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Sample records for irradiated candidate materials

  1. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J., E-mail: jiachao.chen@psi.ch; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-15

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2–8 × 10{sup −6} dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  2. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  3. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at temperatures of either 60 or 250 degrees C. Preliminary results have been obtained for several of these materials irradiated at 60 degrees C. The results show that irradiation at this temperature reduces the fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The unloading compliance technique developed for the subsize disk compact specimens works quite well, particularly for materials with lower toughness. Specimens of materials with very high toughness deform excessively, and this results in experimental difficulties

  4. Fracture toughness of irradiated candidate materials for ITER first wall/blanket structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, Kiyoyuki

    1994-01-01

    Disk compact specimens of candidate materials for first wall/blanket structures in ITER have been irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 or 250 degrees C. These specimens have been tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250 degrees C to determine J-integral values and tearing moduli. The results show that irradiation at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steels, but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the test temperature increases. Irradiation at 250 degrees C is more damaging than at 90 degrees C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. Ferritic-martensitic steels are embrittled by the irradiation, and show the lowest toughness at room temperature

  5. Post-Irradiation Properties of Candidate Materials for High-Power Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, H.G.; Ludewig, H.; Mausner, L.F.; Simos, N.; Thieberger, P.; Brookhaven; Hayato, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; McDonald, K.T.; Sheppard, J.; Trung, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    The desire of the high-energy-physics community for more intense secondary particle beams motivates the development of multi-megawatt, pulsed proton sources. The targets needed to produce these secondary particle beams must be sufficiently robust to withstand the intense pressure waves arising from the high peak-energy deposition which an intense pulsed beam will deliver. In addition, the materials used for the targets must continue to perform in a severe radiation environment. The effect of the beam-induced pressure waves can be mitigated by use of target materials with high-yield strength and/or low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) [1, 2, 3]. We report here first results of an expanded study of the effects of irradiation on several additional candidate materials with high strength (AlBeMet, beryllium, Ti-V6-Al4) or low CTE (a carbon-carbon composite, a new Toyota ''gum'' metal alloy [4], Super-Invar)

  6. Deuterium ion irradiation damage and deuterium trapping mechanism in candidate stainless steel material (JPCA2) for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizuka, Norihiro; Kurita, Takaaki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Muroga, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    An improved austenitic stainless steel (JPCA), a candidate material for fusion reactor, is irradiated at room temperature with deuterium ion beams. Desorption spectra of deuterium gas is measured at various increased temperatures and defects formed under irradiation are observed by transmission electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of the thermal release of deuteriums and the characteristics of irradiation-induced defects involved in the process. In the deuterium deportion spectra observed, five release stages are found to exist at 90 deg C, 160 deg C, 220 deg C, 300 deg C and 400 deg C, referred to as Stage I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Stage I is interpreted as representing the release of deuteriums trapped in point defects (presumably vacancies) formed under irradiation. The energy of desorption from the trapping sites is estimated at 0.8 eV. Stage II is concluded to be associated with the release of deuteriums trapped in a certain kind of existing defects. Stage III involves the release of deuteriums that are trapped in dislocations, dislocation loops or dislocated portions of stacking fault tetrahedra. This release occurs significantly in processed materials and other materials irradiated with high energy ion beams that may cause cascade damage. Stage IV is interpreted in terms of thermal decomposition of small deuterium clusters. Stage V is associated with the decomposition of rather large deuterium clusters grown on the {111} plane. (Nogami, K.)

  7. Surface damage of TFTR protective plate candidate materials by energetic D+ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the surface damage of ATJ graphite, V, Cu, and Type 316 stainless steel under 60-keV D + irradiation. The irradiations were conducted in the pulsed mode. For a total accumulated dose of 8.1 x 10 18 ions/cm 2 , blisters were readily seen for Cu surfaces, but no blisters were observed on Type 316 stainless steel and vanadium surfaces. For the case of ATJ graphite, the surface damage was observed in the form of ridges and grooves. In the case of copper, many large blisters with diameters ranging from 3.5 μm to 46 μm are observed in addition to some small ones (average diameter approx. 2 μm. The blister density of the large blisters is the highest in the case of copper (1.1 x 10 5 blisters/cm 2 ). These observations of blister formation are related to the differences in the premeability of deuterium in these materials. An examination of the cross section of the ridges in fractured samples of graphite indicates that they are not hollow. The mechanisms of formation of these ridges is not clear at present. 1 figure

  8. Microstructural evolution during dual-ion irradiation of candidate fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolfi, F.V. Jr.; Ayrault, G.

    1979-01-01

    Single- and dual-ion (heavy ions + 3 He) irradiations of Fe-20wt.%Ni-15wt.%Cr, V-15wt.%Cr and Ti-6wt.%Al-4wt.%V alloys have been performed over a range of temperatures and doses. Various features of microstructural evolution during irradiation are reported as determined by transmission electron microscopy and Auger spectroscopy investigations

  9. Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Candidate SNS Target Container Materials after Proton and Neutron Irradiation; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the tensile properties of EC316LN austenitic stainless steel and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel after 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses in the range 0.54 to 2.53 dpa. Irradiation temperatures were in the range 30 to 100 C. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature (20 C) and 164 C to study the effects of test temperature on the tensile properties. Test materials displayed significant radiation-induced hardening and loss of ductility due to irradiation. The EC316LN stainless steel maintained notable strain-hardening capability after irradiation, while the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel posted negative strain hardening. In the EC316LN stainless steel, increasing the test temperature from 20 C to 164 C decreased the strength by 13 to 18% and the ductility by 8 to 36%. The tensile data for the EC316LN stainless steel irradiated in spallation conditions were in line with the values in a database for 316 stainless steels for doses up to 1 dpa irradiated in fission reactors at temperatures below 200 C. However, extra strengthening induced by helium and hydrogen contents is evident in some specimens irradiated to above about 1 dpa. The effect of test temperature for the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel was less significant than for the EC316LN stainless steel. In addition, strain-hardening behaviors were analyzed for EC316LN and 316L stainless steels. The strain-hardening rate of the 316 stainless steels was largely dependent on test temperature. It was estimated that the 316 stainless steels would retain more than 1% true stains to necking at 164 C after irradiation to 5 dpa. A calculation using reduction of area (RA) measurements and stress-strain data predicted positive strain hardening during plastic instability

  10. Temperature effects on the mechanical properties of candidate SNS target container materials after proton and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, T.S.; Farrell, K.; Lee, E.H.; Mansur, L.K.; Maloy, S.A.; James, M.R.; Johnson, W.R.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the tensile properties of EC316LN austenitic stainless steel and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel after 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses in the range 0.54-2.53 dpa at 30-100 deg. C. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature (20 deg. C) and 164 deg. C. The EC316LN stainless steel maintained notable strain-hardening capability after irradiation, while the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel posted negative hardening in the engineering stress-strain curves. In the EC316LN stainless steel, increasing the test temperature from 20 to 164 deg. C decreased the strength by 13-18% and the ductility by 8-36%. The effect of test temperature for the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel was less significant than for the EC316LN stainless steel. In addition, strain-hardening behaviors were analyzed for EC316LN and 316L stainless steels. The strain-hardening rate of the 316 stainless steels was largely dependent on test temperature. A calculation using reduction of area measurements and stress-strain data predicted positive strain hardening during plastic instability

  11. Materials modified by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Application of radiation in pharmaceutical sciences and cosmetology, polymer materials, food industry, environment, health camre products and packing production is described. Nano-technology is described more detailed, because it is less known as irradiation using technology. Economic influence of the irradiation on the materials value addition is shown

  12. Analysis of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Papers presented at the UKAEA Conference on Materials Analysis by Physical Techniques (1987) covered a wide range of techniques as applied to the analysis of irradiated materials. These varied from reactor component materials, materials associated with the Authority's radwaste disposal programme, fission products and products associated with the decommissioning of nuclear reactors. An invited paper giving a very comprehensive review of Laser Ablation Microprobe Mass Spectroscopy (LAMMS) was included in the programme. (author)

  13. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  14. Microstructure of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was on the changes produced in the microstructure of metals, ceramics, and semiconductors by irradiation with energetic particles. the symposium brought together those working in the different material systems, which revealed that there are a remarkable number of similarities in the irradiation-produced microstructures in the different classes of materials. Experimental, computational and theoretical contributions were intermixed in all of the sessions. This provided an opportunity for these groups, which should interact, to do so. Separate abstracts were prepared for 58 papers in this book

  15. Neutron irradiation behavior of ITER candidate beryllium grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N. [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Scientific Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Melder, R.R.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the main candidate materials both for the neutron multiplier in a solid breeding blanket and for the plasma facing components. That is why its behaviour under the typical for fusion reactor loading, in particular, under the neutron irradiation is of a great importance. This paper presents mechanical properties, swelling and microstructure of six beryllium grades (DshG-200, TR-30, TshG-56, TRR, TE-30, TIP-30) fabricated by VNIINM, Russia and also one - (S-65) fabricated by Brush Wellman, USA. The average grain size of the beryllium grades varied from 8 to 25 {mu}m, beryllium oxide content was 0.8-3.2 wt. %, initial tensile strength was 250-680 MPa. All the samples were irradiated in active zone of SM-3 reactor up to the fast neutron fluence (5.5-6.2) {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (2.7-3.0 dpa, helium content up to 1150 appm), E > 0.1 MeV at two temperature ranges: T{sub 1} = 130-180degC and T{sub 2} = 650-700degC. After irradiation at 130-180degC no changes in samples dimensions were revealed. After irradiation at 650-700degC swelling of the materials was found to be in the range 0.1-2.1 %. Beryllium grades TR-30 and TRR, having the smallest grain size and highest beryllium oxide content, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was no more than 0.1 % at 650-700degC and fluence 5.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. Tensile and compression test results and microstructure parameters measured before and after irradiation are also presented. (author)

  16. Updated candidate list for engineered barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes candidate materials to be evaluated over the next several years during advanced design phases for the waste package to be used for the underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes at the Yucca Mountain facility

  17. Characterization of nanoparticles as candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Ferreira, E.H.; Robertis, E. de; Landi, S.M.; Gouvea, C.P.; Archanjo, B.S.; Almeida, C.A.; Araujo, J.R. de; Kuznetsov, O.; Achete, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the characterization of three different nanoparticles (silica, silver and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) as candidate reference material. We focus our analysis on the size distribution of those particles as measured by different microscopy techniques. (author)

  18. Certification of biological candidates reference materials by neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, Denis V.; Nesterova, Yulia V.; Merkulov, Viktor G.

    2018-03-01

    The paper gives the results of interlaboratory certification of new biological candidate reference materials by neutron activation analysis recommended by the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland). The correctness and accuracy of the applied method was statistically estimated for the determination of trace elements in candidate reference materials. The procedure of irradiation in the reactor thermal fuel assembly without formation of fast neutrons was carried out. It excluded formation of interfering isotopes leading to false results. The concentration of more than 20 elements (e.g., Ba, Br, Ca, Co, Ce, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Th, Tb, Yb, U, Zn) in candidate references of tobacco leaves and bottom sediment compared to certified reference materials were determined. It was shown that the average error of the applied method did not exceed 10%.

  19. Irradiation environment and materials behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation environment is unique for materials used in a nuclear energy system. Material itself as well as irradiation and environmental conditions determine the material behaviour. In this review, general directions of research and development of materials in an irradiation environment together with the role of materials science are discussed first, and then recent materials problems are described for energy systems which are already existing (LWR), under development (FBR) and to be realized in the future (CTR). Topics selected are (1) irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels for LWRs, (2) high fluence performance of cladding and wrapper materials for fuel subassemblies of FBRs and (3) high fluence irradiation effects in the first wall and blanket structural materials of a fusion reactor. Several common topics in those materials issues are selected and discussed. Suggestions are made on some elements of radiation effects which might be purposely utilized in the process of preparing innovative materials. (J.P.N.) 69 refs

  20. Irradiating strand material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, J.R.; Brown, M.J.; Loan, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Conductors covered with insulation which is to be irradiated are passed between two groups of coaxial sheaves mounted rotatably individually. Successive sections of the conductors are advanced past the window of one accelerator head, around the associated sheave or sheaves, and then past the window of another accelerator head. The accelerators face in substantially opposite directions and are staggered along the paths of the conductors to avoid any substantial overlap of the electron beams associated therewith. The windows extend vertically to encompass all the generally horizontal passes of the conductors as between the two groups of sheaves. Preferably, conductors are strung-up between the sheaves in a modified figure eight pattern. The pattern is a figure eight modified to intermittently include a pass between the sheaves which is parallel to a line joining the axes of the two groups of sheaves. This reverses the direction of travel of the conductors and optimizes the uniformity of exposure of the cross sectional area of the insulation of the conductors to irradiation. The use of a figure eight path for the conductors causes the successive sections of the conductor to turn about the longitudinal axes thereof as they are advanced around the sheaves. In this way the insulation is more uniformly irradiated. In a preferred embodiment, twisted conductor pairs may be irradiated. The twist accentuates the longitudinal turning of the conductor pair. The irradiation of twisted pairs achieves obvious manufacturing economies while avoiding the necessity of having to twist irradiation cross-linked conductors

  1. Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept. The objective of the proposed research was to investigate degradation of materials in the supercritical water environment (SCW). First, representative alloys from the important classes of candidate materials were studied for their corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance in supercritical water. These included ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Ni-base alloys. Corrosion and SCC tests were conducted at various temperatures and exposure times, as well as in various water chemistries. Second, emerging plasma surface modification and grain boundary engineering technologies were applied to modify the near surface chemistry, microstructure, and stress-state of the alloys prior to corrosion testing. Third, the effect of irradiation on corrosion and SCC of alloys in the as-received and modified/engineered conditions were examined by irradiating samples using high-energy protons and then exposing them to SCW

  2. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  3. Effects of irradiation and mechanical stress on the superconducting properties of candidate magnet conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, C.L. Jr.; Luhman, T.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage on the superconducting critical properties of candidate magnet materials are reviewed. Neutron, and charged-particle irradiation results are covered. The discussion is restricted to effects in NbTi and the A15-compound superconductors. The utility of these conductors in radiation fields is first explored by defining the magnitude of critical-property changes with the fluence of various irradiating particles. The physical mechanisms that couple the irradiation defects to the observed critical-property changes are discussed. Annealing/recovery data on irradiated materials are included where they pertain to the understanding of the physical mechanisms involved, and thereby to the desirability of magnet annealing in actual operating circumstances

  4. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    This is an editorial article (preface) for the publication of symposium papers in the Journal of Nuclear materials: These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15–19, 2015.

  5. Irradiation plant for flowable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshard, E.

    1975-01-01

    The irradiation plant can be used to treat various flowable materials including effluent or sewage sludge. The plant contains a concrete vessel in which a partition is mounted to form two coaxial irradiation chambers through which the flowable material can be circulated by means of an impeller. The partition can be formed to house tubes of radiation sources and to provide a venturi-like member about the impeller. The operation of the impeller is reversed periodically to assure movement of both heavy and light particles in the flow. (U.S.)

  6. AGC 2 Irradiated Material Properties Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technologies Graphite Research and Development Program is conducting an extensive graphite irradiation experiment to provide data for licensing of a high temperature reactor (HTR) design. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor designs. , Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphite grades have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for new HTR reactor designs. To support the design and licensing of HTR core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade, with a specific emphasis on data accounting for the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the HTR candidate graphite grades. Further details on the research and development activities and associated rationale required to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the HTR are documented in the graphite technology research and development plan.

  7. Materials irradiation research in neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Materials irradiation researches are planned in Neutron Science Research Program. A materials irradiation facility has been conceived as one of facilities in the concept of Neutron Science Research Center at JAERI. The neutron irradiation field of the facility is characterized by high flux of spallation neutrons with very wide energy range up to several hundred MeV, good accessibility to the irradiation field, good controllability of irradiation conditions, etc. Extensive use of such a materials irradiation facility is expected for fundamental materials irradiation researches and R and D of nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven incineration plant for long-lifetime nuclear waste. In this paper, outline concept of the materials irradiation facility, characteristics of the irradiation field, preliminary technical evaluation of target to generate spallation neutrons, and materials researches expected for Neutron Science Research program are described. (author)

  8. Neutron irradiation effects on plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Rödig, M.; Snead, L. L.; Wu, C. H.

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the effects of neutron irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties and bulk tritium retention of armour materials (beryllium, tungsten and carbon). For each material, the main properties affected by neutron irradiation are described and the specific tests of neutron irradiated armour materials under thermal shock and disruption conditions are summarized. Based on current knowledge, the expected thermal and structural performance of neutron irradiated armour materials in the ITER plasma facing components are analysed.

  9. Neutron irradiation effects on plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Roedig, M.; Snead, L.L.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of neutron irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties and bulk tritium retention of armour materials (beryllium, tungsten and carbon). For each material, the main properties affected by neutron irradiation are described and the specific tests of neutron irradiated armour materials under thermal shock and disruption conditions are summarized. Based on current knowledge, the expected thermal and structural performance of neutron irradiated armour materials in the ITER plasma facing components are analysed

  10. Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab

  11. An annotated history of container candidate material selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.

    1988-07-01

    This paper documents events in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project that have influenced the selection of metals and alloys proposed for fabrication of waste package containers for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The time period from 1981 to 1988 is covered in this annotated history. The history traces the candidate materials that have been considered at different stages of site characterization planning activities. At present, six candidate materials are considered and described in the 1988 Consultation Draft of the NNWSI Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The six materials are grouped into two alloy families, copper-base materials and iron to nickel-base materials with an austenitic structure. The three austenitic candidates resulted from a 1983 survey of a longer list of candidate materials; the other three candidates resulted from a special request from DOE in 1984 to evaluate copper and copper-base alloys. 24 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kaoumi, Djamel; Bai, Xian-Ming

    2017-12-01

    The 8th symposium on Microstructural Progresses in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) was held at San Diego Convention Center and Marriott Marquis & Marina, San Diego, California, USA, February 26-March 2, 2017, as part of the TMS 2017 146th Annual Meeting and Exhibition. Since 2003, when the first MPIM symposium was held in the same place, the symposium has been held in odd years and has grown to one of the biggest symposia in the TMS Annual Meeting which invites more than sixty symposia. In the 8th MPIM symposium, a total of 106 oral and poster presentations, including 16 invited talks, were delivered for 4 days.

  13. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  14. Research and materials irradiation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Guigon, B.

    2004-01-01

    Devoted to the fundamental and applied research on materials irradiation, research reactors are nuclear installations where high neutrons flux are maintained. After a general presentation of the research reactors in the world and more specifically in France, this document presents the heavy water cooled reactors and the water cooled reactors. The third part explains the technical characteristics, thermal power, neutron flux, operating and details the Osiris, the RHF (high flux reactor), the Orphee and the Jules Horowitz reactors. The last part deals with the possible utilizations. (A.L.B.)

  15. SEM analysis for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaosong; Yao Liang

    2008-06-01

    A radiation-proof Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) system is introduced. It has been widely used in various areas. For analyzing radioactive samples, normal SEM system needs lots of alterations. Based on KYKY-2800B SEM, the sample room, belt line, operating table and aerator were updated. New radiation-proof SEM system has used to analytic surface contaminated samples and RPV materials samples. An elementary means of SEM analysis for radioactive samples was studied, and this examination supported some available references for further irradiated fuel researches. (authors)

  16. Irradiation devices for fusion reactor materials results obtained from irradiated lithium aluminate at the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.; Rasneur, B.; Botter, F.

    1986-06-01

    Studies about controlled fusion reactor of the Tokamak type require the examination of the radiation effects on the behaviour of various potential materials. Thus, in the first part of this paper, are presented the devices adapted to these materials studies and used in the OSIRIS reactor. In a second part, is described an experiment of irradiation ceramics used as candidates for breeding material and are given the first results

  17. High energy electron irradiation of flowable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offermann, B.P.

    1975-01-01

    In order to efficiently irradiate a flowable material with high energy electrons, a hollow body is disposed in a container for the material and the material is caused to flow in the form of a thin layer across a surface of the body from or to the interior of the container while the material flowing across the body surface is irradiated. (U.S.)

  18. Candidate materials to prevent brittle fracture - (186)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanzy, Y.; Roland, V.

    2004-01-01

    For heavy transport or dual purpose casks, selecting the appropriate materials for the body is a key decision. To get a Type B(U) approval, it is necessary to demonstrate that the mechanical strength of the material is good enough at temperature as low as -40 C so as to prevent the cask from any risk of brittle fracture in regulatory accident conditions. Different methods are available to provide such a demonstration and can lead to different choices. It should be noted also that the material compositions given by national or international standards display relatively wide tolerances and therefore are not necessarily sufficient to guarantee a required toughness. It is therefore necessary to specify to the fabricator the minimum value for toughness, and to verify it. This paper gives an overview of the different methods and materials that are used in several countries. Although the safety is strongly linked to the choice of the material, it is shown that many other parameters are important, such as the design, the fabrication process (multi layer, cast or forged body), the welding material and process, the ability to detect flaws, and the measured and/or calculated stress level, including stress concentration, in particular when bolts are used. The paper will show that relying exclusively on high toughness at low temperature does not necessarily deliver the maximum safety as compared with other choices. It follows that differences in approaches to licensing by different competent authorities may bias the choice of material depending on the country of application, even though B(U) licenses are meant to guarantee unilaterally a uniform minimum level of safety

  19. Delayed hydride cracking and elastic properties of Excel, a candidate CANDU-SCWR pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Z.L.

    2010-01-01

    Excel, a Zr alloy which contains 3.5%Sn, 0.8%Nb and 0.8%Mo, shows high strength, good corrosion resistance, excellent creep-resistance and dimension stability and thus is selected as a candidate pressure tube material for CANDU-SCWR. In the present work, the delayed hydride cracking properties (K IH and the DHC growth rates), the hydrogen solubility and elastic modulus were measured in the irradiated and unirradiated Excel pressure tube material. (author)

  20. Immune reactivity of candidate reference materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Aalbers, Marja; Fötisch, Kay; de Heer, Pleuni; Notten, Silla; Vieths, Stefan; van Ree, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Immune reactivity is a key issue in the evaluation of the quality of recombinant allergens as potential reference materials. Within the frame of the CREATE project, the immune reactivity of the natural and recombinant versions of the major allergens of birch pollen (Bet v 1), grass pollen (Phl p 1

  1. Irradiated film material and method of the irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The irradiation of polymer film material is a strengthening procedure. To obtain a substantial uniformity in the radiation dosage profile, the film is irradiated in a trough having lateral deflection blocks adjacent to the film edges. These deflect the electrons towards the surface of the trough bottom for further deflection towards the film edge. (C.F.)

  2. Candidate container materials for Yucca Mountain waste package designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; Halsey, W.G.; Gdowski, G.E.; Clarke, W.L.

    1991-09-01

    Materials considered as candidates for fabricating nuclear waste containers are reviewed in the context of the Conceptual Design phase of a potential repository located at Yucca Mountain. A selection criteria has been written for evaluation of candidate materials for the next phase -- Advanced Conceptual Design. The selection criteria is based on the conceptual design of a thin-walled container fabricated from a single metal or alloy; the criteria consider the performance requirements on the container and the service environment in which the containers will be emplaced. A long list of candidate materials is evaluated against the criteria, and a short list of materials is proposed for advanced characterization in the next design phase

  3. Stock selection of high-dose-irradiation-resistant materials for filter press under high-dose irradiation operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro; Minami, Mamoru; Hara, Kouji; Yamashita, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    In a volume reduction process for the decontamination of contained soil, the performance degradation of a filter press is expected owing to material deterioration under high-dose irradiation. Eleven-stock selection of candidate materials including polymers, fibers and rubbers for the filter press was conducted to achieve a high performance of volume reduction of contaminated soil and the following results were derived. Crude rubber and nylon were selected as prime candidates for packing, diaphragm and filter plate materials. Polyethylene was also selected as a prime candidate for the filter cloth material. (author)

  4. Irradiation probe and laboratory for irradiated material evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutny, S.; Kupca, L.; Beno, P.; Stubna, M.; Mrva, V.; Chmelo, P.

    1975-09-01

    The survey and assessment are given of the tasks carried out in the years 1971 to 1975 within the development of methods for structural materials irradiation and of a probe for the irradiation thereof in the A-1 reactor. The programme and implementation of laboratory tests of the irradiation probe are described. In the actual reactor irradiation, the pulse tube length between the pressure governor and the irradiation probe is approximately 20 m, the diameter is 2.2 mm. Temperature reaches 800 degC while the pressure control system operates at 20 degC. The laboratory tests (carried out at 20 degC) showed that the response time of the pressure control system to a stepwise pressure change in the irradiation probe from 0 to 22 at. is 0.5 s. Pressure changes were also studied in the irradiation probe and in the entire system resulting from temperature changes in the irradiation probe. Temperature distribution in the body of the irradiation probe heating furnace was determined. (B.S.)

  5. Assessment of repair welding technologies of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Damages of reactor internals of stainless steels caused by SCC and fatigue were identified in aged BWR plants. Repair-welding is one of the practical countermeasure candidates to restore the soundness of components and structures. The project of 'Assessment of Repair welding Technologies of Irradiated Materials' is being carried out to develop the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals. In fiscal 2011, we investigated the weldability of stainless steel 316L irradiated by welding (TIG) tungsten inert gas. Furthermore, the tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the welds were investigated. Cross-sectional observation of heat affected zone (HAZ) of the bead on plate TIG weldments (heat input 4 kJ/cm) of irradiated SUS316L stainless steel containing 0.026 ~ 0.12appm helium showed degradation of grain boundaries due to helium accumulation. Degree of the degradation depended on the amount of helium. No deterioration of grain boundaries was observed by bead on plate welding with one pass one layer when helium content was 0.039appm. The tensile strengths of welds in non-irradiated and irradiated material were similar. However, the elongation of a weldment by irradiated SUS316L containing 0.124appm Helium was lower than non-irradiated. It was estimated to cause the effects of helium bubbles. The SCC susceptibility of the HAZ was no significant difference compared with other locations. (author)

  6. Comparison of swelling for structural materials on neutron and ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, B.A.

    1986-03-01

    The swelling of V-base alloys, Type 316 stainless steel, Fe-25Ni-15Cr alloys, ferritic steels, Cu, Ni, Nb-1% Zr, and Mo on neutron irradiation is compared with the swelling for these materials on ion irradiation. The results of this comparison show that utilization of the ion-irradiation technique provides for a discriminative assessment of the potential for swelling of candidate materials for fusion reactors.

  7. Tests of candidate materials for particle bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Wales, D.

    1987-01-01

    Rhenium metal hot frits and zirconium carbide-coated fuel particles appear suitable for use in flowing hydrogen to at least 2000 K, based on previous tests. Recent tests on alternate candidate cooled particle and frit materials are described. Silicon carbide-coated particles began to react with rhenium frit material at 1600 K, forming a molten silicide at 2000 K. Silicon carbide was extensively attacked by hydrogen at 2066 K for 30 minutes, losing 3.25% of its weight. Vitrous carbon was also rapidly attacked by hydrogen at 2123 K, losing 10% of its weight in two minutes. Long term material tests on candidate materials for closed cycle helium cooled particle bed fuel elements are also described. Surface imperfections were found on the surface of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles after ninety days exposure to flowing (∼500 ppM) impure helium at 1143 K. The imperfections were superficial and did not affect particle strength

  8. Survey of Swedish buffer material candidates and methods for characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlstroem, M.; Pusch, R.

    1987-12-01

    The study has given a good overview of potential clay buffer candidates in the part of Sweden that offers the best possibilities to find large accessible quantities of smectitic materials. The most promising Scanian materials are those in the Kaageroed and Vallaakra (Margreteberg) areas since they represent the most smectitic ones, which may serve as raw material for the production of canister embedment. The moraine clays in the Lund-Landskrona region seem to be useful for backfilling purposes. A refined version of Reynolds technique is suggested as an SKB standard for prospecting and characterization of buffer materials. (orig./DG)

  9. Evaluation of irradiated coating material specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Lee Moon

    2007-12-01

    Evaluation result of irradiated coating material specimens - Coating material specimens radiated Gamma Energy(Co 60) in air condition. - Evaluation conditions was above 1 X 10 4 Gy/hr, and radiated TID 2.0 X 10 6 Gy. - The radiated coating material specimens, No Checking, Cracking, Flaking, Delamination, Peeling and Blistering. - Coating system at the Kori no. 1 and APR 1400 Nuclear power plant, evaluation of irradiated coating materials is in accordance with owner's requirement(2.0 X 10 6 Gy)

  10. Low cycle fatigue of irradiated LMFBR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    A review of low cycle fatigue data on irradiated LMFBR materials was conducted and extensive graphical representations of available data are presented. Representative postirradiation tensile properties of annealed 304 and 316 SS are selected and employed in several predictive methods to estimate irradiated material fatigue curves. Experimental fatigue data confirm the use of predictive methods for establishing conservative design curves over the range of service conditions relevant to such CRBRP components as core former, fixed radial shielding, core barrel, lower inlet module and upper internals structures. New experimental data on fatigue curves and creep-fatigue interaction in irradiated 20 percent cold worked (CW) 316 SS and Alloy 718 would support the design of removable radial shielding and upper internals in CRBRP. New experimental information on notched fatigue behavior and cyclic stress-strain curves of all these materials in the irradiated condition could provide significant design data

  11. Mechanical properties of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.; Robach, J.; Wirth, B.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of metals is considered with particular attention being paid to the development of defect-free channels following uniaxial tensile loading. The in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique is coupled with dislocation dynamic computer simulations to reveal the fundamental processes governing the elimination of defects by glissile dislocations. The observations of preliminary experiments are reported.(author)

  12. Cryogenic Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Candidate Materials for Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, JIm; Canavan, Ed; Jahromi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Spacecraft and instruments on space missions are built using a wide variety of carefully-chosen materials. In addition to having mechanical properties appropriate for surviving the launch environment, these materials generally must have thermal conductivity values which meet specific requirements in their operating temperature ranges. Space missions commonly propose to include materials for which the thermal conductivity is not well known at cryogenic temperatures. We developed a test facility in 2004 at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center to measure material thermal conductivity at temperatures between 4 and 300 Kelvin, and we have characterized many candidate materials since then. The measurement technique is not extremely complex, but proper care to details of the setup, data acquisition and data reduction is necessary for high precision and accuracy. We describe the thermal conductivity measurement process and present results for several materials.

  13. Structural material irradiations in FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA); instrumentation and control system; MOTA neutronic data; pressurized tube specimens; stress-rupture measurements for reactor materials; miniature specimen design; the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell at the FFTF; support services; and general information concerning the FFTF

  14. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to −80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use. - Highlights: ► A study is performed to quantify low temperature irradiation effects on polymer materials and BIs. ► Low temperature irradiation alters the balance of cross-linking and chain scissoning in polymers. ► Low temperatures provide radioprotection for BIs. ► Benefits of low temperatures are application specific and must be considered when dose setting.

  15. Evaluation of Candidate Linear Variable Displacement Transducers for High Temperature Irradiations in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.; Daw, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to promote nuclear science and technology in the U.S. Given this designation, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A fundamental component of the ATR NSUF program is to develop in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation experiments. Dimensional change is a key parameter that must be monitored during irradiation of new materials being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, dimensional changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the ATR and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data (i.e., only characterizing the end state when samples are removed from the reactor) and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable displacement transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDT vendor designs were identified for consideration - a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 C. Initial evaluation efforts include collecting calibration data as a function of temperature, long duration testing of LVDT response while held at high temperature, and the assessment of changes

  16. The construction of irradiated material examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Lee, Key Soon; Herr, Young Hoi

    1990-03-01

    A detail design of the examination process, the hot cell facility and the annexed facility of the irradiated material examination facility (IMEF) which will be utilized to examine and evaluate physical and mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated materials, has been performed. Also a start-up work of the underground structure construction has been launched out. The project management and tasks required for the license application were duly carried out. The resultant detail design data will be used for the next step. (author)

  17. Polymeric materials obtained by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, M.; Moraru, R.; Martin, D.; Radoiu, M.; Marghitu, S.; Oproiu, C.

    1995-01-01

    Research activities in the field of electron beam irradiation of monomer aqueous solution to produce polymeric materials used for waste waters treatment, agriculture and medicine are presented. The technologies and special features of these polymeric materials are also described. The influence of the chemical composition of the solution to ba irradiated, absorbed dose level and absorbed dose rate level are discussed. Two kinds of polyelectrolytes, PA and PV types and three kinds of hydrogels, pAAm, pAAmNa and pNaAc types, the production of which was first developed with IETI-10000 Co-60 source and then adapted to the linacs built in Accelerator Laboratory, are described. (author)

  18. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10 21 to 10 22 n/cm 2

  19. Post irradiation examinations on HTTR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Haruyuki; Ohmi, Masao; Eto, Motokuni; Watanabe, Katsutoshi

    1995-01-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) is being constructed at Oarai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In order to develop necessary materials for the HTTR, after irradiations in the JMTR, PIEs are being carried out on these materials in the JMTRHL (JMTR Hot Laboratory). Impact test, tensile test, fatigue test, creep test, metallography and so on were performed for irradiated 2 1/4Cr 1Mo steel as the pressure vessel material and Alloy 800H as the cladding material of the control rod. A fatigue testing machine and four creep testing machines newly designed were fabricated and installed in the steel cells in order to evaluate the integrity of the HTTR materials. The development process and PIE results obtained with these machines are given in this paper

  20. Space Environmental Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Nehls, Mary; Semmel, Charles; Hovater, Mary; Gray, Perry; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues research into the utilization of photonic materials for spacecraft propulsion. Spacecraft propulsion, using photonic materials, will be achieved using a solar sail. A solar sail operates on the principle that photons, originating from the sun, impart pressure to the sail and therefore provide a source for spacecraft propulsion. The pressure imparted ot a solar sail can be increased, up to a factor of two, if the sun-facing surface is perfectly reflective. Therefore, these solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic sun-facing layer, a thin polymeric substrate and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. Near term solar sail propelled science missions are targeting the Lagrange point 1 (L1) as well as locations sunward of L1 as destinations. These near term missions include the Solar Polar Imager and the L1 Diamond. The Environmental Effects Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) continues to actively characterize solar sail material in preparation for these near term solar sail missions. Previous investigations indicated that space environmental effects on sail material thermo-optical properties were minimal and would not significantly affect the propulsion efficiency of the sail. These investigations also indicated that the sail material mechanical stability degrades with increasing radiation exposure. This paper will further quantify the effect of space environmental exposure on the mechanical properties of candidate sail materials. Candidate sail materials for these missions include Aluminum coated Mylar, Teonex, and CP1 (Colorless Polyimide). These materials were subjected to uniform radiation doses of electrons and protons in individual exposures sequences. Dose values ranged from 100 Mrads to over 5 Grads. The engineering performance property responses of thermo-optical and mechanical properties were characterized

  1. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  2. A Study on the Thermal Neutron Filter for the Irradiation of Electronic Materials at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Kim, Sung Ryul; Park, Seung Jae; Shin, Yoon Taeg; Cho, Man Soon; Cho, Kee Nam [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The representative example is a technique of making the semiconductor with the transmutation using the pure Si. This NTD (Neutron Transmutation Doping) Si is used as a high-quality semiconductor because it has a uniform resistance. Likewise, the electronic materials are being investigated to improve the performance of material using the neutron irradiation method. The mechanism for reaction between the electronic materials and the neutrons depends on the energy of the neutron. Capturing reaction by thermal neutrons causes the transmutation and a lot of defects are made by fast neutrons. The study for the effect by such neutron energy is necessary to understand the performance improvement of the irradiated electronic materials. The thermal neutron filter was investigated to be used for the irradiation of electronic materials at HANARO. IP irradiation hole was selected and the irradiation device was designed. The analysis was conducted considering four candidate materials.

  3. Irradiation response of rapidly solidified Path A type prime candidate alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imeson, E.; Tong, C.; Lee, M.; Vander Sande, J.B.; Harling, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present a first assessment of the microstructural response to neutron irradiation shown by Path A alloys prepared by rapid solidification processing. To more fully demonstrate the potential of the method, alloys with increased titanium and carbon content have been used in addition to the Path A prime candidate alloy

  4. Element content and particle size characterization of a mussel candidate reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A.; Santos, Rafaela G. dos; Martinelli, Jose R.

    2011-01-01

    The use of certified reference materials is an important tool in the quality assurance of analytical measurements. To assure reliability on recently prepared powder reference materials, not only the characterization of the property values of interest and their corresponding uncertainties, but also physical properties such as the particle size distribution must be well evaluated. Narrow particle size distributions are preferable than larger ones; as different size particles may have different analyte content. Due to this fact, the segregation of the coarse and the fine particles in a bottle may lead to inhomogeneity of the reference material, which should be avoided. In this study the element content as well as the particle size distribution of a mussel candidate reference material produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP was investigated. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis was applied to the determination of 15 elements in seven fractions of the material with different particle size distributions. Subsamples of the materials were irradiated simultaneously with elemental standards at the IEA-R1 research nuclear reactor and the induced gamma ray energies were measured in a hyperpure germanium detector. Three vials of the candidate reference material and three coarser fractions, collected during the preparation, were analyzed by Laser Diffraction Particle Analysis to determine the particle size distribution. Differences on element content were detected for fractions with different particle size distribution, indicating the importance of particle size control for biological reference materials. From the particle size analysis, Gaussian particle size distribution was observed for the candidate reference material with mean particle size μ = 94.6 ± 0.8 μm. (author)

  5. Assessment of repair welding technologies of irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Damages on reactor internals of stainless steels caused by stress corrosion cracking and fatigue were identified in aged BWR plants. Repair-welding is one of the practical countermeasure candidates to restore the soundness of components and structures. The project of 'Assessment of Repair welding Technologies of Irradiated Materials' has been carried out to develop the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals. In FY 2011, we investigated the fatigue strength of stainless steel SUS316L irradiated by YAG laser welding. Furthermore, revision of the technical guideline regarding the repair-welding of reactor internals was discussed. Diagram of tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld cracking caused by entrapped Helium was modified. Helium concentration for evaluation-free of TIG weld cracking caused by entrapped Helium was revised to 0.007appm from 0.01appm. (author)

  6. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  7. Gamma irradiation technology for composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Guillermo R; Gonzalez, Maria E.

    2003-01-01

    A composite of sugar cane bagasse and low-density polyethylene was prepared. Gamma -radiation of Cobalt-60 (Co 60 ) and reactive additives were used, to make compatible the lignocellulosic fibers with the polymeric matrix. Gamma-radiation was applied in different stages with different purposes: a) Irradiation of cellulosic fibers treated or not with reactive additive, in presence of air, to produce macro radicals increasing their reactivity during extrusion with polyethylene. A homogeneous and fusible material resulted that can be used as raw material in thermoforming processes with cost in between that of its constitutive elements; b) Irradiation of final products, to produce the cross-linking of polymeric chains. The fibers remain trapped in the cross-linked matrix. A homogeneous and infusible material with high mechanical properties was obtained. (author)

  8. Characterization of Candidate Solar Sail Material Exposed to Space Environmental Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David; Hovater, Mary; Hubbs, Whitney; Wertz, George; Hollerman, William; Gray, Perry

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the exposure of candidate solar sail materials to emulated space environmental effects including energetic electrons, combined electrons and Ultraviolet radiation, and hypervelocity impact of irradiated solar sail material. This paper will describe the testing procedure and the material characterization results of this investigation.

  9. Behavior of candidate canister materials in deep ocean environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyrl, W.H.; Stephenson, L.L.; Braithwaite, J.W.

    1977-04-01

    Corrosion tests have been conducted under simulated deep ocean conditions for nine months. The materials tested were base alloys of titanium, zirconium, and nickel. All materials tested showed corrosion rates that were very low even at the highest test temperature. None showed susceptibility to either stress corrosion cracking or differential aeration corrosion. Ambient electrochemical tests confirmed the findings that none should be sensitive to differential oxygen effects. The zirconium alloys may be more susceptible to pitting corrosion than the others, although the pitting conditions are unlikely to be found in service, unless higher temperatures are encountered. All the alloys tested could give long life under deep ocean conditions and are candidates for more detailed corrosion studies

  10. Thermal analysis of the APT materials irradiation samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, S.A.; Willcutt, G.J.; James, M.R.; Teague, J.; Diebe, D.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-01-01

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) project proposes to use a 1.7 GeV, 100 mA proton beam to produce neutrons from an Inconel 718 clad tungsten target. The neutrons are multiplied and moderated in a lead/water blanket before being captured in He 3 to form tritium. In this process, the materials in the target and blanket region are exposed to a wide range of different fluxes comprised of protons and neutrons with energies into the GeV range. To investigate the effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of candidate APT materials (Inconel 718, 316L stainless steel, Al 6061-T6, Mod 9Cr-1Mo, 304L stainless steel and Al5052-0), the APT Engineering Design and Development group fielded an extensive materials irradiation using the LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) accelerator, which operates at an energy of 800 MeV and a current of 1 mA. The test set-up was designed to place mechanical test specimens in locations in and near the proton beam where the environment of proton and neutron fluxes and temperatures are prototypic to those expected in the APT target/blanket (50--170 C). After irradiating for about 3,600 hours, the maximum achieved proton fluence was 4--5 x 10 21 p/cm 2 for the materials in the center of the beam. To obtain relevant data on the change in the mechanical properties with fluence, it is essential to know the temperature at which the materials were irradiated. This paper explains the method of determining the specimen temperature and reports some specific examples

  11. Self-organization in irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimenko, N.N.; Dzhamanbalin, K.K.; Medetov, N.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: By the present time a great deal of experimental material concerning self-organization in irradiated materials is stored. It means that in different materials (single crystal and amorphous semiconductor, metals, polymers) during one process of irradiation with accelerated particles or energetic quanta the structure previously disordered can be reordered to the previous or different order. These processes are considered separately from the processes of radiation-stimulated ordering when the renewal of the structure occurs as the result of extra irradiation, sometimes accompanied with another influence (heating, lighting, application of mechanical tensions). The processes of reordering are divided into two basic classes: the reconstruction of crystalline structure (1) and the formation of space-ordered system (2). The processes of ordering are considered with the use of synergetic approach and are analyzed conformably to the concrete conditions of new order appearance process realization in order to reveal the self-organization factor's role. The concrete experimental results of investigating of the radiation ordering processes are analyzed for different materials: semiconductor, metals, inorganic dielectrics, polymers. The ordering processes are examined from the point of their possible use in the technology of creating nano-dimensional structures general and quantum-dimensional ones in particular

  12. Materials Modification Under Ion Irradiation: JANNUS Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serruys, Y.; Trocellier, P.; Ruault, M.-O.; Henry, S.; Kaietasov, O.; Trouslard, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nano-Science and Nuclear Simulation) is a project designed to study the modification of materials using multiple ion beams and in-situ TEM observation. It will be a unique facility in Europe for the study of irradiation effects, the simulation of material damage due to irradiation and in particular of combined effects. The project is also intended to bring together experimental and modelling teams for a mutual fertilisation of their activities. It will also contribute to the teaching of particle-matter interactions and their applications. JANNUS will be composed of three accelerators with a common experimental chamber and of two accelerators coupled to a 200 kV TEM

  13. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.; Sutaria, M.; Kurokawa, S.; Mayberry, J.

    1994-04-01

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  14. Compatibility of candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-01-01

    Scoping tests were conducted on compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chronimum. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant to corrosion in static gallium. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/y for Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than does nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥90 and 17 mm/y, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds

  15. Surface segregation in binary alloy first wall candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Susman, S.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1982-01-01

    We have been studying the conditions necessary to produce a self-sustaining stable lithium monolayer on a metal substrate as a means of creating a low-Z film which sputters primarily as secondary ions. It is expected that because of the toroidal field, secondary ions originating at the first wall will be returned and contribute little to the plasma impurity influx. Aluminum and copper have, because of their high thermal conductivity and low induced radioactivity, been proposed as first wall candidate materials. The mechanical properties of the pure metals are very poorly suited to structural applications and an alloy must be used to obtain adequate hardness and tensile strength. In the case of aluminum, mechanical properties suitable for aircraft manufacture are obtained by the addition of a few at% Li. In order to investigate alloys of a similar nature as candidate structural materials for fusion machines we have prepared samples of Li-doped aluminum using both a pyro-metallurgical and a vapor-diffusion technique. The sputtering properties and surface composition have been studied as a function of sample temperature and heating time, and ion beam mass. The erosion rate and secondary ion yield of both the sputtered Al and Li have been monitored by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger analysis providing information on surface segregation, depth composition profiles, and diffusion rates. The surface composition ahd lithium depth profiles are compared with previously obtained computational results based on a regular solution model of segregation, while the partial sputtering yields of Al and Li are compared with results obtained with a modified version of the TRIM computer program. (orig.)

