract fatigue. This study provides knowledge on truck and taxi drivers' characteristics in fatigue experience, fatigue attitude, and

  11. Experimental Research in Boost Driver with EDLCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    The supply used in servo systems tends to have a high voltage in order to reduce loss and improve the response of motor drives. We propose a new boost motor driver that comprises EDLCs. The proposed driver has a simple structure, wherein the EDLCs are connected in series to the supply, and comprises a charge circuit to charge the EDLCs. The proposed driver has three advantages over conventional boost drivers. The first advantage is that the driver can easily attain the stable boost voltage. The second advantage is that the driver can reduce input power peaks. In a servo system, the input power peaks become greater than the rated power in order to accelerate the motor rapidly. This implies that the equipments that supply power to servo systems must have sufficient power capacity to satisfy the power peaks. The proposed driver can suppress the increase of the power capacity of supply facilities. The third advantage is that the driver can store almost all of the regenerative energy. Conventional drivers have a braking resistor to suppress the increase in the DC link voltage. This causes a considerable reduction in the efficiency. The proposed driver is more efficient than conventional drivers. In this study, the experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed driver and showed that the drive performance of the proposed driver is the same as that of a conventional driver. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the results of the simulation of a model of the EDLC module, whose capacitance is dependent on the frequency, correspond well with the experimental results.

  12. Industrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Production lines for rubber gloves would not appear to have much in common with particle physics laboratories, but they both use accelerators. Electron beam irradiation is often used in industry to improve the quality of manufactured goods or to reduce production cost. Products range from computer disks, shrink packaging, tyres, cables, and plastics to hot water pipes. Some products, such as medical goods, cosmetics and certain foodstuffs, are sterilized in this way. In electron beam irradiation, electrons penetrate materials creating showers of low energy electrons. After many collisions these electrons have the correct energy to create chemically active sites. They may either break molecular bonds or activate a site which promotes a new chemical linkage. This industrial irradiation can be exploited in three ways: breaking down a biological molecule usually renders it useless and kills the organism; breaking an organic molecule can change its toxicity or function; and crosslinking a polymer can strengthen it. In addition to traditional gamma irradiation using isotopes, industrial irradiation uses three accelerator configurations, each type defining an energy range, and consequently the electron penetration depth. For energies up to 750 kV, the accelerator consists of a DC potential applied to a simple wire anode and the electrons extracted through a slot in a coaxially mounted cylindrical cathode. In the 1-5 MeV range, the Cockcroft-Walton or Dynamitron( R ) accelerators are normally used. To achieve the high potentials in these DC accelerators, insulating SF6 gas and large dimension vessels separate the anode and cathode; proprietary techniques distinguish the various commercial models available. Above 5 MeV, the size of DC accelerators render them impractical, and more compact radiofrequency-driven linear accelerators are used. Irradiation electron beams are actually 'sprayed' over the product using a magnetic deflection system. Lower energy beams of

  13. Dose to drivers during drive-through cargo scanning using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Rogerio S.; Gomes, Joana D'Arc R.L.; Costa, Mara Lucia L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiation technologies to perform screening for cargo containers has been increased due to security issues, mainly, as a consequence of the United States (US) legislation which requires, from 2013, the scanning of all intermodal cargo containers which arrive at US ports. Currently, systems to cargo inspections, using accelerator-driven high energy X-rays, between 4 and 9 MeV, are available for scanning operations. It is expected that, in the future, the use of these systems will be widely spread on roads, ports and airports in Brazil. However, in order to improve the productivity and reduce the costs of acquisition, operation and maintenance these systems require that the driver drives its vehicle through irradiation area, in a situation where members of the public (the truck drivers) enter in controlled area and are deliberately exposed to high-energy beam. Some manufacturers justifies this procedure arguing that the drivers are exposed briefly, and only to the scattered beam, since there are safety systems in order to avoid that the drivers are exposed to direct beam. In this work, it is presented the preliminary results of Monte Carlo simulations concerning the dose of drivers during scanning operations, including the dose due to a failure of safety system, producing an exposure of drivers to the direct beam, as well as, an analysis of the justification of practice, mainly related to the drive-through operational procedure. (author)

  14. SBS pulse compression for excimer inertial fusion energy drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

    1994-12-31

    A key requirement for the development of commercial fusion power plants utilizing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as a source of thermonuclear power is the availability of reliable, efficient laser drivers. These laser drivers must be capable of delivering UV optical pulses having energies of the order of 5MJ to cryogenic deuterium-tritium (D/T) ICF targets. The current requirements for laser ICF target irradiation specify the laser wavelength, {lambda} ca. 250 nm, pulse duration, {tau}{sub p} ca. 6 ns, bandwidth, {Delta}{lambda} ca. 0.1 nm, polarization state, etc. Excimer lasers are a leading candidate to fill these demanding ICF driver requirements. However, since excimer lasers are not storage lasers, the excimer laser pulse duration, {tau}{sub pp}, is determined primarily by the length of the excitation pulse delivered to the excimer laser amplifier. Pulsed power associated with efficiently generating excimer laser pulses has a time constant, {tau}{sub pp} which falls in the range, 30 {tau}{sub p}<{tau}{sub pp}<100{tau}{sub p}. As a consequence, pulse compression is needed to convert the long excimer laser pulses to pulses of duration {tau}{sub p}. These main ICF driver pulses require, in addition, longer, lower power precursor pulses delivered to the ICF target before the arrival of the main pulse. Although both linear and non-linear optical (NLO) pulse compression techniques have been developed, computer simulations have shown that a ``chirped,`` self-seeded, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) pulse compressor cell using SF{sub 6} at a density, {rho} ca. 1 amagat can efficiently compress krypton fluoride (KrF) laser pulses at {lambda}=248 nm. In order to avoid the generation of output pulses substantially shorter than {tau}{sub p}, the optical power in the chirped input SBS ``seed`` beams was ramped. Compressed pulse conversion efficiencies of up to 68% were calculated for output pulse durations of {tau}{sub p} ca. ns.

  15. SBS pulse compression for excimer inertial fusion energy drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    A key requirement for the development of commercial fusion power plants utilizing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as a source of thermonuclear power is the availability of reliable, efficient laser drivers. These laser drivers must be capable of delivering UV optical pulses having energies of the order of 5MJ to cryogenic deuterium-tritium (D/T) ICF targets. The current requirements for laser ICF target irradiation specify the laser wavelength, λ ca. 250 nm, pulse duration, τ p ca. 6 ns, bandwidth, Δλ ca. 0.1 nm, polarization state, etc. Excimer lasers are a leading candidate to fill these demanding ICF driver requirements. However, since excimer lasers are not storage lasers, the excimer laser pulse duration, τ pp , is determined primarily by the length of the excitation pulse delivered to the excimer laser amplifier. Pulsed power associated with efficiently generating excimer laser pulses has a time constant, τ pp which falls in the range, 30 τ p pp p . As a consequence, pulse compression is needed to convert the long excimer laser pulses to pulses of duration τ p . These main ICF driver pulses require, in addition, longer, lower power precursor pulses delivered to the ICF target before the arrival of the main pulse. Although both linear and non-linear optical (NLO) pulse compression techniques have been developed, computer simulations have shown that a ''chirped,'' self-seeded, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) pulse compressor cell using SF 6 at a density, ρ ca. 1 amagat can efficiently compress krypton fluoride (KrF) laser pulses at λ=248 nm. In order to avoid the generation of output pulses substantially shorter than τ p , the optical power in the chirped input SBS ''seed'' beams was ramped. Compressed pulse conversion efficiencies of up to 68% were calculated for output pulse durations of τ p ca. ns

  16. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerens, H [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Saint-Lebe, L

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment.

  17. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransohoff, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Carriers, after being loaded with product to be irradiated, are transported by an input-output conveyor system into an irradiation chamber where they are received in a horizontal arrangement on racks which may support different sizes and numbers of carriers. The racks are moved by a chamber conveyor system in an endless rectangular path about a radiation source. Packers shift the carriers on the racks to maintain nearest proximity to the radiation source. The carriers are shifted in position on each rack during successive rack cycles to produce even radiation exposure. The carriers may be loaded singly onto successive racks during a first cycle of movement thereof about the source, with loading of additional carriers, and/or unloading of carriers, onto each rack occurring on subsequent rack cycles of movement

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Food can be provided with extra beneficial properties by physical processing. These benefits include a reduced possibility of food poisoning, or an increased life of the food. We are familiar with pasteurisation of milk, drying of vegetables, and canning of fruit. These physical processes work because the food absorbs energy during treatment which brings about the changes needed. The energy absorbed in these examples is heat energy. Food irradiation is a less familiar process. It produces similar benefits to other processes and it can sometimes be applied with additional advantages over conventional processing. For example, because irradiation causes little heating, foods may look and taste more natural. Also, treatment can take place with the food in its final plastic wrappers, reducing the risk of re-contamination. (author). 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  20. Endolymphatic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, M.M.; Ianhez, L.E.; Sabbaga, E.

    1982-01-01

    The authors analysed the clinical evolution and the result of renal transplantation some years after irradiation in 24 patients (group I) who received endolymphatic 131 I as a pre-transplantation immunesuppresive measure. The control group (group II) consisted of 24 non-irradiated patients comparable to group I in age, sex, primary disease, type of donor and immunesuppressive therapy. Significant differences were observed between the two groups regarding such factors a incidence and reversibility of rejection crises in the first 60 post-transplantation days, loss of kidney due to rejection, and dosage of azathioprine. The authors conclude that this method, besides being harmless, has prolonged immunesuppressive action, its administration being advised for receptores of cadaver kidneys, mainly those who show positive cross-match against HLA antigens for painel. (Author) [pt

  1. Driver style and driver skill – Clustering sub-groups of drivers differing in their potential danger in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) and the Driver Skill Inventory (DSI) are two of the most frequently used measures of self-reported driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to test drivers’ consistency or judgment of their own self-reported driving ability...... based on a combined use of the DBQ and the DSI. Moreover, the joint use of the two instruments was applied to identify sub-groups of drivers that differ in their potential danger in traffic (as measured by frequency of aberrant driving behaviors and level of driving skills), as well as to test whether...... the sub-groups of drivers differed in characteristics such as age, gender, annual mileage and accident involvement. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. The results suggested that the drivers are consistent in their reporting of driving ability, as the self-reported driving skill level...

  2. Cognitive characteristics of older Japanese drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilowati, Indri H; Yasukouchi, Akira

    2012-02-29

    Some causes of accidents among older drivers are: not paying attention to traffic signals; missing stop lines; and having to deal with and misjudging emergency situations. These causes of accidents reveal problems with attention and cognition. Such incidents are also related to driver perception and stress-coping mechanisms. It is important to examine the relation of stress reactions to attention and cognition as a factor influencing the causes of accidents commonly involving older drivers. Subjects were 10 young drivers (23.3 ± 3.33 years) and 25 older drivers divided into two groups (older1 [60 to 65 years] and older2 [> 65 years]). This study revealed the correlation within driver stress inventory and driver coping questionnaires parameters was observed only in older drivers. They also needed a longer response time for Trail Making Test A and B. The factors affected the attention and cognition of older drivers by age but not driving experience itself, and coping parameters such as emotion focus, reappraisal, and avoidance were not included as stress inventory parameters. Being prone to fatigue was less for younger drivers than older drivers. Because they have shorter distances, shorter drive times, and no need for expressways, older drivers also had a significantly lower risk of thrill-seeking behaviour and more patience. The intervention addressing their attention skills, aggressive feelings, and emotion focus should be considered. The technological improvements in cars will make older drivers feel safer and make driving easier which might lower the attention paid to the road, and regular driving training might be needed to assess and enhance their safety.

  3. Cognitive characteristics of older Japanese drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilowati Indri H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some causes of accidents among older drivers are: not paying attention to traffic signals; missing stop lines; and having to deal with and misjudging emergency situations. These causes of accidents reveal problems with attention and cognition. Such incidents are also related to driver perception and stress-coping mechanisms. It is important to examine the relation of stress reactions to attention and cognition as a factor influencing the causes of accidents commonly involving older drivers. Finding Subjects were 10 young drivers (23.3 ± 3.33 years and 25 older drivers divided into two groups (older1 [60 to 65 years] and older2 [> 65 years]. This study revealed the correlation within driver stress inventory and driver coping questionnaires parameters was observed only in older drivers. They also needed a longer response time for Trail Making Test A and B. The factors affected the attention and cognition of older drivers by age but not driving experience itself, and coping parameters such as emotion focus, reappraisal, and avoidance were not included as stress inventory parameters. Being prone to fatigue was less for younger drivers than older drivers. Because they have shorter distances, shorter drive times, and no need for expressways, older drivers also had a significantly lower risk of thrill-seeking behaviour and more patience. Conclusion The intervention addressing their attention skills, aggressive feelings, and emotion focus should be considered. The technological improvements in cars will make older drivers feel safer and make driving easier which might lower the attention paid to the road, and regular driving training might be needed to assess and enhance their safety.

  4. Dominant drivers of business students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Cătălina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Taibi Kahler wrote in 1974 a theory about five main drivers that could explain people’s motivation and a series of positive and negative behavior patterns: Be Strong, Be Perfect, Hurry Up, Try Hard and Please People. Of course, we consider there is no absolute positive or negative behavior, since (1 everything needs to be analyzed by taking into account the context and (2 any behavior pattern can mean a series of advantages as long as people understand their own values, beliefs, attitudes and behaviors. It would be interesting to link Kahler’s drivers to the educational process, in order to be able to adapt our courses and our teaching styles to students’ requirements and also to the requirements in the labor market. Our paper is built on literature review and a questionnaire applied to a sample of 607 students in Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania. Information was processed with Microsoft Excel 2013, in order to look at the main working styles our students have, at the main explanations for the differences between them and in order to test a series of hypotheses. We were interested to look at the main traits of the current generation of students in our university: dominant drivers, roles of managers and specialists, the attractiveness of the entrepreneurial career path, etc. and at a series of patterns (i.e. gender-related differences. We consider results of this study are useful both for teaching and research purposes. In terms of teaching, we plan to adapt our educational methods in order to improve the educational process.

  5. HANARO fuel irradiation test(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, D. S.; Kim, H. R.; Chae, H. T.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, C. S.; Kim, B. G.; Lee, C. B.; Hwang, W

    2001-04-01

    In order to fulfill the requirement to prove HANARO fuel integrity when irradiated at a power greater than 112.8 kW/m, which was imposed during HANARO licensing, and to verify the irradiation performance of HANARO fuel, the in-pile irradiation test of HANARO fuel has been performed. Two types of test fuel, the un-instrumented Type A fuel for higher burnup irradiation in shorter period than the driver fuel and the instrumented Type B fuel for higher linear heat rate and precise measurement of irradiation conditions, have been designed and fabricated. The test fuel assemblies were irradiated in HANARO. The two Type A fuel assemblies were intended to be irradiated to medium and high burnup and have been discharged after 69.9 at% and 85.5 at% peak burnup, respectively. Type B fuel assembly was intended to be irradiatied at high power with different instrumentations and achieved a maximum power higher than 120 kW/m without losing its integrity and without showing any irregular behavior. The Type A fuel assemblies were cooled for about 6 months and transported to the IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility) for consequent evaluation. Detailed non-destructive and destructive PIE (Post-Irradiation Examination), such as the measurement of burnup distribution, fuel swelling, clad corrosion, dimensional changes, fuel rod bending strength, micro-structure, etc., has been performed. The measured results have been analysed/compared with the predicted performance values and the design criteria. It has been verified that HANARO fuel maintains proper in-pile performance and integrity even at the high power of 120 kw/m up to the high burnup of 85 at%.