  16. Corrosion of candidate container materials by Yucca Mountain bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J; Jones, D; Lian, T; Martin, S; Rivera, A

    1999-01-01

    Several candidate container materials have been studied in modified Yucca Mountain (YM) ground water in the presence or absence of YM bacteria. YM bacteria increased corrosion rates by 5-6 fold in UNS G10200 carbon steel, and nearly 100-fold in UNS NO4400 Ni-Cu alloy. YM bacteria caused microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) through de-alloying or Ni-depletion of Ni-Cu alloy as evidenced by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. MIC rates of more corrosion-resistant alloys such as UNS NO6022 Ni-Cr- MO-W alloy, UN's NO6625 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, and UNS S30400 stainless steel were measured below 0.05 umyr, however YM bacteria affected depletion of Cr and Fe relative to Ni in these materials. The chemical change on the metal surface caused by depletion was characterized in anodic polarization behavior. The anodic polarization behavior of depleted Ni-based alloys was similar to that of pure Ni. Key words: MIC, container materials, YM bacteria, de-alloying, Ni-depletion, Cr-depletion, polarization resistance, anodic polarization,

  17. Irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.; Findeisen, A.; Katzmann, H.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is concerning with an irradiation can for the activation of materials in nuclear reactors in particular for materials with a high heat generation due to irradiation. A good heat transfer between the irradiated material and the irradiation can environment has been guaranteed by a special can design. The outside of the can consists of a tube or a tube bandle which has been formed as a water guide tube. One or more tubes containing the irradiated materials have been positioned at the inner areas of the irradiated can

  18. VUV photoemission studies of candidate LHC vacuum chamber materials

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Collins, I R

    1998-01-01

    In the context of future accelerators and, in particular, the beam vacuum of the LargeHadron Collider (LHC), a 27 km circumference proton collider to be built at CERN, VUVsynchrotron radiation (SR) has been used to study both qualitatively and quantitatively candidatevacuum chamber materials. Emphasis is given to show that angle and energy resolvedphotoemission is an extremely powerful tool to address important issues relevant to the LHC, suchas the emission of electrons that contribute to the creation of an electron cloud which may causeserious beam instabilities. Here we present not only the measured photoelectron yields (PY)from the proposed materials, prepared on an industrial scale, but also the energy and, in some cases,the angular dependence of the emitted electrons when excited with either a white light (WL)spectrum, simulating that in the arcs of the LHC or monochromatic light in the photon energy rangeof interest. The effects on the materials examined of WL irradiation and/or ion sputtering,simulati...

  19. A study on the proton irradiation effect of reactor materials using cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Park, Deuk Keun; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung

    1993-02-01

    Understanding on radiation damage of important structural materials is important for safe operation and radiation damage evaluation of new reactor structural materials. This study was performed to simulate and evaluate 14 MeV neutron irradiation effects on mechanical properties of candidate structural materials (HT-9/SS316) of next generation reactors (FBR, Fusion) irradiated by Cyclotron(MC-50) using SP test technique. After qualification of SP test techniques from J IC and ε qf correlation, SP tests were performed to evaluate 16MeV proton irradiation effects on mechanical properties of irradiated and unirradiated HT-9/SS316 steels. Test results were evaluated for ε qf , energy and displacement up to failure and J IC change. In addition, damaged zone and dpa upon depth after irradiation were calculated using TRIM code and Doppler broadening line shapes were measured to evaluate defects for 15% cold worked HT-9 steel using PAS. (Author)

  20. LACK OF INFLATED RADII FOR KEPLER GIANT PLANET CANDIDATES RECEIVING MODEST STELLAR IRRADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara

    2011-01-01

    The most irradiated transiting hot Jupiters are characterized by anomalously inflated radii, sometimes exceeding Jupiter's size by more than 60%. While different theoretical explanations have been applied, none of them provide a universal resolution to this observation, despite significant progress in the past years. We refine the photometric transit light curve analysis of 115 Kepler giant planet candidates based on public Q0-Q2 photometry. We find that 14% of them are likely false positives, based on their secondary eclipse depth. We report on planet radii versus stellar flux. We find an increase in planet radii with increased stellar irradiation for the Kepler giant planet candidates, in good agreement with existing hot Jupiter systems. We find that in the case of modest irradiation received from the stellar host, giant planets do not have inflated radii, and appear to have radii independent of the host star incident flux. This finding suggests that the physical mechanisms inflating hot Jupiters become ineffective below a given orbit-averaged stellar irradiation level of ∼2 × 10 8 erg s –1 cm –2 .

  1. Tests on irradiated magnet-insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmunk, R.E.; Miller, L.G.; Becker, H.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion-reactor coils, located in areas where they will be only partially shielded, must be fabricated from materials which are as resistant to radiation as possible. They will probably incorporate resistive conductors with either water or cryogenic cooling. Inorganic insulators have been recommended for these situations, but the possibility exists that some organic insulators may be usuable as well. Results were previously reported for irradiation and testing of three glass reinforced epoxies: G-7, G-10, and G-11. Thin disks of these materials, nominally 0.5 mm thick by 11.1 mm diameter, were tested in compressive fatigue, a configuration and loading which represents reasonably well the magnet environment. In that work G-10 was shown to withstand repeated loading to moderately high stress levels without failure, and the material survived better at liquid nitrogen temperature than at room temperature

  2. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiya, P.S.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1989-09-01

    Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS), Incoloy 825, Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al have been selected as candidate materials for the containment of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. The susceptibility of these materials to stress corrosion cracking has been investigated by slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in water which simulates that from well J-13 (J-13 water) and is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. The SSRTs were performed on specimens exposed to simulated J-13 water at 93 degree C and at a strain rate 10 -7 s -1 under crevice conditions and at a strain rate of 10 -8 s -1 under both crevice and noncrevice conditions. All the tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strains of 1--4%. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed some crack initiation in virtually all specimens. Optical microscopy of metallographically prepared transverse sections of Type 304L SS suggests that the crack depths are small (<10 μm). Preliminary results suggest that a lower strain rate increases the severity of cracking of Types 304L and 316L SS, Incoloy 825, and Cu but has virtually no effect on Cu-30%Ni and Cu-7%Al. Differences in susceptibility to cracking were evaluated in terms of a stress ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the increase in stress after local yielding in the environment to the corresponding stress increase in an identical test in air, both computed at the same strain. On the basis of this stress ratio, the ranking of materials in order of increasing resistance to cracking is: Types 304L SS < 316L SS < Incoloy 825 congruent Cu-30%Ni < Cu congruent Cu-7%Al. 9 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Metallographic examination in irradiated materials examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Lee, Key Soon; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Yoo, Byoung Ok

    1998-01-01

    It is very important to have equipment of metallographic examination in hot-cell to observe the micro-structure of nuclear fuels and materials irradiated at nuclear power and/or research reactor. Those equipment should be operated by master-slave manipulators, so they are designed, manufactured and modified to make exercise easy and no trouble. The metallographic examination equipment and techniques as well as its operation procedure are described, so an operator can practice the metallography in hot-cell. (author). 5 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs.

  5. Studies on gamma irradiated rubber materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, I. B.; Stelescu, M. D.; Cutrubinis, M.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the increase in use and production of polymer materials, there is a constant pressure of finding a solution to more environmental friendly composites. Beside the constant effort of recycling used materials, it seems more appropriate to manufacture and use biodegradable and renewable row materials. Natural polymers like starch, cellulose, lignin etc are ideal for preparing biodegradable composites. Some of the dynamic markets that use polymer materials are the food and pharmaceutical industries. Because of their desinfastation and sometimes sterility requirements, different treatment processes are applied, one of it being radiation treatment. The scope of this paper is to analyze the mechanical behaviour of rubber based materials irradiated with gamma rays at four medium doses, 30.1 kGy, 60.6 kGy, 91 kGy and 121.8 kGy. The objectives are the following: to identify the optimum radiation dose in order to obtain a good mechanical behaviour and to identify the mechanical behaviour of the material when adding different quantities of natural filler (20 phr, 60 phr and 100 phr).

  6. A new materials irradiation facility at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yanagita, S.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Tsujimoto, H.; Kozuka, T.; Kamae, K.; Mishima, K.; Shiroya, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new materials irradiation facility with improved control capabilities has been installed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Several deficiencies of conventional fission neutron material irradiation systems have been corrected. The specimen temperature is controlled both by an electric heater and by the helium pressure in the irradiation tube without exposure to neutrons at temperatures different from the design test conditions. The neutron spectrum is varied by the irradiation position. Irradiation dose is changed by pulling the irradiation capsule up and down during irradiation. Several characteristics of the irradiation field were measured. The typical irradiation intensity is 9.4x10 12 n/cm 2 s (>0.1 MeV) and the irradiation temperature of specimens is controllable from 363 to 773 K with a precision of ±2 K

  7. The feasibility of welding irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. T.; Chin, B. A.

    1991-03-01

    Helium was implanted into solution-annealed (SA) 316 stainless steel, 20% cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel and titanium-modified Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) through tritium decay to levels ranging from 0.18 to 256 appm. Full penetration welds were then made on helium-doped materials using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) under fully constrained conditions. Intergranular heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was observed in all of the materials containing greater than 1 appm He. Electron microscopy showed that the HAZ cracking originated from the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. Bubble growth kinetics in the HAZ is explained by stress-enhanced diffusive cavity growth. Results suggest that the propensity for HAZ cracking can be reduced by the pre-existing cold-worked structure and by finely-distributed MC precipitates that refine the distribution of helium bubbles and minimize the flow of vacancies in grain boundaries.

  8. The feasibility of welding of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.T.; Chin, B.A.; Auburn Univ., AL

    1989-01-01

    Helium was implanted into solution-annealed (SA) 316 stainless steel, 20% cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel and titanium-modified Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) through tritium decay to levels ranging from 0.18 to 256 appm. Full penetration welds were then made on helium-doped materials using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) under fully constrained conditions. Intergranular heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was observed in all of the materials containing greater than 1 appm He. Electron microscopy showed that the HAZ cracking originated from the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. Bubble growth kinetics in the HAZ is explained by stress-enhanced diffusive cavity growth. Results suggest that the propensity for HAZ cracking can be reduced by the preexisting cold-worked structure and by finely-distributed MC precipitates that refine the distribution of helium bubbles and minimize the flow of vacancies in grain boundaries. 16 refs., 3 figs

  9. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400 degrees C, corrosion rates are ∼4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400 degrees C are ≥88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400 degrees C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized

  10. Laboratory Reference Spectroscopy of Icy Satellite Candidate Surface Materials (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J. B.; Jamieson, C. S.; Shirley, J. H.; Pitman, K. M.; Kariya, M.; Crandall, P.

    2013-12-01

    The bulk of our knowledge of icy satellite composition continues to be derived from ultraviolet, visible and infrared remote sensing observations. Interpretation of remote sensing observations relies on availability of laboratory reference spectra of candidate surface materials. These are compared directly to observations, or incorporated into models to generate synthetic spectra representing mixtures of the candidate materials. Spectral measurements for the study of icy satellites must be taken under appropriate conditions (cf. Dalton, 2010; also http://mos.seti.org/icyworldspectra.html for a database of compounds) of temperature (typically 50 to 150 K), pressure (from 10-9 to 10-3 Torr), viewing geometry, (i.e., reflectance), and optical depth (must manifest near infrared bands but avoid saturation in the mid-infrared fundamentals). The Planetary Ice Characterization Laboratory (PICL) is being developed at JPL to provide robust reference spectra for icy satellite surface materials. These include sulfate hydrates, hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, and both organic and inorganic volatile ices. Spectral measurements are performed using an Analytical Spectral Devices FR3 portable grating spectrometer from .35 to 2.5 microns, and a Thermo-Nicolet 6500 Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer from 1.25 to 20 microns. These are interfaced with the Basic Extraterrestrial Environment Simulation Testbed (BEEST), a vacuum chamber capable of pressures below 10-9 Torr with a closed loop liquid helium cryostat with custom heating element capable of temperatures from 30-800 Kelvins. To generate optical constants (real and imaginary index of refraction) for use in nonlinear mixing models (i.e., Hapke, 1981 and Shkuratov, 1999), samples are ground and sieved to six different size fractions or deposited at varying rates to provide a range of grain sizes for optical constants calculations based on subtractive Kramers-Kronig combined with Hapke forward modeling (Dalton and

  11. Application of miniaturized disk bend test technique for selection of optimum composition of candidate materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsepelev, A.B.; Poymenov, I.L.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the potential of a miniaturized disk bend test (MDBT) technique for estimation of irradiated steel mechanical properties behaviour indicates promise in selecting candidate materials for nuclear applications. The advantages of the method are most clearly demonstrated when a large series of tests is needed. The tiny specimen size gives an additional advantage from the point of view of radiation material science. As an example of the MDBT potential, preliminary results of electron irradiation effects on Cr-Mn-W austenitic and Cr-W ferrite carbon and nitrogen steels are presented. It is shown that electron irradiation causes changes of the loading MDBT-curve form of the steels that most probably are connected with radiation-induced structure-phase transformations in the steels. (orig.)

  12. Current investigations of packaging materials used for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiszer, W.

    1996-01-01

    The article reviews current investigations of packaging materials applied for food irradiation. The increasing role of various synthetic materials is described. Author reviews radiation-induced damages in these materials. The article includes the list of materials accepted for food packaging and subsequent irradiation with different doses

  13. Simulation of the welding of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hua Tay

    1989-07-01

    Helium was uniformly implanted using the ''tritium trick'' technique to levels of 0.18, 2.5, 27, 105 and 256 atomic part per million (appm) for type 316 stainless steel, and 0.3 and 1 appm for Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr-1MoVW). Both full penetration as well as partial penetration welds were then produced on control and helium-containing materials using the autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under full constraint conditions. For full penetration welds, both materials were successfully welded when they contained less than 0.3 appm helium. However, welds of both materials, when containing greater than 1 appm helium, were found to develop cracks during cooling of the weld. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the HAZ cracking was caused by the growth and coalescence of grain boundary (GB) helium bubbles. This cracking occurred as a result of the combination of high temperatures and high shrinkage tensile stresses. The cracking in the fusion zone was found to result from the precipitation of helium along dendrite interfaces. A model based on the kinetics of diffusive cavity growth is presented to explain the observed results. The model proposes a helium bubble growth mechanism which leads to final intergranular rupture in the heat-affected zone. Results of the present study demonstrate that the use of conventional fusion welding techniques to repair materials degraded by exposure to irradiation environments may be difficult if the irradiation results in the generation of helium equal to or greater than 1 appm

  14. Workshop on materials irradiation effects and applications 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qiu; Sato, Koichi; Yoshiie, Toshimasa

    2013-01-01

    For the study of the material irradiation effects, irradiation fields with improved control capabilities, advanced post irradiation experiments and well developed data analyses are required. This workshop aims to discuss new results and to plan the future irradiation research in the KUR. General meeting was held from December 14, 2012 to December 15, 2012 with 44 participants and 28 papers were presented. Especially recent experimental results using irradiation facilities in the KUR such as Materials Controlled Irradiation Facility, Low Temperature Loop and LINAC, and results of computer simulation, and fruitful discussions were performed. This volume contains the summary and selected transparencies presented in the meeting. (author)

  15. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-01-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10 16 cm -2 was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  16. Modelling irradiation effects in fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Dudarev, S.; Boutard, J.L.; Diegele, E.; Laesser, R.; Almazouzi, A.; Caturla, M.J.; Fu, C.C.; Kaellne, J.; Malerba, L.; Nordlund, K.; Perlado, M.; Rieth, M.; Samaras, M.; Schaeublin, R.; Singh, B.N.; Willaime, F.

    2007-01-01

    We review the current status of the European fusion materials modelling programme. We describe recent findings and outline potential areas for future development. Large-scale density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the structure of the point defects in α-Fe, and highlight the crucial part played by magnetism. The calculations give accurate migration energies of point defects and the strength of their interaction with He atoms. Kinetic models based on DFT results reproduce the stages of radiation damage recovery in iron, and stages of He-desorption from pre-implanted iron. Experiments aimed at validating the models will be carried out in the future using a multi-beam ion irradiation facility chosen for its versatility and rapid feedback

  17. Modelling irradiation effects in fusion materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Dudarev, S. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB, UK and Department of Physics, Imperial College, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Boutard, J.L. [EFDA-CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: jean-louis.boutard@tech.efda.org; Diegele, E.; Laesser, R. [EFDA-CSU Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Almazouzi, A. [Structural Materials Expert Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Caturla, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, 03690 San Vicente de Raspeig (Spain); Fu, C.C. [Service de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Kaellne, J. [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Malerba, L. [Structural Materials Expert Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-Tekes, Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 43, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Perlado, M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rieth, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Samaras, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schaeublin, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Singh, B.N. [Department of Materials Research, Risoe National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Willaime, F. [Service de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15

    We review the current status of the European fusion materials modelling programme. We describe recent findings and outline potential areas for future development. Large-scale density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the structure of the point defects in {alpha}-Fe, and highlight the crucial part played by magnetism. The calculations give accurate migration energies of point defects and the strength of their interaction with He atoms. Kinetic models based on DFT results reproduce the stages of radiation damage recovery in iron, and stages of He-desorption from pre-implanted iron. Experiments aimed at validating the models will be carried out in the future using a multi-beam ion irradiation facility chosen for its versatility and rapid feedback.

  18. Irradiation creep lifetime analysis on first wall structure materials for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Bing; Peng, Lei, E-mail: penglei@ustc.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiansheng; Shi, Jingyi; Zhan, Jie

    2017-05-15

    Fusion reactor first wall services on the conditions of high surface heat flux and intense neutron irradiation. For China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) with high duty time factor, it is important to analyze the irradiation effect on the creep lifetime of the main candidate structure materials for first wall, i.e. ferritic/martensitic steel, austenite steel and oxide dispersion strengthened steel. The allowable irradiation creep lifetime was evaluated with Larson-Miller Parameter (LMP) model and finite element method. The results show that the allowable irradiation creep lifetime decreases with increasing of surface heat flux, first wall thickness and inlet coolant temperature. For the current CFETR conceptual design, the lifetime is not limited by thermal creep or irradiation creep, which indicated the room for design parameters optimization.

  19. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  20. 77 FR 20886 - Proposed Information Collection (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and Candidate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and Candidate Handbooks) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor... information technology. Title: Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and Candidate Handbooks, 38 CFR...

  1. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  2. Radiation research of materials using irradiation capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamrad, B.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are briefly characterized of radiation experiments on the WWR-S research reactor. The irradiation capsule installed in the reactor including the electronic instrumentation is described. Irradiated samples temperature is stabilized by an auxiliary heat source placed in the irradiation space. The electronic control equipment of the system is automated. In irradiation experiments, experimental and operating conditions are recorded by a digital measuring centre with electric typewriter and paper tape data recording and by an analog compensating recorder. The irradiation experiment control system controls irradiated sample temperature, the supply current size and the heating element temperature of the auxiliary stabilizing source, inert and technological pressures of the capsule atmosphere and the thermostat temperature of the thermocouple junctions. (O.K.)

  3. Investigation of structural materials of reactors using high-energy heavy-ion irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguang

    2007-01-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials of fission/fusion reactors is mainly attributed to the evolution of intensive atom displacement damage induced by energetic particles (n, α and/or fission fragments) and high-rate helium doping by direct α particle bombardments and/or (n, α) reactions. It can cause severe degradation of reactor structural materials such as surface blistering, bulk void swelling, deformation, fatigue, embrittlement, stress erosion corrosion and so on that will significantly affect the operation safety of reactors. However, up to now, behavior of structural materials at the end of their service can hardly be fully tested in a real reactor. In the present work, damage process in reactor structural materials is briefly introduced, then the advantages of energetic ion implantation/irradiation especially high-energy heavy ion irradiation are discussed, and several typical examples on simulation of radiation effects in reactor candidate structural materials using high-energy heavy ion irradiations are pronounced. Experimental results and theoretical analysis suggested that irradiation with energetic particles especially high-energy heavy ions is very useful technique for simulating the evolution of microstructures and macro-properties of reactor structural materials. Furthermore, an on-going plan of material irradiation experiments using high energy H- and He-ions based on the Heavy Ion Research Facilities in Lanzhou (HIRFL) is also briefly interpreted. (authors)

  4. Standard Guide for Packaging Materials for Foods to Be Irradiated

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides a format to assist producers and users of food packaging materials in selecting materials that have the desirable characteristics for their intended use and comply with applicable standards or government authorizations. It outlines parameters that should be considered when selecting food-contact packaging materials intended for use during irradiation of prepackaged foods and it examines the criteria for fitness for their use. 1.2 This guide identifies known regulations and regulatory frameworks worldwide pertaining to packaging materials for holding foods during irradiation; but it does not address all regulatory issues associated with the selection and use of packaging materials for foods to be irradiated. It is the responsibility of the user of this guide to determine the pertinent regulatory issues in each country where foods are to be irradiated and where irradiated foods are distributed. 1.3 This guide does not address all of the food safety issues associated with the synergisti...

  5. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  6. Inclusion and difusion studies of D in fusion breeding blanket candidate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.

    2015-07-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) reaction is the most practical fusion reaction on the way to harness fusion energy. As tritium presents trace quantities on Earth [1], tritium fuel is essential to be generated simultaneously with the D-T reaction in a commerical fusion power plant. Tritium can be obtained in the lithium contained breeding blanket as a transmutation product of nuclear reaction 6Li (n, a)T. Li2T iO3 is considered to be one promising candidate solid tritium breeder material, due to its high lithium density, low activation, compatiblity with structure materials and high chemical stability. The tritium generated in Li2T iO3 breeding blanket needs to be collected and recycled back to the fusion reaction. Therefore, the study of the diffusion characteristic of breeder material Li2T iO3 is necessary to determine tritium mobility and tritium extraction efficiency. In order to study tritium release mechanism of Li2T iO3 breeding material in a fusion power plant environment, a fusion like neutron spectrum is essential while it is now not availble in any laboratory. One alternative is using ion accelerator or implantor to get energetic hydrogenic (H,D,T) ions impacting on breeding material, to simulate the tritium distribution situation. Because of the radioactive property of tritium which will complicate processing procedure, another isotope of hydrogen Deuterium is actually used to be studied. The defect structure in Li2T iO3, due to reactor exposure to fusion generated particles and ? ray irradiation, is achieved by energetic Ti ions. SRIM program is implemented to simulate the D ion or Ti ion distributions after bombarding, as well as the defects. X-ray diffraction technique helps to identify phase compositions. Transmission electron microscopy technique is used to observe the microstructures (Author)

  7. Evaluation of thermal shock strengths for graphite materials using a laser irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Young Shin; Kim, Duck Hoi; Park, No Seok; Suh, Jeong; Kim, Jeng O.; Il Moon, Soon

    2004-01-01

    Thermal shock is a physical phenomenon that occurs during the exposure to rapidly high temperature and pressure changes or during quenching of a material. The rocket nozzle throat is exposed to combustion gas of high temperature. Therefore, it is important to select suitable materials having the appropriate thermal shock resistance and to evaluate these materials for rocket nozzle design. The material of this study is ATJ graphite, which is the candidate material for rocket nozzle throat. This study presents an experimental method to evaluate the thermal shock resistance and thermal shock fracture toughness of ATJ graphite using laser irradiation. In particular, thermal shock resistance tests are conducted with changes of specimen thickness, with laser source irradiated at the center of the specimen. Temperature distributions on the specimen surface are detected using type K and C thermocouples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to observe the thermal cracks on specimen surface

  8. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  9. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y H; Cho, M S [and others

    2007-06-15

    The essential technology for an irradiation test of materials and nuclear fuel has been successively developed and utilized to meet the user's requirements in Phase I(July 21, 1997 to March 31, 2000). It enables irradiation tests to be performed for a non-fissile material under a temperature control(300{+-}10 .deg. C) in a He gas environment, and most of the irradiation tests for the internal and external users are able to be conducted effectively. The basic technology was established to irradiate a nuclear fuel, and a creep capsule was also developed to measure the creep property of a material during an irradiation test in HANARO in Phase II(April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2003). The development of a specific purpose capsule, essential technology for a re-irradiation of a nuclear fuel, advanced technology for an irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel were performed in Phase III(April 1, 2003 to February 28, 2007). Therefore, the technology for an irradiation test was established to support the irradiation of materials and a nuclear fuel which is required for the National Nuclear R and D Programs. In addition, an improvement of the existing capsule design and fabrication technology, and the development of an instrumented capsule for a nuclear fuel and a specific purpose will be able to satisfy the user's requirements. In order to support the irradiation test of materials and a nuclear fuel for developing the next generation nuclear system, it is also necessary to continuously improve the design and fabrication technology of the existing capsule and the irradiation technology.

  10. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  11. On the material durability under irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselevskij, V.N.; Kosov, B.D.

    1977-01-01

    The initial principle adopted for the construction of a phenomenological model of the failure of irradiated steel, as proposed in the paper of V.A. Tsykanov and coworkers, is analized and some critical remarks made

  12. Van de Graaff Irradiation of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Through irradiations using our 3 MeV Van de Graaf accelerator, Argonne is testing the radiation stability of components of equipment that are being used to dispense molybdenum solutions for use as feeds to 99mTc generators and in the 99mTc generators themselves. Components have been irradiated by both a direct electron beam and photons generated from a tungsten convertor.

  13. IFMIF - International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity/Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental acceptability, safety, and economic viability win ultimately be the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power. This will entail the development of radiation- resistant and low- activation materials. These low-activation materials must also survive exposure to damage from neutrons having an energy spectrum peaked near 14 MeV with annual radiation doses in the range of 20 displacements per atom (dpa). Testing of candidate materials, therefore, requires a high-flux source of high energy neutrons. The problem is that there is currently no high-flux source of neutrons in the energy range above a few MeV. The goal, is therefore, to provide an irradiation facility for use by fusion material scientists in the search for low-activation and damage-resistant materials. An accellerator-based neutron source has been established through a number of international studies and workshops' as an essential step for materials development and testing. The mission of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is to provide an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium (D-Li) neutron source to produce high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials up to about a full lifetime of anticipated use in fusion energy reactors. would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator-based irradiation tests. It would generate material- specific activation and radiological properties data, and support the analysis of materials for use in safety, maintenance, recycling, decommissioning, and waste disposal systems

  14. Dust Erosion Performance of Candidate Motorcase Thermal Protection Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-10

    REFERENCE DESCRIPTION SOURCE NUMBER 4.01 NBR B. F. Goodrich Aerospace and Defense Products (Nitrile butadiene 500 South Main Street rubber ) Akron, Ohio...material degradation occurs. 5.3 BALLISTIC RANGES Ballistic ranges are widely used for reentry erosion testing for two reasons: 1) no other type of facility...DET REFERENCE OTHER COMMENTS NUMBER DESIGNATION 2002 KEVLAR-EPOXY STAGE 3 MOTORCASE MATERIAL MOTORCAS E 2402 NBR 68 2403 NBR 69 2404 NBR -19709-6A (60

  15. Opening of new field in material science and technology by materials irradiation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurishita, Hiroaki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1998-03-01

    It is believed that high energy particle irradiation causes severe degradation of materials, and great efforts have been made to reveal the underlying mechanism of such degradation. However, recent progress of the developments of irradiation rigs performed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and materials fabrication techniques has enabled to change our understanding of radiation effects on materials from the above pessimistic one to the very challenging one, i.e., irradiation has the beneficial effect of producing new phenomena and/or innovative materials that will not be available without irradiation. An example to be noted is that irradiation with neutrons in JMTR greatly improved the ductility of less ductile metals. This ductility improvement due to irradiation is directly opposite to irradiation embrittlement and is called radiation induced ductilization (RIDU). In this presentation the significance of RIDU and its mechanism will be stated. (author)

  16. Low activation structural material candidates for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty, C.B.A.; Cook, I.

    1997-06-01

    Under the SEAL Programme of the European Long-Term Fusion Safety Programme, an assessment was performed of a number of possible blanket structural materials. These included the steels then under consideration in the European Blanket Programme, as well as materials being considered for investigation in the Advanced Materials Programme. Calculations were performed, using SEAFP methods, of the activation properties of the materials, and these were related, based on the SEAFP experience, to assessments of S and E performance. The materials investigated were the SEAFP low-activation martensitic steel (LA12TaLC); a Japanese low-activation martensitic steel (F-82H), a range of compositional variants about this steel; the vanadium-titanium-chromium alloy which was the original proposal of the ITER JCT for the ITER in-vessel components; a titanium-aluminium intermetallic (Ti-Al) which is under investigation in Japan; and silicon carbide composite (SiC). Assessed impurities were included in the compositions of these materials, and they have very important impacts on the activation properties. Lack of sufficiently detailed data on the composition of chromium alloys precluded their inclusion in the study. (UK)

  17. Design and fabrication of irradiation testing capsule for research reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Seung Jae; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Oh, Jong Myeong; Choi, Myeong Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Dae Jong; Chun, Young Bum; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the demand of research reactors is increasing because there are many ageing research reactors in the world. Also, the production of radioisotope related with the medical purpose is very important. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is designing and licensing for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) and new type research reactor for export which will be constructed in Amman, Jordan and Busan, Korea, respectively. Thus, It is expected that more research reactors will be designed and constructed by KAERI. To design the research reactor, the irradiation performance and behavior of core structure material are necessary. However, the irradiation behavior of these materials is not yet investigated. Therefore, the irradiation performance must be verified by irradiation test. 11M 20K and 11M 21K irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated to conduct the irradiation test for some candidate core materials, Zircaloy 4, beryllium, and graphite, at HANARO. In this paper, the design and fabrication features of 11M 20K and 11M 21K were discussed

  18. Design and fabrication of irradiation testing capsule for research reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Seung Jae; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Oh, Jong Myeong; Choi, Myeong Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Dae Jong; Chun, Young Bum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Recently, the demand of research reactors is increasing because there are many ageing research reactors in the world. Also, the production of radioisotope related with the medical purpose is very important. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is designing and licensing for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) and new type research reactor for export which will be constructed in Amman, Jordan and Busan, Korea, respectively. Thus, It is expected that more research reactors will be designed and constructed by KAERI. To design the research reactor, the irradiation performance and behavior of core structure material are necessary. However, the irradiation behavior of these materials is not yet investigated. Therefore, the irradiation performance must be verified by irradiation test. 11M 20K and 11M 21K irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated to conduct the irradiation test for some candidate core materials, Zircaloy 4, beryllium, and graphite, at HANARO. In this paper, the design and fabrication features of 11M 20K and 11M 21K were discussed.

  19. Thermal and irradiation effects on high-temperature mechanical properties of materials for SCWR fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, F.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Oka, K.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal and irradiation effects on high-temperature mechanical properties are examined for candidate alloys for fuel cladding of supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCRWs). JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) and Experimental Fast Reactor JOYO were utilized for neutron irradiation tests, considering their fluence and temperature. Irradiation was performed with JMTR at 600degC up to 4x10 24 n/m 2 and with JOYO at 600degC and 700degC up to 6x10 25 n/m 2 . Tensile test, creep test and hardness measurement were carried out for high-temperature mechanical properties. Based on the uniaxial creep test, the extrapolation curves were drawn with time-temperature relationships utilizing the Larson and Miller Parameter. Several candidate alloys are expected to satisfy the design requirement from the estimation of the creep rupture stress for 50000 hours. Comparing the creep strengths under irradiated and unirradiated conditions, it was inferred that creep deformation was dominated by the thermal effect rather than the irradiation at SCWR core condition. The microstructure was examined using transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis, focusing on void swelling and helium (He) bubble formation. Void formation was observed in the materials irradiated with JOYO at 600degC but not at 700degC. However, its effect on the deformation of components was estimated to be tolerable since their size and density were negligibly small. The manufacturability of the thin-wall, small-diameter tube was confirmed for the potential candidate alloys through the trial tests in the factory where the fuel cladding tube is manufactured. (author)

  20. Disk-bend ductility tests for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Braski, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    We modified the HEDL disk-bend test machine and are using it to qualitatively screen alloys that are susceptible to embrittlement caused by irradiation. Tests designed to understand the disk-bend test in relation to a uniaxial test are discussed. Selected results of tests of neutron-irradiated material are also presented

  1. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2001-01-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  2. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  3. Corrosion of candidate materials in Lake Rotokawa geothermal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion rates were determined for CDA 613, CDA 715, A-36 carbon steel, 1020 carbon steel, and Alloy 825 flat coupons which were exposed to geothermal spring water at Paraiki site number 9 near Lake Rotokawa, New Zealand. Qualitative observations of the corrosion performance of Type 304L stainless steel and CDA 102 exposed to the same environment were noted. CDA 715, Alloy 825, 1020 carbon steel, and other alloys are being considered for the materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste containers for the United States civilian radioactive waste disposal program. Alloys CDA 613 and CDA 102 were tested to provide copper-based materials for corrosion performance comparison purposes. A36 was tested to provide a carbon steel baseline material for comparison purposes, and alloy 304L stainless steel was tested to provide an austenitic stainless steel baseline material for comparison purposes. In an effort to gather corrosion data from an environment that is rooted in natural sources of water and rock, samples of some of the proposed container materials were exposed to a geothermal spring environment. At the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, currently under consideration for high-level nuclear waste disposal, transient groundwater may come in contact with waste containers over the course of a 10,000-year disposal period. The geothermal springs environment, while extremely more aggressive than the anticipated general environment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, could have similarities to the environment that arises at selected local sites on a container as a result of crevice corrosion, pitting corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), or the concentration of the ionic species due to repetitive evaporation or boiling of the groundwater near the containers. The corrosion rates were based on weight loss data obtained after six weeks exposure in a 90{degrees}C, low-pH spring with relatively high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}.

  4. Production behavior of irradiation defects in solid breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Hirotake; Moritani, Kimikazu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The irradiation effects in solid breeder materials are important for the performance assessment of fusion reactor blanket systems. For a clearer understanding of such effects, we have studied the production behavior of irradiation defects in some lithium ceramics by an in-situ luminescence measurement technique under ion beam irradiation. The luminescence spectra were measured at different temperatures, and the temperature-transient behaviors of luminescence intensity were also measured. The production mechanisms of irradiation defects were discussed on the basis of the observations. (author)

  5. Sound absorption of low-temperature reusable surface insulation candidate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorption data from tests of four candidate low-temperature reusable surface insulation materials are presented. Limitations on the use of the data are discussed, conclusions concerning the effective absorption of the materials are drawn, and the relative significance to Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility test planning of the absorption of each material is assessed.

  6. Development status of irradiation devices and instrumentation for material and nuclear fuel irradiation tests in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Sohn, Jae Min; Choo, Kee Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), an open-tank-in-pool type reactor, is one of the multi-purpose research reactors in the world. Since the commencement of HANARO's operations in 1995, a significant number of experimental facilities have been developed and installed at HANARO, and continued efforts to develop more facilities are in progress. Owing to the stable operation of the reactor and its frequent utilization, more experimental facilities are being continuously added to satisfy various fields of study and diverse applications. The irradiation testing equipment for nuclear fuels and materials at HANARO can be classified into capsules and the Fuel Test Loop (FTL). Capsules for irradiation tests of nuclear fuels in HANARO have been developed for use under the dry conditions of the coolant and materials at HANARO and are now successfully utilized to perform irradiation tests. The FTL can be used to conduct irradiation testing of a nuclear fuel under the operating conditions of commercial nuclear power plants. During irradiation tests conducted using these capsules in HANARO, instruments such as the thermocouple, Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT), small heater, Fluence Monitor (F/M) and Self-Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) are used to measure various characteristics of the nuclear fuel and irradiated material. This paper describes not only the status of HANARO and the status and perspective of irradiation devices and instrumentation for carrying out nuclear fuel and material tests in HANARO but also some results from instrumentation during irradiation tests

  7. Corrosion susceptibility study of candidate pin materials for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovard, Francine S.; Cieslak, Wendy R.

    1987-09-01

    The corrosion susceptibilities of eight alternate battery pin material candidates for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries in 1.5M LiAlCl4/SOCl2 electrolyte have been investigated using ampule exposure and electrochemical tests. The thermal expansion coefficients of these candidate materials are expected to match Sandia-developed Li-corrosion resistant glasses. The corrosion resistances of the candidate materials, which included three stainless steels (15-5 PH, 17-4 PH, and 446), three Fe-Ni glass sealing alloys (Kovar, Alloy 52, and Niromet 426), a Ni-based alloy (Hastelloy B-2) and a zirconium-based alloy (Zircaloy), were compared to the reference materials Ni and 316L SS. All of the candidate materials showed some evidence of corrosion and, therefore, did not perform as well as the reference materials. The Hastelloy B-2 and Zircaloy are clearly unacceptable materials for this application. Of the remaining alternate materials, the 446 SS and Alloy 52 are the most promising candidates.

  8. Experimental study associated to irradiation of FBR structural material, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The study presents one of the bases to evaluate the results of the post-irradiation tests to conduct the thermal control tests related to the second JMTR irradiation (70M-61P) of the demestic austenitic stainless steels for the structural material of the FBR performed by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The thermal control specimens were given the temperature history which simulated that of the irradiation temperature in vacuum by the electrical furnance, and then the tensile, fatigue and Charpy impact tests were performed. The changes of the material properties caused by the thermal history were investigated. (auth.)

  9. Simulated Space Environment Effects on a Candidate Solar Sail Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Wadsworth, Heather M.; Craven, Paul D.; Nehls, Mary K.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    For long duration missions of solar sails, the sail material needs to survive harsh space environments and the degradation of the sail material controls operational lifetime. Therefore, understanding the effects of the space environment on the sail membrane is essential for mission success. In this study, we investigated the effect of simulated space environment effects of ionizing radiation, thermal aging and simulated potential damage on mechanical, thermal and optical properties of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) polyester solar sail membrane to assess the degradation mechanisms on a feasible solar sail. The solar sail membrane was exposed to high energy electrons (about 70 keV and 10 nA/cm2), and the physical properties were characterized. After about 8.3 Grad dose, the tensile modulus, tensile strength and failure strain of the sail membrane decreased by about 20 95%. The aluminum reflective layer was damaged and partially delaminated but it did not show any significant change in solar absorbance or thermal emittance. The effect on mechanical properties of a pre-cracked sample, simulating potential impact damage of the sail membrane, as well as thermal aging effects on metallized PEN (polyethylene naphthalate) film will be discussed.

  10. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  11. Irradiation and testing of compact ignition tokamak toroidal field coil insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, G.K.; Sherick, M.J.; Sparks, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    This report documents the results of an irradiation and testing program performed on behalf of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. in support of the Compact Ignition Tokamak Research and Development program. The purpose of the irradiation and testing program was to determine the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the mechanical and electrical properties of candidate toroidal field coil insulation materials. Insulation samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in a large I-hole. The insulation samples were irradiated within a lead shield to reduce exposure to gamma radiation to better approximate the desired ration of neutron to gamma exposure. Two different exposure levels were specified for the insulation samples. To accomplish this, the samples were encapsulated in two separate aluminum capsules; the capsules positioned at the ATR core mid-plane and at the top of the fueled region to take advantage of the axial cosine distribution of the neutron and gamma flux; and by varying the length of irradiation time of the two capsules. Disassembly of the irradiated capsules and testing of the insulation samples were performed at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cell Facilities. Testing of the samples included shear compression static, shear compression fatigue, flexure static, and electrical resistance measurements

  12. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-28

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  13. Hazard evaluation of The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgazzi, Luciano [ENEA-Centro Ricerche ' Ezio Clementel' , Advanced Physics Technology Division, Via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: burgazzi@bologna.enea.it

    2005-01-15

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is aimed to provide an intense neutron source by a high current deuteron linear accelerator and a high-speed lithium flow target, for testing candidate materials for fusion. Liquid lithium is being circulated through a loop and is kept at a temperature above its freezing point. In the frame of the design phase called Key Element technology Phase (KEP), jointly performed by an international team to verify the most important risk factors, safety assessment of the whole plant has been required in order to identify the hazards associated with the plant operation. This paper discusses the safety assessments that were performed and their outcome: Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) approach has been adopted in order to accomplish the task. Main conclusions of the study is that, on account of the safety and preventive measures adopted, potential plant related hazards are confined within the IFMIF security boundaries and great care must be exercised to protect workers and site personnel from operating the plant. The analysis has provided as a result a set of Postulated Initiating Events (PIEs), that is off-normal events, that could result in hazardous consequences for the plant, together with the total frequency and the list of component failures which could induce the PIE: this assures the exhaustive list of major initiating events of accident sequences, helpful to the further accident sequence analysis phase. Finally, for each one of the individuated PIEs, the evaluation of the accident evolution, in terms of effects on the plant and relative countermeasures, has allowed to verify that adequate measures are being taken both to prevent the accident occurrence and to cope with the accident consequences, thus assuring the fulfilment of the safety requirements.

  14. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)

  15. Capsule Development and Utilization for Material Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this project was to establish basic capsule irradiation technology using the multi-purpose research reactor [HANARO] to eventually support national R and D projects of advanced fuel and materials related to domestic nuclear power plants and next generation reactors. There are several national nuclear projects in KAERI, which require several irradiation tests to investigate in-pile behavior of nuclear reactor fuel and materials for the R and D of several types of fuels such as advanced PWR and DUPIC fuels and for the R and D of structural materials such as RPV(reactor pressure vessel) steel, Inconel, zirconium alloy, and stainless steel. At the moment, internal and external researchers in institutes, industries and universities are interested in investigating the irradiation characteristics of materials using the irradiation facilities of HANARO. For these kinds of material irradiation tests, it is important to develop various capsules using our own techniques. The development of capsules requires several leading-edge technologies and our own experiences related to design and fabrication. In the second phase from April 1,2000 to March 31, 2003, the utilization technologies were developed using various sensors for the measurements of temperature, pressure and displacement, and instrumented capsule technologies for the required fuel irradiation tests were developed. In addition, the improvement of the existing capsule technologies and the development of an in-situ measurable creep capsule for specific purposes were done to meet the various requirements of users

  16. Microstructural examination of irradiated zircaloy-2 pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Sah, D.N.; Banerjee, S.

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation induced microstructural changes in Zr alloys strongly influence the creep, growth and mechanical properties of pressure tube material. Since dimensional changes and mechanical property degradation can limit the life of pressure tube, it is essential to study and develop an understanding of the microstructure produced by neutron irradiation, by examining samples taken from the irradiated components. In the present work, an effort has been made to examine, microstructure of the Zircaloy-2 pressure tube material irradiated in the Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The present work is a first step towards a comprehensive program of characterization of microstructure of reactor materials after irradiation to different fluence levels in power reactors. In this study, samples from a Zircaloy-2 pressure tube, which had been in operation in the high flux region of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit 1, for a period for 6.77 effective full power years (EFPYs), have been prepared and examined. The samples selected from the tube are expected to have a cumulative radiation damage of about 3 dpa. Samples prepared from the off cuts of RAPS-1 pressure tubes were also studied for examining the unirradiated microstructure of the material. The samples were examined in a 200kV JEOL 2000 FX microscope. This paper presents the distinct features observed in irradiated sample and a comprehensive comparison of the microstructures of the unirradiated and irradiated material. The effect of annealing on the annihilation of the defects generated during irradiation has been also studied. The bright field micrographs revealed that microstructure of the irradiated samples was different in many respects from the microstructure of the unirradiated samples. The presence of defect structure in the form of loops etc could be seen in the irradiated sample. These loops were mostly c-type loops lying in the basal plane. The dissolution and redistribution of the precipitates were

  17. Needs of in-situ materials testing under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Hishinuma, A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    Under neutron irradiation, the component atoms of materials are displaced as primary knock-on atoms, and the energy of the primary knock-on atoms is consumed by electron excitation and nuclear collision. Elementary irradiation defects accumulate to form damage structure including voids and bubbles. In situ test under neutron irradiation is necessary for investigating into the effect of irradiation on creep behavior, the electric properties of ceramics, transport phenomena and so on. The in situ test is also important to investigate into the phenomena related to the chemical reaction with environment during irradiation. Accelerator type high energy neutron sources are preferable to fission reactors. In this paper, the needs and the research items of in situ test under neutron irradiation using a D-Li stripping type high energy neutron source on metallic and ceramic materials are described. Creep behavior is one of the most important mechanical properties, and depends strongly on irradiation environment, also it is closely related to microstructure. Irradiation affects the electric conductibity of ceramics and also their creep behavior. In this way, in situ test is necessary. (K.I.)