  6. Solar EUV irradiance for space weather applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar EUV irradiance is an important driver of space weather models. Large changes in EUV and x-ray irradiances create large variability in the ionosphere and thermosphere. Proxies such as the F10.7 cm radio flux, have provided reasonable estimates of the EUV flux but as the space weather models become more accurate and the demands of the customers become more stringent, proxies are no longer adequate. Furthermore, proxies are often provided only on a daily basis and shorter time scales are becoming important. Also, there is a growing need for multi-day forecasts of solar EUV irradiance to drive space weather forecast models. In this presentation we will describe the needs and requirements for solar EUV irradiance information from the space weather modeler's perspective. We will then translate these requirements into solar observational requirements such as spectral resolution and irradiance accuracy. We will also describe the activities at NOAA to provide long-term solar EUV irradiance observations and derived products that are needed for real-time space weather modeling.

  7. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  8. Drivers' reactions to sudden lead car braking under varying workload conditions; towards a driver support system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Nina; van der Horst, A.R.A.; van Arem, Bart; Brookhuis, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    At urban intersections drivers handle multiple tasks simultaneously, making urban driving a complex task. An advanced driver assistance system may support drivers in this specific driving task, but the design details of such a system need to be determined before they can be fully deployed. A driving

  9. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  10. Functional Bus Driver-Pupil Passenger Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Ernest

    1987-01-01

    Successful school bus drivers bring much more than mechanical know-how to the job. They develop good rapport with students while acting to bring undesirable student behavior under control. Drivers must also show an interest in students' welfare and have a good sense of humor. (MLH)

  11. Cedar Avenue driver assist system evaluation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation of the Driver Assist System (DAS) used by the Minnesota Valley Transit Authority (MTVA) for bus shoulder operations. The DAS is a GPS-based technology suite that provides lane-position feedback to the driver via a ...

  12. Driver electronic device use in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The percentage of drivers text-messaging or visibly manipulating : hand-held devices increased from 1.5 percent in : 2012 to 1.7 percent in 2013; however, this was not a statistically : significant increase. Driver hand-held cell phone : use decrease...

  13. Vehicle and driver scheduling for public transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The problem of driver scheduling involves the construction of a legal set of shifts, including allowance : of overtime, which cover the blocks in a particular vehicle schedule. A shift is the work scheduled to be performed by : a driver in one day, w...

  14. Traffic Safety through Driver Assistance and Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner Bubb

    2011-05-01

    BMW, Daimler, Audi, Citroen, Lexus, VW, Opel, Peugeot, Renault, Chevrolet, Saab and Bosch. Both the contributions of research work concerning driving behavior analysis and driver assistance systems have to be aligned with a permanently updated interaction within the system of driver, vehicle and road traffic environment.

  15. Impact Driver With Integral Sliding Hammer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Bilby J.

    1987-01-01

    Tool combines impact driver with sliding dead-blow hammer. Used for any purpose for which ordinary impact driver used; tightening fasteners or driving starter holes for drill. Tool protects user from accidental injury and surrounding equipment from damage that might occur from ordinary arm-wielded hammer. Especially useful in underwater work.

  16. Driver citation/carrier data relationship project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Driver/Carrier Relationship Project was commissioned to address three issues. The first was to determine if drivers of commercial motor vehicles get tickets at a different rate, depending on the carrier that they are working for. The second issue...

  17. About Assessment Criteria of Driver's Accidental Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, Yuliya I.; Glushko, Kirill V.

    2016-01-01

    The article points at the importance of studying the human factor as a cause of accidents of drivers, especially in loosely structured traffic situations. The description of the experiment on the measurement of driver's accidental abilities is given. Under accidental ability is meant the capability to ensure the security of driving as a behavior…

  18. Optimizing the Universal Robots ROS driver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Timm

    improvement both in terms of faster reaction as well as making it possible to control the robot using either ros_control or ordinary joint speed commands, which is required for many types of sensory based control like visual servoing. The developed driver is compared to the drivers already existing in the ROS...

  19. High speed CAMAC differential branch highway driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, D.E.; Nelson, R.O.; Poore, R.V.; Sunier, J.W.; Ross, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    A new CAMAC branch driver is described that incorporates several unusual features which combine to give reliable, high-speed performance. These include balanced line driver/receivers, stored CAMAC command lists, 8 DMA channels, pseudo LAMS, hardware priority encoding of LAMS, and hardware-implemented Q-controlled block transfers. 3 figures

  20. Biology of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The author presents his arguments for food scientists and biologists that the hazards of food irradiation outweigh the benefits. The subject is discussed in the following sections: introduction (units, mutagenesis, seed viability), history of food irradiation, effects of irradiation on organoleptic qualities of staple foods, radiolytic products and selective destruction of nutrients, production of microbial toxins in stored irradiated foods and loss of quality in wheat, deleterious consequences of eating irradiated foods, misrepresentation of the facts about food irradiation. (author)

  1. BDC 500 branch driver controller

    CERN Document Server

    Dijksman, A

    1981-01-01

    This processor has been designed for very fast data acquisition and date pre-processing. The dataway and branch highway speeds have been optimized for approximately 1.5 mu sec. The internal processor cycle is approximately 0.8 mu sec. The standard version contains the following functions (slots): crate controller type A1; branch highway driver including terminator; serial I/O port (TTY, VDU); 24 bit ALU and 24 bit program counter; 16 bit memory address counter and 4 word stack; 4k bit memory for program and/or data; battery backup for the memory; CNAFD and crate LAM display; request/grant logic for time- sharing operation of several BDCs. The free slots can be equipped with e.g. extra RAM, computer interfaces, hardware multiplier/dividers, etc. (0 refs).

  2. Effects of heat treatment and formulation on the phase composition and chemical durability of the EBR-II ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. E.; Dietz, N. L.; Janney, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II will be immobilized in a ceramic waste form (CWF). Tests are being conducted to evaluate the suitability of the CWF for disposal in the planned federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. In this report, the results of laboratory tests and analyses conducted to address product consistency and thermal stability issues called out in waste acceptance requirements are presented. The tests measure the impacts of (1) variations in the amounts of salt and binder glass used to make the CWF and (2) heat treatments on the phase composition and chemical durability of the waste form. A series of CWF materials was made to span the ranges of salt and glass contents that could be used during processing: between 5.0 and 15 mass% salt loaded into the zeolite (the nominal salt loading is 10.7%, and the process control range is 10.6 to 11.2 mass%), and between 20 and 30 mass% binder glass mixed with the salt-loaded zeolite (the nominal glass content is 25% and the process control range is 20 to 30 mass%). In another series of tests, samples of two CWF products made with the nominal salt and glass contents were reheated to measure the impact on the phase composition and durability: long-term heat treatments were conducted at 400 and 500 C for durations of 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year; short-term heat treatments were conducted at 600, 700, 800, and 850 C for durations of 4, 28, 52, and 100 hours. All of the CWF products that were made with different amounts of salt, zeolite, and glass and all of the heat-treated CWF samples were analyzed with powder X-ray diffraction to measure changes in phase compositions and subjected to 7-day product consistency tests to measure changes in the chemical durability. The salt loading had the greatest impact on phase composition and durability. A relatively large amount of nepheline, Na 4 (AlSiO 4 ) 4 , was formed in the material made with 5.0 mass% salt loading, which was also the least durable of the materials that were tested. Nepheline was not detected in materials made with salt-loaded zeolites containing 15 or 20 mass% salt. Conversely, halite was not detected with XRD in materials made with 5.0 or 7.5 mass% salt loading, but similar amounts of halite were measured in the other CWF materials. The sodalite contents of all materials were similar. The halite content in the CWF source material used in the short-term heat-treatment study, which had the nominal salt and binder glass loadings, was determined to be about 1.3 mass% by standard addition analysis. Heat treatment had only a small effect on the phase composition: the amount of halite increased to as much as 3.7 mass%, and trace amounts of nepheline were detected in samples treated at 800 and 850 C. The CWF samples treated at high temperatures had lower amounts of halite detected in the rapid water-soluble test. The releases of B, Na, and Si in the product consistency tests (PCTs) were not sensitive to the heat-treatment conditions. The PCT responses of all salt-loaded and heat-treated CWF materials were well below that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass

  3. Visual behaviour analysis and driver cognitive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baujon, J.; Basset, M.; Gissinger, G.L. [Mulhouse Univ., (France). MIPS/MIAM Lab.

    2001-07-01

    Recent studies on driver behaviour have shown that perception - mainly visual but also proprioceptive perception - plays a key role in the ''driver-vehicle-road'' system and so considerably affects the driver's decision making. Within the framework of the behaviour analysis and studies low-cost system (BASIL), this paper presents a correlative, qualitative and quantitative study, comparing the information given by visual perception and by the trajectory followed. This information will help to obtain a cognitive model of the Rasmussen type according to different driver classes. Many experiments in real driving situations have been carried out for different driver classes and for a given trajectory profile, using a test vehicle and innovative, specially designed, real-time tools, such as the vision system or the positioning module. (orig.)

  4. SPIDER: A Framework for Understanding Driver Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, David L; Fisher, Donald L

    2016-02-01

    The objective was to identify key cognitive processes that are impaired when drivers divert attention from driving. Driver distraction is increasingly recognized as a significant source of injuries and fatalities on the roadway. A "SPIDER" model is developed that identifies key cognitive processes that are impaired when drivers divert attention from driving. SPIDER is an acronym standing for scanning, predicting, identifying, decision making, and executing a response. When drivers engage in secondary activities unrelated to the task of driving, SPIDER-related processes are impaired, situation awareness is degraded, and the ability to safely operate a motor vehicle may be compromised. The pattern of interference helps to illuminate the sources of driver distraction and may help guide the integration of new technology into the automobile. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  5. Quantitative assessment of drivers of recent climate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Ramesh, Durbha Sai; Vichare, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Identification and quantification of possible drivers of recent climate variability remain a challenging task. This important issue is addressed adopting a non-parametric information theory technique, the Transfer Entropy and its normalized variant. It distinctly quantifies actual information...... exchanged along with the directional flow of information between any two variables with no bearing on their common history or inputs, unlike correlation, mutual information etc. Measurements of greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4, and N2O; volcanic aerosols; solar activity: UV radiation, total solar irradiance (TSI...... ) and cosmic ray flux (CR); El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Global Mean Temperature Anomaly (GMTA) made during 1984-2005 are utilized to distinguish driving and responding climate signals. Estimates of their relative contributions reveal that CO 2 (~24%), CH 4 (~19%) and volcanic aerosols (~23...

  6. Modeling of Driver Steering Operations in Lateral Wind Disturbances toward Driver Assistance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Yoshinori; Wada, Takahiro; Kamiji, Norimasa; Doi, Shun'ichi

    Disturbances decrease vehicle stability and increase driver's mental and physical workload. Especially unexpected disturbances such as lateral winds have severe effect on vehicle stability and driver's workload. This study aims at building a driver model of steering operations in lateral wind toward developing effective driver assistance system. First, the relationship between the driver's lateral motion and its reactive quick steering behavior is investigated using driving simulator with lateral 1dof motion. In the experiments, four different wind patterns are displayed by the simulator. As the results, strong correlation was found between the driver's head lateral jerk by the lateral disturbance and the angular acceleration of the steering wheel. Then, we build a mathematical model of driver's steering model from lateral disturbance input to steering torque of the reactive quick feed-forward steering based on the experimental results. Finally, validity of the proposed model is shown by comparing the steering torque of experimental results and that of simulation results.

  7. Reducing risky driver behaviour through the implementation of a driver risk management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has one of the highest incidences of road accidents in the world. Most accidents are avoidable and are caused by driver behaviour and errors. The purpose of this article was to identify the riskiest driver behaviours in commercial fleets in South Africa, to determine the business impact of such behaviour, to establish a framework for the management of risky driver behaviour and to test the framework by applying a leading commercial driver behaviour management system as a case study. The case study comprised three South African commercial fleets. Using data from these fleets, critical incident triangles were used to determine the ratio data of risky driver behaviour to near-collisions and collisions. Based on managing the riskiest driver behaviours as causes of more serious incidents and accidents, the results indicated that through the implementation of an effective driver risk management system, risky incidents were significantly reduced.

  8. How driving duration influences drivers' visual behaviors and fatigue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    Eye fixations express the focus of driver's visual attention on driving, ... driver's attention is attracted by fatigue. The second ... was divided into seven refined categories (see Table 1), ...... driver fatigue in terms of line crossing: a pilot study.

  9. Ionospheric Change and Solar EUV Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; David, M.; Jensen, J. B.; Schunk, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ionosphere has been quantitatively monitored for the past six solar cycles. The past few years of observations are showing trends that differ from the prior cycles! Our good statistical relationships between the solar radio flux index at 10.7 cm, the solar EUV Irradiance, and the ionospheric F-layer peak density are showing indications of divergence! Present day discussion of the Sun-Earth entering a Dalton Minimum would suggest change is occurring in the Sun, as the driver, followed by the Earth, as the receptor. The dayside ionosphere is driven by the solar EUV Irradiance. But different components of this spectrum affect the ionospheric layers differently. For a first time the continuous high cadence EUV spectra from the SDO EVE instrument enable ionospheric scientists the opportunity to evaluate solar EUV variability as a driver of ionospheric variability. A definitive understanding of which spectral components are responsible for the E- and F-layers of the ionosphere will enable assessments of how over 50 years of ionospheric observations, the solar EUV Irradiance has changed. If indeed the evidence suggesting the Sun-Earth system is entering a Dalton Minimum periods is correct, then the comprehensive EVE solar EUV Irradiance data base combined with the ongoing ionospheric data bases will provide a most fortuitous fiduciary reference baseline for Sun-Earth dependencies. Using the EVE EUV Irradiances, a physics based ionospheric model (TDIM), and 50 plus years of ionospheric observation from Wallops Island (Virginia) the above Sun-Earth ionospheric relationship will be reported on.

  10. Square pulse linear transformer driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The linear transformer driver (LTD technological approach can result in relatively compact devices that can deliver fast, high current, and high-voltage pulses straight out of the LTD cavity without any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The usual LTD architecture [A. A. Kim, M. G. Mazarakis, V. A. Sinebryukhov, B. M. Kovalchuk, V. A. Vizir, S. N Volkov, F. Bayol, A. N. Bastrikov, V. G. Durakov, S. V. Frolov, V. M. Alexeenko, D. H. McDaniel, W. E. Fowler, K. LeCheen, C. Olson, W. A. Stygar, K. W. Struve, J. Porter, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402; M. G. Mazarakis, W. E. Fowler, A. A. Kim, V. A. Sinebryukhov, S. T. Rogowski, R. A. Sharpe, D. H. McDaniel, C. L. Olson, J. L. Porter, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, and J. R. Woodworth, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050401 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050401] provides sine shaped output pulses that may not be well suited for some applications like z-pinch drivers, flash radiography, high power microwaves, etc. A more suitable power pulse would have a flat or trapezoidal (rising or falling top. In this paper, we present the design and first test results of an LTD cavity that generates such a type of output pulse by including within its circular array a number of third harmonic bricks in addition to the main bricks. A voltage adder made out of a square pulse cavity linear array will produce the same shape output pulses provided that the timing of each cavity is synchronized with the propagation of the electromagnetic pulse.