  18. Irradiation behavior of graphite shielding materials for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Kaito, Takeji; Onose, Shoji; Shibahara, Itaru

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597degC. Postirradiation examination was carried out on dimensional change, elastic modulus, and the thermal conductivity. The result of measurement of dimensional change indicated that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased to two to three times of unirradiated values. A large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependency on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, but the change in specific heat was negligibly small. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (author)

  19. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D{sup +})-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  20. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D + )-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm 3 for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  1. Element concentrations in candidate biological and environmental reference materials by k0-standardized INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    K 0 -Based Neutron Activation Analysis (k 0 INAA) was used to analyze the candidate reference materials Apple Leaves and Peach Leaves, and Oriental Tobacco Leaves and Virginia Tobacco Leaves. Concentration values for 27 elements were measured. The accuracy was ascertained by analysis of two certified reference materials. NIST 1572 Citrus Leaves and 1573 Tomato Leaves. The homogeneity test of the IAEA Evernia prunastri candidate reference material in aliquots ≥ 100 mg is extended to the elements Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, Rb, Sb, Cs, Ba, Ce and Th. (orig.)

  2. How to improve the irradiation conditions for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Daum, E

    2000-01-01

    The accelerator-based intense D-Li neutron source International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) provides very suitable irradiation conditions for fusion materials development with the attractive option of accelerated irradiations. Investigations show that a neutron moderator made of tungsten and placed in the IFMIF test cell can further improve the irradiation conditions. The moderator softens the IFMIF neutron spectrum by enhancing the fraction of low energy neutrons. For displacement damage, the ratio of point defects to cascades is more DEMO relevant and for tritium production in Li-based breeding ceramic materials it leads to a preferred production via the sup 6 Li(n,t) sup 4 He channel as it occurs in a DEMO breeding blanket.

  3. New JMTR irradiation test plan on fuels and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Sasajima, Hideo; Ogiyanagi, Jin; Nakamura, Jinichi; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In order to maintain and enhance safety of light water reactors (LWRs) in long-term and up-graded operations, proper understanding of irradiation behavior of fuels and materials is essentially important. Japanese government and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have decided to refurbish the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and to install new tests rigs, in order to play an active role for solving irradiation related issues on plant aging and high-duty uses of the current LWRs and on development of next-generation reactors. New tests on fuel integrity under simulated abnormal transients and high-duty irradiation conditions are planned in the JMTR. Power ramp tests of newdesign fuel rods will also be performed in the first stage of the program, which is expected to start in year 2011 after refurbishment of the JMTR. Combination of the JMTR tests with simulated reactivity initiated accident tests in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) and loss of coolant accident tests in hot laboratories would serve as the integrated fuel safety research on the high performance fuels at extended burnups, covering from the normal to the accident conditions, including abnormal transients. For the materials irradiation, fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steels are being studied in addition to basic irradiation behavior of nuclear materials such as hafnium. The irradiation studies would contribute not only to solve the current problems but also to identify possible seeds of troubles and to make proactive responses. (author)

  4. Stored energy in fusion magnet materials irradiated at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, R.L.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R.

    1989-08-01

    During the power cycle of a fusion reactor, the radiation reaching the superconducting magnet system will produce an accumulation of immobile defects in the magnet materials. During a subsequent warm-up cycle of the magnet system, the defects will become mobile and interact to produce new defect configurations as well as some mutual defect annihilations which generate heat-the release of stored energy. This report presents a brief qualitative discussion of the mechanisms for the production and release of stored energy in irradiated materials, a theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials, theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials during warm-up, and a discussion of the possible impact of stored energy release on fusion magnet operation 20 refs

  5. Materials aging: first predictive modeling of iron under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    Researchers from the CEA-Bruyeres-le-Chatel have been able to quantitatively foresee for the very first time the evolution of irradiation defects inside a structural material. Their results, obtained with iron, will contribute to better understand the aging of the materials of today's nuclear power plants and of future nuclear systems. Short paper. (J.S.)

  6. VUV photoemission studies of candidate Large Hadron Collider vacuum chamber materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cimino

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of future accelerators and, in particular, the beam vacuum of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, a 27 km circumference proton collider to be built at CERN, VUV synchrotron radiation (SR has been used to study both qualitatively and quantitatively candidate vacuum chamber materials. Emphasis is given to show that angle and energy resolved photoemission is an extremely powerful tool to address important issues relevant to the LHC, such as the emission of electrons that contributes to the creation of an electron cloud which may cause serious beam instabilities and unmanageable heat loads on the cryogenic system. Here we present not only the measured photoelectron yields from the proposed materials, prepared on an industrial scale, but also the energy and in some cases the angular dependence of the emitted electrons when excited with either a white light (WL spectrum, simulating that in the arcs of the LHC, or monochromatic light in the photon energy range of interest. The effects on the materials examined of WL irradiation and /or ion sputtering, simulating the SR and ion bombardment expected in the LHC, were investigated. The studied samples exhibited significant modifications, in terms of electron emission, when exposed to the WL spectrum from the BESSY Toroidal Grating Monochromator beam line. Moreover, annealing and ion bombardment also induce substantial changes to the surface thereby indicating that such surfaces would not have a constant electron emission during machine operation. Such characteristics may be an important issue to define the surface properties of the LHC vacuum chamber material and are presented in detail for the various samples analyzed. It should be noted that all the measurements presented here were recorded at room temperature, whereas the majority of the LHC vacuum system will be maintained at temperatures below 20 K. The results cannot therefore be directly applied to these sections of the machine until

  7. Reliability of Scores Obtained from Self-, Peer-, and Teacher-Assessments on Teaching Materials Prepared by Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantoglu Yilmaz, Funda

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine the reliability of scores obtained from self-, peer-, and teacher-assessments in terms of teaching materials prepared by teacher candidates. The study group of this research constitutes 56 teacher candidates. In the scope of research, teacher candidates were asked to develop teaching material related to their study.…

  8. Preliminary cleaning tests on candidate materials for APS beamline and front end UHV components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, R.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Comparative cleaning tests have been done on four candidate materials for use in APS beamline and front-end vacuum components. These materials are 304 SS, 304L SS, OFHC copper, and Glidcop* (Cu-Al 2 O 3 )- Samples of each material were prepared and cleaned using two different methods. After cleaning, the sample surfaces were analyzed using ESCA (Electron Spectography for Chemical Analysis). Uncleaned samples were used as a reference. The cleaning methods and surface analysis results are further discussed

  9. In-service irradiated and aged material evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.; Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this task is to provide a direct assessment of actual material properties in irradiated components of nuclear reactors, including the effects of irradiation and aging. Four activities are currently in progress: (1) establishing a machining capability for contaminated or activated materials by completing procurement and installation of a computer-based milling machine in a hot cell; (2) machining and testing specimens from cladding materials removed from the Gundremmingen reactor to establish their fracture properties; (3) preparing an interpretive report on the effects of neutron irradiation on cladding; and (4) continuing the evaluation of long-term aging of austenitic structural stainless steel weld metal by metallurgically examining and testing specimens aged at 288 and 343 degrees C and reporting the results, as well as by continuing the aging of the stainless steel cladding toward a total time of 50,000 h

  10. Accelerated irradiation test of gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279 degrees C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed

  11. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  12. The international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, T.E.; Cozzani, F.; Crandall, D.H.; Wiffen, F.W.; Katsuta, H.; Kondo, T.; Teplyakov, V.; Zavialsky, L.

    1994-01-01

    It is widely agreed that the development of materials for fusion systems requires a high flux, 14 MeV neutron source. The European Union, Japan, Russia and the US have initiated the conceptual design of such a facility. This activity, under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Fusion Materials Agreement, will develop the design for an accelerator-based D-Li system. The first organizational meeting was held in June 1994. This paper describes the system to be studied and the approach to be followed to complete the conceptual design by early 1997

  13. Investigations on neutron irradiated 3D carbon fibre reinforced carbon composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Alur, V. D.; Patra, A. K.; Acharya, R.; Srivastava, D.

    2018-04-01

    As against conventional graphite materials carbon-carbon (C/C) composite materials are now being contemplated as the promising candidate materials for the high temperature and fusion reactor owing to their high thermal conductivity and high thermal resistance, better mechanical/thermal properties and irradiation stability. The current need is for focused research on novel carbon materials for future new generation nuclear reactors. The advantage of carbon-carbon composite is that the microstructure and the properties can be tailor made. The present study encompasses the irradiation of 3D carbon composite prepared by reinforcement using PAN carbon fibers for nuclear application. The carbon fiber reinforced composite was subjected to neutron irradiation in the research reactor DHRUVA. The irradiated samples were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The DSC scans were taken in argon atmosphere under a linear heating program. The scanning was carried out at temperature range from 30 °C to 700 °C at different heating rates in argon atmosphere along with reference as unirradiated carbon composite. The Wigner energy spectrum of irradiated composite showed two peaks corresponding to 200 °C and 600 °C. The stored energy data for the samples were in the range 110-170 J/g for temperature ranging from 30 °C to 700 °C. The Wigner energy spectrum of irradiated carbon composite did not indicate spontaneous temperature rise during thermal annealing. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments have been carried out to investigate neutron irradiation induced changes in porosity of the composite samples. SANS data were recorded in the scattering wave vector range of 0.17 nm-1 to 3.5 nm-1. Comparison of SANS profiles of irradiated and unirradiated samples indicates significant change in pore morphology. Pore size distributions of the samples follow power law size distribution with

  14. Modelling irradiation effects in fusion materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Victoria, M.; Dudarev, S.; Boutard, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    We review the current status of the European fusion materials modelling programme. We describe recent findings and outline potential areas for future development. Large-scale density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the structure of the point defects in α-Fe, and highlight the crucial...

  15. Repair-welding technology of irradiated materials - WIM project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new project on the development of repair-welding technology for core internals and reactor (pressure) vessel, consigned by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), has been started from October 1997. The objective of the project is classified into three points as follows: (1) to develop repair-welding techniques for neutron irradiated materials, (2) to prove the availability of the techniques for core internals and reactor (pressure) vessel, and (3) to recommend the updated repair-welding for the Technical Rules and Standards. Total planning, neutron irradiation, preparation of welding equipment are now in progress. The materials are austenitic stainless steels and a low alloy steel. Neutron irradiation is performed using test reactors. In order to suppress the helium aggregation along grain boundaries, low heat input welding techniques, such as laser, low heat input TIG and friction weldings, will be applied. (author)

  16. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  17. Irradiation facilities for materials research: IFMIF and small scale installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlado, J. M.; Victoria, M.

    2007-01-01

    The research of advance materials in nuclear fields such as new fission reactors (Generation-IV), Accelerator Driven Systems for Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes and Nuclear Fusion, is becoming very much common in the types of low activation and radiation resistant Materials. Ferritic-Martensitic Steels (based in 9-12 Cr) with or without Oxide Dispersion Techniques (Ytria Nanoparticles), Composites materials are becoming the new generation to answer requirements of high temperature, high radiation resistance of structural materials. Special dedication is appearing in general research programmes to this area of Materials. The understanding of their final performance needs a wider knowledge of the mechanisms of radiation damage in these materials from the atomistic scale to the macroscopic responses. New extensive campaigns are being funded to irradiate from simple elements to model alloys and finally the complex materials themselves. That sequence and its state of art will be presented One clear technique for that understanding is the Multi scale Modelling which includes simulation techniques from quantum mechanics, molecular dynamics, defects diffusion, mesoscopic modelling and finally the macroscopic constitutive relations for macroscopic analysis. However, in each one of these steps is necessary a systematic and well established program of experiments that combines the irradiation and the very detailed analysis with techniques such as Transmission Electron Microscope, Positron Annihilation, SIMS, Atom Probe, Nanoindebntation. A key aspect that wants to be presented in this work is the state of art and discussion of Irradiation Facilities for Materials studies. Those facilities goes from ion implantation sources, small accelerator, Experimental Reactors such High Flux Reactor, sophisticated Triple Beams Sources as JANNUS in France to generate at the same time displacements-hydrogen-helium, and projected very large neutron installation such as IFMIF. The role to

  18. Simulation of tensile stress-strain properties of irradiated type 316 SS by heavily cold-worked material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Yasushi; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    1995-07-01

    Type 316 stainless steel is one of the most promising candidate materials to be used for the structural parts of plasma facing components in the nuclear fusion reactor. The neutron irradiation make the material brittle and reduces its uniform elongation to almost zero at heavy doses. In order to apply such a material of reduced ductility to structural components, the structural integrity should be examined and assured by the fracture mechanics. The procedure requires a formulated stress-strain relationship. However, the available irradiated tensile test data are very limited at present, so that the cold-worked material was used as a simulated material in this study. Property changes of 316 SS, that is, a reduction of uniform elongation and an enhancement of yield stress are seemingly very similar for both the irradiated 316 SS and the cold-worked one. The specimens made of annealed 316 SS, 20% (or 15%) cold worked one and 40% cold worked one were prepared. After the formulation of stress strain behavior, the equation for the cold-worked 316 SS was fitted to the data on irradiated material under the assumption that the yield stress is the same for both materials. In addition, the upper limit for the plastic strain was introduced using the data on the irradiated material. (author)

  19. Sampling by electro-erosion on irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, M.; Pizzanelli, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    Sampling on irradiated materials, in particular for mechanical property study of steels in the FAST NEUTRON program needed the set in a hot cell of a machining device by electroerosion. This device allows sampling of tenacity, traction, resilience test pieces [fr

  20. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  1. High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parkison, Adam [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-12-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels in order to overcome the inherent shortcomings of light water reactor (LWR) fuels when exposed to beyond design basis accident conditions. The campaign has invested in development of experimental infrastructure within the Department of Energy complex capable of chronicling the performance of a wide range of concepts under prototypic accident conditions. This report summarizes progress made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY13 toward these goals. Alternative fuel cladding materials to Zircaloy for accident tolerance and a significantly extended safety margin requires oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ≥1200°C for short times. At ORNL, prior work focused attention on SiC, FeCr and FeCrAl as the most promising candidates for further development. Also, it was observed that elevated pressure and H2 additions had minor effects on alloy steam oxidation resistance, thus, 1 bar steam was adequate for screening potential candidates. Commercial Fe-20Cr-5Al alloys remain protective up to 1475°C in steam and CVD SiC up to 1700°C in steam. Alloy development has focused on Fe-Cr-Mn-Si-Y and Fe-Cr-Al-Y alloys with the aluminaforming alloys showing more promise. At 1200°C, ferritic binary Fe-Cr alloys required ≥25% Cr to be protective for this application. With minor alloy additions to Fe-Cr, more than 20%Cr was still required, which makes the alloy susceptible to α’ embrittlement. Based on current results, a Fe-15Cr-5Al-Y composition was selected for initial tube fabrication and welding for irradiation experiments in FY14. Evaluations of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were conducted up to 1700°C in steam. The reaction of H2O with the alumina reaction tube at 1700°C resulted in Al(OH)3

  2. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  3. The opinions of primary school teachers’ candidates towards material preparation and usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Genc

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Instruction materials help students to acquire more memorable information. Instruction materials have an important effect on providing more permanent and simple way of learning in every step of education. Instruction materials are the most frequently used by primary school teachers. Primary school teachers should support their lectures with instruction materials in order to provide permanent learning. The Teaching Technologies and Material Designing (TTMD course which is one of the compulsory courses that students must take aims to acquire students the information and skills related with the preparation and use of materials. Evaluation of TTMD course is important in terms of the effectiveness of the course which provides the opportunity of motivating the students to learn by attracting their attention, keeping their attentions alive, making abstract concepts more concrete, facilitating the acquisition of knowledge in an organized way in the process of learning and teaching. In this context, it was aimed to determine the opinions of students in the department of primary school teaching about preparation and use of materials through teaching practice which is done within TTMD course in this study. This study is a descriptive study based on qualitative data. The sample of this research included 37 students from the department of primary school teaching who took TTMD course in the second semester in 2014-2015 academic year at Ataturk Education Faculty of Near East University or students who took this course in previous academic years. The data of this research were collected with structured interview form. According to the results, it was revealed that primary school teachers’ candidates attach importance to prepare and use materials based on their answers about the use and preparation of materials in instruction. When the opinions of primary school teachers candidates about the criteria that they give value in preparing and using

  4. Characteristics study of bentonite as candidate of buffer materials for radioactive waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro; Arimuladi, S.P.; Sastrowardoyo, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Literature studies on bentonite characteristic of, as candidate for radioactive waste disposal system, have been conducted. Several information have been obtained from references, which would be contributed on performance assessment of engineered barrier. The functions bentonite includes the buffering of chemical and physical behavior, i.e. swelling property, self sealing, hydraulic conductivities and gas permeability. This paper also presented long-term stability of bentonite in natural condition related to the illitisazation, which could change its buffering capacities. These information, showed that bentonite was satisfied to be used for candidate of buffer materials in radioactive waste disposal system. (author)

  5. Characterisation of candidate reference materials by PIXE analysis and nuclear microprobe PIXE imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, M.; Pastuovic, Z.; Bogdanovic, I.; Tadic, T.

    2002-01-01

    In order to test whether some candidate reference materials show homogeneity that can satisfy quality control of the PIXE technique, six bottles of each of the two Candidate RM's - Lichen (IAEA 338) and Algae (IAEA 413) were tested. Four different tests were performed. First, two pellets from each bottle were prepared and analysed using broad beam (φ = 5 mm) PIXE. Second and third was analysis of homogeneity using scanning focussed beam at the nuclear microprobe. Scans of 50x50 μm 2 and 240x260 μm 2 were performed. Finally, individual grains with composition differing from the rest of the sample, were analysed using PIXE and RBS. (author)

  6. Growth kinetics of dislocation loops in irradiated ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Kinoshita, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic materials are expected to be applied in the future fusion reactor as radio frequency (RF) windows, toroidal insulating breaks and diagnostic probes. The radiation resistance of ceramic materials, degradation of the electrical properties and radiation induced conductivity of these materials under neutron irradiation are determined by the kinetics of the accumulation of point defects in the matrix and point defect cluster formation (dislocation loops, voids, etc.). Under irradiation, due to the ionization process, excitation of electronic subsystem and covalent type of interaction between atoms the point defects in ceramic materials are characterized by the charge state (e.g. an F + center, an oxygen vacancy with a single trapped electron) and the effective charge. For the investigation of radiation resistance of ceramic materials for future fusion applications it is very important to understand the physical mechanisms of formation and growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation taking into account in this system the effective charge of point defects. In the present paper the physical mechanisms of dislocation loop growth in ceramic material are investigated. For this aim a theoretical model is suggested for the description of the kinetics of point defect accumulation in the matrix taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of an electric field on diffusion migration process of charged point defects. A self-consistent system of kinetic equations describing the generation of electrical fields near dislocation loops and diffusion migration of charged point defects in elastic and electrical fields is formulated. The solution of the kinetic equations allows to find the growth rate of dislocation loops in ceramic materials under irradiation taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of electric and elastic stress fields near dislocation loop on the diffusion processes

  7. Swedish studies on irradiation effect in structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M; Myers, H P

    1962-12-15

    A brief description of work in hand at AB Atomenergi concerning the effects of neutron irradiation on structural materials is given. Some recent data is listed for the following pressure vessel steels 2103/R3 as used in the Aagesta reactor, SIS 142103, NO345, Fortiweld and weld metal OK 54 P. Zircaloy-2 has been studied regarding the combined effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen content on tensile properties. The difficulties associated with determination of neutron dose and the correlation of damage with dose and neutron energy spectrum are discussed.

  8. Effects of gamma irradiation on raw materials and perfumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, M.; Pelpel, A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to enlight the strange problem of apparent perfume stability observed in manufactured talc powders sterilized by gamma rays, investigations were made on samples of odorant substances (raw materials, essential oils, or elaborated mixtures). As a rule, no immediate adulteration of olfactive caracteristics resulted at once from gamma irradiation. In several cases, a stabilizing effect appeared immediately and remained effective after long storage in various conditions (of temperature, or light, or oxygen exposure). This unexpected effect seems to be in accordance with previous experiments on gamma or electron irradiations of mixtures of organic molecules, reported in litterature: a mutual inhibition was observed to take place [fr

  9. Swedish studies on irradiation effect in structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.; Myers, H.P.

    1962-12-01

    A brief description of work in hand at AB Atomenergi concerning the effects of neutron irradiation on structural materials is given. Some recent data is listed for the following pressure vessel steels 2103/R3 as used in the Aagesta reactor, SIS 142103, NO345, Fortiweld and weld metal OK 54 P. Zircaloy-2 has been studied regarding the combined effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen content on tensile properties. The difficulties associated with determination of neutron dose and the correlation of damage with dose and neutron energy spectrum are discussed

  10. River bottom sediment from the Vistula as matrix of candidate for a new reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełbasa, Anna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2017-08-01

    Bottom sediments are very important in aquatic ecosystems. The sediments accumulate heavy metals and compounds belonging to the group of persistent organic pollutants. The accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was used for extraction of 16 compounds from PAH group from bottom sediment of Vistula. For the matrix of candidate of a new reference material, moisture content, particle size, loss on ignition, pH, and total organic carbon were determined. A gas chromatograph with a selective mass detector (GC/MS) was used for the final analysis. The obtained recoveries were from 86% (SD=6.9) for anthracene to 119% (SD=5.4) for dibenzo(ah)anthracene. For the candidate for a new reference material, homogeneity and analytes content were determined using a validated method. The results are a very important part of the development and certification of a new reference materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of electron irradiation to food containers and packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Problems caused by microbial contamination and hazardous chemicals have attracted much attention in the food industry. The number of systems such as hygienic management systems and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems adopted in the manufacturing process is increasing. As manufacturing process control has become stricter, stricter control is also required for microbial control for containers and packaging materials (from disinfection to sterilization). Since safe and reliable methods for sterilizing food containers and packaging materials that leave no residue are required, electron beam sterilization used for medical equipment has attracted attention from the food industry. This paper describes an electron irradiation facility, methods for applying electron beams to food containers and packaging materials, and products irradiated with electron beams. (author)

  12. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  13. Segmented fuel irradiation program: investigation on advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, H.; Goto, K.; Sabate, R.; Abeta, S.; Baba, T.; Matias, E. de; Alonso, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Segmented Fuel Irradiation Program, started in 1991, is a collaboration between the Japanese organisations Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) representing other Japanese utilities, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI); and the Spanish Organisations Empresa Nacional de Electricidad, S.A. (ENDESA) representing A.N. Vandellos 2, and Empresa Nacional Uranio, S.A. (ENUSA); with the collaboration of Westinghouse. The objective of the Program is to make substantial contribution to the development of advanced cladding and fuel materials for better performance at high burn-up and under operational power transients. For this Program, segmented fuel rods were selected as the most appropriate vehicle to accomplish the aforementioned objective. Thus, a large number of fuel and cladding combinations are provided while minimising the total amount of new material, at the same time, facilitating an eventual irradiation extension in a test reactor. The Program consists of three major phases: phase I: design, licensing, fabrication and characterisation of the assemblies carrying the segmented rods (1991 - 1994); phase II: base irradiation of the assemblies at Vandellos 2 NPP, and on-site examination at the end of four cycles (1994-1999). Phase III: ramp testing at the Studsvik facilities and hot cell PIE (1996-2001). The main fuel design features whose effects on fuel behaviour are being analysed are: alloy composition (MDA and ZIRLO vs. Zircaloy-4); tubing texture; pellet grain size. The Program is progressing satisfactorily as planned. The base irradiation is completed in the first quarter of 1999, and so far, tests and inspections already carried out are providing useful information on the behaviour of the new materials. Also, the Program is delivering a well characterized fuel material, irradiated in a commercial reactor, which can be further used in other fuel behaviour experiments. The paper presents the main

  14. TEM examination of irradiated zircaloy-2 pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Sharma, B.P.; Sah, D.N.; Banerjee, Suparna; Sahoo, K.C.

    2005-09-01

    In the present work, microstructure of the zircaloy-2 pressure tube material irradiated in the Indian Pressurized Heavy Water RAPP-1. Reactor (PHWR) has been examined for the first time using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The samples were obtained from a zircaloy-2 pressure tube, which had been in operation in the high flux region of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit -1, for a period for 6.77 effective full power years (EFPYs) and expected to have a cumulative radiation damage of about 3 dpa. In this study irradiated microstructure has been characterized and compared it with the microstructure of the unirradiated pressure tube samples. The effect of irradiation on the hydriding behaviour is also studied. (author)

  15. Irradiation of aluminium alloy materials with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Osamu; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi

    1982-01-01

    It is a theme with a room for discussion to employ the stainless steel composed of longer half-life materials for the vacuum system of accelerators, from the viewpoint of radiation exposure. Therefore, it is desirable to use aluminium of shorter half-life in place of stainless steel. As a result of investigation on the above theme in the 1.2 GeV electron linac project in Tohoku University, it has been concluded that aluminium alloy vacuum chambers can reduce exposure dose by about one or two figures as compared with stainless steel ones. Of course, aluminium alloy contains trace amounts of Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu and others. Therefore, four kinds of aluminium alloy considered to be usable have been examined for induced radioactivity by electron beam irradiation. Stainless steel SUS 304 has been also irradiated for comparison. Radiation energy has been 30 MeV and 200 MeV. When stainless steel and aluminium alloy were compared, aluminium alloy was very effective for reducing surface dose in low energy irradiation. In 200 MeV irradiation, the dose ratio of aluminium alloy to stainless steel became 1/30 to 1/100 after one week, though the dose difference between these two materials became smaller in 100 days or more after irradiation. If practical inspection and repair are implemented during the period from a few days to one week after shutdown, the aluminium alloy is preferable for exposure dose reduction even in high energy irradiation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.; Kass, J.N.

    1988-06-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys and three copper-based alloys are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The austenitic alloys are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and the high-nickel material Alloy 825. The copper-based alloys are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). Waste in the forms of both spent fuel assemblies from reactors and borosilicate glass will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking; and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Problems specific to welds, such as hot cracking, may also occur. A survey of the literature has been prepared as part of the process of selecting, from among the candidates, a material that is adequate for repository conditions. The modes of degradation are discussed in detail in the survey to determine which apply to the candidate alloys and the extent to which they may actually occur. The eight volumes of the survey are summarized in Sections 1 through 8 of this overview. The conclusions drawn from the survey are also given in this overview

  17. Project accent: graphite irradiated creep in a materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooking, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atkins manages a pioneering programme of irradiation experiments for EDF Energy. One of these projects is Project ACCENT, designed to obtain evidence of a beneficial physical property of the graphite, which may extend the life of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The project team combines the in-house experience of EDF Energy with two supplier organisations (providing the material test reactors and testing facilities) and supporting consultancies (Atkins and an independent technical expert). This paper describes: - Brief summary of the Project; - Discussion of the challenges faced by the Project; and - Conclusion elaborating on the aims of the Project. These challenging experiments use bespoke technology and both un-irradiated (virgin) and irradiated AGR graphite. The results will help to better understand graphite irradiation-induced creep (or stress modified dimensional change) properties and therefore more accurately determine lifetime and safe operating envelopes of the AGRs. The first round of irradiation has been completed, with a second round about to commence. This is a key step to realising the full lifetime ambition for AGRs, demonstrating the relaxation of stresses within the graphite bricks. (authors)

  18. The function of packing materials in a high-level nuclear waste repository and some candidate materials: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Shade, J.W.

    1987-03-01

    Packing materials should be included in waste package design for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. A packing material barrier would increase confidence in the waste package by alleviating possible shortcomings in the present design and prolonging confinement capabilities. Packing materials have been studied for uses in other geologic repositories; appropriately chosen, they would enhance the confinement capabilities of salt repository waste packages in several ways. Benefits of packing materials include retarding or chemically modifying brines to reduce corrosion of the waste package, providing good thermal conductivity between the waste package and host rock, retarding or absorbing radionuclides, and reducing the massiveness of the waste package. These benefits are available at low percentage of total repository cost, if the packing material is properly chosen and used. Several candidate materials are being considered, including oxides, hydroxides, silicates, cement-based mixtures, and clay mixtures. 18 refs

  19. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance

  20. Nuclear data for the production of radioisotopes in fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Schenter, R.E.; Mann, F.M.; Ikeda, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion materials irradiation facility (FMIF) is a neutron source generator that will produce a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron field for testing candidate fusion materials under reactor irradiation conditions. The construction of such a facility is one of the very important development stages toward realization of fusion energy as a practical energy source for electricity production. As a result of the high-intensity neutron field, 10 MW/m 2 or more equivalent neutron wall loading, and the relatively high-energy (10- to 20-MeV) neutrons, the FMIF, as future fusion reactors, also bears the potential capability of producing a significant quantity of radioisotopes. A study is being conducted to identify the potential capability of the FMIF to produce radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. Two types of radioisotopes are involved: one is already available; the second might not be readily available using conventional production methods. For those radioisotopes that are not readily available, the FMIF could develop significant benefits for future generations as a result of the availability of such radioisotopes for medical or industrial applications. The current production of radioisotopes could help finance the operation of the FMIF for irradiating the candidate fusion materials; thus this concept is attractive. In any case, nuclear data are needed for calculating the neutron flux and spectrum in the FMIF and the potential production rates of these isotopes. In this paper, the authors report the result of a preliminary investigation on the production of 99 Mo, the parent radioisotope for 99m Tc

  1. Stability of aflatoxin B1 in animal feed candidate reference materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A.H.; Mazijk, van R.J.; Tuinstra, L.G.M.T.; Huf, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    Two candidate reference materials animal feed were stored at a temperature of -18°C, 4 C, 20°C and 37°C. The stability of aflatoxin B1 was studied duringa period of two years. A significant decrease in the aflatoxin B1 content was measured in the samples stared at 20°C and 37°C. In the samples

  2. Static and Dynamic Friction Behavior of Candidate High Temperature Airframe Seal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Morris, D. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    The following report describes a series of research tests to evaluate candidate high temperature materials for static to moderately dynamic hypersonic airframe seals. Pin-on-disk reciprocating sliding tests were conducted from 25 to 843 C in air and hydrogen containing inert atmospheres. Friction, both dynamic and static, was monitored and serves as the primary test measurement. In general, soft coatings lead to excessive static friction and temperature affected friction in air environments only.

  3. Data for the sorption of actinides on candidate materials for use in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.D.; Pryke, D.C.; Rees, J.H.

    1988-02-01

    The sorptive behaviour of the actinides uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium has been investigated under air-saturated conditions on a number of candidate near-field materials by batch sorption experiments. Distribution ratios were measured with respect to initial actinide concentration, the solid:liquid ratio and contact time. Desorption experiments were carried out to help elucidate the mechanism of sorption. The fit of the data to the Freundlich isotherm was assessed. This work contains the data obtained in the investigation. (author)

  4. Calculations on neutron irradiation damage in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho; Shiraishi, Kensuke

    1976-01-01

    Neutron irradiation damage calculations were made for Mo, Nb, V, Fe, Ni and Cr. Firstly, damage functions were calculated as a function of neutron energy with neutron cross sections of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and (n,2n) and (n,γ) reactions filed in ENDF/B-III. Secondly, displacement damage expressed in displacements per atom (DPA) was estimated for neutron environments such as fission spectrum, thermal neutron reactor (JMTR), fast breeder reactor (MONJU) and two fusion reactors (The Conceptual Design of Fusion Reactor in JAERI and ORNL-Benchmark). then, damage cross section in units of dpa. barn was defined as a factor to convert a given neutron fluence to the DPA value, and was calculated for the materials in the above neutron environments. Finally, production rates of helium and hydrogen atoms were calculated with (n,α) and (n,p) cross sections in ENDF/B-III for the materials irradiated in the above reactors. (auth.)

  5. Fracture toughness properties of candidate canister materials for spent fuel storage by concrete cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taku; Mayuzumi, Masami; Libin, Niu; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    It is very significant to clarify the fracture toughness properties of candidate canister materials to ensure the structural integrity against the accidents during handling in the storage facility. Fracture toughness tests on the CT specimens cut from base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal in the 2 types of weld joints made by candidate canister materials (SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel and YUS270 super stainless steel) were conducted under various test temperature between 233K and 473K. Stable ductile crack extensions were observed in all of the specimens. The fracture toughness J Q of the base metal and the HAZ of SUS329L4L showed the smallest value at 233K, and increased with temperature, then reached to the largest value at 298K. At the higher temperature, the value of J Q decreased slightly with temperature. While, the value of J Q in the weld metal increased with temperature. The value of J Q of YUS270 increased with temperature. The values of J Q for weld metal in both of the materials were not greater than those in base metal and HAZ at each test temperature. The values of J Q in weld metal of both materials at 213K and 473K were greater than applied J derived from postulated semi-elliptical surface flaw and maximum allowable stress in JSME design coed. This result suggested that these materials have enough toughness for use as the canister material. (author)

  6. Corrosion of candidate materials for canister: applications in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azkarate, I.; Madina, V.; Barrio, A. del; Macarro, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Previous corrosion studies carried out on various metallic materials in typical salt rock environments show that carbon steel and titanium alloys are the most promising candidates for canister applications in this geological formation. Although carbon steels have a low corrosion resistance, they are considered acceptable as corrosion-allowance materials for a thick walled container due to their practical immunity to the localized corrosion phenomena such as stress corrosion cracking, pitting or crevice corrosion. Aiming to improve the performances of these materials, studies on the effect of small additions of Ni and V on the general corrosion are in process. The improvement in the resistance to general corrosion should not be accompanied by a sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking. On the contrary, alfa titanium alloys are considered the most resistant materials to general corrosion in salt brines. However, pitting, are potential deficiencies of this corrosion-resistant materials for a thin walled container. (Author)

  7. Development of Candidate Reference Materials of Endosulfan Sulfate and Bifenthrin in Black Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhani Aryana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The candidate reference materials of endosulfan sulfate and bifenthrin in black tea have been developed according to the requirements of ISO Guide 34 and 35. Preparation of candidate material includes grinding and sieving of the black tea leaves, spiking the black tea powder by both analytes, homogenization, and bottling. Homogeneity and short-term stability test were performed using a GC-µECD instrument. Meanwhile, the characterization was carried out by a collaborative study using both of GC-µECD and GC-MS instruments. The uncertainty budget was evaluated from sample inhomogeneity, short-term instability and variability in the characterization procedure. In a dry mass fraction, endosulfan sulfate was assigned to be 491 µg kg-1 with a relative expanded uncertainty of ± 33.2%, and bifenthrin was assigned to be 937 µg kg-1 with a relative expanded uncertainty of ± 18.5%. The candidate reference materials are aimed to support the need of matrix CRM especially for the measurement of pesticide residue for quality assurance work done by laboratories in Indonesia.

  8. Characterization of damaging in apatitic materials irradiated with heavy ions and thermally annealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisserand, R.

    2004-12-01

    Some minerals belonging to the family of apatite are seen to be potential candidates for use as conditioning matrices or transmutation targets for high level nuclear waste management. Indeed, studies of natural nuclear reactors (Oklo) highlighted the strong ability of these minerals to anneal irradiation damage. In order to determine the global behaviour of these materials, we performed a fundamental study on the evolution of irradiation damage induced by various heavy ions in two apatites: a natural phospho-calcic fluor-apatite from Durango and a synthetic sintered mono-silicated fluor-apatite, called britholite. The damage in these materials was measured by using channelling R.B.S. and X-ray diffraction respectively and by determining an amorphization effective radius Re. The results revealed a similar behaviour for both apatites according to the electronic energy deposit at the entrance of the material. In addition, the effect of an isothermal annealing at 300 C was quantified on a mono-silicated britholite previously irradiated with Kr ions. We highlighted in this case the return of the lattice parameters to their initial values, followed by a partial and slow rebuilding of the crystalline lattice versus the annealing time. Finally, we followed the changes in the morphology of etch pits in the Durango fluor-apatite after acid dissolution as a function of the energy deposit by the ions. We showed that the influence of crystallography leads quickly to opening angles close to 30 degrees. The calculation of etching velocities within the irradiated material highlighted that there is a range of deposit energy where the velocity ratio increases strongly before becoming constant. (author)

  9. Contamination confinement system of irradiated materials handling laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobao, A. dos S.T.; Araujo, J.A. de; Camilo, R.L.

    1988-06-01

    A study to prevent radioctivity release in lab scale is presented. As a basis for the design all the limits established by the IAEA for ventilation systems were observed. An evaluation of the different parameters involved in the design have been made, resulting in the especification of the working areas, ducts and filtering systems in order to get the best conditions for the safe handling of irradiated materials. (author) [pt

  10. Construction of irradiated material examination facility-basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Kim, Eun Ka; Hong, Gye Won; Herr, Young Hoi; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, Myeong Han; Baik, Sang Youl; Choo, Yong Sun; Baik, Seung Je

    1989-02-01

    The basic design of the hot cell facility which has the main purpose of doing mechanical and physical property tests of irradiated materials, the examination process, and the annexed facility has been made. Also basic and detall designs for the underground excavation work have been performed. The project management and tasks required for the license application have been carried out in due course. The facility is expected to be completed by the end of 1992, if the budgetary support is sufficient. (Author)

  11. Containment system of contamination in irradiated materials handling laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobao, A.S.T.; Araujo, J.A. de; Camilo, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    A study to prevent radiactivity release in lab scale is presented. As a basis for the design all the limits established by the IAEA for ventilation systems were observed. An evaluation of the different parameters involved in the design have been made, resulting in the specification of the working areas, ducts and filtering systems in order to get the best conditions for the safe handling of irradiated materials. (author) [pt

  12. Irradiation effects on the ductility of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudamous, F.

    1986-10-01

    Austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steels have been proposed as first wall structural materials for the next generation of fusion devices. In order to study the effect of high temperature irradiation on their tensile properties, specimens of the steel AISI 316 L (CEC reference), of the martensitic steel W. Nr 1.4914 and of the duplex ferritic-martensitic steel EM12 have been irradiated in the BR2 reactor in Mol. The austenitic steel was irradiated at 470 0 C to about 1.1 10 22 n/cm 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) while the ferritic-martensitic steels were irradiated at 590 0 C to about 7.7 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). The tensile tests of the 316 L steel have been performed between 250 and 750 0 C. Below around 550 0 C, the yield stress after irradiation increased from about 160 to 270 MPa and the total elongation decreased from 42 to about 26%. At 750 0 C, the yield stress increase was small but the total elongation decreased from 60 to only 10%. At this temperature, the rupture of the irradiated specimen was intergranular while all the other specimens presented a transgranular rupture. At 650 0 C the variations were intermediate. The change of the ultimate tensile strength was small at all test temperatures. The EM12 and W. Nr 1.4914 steels tested only at 550 0 C, showed a decrease of the yield and tensile strength as well as an increase of the total elongation. The same tests performed on specimens which have been heat treated in parallel showed that the observed changes were due, in a large part, if not completely, to the maintenance of steels at high temperature

  13. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  14. Preparation of silica-based hybrid materials by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, S.R.; Margaca, F.M.A.; Miranda Salvado, I.M.; Ferreira, L.M.; Falcao, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray irradiation is well known to promote the crosslinking of polymer chains. The method is now used by the authors to prepare hybrid materials from a mixture of polymer and metallic alkoxides of silicium and zirconium that are usually obtained via the sol-gel process. Macroscopically homogeneous and transparent hybrid materials have been obtained by γ-irradiation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and zirconium propoxide (PrZr). The influence of several parameters has been studied. The dose rate was found to have no significant impact in the prepared material. The polymer molecular weight was also observed not to play any special role. It was found that all irradiated samples consist of a polymer gel matrix. In the case where both alkoxides are present there are inorganic oxide regions linked to the PDMS network. However when one of the alkoxides is absent there is no formation of inorganic oxide regions linked to the polymer matrix, there being only a few individual derived molecules of the other alkoxide linked to the polymer

  15. PIREX II, a new irradiation facility for testing fusion first wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmy, P.; Daum, M.; Gavillet, D.; Green, S.; Green, W.V.; Hegedues, F.; Pronnecke, S.; Rohrer, U.; Stiefel, U.; Victoria, M.

    1988-12-01

    A new irradiation facility, PIREX II, became operational in March 1987. It is located on a dedicated beam line split from the main beam of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Irradiation with protons of this energy introduces simultaneously displacement damage, helium and other impurities. Because of the penetration range of 590 MeV protons, both damage and impurities are homogeneously distributed in the target. The installation has its own beam line optics that can support a proton current of up to 50 μA. At a typical beam density of 4 μA/mm 2 , the damage rate in steels is 0.7 x 10 -5 dpa/sec (dpa: displacements per atom) and the helium production rate is 170 appm He/dpa. Both flat tensile specimens of up to 0.4 mm thickness and tubular fatigue samples of 3 mm diameter can be irradiated. Cooling of the temperatures can be controlled between 100 o and 800 o C. Installation of an in situ low cycle fatigue device is foreseen. Beams of up to 20 μA have been obtained, the beam having approximately a gaussian distribution of elliptical cross section with 4 σ between 0.8 and 3 mm by 10 mm. Irradiations for a dosimetry program have been completed on samples of Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Au, W, and the 1.4914 ferritic steel. The evaluation of results allows the correct choice of reactions to be used for determining total dose, from the standpoint of half life and gamma energy. A program of irradiations on candidate materials for the Next European Torus (NET) design (Cu and Cu alloys, the 1.4914 ferritic martensitic steel, W and W-Re alloys and Mo alloys), where the above mentioned characteristics of this type of irradiation can be used advantageously, is now under way. (author) 11 figs., 4 tabs., 20 refs

  16. Development of Environment and Irradiation Effects of High Temperature Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. W.; Kim, S. H.

    2009-11-01

    Proposed materials, Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (32 mm thickness) and 9Cr-1Mo-1W (100 mm thickness), for the reactor vessel were procured, and welded by the qualified welding technologies. Welding soundness was conformed by NDT, and mechanical testings were done along to weld depth. Two new irradiation capsules for use in the OR test hole of HANARO were designed and fabricated. specimens was irradiated in the OR5 test hole of HANARO with a 30MW thermal power at 390±10 .deg. C up to a fast neutron fluence of 4.4x10 19 (n/cm 2 ) (E>1.0 MeV). The dpa was evaluated to be 0.034∼0.07. Base metals and weldments of both Mod.9Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo-1W steels were tested tensile and impact properties in order to evaluate the irradiation hardening effects due to neutron irradiation. DBTT of base metal and weldment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were -16 .deg. C and 1 .deg. C, respectively. After neutron irradiation, DBTT of weldment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel increased to 25 . deg. C. Alloy 617 and several nickel-base superalloys were studied to evaluate high temperature degradation mechanisms. Helium loop was developed to evaluate the oxidation behaviors of materials in the VHTR environments. In addition, creep behaviors in air and He environments were compared, and oxidation layers formed outer surfaces were measured as a function of applied stress and these results were investigated to the creep life

  17. Space Environmental Effects Testing and Characterization of the Candidate Solar Sail Material Aluminized Mylar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. L.; Hubbs, W. S.; Wertz, G. E.; Alstatt, R.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The usage of solar sails as a propellantless propulsion system has been proposed for many years. The technical challenges associated with solar sails are fabrication of ultralightweight films, deploying the sails and controlling the spacecraft. Integral to all these challenges is the mechanical property integrity of the sail while exposed to the harsh environment of space. This paper describes testing and characterization of a candidate solar sail material, Aluminized Mylar. This material was exposed to a simulated Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) and evaluated by measuring thermooptical and mechanical property changes. Testing procedures and results are presented.

  18. In-situ hot corrosion testing of candidate materials for exhaust valve spindles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe; Hoeg, Harro A.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2011-01-01

    The two stroke diesel engine has been continually optimized since its invention more than a century ago. One of the ways to increase fuel efficiency further is to increase the compression ratio, and thereby the temperature in the combustion chamber. Because of this, and the composition of the fuel...... used, exhaust valve spindles in marine diesel engines are subjected to high temperatures and stresses as well as molten salt induced corrosion. To investigate candidate materials for future designs which will involve the HIP process, a spindle with Ni superalloy material samples inserted in a HIPd Ni49...