  11. Education for older drivers in the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esko Keskinen

    2014-07-01

    Five presumptions have to be considered when addressing future education for older drivers: 1. Driving a car will continue to be one element of mobility in the future; 2. Older people want to be able to keep driving; 3. Safety will be an even more important factor in mobility in the future; 4. Ecological values will be more important in the future; and 5. Innovative technological applications will be more important in the future. Hierarchical models of driving are suitable in increasing understanding of older drivers' needs and abilities. The highest levels of the driving hierarchy in the Goals for Driver Education (GDE model are especially important for the safety of both young and elderly drivers. In these highest levels goals for life, skills for living, and social environment affect everyday decision making in general but also driving, which has an impact on driver safety. Giving up driving is very much a social decision and should be taken as such. However, the highest levels of the driving hierarchy are by nature inaccessible to teacher-centered instruction These levels require more coaching-like education methods where the learner takes the central role and the teacher helps the drivers understand their own abilities and limitations in traffic. Testing and selecting older drivers to enhance safety is not, according to research findings, working in a proper way. Older drivers do not so much need more information concerning traffic rules, etc., but rather better understanding of themselves, their health restrictions, their skills, and their abilities to ensure daily mobility. Their closest companions also need tools to help them in discussions of traffic safety issues affecting older drivers.

  12. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  13. Medical waste irradiation study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, R.J.; Stein, J. [North Star Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nygard, J. [Advance Bio-Control (United States)

    1998-07-25

    The North Star Research Corporation Medical Waste project is described in this report, with details of design, construction, operation, and results to date. The project began with preliminary design of the accelerator. The initial design was for a single accelerator chamber with a vacuum tube cavity driver built into the chamber itself, rather than using a commercial tube separate from the RF accelerator. The authors believed that this would provide more adjustability and permit better coupling to be obtained. They did not have sufficient success with that approach, and finally completed the project using a DC accelerator with a unique new scanning system to irradiate the waste.

  14. Medical waste irradiation study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, R.J.; Stein, J.; Nygard, J.

    1998-01-01

    The North Star Research Corporation Medical Waste project is described in this report, with details of design, construction, operation, and results to date. The project began with preliminary design of the accelerator. The initial design was for a single accelerator chamber with a vacuum tube cavity driver built into the chamber itself, rather than using a commercial tube separate from the RF accelerator. The authors believed that this would provide more adjustability and permit better coupling to be obtained. They did not have sufficient success with that approach, and finally completed the project using a DC accelerator with a unique new scanning system to irradiate the waste

  15. SUBJECTIVE METHODS FOR ASSESSMENT OF DRIVER DROWSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Mashko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of fatigue and sleepiness behind the wheel, which for a long time has been of vital importance for the research in the area of driver-car interaction safety. Numerous experiments on car simulators with diverse measurements to observe human behavior have been performed at the laboratories of the faculty of the authors. The paper provides analysis and an overview and assessment of the subjective (self-rating and observer rating methods for observation of driver behavior and the detection of critical behavior in sleep deprived drivers using the developed subjective rating scales.

  16. Will the Driver Seat Ever Be Empty?

    OpenAIRE

    Fraichard , Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Self-driving technologies have matured and improved to the point that, in the past few years, self-driving cars have been able to safely drive an impressive number of kilometers. It should be noted though that, in all cases, the driver seat was never empty: a human driver was behind the wheel, ready to take over whenever the situation dictated it. This is an interesting paradox since the point of a self-driving car is to remove the most unreliable part of the car, namely the human driver. So,...

  17. Tarantula: Killing driver bugs before they hatch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Muller, Gilles; Urunuela, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Linux operating system is undergoing continual evolution. Evolution in the kernel and generic driver modules often triggers the need for corresponding evolutions in specific device drivers. Such collateral evolutions are tedious, because of the large number of device drivers, and error......-prone, because of the complexity of the code modifications involved. We propose an automatic tool, Tarantula, to aid in this process. In this paper, we examine some recent evolutions in Linux and the collateral evolutions they trigger, and assess the corresponding requirements on Tarantula....

  18. Assessing the relationship between the Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory: Revealing sub-groups of drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory are two of the most frequently used measures of self-reported driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to identify sub-groups of drivers that potentially act dangerously in traffic (as measured...... self-reported driving skills and whether the reported skill level was reflected in the reported aberrant driving behaviors. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. K-means cluster analysis revealed four distinct sub-groups that differed in driving skills and frequency of aberrant driving...... by frequency of aberrant driving behaviors and level of driving skills), as well as to test whether the sub-groups differ in characteristics such as age, gender, annual mileage and accident involvement. Furthermore, the joint analysis of the two instruments was used to test drivers’ assessment of their own...

  19. Perspective on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review summarizes current scientific information on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of foods. Attention is focused on: specifics of the irradiation process and its effectiveness in food preservation; the historical development of food irradiation technology in the US; the response of the Institute of Food Technologists to proposed FDA guidelines for food irradiation; the potential uses of irradiation in the US food industry; and the findings of the absence of toxins and of unaltered nutrient density (except possibly for fats) in irradiated foods. The misconceptions of consumers concerning perceived hazards associated with food irradiation, as related to consumer acceptance, also are addressed

  20. 2010 driver attitudes and awareness survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A basic of questions were developed that could be used in periodic surveys that track drivers attitudes and awareness concerning impaired driving, seat belt use, and speeding issues. The objective of the survey was to learn the knowledge, views, and ...

  1. Understanding & modeling bus transit driver availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Bus transit agencies are required to hire extraboard (i.e. back-up) operators to account for unexpected absences. Incorrect sizing of extra driver workforce is problematic for a number of reasons. Overestimating the appropriate number of extraboard o...

  2. Chinese Road Safety and Driver Behavior Research

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    The seminar will begin with a brief overview of the Chinese road safety situation, including current safety problems, and then move on to discuss safety research including driver behavior, freeway operational safety, and infrastructure development.

  3. Drug involvement of fatally injured drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    While data focusing on the danger of driving under the influence : of alcohol is readily available and often cited, less is : known or discussed about drivers under the influence of : other drugs. The Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), : a ce...

  4. Driver Education for New Multimodal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Local and state transportation agencies are redesigning roads to accommodate multimodal travel, including the addition of new configurations, infrastructures, and rules that may be unfamiliar to current drivers and other road users. Education and out...

  5. Deregulation and Macroeconomic Drivers Of Foreign Direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deregulation and Macroeconomic Drivers Of Foreign Direct Investment In Nigerian Agriculture (1970 -2009): An Econometric Analysis. ... The study showed that foreign exchange and the economic deregulation policy of Nigerian government ...

  6. Symbol signing design for older drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This project evaluated the effectiveness of symbol traffic signs for young, middle-aged and elderly drivers. Daytime legibility distance and comprehension of 85 symbols in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) were measured. Legibilit...

  7. Teen driver crashes : a report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This report summarizes what is known about the teen driver crash problem and reviews the research on the major contributing factors to the high teen crash rate. Dispositional factors, such as immaturity, inexperience, faulty judgment, and a higher pr...

  8. The importance of sight for drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Pas-Wyroślak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sight is the basic sense for drivers. Condition of the eye determines correct, comfortable and safe performance of the work as drivers. This article presents various factors influencing the sight condition. There are two groups of factors, external (environment, the kind and time of work, stress caused by work and internal (systemic and local disorders. All these factors can reduce significantly visual functions, such as visual acuity, field of vision, color vision, strereoscopic vision, twilight vision and glare sensitivity. There are also presented actual requirements for drivers and causes of the car accidents in various age groups. Impairments in vision functions can be dangerous for both the driver and other road users. Med Pr 2013;64(3:419–425

  9. Experimental testing of designated driver cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-27

    In theory, the designated-driver concept holds great promise for reducing the incidences of drunk driving. It is simple, inexpensive, almost universally recognized, and generally positively regarded by the U.S. population as a means for avoiding drun...

  10. Heavy-ion driver parametric studies and choice of a base 5 mega-joule driver design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, R.; Meier, W.

    1992-01-01

    Parametric studies to optimize heavy-ion driver designs are described and an optimized 5 MJ driver design is described. Parametric studies are done on driver parameters including driver energy, number of beams, type of superconductor used in focusing magnets, maximum magnetic field allowed at the superconducting windings, axial quadrupole field packing fraction, ion mass, and ion charge state. All modeled drivers use the maximum beam currents allowed by the Maschke limits; driver scaling is described in a companion paper. The optimized driver described is conservative and cost effective. The base driver direct costs are only $120/Joule, and the base driver uses no recirculation, beam combination, or beam separation. The low driver cost achieved is due, in part, to the use of compact Nb 3 Sn quadrupole arrays, but results primarily from optimization over the large, multi-dimensional, parameter space available for heavy-ion drivers

  11. Identification of drivers for modular production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunoe, Thomas Ditlev; Bossen, Jacob; Nielsen, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Todays competitive environment in industry creates a need for companies to enhance their ability to introduce new products faster. To increase rampup speed reconfigurable manufacturing systems is a promising concept, however to implement this production platforms and modular manufacturing...... is required. This paper presents an analysis whether and which module drivers from general product development can be applied to the development process of a modular manufacturing system. The result is a compiled list of modular drivers for manufacturing and examples of their use....

  12. Important information for drivers in France

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    From 1 July 2012, any driver of a motorised road vehicle, excluding two- or three-wheeled vehicles whose engine capacity does not exceed 50cm3, must be in possession of a breathalyser in full working order. With effect from 1 November 2012*, drivers failing to produce a breathalyser run the risk of being served with an 11 euro fine. A breathalyser is used to measure the alcohol content in the motorist's breath. The permissible level of alcohol for drivers is less than 0.5 g of alcohol per litre of blood, or 0.25 mg of alcohol per litre of air exhaled. The obligation to have a breathalyser on board the vehicle also applies to all drivers on the French part of the CERN site. All vehicles belonging to or leased by the Organization must also carry a breathalyser together with all the requisite documentation (cf. Operational Circular No. 4). Drivers of privately owned vehicles can obtain breathalysers from car accessory dealers, service stations or pharmacies, etc. Drivers of vehicles belonging to or l...

  13. Myocardial infarction in Swedish subway drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigert, Carolina; Klerdal, Kristina; Hammar, Niklas; Gustavsson, Per

    2007-08-01

    Particulate matter in urban air is associated with the risk of myocardial infarction in the general population. Very high levels of airborne particles have been detected in the subway system of Stockholm, as well as in several other large cities. This situation has caused concern for negative health effects among subway staff. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an increased incidence of myocardial infarction among subway drivers. Data from a population-based case-control study of men aged 40-69 in Stockholm County in 1976-1996 were used. The study included all first events of myocardial infarction in registers of hospital discharges and deaths. The controls were selected randomly from the general population. National censuses were used for information on occupation. Altogether, 22 311 cases and 131 496 controls were included. Among these, 54 cases and 250 controls had worked as subway drivers. The relative risk of myocardial infarction among subway drivers was not increased. It was 0.92 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.68-1.25] when the subway drivers were compared with other manual workers and 1.06 (95% CI 0.78-1.43) when the subway drivers were compared with all other gainfully employed men. Subgroup analyses indicated no influence on the risk of myocardial infarction from the duration of employment, latency time, or time since employment stopped. Subway drivers in Stockholm do not have a higher incidence of myocardial infarction than other employed persons.

  14. Effects of Defensive Vehicle Handling on Novice Driver Safety : Phase 3. Data Analysis and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This project evaluates the effectiveness of a multistage driver education program for Montanas young : drivers. A total of 347 teenaged drivers who had completed high school driver education agreed to participate. : These drivers were randomly spl...

  15. Workshop on transport for a common ion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.C.; Lee, E.; Langdon, B.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains research in the following areas related to beam transport for a common ion driver: multi-gap acceleration; neutralization with electrons; gas neutralization; self-pinched transport; HIF and LIF transport, and relevance to common ion driver; LIF and HIF reactor concepts and relevance to common ion driver; atomic physics for common ion driver; code capabilities and needed improvement

  16. Electron beam irradiating device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, K

    1969-12-20

    The efficiency of an electron beam irradiating device is heightened by improving the irradiation atmosphere and the method of cooling the irradiation window. An irradiation chamber one side of which incorporates the irradiation windows provided at the lower end of the scanner is surrounded by a suitable cooling system such as a coolant piping network so as to cool the interior of the chamber which is provided with circulating means at each corner to circulate and thus cool an inert gas charged therewithin. The inert gas, chosen from a group of such gases which will not deleteriously react with the irradiating equipment, forms a flowing stream across the irradiation window to effect its cooling and does not contaminate the vacuum exhaust system or oxidize the filament when penetrating the equipment through any holes which the foil at the irradiation window may incur during the irradiating procedure.

  17. Reliability of drivers in urban intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gstalter, Herbert; Fastenmeier, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The concept of human reliability has been widely used in industrial settings by human factors experts to optimise the person-task fit. Reliability is estimated by the probability that a task will successfully be completed by personnel in a given stage of system operation. Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is a technique used to calculate human error probabilities as the ratio of errors committed to the number of opportunities for that error. To transfer this notion to the measurement of car driver reliability the following components are necessary: a taxonomy of driving tasks, a definition of correct behaviour in each of these tasks, a list of errors as deviations from the correct actions and an adequate observation method to register errors and opportunities for these errors. Use of the SAFE-task analysis procedure recently made it possible to derive driver errors directly from the normative analysis of behavioural requirements. Driver reliability estimates could be used to compare groups of tasks (e.g. different types of intersections with their respective regulations) as well as groups of drivers' or individual drivers' aptitudes. This approach was tested in a field study with 62 drivers of different age groups. The subjects drove an instrumented car and had to complete an urban test route, the main features of which were 18 intersections representing six different driving tasks. The subjects were accompanied by two trained observers who recorded driver errors using standardized observation sheets. Results indicate that error indices often vary between both the age group of drivers and the type of driving task. The highest error indices occurred in the non-signalised intersection tasks and the roundabout, which exactly equals the corresponding ratings of task complexity from the SAFE analysis. A comparison of age groups clearly shows the disadvantage of older drivers, whose error indices in nearly all tasks are significantly higher than those of the other groups

  18. Reassessment of the swelling behavior of AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Porter, D.L.

    1982-03-01

    Published swelling data derived from EBR-II irradiations of AISI 304 and 304L have been reanalyzed in light of insights gained from irradiation of AISI 316 and Fe-15Cr-25Ni. The primary influence of temperature, displacement rate and compositional variations in the 300 series stainless steels lies in the duration of the transient regime of swelling and not in the steady-state or constant swelling rate regime

  19. Irradiation of goods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, G.

    1992-01-01

    The necessary dose and the dosage limits to be observed depend on the kind of product and the purpose of irradiation. Product density and density distribution, product dimensions, but also packaging, transport and storage conditions are specific parameters influencing the conditions of irradiation. The kind of irradiation plant - electron accelerator or gamma plant - , its capacity, transport system and geometric arrangement of the radiation field are factors influencing the irradiation conditions as well. This is exemplified by the irradiation of 3 different products, onions, deep-frozen chicken and high-protein feed. Feasibilities and limits of the irradiation technology are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  20. Assessing drivers' response during automated driver support system failures with non-driving tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Sijun; Neyens, David M