  19. Effects of irradiation on four solid breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The tritium breeding material with the highest lithium atom density, Li 2 O has been observed to incur significant swelling (>4%) under fast reactor irradiation. Such swelling, if unrestrained leads to either unacceptable, induced-strains in adjacent structural material or undesirable design compromises. Fortunately, however, Li 2 O deforms at low temperatures so that swelling strains may be internally accommodated. Laboratory dilational creep experiments were conducted on unirraciated Li 2 O between 500 and 700 0 C in order to provide data for structural analysis of in-reactor experiments and blanket design studies. A densification model agreed with most of the available data. 15 refs

  20. Value determination of ZrO2 in-house reference material (RM) candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanna Tuning Sunanti; Samin; Supriyanto C

    2013-01-01

    The value determination of zirconium oxide in-house reference materials (RM) candidate has been done by referring to ISO:35-2006 standard. The raw material of RM was 4 kg of ZrO 2 , Merck, that was dried at 90°C for 2×6 hours in a closed room. The samples were crushed with stainless steel (SS) pestle to pass ≤ 200 mesh sieve, homogenized in a homogenizer for 3×6 hours to obtain the powdered, dried and homogenous samples. The gravimetric method was performed to test the moisture content, while XRF and AAS methods were used to test the homogeneity and stability of samples candidates. Reference material (RM) candidates of ZrO 2 powder were put into polyethylene bottles, each weighing 100 g. Samples were distributed to 10 testing laboratories that have been accredited for testing the composition of the oxide contents and loss of ignition (LOI) using variety of analytical methods that have been validated such as AAS, XRF, NAA, and UV-Vis. The testing results of oxide content and loss of ignition parameters from various laboratories were analyzed using statistical methods. The testing data of oxide concentration in zirconium oxide RM candidates obtained from various laboratories were ZrO 2 : 97.7334 ± 0.0016%, HfO 2 : 1.7329 ± 0.0024%, SiO 2 : 30.1224 ± 0.0053%, Al 2 O 3 : 0.0245 ± 0.0015%, TiO 2 : 0.0153 ± 0.0006%, Fe 2 O 3 : 0.0068 ± 0.0005%, CdO: 3.1798 ± 0.00006 ppm, and the LOI results was = 0.0217 ± 0.00022%. (author)

  1. Optical and electrical phenomena in dielectric materials under irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, P A; Demenkov, P V; Chernov, V M; Krutskikh, A O

    2002-01-01

    Optical and acoustic properties of the materials based on Al sub 2 O sub 3 , SiO sub 2 and BN under 8 MeV proton irradiation (<10 sup 4 Gy/s) have been measured. Electric charge partitioning has been shown to result in charging the microscopic regions in the bulk of the dielectrics under irradiation, which is due to different mobility of free electrons and holes (sapphire), concentration inhomogeneity in the system of charge carrier traps (alumina), or thermodynamic instability of the homogeneous distribution of the filled traps (silica glasses). Prevalent charge carrier recombination in the grain boundaries causes re-crystallization of pyrolytic boron nitride under irradiation, which shows up as simultaneous decrease of the intensity of radiation-induced luminescence (RIL) of the centres in the grain boundaries and the BN. The local charging results in optical inhomogeneity of the silica glasses which is sustained by the optical loss spectra of the irradiated glasses, features of kinetics of bleaching, RI...

  2. A feasibility study for producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for the polyether ionophore salinomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rosana Gomes; Monteiro, Mychelle Alves; Pereira, Mararlene Ulberg; da Costa, Rafaela Pinto; Spisso, Bernardete Ferraz; Calado, Veronica

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of producing an egg matrix candidate reference material for salinomycin. Preservation techniques investigated were freeze-drying and spray drying dehydration. Homogeneity and stability studies of the produced batches were conducted according to ISO Guides 34 and 35. The results showed that all produced batches were homogeneous and both freeze-drying and spray drying techniques were suitable for matrix dehydrating, ensuring the material stability. In order to preserve the material integrity, it must be transported within the temperature range of -20 up to 25°C. The results constitute an important step towards the development of an egg matrix reference material for salinomycin is possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E.; Weiss, H.

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are being considered along with three austenitic candidates as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level reprocessing wastes in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain mechanical integrity for 50 yr after emplacement to allow for retrieval of waste during the preclosure phase of repository operation. Containment is required to be substantially complete for up to 300 to 1000 yr. During the early period, the containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. The final closure joint will be critical to the integrity of the containers. This volume surveys the available data on the metallurgy of the copper-based candidate alloys and the welding techniques employed to join these materials. The focus of this volume is on the methods applicable to remote-handling procedures in a hot-cell environment with limited possibility of postweld heat treatment. The three copper-based candidates are ranked on the basis of the various closure techniques. On the basis of considerations regarding welding, the following ranking is proposed for the copper-based alloys: CDA 715 (best) > CDA 102 > CDA 613 (worst). 49 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  4. Stochastic simulation of destruction processes in self-irradiated materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Patsahan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-irradiation damages resulting from fission processes are common phenomena observed in nuclear fuel containing (NFC materials. Numerous α-decays lead to local structure transformations in NFC materials. The damages appearing due to the impacts of heavy nuclear recoils in the subsurface layer can cause detachments of material particles. Such a behaviour is similar to sputtering processes observed during a bombardment of the material surface by a flux of energetic particles. However, in the NFC material, the impacts are initiated from the bulk. In this work we propose a two-dimensional mesoscopic model to perform a stochastic simulation of the destruction processes occurring in a subsurface region of NFC material. We describe the erosion of the material surface, the evolution of its roughness and predict the detachment of the material particles. Size distributions of the emitted particles are obtained in this study. The simulation results of the model are in a qualitative agreement with the size histogram of particles produced from the material containing lava-like fuel formed during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster.

  5. Gamma irradiation induced effects of butyl rubber based damping material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Wang, Pu-Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Feng-Shun; Ao, Yin-Yong

    2018-04-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the butyl rubber based damping material (BRP) at various doses in nitrogen were investigated in this study. The results show that irradiation leads to radiolysis of BRP, with extractives increasing from 14.9 ± 0.8% of control to 37.2 ± 1.2% of sample irradiated at 350 kGy, while the swelling ratio increasing from 294 ± 3% to 766 ± 4%. The further investigation of the extractives with FTIR shows that the newly generated extractives are organic compounds containing C-H and C˭C bonds, with molecular weight ranging from 26,500 to 46,300. SEM characterization shows smoother surface with holes disappearing with increasing absorbed doses, consistent with "softer" material because of radiolysis. Dynamic mechanical study of BRP show that tan δ first slightly then obviously increases with increasing absorbed dose, while storage modulus slightly decreases. The tensile testing shows that the tensile strength decreases while the elongation at break increases with increasing dose. The positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy show no obvious relations between free volume parameters and the damping properties, indicating the complicated influencing factors of damping properties.

  6. Small Punch Test Techniques for Irradiated Materials in Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Sik; Ahn, S. B.; Oh, W. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Choo, Y. S.

    2006-06-01

    Detailed procedures of the small punch test including the apparatus, the definition of small punch-related parameters, and the interpretation of results were presented. The testing machine should have a capability of the compressive loading and unloading at a given deflection level. The small punch specimen holder consists of an upper and lower die and clamping screws. The clamped specimen is deformed by using ball or spherical head punch. Two type of specimens with a circular and a square shape were used. The irradiated small punch specimen is made from the undamaged portion of the broken CVN bars or prepared by the irradiation of the specimen fabricated from the fresh materials. The heating and cooling devices should have the capability of the temperature control within ±2 .deg. C for the target value during the test. Based on the load-deflection data obtained from the small punch test. the empirical correlation between the small punch related parameters and a tensile properties such as 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength, fracture toughness, ductile-brittle transition temperature and creep properties determined from the standard test method is established and used to evaluate the mechanical properties of an irradiated materials. In addition, from the quantitative fractographic assessment of small punch test specimens, the relationship between the small punch energy and the quantity of ductile crack growth is obtained. Analytical formulations demonstrated good agreement with experimental load-deflection curves

  7. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-04-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Bullen, D.B.

    1988-04-01

    Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides in the repository will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluences of gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including atmospheric oxidation; uniform aqueous phase corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; sensitization and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This report is an analysis of data relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three austenitic candidate alloys. The candidates are compared in terms of their susceptibilities to these forms of corrosion. Although all three candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these types of localized corrosion (LC); such resistance is important because pits can penetrate the metal and serve as crack initiation sites. Both Types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented in Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma radiation has been found to enhance SCC in Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while the effects of microbiologically induced corrosion have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. 211 refs., 49 figs., 10 tabs

  9. Irradiation-accelerated corrosion of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, David; Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie

    2012-09-01

    The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, but also applies to most all other GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion presents a unique and extremely challenging environment for materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is essentially absent. Irradiation can affect corrosion or oxidation in at least three different ways. Radiation interaction with water results in the decomposition of water into radicals and oxidizing species that will increase the electrochemical corrosion potential and lead to greater corrosion rates. Irradiation of the solid surface can produce excited states that can alter corrosion, such as in the case of photo-induced corrosion. Lastly, displacement damage in the solid will result in a high flux of defects to the solid-solution interface that can alter and perhaps, accelerate interface reactions. While there exists reasonable understanding of how corrosion is affected by irradiation of the aqueous environment, there is little understanding of how irradiation affects corrosion through its impact on the solid, whether metal or oxide. The reason is largely due to the difficulty of conducting experiments that can measure this effect separately. We have undertaken a project specifically to separate the several effects of irradiation on the mechanisms of corrosion. We seek to answer the question: How does radiation damage to the solution-oxide couple affect the oxidation process differently from radiation damage to either component alone? The approach taken in this work is to closely compare corrosion accelerated by (1) proton irradiation, (2) electron irradiation, and (3) chemical corrosion potential effects alone, under typical PWR operating conditions at 300 deg. C. Both 316 stainless steel and zirconium are to be studied. The proton

  10. Staged deployment of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) employs an accelerator based D-Li intense neutron source as defined in the 1995-96 Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) study. In 1999, IEA mandated a review of the CDA IFMIF design for cost reduction without change to its original mission. This objective was accomplished by eliminating the previously assumed possibility of potential upgrade of IFMIF beyond the user requirements. The total estimated cost was reduced from $797.2 M to $487.8 M. An option of deployment in 3 stages was also examined to reduce the initial investment and annual expenditures during construction. In this scenario, full performance is achieved gradually with each interim stage as follows. 1st Stage: 20% operation for material selection for ITER breeding blanket, 2nd Stage: 50% operation to demonstrate materials performance of a reference alloy for DEMO, 3rd Stage: full performance operation ( 2MW/m 2 at 500cm 3 ) to obtain engineering data for potential DEMO materials under irradiation up to 100-200 dpa. In summary, the new, reduced cost IFMIF design and staged deployment still satisfies the original mission. The estimated cost of the 1st Stage facility is only $303.6 M making it financially much more attractive. Currently, IFMIF Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) is underway to reduce the key technology risk factors. (author)

  11. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility

  12. Irradiation tests on bitumen and bitumen coated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabardel-Brian, R.; Rodier, J.; Lefillatre, G.

    1969-01-01

    The use of bitumen as a material for coating high-activity products calls for prior study of the resistance of bitumen to irradiation. After giving briefly the methods of preparation of bitumen- coated products, this report lists the equipment which has been used for carrying out the β and γ irradiations of these products, and gives the analytical results obtained as a function of the dose rates chosen and of the total integrated dose. Finally, some conclusions have been drawn concerning the best types of bitumen. It should be stressed that some bitumens apparently underwent no degradation whatsoever nor any volume increase, for a total integrated dose of 1.8 x 10 10 rads. (authors) [fr

  13. Process for the irradiation of a film-like material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Kazuo; Inoue, Takashi.

    1969-01-01

    Herein provided is a process for curing a polymerizable coating applied to a strip-like material by irradiating the film with high energy radiation. A plurality of rollers are arranged on both sides of the radiation path in a rectangular configuration such that only the underside of the film contacts the rollers as it is unwound in spiral fashion from a feed bobbin and rewound by a take-up bobbin located within the rectangle. The rollers are further positioned to feed the film in a direction perpendicular to the radiation beam path and to assure that successive levels of the strip superimposed while being inwardly wound are mutually parallel, uniformly spaced and adjusted to precisely intercept the radiation beam. Such an arrangement prevents a polymerizable liquid coating applied to the surface of the strip from contacting the rollers and allows effective repetitive irradiation of the strip as it passes through successive levels of the spiral before being rewound. (Owens, K. J.)

  14. Dielectric changes in neutron-irradiated rf window materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, H.M.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics used for windows in ECRH heating systems for magnetically-confined fusion reactors must retain adequate properties during and after intense neutron irradiation. Of particular concern is a decrease in transmissivity, a parameter inversely related to the product of dielectric constant K and loss tangent tanδ. Samples of polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 and BeO were irradiated to 1 x 10 26 n/m 2 at 660K in the EBR-II fission reactor, and the above properties subsequently measured at 95 GHz. It was found that ktanδ for both materials doubled, implying a doubling of thermal stresses and a consequent reduction of time-to-failure from an assumed one year to 20 min for beryllia and 2 s for alumina. In the case of BeO, a large increase in reflectance of the incident millimeter-wave power results from dielectrically uncompensated swelling. This phenomenon could significantly degrade source performance

  15. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ''excess'' nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist

  16. Testing capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, S.A.; James, M.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources expose materials to high energy (>100 MeV) proton and neutron spectra. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of radiation damage in a lower energy neutron flux from fission or fusion reactors on the mechanical properties of materials, very little work has been performed on the effects that exposure to a spallation neutron spectrum has on the mechanical properties of materials. These effects can be significantly different than those observed in a fission or fusion reactor spectrum because exposure to high energy protons and neutrons produces more He and H along with the atomic displacement damage. Los Alamos National Laboratory has unique facilities to study the effects of spallation radiation damage on the mechanical properties of materials. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has a pulsed linear accelerator which operates at 800 MeV and 1 mA. The Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF) located at the end of this accelerator is designed to allow the irradiation of components in a proton beam while water cooling these components and measuring their temperature. After irradiation, specimens can be investigated at hot cells located at the Chemical Metallurgy Research Building. Wing 9 of this facility contains 16 hot cells set up in two groups of eight, each having a corridor in the center to allow easy transfer of radioactive shipments into and out of the hot cells. These corridors have been used to prepare specimens for shipment to collaborating laboratories such as PNNL, ORNL, BNL, and the Paul Scherrer Institute to perform specialized testing at their hot cells. The LANL hot cells contain capabilities for opening radioactive components and testing their mechanical properties as well as preparing specimens from irradiated components

  17. A study on homogeneity of the IAEA candidate reference materials for microanalysis and analytical support in the certification of these materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, R.; Danko, B.; Polkowska-Motrenko, H.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a study on homogeneity of new IAEA candidate reference materials: IAEA 338 Lichen and IAEA 413 Algae in small (ca.10 mg) samples as well as some data contributing to certification of these materials are presented. (author)

  18. Radiation damage and materials performance in irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.

    2009-01-01

    Collisions of energetic projectile particles with host atoms produce atomic displacements in the target materials. Subsequently, some of these displacements are transformed into lattice defects and survive in the form of single defects and of defect clusters. Depending on the ambient temperature, these defects and their clusters diffuse, interact, annihilate, segregate and accumulate in various forms and are responsible for the evolution of the irradiation-induced microstructure. Naturally, both physical and mechanical properties and thereby the performance and lifetime of target materials are likely to be determined by the nature and the magnitude of the accumulated defects and their spatial dispositions. The defect accumulation, microstructural evolution and the resulting materials response gets very complicated particularly under the reactor operational conditions. The complication arises from the fact that the materials used in the structural components will experience concurrently generation of defects produced by the flux of neutrons and generation of dislocations due to plastic deformation. In other words, the defect accumulation will have to be considered under the conditions of two interactive reaction kinetics operating simultaneously. Both materials and experimental variables are likely to affect the damage accumulation and thereby the materials performance. Experimental and theoretical results pertaining to effects of major materials and experimental variables on materials performance will be briefly examined. (au)

  19. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  20. Micro-homogeneity evaluation of a bovine kidney candidate reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Liliana; Moreira, Edson G.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A., E-mail: lcastroesnal@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The minimum sample intake for which a reference material remains homogeneous is one of the parameters that must be estimated in the homogeneity assessment study of reference materials. In this work, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis was used to evaluate this quantity in a bovine kidney candidate reference material. The mass fractions of 9 inorganic constituents were determined in subsamples between 1 and 2 mg in order to estimate the relative homogeneity factor (HE) and the minimum sample mass to achieve 5% and 10% precision on a 95% confidence level. Results obtained for H{sub E} in all the analyzed elements were satisfactory. The estimated minimum sample intake was between 2 mg and 40 mg, depending on the element. (author)

  1. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov; Egle, B. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zenobia, S. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10{sup 14} ions/(cm{sup 2} s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  2. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  3. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  4. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams

  6. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  7. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  8. Corrosion of candidate iron-base waste package structural barrier materials in moist salt environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.

    1984-11-01

    Mild steels are considered to be strong candidates for waste package structural barrier (e.g., overpack) applications in salt repositories. Corrosion rates of these materials determined in autoclave tests utilizing a simulated intrusion brine based on Permian Basin core samples are low, generally <25 μm (1 mil) per year. When the steels are exposed to moist salts containing simulated inclusion brines, the corrosion rates are found to increase significantly. The magnesium in the inclusion brine component of the environment is believed to be responsible for the increased corrosion rates. 1 reference, 4 figures, 2 tables

  9. Dose requirements for microbial decontamination of botanical materials by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razem, D.; Katusin-Razem, Branka

    2002-01-01

    Microbial contamination levels and corresponding resistivities to irradiation (expressed as dose required for the first 90% reduction, D first 9 0% r ed ) were analyzed in a number of various botanical materials. The following generalizations could be made: total aerobic plate count is the most informative measure of contamination; the probability of contamination depends on available surface of the material and processing history: flowers and leaves usually contain more contamination than fruits and seeds, while crude herbs contain more than extracts; liquid extracts are more contaminated than dry ones. At the same time, resistivity to irradiation increases approximately in the reverse order of contamination level on going from flowers and leaves, to fruits and seeds, to liquid and dry extracts. The two quantities, probability of contamination and D first 9 0% r ed being inversely related, the treatment dose needed to reduce initial contamination to tolerable level amounts to between 4 and 30 kGy under a typical scenario, and between 8 and 40 kGy under the worst-case scenario for the whole range of raw materials and botanical products

  10. Determination of material irradiation parameters. Required accuracies and available methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerles, J.M.; Mas, P.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports some main methods to determine the nuclear parameters of material irradiation in testing reactor (nuclear power, burn-up, fluxes, fluences, ...). The different methods (theoretical or experimental) are reviewed: neutronics measurements and calculations, gamma scanning, thermal balance, ... The required accuracies are reviewed: they are of 3-5% on flux, fluences, nuclear power, burn-up, conversion factor, ... These required accuracies are compared with the real accuracies available which are at the present time of order of 5-20% on these parameters

  11. Precise measurement of fuel content of irradiated and nonirradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, Y.D.; Napper, P.R.; Proctor, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of precise reactivity measurements in the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine th fuel content in irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Different methods of reactivity measurements and examples of how they have been are presented, which provides an insight in capabilities available to analyze samples with different geometrical sizes from small volumes approx. 100 cc to 12 ft long fuel pins and also samples with different fuel content ranges from approx. 2 mg to approx. 600 g. The overall accuracy of these measurements is approx. 0.5% (1sigma)

  12. Interfacial degradation of organic composite material by irradiation in reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Shigehiro; Nishiura, Tetsuya; Okada, Toichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research

    1996-04-01

    Glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) with many kinds of matrix resins were made of E glass treated with silane as the reinforced material. Degradation of shearing strength of GFRP irradiated at low temperature was determined. It was clear from the results of comparing the degradation process with the fractured surface that the degradation was very affected by the radiation resistance of the bonded part between resin and coupling agents. It means that we had to be careful in the choice of interfacial treatments and epoxy matrices corresponded to it. (S.Y.)

  13. Testing of irradiated and annealed 15H2MFA materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillemot, F.; Uri, G.

    1994-01-01

    A set of surveillance samples made from 15H2MFA material has been studied in the laboratory of AEKI. Miniature notched tensile specimens were cut from some remnants of irradiated and broke surveillance charpy remnants. The Absorbed Specific Fracture Energy (ASFE) was measured on the specimens. A cutting machine and testing technique were elaborated for the measurements. The second part of the Charpy remnants was annealed at 460 deg. C and 490 deg. C for 6-8 hours. The specimens were tested similarity and the results were compared. (author). 5 refs, 9 figs

  14. Shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    The shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility is based upon one-, two- and three-dimensional transport calculations with experimental measurements utilized to refine the nuclear data including the neutron cross sections from 20 to 50 MeV and the gamma ray and neutron source terms. The high energy neutrons and deuterons produce activation products from the numerous reactions that are kinematically allowed. The analyses for both beam-on and beam-off (from the activation products) conditions have required extensive nuclear data libraries and the utilization of Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates, point kernel and auxiliary computer codes

  15. Transmutation of waste actinides in thermal reactors: survey calculations of candidate irradiation schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1978-11-01

    Actinide recycle and transmutation calculations were made for twelve specific thermal reactor environments. The calculations included H 2 O-moderated reactor lattices with enriched U, recycled Pu, and 233 ' 235 U-Th. In addition two D 2 O reactor cases were calculated. When all actinides were recycled into 235 U-enriched fuel, about 10 percent of the transuranic actinides were fissioned per 3-year fuel cycle. About 9 percent of the actinides were fissioned per 3-year fuel cycle when waste actinides (no U or Pu) were irradiated in separate target rods in a U-fuel assembly. When actinides were recycled in separate target assemblies, the fission rate was strongly dependent on the specific loading of the target. Fission rates of 5 to 10 percent per 3-year fuel cycle were observed

  16. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1988-06-01

    Three copper-based alloys, CDA 102 (oxygen-free, high-purity copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni), are candidates for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass, and will be sent to the prospective repository site at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and in fluxes of gamma radiation outside the containers. In this environment, container materials might degrade by atmospheric oxidation, general aqueous phase corrosion, localized corrosion (LC), and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This volume is a critical survey of available data on pitting and crevice corrosion of the copper-based candidates. Pitting and crevice corrosion are two of the most common forms of LC of these materials. Data on the SCC of these alloys is surveyed in Volume 4. Pitting usually occurs in water that contains low concentrations of bicarbonate and chloride anions, such as water from Well J-13 at the Nevada Test Site. Consequently, this mode of degradation might occur in the repository environment. Though few quantitative data on LC were found, a tentative ranking based on pitting corrosion, local dealloying, crevice corrosion, and biofouling is presented. CDA 102 performs well in the categories of pitting corrosion, local dealloying, and biofouling, but susceptibility to crevice corrosion diminishes its attractiveness as a candidate. The cupronickel alloy, CDA 715, probably has the best overall resistance to such localized forms of attack. 123 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) as a candidate phase change material for high temperature thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuecuekaltun, Engin [Advansa Sasa Polyester San, A.S., Adana (Turkey); Paksoy, Halime; Bilgin, Ramazan; Yuecebilgic, Guezide [Cukurova Univ., Adana (Turkey). Chemistry Dept.; Evliya, Hunay [Cukurova Univ., Adana (Turkey). Center for Environmental Research

    2010-07-01

    Thermal energy storage at elevated temperatures, particularly in the range of 120-250 C is of interest with a significant potential for industrial applications that use process steam at low or intermediate pressures. At given temperature range there are few studies on thermal energy storage materials and most of them are dedicated to sensible heat. In this study, Dimethyl Terephthalate - DMT (CAS No: 120-61-6) is investigated as a candidate phase change material (PCM) for high temperature thermal energy storage. DMT is a monomer commonly used in Polyethylene terephtalate industry and has reasonable cost and availability. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis and heating cooling curves show that DMT melts at 140-146 C within a narrow window. Supercooling that was detected in DSC results was not observed in the cooling curve measurements made with a larger sample. With a latent heat of 193 J/g, DMT is a candidate PCM for high temperature storage. Potential limitations such as, low thermal conductivity and sublimation needs further investigation. (orig.)

  18. Global blending optimization of laminated composites with discrete material candidate selection and thickness variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren N.; Stolpe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    rate. The capabilities of the method and the effect of active versus inactive manufacturing constraints are demonstrated on several numerical examples of limited size, involving at most 320 binary variables. Most examples are solved to guaranteed global optimality and may constitute benchmark examples...... but is, however, convex in the original mixed binary nested form. Convexity is the foremost important property of optimization problems, and the proposed method can guarantee the global or near-global optimal solution; unlike most topology optimization methods. The material selection is limited...... for popular topology optimization methods and heuristics based on solving sequences of non-convex problems. The results will among others demonstrate that the difficulty of the posed problem is highly dependent upon the composition of the constitutive properties of the material candidates....

  19. Creep rupture behavior of candidate materials for nuclear process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, F.; te Heesen, E.; Bruch, U.; Cook, R.; Diehl, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Jakobeit, W.; Penkalla, H.J.; Ullrich, G.

    1984-01-01

    Creep and stress rupture properties are determined for the candidate materials to be used in hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) components. The materials and test methods are briefly described based on experimental results of test durations of about20000 h. The medium creep strengths of the alloys Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, Hastelloy-S, Manaurite-36X, IN-519, and Incoloy-800H are compared showing that Inconel-617 has the best creep rupture properties in the temperature range above 800 0 C. The rupture time of welded joints is in the lower range of the scatterband of the parent metal. The properties determined in different simulated HTGR atmospheres are within the scatterband of the properties obtained in air. Extrapolation methods are discussed and a modified minimum commitment method is favored

  20. Study on corrosion behavior of candidate materials in 650℃ supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shuli; Luo Ying; Zhang Qiang; Wang Hao; Qiu Shaoyu

    2014-01-01

    The general corrosion behavior of three candidate materials (347, HR3C and In-718) was investigated in 650 ℃/25 MPa deionized water. Morphology and composition of the surface oxide film with different exposure time were observed through FEG-SEM and EDS. The phase constitute was analyzed by GIXRD. For all the test materials, the weight loss follows typical parabolic law and the weight loss of 347 shows more than 40 times higher than that of HR3C and In-718. The oxide film of three alloys mainly consists of Ni(Cr, Fe) 2 O 4 . In-718 shows severe pitting and the oxide film of 347 appears significant spalling, while HR3C has compact oxide film. In the high temperature supercritical water, the high Cr content may enhance the general corrosion property of the alloys, while addition of Nb may be detrimental to the pitting resistance of alloys. (authors)

  1. Accelerator-Based PIXE and STIM Analysis of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollerman, W.A.; Stanaland, T.L.; Boudreaux, P.; Elberson, L.; Fontenot, J.; Gates, E.; Greco, R.; McBride, M.; Woodward, A.; Edwards, D.

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. A totally reflective sail experiences a pressure of 9.1 μPa at a distance of 1 AU from the Sun. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. One of the current challenges is to develop strong, lightweight, and radiation resistant sail materials. This paper will discuss initial results from a Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) analysis of candidate solar sail materials

  2. Evidence of different red emissions in irradiated germanosilicate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, A., E-mail: antonino.alessi@univ-st-etienne.fr [Univ-Lyon, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université Jean Monnet, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Di Francesca, D. [Univ-Lyon, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université Jean Monnet, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Agnello, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Girard, S. [Univ-Lyon, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université Jean Monnet, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Cannas, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Richard, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F91297 Arpajon (France); Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y. [Univ-Lyon, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, Université Jean Monnet, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2016-09-15

    This experimental investigation is focused on a radiation induced red emission in Ge doped silica materials, elaborated with different methods and processes. The differently irradiated samples as well as the pristine ones were analyzed with various spectroscopic techniques, such as confocal microscopy luminescence (CML), time resolved luminescence (TRL), photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Our data prove that irradiation induces a red luminescence related to the presence of the Ge atoms. Such emission features a photoexcitation spectrum in the UV-blue spectral range and, TRL measurements show that its decrease differs from a single exponential law with a lifetime of tens of nanoseconds. CML measurements under laser at 633 nm evidenced the lack of correlation of the emission here reported with that of the Ge- or Si- non bridging oxygen hole centers. Moreover, our EPR experiments highlighted the lack of correlation between the red emitting defect with other radiation induced paramagnetic centers such as the E′Ge and Ge(2). The relation of the investigated emission with the H(II) defects, previously considered as responsible for a red emission, can not be totally excluded. - Highlights: • Composite nature of the red emission in Ge-doped doped silica materials. • Experimental study with various spectroscopic techniques and on different samples. • Time resolved and stationary characterization of an new red emission. • Study of the spatial distributions of diverse red emissions in optical fibers.

  3. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.W.; Nutt, W.M.; Bullen, D.B. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27.

  4. Survey of the degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinson, D.W.; Nutt, W.M.; Bullen, D.B.

    1995-06-01

    Oxidation and atmospheric corrosion data suggest that addition of Cr provides the greatest improvement in oxidation resistance. Cr-bearing cast irons are resistant to chloride environments and solutions containing strongly oxidizing constituents. Weathering steels, including high content and at least 0.04% Cu, appear to provide adequate resistance to oxidation under temperate conditions. However, data from long-term, high-temperature oxidation studies on weathering steels were not available. From the literature, it appears that the low alloy steels, plain carbon steels, cast steels, and cast irons con-ode at similar rates in an aqueous environment. Alloys containing more than 12% Cr or 36% Ni corrode at a lower rate than plain carbon steels, but pitting may be worse. Short term tests indicate that an alloy of 9Cr-1Mo may result in increased corrosion resistance, however long term data are not available. Austenitic cast irons show the best corrosion resistance. A ranking of total corrosion performance of the materials from most corrosion resistant to least corrosion resistant is: Austenitic Cast Iron; 12% Cr = 36% Ni = 9Cr-1Mo; Carbon Steel = Low Alloy Steels; and Cast Iron. Since the materials to be employed in the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) waste package are considered to be corrosion allowance materials, the austenitic cast irons, high Cr steels, high Ni steels and the high Cr-Mo steels should not be considered as candidates for the outer containment barrier. Based upon the oxidation and corrosion data available for carbon steels, low alloy steels, and cast irons, a suitable list of candidate materials for a corrosion allowance outer barrier for an ACD waste package could include, A516, 2.25%Cr -- 1%Mo Steel, and A27

  5. Selection and evaluation of inner material candidates for Spanish high level radioactive waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Francesc; Dies, Javier; Sevilla, Manuel; Pablo, Joan de; Pueyo, Juan Jose; Miralles, Lourdes; Martinez-Esparza, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work carried out to analyse different alternatives related to the inner material selection of the Spanish high level waste canister for long term storage. The preliminary repository design considers granitic or clay formations, compacted bentonite sealing, corrosion allowing steel canisters and glass bead filling between the fuel assemblies and canister walls. This filling material will have the primary role of avoiding the possibility of a criticality event, which becomes an issue of major importance once the container is finally breached by corrosion and flooded by groundwater. In the first place, a complete set of requirements have been devised as evaluation criteria for candidate materials examination and selection; resulting in a compilation of demands significantly deeper and more exhaustive than any other similar work found in literature, including over 20 requirements and some other general aspects that could involve improvements in repository performance. Secondly, eight materials or material families (cast iron or steel, borosilicate glass, spinel, depleted uranium, dehydrated zeolites, hematite, phosphates and olivine) have been chosen and examined in detail, extracting some relevant conclusions. Either cast iron, borosilicate glass, spinel or depleted uranium are considered to look quite promising for the mentioned purpose. (authors)

  6. Use of the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) for fusion materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    In May 1983 the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy authorized the establishment of a National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at ORNL's Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR). The NLTNIF, which will be available for qualified experiments at no cost to users, will provide a combination of high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions that have not been previously available in the US. Since the DOE authorization, work has proceeded on the design and construction of the new facility without interruption. This report describes the present status of the development of NLTNIF and, for the information of new candidate users, a recounting of the major specifications and capabilities is also given

  7. Homogeneity study on biological candidate reference materials: the role of neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Daniel P.; Moreira, Edson G., E-mail: dsilva.pereira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis (INAA) is a mature nuclear analytical technique able to accurately determine chemical elements without the need of sample digestion and, hence, without the associated problems of analyte loss or contamination. This feature, along with its potentiality use as a primary method of analysis, makes it an important tool for the characterization of new references materials and in the assessment of their homogeneity status. In this study, the ability of the comparative method of INAA for the within-bottle homogeneity of K, Mg, Mn and V in a mussel reference material was investigated. Method parameters, such as irradiation time, sample decay time and distance from sample to the detector were varied in order to allow element determination in subsamples of different sample masses in duplicate. Sample masses were in the range of 1 to 250 mg and the limitations of the detection limit for small sample masses and dead time distortions for large sample masses were investigated. (author)

  8. Reduced cost design of liquid lithium target for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is being jointly planned to provide an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source to produce intense high energy neutrons (2 MW/m 2 ) up to 200 dpa and a sufficient irradiation volume (500 cm 3 ) for testing the candidate materials and components up to about a full lifetime of their anticipated use in ITER and DEMO. To realize such a condition, 40 MeV deuteron beam with a current of 250 mA is injected into high speed liquid lithium flow with a speed of 20 m/s. Following Conceptual Design Activity (1995-1998), a design study with focus on cost reduction without changing its original mission has been done in 1999. The following major changes to the CAD target design have been considered in the study and included in the new design: i) number of the Li target has been changed from 2 to 1, ii) spare of impurity traps of the Li loop was removed although the spare will be stored in a laboratory for quick exchange, iii) building volume was reduced via design changes in lithium loop length. This paper describes the reduced cost design of the lithium target system and recent status of Key Element Technology activities. (author)

  9. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, Juergen; Aaron, A. M.; Bell, Gary L.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Ellis, Ronald James; Giuliano, D.; Howard, R.; Kiggans, James O.; Lessard, Timothy L.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Perkins, Dale E.; Varma, Venugopal Koikal

    2015-01-01

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma-material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a ''. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.'' The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma-material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL's proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL's strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the ''signature facility'' FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady-state heat fluxes of

  10. Experimental Irradiations of Materials and Fuels in the BR2 Reactor: An Overview of Current Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.; Koonen, E.; Verwerft, M.; Wéber, M.

    2013-01-01

    The BR2 material test reactor offers a variety of experimental irradiation possibilities for testing of materials, fuels and instruments. The current paper gives an overview of the recent and ongoing programmes in order to illustrate the experimental potential of the reactor. Three domains of applications are reviewed: Irradiation of materials and fuels for pressurised water reactors (PWR); irradiation of materials for accelerator driven systems (ADS), cooled by liquid lead alloys; and irradiation of fuel for Material Test Reactors (MTR). For PWR relevant tests, a dedicated loop is available, providing a full simulation of the thermo hydraulic conditions of a PWR. ADS related tests require particular control of the irradiation environment and the necessary safety precautions in order to avoid 210 Po contamination. In-core mechanical testing of materials is done in comparison and complimentarily to post-irradiation examinations in order to assess flux related effects on the deformation behaviour of materials. (author)

  11. A simplified in vivo approach for evaluating the bioabsorbable behavior of candidate stent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Daniel; Edick, Jacob; Tauscher, Aaron; Pokorney, Ellen; Bowen, Patrick; Gelbaugh, Jesse; Stinson, Jon; Getty, Heather; Lee, Chee Huei; Drelich, Jaroslaw; Goldman, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Metal stents are commonly used to revascularize occluded arteries. A bioabsorbable metal stent that harmlessly erodes away over time may minimize the normal chronic risks associated with permanent implants. However, there is no simple, low-cost method of introducing candidate materials into the arterial environment. Here, we developed a novel experimental model where a biomaterial wire is implanted into a rat artery lumen (simulating bioabsorbable stent blood contact) or artery wall (simulating bioabsorbable stent matrix contact). We use this model to clarify the corrosion mechanism of iron (≥99.5 wt %), which is a candidate bioabsorbable stent material due to its biocompatibility and mechanical strength. We found that iron wire encapsulation within the arterial wall extracellular matrix resulted in substantial biocorrosion by 22 days, with a voluminous corrosion product retained within the vessel wall at 9 months. In contrast, the blood-contacting luminal implant experienced minimal biocorrosion at 9 months. The importance of arterial blood versus arterial wall contact for regulating biocorrosion was confirmed with magnesium wires. We found that magnesium was highly corroded when placed in the arterial wall but was not corroded when exposed to blood in the arterial lumen for 3 weeks. The results demonstrate the capability of the vascular implantation model to conduct rapid in vivo assessments of vascular biomaterial corrosion behavior and to predict long-term biocorrosion behavior from material analyses. The results also highlight the critical role of the arterial environment (blood vs. matrix contact) in directing the corrosion behavior of biodegradable metals. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Activation characteristics of candidate structural materials for a near-term Indian fusion reactor and the impact of their impurities on design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, L. SWAMI; C, DANANI; A, K. SHAW

    2018-06-01

    Activation analyses play a vital role in nuclear reactor design. Activation analyses, along with nuclear analyses, provide important information for nuclear safety and maintenance strategies. Activation analyses also help in the selection of materials for a nuclear reactor, by providing the radioactivity and dose rate levels after irradiation. This information is important to help define maintenance activity for different parts of the reactor, and to plan decommissioning and radioactive waste disposal strategies. The study of activation analyses of candidate structural materials for near-term fusion reactors or ITER is equally essential, due to the presence of a high-energy neutron environment which makes decisive demands on material selection. This study comprises two parts; in the first part the activation characteristics, in a fusion radiation environment, of several elements which are widely present in structural materials, are studied. It reveals that the presence of a few specific elements in a material can diminish its feasibility for use in the nuclear environment. The second part of the study concentrates on activation analyses of candidate structural materials for near-term fusion reactors and their comparison in fusion radiation conditions. The structural materials selected for this study, i.e. India-specific Reduced Activation Ferritic‑Martensitic steel (IN-RAFMS), P91-grade steel, stainless steel 316LN ITER-grade (SS-316LN-IG), stainless steel 316L and stainless steel 304, are candidates for use in ITER either in vessel components or test blanket systems. Tungsten is also included in this study because of its use for ITER plasma-facing components. The study is carried out using the reference parameters of the ITER fusion reactor. The activation characteristics of the materials are assessed considering the irradiation at an ITER equatorial port. The presence of elements like Nb, Mo, Co and Ta in a structural material enhance the activity level as well

  13. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  14. Comparison of material irradiation conditions for fusion, spallation, stripping and fission neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Selection and development of materials capable of sustaining irradiation conditions expected for a future fusion power reactor remain a big challenge for material scientists. Design of other nuclear facilities either in support of the fusion materials testing program or for other scientific purposes presents a similar problem of irradiation resistant material development. The present study is devoted to an evaluation of the irradiation conditions for IFMIF, ESS, XADS, DEMO and typical fission reactors to provide a basis for comparison of the data obtained for different material investigation programs. The results obtained confirm that no facility, except IFMIF, could fit all user requirements imposed for a facility for simulation of the fusion irradiation conditions

  15. Recent results on the neutron irradiation of ITER candidate copper alloys irradiated in DR-3 at 250{degrees}C to 0.3 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.; Eldrup, M.

    1997-04-01

    Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing and bonding thermal treatment with additional specimens re-aged and given a reactor bakeout treatment at 350{degrees}C for 100 h. CuAl-25 was also heat treated to simulate the effects of a bonding thermal cycle on the material. A number of heat treated specimens were neutron irradiated at 250{degrees}C to a dose level of {approximately}0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor as Riso. The main effect of the bonding thermal cycle heat treatment was a slight decrease in strength of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. The strength of CuAl-25, on the other hand, remained almost unaltered. The post irradiation tests at 250{degrees}C showed a severe loss of ductility in the case of the CuNiBe alloy. The irradiated CuAl-25 and CuCrZr specimens exhibited a reasonable amount of uniform elongation, with CuCrZr possessing a lower strength.

  16. Application of INAA complementary gamma ray photopeaks to homogeneity study of candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A.; Lima, Ana P.S.; Catharino, Marilia G.M.; Maihara, Vera A.; Saiki, Mitiko

    2009-01-01

    Characterization and certification of reference materials, RMs, is a complex task involving many steps. One of them is the homogeneity testing to assure that key property values will not present variation among RM bottles. Good precision is the most important figure of merit of an analytical technique to allow it to be used in the homogeneity testing of candidate RMs. Due to its inherent characteristics, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, INAA, is an analytical technique of choice for homogeneity testing. Problems with sample digestion and contamination from reagents are not an issue in INAA, as solid samples are analyzed directly. For element determination via INAA, the activity of a suitable gamma ray decay photopeak for an element is chosen and it is compared to the activity of a standard of the element. An interesting possibility is the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks (for the elements that present them) to confirm the homogeneity test results for an element. In this study, an investigation of the use of the complementary gamma ray photopeaks of 110 mAg, 82 Br, 60 Co, 134 Cs, 152 Eu, 59 Fe, 140 La, 233 Pa (for Th determination), 46 Sc and 75 Se radionuclides was undertaken in the between bottle homogeneity study of a mussel candidate RM under preparation at IPEN - CNEN/SP. Although some photopeaks led to biased element content results, the use of complementary gamma ray photopeaks proved to be helpful in supporting homogeneity study conclusions of new RMs. (author)

  17. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B.

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials [CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)], which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  18. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials (CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)), which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strum, M.J.; Weiss, H.; Farmer, J.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

    1988-06-01

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strum, M.J.; Weiss, H.; Farmer, J.C.; Bullen, D.B.

    1988-06-01

    This volume surveys the effects of welding on the degradation modes of three austenitic alloys: Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. These materials are candidates for the fabrication of containers for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste. The metallurgical characteristics of fusion welds are reviewed here and related to potential degradation modes of the containers. Three specific areas are discussed in depth: (1) decreased resistance to corrosion in the forms of preferential corrosion, sensitization, and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking, (2) hot cracking in the heat-affected zone and the weld zone, and (3) formation of intermetallic phases. The austenitic alloys are ranked as follows in terms of overall weldability: Alloy 825 (best) > Type 316L stainless steel > Type 304L stainless steel (worst). 108 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  1. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P.K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A.K.; Avasthi, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 10 12 ions/cm 2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures

  2. Proposed rf system for the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Hoffert, W.J.; Boyd, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary rf system design for the accelerator portion of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is in progress. The 35-MeV, 100-mA, cw deuteron beam will require 6.3 MW rf power at 80 MHz. Initial testing indicates the EIMAC 8973 tetrode is the most suitable final amplifier tube for each of a series of 15 amplifier chains operating at 0.5-MW output. To satisfy the beam dynamics requirements for particle acceleration and to minimize beam spill, each amplifier output must be controlled to +-1 0 in phase and the field amplitude in the tanks must be held within a 1% tolerance. These tolerances put stringent demands on the rf phase and amplitude control system

  3. Material irradiation techniques used in corrosion and wear analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenreiro, Claudio

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear physics methods, applied to material analysis are discussed and some application examples are given. Experiments have been performed to study corrosion du to the presence of humidity and sulfur compounds. The use of resonant reactors allows the determination of depth profiles of H and S from structures located in particularly contaminated areas. The method provides a non destructive and quick way of estimating the effect of such elements in different types of structures, such as the ones used in high voltage transmission lines. Also the wear out rates in mechanical engine components having a difficult direct access, have been evaluated by proton activation analysis. The evaluation of the advantages of this method is being done. The effect of irradiation damage on superconducting high temperature ceramics was analyzed by the interaction of energetic alpha particles with high T c YBaCuO samples

  4. Accelerator conceptual design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, M.; Kinsho, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Intense Neutron Source Lab.; Jameson, R.A.; Blind, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Teplyakov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Berwald, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Peakock, M.; Rathke, J. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States); Deitinghoff, H.; Klein, H.; Pozimski, Y.; Volk, K. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fur Angewandte Phys.; Ferdinand, R.; Lagniel, J.-M. [CEA Saclay LNS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miyahara, A. [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Olivier, M. [CEA DSM, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Piechowiak, E. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States); Tanabe, Y. [Toshiba Corp., Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    The accelerator system of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) provides the 250-mA, 40-MeV continuous-wave deuteron beam at one of the two lithium target stations. It consists of two identical linear accelerator modules, each of which independently delivers a 125-mA beam to the common footprint of 20 cm x 5 cm at the target surface. The accelerator module consists of an ion injector, a 175 MHz RFQ and eight DTL tanks, and rf power supply system. The requirements for the accelerator system and the design concept are described. The interface issues and operational considerations to attain the proposed availability are also discussed. (orig.) 8 refs.

  5. Accelerator conceptual design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Kinsho, M.; Teplyakov, V.; Berwald, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Peakock, M.; Rathke, J.; Deitinghoff, H.; Klein, H.; Pozimski, Y.; Volk, K.; Miyahara, A.; Olivier, M.; Piechowiak, E.; Tanabe, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The accelerator system of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) provides the 250-mA, 40-MeV continuous-wave deuteron beam at one of the two lithium target stations. It consists of two identical linear accelerator modules, each of which independently delivers a 125-mA beam to the common footprint of 20 cm x 5 cm at the target surface. The accelerator module consists of an ion injector, a 175 MHz RFQ and eight DTL tanks, and rf power supply system. The requirements for the accelerator system and the design concept are described. The interface issues and operational considerations to attain the proposed availability are also discussed. (orig.)

  6. Short-term stability test for thorium soil candidate a reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clain, Almir F.; Fonseca, Adelaide M.G.; Dantas, Vanessa V.D.B.; Braganca, Maura J.C.; Souza, Poliana S., E-mail: almir@ird.gov.br, E-mail: adelaide@ird.gov.br, E-mail: vanessa@ird.gov.br, E-mail: maura@ird.gov.br, E-mail: poliana@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work describes a methodology to determine the soil short-term stability after the steps of production in laboratory. The short-term stability of the soil is an essential property to be determined in order to producing a reference material. The soil is a candidate of reference material for chemical analysis of thorium with metrological traceability to be used in environmental analysis, equipment calibration, validation methods, and quality control. A material is considered stable in a certain temperature if the property of interest does not change with time, considering the analytical random fluctuations. Due to this, the angular coefficient from the graphic of Th concentration versus elapsed time must be near to zero. The analytical determinations of thorium concentration were performed by Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis. The slopes and their uncertainties were obtained from the regression lines at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, with control temperature of -20 deg C. From the obtained data a t-test was applied. In both temperatures the calculated t-value was lower than the critical value, so we can conclude with 95% confidence level that no significant changes happened during the period studied concerning thorium concentration in soil at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, showing stability at these temperatures. (author)

  7. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Cao, Guoping; Kulcinski, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan (1) has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  8. VUV photoemission studies of candidate Large Hadron Collider vacuum chamber materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cimino, R; Baglin, V

    1999-01-01

    In the context of future accelerators and, in particular, the beam vacuum of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 27 km circumference proton collider to be built at CERN, VUV synchrotron radiation (SR) has been used to study both qualitatively and quantitatively candidate vacuum chamber materials. Emphasis is given to show that angle and energy resolved photoemission is an extremely powerful tool to address important issues relevant to the LHC, such as the emission of electrons that contributes to the creation of an electron cloud which may cause serious beam instabilities and unmanageable heat loads on the cryogenic system. Here we present not only the measured photoelectron yields from the proposed materials, prepared on an industrial scale, but also the energy and in some cases the angular dependence of the emitted electrons when excited with either a white light (WL) spectrum, simulating that in the arcs of the LHC, or monochromatic light in the photon energy range of interest. The effects on the materials ...

  9. Short-term stability test for thorium soil candidate a reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clain, Almir F.; Fonseca, Adelaide M.G.; Dantas, Vanessa V.D.B.; Braganca, Maura J.C.; Souza, Poliana S.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a methodology to determine the soil short-term stability after the steps of production in laboratory. The short-term stability of the soil is an essential property to be determined in order to producing a reference material. The soil is a candidate of reference material for chemical analysis of thorium with metrological traceability to be used in environmental analysis, equipment calibration, validation methods, and quality control. A material is considered stable in a certain temperature if the property of interest does not change with time, considering the analytical random fluctuations. Due to this, the angular coefficient from the graphic of Th concentration versus elapsed time must be near to zero. The analytical determinations of thorium concentration were performed by Instrumental Neutron activation Analysis. The slopes and their uncertainties were obtained from the regression lines at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, with control temperature of -20 deg C. From the obtained data a t-test was applied. In both temperatures the calculated t-value was lower than the critical value, so we can conclude with 95% confidence level that no significant changes happened during the period studied concerning thorium concentration in soil at temperatures of 20 deg C and 60 deg C, showing stability at these temperatures. (author)

  10. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: a facility for fusion-materials qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Hagan, J.W.; Opperman, E.K.; Burke, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will provide a unique testing environment for irradiation of structural and special purpose materials in support of fusion power systems. The neutron source will be produced by a deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to generate high energy neutrons to ensure damage similar to that of a deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum. The facility design is now ready for the start of construction and much of the supporting lithium system research has been completed. Major testing of key low energy end components of the accelerator is about to commence. The facility, its testing role, and the status and major aspects of its design and supporting system development are described

  11. RF structure design of the China Material Irradiation Facility RFQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxing; He, Yuan; Xu, Xianbo; Zhang, Zhouli; Wang, Fengfeng; Dou, Weiping; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Tieshan

    2017-10-01

    The radio frequency structure design of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the front end of China Material Irradiation Facility (CMIF), which is an accelerator based neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor material qualification, has been completed. The RFQ is specified to accelerate 10 mA continuous deuteron beams from the energies of 20 keV/u to 1.5 MeV/u within the vane length of 5250 mm. The working frequency of the RFQ is selected to 162.5 MHz and the inter-vane voltage is set to 65 kV. Four-vane cavity type is selected and the cavity structure is designed drawing on the experience of China Initiative Accelerator Driven System (CIADS) Injector II RFQ. In order to reduce the azimuthal asymmetry of the field caused from errors in fabrication and assembly, a frequency separation between the working mode and its nearest dipole mode is reached to 17.66 MHz by utilizing 20 pairs of π-mode stabilizing loops (PISLs) distributed along the longitudinal direction with equal intervals. For the purpose of tuning, 100 slug tuners were introduced to compensate the errors caused by machining and assembly. In order to obtain a homogeneous electrical field distribution along cavity, vane cutbacks are introduced and output endplate is modified. Multi-physics study of the cavity with radio frequency power and water cooling is performed to obtain the water temperature tuning coefficients. Through comparing to the worldwide CW RFQs, it is indicated that the power density of the designed structure is moderate for operation under continuous wave (CW) mode.

  12. Modification of MELCOR for severe accident analysis of candidate accident tolerant cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J., E-mail: brad.merrill@inl.gov; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M., E-mail: shannon.bragg-sitton@inl.gov; Humrickhouse, Paul W., E-mail: paul.humrickhouse@inl.gov

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) systems are currently under development for LWRs. • Many performance analysis tools are specifically developed for UO{sub 2}–Zr alloy fuel. • Modifications were made to the MELCOR code for candidate ATF cladding. • Preliminary analysis results for SiC and FeCrAl cladding concepts are presented. - Abstract: A number of materials are currently under development as candidate accident tolerant fuel and cladding for application in the current fleet of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to the industry’s success. Enhancing the accident tolerance of light water reactors became a topic of serious discussion following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex. The overall goal for the development of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) systems for LWRs is to identify alternative fuel system technologies to further enhance the safety, competitiveness, and economics of commercial nuclear power. Designed for use in the current fleet of commercial LWRs, or in reactor concepts with design certifications (GEN-III+), to achieve their goal enhanced ATF must endure loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer period of time than the current fuel system, while maintaining or improving performance during normal operation. Many available nuclear fuel performance analysis tools are specifically developed for the current UO{sub 2}–Zirconium alloy fuel system. The MELCOR severe-accident analysis code, under development at the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL-NM) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is one of these tools. This paper describes modifications

  13. Behaviour of candidate materials for fusion applications under high surface heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Nickel, H.; Kuroda, T.; Miyahara, A.

    1988-07-01

    High heat fluxes to in-vessel components of nuclear fusion devices (tokamaks) during normal operation and abnormal operation conditions are one of the governing issues in the selection of a plasma facing material and the design of first wall components. Their failure under high heat loads during service can severely influence the further operability of the entire fusion device. In order to determine the response of candidate materials to high heat fluxes an experimental program was carried out using the 10 MW Neutral Beam Injection Test Stand of the Institute for Plasma Physics of Nagoya University. Metal samples, 13 different fine grain graphites, carbon - carbon composites, and pyrolytic carbon samples were subjected to heat loads between 16 and 117 MW/m 2 and pulse durations of 50 to 950 ms. Afterwards the resulting structural changes as well as threshold values for the occurance of material damage were determined. The main damage observed on carbon materials was cracking in the case of graphites and pyrolytic carbon and erosion in the case of graphites and carbon - carbon composites. Processes leading to such damage were discussed and described in form of models. Parallel to these laboratory experiments numerical analyses of the response of graphite materials to high heat fluxes were carried out. The results are in general agreement with the experimentally determined values. In order to verify the results from experiments and numerical analyses, graphite test limiters were exposed to about 900 discharges in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. These proof tests fully confirmed the results obtained. (orig.) [de

  14. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1988-08-01

    Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The austenitic materials are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr, and they must be retrievable from the disposal site during the first 50 yr after emplacement. The containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on the phase stability of both groups of candidate alloys. The austenitic alloys are reviewed in terms of the physical metallurgy of the iron-chromium-nickel system, martensite transformations, carbide formation, and intermetallic-phase precipitation. The copper-based alloys are reviewed in terms of their phase equilibria and the possibility of precipitation of the minor alloying constituents. For the austenitic materials, the ranking based on phase stability is: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) (best), and then both CDA 715 and CDA 613. 75 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Corrosion susceptibility study of candidate pin materials for ALTC (active lithium/thionyl chloride) batteries. [Active lithium/thionyl chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovard, F.S.; Cieslak, W.R.

    1987-09-01

    (ALTC = active lithium/thionyl chloride.) We have investigated the corrosion susceptibilities of eight alternate battery pin materials in 1.5M LiAlCl/sub 4//SOCl/sub 2/ electrolyte using ampule exposure and electrochemical tests. The thermal expansion coefficients of these candidate materials are expected to match Sandia-developed Li-corrosion resistant glasses. The corrosion resistances of the candidate materials, which included three stainless steels (15-5 PH, 17-4 PH, and 446), three Fe-Ni glass sealing alloys (Kovar, Alloy 52, and Niromet 426), a Ni-based alloy (Hastelloy B-2) and a zirconium-based alloy (Zircaloy), were compared to the reference materials Ni and 316L SS. All of the candidate materials showed some evidence of corrosion and, therefore, did not perform as well as the reference materials. The Hastelloy B-2 and Zircaloy are clearly unacceptable materials for this application. Of the remaining alternate materials, the 446 SS and Alloy 52 are the most promising candidates.

  16. Experimental data base for assessment of irradiation induced ageing effects in pre-irradiated RPV materials of German PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, H.; Gundermann, A.; Keim, E.; Schnabel, H. [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Ganswind, J. [VGB PowerTech e.V (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The 5 year research program CARISMA which ended in 2008 has produced a data base to characterize the fracture toughness of pre-irradiated original RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) materials being representative for all four German PWR construction lines of former Siemens/KWU company. For this purpose tensile, Charpy-V impact, crack initiation and crack arrest tests have been performed for three base materials and four weld metals irradiated to neutron fluences beyond the designed EoL range. RPV steels with optimized chemical composition and with high copper as well as high nickel content were examined in this study. The RTNDT concept and the Master Curve approach were applied for the assessment of the generated data in order to compare both approaches. A further objective was to clarify in which extent crack arrest curves can be generated for irradiated materials and how crack arrest can be integrated into the Master Curve approach. By the ongoing follow-up project CARINA the experimental data base will be extended by additional representative materials irradiated under different conditions and with respect to the accumulated neutron fluences and specific impact parameters such as neutron flux and manufacturing effects. The irradiation data cover also the long term irradiation behavior of the RPV steels concerned. Moreover, most of the irradiated materials were and will be used for microstructural examinations to get a deeper insight in the irradiation embrittlement mechanisms and their causal relationship to the material property changes. By evaluation of the data base the applicability of the Master Curve approach for both crack initiation and arrest was confirmed to a large extent. Moreover, within both research programs progress was made in the development of crack arrest test techniques and in specific issues of RPV integrity assessment. (authors)

  17. Comparison of candidate materials for a synthetic osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao Wei; Perera, A Promoda P; Tan, Anna; Tan, Donald; Khor, K A; Beuerman, Roger W; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2011-01-05

    Osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis is one of the most successful forms of keratoprosthesis surgery for end-stage corneal and ocular surface disease. There is a lack of detailed comparison studies on the biocompatibilities of different materials used in keratoprosthesis. The aim of this investigation was to compare synthetic bioinert materials used for keratoprosthesis surgery with hydroxyapatite (HA) as a reference. Test materials were sintered titanium oxide (TiO(2)), aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)), and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with density >95%. Bacterial adhesion on the substrates was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and the spread plate method. Surface properties of the implant discs were scanned using optical microscopy. Human keratocyte attachment and proliferation rates were assessed by cell counting and MTT assay at different time points. Morphologic analysis and immunoblotting were used to evaluate focal adhesion formation, whereas cell adhesion force was measured with a multimode atomic force microscope. The authors found that bacterial adhesion on the TiO(2), Al(2)O(3), and YSZ surfaces were lower than that on HA substrates. TiO(2) significantly promoted keratocyte proliferation and viability compared with HA, Al(2)O(3,) and YSZ. Immunofluorescent imaging analyses, immunoblotting, and atomic force microscope measurement revealed that TiO(2) surfaces enhanced cell spreading and cell adhesion compared with HA and Al(2)O(3). TiO(2) is the most suitable replacement candidate for use as skirt material because it enhanced cell functions and reduced bacterial adhesion. This would, in turn, enhance tissue integration and reduce device failure rates during keratoprosthesis surgery.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for HDPE, BPE and concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhang, Prosenjit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    In the compact accelerator based DD neutron generator, the deuterium ions generated by the ion source are accelerated after the extraction and bombarded to a deuterated titanium target. The emitted neutrons have typical energy of ∼2.45MeV. Utilization of these compact accelerator based neutron generators of yield up to 10 9 neutron/second (DD) is under active consideration in many research laboratories for conducting active neutron interrogation experiments. Requirement of an adequately shielded laboratory is mandatory for the effective and safe utilization of these generators for intended applications. In this reference, we report the comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and Concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding. In shielding calculations, neutron induced scattering and absorption gamma dose has also been considered along with neutron dose. Contemporarily any material with higher hydrogenous concentration is best suited for neutron shielding. Choice of shielding material is also dominated by practical issues like economic viability and availability of space. Our computational analysis results reveal that utilization of BPE sheets results in minimum wall thickness requirement for attaining similar range of attenuation in neutron and gamma dose. The added advantage of using borated polyethylene is that it reduces the effect of both neutron and gamma dose by absorbing neutron and producing lithium and alpha particle. It has also been realized that for deciding upon optimum thickness determination of any shielding material, three important factors to be necessarily considered are: use factor, occupancy factor and work load factor. (author)

  19. Irradiation experiments and materials testing capabilities in High Flux Reactor in Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzginova, N.; Blagoeva, D.; Hegeman, H.; Van der Laan, J.

    2011-01-01

    The text of publication follows: The High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten is a powerful multi-purpose research and materials testing reactor operating for about 280 Full Power Days per year. In combination with hot cells facilities, HFR provides irradiation and post-irradiation examination services requested by nuclear energy research and development programs, as well as by industry and research organizations. Using a variety of the custom developed irradiation devices and a large experience in executing irradiation experiments, the HFR is suitable for fuel, materials and components testing for different reactor types. Irradiation experiments carried out at the HFR are mainly focused on the understanding of the irradiation effects on materials; and providing databases for irradiation behavior of materials to feed into safety cases. The irradiation experiments and materials testing at the HFR include the following issues. First, materials irradiation to support the nuclear plant life extensions, for instance, characterization of the reactor pressure vessel stainless steel claddings to insure structural integrity of the vessel, as well as irradiation of the weld material coupons to neutron fluence levels that are representative for Light Water Reactors (LWR) internals applications. Secondly, development and qualification of the structural materials for next generation nuclear fission reactors as well as thermo-nuclear fusion machines. The main areas of interest are in both conventional stainless steel and advanced reduced activation steels and special alloys such as Ni-base alloys. For instance safety-relevant aspects of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) such as the integrity of fuel and structural materials with increasing neutron fluence at typical HTR operating conditions has been recently assessed. Thirdly, support of the fuel safety through several fuel irradiation experiments including testing of pre-irradiated LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or MOX fuel. Fourthly

  20. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  1. Superconducting Gamma/Neutron Spectrometer Task 1 Completion Report Evaluation of Candidate Neutron-Sensitive Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z W

    2002-01-01

    A review of the scientific literature regarding boron- and lithium-containing compounds was completed. Information such as Debye temperature, heat capacity, superconductivity properties, physical and chemical characteristics, commercial availability, and recipes for synthesis was accumulated and evaluated to develop a list of neutron-sensitive materials likely to perform properly in the spectrometer. The best candidate borides appear to be MgB sub 2 (a superconductor with T sub c = 39 K), B sub 6 Si, B sub 4 C, and elemental boron; all are commercially available. Among the lithium compounds are LiH, LiAl, Li sub 1 sub 2 Si sub 7 , and Li sub 7 Sn sub 2. These materials have or are expected to have high Debye temperatures and sufficiently low heat capacities at 100 mK to produce a useful signal. The responses of sup 1 sup 0 B and sup 6 Li to a fission neutron spectrum were also estimated. These demonstrated that the contribution of scattering events is no more than 3% in a boron-based system and 1.5% in a lith...

  2. TEM investigation of plant-irradiated NPP bolt material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Ehrnsten, U.; Keinaenen, H.; Karlsen, W.; Karlsen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) was used to examine irradiation-induced damage in material removed from two different bolts from two different nuclear power plants. One section came from a French PWR, was made of CW AISI 316, and included a section of the bolt that had accumulated a dose of approximately 15 dpa during 19 operation cycles at 350 - 390 C. degrees. Another section came from a VVER bolt that was removed from the plant due to indications found in non-destructive examinations (NDE). The VVER bolt was made of solution annealed titanium stabilized 0X18H10T (corresponding to Type AISI 321) and had accumulated a fluence of 2.9 dpa. During the removal of that bolt, it was found that the bolt washer had been inappropriately spot welded to the shielding plate during assembly. Destructive investigations showed that the bolt had two large intergranular cracks, and the TEM samples were prepared from the material adjacent to those cracks. The PWR bolt had not failed, although cracks in the bolts with a similar history had been found previously. The fluence for the cold-worked AISI 316 PWR bolt was estimated to be about 15 dpa. Both the examined bolts showed a clear radiation induced segregation of alloying elements at the grain boundaries (GB-RIS), the presence of dislocation loops, the formation of precipitates, and linear deformation microstructures. Additionally, voids were found from the PWR bolt and the VVER bolt had a high density of dislocations. (authors)

  3. Progress report on the accelerator production of tritium materials irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Brown, R.D.; Roberts, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project is developing an accelerator and a spoliation neutron source capable of producing tritium through neutron capture on He-3. A high atomic weight target is used to produce neutrons that are then multiplied and moderated in a blanket prior to capture. Materials used in the target and blanket region of an APT facility will be subjected to several different and mixed particle radiation environments; high energy protons (1-2 GeV), protons in the 20 MeV range, high energy neutrons, and low energy neutrons, depending on position in the target and blanket. Flux levels exceed 10 14 /cm 2 s in some areas. The APT project is sponsoring an irradiation damage effects program that will generate the first data-base for materials exposed to high energy particles typical of spallation neutron sources. The program includes a number of candidate materials in small specimen and model component form and uses the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the 800 MeV, Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator

  4. Performance of candidate gas turbine abradeable seal materials in high temperature combustion atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, N.J. [Cranfield University, Power Generation Technology Centre, Cranfield, Beds, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Norton, J.F. [Cranfield University, Power Generation Technology Centre, Cranfield, Beds, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Consultant in Corrosion Science and Technology, Hemel Hempstead, Herts HP1 1SR (United Kingdom); McColvin, G. [Siemens Industrial Turbines Ltd., Lincoln, LN5 7FD (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    The development of abradeable gas turbine seals for higher temperature duties has been the target of an EU-funded R and D project, ADSEALS, with the aim of moving towards seals that can withstand surface temperatures as high as {proportional_to} 1100 C for periods of at least 24,000 h. The ADSEALS project has investigated the manufacturing and performance of a number of alternative materials for the traditional honeycomb seal design and novel alternative designs. This paper reports results from two series of exposure tests carried out to evaluate the oxidation performance of the seal structures in combustion gases and under thermal cycling conditions. These investigations formed one part of the evaluation of seal materials that has been carried out within the ADSEALS project. The first series of three tests, carried out for screening purposes, exposed candidate abradeable seal materials to a simulated natural gas combustion environment at temperatures within the range 1050-1150 C in controlled atmosphere furnaces for periods of up to {proportional_to} 2,500 h with fifteen thermal cycles. The samples were thermally cycled to room temperature on a weekly basis to enable the progress of the degradation to be monitored by mass change and visual observation, as well as allowing samples to be exchanged at planned intervals. The honeycombs were manufactured from PM2000 and Haynes 214. The backing plates for the seal constructions were manufactured from Haynes 214. Some seals contained fillers or had been surface treated (e.g. aluminised). The second series of three tests were carried out in a natural gas fired ribbon furnace facility that allowed up to sixty samples of candidate seal structures (including honeycombs, hollow sphere structures and porous ceramics manufactured from an extended range of materials including Aluchrom YHf, PM2Hf, Haynes 230, IN738LC and MarM247) to be exposed simultaneously to a stream of hot combustion gas. In this case the samples were cooled

  5. Irradiation damage behavior of low alloy steel wrought and weld materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stofanak, R.J.; Poskie, T.J.; Li, Y.Y.; Wire, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the irradiation damage response of several different types of low alloy steel: vintage type ASTM A302 Grade B (A302B) plates and welds containing different Ni and Cu concentrations, 3.5% Ni steels similar to ASTM A508 Class 4, welds containing about 1% Ni (similar to type 105S), and 3.5% Ni steels with ''superclean'' composition. All materials were irradiated at several different irradiation damage levels ranging from 0.0003 to 0.06 dpa at 232C (450F). Complete Charpy V-notch impact energy transition temperature curves were generated for all materials before and after irradiation to determine transition temperature at 4IJ (30 ft-lb) or 47J (35 ft-lb) and the upper shelf energy. Irradiation damage behavior was measured by shift in Charpy 41J or 47J transition temperature (ΔTT4 41J or ΔTT 47J ) and lowering of upper shelf Charpy energy at a given irradiation damage level. It was found that chemical composition greatly influenced irradiation damage behavior; highest irradiation damage (greatest ΔTT) was found in an A302B type weld containing 1.28% Ni and 0.20% Cu while the least damage was found in 3.5% Ni, 0.05% Cu, superclean wrought materials. Combination of Ni and Cu was found to affect irradiation damage behavior at higher irradiation damage levels in the A302B welds where the 1.28% Ni, 0.20% Cu weld showed more damage than a 0.60% Ni, 0.31% Cu weld. For the 3.5% Ni steels, fabrication influenced irradiation behavior in that a silicon (Si) killed material showed greater irradiation damage than a low silicon material. In general, the 3.5% Ni materials with low copper showed less irradiation damage than the A302B materials

  6. Status of the material capsule irradiation and the development of the new capsule technology in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Kee-Nam; Kang, Young-Hwan; Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Man-Soon; Kim, Bong-Goo

    2006-01-01

    A material capsule system including a main capsule, fixing, control, cutting, and transport systems was developed for an irradiation test of non-fissile materials in HANARO. 14 irradiation capsules (12 instrumented and 2 non-instrumented capsules) have been designed, fabricated and successfully irradiated in the HANARO CT and IR test holes since 1995. The capsules were mainly designed for an irradiation of the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel), reactor core materials, and Zr-based alloys. Most capsules were made for KAERI material research projects, but 5 capsules were made as a part of national projects for the promotion of the HANARO utilization for universities. Based on the accumulated irradiation experience and the user's sophisticated requirements, development of new instrumented capsule technologies for a more precise control of the irradiation temperature and fluence of a specimen irrespective of the reactor operation has been performed in HANARO. (author)

  7. Comparison of lithium and the eutectic lead lithium alloy, two candidate liquid metal breeder materials for self-cooled blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Mattas, R.

    1994-06-01

    Liquid metals are attractive candidates for both near-term and long-term fusion applications. The subjects of this comparison are the differences between the two candidate liquid metal breeder materials Li and LiPb for use in breeding blankets in the areas of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, tritium control, compatibility with structural materials, heat extraction system, safety, and required R ampersand D program. Both candidates appear to be promising for use in self-cooled breeding blankets which have inherent simplicity with the liquid metal serving as both breeders and coolant. The remaining feasibility question for both breeder materials is the electrical insulation between liquid metal and duct walls. Different ceramic coatings are required for the two breeders, and their crucial issues, namely self-healing of insulator cracks and radiation induced electrical degradation are not yet demonstrated. Each liquid metal breeder has advantages and concerns associated with it, and further development is needed to resolve these concerns

  8. Corrosion product identification and relative rates of corrosion of candidate metals in an irradiated air-steam environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Swayambunathan, V.; Tani, B.S.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Previously reported work by others indicates that dicopper trihydroxide nitrate, Cu 2 NO 3 (OH) 3 , forms on copper and copper alloys subjected to irradiated moist air near room temperature. We have performed experiments over a range of temperature and humidity, and have found that this species is formed at temperatures up to at least 150 degree C if low to intermediate relative humidities are present. At 150 degree C and 100% relative humidity, only Cu 2 O and CuO were observed. The relative general corrosion rates of the copper materials tested in 1-month experiments at dose rates of 0.7 and 2.0 kGy/h were Cu > 70/30 Cu--Ni > Al-bronze. High-nickel alloy 825 showed no observable corrosion. 29 refs., 4 tabs

  9. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-01

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  10. Developing and Evaluating Candidate Materials for Generation IV Supercritical Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Sung Ho; Hwang Sung Sik and others

    2006-03-15

    High temperature mechanical behavior High temperature behavior of two F-M steels were investigated, considering the transient temperature range of the SCWR (above 800 .deg. C). T91 and T122 specimens were five times cyclically heat treated to the temperature 810 .deg. C and 845 .deg. C respectively. And the heat treatments were found to have little effect on the creep rupture behavior at 550, 600, or 650 .deg. C. However, the microstructural change was detected by the rapid hardness change after the holding the specimens at 840 .deg. C even for 10 sec. (by INL, previously ANL-W) A 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy (MA956) was isothermally heat treated at 475 .deg. C for various times and then impact tested. The material was found to become very brittle after the heat treatment even for 100 hrs by the drastic decrease of the impact absorption energy (from 300 J to about the nil) and by the typically brittle fracture surface. (by KAIST) Corrosion and SCC Behavior in SCW (1) The corrosion behaviors of the F-M steels (T91, T92, and T122) and high Ni alloys (alloy 625, Alloy 690, and alloy 800H) and an ODS alloy (MA 956) were studied in the aerated SCW (8 ppm of D.O; dissolved oxygen) under 25 MPa from 300 to 600 .deg. C with an interval of 50 .deg. C. The test durations were 100, 200, and 500 hrs respectively. In general high Ni alloys were definitely more resistant to corrosion in SCW than F-M steels. As the Cr content increases the resistance of F-M steels to corrosion becomes better. The resistance of F-M steels to corrosion at 350 .deg. C, a subcritical temperature, was revealed to be comparatively similar to those at 550 .deg. C, a 200 .deg. C higher temperature. (2) The SCC resistance of F-M steels, T91 and T92, was evaluated by CERT (constant extension rate test) method. T91 specimens were tested at 500, 550 and 600 .deg. C in a fully deaerated SCW (below 10 ppb D.O), and SCC did not happen in the T91 specimens. T92 specimens were tested at 500 .deg. C in SCW of different

  11. Materials of 15. autumn school on irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The ionizing radiation use for food preservation has been shown on the background of other methods. Several aspects connected with food irradiation have been discussed. Among them the legal aspects and recommendations have been performed. The healthy aspects from the view point of the radiolysis of main components of irradiated food have been presented. The broad review of physical, chemical and biological methods for identification of irradiated food products has been done. The accelerator pilot plant for food irradiation working at the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw, has been presented as well

  12. Certification of a new biological reference material - Virginia Tobacco Leaves (CTA-VTL-2) and homogeneity study by NAA on this and other candidate reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, Rajmund; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Samczynski, Zbigniew; Szopa, Zygmunt; Kulisa, Krzysztof; Wasek, Marek

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the laboratory's participation in the interlaboratory comparison run where the laboratory applied neutron activation analysis aimed at certification of the candidate reference material. Data evaluation and statistical treatment steps are discussed. The report also describes homogeneity study on the reference material and provides details of the analytical procedures

  13. Electron irradiation experiments in support of fusion materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Matsui, H.; Kohno, Y.

    1991-11-01

    Microstructural evolution in response to 1 MeV irradiation has been investigated for three simple ferritic alloys, pure beryllium, pure vanadium, and two simple vanadium alloys over a range of temperatures and doses. Microstructural evolution in Fe-3, -9, and -18Cr ferritic alloys is found to consist of crenulated, faulted a loops and circular, unfaulted a/2 loops at low temperatures, but with only unfaulted loops at high temperatures. The complex dislocation evolution is attributed to sigma phase precipifaults arising from chromium segregation to point defect sinks. Beryllium is found to be resistant to electron damage; the only effect observed was enhanced dislocation mobility. Pure vanadium, V-5Fe, and V-1Ni microstructural response was complicated by precipitation on heating to 400 degrees C and above, but dislocation evolution was investigated in the range of room temperature to 300 degrees C and at 600 degrees C. The three materials behaved similarly, except that pure vanadium showed more rapid dislocation evolution. This difference does not explain the enhanced swelling observed in vanadium alloys

  14. Resistivity measurements on the neutron irradiated detector grade silicon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng

    1993-11-01

    Resistivity measurements under the condition of no or low electrical field (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) have been made on various device configurations on detector grade silicon materials after neutron irradiation. Results of the measurements have shown that the ENB resistivity increases with neutron fluence ({Phi}{sub n}) at low {phi}{sub n} (<10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}) and saturates at a value between 300 and 400 k{Omega}-cm at {phi}{sub n} {approximately}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, the effective doping concentration N{sub eff} in the space charge region (SCR) obtained from the C-V measurements of fully depleted p{sup +}/n silicon junction detectors has been found to increase nearly linearly with {phi}{sub n} at high fluences ({phi}{sub n} > 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}). The experimental results are explained by the deep levels crossing the Fermi level in the SCR and near perfect compensation in the ENB by all deep levels, resulting in N{sub eff} (SCR) {ne} n or p (free carrier concentrations in the ENB).

  15. Development of a candidate certified reference material of cypermethrin in green tea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sin, Della W.M.; Chan, Pui-kwan; Cheung, Samuel T.C.; Wong, Yee-Lok; Wong, Siu-kay; Mok, Chuen-shing; Wong Yiuchung

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A cypermethrin CRM in green tea was developed. ► Using two isotope dilution mass spectrometry techniques for characterization. ► Certified value of 148 μg kg −1 with expanded uncertainty of ±9.2%. ► Support quality assurance of pesticide residue analysis in tea to testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the preparation of a candidate certified reference material (CRM) of cypermethrin in green tea, GLHK-11-01a according to the requirements of ISO Guide 34 and 35. Certification of the material was performed using a newly developed isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) approach, with gas chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry (GC–HRMS) and gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (GC–MS/MS). Statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA) showed excellent agreement of the analytical data sets generated from the two mass spectrometric detections. The characterization methods have also been satisfactorily applied in an Asia-Pacific Metrology Program (APMP) interlaboratory comparison study. Both the GC–HRIDMS and GC–IDMS/MS methods proved to be sufficiently reliable and accurate for certification purpose. The certified value of cypermethrin in dry mass fraction was 148 μg kg −1 and the associated expanded uncertainty was 14 μg kg −1 . The uncertainty budget was evaluated from sample in homogeneity, long-term and short-term stability and variability in the characterization procedure. GLHK-11-01a is primarily developed to support the local and wider testing community on need basis in quality assurance work and in seeking accreditation.

  16. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential E NP and the protection potential E PP . The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  17. Tribological Evaluation of Candidate Gear Materials Operating Under Light Loads in Highly Humid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Thomas, Fransua; Leak, Olivia Ann

    2015-01-01

    A series of pin-on-disk sliding wear tests were undertaken to identify candidate materials for a pair of lightly loaded timing gears operating under highly humid conditions. The target application involves water purification and thus precludes the use of oil, grease and potentially toxic solid lubricants. The baseline sliding pair is austenitic stainless steel operating against a carbon filled polyimide. The test load and sliding speed (4.9 N, 2.7 m/s) were chosen to represent average contact conditions of the meshing gear teeth. In addition to the baseline materials, the hard superelastic NiTiNOL 60 (60NiTi) was slid against itself, against the baseline polyimide, and against 60NiTi onto which a commercially deposited dry film lubricant (DFL) was applied. The alternate materials were evaluated as potential replacements to achieve a longer wear life and improved dimensional stability for the timing gear application. An attempt was also made to provide solid lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi by rubbing the polyimide against the disk wear track outside the primary 60NiTi-60NiTi contact, a method named stick or transfer-film lubrication. The selected test conditions gave repeatable friction and wear data and smooth sliding surfaces for the baseline materials similar to those in the target application. Friction and wear for self-mated stainless steel were high and erratic. Self-mated 60NiTi gave acceptably low friction (approx. 0.2) and modest wear but the sliding surfaces were rough and potentially unsuitable for the gear application. Tests in which 60NiTi pins were slid against DFL coated 60NiTi and DFL coated stainless steel gave low friction and long wear life. The use of stick lubrication via the secondary polyimide pin provided effective transfer film lubrication to self-mated 60NiTi tribological specimens. Using this approach, friction levels were equal or lower than the baseline polyimide-stainless combination and wear was higher but within data scatter observed

  18. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann; Ohlsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, ν). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m 3 . The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  19. Characterization of a backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF Baclo Project - Phase 3 Laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Dueck, Ann; Ohlsson, Lars (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    A backfill candidate material, IBECO-RWC-BF, which origin from Milos, Greece, has been investigated. The material was delivered both as granules and as pellets. The investigation described in this report aimed to characterize the material and evaluate if it can be used in a future repository. The following investigations have been done and are presented in this report: 1. Standard laboratory tests. Water content, liquid limit and swelling potential are examples on standard tests that have been performed. 2. Block manufacturing. The block compaction properties of the material have been determined. A first test was performed in laboratory but also tests in large scale have been performed. After finishing the test phase, 60 tons of blocks were manufactured at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB. The blocks will be used in large scale laboratory tests at Aespoe HRL. 3. Mechanical parameters. The compressibility of the material was investigated with oedometer tests (four tests) where the load was applied in steps after saturation. The evaluated oedometer modulus varied between 34.50 MPa. Tests were made to evaluate the elastic parameters of the material (E, nu). Altogether three tests were made on specimens with dry densities of about 1,710 kg/m3. The evaluated E-modulus and Poisson's ratio varied between 231-263 MPa and 0.16-0.19 respectively. The strength of the material, both the compressive strength and the tensile strength were measured on specimens compacted to different dry densities. The test results yielded a relation between density and the two types of strength. Furthermore, tests have been made in order to determine the compressibility of the unsaturated filling of pellets. Two tests were made where the pellets were loosely filled in a Proctor cylinder and then compressed at a constant rate of strain during continuously measurement of the applied load. 4. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity. There is, as expected, a very clear influence of the dry density on the

  20. Irradiation of structural materials in contact with lead bismuth eutectic in the high flux reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magielsen, A.J., E-mail: magielsen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Jong, M.; Bakker, T.; Luzginova, N.V.; Mutnuru, R.K.; Ketema, D.J.; Fedorov, A.V. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-08-31

    In the framework of the materials domain DEMETRA in the European Transmutation research and development project EUROTRANS, irradiation experiment IBIS has been performed in the High Flux Reactor in Petten. The objective was to investigate the synergystic effects of irradiation and lead bismuth eutectic exposure on the mechanical properties of structural materials and welds. In this experiment ferritic martensitic 9 Cr steel, austenitic 316L stainless steel and their welds have been irradiated for 250 Full Power Days up to a dose level of 2 dpa. Irradiation temperatures have been kept constant at 300 deg. C and 500 deg. C. During the post-irradiation test phase, tensile tests performed on the specimens irradiated at 300 deg. C have shown that the irradiation hardening of ferritic martensitic 9 Cr steel at 1.3 dpa is 254 MPa, which is in line with the irradiation hardening obtained for ferritic martensitic Eurofer97 steel investigated in the fusion program. This result indicates that no LBE interaction at this irradiation temperature is present. A visual inspection is performed on the specimens irradiated in contact with LBE at 500 deg. C and have shown blackening on the surface of the specimens and remains of LBE that makes a special cleaning procedure necessary before post-irradiation mechanical testing.

  1. Effects of material property changes on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Morihito; Fukuya, Koji; Fujii, Katsuhiko [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility and radiation-induced material changes in microstructure and microchemistry under pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment were examined on irradiated stainless steels (SSs), post-irradiation annealed SSs and post-irradiation deformed SS. The yield stress and grain boundary segregation were considerably high in SSs highly irradiated to 1-8 x 10{sup 26}n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) in PWR at 290-320degC, resulting in a high IASCC susceptibility. Following post-irradiation annealing of highly irradiated SSs, IASCC susceptibility showed significant recovery from 89% (as-irradiated) to 8% (550degC) of %IGSCC, while the hardness recovered from Hv375 (400degC) to Hv315 (550degC). Apparent recovery of segregation at grain boundaries was not observed. The SSs irradiated to 5.3 x 10{sup 24}n/m{sup 2} (E>1MeV) in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) at < 400degC, which had grain boundary segregation and low hardness, showed no IASCC susceptibility. Due to post-irradiation deforming for JMTR irradiated SS, the hardness increased but IASCC did not occur. These results suggested that the hardening would be a key factor for IASCC initiation under PWR hydrogenated water and that a yield stress threshold for IASCC initiation under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing would the about 600MPa. (author)

  2. Effects of material property changes on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Morihito; Fukuya, Koji; Fujii, Katsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility and radiation-induced material changes in microstructure and microchemistry under pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment were examined on irradiated stainless steels (SSs), post-irradiation annealed SSs and post-irradiation deformed SS. The yield stress and grain boundary segregation were considerably high in SSs highly irradiated to 1-8 x 10 26 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) in PWR at 290-320degC, resulting in a high IASCC susceptibility. Following post-irradiation annealing of highly irradiated SSs, IASCC susceptibility showed significant recovery from 89% (as-irradiated) to 8% (550degC) of %IGSCC, while the hardness recovered from Hv375 (400degC) to Hv315 (550degC). Apparent recovery of segregation at grain boundaries was not observed. The SSs irradiated to 5.3 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E>1MeV) in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) at < 400degC, which had grain boundary segregation and low hardness, showed no IASCC susceptibility. Due to post-irradiation deforming for JMTR irradiated SS, the hardness increased but IASCC did not occur. These results suggested that the hardening would be a key factor for IASCC initiation under PWR hydrogenated water and that a yield stress threshold for IASCC initiation under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing would the about 600MPa. (author)

  3. Induction of materials for mutation breeding of strawberry (Fragaria × Ananassa) by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Trieu; Nguyen Tuong Mien; Le Tien Thanh; Huynh Thi Trung; Pham Van Nhi; Vu Thi Trac

    2015-01-01

    From collected New Zealand strawberry runners, micropropagation was executed to establish 500 shoot clusters for investigation effect of Gamma ray irradiation doses on survival rate. LD_5_0 at 52 Gy was recorded 45 days after re-injection and used as base for choosing 5 irradiation doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 Gy for creation potentially existent mutant materials. 30 shoot clusters were irradiated at each chosen dose. Irradiated material was propagated by in vitro techniques to achieve 300 plantlets/chosen dose. There was no recorded alteration in survival rate and other morphological characteristics of irradiated materials compared to the control in nursery period. These materials were transplanted to plastic greenhouse to screen the mutant. (author)

  4. Development of a Low Temperature Irradiation Capsule for Research Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Kee Nam; Cho, Man Soon; Lee, Cheol Yong; Yang, Sung Woo; Shin, Yoon Taek; Park, Seng Jae; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Sang Jun

    2013-01-01

    A new capsule design was prepared and tested at HANARO for a neutron irradiation of core materials of research reactors as a part of the research reactor development project. Irradiation testing of the materials including graphite, beryllium, and zircaloy-4 that are supposed to be used as core materials in research reactors was required for irradiation at up to 8 reactor operation cycles at low temperature (<100 .deg. C). Therefore, three instrumented capsules were designed and fabricated for an evaluation of the neutron irradiation properties of the core materials (Graphite, Be, Zircaloy-4) of research reactors. The capsules were first designed and fabricated to irradiate materials at low temperature (<100 .deg. C) for a long cycle of 8 irradiation cycles at HANARO. Therefore, the safety of the new designed capsule should be fully checked before irradiation testing. Out-pile performance and endurance testing before HANARO irradiation testing was performed using a capsule under a 110% condition of a reactor coolant flow amount. The structural integrity of the capsule was analyzed in terms of a vibration-induced fatigue cracking of a rod tip of the capsule that is suspected to be the most vulnerable part of a capsule. Another two capsules were irradiated at HANARO for 4 cycles, and one capsule was transferred to a hot cell to examine the integrity of the rod tip of the capsule. After confirming the soundness of the 4 cycle-irradiated capsule, the remaining capsule was irradiated at up to 8 cycles at HANARO. Based on the structural integrity analysis of the capsule, an improved capsule design will be suggested for a longer irradiation test at HANARO

  5. Preparation of candidate reference materials for the determination of phosphorus containing flame retardants in styrene-based polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Urpi Bertran, Raquel; Latza, Andreas; Andörfer-Lang, Katrin; Hügelschäffer, Claudia; Pöhlein, Manfred; Puchta, Ralph; Placht, Christian; Maid, Harald; Bauer, Walter; van Eldik, Rudi

    2015-04-01

    Candidate reference materials (RM) for the analysis of phosphorus-based flame retardants in styrene-based polymers were prepared using a self-made mini-extruder. Due to legal requirements of the current restriction for the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, focus now is placed on phosphorus-based flame retardants instead of the brominated kind. Newly developed analytical methods for the first-mentioned substances also require RMs similar to industrial samples for validation and verification purposes. Hence, the prepared candidate RMs contained resorcinol-bis-(diphenyl phosphate), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate), triphenyl phosphate and triphenyl phosphine oxide as phosphorus-based flame retardants. Blends of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile-co-butadiene-co-styrene as well as blends of high-impact polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide were chosen as carrier polymers. Homogeneity and thermal stability of the candidate RMs were investigated. Results showed that the candidate RMs were comparable to the available industrial materials. Measurements by ICP/OES, FTIR and NMR confirmed the expected concentrations of the flame retardants and proved that analyte loss and degradation, respectively, was below the uncertainty of measurement during the extrusion process. Thus, the candidate RMs were found to be suitable for laboratory use.

  6. Irradiation studies of mallard duck eggs material containing Mirex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, R.H.; Grodner, R.M.; Graves, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    Eggs containing Mirex (dodecachloropentacyclo[5.3.0.0 2 , 6 .0 3 , 9 .0 4 , 8 ]decane) from mallard ducks (Anas platyrhychos l.), fed diets with the insecticide incorporated at levels of 1 and 100 ppM for 25 weeks, were subjected to ultraviolet (uv) and γ irradiation. Seven derivatives were obtained on photolysis and eight derivatives were obtained from γ irradiation. Irradiation products appeared to be mono and dihydro derivatives of Mirex. Structural assignments for two monohydro derivatives and three dihydro derivatives were made on the basis of retention time and mass spectral data

  7. On the Thermal Conductivity Change of Matrix Graphite Materials after Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Kim, Eung-Seon; Sah, Injin; Park, Daegyu; Kim, Youngjun; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this work, the variations of the thermal conductivity of the A3-3 matrix graphite after neutron irradiation is discussed as well as of the IG-110 graphite for comparison. Neutron irradiation of the graphite specimens was carried out as a part of the first irradiation test of KAERI's coated particle fuel specimens by use of Hanaro research reactor. This work can be summarized as follows: 1) In the evaluation of the specific heat of the graphite materials, various literature data were used and the variations of the specific heat data of all the graphite specimens are observed well agreed, irrespectively of the difference in specimens (graphite and matrix graphite and irradiated and un-irradiated). 2) This implies that it should be reasonable that for both structural graphite and fuel matrix graphite, and even for the neuron-irradiated graphite, any of these specific heat data set be used in the calculation of the thermal conductivity. 3) For the irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity decreased on both directions. On the radial direction, the tendency of variation upon temperature is similar to that of unirradiated specimen, i.e., decreasing as the temperature increases. 4) In the German irradiation experiments with A3-27 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity of the un-irradiated specimen shows a decrease and that of irradiated specimen is nearly constant as the temperature increases. 5) The thermal conductivity of the irradiated IG-110 was considerably decreased compared with that of un-irradiated specimens The difference of the thermal conductivity of un-irradiated and irradiated IG-110 graphite specimens is much larger than that of un-irradiated and irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens.