    2017-06-01

    With the increase in automated driver support systems, drivers are shifting from operating their vehicles to supervising their automation. As a result, it is important to understand how drivers interact with these automated systems and evaluate their effect on driver responses to safety critical events. This study aimed to identify how drivers responded when experiencing a safety critical event in automated vehicles while also engaged in non-driving tasks. In total 48 participants were included in this driving simulator study with two levels of automated driving: (a) driving with no automation and (b) driving with adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping (LK) systems engaged; and also two levels of a non-driving task (a) watching a movie or (b) no non-driving task. In addition to driving performance measures, non-driving task performance and the mean glance duration for the non-driving task were compared between the two levels of automated driving. Drivers using the automated systems responded worse than those manually driving in terms of reaction time, lane departure duration, and maximum steering wheel angle to an induced lane departure event. These results also found that non-driving tasks further impaired driver responses to a safety critical event in the automated system condition. In the automated driving condition, driver responses to the safety critical events were slower, especially when engaged in a non-driving task. Traditional driver performance variables may not necessarily effectively and accurately evaluate driver responses to events when supervising autonomous vehicle systems. Thus, it is important to develop and use appropriate variables to quantify drivers' performance under these conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  1. Novice drivers' individual trajectories of driver behavior over the first three years of driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Gabriela D; Poulter, Damian; Barker, Edward; McKenna, Frank P; Rowe, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the changes in driving behavior that underlie the decrease in crash risk over the first few months of driving is key to efforts to reduce injury and fatality risk in novice drivers. This study represented a secondary data analysis of 1148 drivers who participated in the UK Cohort II study. The Driver Behavior Questionnaire was completed at 6 months and 1, 2 and 3 years after licensure. Linear latent growth models indicated significant increases across development in all four dimensions of aberrant driving behavior under scrutiny: aggressive violations, ordinary violations, errors and slips. Unconditional and conditional latent growth class analyses showed that the observed heterogeneity in individual trajectories was explained by the presence of multiple homogeneous groups of drivers, each exhibiting specific trajectories of aberrant driver behavior. Initial levels of aberrant driver behavior were important in identifying sub-groups of drivers. All classes showed positive slopes; there was no evidence of a group of drivers whose aberrant behavior decreased over time that might explain the decrease in crash involvement observed over this period. Male gender and younger age predicted membership of trajectories with higher levels of aberrant behavior. These findings highlight the importance of early intervention for improving road safety. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding the behavioral underpinnings of the decrease in crash involvement observed in the early months of driving. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Assisting Driver Sovereignty : A Fail-Safe Design Approach to Driver Distraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gijssel, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a fail-safe approach to driver distraction through novel interface concepts for integrated Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). Traffic accidents are a negative side effect of the universal and economical desire for mobility. The year 2009 saw the

  3. Facts about food irradiation: Food irradiation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet gives the cost of a typical food irradiation facility (US $1 million to US $3 million) and of the food irradiation process (US $10-15 per tonne for low-dose applications; US $100-250 per tonne for high-dose applications). These treatments also bring consumer benefits in terms of availability, storage life and improved hygiene. 2 refs

  4. Food irradiation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jiang

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the author discussed the recent situation of food irradiation in China, its history, facilities, clearance, commercialization, and with emphasis on market testing and public acceptance of irradiated food. (author)

  5. Redesign of Transjakarta Bus Driver's Cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardi Safitri, Dian; Azmi, Nora; Singh, Gurbinder; Astuti, Pudji

    2016-02-01

    Ergonomic risk at work stations with type Seated Work Control was one of the problems faced by Transjakarta bus driver. Currently “Trisakti” type bus, one type of bus that is used by Transjakarta in corridor 9, serving route Pinang Ranti - Pluit, gained many complaints from drivers. From the results of Nordic Body Map questionnaires given to 30 drivers, it was known that drivers feel pain in the neck, arms, hips, and buttocks. Allegedly this was due to the seat position and the button/panel bus has a considerable distance range (1 meter) to be achieved by drivers. In addition, preliminary results of the questionnaire using Workstation Checklist identified their complaints about uncomfortable cushion, driver's seat backrest, and the exact position of the AC is above the driver head. To reduce the risk level of ergonomics, then did research to design the cabin by using a generic approach to designing products. The risk analysis driver posture before the design was done by using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA), Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA), and Quick Exposure Checklist (QEC), while the calculation of the moment the body is done by using software Mannequin Pro V10.2. Furthermore, the design of generic products was done through the stages: need metric-matrix, house of quality, anthropometric data collection, classification tree concept, concept screening, scoring concept, design and manufacture of products in the form of two-dimensional. While the design after design risk analysis driver posture was done by using RULA, REBA, and calculation of moments body as well as the design visualized using software 3DMax. From the results of analysis before the draft design improvements cabin RULA obtained scores of 6, REBA 9, and the result amounted to 57.38% QEC and moment forces on the back is 247.3 LbF.inch and on the right hip is 72.9 LbF.in. While the results of the proposed improvements cabin design RULA obtained scores of 3, REBA 4, and the moment of force on

  6. Actinide behavior in the integral fast reactor. Progress report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    Goal of this project is to determine the consumption of Np-237, Pu-240, Am-241, and Am-243 in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. These four actinides set the long term waste management criteria for spent nuclear fuel; if it can be demonstrated that they can be efficiently consumed in the IFR, then requirements for nuclear waste repositories can be much less demanding. Irradiations in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory`s site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, will be conducted to determine fission and transmutation rates for the four nuclides. The experimental effort involves target package design, fabrication, quality assurance, and irradiation. Post irradiation analyses are required to determine the fission rates and neutron spectra in the EBR-II core.

  7. Actinide behavior in the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    Goal of this project is to determine the consumption of Np-237, Pu-240, Am-241, and Am-243 in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. These four actinides set the long term waste management criteria for spent nuclear fuel; if it can be demonstrated that they can be efficiently consumed in the IFR, then requirements for nuclear waste repositories can be much less demanding. Irradiations in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory's site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, will be conducted to determine fission and transmutation rates for the four nuclides. The experimental effort involves target package design, fabrication, quality assurance, and irradiation. Post irradiation analyses are required to determine the fission rates and neutron spectra in the EBR-II core

  8. Dosimetry for Crystals Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Before shipment to CMS, all PbWO4 crystals produced in China are irradiated there with 60 Co , in order to insure that the induced absorption coefficient is within specifications. Acceptance tests at CERNand at ENEA also include irradiation with gamma rays from 60 Co sources. There were initially discrepancies in quoted doses and doserates as well as in induced absorption coefficients. The present work resolves the discrepancies in irradiation measurements and defines common dosimetry methods for consistency checks between irradiation facilities.

  9. Irradiation and flavor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reineccius, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    Flavor will not be a significant factor in determining the success of irradiated foods entering the U.S. market. The initial applications will use low levels of irradiation that may well result in products with flavor superior to that of products from alternative processing techniques (thermal treatment or chemical fumigation). The success of shelf-stable foods produced via irradiation may be much more dependent upon our ability to deal with the flavor aspects of high levels of irradiation

  10. Food irradiation makes progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooij, J. van

    1984-01-01

    In the past fifteen years, food irradiation processing policies and programmes have been developed both by a number of individual countries, and through projects supported by FAO, IAEA and WHO. These aim at achieving general acceptance and practical implementation of food irradiation through rigorous investigations of its wholesomeness, technological and economic feasibility, and efforts to achieve the unimpeded movement of irradiated foods in international trade. Food irradiation processing has many uses

  11. Driver's Behavior Modeling Using Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehraneh Ghaemi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a hierarchical fuzzy system for human in a driver-vehicle-environment system to model takeover by different drivers. The driver's behavior is affected by the environment. The climate, road and car conditions are included in fuzzy modeling. For obtaining fuzzy rules, experts' opinions are benefited by means of questionnaires on effects of parameters such as climate, road and car conditions on driving capabilities. Also the precision, age and driving individuality are used to model the driver's behavior. Three different positions are considered for driving and decision making. A fuzzy model called Model I is presented for modeling the change of steering angle and speed control by considering time distances with existing cars in these three positions, the information about the speed and direction of car, and the steering angle of car. Also we obtained two other models based on fuzzy rules called Model II and Model III by using Sugeno fuzzy inference. Model II and Model III have less linguistic terms than Model I for the steering angle and direction of car. The results of three models are compared for a driver who drives based on driving laws.

  12. Views of US drivers about driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan F

    2003-01-01

    To assess how drivers view dangers on the highway, what motivates them to drive safely, how they say they reduce their crash and injury risk, and how they rate their own driving skills. Most drivers rated their skills as better than average. The biggest motivating factor for safe driving was concern for safety of others in their vehicle, followed by negative outcomes such as being in a crash, increased insurance costs, and fines. The greatest threats to their safety were thought to be other drivers' actions that increase crash risk such as alcohol impairment or running red lights. In terms of reducing crashes and injuries, drivers tended to focus on actions they could take such as driving defensively or using seat belts. There was less recognition of the role of vehicles and vehicle features in crash or injury prevention. Knowing how drivers view themselves and others, their concerns, and their motivations and techniques for staying out of trouble on the roads provides insight into the difficulty of changing driving practices.