  8. Low temperature gamma-ray irradiation effects on polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudoh, Hisaaki; Kasai, Noboru; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao

    1995-01-01

    The gamma radiation induced degradation of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) at 77K was examined by flexural test and gas analysis after irradiation and compared by the irradiation at room temperature. The decrease in flexural strength at break was much less at 77K than at RT. The evolution of CH 4 , CO and CO 2 was also depressed at 77K. The temperature dependence of the degradation closely relates to the local molecular motion of matrix resin during irradiation. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was also studied by irradiation at RT, 77K and 4K in terms of tensile elongation and molecular weight. The degradation was much less at 77K and 4K than at RT, and the same between 77K and 4K. (author)

  9. Diatomite: A promising natural candidate as carrier material for low, middle and high temperature phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Min, Xin; Deng, Yong; Guan, Weimin; Ning, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Low-temperature PCMs are always the objects of prime investigations, however, the field of PCMs’ applications is not limited to low temperatures only. In the present study, three kinds of PCMs: polyethylene glycol (PEG), lithium nitrate, and sodium sulfate were respectively employed as the low-, middle- and high-temperature storage medium. A series of novel form-stable phase change materials (fs-PCMs) were tailor-made by blending diatomite and the three kinds of PCMs via a vacuum impregnation method or a facile mixing and sintering method. Various techniques were employed to characterize their structural and thermal properties. - Highlights: • Low-temperature PEG/diatomite was prepared. • Middle-temperature LiNO 3 /diatomite was prepared. • High-temperature Na 2 SO 4 /diatomite was prepared. - Abstract: Low-temperature PCMs are always the objects of prime investigations, however, the field of PCM’s application is not only limited to low temperatures. In this study, polyethylene glycol (PEG), lithium nitrate (LiNO 3 ), and sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ) were respectively employed as the low-, middle- and high-temperature storage medium. A series of novel form-stable phase change materials (fs-PCMs) were tailor-made by blending diatomite and the three PCMs via a vacuum impregnation method or a facile mixing and sintering method. Various techniques were employed to characterize their structural and thermal properties. The maximum loads of PEG, LiNO 3 , and Na 2 SO 4 in diatomite powder could respectively reach 58%, 60%, and 65%, while PCM melts during the solid–liquid phase transformation. SEM, XRD, and FT-IR results indicated that PCMs were well dispersed into diatomite pores and no chemical changes took place during the heating and cooling process. The prepared fs-PCMs were quite stable in terms of thermal and chemical manner even after a 200-cycle of melting and freezing. The resulting composite fs-PCMs were promising candidates to

  10. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond

  11. Analysis of the radiolytic products on high-dose irradiated food and packing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyong Su; Shim, Sung Lye; Chung, In Sun

    2010-04-01

    The aims of this study were to prepare the government approval for the extension of food irradiation item to food or its products, to promote the industrial application of radiation technology, and to apply basic data in policy for introduction of irradiation. The change of hydrocarbons by irradiation was evaluated for the detection of irradiated meat. The results showed that hydrocarbons were detected in all of irradiated samples, but these hydrocarbons were not detected in non-irradiated samples. There were no difference between vacuum and N 2 - packaging. According to fatty acid compounds and degradation pathway of beef and pork, it could be deliberated that a great amount of produced hydrocarbons such as 8-heptadenene and 1,7-hexadecadien were able to be used as identification factor of irradiated meat. Effects of γ-irradiation on the volatile organic compounds in agricultural products were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. The composition of volatile organic compounds were little changed, but few specific compounds induced by γ-irradiation were identified. The variations of concentration in irradiated samples identified in this study could be due to the radiation sensitivity of compounds with the dose used. Effects of γ-irradiation on the volatile compounds in packaging materials were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. In polyethylene and polypropylene, 1,3-DBB was identified only in irradiated samples. Levels of 1,3-DBB increased with increasing irradiation doses. These results suggest may be useful in evaluation of γ-irradiation effects on food packaging materials

  12. Analysis of the radiolytic products on high-dose irradiated food and packing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyong Su; Shim, Sung Lye; Chung, In Sun [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The aims of this study were to prepare the government approval for the extension of food irradiation item to food or its products, to promote the industrial application of radiation technology, and to apply basic data in policy for introduction of irradiation. The change of hydrocarbons by irradiation was evaluated for the detection of irradiated meat. The results showed that hydrocarbons were detected in all of irradiated samples, but these hydrocarbons were not detected in non-irradiated samples. There were no difference between vacuum and N{sub 2}- packaging. According to fatty acid compounds and degradation pathway of beef and pork, it could be deliberated that a great amount of produced hydrocarbons such as 8-heptadenene and 1,7-hexadecadien were able to be used as identification factor of irradiated meat. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the volatile organic compounds in agricultural products were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. The composition of volatile organic compounds were little changed, but few specific compounds induced by {gamma}-irradiation were identified. The variations of concentration in irradiated samples identified in this study could be due to the radiation sensitivity of compounds with the dose used. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the volatile compounds in packaging materials were determined by analyzing changes of volatile composition. In polyethylene and polypropylene, 1,3-DBB was identified only in irradiated samples. Levels of 1,3-DBB increased with increasing irradiation doses. These results suggest may be useful in evaluation of {gamma}-irradiation effects on food packaging materials

  13. Chemical and physical change of packaging materials for food by γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Takeda, Yuiko; Yamada, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Packaging materials for food made of polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene were irradiated with 60 Co γ-ray. Exposure was 10, 30 and 50 kGy at 5 kGy/h exposure rate. With irradiating, all packaging materials of polyethylene and polypropylene produced volatile substances, for example, aldehydes, ketones and alcohols, especially, large amount of acetic acid and acetone. These volatile compounds were not observed in the sample unirradiated and increased with increasing exposure. Accordingly, it is concluded that they were decomposition products depend on irradiation. Polypropylene products were much more easily decomposed than polyethylene one because much more kinds and amount of volatile products were formed. However, on polystyrene products, content of styrene and ethylbenzene, monomer of raw materials, were reduced by irradiation and small amount of volatile substances were formed. These results proved its resistance to irradiation. (S.Y.)

  14. Joint research centre fusion materials irradiations in HFR: Present status and prospectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, G.; Fenici, P.

    1989-01-01

    First a review is made of the Joint Research Centre experimental activity at HFR-Petten in the frame of the Fusion Technology and Safety Programme. The materials under investigation are: Cr-Ni Austenitic steels (316-L type) and Cr-Mn Austenitic steels (AMCR and FI type) as structural materials and Pb-17Li eutetic as tritium breeding material. The experiments on structural materials comprise: Sample irradiations with post-irradiation tensile tests (FRUST) Sample irradiations under constant load and post-irradiation strain measurement (TRIESTE) On-line creep tests (CRISP). The experiments on Pb-17Li breeder material regard sample irradiations to investigate tritium production and recovery as well as tritium permeation through blanket structures (LIBRETTO Experiment). Both irradiations on structural and breeding materials will be pursued up to the end of the current JRC-Multiannual Programme (1988-1991) and even further. In the last part of the paper expected developments of the testing programme at HFR are discussed. New areas of research should involve materials for divertor applications (NET/ITER) and advanced low activation composite materials for Commercial Power Reactors

  15. Proceedings of the international conference on irradiation behaviour of metallic materials for fast reactor core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    In this conference are presented papers dealing with swelling of metals and alloys, (and specially ferritic steels), structural evolution and stability under irradiation, modifications of mechanical properties, consequences on the behaviour of fuel elements and the optimization of materials selection, and irradiation creep [fr

  16. Development of geopolymers as candidate materials for low/intermediate level highly alkaline nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, D.S.; Vance, E.R.; Kiyama, S.; Aly, Z.; Yee, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Geopolymers have been studied for many years as a possible improvement on cement in respect of compressive strength, resistance to fire, heat and acidity, and as a medium for the encapsulation of hazardous or low/ intermediate level radioactive waste. They are made by adding aluminosilicates to concentrated alkali solutions and the application of heat at 0 Cfor subsequent polymerisation. In this work we studied them as suitable candidate materials to incorporate NaOH/NaA10 2 containing waste with low levels of Cs, Sr and Nd. Geopolymers were produced by incorporating the highly alkaline solution as part of the composition with added metakaolinite, fumed silica and extra NaOH, such that the overall geopolymer composition was of molar ratios Si/Al = 2 and Na/Al = 1. The simulated waste contained Na2SO 4 , therefore Ba(OH) 2 was also added to precipitate the SO 4 x 2 as BaSO 4 . Three geoplymers of the same composition containing simulated wastes were leach tested in triplicate after heating at 400 0 Cfor 1 h (to remove -98% of free and interstitial water) under the PCT-B test protocol at 90 0 Cfor 7 days and their results are listed in Table 1. The Cs, Sr and Nd normalised leach rates were low. The Na leach rate was ∼ 4 g/L thus passing the PCT-B test protocol value of 13.5 g/L for EA glass. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy showed that BaS04 did precipitate, however all the S did not appear to have precipitated. The ANSI/ANS-16.1-2003 test was carried out on the above geopolymer composition for 5 days. The ANSI Leachability Index D (diffusivity of 10''cm sec'') for the elements released are listed in Table 2. A Portland cement was also tested for comparison and the Leachability index values are 11, 8 and 10 for Al, Na and Ca respectively. Both passed the test protocol insofar as they were > 6. Geopolymers thus passing the tests for high level nuclear waste glass (PCT-B) and for low level nuclear waste (ANSI) show promising potential

  17. Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for SCWR in superheated steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Hong, Seung Mo; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of cold work on oxidation kinetics was clearly observed for 15Cr–20Ni SS. • The tube-shaped 15Cr–20Ni SS showed very good oxidation resistance. • The machined layer by cold drawing has a significant role to mitigate oxidation. - Abstract: Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR), including three types of 15Cr–20Ni stainless steels (1520 SSs), in the temperature range of 700–780 °C superheated steam have been investigated. Effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), degree of cold work (CW), and machined layer by cold drawing process on the oxidation kinetics assuming power-law kinetics are discussed. Characteristics of oxide layers and its relation to oxidation behaviors are also discussed. The effect of DO on the weight gain behavior in superheated steam at 700 °C was minor for all specimens at least up to 200 ppb DO. The tube-shaped specimens of 1520 SSs showed very good oxidation resistance at 700–780 °C. There was no clear difference in the oxidation kinetics among the three investigated types of 1520 SSs. The machined layer formed at the tube surface has a significant role to mitigate oxidation in superheated steam. A fine-grained microstructure near the surface due to recrystallization by cold drawing process is effective to form the protective Cr 2 O 3 layer. It has been suggested that since Cr diffusion in the outside surface of tubes is accelerated as a result of an increased dislocation density and/or grain refinement by cold drawing, tube specimens show very slow oxidation kinetics. Breakdown of the protective Cr 2 O 3 layer and nodule oxide formation were partly observed on the tube-shaped specimens of 15Cr–20Ni SSs. The reliability of Cr 2 O 3 layer has to be carefully examined to predict the oxidation kinetics after long-term exposure

  18. Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for SCWR in superheated steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi.abe@qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Hong, Seung Mo; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Effect of cold work on oxidation kinetics was clearly observed for 15Cr–20Ni SS. • The tube-shaped 15Cr–20Ni SS showed very good oxidation resistance. • The machined layer by cold drawing has a significant role to mitigate oxidation. - Abstract: Oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steels as fuel cladding candidate materials for supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR), including three types of 15Cr–20Ni stainless steels (1520 SSs), in the temperature range of 700–780 °C superheated steam have been investigated. Effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), degree of cold work (CW), and machined layer by cold drawing process on the oxidation kinetics assuming power-law kinetics are discussed. Characteristics of oxide layers and its relation to oxidation behaviors are also discussed. The effect of DO on the weight gain behavior in superheated steam at 700 °C was minor for all specimens at least up to 200 ppb DO. The tube-shaped specimens of 1520 SSs showed very good oxidation resistance at 700–780 °C. There was no clear difference in the oxidation kinetics among the three investigated types of 1520 SSs. The machined layer formed at the tube surface has a significant role to mitigate oxidation in superheated steam. A fine-grained microstructure near the surface due to recrystallization by cold drawing process is effective to form the protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. It has been suggested that since Cr diffusion in the outside surface of tubes is accelerated as a result of an increased dislocation density and/or grain refinement by cold drawing, tube specimens show very slow oxidation kinetics. Breakdown of the protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and nodule oxide formation were partly observed on the tube-shaped specimens of 15Cr–20Ni SSs. The reliability of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer has to be carefully examined to predict the oxidation kinetics after long-term exposure.

  19. Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

    2012-04-01

    This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

  20. Gamma irradiation of yellow and blue colorants in polystyrene packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komolprasert, V.; Diel, Todd; Sadler, G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of 10- and 20-kGy gamma irradiation was studied on chromophtal yellow 2RLTS (Yellow 110-2, 3, 4, 5-tetrachloro-6-cyanobenzoic acid) and Irgalite Blue GBP (copper (II) phthalocyanine blue) colorants, which were added to polystyrene (PS) material used to package food prior to irradiation. Analytical results obtained suggest that irradiation did not generate any new chemicals in the PS polymer containing either yellow or blue colorant at a concentration of up to 1% (w/w). Both yellow and blue colorants are relatively stable to gamma irradiation

  1. Effect of ammonia and electron beam irradiation on lignocelulosic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastro, N.L. del; Gennari, S.M.; Castagnet, A.C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on some of the effects produced on sugarcane bagasse and eucaliptus wood saccharification by combining irradiation and NH 3 treatment. The samples irradiated at 10 5 Gy, 2x10 5 Gy and 5x10 5 Gy with an electron accelerator were treated with anhydrous gaseous ammonia. Cellulase complex from T. reesei was used for hydrolysis assays. Bromatological analysis and 'in vitro' digestibility tests were performed. The combination of EBI and ammonia treatments produced and increase in the saccharification yield, 'in vitro' digestibility and protein content for the two kinds of sample. (Author) [pt

  2. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  3. Down-selection of candidate alloys for further testing of advanced replacement materials for LWR core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Applied Physics Program; Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Life extension of the existing nuclear reactors imposes irradiation of high fluences to structural materials, resulting in significant challenges to the traditional reactor materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Advanced alloys with superior radiation resistance will increase safety margins, design flexibility, and economics for not only the life extension of the existing fleet but also new builds with advanced reactor designs. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) teamed up with Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program to initiate the Advanced Radiation Resistant Materials (ARRM) program, aiming to identify and develop advanced alloys with superior degradation resistance in light water reactor (LWR)-relevant environments by 2024.

  4. A review of formulas for predicting irradiation embrittlement of reactors vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrequin, P.

    1995-01-01

    Formulas developed in different countries for predicting irradiation embrittlement of reactors vessel materials are presented. Results of predictions were compared with different data sets, from surveillance programmes or studies in test reactors, with different residual elements contents. Figs

  5. Irradiation effect of the insulating materials for fusion superconducting magnets at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    In ITER, superconducting magnets should be used in such severe environment as high fluence of fast neutron, cryogenic temperature and large electromagnetic forces. Insulating material is one of the most sensitive component to radiation. So radiation resistance on mechanical properties at cryogenic temperature are required for insulating material. The purpose of this study is to evaluate irradiation effect of insulating material at cryogenic temperature by gamma-ray irradiation. Firstly, glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and hybrid composite were prepared. After irradiation at room temperature (RT) or liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT, 77 K), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and glass-transition temperature (Tg) measurement were conducted. It was shown that insulating materials irradiated at room temperature were much degraded than those at cryogenic temperature.

  6. Effect of 60Co γ-irradiation on saccharification of uncooked sweet potato material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Tingchun; Xiong Xingyao; Yi Jinqiong; Wang Keqin; Su Xiaojun; Zou Jianfeng

    2010-01-01

    Using the starch and powder of sweet potato of Xiangshu 86 and Xiangshu 541 as materials, the effect of 60 Co γ-irradiation on the structure of starch particle and the efficiency of saccharification were studied. The result showed that some reticulate flaws appeared in the surface of irradiated starch particles, and the reticulate flaws were increased with the increase of irradiation dose. The content of reducing sugar and total soluble sugar in both starch and the powder were obviously increased along with the increase of irradiation dose ranged from 50 to 1200 kGy. The saccharification efficiency of Xiangshu 86 and Xiangshu 541 was obviously difference at the dose lower than 500 kGy, and then the efficiency showed the similar trends at higher dose irradiation, the saccharification rate reached the highest value after the treatment of 1200 kGy irradiation. (authors)

  7. Surface Catalytic Efficiency of Advanced Carbon Carbon Candidate Thermal Protection Materials for SSTO Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for advanced ceramic thermal protection systems was calculated using arc-jet data. Coefficients for both oxygen and nitrogen atom recombination on the surfaces of these systems were obtained to temperatures of 1650 K. Optical and chemical stability of the candidate systems to the high energy hypersonic flow was also demonstrated during these tests.

  8. Installation of remote-handling typed EBSD-OIM analyzer for heavy irradiated reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Takada, Fumiki; Ohmi, Masao; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Miwa, Yukio

    2008-06-01

    The remote-handling typed EBSD-OIM analyzer for heavy irradiated reactor materials was installed in the JMTR hot laboratory at the first time in the world. The analyzer is used to study on IASCC (irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking) or IGSCC (inter granular stress corrosion cracking) in reactor materials. This report describes the measurement procedure, the measured results and the operating experiences on the analyzer in the JMTR hot laboratory. (author)

  9. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, V.P. E-mail: fae@niiar.ru; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B. E-mail: vniinm.400@g23.relkom.ru

    2001-11-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10{sup 22} and 8.0x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket.

  10. High dose neutron irradiation damage in beryllium as blanket material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.; Teykovtsev, A.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Shimansky, G.A.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.; Suslov, D.N.; Latypov, R.N.; Belozerov, S.V.; Kupriyanov, I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation results of beryllium products that operated in the SM and BOR-60 reactors up to neutron doses of 2.8x10 22 and 8.0x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV), respectively. The calculated and experimental data are given on helium and tritium accumulation, swelling, micro-hardness and thermal conductivity. The microstructural investigation results of irradiated beryllium are also presented. It is shown that the rate of helium and tritium accumulation in beryllium in the SM and BOR-60 reactors is high enough, which is of interest from the viewpoint of modeling the working conditions of the DEMO fusion reactor. Swelling of beryllium at irradiation temperature of 70-150 deg. C and neutron fluence of 2.8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV) makes up 0.8-1.5%, at 400 deg. C and fluence of 8x10 22 cm -2 (E>1 MeV)-3.2-5.0%. Irradiation hardening and decrease of thermal conductivity strongly depend on the irradiation temperature and are more significant at reduced temperatures. All results presented in the paper were analyzed with due account of the supposed working parameters of the DEMO fusion reactor blanket

  11. Binary-collision-approximation-based simulation of noble gas irradiation to tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    To reveal the possibility of fuzz formation of tungsten material under noble gas irradiation, helium, neon, and argon atom injections into tungsten materials are performed by binary-collision-approximation-based simulation. The penetration depth is strongly depends on the structure of the target material. Therefore, the penetration depth for amorphous and bcc crystalline structure is carefully investigated in this paper

  12. Experimental demonstration of radiation effects on the performance of a stirling-alternator convertor and candidate materials evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Omar R.

    Free-piston Stirling power convertors are under consideration by NASA for service in the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) and Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems to enable aggressive exploration missions by providing a reliable and constant power supply. The ASRG must withstand environmental radiation conditions, while the FSP system must tolerate a mixed neutron and gamma-ray environment resulting from self-irradiation. Stirling-alternators utilize rare earth magnets and a variety of organic materials whose radiation limits dominate service life estimates and shielding requirements. The project objective was to demonstrate the performance of the alternator, identify materials that exhibit excessive radiation sensitivity, identify radiation tolerant substitutes, establish empirical dose limits, and demonstrate the feasibility of cost effective nuclear and radiation tests by selection of the appropriate personnel and test facilities as a function of hardware maturity. The Stirling Alternator Radiation Test Article (SARTA) was constructed from linear alternator components of a Stirling convertor and underwent significant pre-exposure characterization. The SARTA was operated at the Sandia National Laboratories Gamma Irradiation Facility to a dose of over 40 Mrad. Operating performance was within nominal variation, although modestly decreasing trends occurred in later runs as well as the detection of an electrical fault after the final exposure. Post-irradiation disassembly and internal inspection revealed minimal degradation of the majority of the organic components. Radiation testing of organic material coupons was conducted since the majority of the literature was inconsistent. These inconsistencies can be attributed to testing at environmental conditions vastly different than those Stirling-alternator organics will experience during operation. Samples were irradiated at the Texas A&M TRIGA reactor to above expected FSP neutron fluence. A thorough

  13. Investigation of high flux test module for the international fusion materials irradiation facilities (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Makoto; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2007-03-01

    This report describes investigation on structure of a high neutron flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facilities (IFMIF). The HFTM is aimed for neutron irradiation of a specimen in a high neutron flux domain of the test cell for irradiation ground of IFMIF. We investigated the overall structure of the HFTM that was able to include specimens in a rig and thermocouple arrangement, an interface of control signal and support structure. Moreover, pressure and the amount of the bend in the module vessel (a rectangular section pressure vessel) were calculated. The module vessel did a rectangular section from limitation of a high neutron flux domain. Also, we investigated damage of thermocouples under neutron irradiation, which was a temperature sensor of irradiation materials temperature control demanded high precision. Based on these results, drawings on the HTFM structure. (author)

  14. Radiation-Induced Fluidity and Glass-Liquid Transition in Irradiated Amorphous Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the fluidity behaviour of continuously irradiated glasses using the Congruent Bond Lattice model in which broken bonds 'configurons' facilitate the flow. Irradiation breaks the bonds creating configurons which at high concentrations provide the transition of material from the glassy to liquid state. An explicit equation of viscosity has been derived which gives results in agreement with experimental data. This equation provides correct viscosity data for non-irradiated materials and shows a significant increase of fluidity in radiation fields. It demonstrates a decrease of activation energy of flow for irradiated glasses. A simple equation for glass-transition temperature was also obtained which shows that irradiated glasses have lower glass transition temperatures and are readily transformed from glassy to liquid state e.g. fluidized in strong radiation fields. (authors)

  15. Deformation behavior of irradiated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himbeault, D.D.; Chow, C.K.; Puls, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    A study of the deformation behavior of irradiated highly textured Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of 30 degree C to 300 degree C was undertaken to understand better the mechanism for the deterioration of the fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. Strain localization behavior, believed to be a main contributor to reduced toughness, was observed in irradiated transverse tensile specimens at temperature greater than 100 degree C. The strain localization behavior was found to occur by the cooperative twinning of the highly textured grains of the material, resulting in a local softening of the material, where the flow than localizes. It is believed that the effect of the irradiation is to favor twinning at the expense of slip in the early stages of deformation. This effect becomes more pronounced at higher temperature, thus leading to the high-temperature strain localization behavior of the material. A limited amount of dislocation channeling was also observed; however, it is not considered to have a major role in the strain localization behavior of the material. Contrary to previous reports on irradiated zirconium alloys, static strain aging is observed in the irradiated material in the temperature range of 150 degree C to 300 degree C

  16. Development of Multiscale Materials Modeling Techniques and Coarse- Graining Strategies for Predicting Materials Degradation in Extreme Irradiation Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Exposure of metallic structural materials to irradiation environments results in significant microstructural evolution, property changes and performance degradation, which limits the extended operation of current generation light water reactors and restricts the design of advanced fission and fusion reactors [1-8]. This effect of irradiation on materials microstructure and properties is a classic example of an inherently multiscale phenomenon, as schematically illustrated in Figure 1a. Pertinent processes range from the atomic nucleus to structural component length scales, spanning more than 15 orders of magnitude. Time scales bridge more than 22 orders of magnitude, with the shortest being less than a femtosecond [1,8]. Further, the mix of radiation-induced features formed and the corresponding property degradation depend on a wide range of material and irradiation variables. This emphasizes the importance of closely integrating models with high-resolution experimental characterization of the evolving radiation- damaged microstructure, including measurements performed in-situ during irradiation. In this article, we review some recent successes through the use of closely coordinated modeling and experimental studies of the defect cluster evolution in irradiated body-centered cubic materials, followed by a discussion of outstanding challenges still to be addressed, which are necessary for the development of comprehensive models of radiation effects in structural materials.

  17. An investigation of neutron irradiation test on superplastic zirconia-ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Ishihara, Masahiro; Baba, Shinichi; Hayashi, Kimio

    2000-05-01

    A neutron irradiation test on superplastic ceramic materials at high temperature has been proposed as an innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). For the effective execution of the test, we reviewed the superplastic deformation mechanism of ceramic materials and discussed neutron irradiation effects on the superplastic deformation process of stabilized Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystal (TZP), which is a representative superplastic ceramic material. As a result, we pointed out that the decrease in the activation energy for superplastic deformation is expected by the radiation-enhanced diffusion. We selected a fast neutron fluence of 5x10 20 n/cm 2 and an irradiation temperature of about 600degC as test conditions for the first irradiation test on TZP and decided to perform a preliminary irradiation test by the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Moreover, we estimated the radioactivity of irradiated TZP and indicated that it is in the order of 10 10 Bq/g (about 0.3 Ci/g) immediately after irradiation to a thermal neutron fluence of 3x10 20 n/cm 2 and that it decays to about 1/100 in a year. (author)

  18. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  19. Production of candidate natural matrix reference materials for micro-analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Fajgelj, A.; Zeiller, E.

    2002-01-01

    Homogeneity is considered to be the most vital prerequisite for a certified reference material (CRM); more stringent requirements exist for the analysis of small subsamples. Many of the natural matrix CRMs are prepared from bulk samples by grinding and milling them to a certain particle size, which is expected to provide a more homogenous material; however recommended sample sizes for biological and environmental reference materials are found to be more than 100 mg. Since the milling of materials is costly and has some drawbacks, natural materials that already occur as small particles such as air particulate matter, certain sediments, and cellular biological materials may form the basis of the required reference materials. The nature of these materials, i.e. naturally occurring particles, may provide ideal model reference material. We describe here the production of the materials and preliminary tests, the evaluation for the micro-analytical techniques

  20. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, B. E-mail: esposito@frascati.enea.it; Bertalot, L.; Maruccia, G.; Petrizzi, L.; Bignan, G.; Blandin, C.; Chauffriat, S.; Lebrun, A.; Recroix, H.; Trapp, J.P.; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-11-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties. The analysis has been carried out using the LSL-M2 code, which optimizes the neutron spectrum by means of a least-squares technique taking into account the variance and covariance files. In the second part of the activity, the possibility of extending to IFMIF the use of existing on-line in-core neutron/gamma monitors (to be located at several positions inside the IFMIF test cell for beam control, safety and diagnostic purposes) has been studied. A feasibility analysis of the modifications required to adapt sub-miniature fission chambers (recently developed by CEA-Cadarache) to the high flux test module of the test cell has been carried out. The verification of this application pertinence and a gross definition of the in-core detector characteristics are described. The option of using self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) is also discussed.

  1. Charge, spin and orbital order in the candidate multiferroic material LuFe2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, Joost de

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a detailed study of the magnetic, structural and orbital order parameters of the candidate multiferroic material LuFe 2 O 4 . Multiferroic oxides with a strong magnetoelectric coupling are of high interest for potential information technology applications, but they are rare because the traditional mechanism of ferroelectricity is incompatible with magnetism. Consequently, much attention is focused on various unconventional mechanisms of ferroelectricity. Of these, ferroelectricity originating from charge ordering (CO) is particularly intriguing because it potentially combines large electric polarizations with strong magneto-electric coupling. However, examples of oxides where this mechanism occurs are exceedingly rare and none is really well understood. LuFe 2 O 4 is often cited as the prototypical example of CO-based ferroelectricity. In this material, the order of Fe valences has been proposed to render the triangular Fe/O bilayers polar by making one of the two layers rich in Fe 2+ and the other rich in Fe 3+ , allowing for a possible ferroelectric stacking of the individual bilayers. Because of this new mechanism for ferroelectricity, and also because of the high transition temperatures of charge order (T CO ∝320K) and ferro magnetism (T N ∝240 K) LuFe 2 O 4 has recently attracted increasing attention. Although these polar bilayers are generally accepted in the literature for LuFe 2 O 4 , direct proof is lacking. An assumption-free experimental determination of whether or not the CO in the Fe/O bilayers is polar would be crucial, given the dependence of the proposed mechanism of ferroelectricity from CO in LuFe 2 O 4 on polar bilayers. This thesis starts with a detailed characterization of the macroscopic magnetic properties, where growing ferrimagnetic contributions observed in magnetization could be ascribed to increasing oxygen off-stoichiometry. The main focus is on samples exhibiting a sharp magnetic transition to long-range spin order

  2. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T.

    1998-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  3. The feasibility of small size specimens for testing of environmentally assisted cracking of irradiated materials and of materials under irradiation in reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Saario, T. [Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of core materials has become an increasingly important issue of downtime and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. Small size specimens are necessary in stress corrosion testing of irradiated materials because of difficulties in handling high dose rate materials and because of restricted availability of the materials. The drawback of using small size specimens is that in some cases they do not fulfil the requirements of the relevant testing standards. Recently VTT has developed J-R testing with irradiated and non-irradiated sub size 3 PB specimens, both in inert and in LWR environments. Also, a new materials testing system which will enable simultaneous multiple specimen testing both in laboratory conditions and in operating reactor core is under development. The new testing system will utilize Charpy and sub size 3 PB specimens. The feasibility study of the system has been carried out using different materials. Fracture resistance curves of a Cu-Zr-Cr alloy are shown to be independent of the specimen geometry and size, to some extent. Results gained from tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water are presented for sensitized SIS 2333 stainless steel. The experimental results indicate that the size of the plastic zone or stress triaxiality must be further studied although no significant effect on the environmentally assisted crack growth rate was observed. (orig.)

  4. Verification of neutron irradiation on S/G tube materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byoung Hwi; Lee, S. K.; Jang, D. Y.; Jo, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    The fluence monitors were fabricated with metal wires of the purity ≥ 99.9%, whose dimensions were 0.1mm diameter, about 3mm length, and around 150-200 μg mass range. Three wire samples (Fe, Ni, Ti) were prepared for one irradiation aluminum capsule. Five capsules were irradiated in the OR5 hole of the HANARO reactor at 30 MW power for about 25 days. The reaction rates were calculated by using the measured radiation activity data, and then neutron fluence were obtained from the reaction rates and the weighted neutron cross section with calculated neutron spectrum at the fluence monitor position. The measured neutron fluences were compared to the calculated ones. (Errors ≤ 35%)

  5. Materials irradiation subpanel report to BESAC neutron sources and research panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Goland, A.N.; Lott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The future success of the nuclear power option in the US (fission and fusion) depends critically on the continued existence of a healthy national materials-irradiation program. Consideration of the requirements for acceptable materials-irradiation systems in a new neutron source has led the subcommittee to identify an advanced steady-state reactor (ANS) as a better choice than a spallation neutron source. However, the subcommittee also hastens to point out that the ANS cannot stand alone as the nation's sole high-flux mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation source in the next century. It must be incorporated in a broader program that includes other currently existing neutron irradiation facilities. Upgrading and continuing support for these facilities must be planned. In particular, serious consideration should be given to converting the HFIR into a dedicated materials test reactor, and long-term support for several university reactors should be established

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum: effects of irradiation on material microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranwal, R.; Burke, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the effects of irradiation on material microstructure. This work describes the results-to-date from TEM characterization of unirradiated and irradiated ODS molybdenum. The general microstructure of the unirradiated material consists of fine molybdenum grains (< 5 (micro)m average grain size) with numerous low angle boundaries and isolated dislocation networks. 'Ribbon'-like lanthanum oxides are aligned along the working direction of the product form and are frequently associated with grain boundaries, serving to inhibit grain boundary and dislocation movement. In addition to the 'ribbons', discrete lanthanum oxide particles have also been detected. After irradiation, the material is characterized by the presence of nonuniformly distributed large (∼ 20 to 100 nm in diameter), multi-faceted voids, while the molybdenum grain size and oxide morphology appear to be unaffected by irradiation

  7. Effects of non-steady irradiation conditions on fusion materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, H.; Fukumoto, K.; Nagumo, T.; Nita, N.

    2001-01-01

    During startup of fusion reactors, materials are exposed to neutron irradiation under non-steady temperature condition. Since the temperature of irradiation has decisive effects on the microstructural evolution, the non-steady temperature will have important consequences in the performance of fusion reactor materials. In the present study, a series of vanadium based alloys have been irradiated with neutrons in a temperature cycling condition. It has been found from this study that cavity number density is much greater in temperature cycled specimens than in steady temperature irradiation. Keeping the upper temperature constant, cavity number density is greater for smaller difference between the upper and the lower temperature. It follows that relatively small temperature excursions may have rather significant effects on the fusion material performance in service. (author)

  8. Creep of fissile ceramic materials under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brucklacher, D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical estimation of the irradiation-induced creep rate of U0 2 by a modification of the Nabarro-Herring model for diffusional creep resulted in a creep rate range between about 6 x 10 -6 to 8 x 10 -5 h -1 for a fission rate of 1 x 10 14 f/cm 3 s and a stress of 2 kgf/mm 2 . Accordingly, the creep rate is enhanced by irradiation at temperatures below 1000 0 to 1200 0 C. It is essentially due to the 'thermal rods' along the fission fragment tracks. Therefore, irradiation-induced creep rates should depend only slightly on temperature and must be markedly lower for carbide and nitride fuel. In-reactor creep experiments on UO 2 were performed at fuel temperatures between 250 0 to 850 0 C. At burnups between 0.3 to 3% the steady-state compressive creep rates are proportional to stress (0 to 4 kgf/mm 2 ) and to fission rate (1 x 10 13 to 2 x 10 14 f/cm 3 s), and are in the range estimated before. The increase in the creep rate with increasing temperature is low and corresponds to an apparent activation energy of only 5200 cal/mol. At burnups above 3 to 4% the stress exponent of the irradiation-induced creep rate increased from n = 1 to n = 1.5. Creep measurements on UO 2 to 15 wt-%Pu0 2 (mechanically mixed, sintered density 86% TD) showed the same temperature dependence as UO 2 below 700 0 C. However, the creep rates were higher by a factor of about 20 compared to fully dense UO 2 . This difference may be explained by assuming a high 'effective' porosity. In-pile creep tests on some UN samples resulted in creep rates that were lower by an order of magnitude than for UO 2 under comparable conditions. (author)

  9. Biocompatibility and characterisation of a candidate microelectrode material for biosensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyster, L.A.

    2001-10-01

    Recent advances in microcircuit technology have enabled the fabrication of Multiple Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for investigating the characteristics of networks of neuronal cells either in vivo or in vitro. When producing a MEA materials used must be corrosion resistant, have low electrical impedance and the materials must be biocompatible. Existing MEA's have limited life spans, relatively high impedance values and limited uses. Thus creating a requirement for new MEA technology. TiN thin films have become increasingly useful in a wide variety of applications, due to their nature, which includes chemical stability, high hardness, excellent wear and electrical properties and also biocompatibility. The favourable electrical and biocompatibility characteristics of thin films of TiN make them a possible candidate for use in a MEA. TiN thin films can be deposited by a number of methods including evaporation, ion plating and sputtering. The method of deposition, along with process parameters used can have a marked effect on the characteristics of TiN films, including changes in preferred orientation, hardness and wear and also biocompatibility. TiN thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering of a Ti target, with Argon and nitrogen gas mixtures and labelled Type I TiN films. Also industrial TIN films deposited by Arc Ion plating were carefully selected for comparison and labelled Type II TiN films. The microstructure, composition, surface chemistry, surface topography and roughness were studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Profilometry. Type I TIN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone I and Type II TiN films showed a surface topography similar to Zone 2 of the Movchan and Dernchishin structure zone model for sputtered films. XPS showed that the surface composition of all TiN films was predominantly TiO 2 , TiN and TiN x O y . Significant

  10. Diffusion and solubility of oxygen in γ-ray irradiated polymer insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Yamamoto, Yasuaki.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ-rays irradiation on diffusion and solubility of oxygen in polymer materials for electric cable insulation materials were investigated. The polymers were polyethylene, ethylene-propylene rubber, chlorinated polyethylene, chlorosulphonated polyethylene, and chloroprene rubber. They were pure grade and several types of formulation grade. The sheets of these polymers were irradiated up to 5 - 200 Mrad under vacuum or in oxygen under pressure of 3 - 15 atm at room temperature or at 70 deg C. By a method of gas desorption, the diffusion coefficient (D) and solubility coefficient (S) of oxygen or argon in polymer materials were determined at various temperatures of 10 - 80 deg C. The D and S decreased with increase of dose, and the decrease by irradiation with oxidation was more remarkable than that by irradiation without oxidation. However, the decreases of D and S by irradiation were reduced by the formulation of polymers. The additives in formulated polymers would reduce the reactions of crosslinking or oxidation by γ-ray irradiation. The activation energy of D was scarcely changed by irradiations with and without oxidation. (author)

  11. Two spruce shoot candidate reference materials from the German environmental specimen bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backhaus, F.; Bagschik, U.; Burow, M.; Froning, M.; Mohl, C.; Ostapczuk, P.; Rossbach, M.; Schladot, J.D.; Stoeppler, M.; Waidmann, E.; Byrne, A.R.; Zeisler, R.

    1994-01-01

    Two new materials are introduced that might serve as useful aids for the harmonisation of analytical results. Spruce shoots, cryogenically homogenized and characterized for 50 elements from two sampling sites of the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) are presented as possible third generation reference materials that might also act as calibrating materials in speciation analysis. (author)

  12. Complete Report on the Development of Welding Parameters for Irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The advanced welding facility at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which was conceived to enable research and development of weld repair techniques for nuclear power plant life extension, is now operational. The development of the facility and its advanced welding capabilities, along with the model materials for initial welding trials, were funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, with additional support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Welding of irradiated materials was initiated on November 17, 2017, which marked a significant step in the development of the facility and the beginning of extensive welding research and development campaigns on irradiated materials that will eventually produce validated techniques and guidelines for weld repair activities carried out to extend the operational lifetimes of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years. This report summarizes the final steps that were required to complete weld process development, initial irradiated materials welding activities, near-term plans for irradiated materials welding, and plans for post-weld analyses that will be carried out to assess the ability of the advanced welding processes to make repairs on irradiated materials.

  13. Neutronics analysis of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Japanese contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio; Noda, Kenji; Kosako, Kazuaki.

    1997-10-01

    In fusion reactor development for demonstration reactor, i.e., DEMO, materials tolerable for D-T neutron irradiation are absolutely required for both mechanical and safety point of views. For this requirement, several kinds of low activation materials were proposed. However, experimental data by actual D-T fusion neutron irradiation have not existed so far because of lack of fusion neutron irradiation facility, except fundamental radiation damage studies at very low neutron fluence. Therefore such a facility has been strongly requested. According to agreement of need for such a facility among the international parties, a conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been carried out under the frame work of the IEA-Implementing Agreement. In the activity, a neutronics analysis on irradiation field optimization in the IFMIF test cell was performed in three parties, Japan, US and EU. As the Japanese contribution, the present paper describes a neutron source term as well as incident deuteron beam angle optimization of two beam geometry, beam shape (foot print) optimization, and dpa, gas production and heating estimation inside various material loading Module, including a sensitivity analysis of source term uncertainty to the estimated irradiation parameters. (author)

  14. Effect of Fast Neutron Irradiation on Current Transport Properties of HTS Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A; Kruglov, V S; Latushkin, S T; Lubimov, A N; Ryazanov, A I; Shavkin, S V; Taylor, T M; Volkov, P V

    2004-01-01

    The effect of fast neutron irradiation with energy up to 35 MeV and integrated fluence of up to 5 x 10**15 cm-2 on the current transport properties of HTS materials Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 has been studied, both at liquid nitrogen and at room temperatures. The samples irradiated were selected after verification of the stability of their superconducting properties after temperature cycling in the range of 77 K - 293 K. It has been found that the irradiation by fast neutrons up to the above dose does not produce a significant degradation of critical current. The effect of room temperature annealing on the recovery of transport properties of the irradiated samples is also reported, as is a preliminary microstructure investigation of the effect of irradiation on the soldered contacts.

  15. A sharp interface model for void growth in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochrainer, Thomas; El-Azab, Anter

    2015-03-01

    A thermodynamic formalism for the interaction of point defects with free surfaces in single-component solids has been developed and applied to the problem of void growth by absorption of point defects in irradiated metals. This formalism consists of two parts, a detailed description of the dynamics of defects within the non-equilibrium thermodynamic frame, and the application of the second law of thermodynamics to provide closure relations for all kinetic equations. Enforcing the principle of non-negative entropy production showed that the description of the problem of void evolution under irradiation must include a relationship between the normal fluxes of defects into the void surface and the driving thermodynamic forces for the void surface motion; these thermodynamic forces are identified for both vacancies and interstitials and the relationships between these forces and the normal point defect fluxes are established using the concepts of transition state theory. The latter theory implies that the defect accommodation into the surface is a thermally activated process. Numerical examples are given to illustrate void growth dynamics in this new formalism and to investigate the effect of the surface energy barriers on void growth. Consequences for phase field models of void growth are discussed.

  16. Effects of irradiation temperature on polarisation and relaxation characteristics of polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, Marcel; Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Reeve, Scott; Runkel, Stefan [Physikalisches Institut, Bonn Univ. (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To achieve significant enhancement of polarisation of solid target materials one must use the principles of dynamic nuclear polarisation and utilise the coupling of the nuclear and electron spins. The unpaired electrons needed can be created as paramagnetic structural defects by irradiation of the material. Polyethylene and polypropylene materials were irradiated at various temperatures and subsequently polarised with microwaves of approximately 70 GHz at temperatures around 1 K. Additionally the samples were investigated with respect to the nature of the created paramagnetic defects using a X-band EPR spectrometer. It was found that the irradiation temperature has a significant effect on the polarisation values achieved and also on the relaxation times of the materials in the 2.5 T magnetic field. The EPR line shape is clearly dominated by the well known alkyl radical structure.

  17. Review Paper: Review of Instrumentation for Irradiation Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Rempe, Joy L.; Villard, Jean-Francois; Solstadd, Steinar

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 years of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation testing has led to many countries developing significant improvements in instrumentation to monitor physical parameters and to control the test conditions in material test reactors (MTRs). Recently, there is increased interest to irradiate new materials and reactor fuels for advanced pressurized water reactors and Gen-IV reactor systems, such as sodium-cooled fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, supercritical water-cooled reactors, and gas-cooled fast reactors. This review paper documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world and summarizes ongoing research efforts to deploy new sensors. As described in this paper, a wide range of sensors is available to measure key parameters of interest during fuels and materials irradiations in MTRs. Ongoing development efforts focus on providing MTR users a wider range of parameter measurements with smaller, higher accuracy sensors.

  18. Chemical and physical change of packaging materials for food by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Yamada, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    Recently, foods are often exposed to radiation under packed states with various wrapping materials. In this study, the effects of γ-ray radiation were investigated on the additives in wrapping materials on the market. 10 - 50 kGy γ radiation was irradiated to samples under sealed condition in a glass-ware. Polyethylene bag and wrapping film, polypropylene wrapping film, cup and sheet, and polystyrene cup were used as samples. And the additives in these materials were analyzed by GC/MS to evaluate the radiation effects on them. The irradiation was found to induce rapid degradation of antioxidants, especially, Irgafos 168. Some fatty acid amides used as a lubricant and a plasticizer, DBP were also reduced, but not aliphatic hydrocarbons. However, all polystyrene products used in this study included no additives. The contents of styrene dimer and trimer in those wrapping materials were not changed by γ-irradiation. (M.N.)

  19. Effect of γ-ray irradiation on properties of castor oil-polyurethane potting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Jian; Luo Xianglin; Yue Yilun

    2001-01-01

    After γ-ray sterilization, the amounts of 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA) in the five kinds of synthesized medical castor oil-polyurethane potting materials were detected by HPLC. The influences of γ-ray irradiation on the mechanical performance of the potting materials were also discussed quantitatively.The experimental results show that the amounts of produced MDA increases with γ-ray irradiation dosage. After 25 kGy γ-ray sterilization, the accumulated amounts of MDA in the five kinds of potting materials were 10.33, 10.37, 10.52, 10.59, 10.91 ? μg/g respectively. Those amounts are below the level of harm amount to human body. At the same time, the mechanical properties of the potting materials such as tensile strength, tear strength and hardness are improved because cross-linking happens under irradiation

  20. Evaluation of Landfill Site Candidate for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Norm) and Hazardous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucipta; Hadi Suntoko; Bunawas

    2007-01-01

    Refers to co-location concept, Kabil site, where located at the southeast end of low hills in Batam Island, will be sited as an integrated industrial waste management center including landfill. So that, it is necessary an evaluation of the landfill site candidate for NORM and hazardous waste. The evaluation includes geological and non-geological aspects, to determine the suitability or capability in supporting the function as landfill facility. The site candidate was evaluated by serial sreps as follows: 1) criteria formulation; 2) selecting the parameter for evaluation; 3) Positive screening or evaluation of the land having potentiality for landfill site by descriptive method: and 4) determine the land suitability or capability for landfill site. The evaluation of geological and non- geological aspects include topography, litology, seismicity, groundwater and surface water, climate, hydro-oceanography, flora and fauna, spatial pattern and transportation system. The most of the parameters evaluated show the fulfilling to the site criteria, and can be mentioned that the land is suitable for landfill site. Some parameters are not so suitable for that purpose, especially on permeability and homogeneity of the rocks/soils, distance to surface water body, depth of groundwater, the flow rate of groundwater, precipitation, and humidity of the air. The lack of suitability showed by some parameters can be compensated by improving the appropriate engineered barrier in order to fulfill the landfill performance in providing the supporting capacity, long live stability and waste containment. (author)

  1. High dose radiation damage in nuclear energy structural materials investigated by heavy ion irradiation simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongnan; Xu Yongjun; Yuan Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Structural materials in ITER, ADS and fast reactor suffer high dose irradiations of neutrons and/or protons, that leads to severe displacement damage up to lOO dpa per year. Investigation of radiation damage induced by such a high dose irradiation has attracted great attention along with the development of nuclear energy facilities of new generation. However, it is deeply hampered for the lacking of high dose neutron and proton sources. Irradiation simulation of heavy ions produced by accelerators opens up an effective way for laboratory investigation of high dose irradiation induced radiation damage encountered in the ITER, ADS, etc. Radiation damage is caused mainly by atomic displacement in materials. The displacement rate of heavy ions is about lO 3 ∼10 7 orders higher than those of neutrons and protons. High displacement rate of heavy ions significantly reduces the irradiation time. The heavy ion irradiation simulation technique (HIIS) technique has been developed at China Institute of Atomic Energy and a series of the HIIS experiments have been performed to investigate radiation damage in stainless steels, tungsten and tantalum at irradiation temperatures from room temperature to 800 ℃ and in the irradiation dose region up to 100 dpa. The experimental results show that he radiation swelling peak for the modified stainless steel appears in the temperature region around 580 ℃ and the radiation damage is more sensitive to the temperature, the size of the radiation induced vacancy cluster or void increase with the increasing of the irradiation dose, and among the three materials the home-made modified stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property. (authors)

  2. Temperature response of biological materials to pulsed non-ablative CO2 laser irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugmans, M. J.; Kemper, J.; Gijsbers, G. H.; van der Meulen, F. W.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents surface temperature responses of various tissue phantoms and in vitro and in vivo biological materials in air to non-ablative pulsed CO2 laser irradiation, measured with a thermocamera. We studied cooling off behavior of the materials after a laser pulse, to come to an

  3. A study on the irradiation effect of reactor materials using a cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Joon Hwa; Ji, Se Hwan; Kang, Yung Hwan; Park, Duk Keun; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    The objectives of the present study are to develop the simulation techniques of neutron irradiation through ion irradiation using a Cyclotron and small specimen techniques and to evaluate radiation effects of reactor materials. Effects of proton or neutron irradiation on domestic 12Cr-1MoV and SA508-3 steels were evaluated by small scale specimen test techniques, i.e, small punch and miniaturized tensile test. In order to study the radiation damage mechanism, irradiation effects of the steels were investigated by means of property change tests such as microstructure, physical and thermal properties. Feasibility study on application of a magnetic non-destructive methods to evaluate radiation effects on RPV materials was performed. 109 figs, 12 tabs, 102 refs. (Author).

  4. A study on the irradiation effect of reactor materials using a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Joon Hwa; Ji, Se Hwan; Kang, Yung Hwan; Park, Duk Keun; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung

    1994-12-01

    The objectives of the present study are to develop the simulation techniques of neutron irradiation through ion irradiation using a Cyclotron and small specimen techniques and to evaluate radiation effects of reactor materials. Effects of proton or neutron irradiation on domestic 12Cr-1MoV and SA508-3 steels were evaluated by small scale specimen test techniques, i.e, small punch and miniaturized tensile test. In order to study the radiation damage mechanism, irradiation effects of the steels were investigated by means of property change tests such as microstructure, physical and thermal properties. Feasibility study on application of a magnetic non-destructive methods to evaluate radiation effects on RPV materials was performed. 109 figs, 12 tabs, 102 refs. (Author)

  5. Inorganic-organic hybrid polymer for preparation of affiliating material using electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jaeseung; Kim, Seongeun; Kim, Byounggak; Lee, Jongchan; Park, Jihyun; Lee, Byeongcheol

    2011-01-01

    Recently, silver nano materials have gained a lot of attentions in a variety of applications due to the unique biological, optical, and electrical properties. Especially, the antifouling property of these material is considered to be an important character for biomedical field, marine coatings industry, biosensor, and drug delivery. In this study, we design and synthesize the inorganic-organic hybrid polymer for preparation of affiliating materials. Silver nano materials having antifouling property with different shapes are prepared by control the electron beam irradiation conditions. Inorganic-organic hybrid polymer was synthesized and characterized. → Morphology and size controlled nano materials are prepared using electron beam irradiation. → Silver nano materials having various shapes can be used for antifouling material

  6. Effects of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking resistance of organic insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Boxue; Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Shigeo [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei (Japan). Faculty of Technology

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the influence of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking failure of organic insulating materials by use of the IEC Publ.112 method. Tracking resistance of organic insulating materials under wet polluted condition has been studied by many investigators with a test method of the IEC Publ.112. The investigations on irradiation effects on tracking resistance should be enhanced due to the increasing usage of organic insulating materials in the radiation environments. The tracking resistance seems to be affected by gamma-irradiation, but the knowledge on the influence of gamma-irradiation is quite a few and systematic studies are needed. In this paper, modified polyphenylene oxide, polybutylene naphthalate, modified polycarbonate and polybutylene terephthalate which were irradiated in air until 1x10{sup 7}R and 1x10{sup 8}R with dose rate of 10{sup 6}R/hr using {sup 60}Co gamma-source have been employed. The total dose effects on the number of drops to tracking failure, contact angle and charges of scintillation have been studied. As the total doses are increased, the number of drops to tracking failure decreases with polybutylene terephthalate. On the other hand, the number of drops to tracking failure increases with polybutylene naphthalate and modified polycarbonate when the total doses are increased. The effects of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking failure are due to radiation-induced degradation or cross-linking of organic insulating materials. When the organic insulating materials are degraded by gamma-irradiation, the tracking resistance decreases, but for cross-linking type materials, the tracking resistance increases. (author)

  7. Irradiation as an alternative environmentally friendly method for microbiological decontamination of herbal raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, M.; Rotaru, R.

    2000-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of herbal raw materials is a serious problem in the production of therapeutical preparations. A good quality of the product, according to the pharmaceutical requirements may be achieved by applying suitable methods of decontamination. The decontamination treatments should be fast and effective against all microorganisms. It should ensure the decontamination of both packaging and the microorganisms present and must not reduce the sensory and technological qualities of the commodities. Decontamination of herbal raw materials by irradiation is a method by choice. It is because chemical methods are recognized recently as not safe to the consumer. Irradiation, in turn, is technically feasible, very effective and friendly enough to environment process. Under the prevailing production and handling conditions, most herbs contain a large number of microorganisms what is a serious problem in the production of therapeutical preparations. For several years the most widely used methods for decontamination of herbs was fumigation with ethylene oxide or methyl bromide. Both methods today banned in most countries. Irradiation is an alternative and safe method for effective reducing the microbial contamination of herbal raw materials. The following raw materials have been examined: Folium Cynara, Folium Plantago, Flos Chamomillae, Semen Sylibum Marianum and Folium Farfara. The content of biologically active compounds before and after irradiation of the raw materials did not change in a significant degree after irradiation. The dose of radiation for herbals raw materials was 10 kGy. There are two groups of raw materials: - The raw materials designed for preparing granulates, tablets, dragees, capsules, aqueous extracts, infusions, macerations and preparations for external use; - The raw materials assigned for preparing alcoholic preparations, isolated compounds, oil preparations and essential oils. The medical herbs and herbal raw materials before their

  8. Effect of packaging material on nitrate nitrogen content of irradiated potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondy, N.I.; Koushik, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of packaging materials on nitrate nitrogen content of irradiated potatoes was investigated. Tubers were irradiated at 10, 30 and 100 Krads and stored for 12 wk at 5 degrees C in paper or plastic bags. Nitrate nitrogen content was significantly (p 0.01) higher in tubers packaged in plastic as compared to those in paper bags. Irradiation significantly (p 0.01) increased nitrate nitrogen content between the lowest and highest levels of treatment in tubers stored in both paper and plastic bags

  9. Method and equipment to lead a cable-like material under an irradiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesselmann, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    When irradiating cable-like material (cable jacketed with polyethylene) which is led through an irradiation source and is thus turned and twisted, no uniform irradiation and twist changes have so far been obtained. It is suggested to twist the cable before the first circuit by about 45 0 in one direction, after turning and the second circuit, to twist by about 90 0 in the other direction and to follow with a further two circuits with twisting. A suitable cable twisting device which works with discrete clamping jaw is described in detail. (UWI) [de

  10. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  11. Wear Test Results of Candidate Materials for the OK-542 Towed Array Handling Machine Level Winder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-29

    10 6. Wear Testing Photograph B ....................................................... .11 7. Clad Inconel 625 ...interfere with this wear test. Other materials that were tested included Inconel 625 , Titanium, 304 Stainless, 316 Stainless, and Ni-Al-Br. All of these...Stainless Steel, Inconel 625 , Nickel-Aluminum-Bronze, and Titanium. The specialty materials: Inconel 625 , Monel, Stainless and Stellite, were clad-welded

  12. The effect of neutron irradiation on the trapping of tritium in carbon-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwast, H.; Werle, H.; Glugla, M.; Wu, C.H.; Federici, G.

    1993-11-01

    Carbon-based materials are considered for protection of plasma facing components in the next step fusion device. To investigate the effects of neutron damage on the tritium behaviour an experimental study on the tritium retention of various neutron irradiated graphites and carbon/carbon fibre composites was started. The irradiation dose of the specimens ranges from 10 -3 to 3.5 dpa.g and the irradiation temperature from 390 C to 1500 C. A comparison of tritium retention in pre- and post-irradiated carbon-based materials as a function of the sample temperature is reported in this paper and the results are discussed. The first results indicate that the retention of tritium is higher in irradiated graphite than in unirradiated graphite and depends largely on the density and microstructure. The retention is also influenced by the tritium-loading temperature. Graphite of type S 1611, irradiated at 400 C and 600 C up to a damage of 0.1 dpa.g, retained about two times more tritium than the unirradiated material. (orig.)

  13. Effects of CTR irradiation on the mechanical properties of structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.

    1976-11-01

    Mechanical properties of CTR structural materials are important in determining the reliability and economics of fusion power. Furthermore, these properties are significantly affected by the high neutron flux experienced by components in the regions near the plasma of the fusion reactor. In general, irradiation hardens the material and leads to a reduction in ductility. An exception to this is in some complex engineering alloys where either hardening or softening can be observed depending on the alloy and the irradiation conditions. Regardless of this restriction, irradiation usually leads to a reduction in ductility. Available tensile data examined in this paper show that significant ductility reduction can be found for irradiation conditions typical of CTR operation. Consideration of these effects show that extensive work will be needed to fully establish the in-service properties of CTR structures. This information will be used by designers to develop conditions and design philosophies adapted to avoid the most deleterious conditions and minimize stresses on structures on reactor design. The information will also be used as input to alloy development programs with goals of producing materials more resistant to property degradation during irradiation. It is clear that a great deal of additional work will be required both to understand the effect of CTR irradiation on properties and to develop optimal alloys for this application

  14. Residual stress improvement mechanism on metal material by underwater laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji; Yoda, Masaki; Mukai, Naruhiko; Obata, Minoru; Kanno, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    Residual stress improvement technology for component surface by underwater pulsed laser irradiation has been developed as a method of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of core components in nuclear reactors. In order to optimize the laser irradiation conditions based on a complete understanding of the mechanism, the propagation of a shock wave induced by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the irradiated material were analyzed through time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program. The calculated results are compared with the measured results obtained by experiments in which laser pulses with an energy of 200 mJ are focused to a diameter of 0.8 mm on a water-immersed test piece of 20% cold-worked Type 304 austenitic stainless steel to simulate neutron irradiation hardening. A residual compressive stress, which is nearly equivalent to the yield stress of the processed material, remains on the material surface after passage of the shock wave with enough amplitude to induce a permanent strain. Multiple irradiation of laser pulses extends the stress-improved depth to about 1 mm, which would be the limit corresponding to the three-dimensional dispersion effect of the shock wave. (author)

  15. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  16. Effect of γ-irradiation on commercial polypropylene based mono and multi-layered retortable food packaging materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Johnsy; Kumar, R.; Sajeevkumar, V. A.; Sabapathy, S. N.; Vaijapurkar, S. G.; Kumar, D.; Kchawahha, A.; Bawa, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    Irradiation processing of food in the prepackaged form may affect chemical and physical properties of the plastic packaging materials. The effect of γ-irradiation doses (2.5-10.0 kGy) on polypropylene (PP)-based retortable food packaging materials, were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the changes happening to these materials after irradiation. The mechanical properties decreased with irradiation while oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was not affected significantly. Colour measurement indicated that Nylon 6 containing multilayer films became yellowish after irradiation. Thermal characterization revealed the changes in percentage crystallinity.

  17. Effect of γ-irradiation on commercial polypropylene based mono and multi-layered retortable food packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Johnsy; Kumar, R.; Sajeevkumar, V.A.; Sabapathy, S.N.; Vaijapurkar, S.G.; Kumar, D.; Kchawahha, A.; Bawa, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation processing of food in the prepackaged form may affect chemical and physical properties of the plastic packaging materials. The effect of γ-irradiation doses (2.5-10.0 kGy) on polypropylene (PP)-based retortable food packaging materials, were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the changes happening to these materials after irradiation. The mechanical properties decreased with irradiation while oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was not affected significantly. Colour measurement indicated that Nylon 6 containing multilayer films became yellowish after irradiation. Thermal characterization revealed the changes in percentage crystallinity

  18. Effect of {gamma}-irradiation on commercial polypropylene based mono and multi-layered retortable food packaging materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Johnsy [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India)]. E-mail: g.johnsy@gmail.com; Kumar, R. [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India); Sajeevkumar, V.A. [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India); Sabapathy, S.N. [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India); Vaijapurkar, S.G. [Defence Laboratory, Ratanada Palace, Jodhpur, Rajastan 342011 (India); Kumar, D. [Defence Laboratory, Ratanada Palace, Jodhpur, Rajastan 342011 (India); Kchawahha, A. [Defence Laboratory, Ratanada Palace, Jodhpur, Rajastan 342011 (India); Bawa, A.S. [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India)

    2007-07-15

    Irradiation processing of food in the prepackaged form may affect chemical and physical properties of the plastic packaging materials. The effect of {gamma}-irradiation doses (2.5-10.0 kGy) on polypropylene (PP)-based retortable food packaging materials, were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the changes happening to these materials after irradiation. The mechanical properties decreased with irradiation while oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was not affected significantly. Colour measurement indicated that Nylon 6 containing multilayer films became yellowish after irradiation. Thermal characterization revealed the changes in percentage crystallinity.

  19. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials FY 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Xie, YuLong; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wang, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    This annual report presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Dr. Fei Gao. This project is divided into three tasks, namely (1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; (2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and (3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonlinearity, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the findings and insights obtained in each of these three tasks are provided in this report. Additionally, papers published this fiscal year or currently in review are included in Appendix together with presentations given this fiscal year.

  20. Thermal characteristics of non-edible oils as phase change materials candidate to application of air conditioning chilled water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad, M.; Indartono, Y. S.; Suwono, A.; Pasek, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    The addition of phase change material in the secondary refrigerant has been able to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioning systems in chilled water system. This material has a high thermal density because its energy is stored as latent heat. Based on material melting and freezing point, there are several non-edible oils that can be studied as a phase change material candidate for the application of chilled water systems. Forests and plantations in Indonesia have great potential to produce non-edible oil derived from the seeds of the plant, such as; Calophyllum inophyllum, Jatropha curcas L, and Hevea braziliensis. Based on the melting temperature, these oils can further studied to be used as material mixing in the secondary refrigerant. Thermal characteristics are obtained from the testing of T-history, Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) and thermal conductivity materials. Test results showed an increase in the value of the latent heat when mixed with water with the addition of surfactant. Thermal characteristics of each material of the test results are shown completely in discussion section of this article.

  1. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90 degrees C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Materials Used for Urea Hydrolysis Equipment in Coal-Fired Selective Catalytic Reduction Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jintao; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jinyang; Xu, Hongjie

    2018-05-01

    Corrosion tests were performed in the laboratory in order to assess the corrosion resistance of candidate materials used in urea hydrolysis equipment. The materials to be evaluated were exposed at 145 °C for 1000 h. Alloys 316L, 316L Mod., HR3C, Inconel 718, and TC4 were evaluated. Additionally, aluminide and chromate coatings applied to a 316L substrate were examined. After exposure, the mass changes in the test samples were measured by a discontinuous weighing method, and the morphologies, compositions, and phases of the corrosion products were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Results indicated that continuous pitting and dissolution corrosion were the main failure modes for 316L stainless steel. 316L Mod. and HR3C alloy showed better corrosion resistance than 316L due to their relatively high Cr contents, but HR3C exhibited a strong tendency toward intergranular corrosion. Inconel 718, TC4, and aluminide and chromate coating samples showed similar corrosion processes: only depositions formed by hydrothermal reactions were observed. Based on these results, a possible corrosion process in the urea hydrolysis environment was discussed for these candidate materials and questions to be clarified were proposed.

  3. Use of the SPIRAL 2 facility for material irradiations with 14 MeV energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosnier, A.; Ridikas, D.; Ledoux, X.; Pellemoine, F.; Anne, R.; Huguet, Y.; Lipa, M.; Magaud, P.; Marbach, G.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Villari, A.C.C.

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of an irradiation facility for fusion applications will be to generate a material irradiation database for the design, construction, licensing and safe operation of a fusion demonstration power station (e.g., DEMO). This will be achieved through testing and qualifying material performance under neutron irradiation that simulates service up to the full lifetime anticipated in the power plant. Preliminary investigations of 14 MeV neutron effects on different kinds of fusion material could be assessed by the SPIRAL 2 Project at GANIL (Caen, France), aiming at rare isotope beams production for nuclear physics research with first beams expected by 2009. In SPIRAL 2, a deuteron beam of 5 mA and 40 MeV interacts with a rotating carbon disk producing high-energy neutrons (in the range between 1 and 40 MeV) via C (d, xn) reactions. Then, the facility could be used for 3-4 months y -1 for material irradiation purposes. This would correspond to damage rates in the order of 1-2 dpa y -1 (in Fe) in a volume of ∼10 cm 3 . Therefore, the use of miniaturized specimens will be essential in order to effectively utilize the available irradiation volume in SPIRAL 2. Sample package irradiation temperature would be in the range of 250-1000 deg. C. The irradiation level of 1-2 dpa y -1 with 14 MeV neutrons (average energy) may be interesting for micro-structural and metallurgical investigations (e.g., mini-traction, small punch tests, etc.) and possibly for the understanding of specimen size/geometric effects of critical material properties. Due to the small test cell volume, sample in situ experiments are not foreseen. However, sample packages would be, if required, available each month after transfer in a special hot cell on-site

  4. Irradiation capability of Japanese materials test reactor for water chemistry experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Satoshi; Hata, Kuniki; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Nakamura, Takehiko

    2012-09-01

    Appropriate understanding of water chemistry in the core of LWRs is essential as chemical species generated due to water radiolysis by neutron and gamma-ray irradiation govern corrosive environment of structural materials in the core and its periphery, causing material degradation such as stress corrosion cracking. Theoretical model calculation such as water radiolysis calculation gives comprehensive understanding of water chemistry at irradiation field where we cannot directly monitor. For enhancement of the technology, accuracy verification of theoretical models under wide range of irradiation conditions, i.e. dose rate, temperature etc., with well quantified in-pile measurement data is essential. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has decided to launch water chemistry experiments for obtaining data that applicable to model verification as well as model benchmarking, by using an in-pile loop which will be installed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). In order to clarify the irradiation capability of the JMTR for water chemistry experiments, preliminary investigations by water radiolysis / ECP model calculations were performed. One of the important irradiation conditions for the experiments, i.e. dose rate by neutron and gamma-ray, can be controlled by selecting irradiation position in the core. In this preliminary study, several representative irradiation positions that cover from highest to low absorption dose rate were chosen and absorption dose rate at the irradiation positions were evaluated by MCNP calculations. As a result of the calculations, it became clear that the JMTR could provide the irradiation conditions close to the BWR. The calculated absorption dose rate at each irradiation position was provided to water radiolysis calculations. The radiolysis calculations were performed under various conditions by changing absorption dose rate, water chemistry of feeding water etc. parametrically. Qualitatively, the concentration of H 2 O 2 , O 2 and

  5. Neutron irradiation test of copper alloy/stainless steel joint materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As a study about the joint technology of copper alloy and stainless steel for utilization as cooling piping in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Al 2 O 3 -dispersed strengthened copper or CuCrZr was jointed to stainless steel by three kinds of joint methods (casting joint, brazing joint and friction welding method) for the evaluation of the neutron irradiation effect on joints. A neutron irradiation test was performed to three types of joints and each copper alloy. The average value of fast neutron fluence in this irradiation test was about 2 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV), and the irradiation temperature was about 130degC. As post-irradiation examinations, tensile tests, hardness tests and observation of fracture surface after the tensile tests were performed. All type joints changed to be brittle by the neutron irradiation effect like each copper alloy material, and no particular neutron irradiation effect due to the effect of joint process was observed. On the casting and friction welding, hardness of copper alloy near the joint boundary changed to be lower than that of each copper alloy by the effect of joint procedure. However, tensile strength of joints was almost the same as that of each copper alloy before/after neutron irradiation. On the other hand, tensile strength of joints by brazing changed to be much lower than CuAl-25 base material by the effect of joint process before/after neutron irradiation. Results in this study showed that the friction welding method and the casting would be able to apply to the joint method of piping in ITER. This report is based on the final report of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA). (author)

  6. Evaluation of candidate magnetohydrodynamic materials for the U-02 Phase III test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1978-06-01

    As part of a cooperative U.S.--U.S.S.R. program, electrode and insulator materials tested at the Westinghouse Electrode Systems Test Facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were evaluated. From this evaluation materials will be selected for use in the third phase of tests being conducted in the U-02 magnetohydrodynamics test facility in the Soviet Union. Electrode and insulator materials were examined with both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The cathodes were found to behave differently from the anodes; most notably, the cathodes showed greater potassium interaction. The lanthanum chromite-based electrodes (excluding those fabricated by plasma-spraying) are recommended for testing in the U-02 Phase III test. Hotpressed, fused-grained MgO and sintered MgAl 2 O 4 are recommended as insulator materials. The electrode attachment techniques used in the Westinghouse Tests were inadequate and need to be modified for the U-02 test

  7. PROGRAM ASTEC (ADVANCED SOLAR TURBO ELECTRIC CONCEPT). PART 1. CANDIDATE MATERIALS LABORATORY TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A space power system of the type envisioned by the ASTEC program requires the development of a lightweight solar collector of high reflectance...capable of withstanding the space environment for an extended period. A survey of the environment of interest for ASTEC purposes revealed 4 potential...developed by the solar-collector industry for use in the ASTEC program, and to test the effects of space environment on these materials. Of 6 material

  8. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  9. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Nuclear Waste Container Materials in Repository Environment Paper Number 02529

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, F.; Sarver, J.; Mohn, W.

    2001-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) have been proposed as the corrosion resistant materials for fabricating the waste package outer barrier and the drip shield, respectively for the proposed nuclear waste repository Yucca Mountain Project. In this work, the susceptibility of welded and annealed Alloy 22 (N06022) and Ti Grade 7 (UNS R52400) to crevice corrosion was studied by the Multiple Crevice Assembly (ASTM G78) method combined with surface morphological observation after four and eight weeks of exposure to the Basic Saturated Water (BSW-12) in a temperature range from 60 to 105 C. The susceptibility of the materials to crevice corrosion was evaluated based on the appearance of crevice attack underneath the crevice formers and the weight loss data. The results showed that, after exposed to BSW-12 for four and eight weeks, no obvious crevice attack was observed on these materials. The descaled weight loss increased with the increase in temperature for all materials. The weight loss, however, is believed to be caused by general corrosion, rather than crevice corrosion. There was no significant difference between the annealed and welded materials either. On the other hand, to conclude that these materials are immune to crevice corrosion in BSW-12 will require longer term testing

  10. The irradiation induced creep in fuel compact materials for H.T.R. applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veringa, H.; Blackstone, R.; Loelgen, R.

    1976-01-01

    Restrained shrinkage experiments up to 3 x 10 21 ncm -2 (DNE) in the temperature range of 600-1,200 0 C on three different dummy coated particle fuel compact materials were performed in the High Flux Reactor at Petten, the Netherlands. The data were evaluated to obtain the steady state irradiation creep coefficient of the compacts. It was found that for the materials investigated, the creep coefficient is temperature-dependent, but no clear relationship to the Young's modulus could be established. Under certain conditions, this irradiation-induced plasticity influences the elastic properties, while also the creep coefficient increases. This effect coincides with the formation and further opening of cracks due to stresses caused by irradiation shrinkage of the matrix material. (orig.) [de

  11. Irradiation as an alternative environment friendly method for microbiological decontamination of herbal raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, P.; Kedzia, B.; Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of herbal raw materials is a serious problem in the production of therapeutical preparations. A good quality of the product, according to the pharmaceutical requirements may be achieved by applying suitable methods of decontamination. The decontamination treatments should be fast and effective against all microorganisms. It should ensure the decontamination of both packaging and the product in order to act effectively against all the microorganisms present and must not reduce the sensory and technological qualities of the commodities. In the paper, the results of comparative investigations on the microbiological decontamination of herbal raw materials by chemical (ethylene oxide, methyl bromide) and physical method (irradiation) are presented. Decontamination of herbal raw materials by irradiation is a method by choice. It is because chemical methods have been recognized recently as not safe to the consumer. Irradiation, in turn, is technically feasible, very effective and friendly enough to environment process

  12. Remote-handling demonstration tests for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.; Hussey, M.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is to create a fusion-like environment for fusion materials development. Crucial to the success of FMIT is the development and testing of remote handling systems required to handle materials specimens and maintenance of the facility. The use of full scale mock-ups for demonstration tests provides the means for proving these systems

  13. SORPTION AND DISPERSION OF STRONTIUM RADIONUCLIDE IN THE BENTONITE-QUARTZ-CLAY AS BACKFILL MATERIAL CANDIDATE ON RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Poernomo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment of sorption and dispersion characteristics of strontium in the mixture of bentonite-quartz, clay-quartz, bentonite-clay-quartz as candidate of raw material for backfill material in the radioactive waste repository has been performed. The objective of this research is to know the grain size effect of bentonite, clay, and quartz on the weight percent ratio of bentonite to quartz, clay to quartz, bentonite to clay to-quartz can be gives physical characteristics of best such as bulk density (rb, effective porosity (e, permeability (K, best sorption characteristic such as distribution coefficient (Kd, and best dispersion characteristics such as dispersivity (a and effective dispersion coefficient (De of strontium in the backfill material candidate. The experiment was carried out in the column filled by the mixture of bentonite-quartz, clay-quartz, bentonite-clay-quartz with the weight percent ratio of bentonite to quartz, clay to quartz, bentonite to clay to quartz of 100/0, 80/20, 60/40, 40/60, 20/80, 0/100 respectively at saturated condition of water, then flowed 0.1 N Sr(NO32 as buffer solution with tracer of 0.05 Ci/cm3 90Sr as strontium radionuclide simulation was leached from immobilized radioactive waste in the radioactive waste repository. The concentration of 90Sr in the effluents represented as Ct were analyzed by Ortec b counter every 30 min, then by using profile concentration of Co and Ct, values of Kd, a and De of 90Sr in the backfill material was determined. The experiment data showed that the best results were -80+120 mesh grain size of bentonite, clay, quartz respectively on the weight percent ratio of bentonite to clay to quartz of 70/10/20 with physical characteristics of rb = 0.658 g/cm3, e = 0.666 cm3/cm3, and K = 1.680x10-2 cm/sec, sorption characteristic of Kd = 46.108 cm3/g, dispersion characteristics of a = 5.443 cm, and De = 1.808x10-03 cm2/sec can be proposed as candidate of raw material of backfill material

  14. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity. Present status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tatsuo; Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    For developing the materials for nuclear fusion reactors, it is indispensable to study on the neutron irradiation behavior under fusion reactor conditions, but there is not any high energy neutron irradiation facility that can simulate fusion reactor conditions at present. Therefore, the investigation of the IFMIF was begun jointly by Japan, USA, Europe and Russia following the initiative of IEA. The conceptual design activities were completed in 1997. As to the background and the course, the present status of the research on heavy irradiation and the testing means for fusion materials, the requirement and the technical basis of high energy neutron irradiation, and the international joint design activities are reported. The materials for fusion reactors are exposed to the neutron irradiation with the energy spectra up to 14 MeV. The requirements from the users that the IFMIF should satisfy, the demand of the tests for the materials of prototype and demonstration fusion reactors and the evaluation of the neutron field characteristics of the IFMIF are discussed. As to the conceptual design of the IFMIF, the whole constitution, the operational mode, accelerator system and target system are described. (K.I.)

  15. The Influence of Irradiation Regimes on Retention Hydrogen Isotopes in Structural Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzhnyi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the present work was investigated the influence of irradiation regimes on retention hydrogen isotopes in samples of austenitic steel during heating. The samples of studied materials were irradiated both in the reactor and by hydrogen isotopes ions of different energies and fluencies bombardment in an accelerator. Kinetic of hydrogen release from the samples worked with deuterium plasma was investigated. The following results were obtained. Heating the irradiate d samples of steel (irradiated in the reactor or by hydrogen isotopes ions bombardment), which have been kept in normal temperature during quite a long period after the irradiation, a shift of the diffusion peak of hydrogen release to higher temperatures, comparing to no irradiated samples, was observed. It means that atoms of hydrogen in the irradiated sample were caught by radiation defects, which are very effective as traps for hydrogen atoms till quite high temperatures (700 K). The worked out analysis of the received results supposes that vacancy complexes. On thermodesorption curves of hydrogen release from irradiated samples of austenitic steels a high temperature peak (900-1000 K) was observed because of dissociation of hydrogen containing compounds in micro pores. During investigations of hydrogen release from irradiated samples of austenitic steel, after it had been saturated with hydrogen plasma, abnormally big blisters were registered with cover thickness of about 1 mkm. Three peaks were observed on the thermodesorption curves of hydrogen release from irradiated samples, contained blisters. The low temperature spike (∼500 K) was showed to correspond to hydrogen release because of its resolution from blisters, where it was in molecular form. The high temperature peak (∼900 K) corresponds to hydrogen release from dissociating blisters, which contain hydrocarbons. The mechanism of abnormal blisters generation is offered. Inasmuch methane is not soluble in

  16. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P.; Robbins, J.M.; Strizak, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  17. Femtosecond Laser Irradiation of Plasmonic Nanoparticles in Polymer Matrix: Implications for Photothermal and Photochemical Material Alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton A. Smirnov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the opportunities provided by the plasmonic nanoparticles inserted into the bulk of a transparent medium to modify the material by laser light irradiation. This study is provoked by the advent of photo-induced nano-composites consisting of a typical polymer matrix and metal nanoparticles located in the light-irradiated domains of the initially homogeneous material. The subsequent irradiation of these domains by femtosecond laser pulses promotes a further alteration of the material properties. We separately consider two different mechanisms of material alteration. First, we analyze a photochemical reaction initiated by the two-photon absorption of light near the plasmonic nanoparticle within the matrix. We show that the spatial distribution of the products of such a reaction changes the symmetry of the material, resulting in the appearance of anisotropy in the initially isotropic material or even in the loss of the center of symmetry. Second, we analyze the efficiency of a thermally-activated chemical reaction at the surface of a plasmonic particle and the distribution of the product of such a reaction just near the metal nanoparticle irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  18. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  19. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules

  20. Capsule development and utilization for material irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Hwan; Kim, B G; Joo, K N [and others

    2000-05-01

    The development program of advanced nuclear structural and fuel materials includes the in-pile tests using the instrumented capsule at HANARO. The tests were performed in the in-core test holes of CT, IR 1 and 2 and OR 4 and 5 of HANARO. Extensive efforts have also been made to establish design and manufacturing technology for the instrumented capsule and its related system, which should be compatible with the HANARO's characteristics. Since the first instrumented capsule(97M-01K) had been designed and successfully fabricated, five tests were done to support the users and provided the economic benefits to user by generating the essential in-pile information on the performance and structural integrity of materials. This paper describes the present status and future plans of these R and D activities for the development of the instrumented capsule including in-situ material property measurement capsules and nuclear fuel test capsules.

  1. Instrumentation Technologies for Improving an Irradiation Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Park, Sung Jae; Choo, Ki Nam

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 years of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation testing has led to many countries developing significant improvements in instrumentation to monitor physical parameters and to control the test conditions in Materials Test Reactors (MTRs) or research reactors. Recent effort to deploy new fuels and materials in existing and advanced reactors has increased the demand for well-instrumented irradiation tests. Specifically, demand has increased for tests with sensors capable of providing real-time measurement of key parameters, such as temperature, geometry changes, thermal conductivity, fission gas release, cracking, coating buildup, thermal and fast flux, etc. This review paper documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world and summarizes on-going research efforts to deploy new sensors. There is increased interest to irradiate new materials and reactor fuels for advanced PWRs and the Gen-IV reactor systems, such as SFRs (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors), VHTRs (Very-High-Temperature Reactors), SCWRs (Supercritical-Water-cooled Reactors) and GFRs (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor). This review documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world, identifies challenges faced by previous testing methods and how these challenges were overcome. A wide range of sensors are available to measure key parameters of interest during fuels and materials irradiations in MTRs. Such sensors must be reliable, small size, highly accurate, and able to withstand harsh conditions. On-going development efforts are focusing on providing MTR users a wider range of parameter measurements with increased accuracy. In addition, development efforts are focusing on reducing the impact of sensor on measurements by reducing sensor size. This report includes not only status of instrumentation using research reactors in the world to irradiate nuclear fuels and materials but also future directions relating to instrumentation technologies for

  2. Irradiation effects on material properties of steels used in nuclear reactors: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerceker, N.; Dara, I. H.

    2001-01-01

    The structural materials of a nuclear power plant are of vital importance as they provide mechanical strength, structural support and physical containment for the primary reactor components as well as the nuclear power plant itself. These structural materials comprise mainly of metals and their alloys, ceramics and cermets. However, metals and their alloys are the most widely used materials and the irradiation effects are more pronounced on metallic materials as of their high temperature properties are more sensitive (with respect to ceramics and cermets) to any kind of external effects. The wholesale creation of effects on material properties has been studied for over four decades and it is not realistic to attempt to represent even a small part of the field in single poster paper. In the present contribution, a literature review of the irradiation effects on the material properties of different types of steel alloys will be given because steels are widely used as structural materials in reactors and therefore the irradiation effects on steels may be of paramount importance for reactor design, operation and safety concepts which will be discussed about radiation effects on material properties of steels will provide highlights to better understanding of the origins and development of radiation effects in materials

  3. Irradiation effects of hydrogen and helium plasma on different grade tungsten materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fine-grain tungsten alloys could be one of the solutions for the plasma facing materials of future DEMO reactors. In order to evaluate the service performances of the newly developed W alloys under edge plasma irradiation and the synergetic effect of fusion plasma together with high heat flux, both low energy He ions and high energy H, H/He mixed neutral beam irradiation on W-ZrC, W-K, W-Y2O3, W-La2O3 and CVD-W coating were performed respectively at a liner plasma facility (Dalian Nationality University, China and the neutral beam facility GLADIS (IPP, Germany. Surface damages were characterized, and the crack formation and extension behaviors under ELM-like transient loading after H and H/He mixed beam irradiation were also investigated in the 60kW EMS-60 facility (Electron beam Materials testing Scenario at SWIP (Southwestern Institute of Physics, China. The experimental results indicated that surface damages induced by low or high energy H/He ion/neutral beam didn't closely correlate with the type of tungsten materials. However, H/He (6at% He concentration neutral beam induced more significant surface damages of the tested W materials than only H neutral beam irradiation under the similar irradiation conditions. Similarly, the mixed H/He pre-exposure remarkably reduced the critical power of crack initiation compared with the un-irradiated samples under 100 repetitive loads of 1ms pulse, while no significant degeneration for the case of only H beam irradiation was observed.

  4. Candidate coffee reference material for element content: production and certification schemes adopted at CENA/USP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliaferro, Fabio Sileno; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Radioisotopos], e-mail: fabiotag@cena.usp.br, e-mail: lis@cena.usp.br, e-mail: mabacchi@cena.usp.br, e-mail: ejfranca@cena.usp.br; Bode, Peter; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.], e-mail: P.Bode@iri.tudelft.nl

    2003-07-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a fundamental role in analytical chemistry establishing the traceability of measurement results and assuring accuracy and reliability. In spite of the huge importance of measurements in the food sector, Brazil does not produce CRMs to supply the demand. Consequently the acquisition of CRMs depends on imports at high costs. The coffee sector needs CRMs, however there is no material that represents the coffee composition. Since 1998, the Laboratorio de Radioisotopos (LRi) of CENA/USP has been involved in analysis of coffee. During this period, knowledge has been accumulated about several aspects of coffee, such as system of cultivation, elemental composition, homogeneity of the material, possible contaminants and physical properties of beans. Concomitantly, LRi has concentrated efforts in the field of metrology in chemistry, and now all this expertise is being used as the basis for the production of a coffee certified reference material (CRM) for inorganic element content. The scheme developed for the preparation and certification of coffee RM relies on the ISO Guides 34 and 35. The approaches for selection, collection and preparation of the material, moisture determination method, homogeneity testing, certification and long-term stability testing are discussed and a time frame for the expected accomplishments is provided. (author)

  5. Spectral emissivity measurements of candidate materials for very high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G.; Weber, S.J.; Martin, S.O.; Anderson, M.H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K., E-mail: kumars@cae.wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, T.R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Heat dissipation by radiation is an important consideration in VHTR components, particularly the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), because of the fourth power temperature dependence of radiated heat. Since emissivity is the material property that dictates the ability to radiate heat, measurements of emissivities of materials that are being specifically considered for the construction of VHTR become important. Emissivity is a surface phenomenon and therefore compositional, structural, and topographical changes that occur at the surfaces of these materials as a result of their interactions with the environment at high temperatures will alter their emissivities. With this background, an experimental system for the measurement of spectral emissivity has been designed and constructed. The system has been calibrated in conformance with U.S. DoE quality assurance standards using inert ceramic materials, boron nitride, silicon carbide, and aluminum oxide. The results of high temperature emissivity measurements of potential VHTR materials such as ferritic steels SA 508, T22, T91 and austenitic alloys IN 800H, Haynes 230, IN 617, and 316 stainless steel have been presented.

  6. Candidate coffee reference material for element content: production and certification schemes adopted at CENA/USP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliaferro, Fabio Sileno; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de; Bode, Peter; Bacchi, Marcio Arruda; Franca, Elvis Joacir de

    2003-01-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a fundamental role in analytical chemistry establishing the traceability of measurement results and assuring accuracy and reliability. In spite of the huge importance of measurements in the food sector, Brazil does not produce CRMs to supply the demand. Consequently the acquisition of CRMs depends on imports at high costs. The coffee sector needs CRMs, however there is no material that represents the coffee composition. Since 1998, the Laboratorio de Radioisotopos (LRi) of CENA/USP has been involved in analysis of coffee. During this period, knowledge has been accumulated about several aspects of coffee, such as system of cultivation, elemental composition, homogeneity of the material, possible contaminants and physical properties of beans. Concomitantly, LRi has concentrated efforts in the field of metrology in chemistry, and now all this expertise is being used as the basis for the production of a coffee certified reference material (CRM) for inorganic element content. The scheme developed for the preparation and certification of coffee RM relies on the ISO Guides 34 and 35. The approaches for selection, collection and preparation of the material, moisture determination method, homogeneity testing, certification and long-term stability testing are discussed and a time frame for the expected accomplishments is provided. (author)

  7. Microwave irradiation of lignocellulosic materials, 4: Enhancement of enzymatic susceptibility of microwave-irradiated softwoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, J.; Higashino, J.; Isaka, M.; Koshijima, T.

    1985-01-01

    Effect of microwave irradiation on the enzymatic susceptibility of various softwoods was investigated. The pH values of the reaction liquor dropped with increasing temperature to 2.9-3.3 at 230°C, consistent with increase in acidity (0.5-0.85 meq at 230-239° C). Above approximately 180°C, hemicellulose underwent acid-mediated autohydrolysis and became water-soluble yielding a mixture of oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. The composition of water-soluble portion was similar for all wood species tested. The maximum extents of saccharification below 240°C ranged between 36-62% for softwoods, while those for hardwoods were between 88-93%. The present investigation confirmed that microwave pretreatment enhanced the enzymatic susceptibility of various softwoods. However, further attempt should be needed to give higher values equal to those for hardwoods. (author)

  8. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials: FY 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.

    2014-10-01

    This annual reports presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project is divided into three tasks: 1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; 2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and 3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonproportionality, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the three tasks is provided in this Annual Report. Furthermore, peer-reviewed articles published this FY or currently under review and presentations given this FY are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  9. Semiconductor-diode-aided dosimetry of the irradiation of pourable bulk material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenewald, T.; Rudolf, M.