  13. Railway suicide: the psychological effects on drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, R; Tranah, T; O'Donnell, I; Catalan, J

    1992-05-01

    People have jumped (or fallen) in front of trains on the London Underground system in increasing numbers throughout the twentieth century. During the past decade there have been about 100 such incidents each year, of which around 90 would involve the train driver witnessing his train strike the person on the track. Most are suicides or attempts at suicide. They represent major unexpected and violent events in the lives of the train drivers and it might be expected that some of them would respond by developing a post-traumatic stress reaction of the type identified by Horowitz (1976) or other adverse psychological reactions or both. The research reported in this paper was designed to characterize the range of responses of drivers to the experiences of killing or injuring members of the public during the course of their daily work. It was found that 16.3% of the drivers involved in incidents did develop post-traumatic stress disorder and that other diagnoses, e.g. depression and phobic states, were present in 39.5% of drivers when interviewed one month after the incident.

  14. Containers in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolumen, S.; Espinosa, R.

    1997-01-01

    The preservation of food by irradiation is promising technology which increases industrial application. Packaging of irradiated foods is an integral part of the process. Judicious selection of the package material for successful trade is essential. In this paper is presented a brief review of important aspects of packaging in food irradiation [es

  15. Determinants and Drivers of Infectious Disease Threat Events in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Lindgren, Elisabet; Balkanyi, Laszlo; Espinosa, Laura; Almqvist, My S; Penttinen, Pasi; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-04-01

    Infectious disease threat events (IDTEs) are increasing in frequency worldwide. We analyzed underlying drivers of 116 IDTEs detected in Europe during 2008-2013 by epidemic intelligence at the European Centre of Disease Prevention and Control. Seventeen drivers were identified and categorized into 3 groups: globalization and environment, sociodemographic, and public health systems. A combination of >2 drivers was responsible for most IDTEs. The driver category globalization and environment contributed to 61% of individual IDTEs, and the top 5 individual drivers of all IDTEs were travel and tourism, food and water quality, natural environment, global trade, and climate. Hierarchical cluster analysis of all drivers identified travel and tourism as a distinctly separate driver. Monitoring and modeling such disease drivers can help anticipate future IDTEs and strengthen control measures. More important, intervening directly on these underlying drivers can diminish the likelihood of the occurrence of an IDTE and reduce the associated human and economic costs.

  16. Classifying Drivers' Cognitive Load Using EEG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Shaibal; Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin; Begum, Shahina

    2017-01-01

    A growing traffic safety issue is the effect of cognitive loading activities on traffic safety and driving performance. To monitor drivers' mental state, understanding cognitive load is important since while driving, performing cognitively loading secondary tasks, for example talking on the phone, can affect the performance in the primary task, i.e. driving. Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the reliable measures of cognitive load that can detect the changes in instantaneous load and effect of cognitively loading secondary task. In this driving simulator study, 1-back task is carried out while the driver performs three different simulated driving scenarios. This paper presents an EEG based approach to classify a drivers' level of cognitive load using Case-Based Reasoning (CBR). The results show that for each individual scenario as well as using data combined from the different scenarios, CBR based system achieved approximately over 70% of classification accuracy.

  17. Linear transformer driver for pulse generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alexander A; Mazarakis, Michael G; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A; Volkov, Sergey N; Kondratiev, Sergey S; Alexeenko, Vitaly M; Bayol, Frederic; Demol, Gauthier; Stygar, William A

    2015-04-07

    A linear transformer driver includes at least one ferrite ring positioned to accept a load. The linear transformer driver also includes a first power delivery module that includes a first charge storage devices and a first switch. The first power delivery module sends a first energy in the form of a first pulse to the load. The linear transformer driver also includes a second power delivery module including a second charge storage device and a second switch. The second power delivery module sends a second energy in the form of a second pulse to the load. The second pulse has a frequency that is approximately three times the frequency of the first pulse. The at least one ferrite ring is positioned to force the first pulse and the second pulse to the load by temporarily isolating the first pulse and the second pulse from an electrical ground.

  18. Drivers and moderators of business decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Pretorius

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Reports of business failure elicit various reactions, while research in this domain often appears to be limited by a lack of access to information about failure and by the negativity that surrounds it. Those who have experienced failure do not readily talk about it, or they disappear from the radar screen of researchers. Yet failure is preceded by decline which, when focused on strategically, can reduce eventual failures if early action is taken. The main purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual framework or typology of the drivers and moderators of business decline. Design/methodology/approach: After applying the "grounded theory" approach to the academic literature on decline and failure, a conceptual framework for the variables that drive and moderate business decline is proposed. Findings: The study proposes that decline has three core drivers, three peripheral drivers and four moderators. The core drivers identified are: resource munificence; leadership as origin; and causality (strategic versus operational origin of decline. The three peripheral drivers are: unique preconditions; continuous decisions impact; and extremes dichotomy. The study describes four moderators of the drivers: life cycle stage; stakeholder perspective; quantitative versus qualitative nature of signs and causes; and finally the age and size effects. Research limitations/implications: The proposed conceptual framework is based on literature only, although it has found support during discussions with practitioners. It is proposed to readers of this journal for scrutiny and validation. Practical implications: Strategists need to understand what drives decline in order to act timeously; practitioners who have an insight into the moderators with their impacts could make better decisions in response to decline in organisations and possibly avoid business failure. Originality/Value: Understanding business decline is still a huge theoretical challenge, which

  19. Irradiation of foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeberg, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Foodstuffs are irradiated to make them keep better. The ionizing radiation is not so strong as to cause radioactivity in the foodstuffs. At least so far, irradiation has not gained acceptance among consumers, although it has been shown to be a completely safe method of preservation. Irradiation causes only slight chemical changes in food. What irradiation does, however, is to damage living organisms, such as bacteria, DNA and proteins, thereby making the food keep longer. Irradiation can be detected from the food afterwards; thus it can be controlled effectively. (orig.)

  20. [Occupational stress situation analysis of different types of train drivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Gu, Guizhen; Wu, Hui; Yu, Shanfa

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the status of occupational stress in different types of train drivers. By using cluster sampling method, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 1 339 train drivers (including 289 passenger train drivers, 637 freight trains drivers, 339 passenger shunting train drivers, and 74 high speed rail drivers) from a Railway Bureau depot. The survey included individual factors, occupational stress factors, stress response factors and stress mitigating factors. The occupational stress factors, stress response factors and mitigating factors were measured by the revised effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model questionnaires and occupational stress measurement scale. By using the method of covariance analysized the difference of occupational stress factors of all types train drivers, the method of Stepwise regression was used to analyze the effection (R(2)) of occupational stress factors and stress mitigating factors on stress response factors. Covariance analysis as covariates in age, education level, length of service and marital status showed that the scores of ERI (1.58 ± 0.05), extrinsic effort (19.88 ± 0.44), rewards (23.43 ± 0.43), intrinsic effort (17.86 ± 0.36), physical environment (5.70 ± 0.22), social support (30.51 ± 0.88) and daily tension (10.27 ± 0.38 ) of high speed rail drivers were higher than other drivers (F values were 6.06, 11.32, 7.05, 13.25, 5.20, 9.48 and 6.14 respectively, P occupational stress factors and mitigating factors to depressive symptoms of train drivers was high speed rail drivers (R(2) = 0.64), passenger train drivers (R(2) = 0.44), passenger shunting train drivers (R(2) = 0.39), freight trains drivers (R(2) = 0.38); job satisfaction of train drivers was high speed rail drivers (R(2) = 0.68), passenger train drivers (R(2) = 0.62), freight trains drivers (R(2) = 0.43), passenger shunting train drivers(R(2) = 0.38); to daily tension of train drivers was high speed rail drivers (R(2) = 0.54), passenger train drivers (R(2) = 0