    1987-01-01

    The irradiation of unpackaged pourable bulk material requires the employment of a dosimeter which can be readily transported along with the material. Planar diffused silicon diodes have been found to be suitable for this purpose. To date these have been used solely for the purpose of dose rate measurements; however, it can be shown that the permanent change in reverse recover time at the p-n junction correlates with the absorbed irradiation dose in the range up to 10 kGy. Appropriate selection of the diode and thermal treatment lead to a linear dependence and enable the silicon dosimeter to be reused. (author). 16 refs, 4 figs

  10. Binary-collision-approximation simulation for noble gas irradiation onto plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M

    2014-01-01

    A number of experiments show that helium plasma constructs filament (fuzz) structures whose diameter is in nanometer-scale on the tungsten material under the suitable experimental condition. In this paper, binary-collision-approximation-based simulation is performed to reveal the mechanism and the conditions of fuzz formation of tungsten material under plasma irradiation. The irradiation of the plasma of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium, and also the plasma of noble gas such as helium, neon, and argon atoms are investigated. The possibility of fuzz formation is discussed on the simulation result of penetration depth of the incident atoms

  11. Cobalt and cerium coated Ni powder as a new candidate cathode material for MCFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Hyuk; Hong, Ming Zi; Kim, Young-Suk; Park, Eunjoo; Lee, Hyunsuk; Ha, Hyung-Wook; Kim, Keon

    2006-01-01

    The dissolution of nickel oxide cathode in the electrolyte is one of the major technical obstacles to the commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). To improve the MCFC cathode stability, the alternative cathode material for MCFC was prepared, which was made of Co/Ce-coated on the surface of Ni powder using a polymeric precursor based on the Pechini method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were employed in characterization of the alternative cathode materials. The Co/Ce-coated Ni cathode prepared by the tape-casting technique. The solubility of the Co/Ce-coated Ni cathode was about 80% lower when compare to that of pure Ni cathode under CO 2 :O 2 (66.7:33.3%) atmosphere at 650 deg. C. Consequently, the fine Co/Ce-coated Ni powder could be confirmed as a new alternative cathode material for MCFC

  12. Quality assessment of organic coffee beans for the preparation of a candidate reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliaferro, F.S.; Nadai Fernandes de, E.A.; Bacchi, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    A random sampling was carried out in the coffee beans collected for the preparation of the organic green coffee reference material in view of assessing the homogeneity and the presence of soil as impurity. Fifteen samples were taken for the between-sample homogeneity evaluation. One of the samples was selected and 10 test portions withdrawn for the within-sample homogeneity evaluation. Br, Ca, Co, Cs, Fe, K, Na, Rb, Sc and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The F-test demonstrated that the material is homogeneous for Ca, Co, Cs, K and Sc, but not homogeneous for Br, Fe, Na, Rb and Zn. Results of terrigenous elements suggested negligible soil contamination in the raw material. (author)

  13. Testing the homogeneity of candidate reference materials by solid sampling - AAS and INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossbach, M.; Grobecker, K.-H.

    2002-01-01

    The necessity to quantify a natural material's homogeneity with respect to its elemental distribution prior to chemical analysis of a given aliquot is emphasised. Available instruments and methods to obtain the relevant information are described. Additionally the calculation of element specific, relative homogeneity factors, H E , and of a minimum sample mass M 5% to achieve 5% precision on a 95% confidence level is given. Especially, in the production and certification of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) this characteristic information should be determined in order to provide the user with additional inherent properties of the CRM to enable more economical use of the expensive material and to evaluate further systematic bias of the applied analytical technique. (author)

  14. Study of characteristics of gamma-irradiated materials for calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Vasil'chenko, V.G.; Peresypkin, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation resistance of some structural materials proposed for use in electromagnetic calorimeters is studied. Particular attention is given to the spectral, dose, and other postradiation characteristics of pure heavy fluorides and their solid solutions: The promise of the use of CdF 2 and CdI 2 crystals in calorimeters is noted. 19 refs., 5 figs

  15. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  16. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  17. Surface modification of ceramic materials induced by irradiation of high power pulsed ICP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Takamasa; Okada, Nobuhiro; Ohashi, Naoki; Haneda, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    Newly developed pulse-modulated high-power inductively coupled plasma [ICP] is expected to offer the unique physico-chemical condition, such as the increased concentration of chemically reactive species, as well as the appropriate heat flux for materials processing. Two kinds of oxide materials, titanium and zinc oxide, were placed at the downstream of Ar-H 2 ICP and irradiated in the plasma of continuous [CN] and pulse-modulated [PM] modes. The CN-ICP irradiation at the position close to the plasma tail gave rise to the thermal reduction of oxides. In the PM-ICP irradiation, the degree of thermal reduction depended on the lower power level during pulse-off time, as well as the total electric power. Irradiation in PM-ICP led to the increased formation of oxygen vacancies in titanium dioxide. In the case of zinc oxide, the UV emission efficiency was improved by PM-ICP irradiation, while the green emission became predominant by CN-ICP irradiation at the appropriate position. Induced effects in the two oxides by PM-ICP would be related to the high concentration of hydrogen radicals in the plasma. (author)

  18. Fracture toughness and strength change of neutron-irradiated ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienst, W.; Zimmermann, H.

    1994-01-01

    In order to analyse the results of bending strength measurements on neutron-irradiated samples of Al 2 O 3 , AlN and SiC, fracture toughness measurements were additionally conducted. The neutron fluences concerned were mostly in the range of 0.6 to 3.2x10 26 n/m 2 at irradiation temperatures of 400 to 550 C. A fracture toughness decrease was generally observed for polycrystalline materials which, however, was considerably smaller than the reduction of the fracture strength. Exceptional increase of the fracture toughness seems typical for the effect of rather coarse irradiation defects. The irradiation-induced change of the fracture toughness of single crystal Al 2 O 3 appeared dependent on the crystallographic orientation; both reduced and increased fracture toughness after irradiation was observed. Recent results of neutron irradiation to about 2x10 25 n/m 2 at 100 C showed, that the strength decrease of various Al 2 O 3 grades sets in at (3-5)x10 24 n/m 2 and seems to be little dependent on the irradiation temperature. ((orig.))

  19. Evolution and characterization of eggshell as a potential candidate of raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zaman

    Full Text Available Abstract Characterization of both uncalcined and calcined eggshells was done in this work. Raw eggshells turned out as a good source of calcite phase. Calcined eggshells had a mixture of lime and portlandite phase. A significant impact of calcination temperature on the percentage of generated phases was observed. Qualitative as well as semi-quantitative phase analysis, morphological characterization and physical property estimation was done for the produced powder. The influence of synthesized raw material on soil stabilization and biomaterial formation was further assessed. The eggshell turned out as a potential source of raw material for various sectors.

  20. Design, fabrication, and operation of capsules for the irradiation testing of candidate advanced space reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, K.R.

    1975-04-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments were designed, built, and operated to test uranium mononitride (UN) fuel clad in tungsten-lined T-111 (Ta-8 percent W-2 percent Hf) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel clad in both tungsten-lined T-111 and tungsten-lined Nb-1 percent Zr. A total of nine fuel pins was irradiated (four containing porous UN, two containing dense, nonporous UN, and three containing dense UO 2 ) at average cladding temperatures ranging from 931 to 1015 0 C. The UN experiments, capsules UN-4 and -5, operated for 10,480 and 10,037 hr, respectively, at an average linear heat generation rate of 10 kW/ft. The UO 2 experiment, capsule UN-6, operated for 8333 hr at an average linear heat generation rate of approximately 5 kW/ft. Following irradiation, the nine fuel pins were removed from their capsules, externally examined, and sent to the NASA Plum Brook Facility for more detailed postirradiation examination. During visual examination, it was discovered that the cladding of the fuel pin containing dense UN in each of capsules UN-4 and -5 had failed, exposing the UN fuel to the NaK in which the pins were submerged and permitting the release of fission gas from the failed pins. A rough analysis of the fission gas seen in samples of the gas in the fuel pin region indicated fission gas release-to-birth rates from these fuel pins in the range of 10 -5 . (U.S.)

  1. Electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of amorphous solid phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Wu, Liangcai; Wen, Lin; Ma, Liya; Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Song, Zhitang

    2018-04-01

    The electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of phase change materials in a nano sized area was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Amorphous phase change materials changed to a polycrystalline state after being irradiated with a 200 kV electron beam for a long time. The results indicate that the crystallization temperature strongly depends on the difference in the heteronuclear bond enthalpy of the phase change materials. The selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that Ge2Sb2Te5 is a nucleation-dominated material, when Si2Sb2Te3 and Ti0.5Sb2Te3 are growth-dominated materials.

  2. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on organic insulating materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, W.

    1985-10-01

    Available low-temperature neutron and gamma irradiation data for organic insulating materials are collected and compared with room temperature data. Only the most promising polymers in terms of mechanical strength for magnet insulation are taken into account. For characterization and comparison of different materials the 75% dose is used, i.e. the dose, where the mechanical strength is reduced by 25%, and 75% is retained. For room temperature special prepared polyimide and epoxy materials reinforced with glass fibre retained 75% of the mechanical strength up to a dose of 7x10 7 Gy. For 5 K irradiation the best epoxy material retained the 75% dose up to 1x10 7 Gy, the best polyimide material up to 1x10 8 Gy. (orig.) [de

  3. Distribution of products in polymer materials induced by ion-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Masaki; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hama, Yoshimasa; Hamanaka, Ken-ichi; Matsumoto, Hideya

    1997-03-01

    The depth profile of double bond formed in low density polyethylene (LDPE) sheet by ion beams irradiation was observed by a micro FT-IR spectrometer in order to investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependency on radiation effects to polymer materials. The distribution of double bond formation in LDPE by irradiation of light ions as H+ was found to be same with the dose distribution calculated from TRIM code, and the yield was also same with that by gamma-rays irradiation, which means that the LET dependency is very small. However, the distribution of double bond to depth was much different from the calculated depth-dose in heavy ions irradiation as Ar and Kr. Then, the dose evaluation was difficult from the TRIM code calculation for heavy ions. (author)

  4. Effects of antioxidant and package materials on the quality of irradiated rugao ham

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hong; Chen Xiulan; Bao Jianzhong; Han Yan; Jiang Yunsheng; Wang Zhijun; Dong Jie; Yang Hairong; Xi Jun

    2008-01-01

    Irradiation could extend the shelf life of ham, but irradiation also facilitates the oxidation of fat. Different packaging materials and combination of antioxidants were used to deal with Rugao ham in order to lower the level of antioxidation caused by irradiation treatment. The peroxide value of fat was detected as the reference index. The results were indicated that the fat peroxide value of all samples increased within the storage of 100d, and then decreased. Aluminum film compound packaging showed a better effect than polyethylene plastic bag. The antioxideant combination of 0.5% tea-polyphenol, 0.5% Vc, 0.5% citric acid, 5% sodium alginate, applied on 4 kGy irradiated samples was measured the lowest peroxide value of fat among all the treatments. (authors)

  5. Irradiation data analysis and thermal analysis of the 02M-02K capsule for material irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Myoung Hwan; Choo, K. N.; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G.; Cho, M. S.; Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Kim, Y. J.

    2004-11-01

    In order to evaluate the fracture toughness of RPV materials, the material irradiation test using the instrumented capsule (02M-02K) were carried out in the HANARO in August 2003. Based on the user's requirements the thermal design analysis of the capsule 02M-02K was performed, and the specimens were suitably arranged in each step of the capsule main body. In this report, both the temperature data of specimens measured during irradiation test and the calculated data from the thermal analysis are compared and evaluated. Also, the temperature profile in each step with the HANARO reactor power and helium pressure is reviewed and evaluated. The effects of the gap size such as theoretically calculated from thermal expansion during irradiation test and measured one in the manufacturing of the capsule on the specimen temperature were reviewed. The thermal analysis was performed by using a Finite Element (FE) analysis program, ANSYS. Two-dimensional model for the 1/4 section of the capsule is generated, and the γ-heating rate of the materials used in the capsule at the control rod position of 430 mm is used as input data. The thermal analysis using a 3-dimensional model, which is quite similar to the actual shape of the capsule, is also conducted to obtain the temperature distribution in the axial direction. The analysis results show that the temperature difference between the top and bottom positions of a specimen is found to be smaller than 13.2 .deg. C. The maximum measured and calculated temperature in the step 3 of the capsule is 256 .deg. C and 264 .deg. C, respectively. The measured temperature data are obtained at the reactor power of 24 MW, the heater power of 0 W and the helium pressure of 760 torr. Generally, the temperature data obtained by the FE analysis are slightly lower than those of the measured except the step 1 of the capsule. However, the temperature difference between the measured and the calculated shows a good agreement within 9 percent. It is

  6. Determination of cadmium, lead and zinc in a candidate reference materials using isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Luis; Gras, Nuri; Quejido, Alberto; Fernandez, Marta

    2001-01-01

    The growing demands placed on analytical laboratories to ensure the reliability of their results, due to the introduction of systems of quality and to the increasing use of metrology in chemical measurements has led most laboratories to validate their methodologies and to control them statistically. One of the techniques used most often for these purposes is based on the use of reference materials. The proper use of these materials means that laboratory results may be traced to the International System of Units, analytical methodologies can be validated, instruments calibrated and chemical measurements harmonized. One of the biggest challenges in developing reference materials is that of certifying their properties, a process that has been defined as assigning a concentration value that is as close as possible to the true value together with its uncertainty. Organizations that produce reference materials use several options for their certification process, and among these is the use of a primary method. Among the primary methods recognized by the International Office of Weights and Measures is the Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry technique. The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, through its Reference Materials Program, has prepared a reference material of clam tissue, which has been chemically defined by different analytical methodologies applied in different national and international laboratories. This work describes the methodology developed with the CIEMAT for determining the elements lead, cadmium and zinc in the clam tissue reference material using the primary technique of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry. The calculation is described for obtaining the spike amounts to be added to the sample and the procedure is explained for carrying out the isotopic exchange. The isotopic relationships 204 Pb/ 205 Pb, 111 Cd/ 114 Cd and 66 Zn/ 67 Zn were determined in an atomic emission spectrometer with a plasma source with the following characteristics: plasma

  7. Characterization of a new candidate isotopic reference material for natural Pb using primary measurement method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonose, Naoko; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Shin, Ki-Cheol; Miura, Tsutomu; Hioki, Akiharu

    2017-06-29

    A lead isotopic standard solution with natural abundance has been developed by applying a mixture of a solution of enriched 208 Pb and a solution of enriched 204 Pb ( 208 Pb- 204 Pb double spike solution) as bracketing method. The amount-of-substance ratio of 208 Pb: 204 Pb in this solution is accurately measured by applying EDTA titrimetry, which is one of the primary measurement methods, to each enriched Pb isotope solution. Also metal impurities affecting EDTA titration and minor lead isotopes contained in each enriched Pb isotope solution are quantified by ICP-SF-MS. The amount-of-substance ratio of 208 Pb: 204 Pb in the 208 Pb- 204 Pb double spike solution is 0.961959 ± 0.000056 (combined standard uncertainty; k = 1). Both the measurement of lead isotope ratios in a candidate isotopic standard solution and the correction of mass discrimination in MC-ICP-MS are carried out by coupling of a bracketing method with the 208 Pb- 204 Pb double spike solution and a thallium internal addition method, where thallium solution is added to the standard and the sample. The measured lead isotope ratios and their expanded uncertainties (k = 2) in the candidate isotopic standard solution are 18.0900 ± 0.0046 for 206 Pb: 204 Pb, 15.6278 ± 0.0036 for 207 Pb: 204 Pb, 38.0626 ± 0.0089 for 208 Pb: 204 Pb, 2.104406 ± 0.00013 for 208 Pb: 206 Pb, and 0.863888 ± 0.000036 for 207 Pb: 206 Pb. The expanded uncertainties are about one half of the stated uncertainty for NIST SRM 981, for 208 Pb: 204 Pb, 207 Pb: 204 Pb and 206 Pb: 204 Pb, or one eighth, for 208 Pb: 206 Pb and 207 Pb: 206 Pb, The combined uncertainty consists of the uncertainties due to lead isotope ratio measurements and the remaining time-drift effect of mass discrimination in MC-ICP-MS, which is not removed by the coupled correction method. In the measurement of 208 Pb: 204 Pb, 207 Pb: 204 Pb and 206 Pb: 204 Pb, the latter contribution is two or three times larger than the former. When the coupling of

  8. The effect of γ-irradiation on acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber NBR seal materials with different antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Farida S.; Shafy, Mahmoud; Abd El-megeed, A.A.; Hegazi, Elham M.

    2012-01-01

    Seals made of acrylonitrile–butadiene rubber (NBR) are one of the classified seals used in nuclear facilities. But at high irradiation doses the physical and mechanical properties of NBR are adversely affected due to the degradation induced by radiation and hence affect the sealing performance reducing their service life. In order to improve the NBR sealing performance, antioxidants can be added to the NBR compounds. N-N-substituted p-phenylene diamines (PPDs) antioxidants are selected to improve the resistance of NBR seals against gamma irradiation up to 5 MGy. The effect of addition of different PPDs on the mechanical and physical properties of the NBR seals is investigated. Three types of antioxidants which are N-isopropyl-N′-phenyl-p-phenylene diamine (IPPD), phenyl B-naphthylamine (PBN), and N-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N-phenyl-p-phenylene diamine (6PPD) are chosen. The physical and mechanical properties of these NBR compounds were evaluated by measuring crosslinking density, the tensile strength, and the percentage of elongation as well as hardness and abrasion resistance. The results of the present study show that the addition of 6PPD as a candidate antioxidant to NBR seal material gives the best physical and mechanical performance compared to the other studied antioxidants.

  9. Nb-base FS-85 Alloy as a Candidate Structural Material for Space Reactor Applications: Effects of Thermal Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Hoelzer, David T.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    The proposed use of fission reactors for manned or deep space missions have typically relied on the potential use of refractory metal alloys as structural materials. Throughout the history of these programs, the lead candidate has been Nb-1Zr due to its good fabrication and welding characteristics. However, the less than optimal creep resistance of this alloy has encouraged interest in the more complex FS-85 (Nb-28Ta-10W-1Zr) alloy. Despite this interest, a relatively small database exists for the properties of FS-85. These gaps include potential microstructural instabilities that can lead to mechanical property degradation. In this work, changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of FS-85 were investigated following 1100 h of thermal aging at 1098, 1248 and 1398 K. The changes in electrical resistivity, hardness and tensile properties between the as-annealed and aged materials are compared. Evaluation of the microstructural changes was performed through optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The development of intragranular and grain boundary precipitation of Zr-rich compounds as a function of aging temperature was followed. Brittle tensile behavior was measured in the 1248 K aged material, while ductile behavior occurred in material aged above and below this temperature. The effect of temperature on the under and overaging of the grain boundary particles are believed to have contributed to the mechanical property behavior of the aged material

  10. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 1, Introduction, history, and current candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Roy, A.K.; Jones, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is to evaluate Yucca Mountain for its suitability as a potential site for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been occupied for a number of years with developing and evaluating the performance of waste packages for the potential repository. In recent years this work has been carried out under the guidance of and in collaboration with the Management and Operating contractor for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc., which in turn reports to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes the history of the selection and characterization of materials to be used in the engineered barrier system for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, describes the current candidate materials, presents a compilation of their properties, and summarizes available corrosion data and modeling. The term ''engineered materials'' is intended to distinguish those materials that are used as part of the engineered barrier system from the natural, geologic materials of the site

  11. Remarks on the mathematical description of materials damage by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, E.

    1987-01-01

    In describing radiation damage processes in materials, the chemical rate theory proves to be the most effective mathematical method. The applicability, and even the validity, of this theory, which has been successfully applied in many other scientific fields, have been questioned by some authors. After rigorous mathematical analysis of the relevant rate equations and the corresponding self-consistent calculation of sink strengths, the main criticisms on this subject can be disproved

  12. Experiment and research on materials irradiated by plasma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Wenyu; Yao Lianghua; Tang Sujun; Chang Shufen; Li Guodong

    1992-08-01

    The TiC and SiC coating on the graphite substrate and wall carbonization were studied by plasma radiation in HL-1 tokamak. Samples were analysed with AES (auger electron spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and XDS (X-ray diffraction spectroscopy). The results show that the TiC and SiC materials coated on limiter and wall and wall carbonization can reduce the metal and oxygen impurities and improve the plasma merit

  13. Effect of low temperature neutron irradiation on the magnetoresistivity in stabilizer materials for a superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kiyotomo; Tada, Naobumi; Masaoka, Isao; Takamura, Saburo.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetoresistivity changes caused by neutron irradiation at 5 K, annealing up to 300 K and cyclic irradiation are studied in copper and aluminuim stabilizer materials at 4.2 K. The radiation-induced resistivity in Al is about three times as large as that in Cu, and the resistivities in both Al and Cu are independent of the purity and the degree of cold-work of the samples. The radiation-induced magnetoresistivity of the high purity Cu with R.R.R. (R sub(298 K)/R sub(4.2 K)) of 1400 is larger than that of the impure Cu with R.R.R. of 300 and 280. The magnetoresistivities of the high purity Cu and Al with R.R.R. of 1500 increase with the magetic field. Magnetoresistivity change with the magnetic field in the irradiated Cu mostly follows Kohler's rule, and that in the irradiated Al does not follow the rule at high magnetic fields. By the annealing at 300 K after the irradiation, the radiation-induced resistivity is completely annihilated in the Al, but about 20 % of the resistivity retains in the full-annealed Cu and the retained resistivity is accumulated during the cyclic irradiation. Though the accumulated resistivity in the cold-worked Cu is smaller than that in the full-annealed one, the resistivity before irradiation in the cold-worked samples is very large. From the above results, the full-annealed Cu with R.R.R. of about 300 is considered to be the best material as a stabilizer used under irradiation. (author)

  14. Whole-Genome Sequencing in Microbial Forensic Analysis of Gamma-Irradiated Microbial Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomall, Stacey M; Ait Ichou, Mohamed; Krepps, Michael D; Johnsky, Lauren A; Karavis, Mark A; Hubbard, Kyle S; Insalaco, Joseph M; Betters, Janet L; Redmond, Brady W; Rivers, Bryan A; Liem, Alvin T; Hill, Jessica M; Fochler, Edward T; Roth, Pierce A; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Skowronski, Evan W; Gibbons, Henry S

    2016-01-15

    Effective microbial forensic analysis of materials used in a potential biological attack requires robust methods of morphological and genetic characterization of the attack materials in order to enable the attribution of the materials to potential sources and to exclude other potential sources. The genetic homogeneity and potential intersample variability of many of the category A to C bioterrorism agents offer a particular challenge to the generation of attributive signatures, potentially requiring whole-genome or proteomic approaches to be utilized. Currently, irradiation of mail is standard practice at several government facilities judged to be at particularly high risk. Thus, initial forensic signatures would need to be recovered from inactivated (nonviable) material. In the study described in this report, we determined the effects of high-dose gamma irradiation on forensic markers of bacterial biothreat agent surrogate organisms with a particular emphasis on the suitability of genomic DNA (gDNA) recovered from such sources as a template for whole-genome analysis. While irradiation of spores and vegetative cells affected the retention of Gram and spore stains and sheared gDNA into small fragments, we found that irradiated material could be utilized to generate accurate whole-genome sequence data on the Illumina and Roche 454 sequencing platforms. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Irradiation experiments on materials for core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Materials degradation due to the aging phenomena is one of the key issues for the life assessment and extension of the light water reactors (LWRs). This presentation introduces JAERI`s activities in the field of LWR material researches which utilize the research and testing reactors for irradiation experiments. The activities are including the material studies for the core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding. These materials are exposed to the neutron/gamma radiation and high temperature water environments so that it is worth reviewing their degradation phenomena as the continuum. Three topics are presented; For the core internal materials, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is the present major concern. At JAERI the effects of alloying elements on IASCC have been investigated through the post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in high-temperature water. The radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is still a significant issue for LWR safety, and at JAERI some factors affecting the embrittlement behavior such as a dose rate have been investigated. Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy fuel cladding is one of the limiting factors in fuel rod performance and an in-situ measurement of the corrosion rate in high-temperature water was performed in JMTR. To improve the reliability of experiments and to extent the applicability of experimental techniques, a mutual utilization of the technical achievements in those irradiation experiments is desired. (author)

  16. Long-term radiation effects on commercial cable-insulating materials irradiated at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, P.; Stolarz, A.

    1983-01-01

    Long-term irradiation damage tests have been carried out on a variety of flexible cable-insulating materials offered to CERN by different European cable manufacturers. Tensile test specimens were exposed for a maximum of three years in high-level radiation areas of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and for comparison at high dose rates in a nuclear reactor. The degradation of mechanical properties after irradiation in air depends not only on the total absorbed dose, but also on the dose rate for most of these polymer compounds. These dose-rate effects vary between material types and for different compounds. The results presented here illustrate the difference in radiation damage between short-term and long-term irradiation conditions in a typical service application for the various materials tested. They also allow safety factors to be estimated for the extrapolation of the limiting exposure in service from accelerated material tests in the range of dose rates covered. A discussion of the available models of the dose-rate effects results in a conservative estimate for extrapolation to low dose rates from measured values at intermediate dose rates of the order of 0.1 Gy/s. Based on short-term irradiation tests only, the safety factors to be applied depend on the end-point criterion used, and may vary between 1 and 10 for the range of dose rates and materials considered here. (orig.)

  17. Investigation of cryogenic irradiation influence on mechanical and physical properties of ITER magnetic system insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Scherbacov, E.N.; Dudchenko, N.A.; Shihalev, V.S.; Bedin, V.V.; Paltusov, N.A.; Korsunskiy, V.E.

    1998-01-01

    A set of methods of cryogenic irradiation influence test on mechanical and physical properties of insulation of ITER magnetic system are presented in this paper. Investigations are carried out without intermediate warming up of samples. A Russian insulating composite material was irradiated in the IVV-2M reactor. The ratio of energy absorbed by insulation materials from neutron irradiation to that from gamma irradiation can be varied from ∝(25:75)% to ∝(50:50)% in the reactor. The test results on the thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and gas evolution of the above material are presented. It was shown, that cryogenic irradiation up to the fluence ∝2 x 10 22 n/m 2 (E ≥ 0.1 MeV) leads to 0.27% linear size changes along layers of fiber-glass, the thermal conductivity coefficient is decreased on 15% at 100 k in perpendicular direction to fiber-glass plane, and thermal coefficient of linear expansion (TCLE) has anomalous temperature dependence. (orig.)

  18. Nano-pulsed laser irradiation scanning system for phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sookyung; Li Xuezhe; Lee, Sangbin; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Seung-Yop

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the demand of a laser irradiation tester is increasing for phase change random access memory (PRAM) as well as conventional optical storage media. In this study, a nano-pulsed laser irradiation system is developed to characterize the optical property and writing performance of phase-change materials, based on a commercially available digital versatile disk (DVD) optical pick-up. The precisely controlled focusing and scanning on the material's surface are implemented using the auto-focusing mechanism and a voice coil motor (VCM) of the commercial DVD pick-up. The laser irradiation system provides various writing and reading functions such as adjustable laser power, pulse duration, recording pattern (spot, line and area), and writing/reading repetition, phase transition, and in situ reflectivity measurement before/after irradiation. Measurements of power time effect (PTE) diagram and reflectivity map of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 samples show that the proposed laser irradiation system provides the powerful scanning tool to quantify the optical characteristics of phase-change materials

  19. Microstructural evolution of CANDU spacer material Inconel X-750 under in situ ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He Ken [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Yao, Zhongwen, E-mail: yaoz@me.queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Judge, Colin; Griffiths, Malcolm [Deformation Technology Branch, AECL, Chalk River Laboratories Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •γ′ Disordered at low dose. •Cascade induced SFTs were observed in alloy X-750. •No cavities were found from mono heavy ions irradiated samples. -- Abstract: Work on Inconel® X-750 spacers removed from CANDU® reactors has shown that they become embrittled and there is development of many small cavities within the metal matrix and along grain boundaries. In order to emulate the neutron irradiation induced microstructural changes, heavy ion irradiations (1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} ions) were performed while observing the damage evolution using an intermediate voltage electron microscope (IVEM) operating at 200 kV. The irradiations were carried out at various temperatures 60–400 °C. The principal strengthening phase, γ′, was disordered at low doses (∼0.06 dpa) during the irradiation. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were found to be stable up to 5.4 dpa. Lattice defects consisted mostly of stacking fault tetrahedras (SFTs), 1/2<1 1 0> perfect loops and small 1/3<1 1 1> faulted Frank loops. The ratio of SFT number density to loop number density for each irradiation condition was found to be neither temperature nor dose dependent. Under the operation of the ion beam the SFT production was very rapid, with no evidence for further growth once formed, indicating that they probably formed as a result of cascade collapse in a single cascade. The number density of the defects was found to saturate at low dose (∼0.68 dpa). No cavities were observed regardless of the irradiation temperature between 60 °C and 400 °C for doses up to 5.4 dpa. In contrast, cavities have been observed after neutron irradiation in the same material at similar doses and temperatures indicating that helium, produce during neutron irradiation, may be essential for the nucleation and growth of cavities.

  20. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  1. Interaction of candidate plasma facing materials with tokamak plasma in COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Havránek, Vladimír; Naydenkova, Diana; Klevarová, Veronika; Petersson, P.; Gasior, P.; Hakola, A.; Rubel, M.; Fortuna, E.; Kolehmainen, J.; Tervakangas, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 493, September (2017), s. 102-119 ISSN 0022-3115. [International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/15./. Aix-en-Provence, 18.05.2015-22.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : erosion * COMPASS tokamak * plasma-material interaction * ion beam analysis Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics; JF - Nuclear Energetics (UJF-V) OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering ; Nuclear related engineering (UJF-V) Impact factor: 2.048, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0022311517301708

  2. Inorganic material candidates to replace a metallic or non-metallic concrete containment liner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seni, C [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Mills, R H [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Internal liners for concrete containments are generally organic or metals. They have to be able to inhibit radioactive leakage into the environment, but both types have shortcomings. The results of research to develop a better liner are published in this paper. The best material found was fibre-reinforced mortar. Of the fibres considered, steel, kevlar and glass were the best, each showing advantages and disadvantages. 1 ref., 9 tabs., 12 figs.

  3. Inorganic material candidates to replace a metallic or non-metallic concrete containment liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seni, C.; Mills, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    Internal liners for concrete containments are generally organic or metals. They have to be able to inhibit radioactive leakage into the environment, but both types have shortcomings. The results of research to develop a better liner are published in this paper. The best material found was fibre-reinforced mortar. Of the fibres considered, steel, kevlar and glass were the best, each showing advantages and disadvantages. 1 ref., 9 tabs., 12 figs

  4. Polysaccharide Fabrication Platforms and Biocompatibility Assessment as Candidate Wound Dressing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Aduba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound dressings are critical for wound care because they provide a physical barrier between the injury site and outside environment, preventing further damage or infection. Wound dressings also manage and even encourage the wound healing process for proper recovery. Polysaccharide biopolymers are slowly becoming popular as modern wound dressings materials because they are naturally derived, highly abundant, inexpensive, absorbent, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. Polysaccharide biopolymers have also been processed into biomimetic platforms that offer a bioactive component in wound dressings that aid the healing process. This review primarily focuses on the fabrication and biocompatibility assessment of polysaccharide materials. Specifically, fabrication platforms such as electrospun fibers and hydrogels, their fabrication considerations and popular polysaccharides such as chitosan, alginate, and hyaluronic acid among emerging options such as arabinoxylan are discussed. A survey of biocompatibility and bioactive molecule release studies, leveraging polysaccharide’s naturally derived properties, is highlighted in the text, while challenges and future directions for wound dressing development using emerging fabrication techniques such as 3D bioprinting are outlined in the conclusion. This paper aims to encourage further investigation and open up new, disruptive avenues for polysaccharides in wound dressing material development.

  5. Creep resistance and material degradation of a candidate Ni–Mo–Cr corrosion resistant alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Sachin L., E-mail: sachin@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Bhattacharyya, Dhriti [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yuan, Guangzhou; Li, Zhijun J. [Center of Thorium Molten Salts Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Budzakoska-Testone, Elizabeth; De Los Reyes, Massey; Drew, Michael; Edwards, Lyndon [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2016-09-30

    This study investigated the creep deformation properties of GH3535, a Ni–Mo–Cr corrosion resistant structural alloy being considered for use in future Gen IV molten salt nuclear reactors (MSR) operating at around 700 °C. Creep testing of the alloy was conducted at 650–750 °C under applied stresses between 85–380 MPa. From the creep rupture results the long term creep strain and rupture life of the alloy were estimated by applying the Dorn Shepard and Larson Miller time-temperature parameters and the alloy's allowable ASME design stresses at the MSR's operating temperature were evaluated. The material's microstructural degradation at creep rupture was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructural study revealed that the material failure was due to wedge cracking at triple grain boundary points and cavitation at coarse secondary grain boundary precipitates, nucleated and grown during high temperature exposure, leading to intergranular crack propagation. EBSD local misorientation maps clearly show that the root cause of cavitation and crack propagation was due to large strain localisation at the grain boundaries and triple points instigated by grain boundary sliding during creep deformation. This caused the grain boundary decohesion and subsequent material failure.

  6. Challenges in the size analysis of a silica nanoparticle mixture as candidate certified reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestens, Vikram; Roebben, Gert; Herrmann, Jan; Jämting, Åsa; Coleman, Victoria; Minelli, Caterina; Clifford, Charles; Temmerman, Pieter-Jan De; Mast, Jan; Junjie, Liu; Babick, Frank; Cölfen, Helmut; Emons, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    A new certified reference material for quality control of nanoparticle size analysis methods has been developed and produced by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre. The material, ERM-FD102, consists of an aqueous suspension of a mixture of silica nanoparticle populations of distinct particle size and origin. The characterisation relied on an interlaboratory comparison study in which 30 laboratories of demonstrated competence participated with a variety of techniques for particle size analysis. After scrutinising the received datasets, certified and indicative values for different method-defined equivalent diameters that are specific for dynamic light scattering (DLS), centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle tracking analysis (PTA) and asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) were assigned. The value assignment was a particular challenge because metrological concepts were not always interpreted uniformly across all participating laboratories. This paper presents the main elements and results of the ERM-FD102 characterisation study and discusses in particular the key issues of measurand definition and the estimation of measurement uncertainty.

  7. Tritium retention in candidate next-step protection materials: engineering key issues and research requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Andrew, P.L.; Wu, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Although a considerable volume of valuable data on the behaviour of tritium in beryllium and carbon-based armours exposed to hydrogenic fusion plasmas has been compiled over the past years both from operation of present-day tokamaks and from laboratory simulations, knowledge is far from complete and tritium inventory predictions for these materials remain highly uncertain. In this paper we elucidate the main mechanisms responsible for tritium trapping and release in next-step D-T tokamaks, as well as the applicability of some of the presently known data bases for design purposes. Owing to their strong anticipated implications on tritium uptake and release, attention is focused mainly on the interaction of tritium with neutron damage induced defects, on tritium codeposition with eroded carbon and on the effects of oxide and surface contaminants. Some preliminary quantitative estimates are presented based on most recent experimental findings and latest modelling developments as well. The influence of important working conditions such as target temperature, loading particle fluxes, erosion and redeposition rates, as well as material characteristics such as the type of morphology of the protection material (i.e. amorphous plasma-sprayed beryllium vs. solid forms), and design dependent parameters are discussed in this paper. Remaining issues which require additional effort are identified. (orig.)

  8. Challenges in the size analysis of a silica nanoparticle mixture as candidate certified reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kestens, Vikram, E-mail: vikram.kestens@ec.europa.eu; Roebben, Gert [Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) (Belgium); Herrmann, Jan; Jämting, Åsa; Coleman, Victoria [National Measurement Institute Australia, Nanometrology Section (Australia); Minelli, Caterina; Clifford, Charles [National Physical Laboratory, Analytical Science Division (United Kingdom); Temmerman, Pieter-Jan De; Mast, Jan [Service Electron Microscopy, Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre (CODA-CERVA) (Belgium); Junjie, Liu [National Institute of Metrology, Division of Nanoscale Measurement and Advanced Materials (China); Babick, Frank [Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Verfahrens- und Umwelttechnik (Germany); Cölfen, Helmut [University of Konstanz, Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Emons, Hendrik [Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    A new certified reference material for quality control of nanoparticle size analysis methods has been developed and produced by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre. The material, ERM-FD102, consists of an aqueous suspension of a mixture of silica nanoparticle populations of distinct particle size and origin. The characterisation relied on an interlaboratory comparison study in which 30 laboratories of demonstrated competence participated with a variety of techniques for particle size analysis. After scrutinising the received datasets, certified and indicative values for different method-defined equivalent diameters that are specific for dynamic light scattering (DLS), centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle tracking analysis (PTA) and asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) were assigned. The value assignment was a particular challenge because metrological concepts were not always interpreted uniformly across all participating laboratories. This paper presents the main elements and results of the ERM-FD102 characterisation study and discusses in particular the key issues of measurand definition and the estimation of measurement uncertainty.

  9. IFMIF, a fusion relevant neutron source for material irradiation current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaster, J.; Chel, S.; Fischer, U.; Groeschel, F.; Heidinger, R.; Ibarra, A.; Micciche, G.; Möslang, A.; Sugimoto, M.; Wakai, E.

    2014-01-01

    The d-Li based International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) will provide a high neutron intensity neutron source with a suitable neutron spectrum to fulfil the requirements for testing and qualifying fusion materials under fusion reactor relevant irradiation conditions. The IFMIF project, presently in its Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (EVEDA) phase under the Broader Approach (BA) Agreement between Japan Government and EURATOM, aims at the construction and testing of the most challenging facility sub-systems, such as the first accelerator stage, the Li target and loop, and irradiation test modules, as well as the design of the entire facility, thus to be ready for the IFMIF construction with a clear understanding of schedule and cost at the termination of the BA mid-2017. The paper reviews the IFMIF facility and its principles, and reports on the status of the EVEDA activities and achievements

  10. Damage functions generation for polyatomic materials irradiated in test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberman, A.; Lesueur, D.

    1987-06-01

    Neutron exposure parameters in polyatomic materials is of great importance for fusion technology programs. The COMPOSI code computes the number of displaced atoms of sub-lattice ''j'' induced by one atom of sub-lattice ''i'' either by direct collision or through intermediate knocked atom. The code uses Lindhard equations; it is solved by iterative process. The atomic displacements cross-sections, as a function of neutron energy are derived by folding previous results with ''i'' type PKA. Moreover the COMPOSI code may include recoils from charged particles e.g.: Alpha + Triton from Li 6 capture in Li Al 0 2 . These responses in various spectra are discussed [fr

  11. Analysis of irradiated materials in Ul-chin unit 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Kim, H. M.; Joo, Y. S.

    2007-02-01

    The microstructure examination, the fracture surface observation, the composition analysis and the micro-hardness measurement were carried out for investigation of debris apart from structure in Ul-chin uint 5. As the results of investigation, those of debris were found out screw bolts and the washer. The screw bolts and the washer were coincident with materials from ASTM A-193 by quantitative analysis. The screw bolts and the washer were made by STS 304. Finally, all of screw bolts were parts of the LPSI pump case even though one of them was found in different place. The washer was part of the heat exchanger

  12. Two micro fatigue test methods for irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunomura, Shigetomo; Noguchi, Shinji; Okamura, Yuichi; Kumai, Shinji

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates two miniature fatigue test methods in response to the requirements of the fusion reactor wall materials development program. It is known that the fatigue strength evaluated by the axial loading test is independent of the specimen size, while that evaluated by the bend test or torsion test is dependent upon the size of specimen. The new type of gripping system for the axial, tension-tension, fatigue testing of TEM disk-size specimens that has been developed is described in this paper. An alignment tool assists in gripping the miniature specimen. The miniature tension-tension fatigue test method seems to provide reliable S-N curves for SUS304 and SUS316L stainless steels. An indentation method has also been developed to determine fatigue properties. A hard steel ball or ceramic ball was used for cyclically loading the specimen, and an S-N curve was subsequently obtained. The merit of this method is primarily simple handling. S-N curves obtained from four materials by this indentation method compared well with those obtained from the rotary bend fatigue test employing a standard-size specimen

  13. Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1988-05-01

    Three copper-based alloys --- CDA 102 (OFHC copper), CDA 613 (aluminum bronze), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni) --- are being considered as possible materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. Waste will include fuel assemblies from reactors as well as borosilicate glass forms, and will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for emplacement. The three copper-based alloys discussed here are being considered in addition to the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials discussed in Volume 3. The decay of radionuclides will result in substantial heat generation and in fluxes of gamma radiation. In this environment, container materials may degrade by atmospheric oxidation, uniform aqueous phase corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in tarnishing environments, or intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in nontarnishing environments. This report is a critical survey of available data on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the three copper-based alloys. The requisite conditions for TGSCC and IGSCC include combinations of stress, oxygen, ammonia or nitrite, and water. Note that nitrite is generated by gamma radiolysis of moisture films in air but that ammonia is not. TGSCC has been observed in CDA 102 and CDA 613 exposed to moist ammonia-containing environments whereas SCC has not been documented for CDA 715 under similar conditions. SCC is also promoted in copper by nitrite ions. Furthermore, phosphorus-deoxidized copper is unusually susceptible to embrittlement in such environments. The presence of tin in CDA 613 prevents IGSCC. It is believed that tin segregates to grain boundaries, where it oxidizes very slowly, thereby inhibiting the oxidation of aluminum. 117 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs

  14. Optimization on electrochemical synthesis of HKUST-1 as candidate catalytic material for Green diesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, W. W.; Nugraha, R. E.; Winarni, I. D.; Adreane, M.; Rahmawati, F.

    2016-04-01

    In the effort to support the discovery of new renewable energy sources in Indonesia, biofuel is one of promising options. The conversion of vegetable oil into ready-biofuel, especially green diesel, needs several steps, one of which is a hydrogenation or hydro-deoxygenation reaction. In this case, the catalyst plays a very important role regarding to its activity and selectivity, and Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) becoming a new generation of heterogeneous catalyst in this area. In this research, a preliminary study to optimize electrochemical synthesis of the catalytic material based on MOFs, namely HKUST-1 [Cu3(BTC)2], has been conducted. Some electrochemical reaction parameters were tested, for example by modifying the electrochemical synthetic conditions, i.e. by performing variation of voltages (12, 13, 14, and 15 Volt), temperatures (RT, 40, 60, and 80 °C) and solvents (ethanol, water, methanol and dimethyl-formamide (DMF)). Material characterization was carried out by XRD, SEM, FTIR, DTA/TG and SAA. The results showed that the optimum synthetic conditions of HKUST-1 are performed at room temperature in a solvent combination of water: ethanol (1: 1) and a voltage of 15 Volt for 2 hours. The XRD-analysis revealed that the resulted peaks are identical to the simulated powder pattern generated from single crystal data and comparable to the peaks of solvothermal method. However, the porosity of the resulting material through electrochemical method is still in the range of micro-pore according to IUPAC and 50% smaller than the porosity resulted from solvothermal synthesis. The corresponding compounds are thermally stable until 300 °C according to TG/DTA.

  15. Characterisation of candidate buffer materials. Vol. 2: Thermo-mechanical calculation of buffer in granitic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, D.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanical stresses of compacted clays between the canister and the host rock are studied in the different cases during evolution of a vitrified waste storage site. Thermal stress variations are studied in function of time and thermal power decrease of stored wastes and of materials characteristics and behavior. Consequences of stresses produced by partial hydratation of clays are evaluated. The study concludes that an argillaceous containment does not present a rupture risk, even during a partial hydratation in addition stresses on stored packaging are obtained

  16. Deuterium implantation in first wall candidate materials by exposure in the Princeton large torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.; Tobin, A. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Research and Development Center); Manos, D. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    Titanium alloys are of interest as a first wall material in fusion reactors because of their excellent thermophysical and thermomechanical properties. A major concern with their application to the first wall is associated with the known affinity of titanium for hydrogen and the related consequences for fuel recycling, tritium inventory, and hydrogen embrittlement. Little information exists on trapping and release of hydrogen isotopes implanted at energies below 500 eV. This work was undertaken to measure hydrogen isotope trapping and release at the first wall of the Princeton Large Torus Tokamak (PLT).

  17. Nb-Base FS-85 Alloy as a Candidate Structural Material for Space Reactor Applications: Effects of Thermal Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Hoelzer, David T.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2009-04-01

    The proposed uses of fission reactors for manned or deep space missions have typically relied on the potential use of refractory metal alloys as structural materials. Throughout the history of these programs, a leading candidate has been Nb-1Zr, due to its good fabrication and welding characteristics. However, the less-than-optimal creep resistance of this alloy has encouraged interest in the more complex FS-85 (Nb-28Ta-10W-1Zr) alloy. Despite this interest, only a relatively small database exists for the properties of FS-85. Database gaps include the potential microstructural instabilities that can lead to mechanical property degradation. In this work, changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of FS-85 were investigated following 1100 hours of thermal aging at 1098, 1248, and 1398 K. The changes in electrical resistivity, hardness, and tensile properties between the as-annealed and aged materials are compared. Evaluation of the microstructural changes was performed through optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The development of intragranular and grain-boundary precipitation of Zr-rich compounds as a function of aging temperature was followed. Brittle tensile behavior was measured in the material aged at 1248 K, while ductile behavior occurred in samples aged above and below this temperature. The effect of temperature on the under- and overaging of the grain-boundary particles is believed to have contributed to the mechanical property behavior of the aged materials.

  18. Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; Weiss, H.; Juhas, M.C.; Logan, R.W.

    1983-11-01

    A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables

  19. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.

    1995-01-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons

  20. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  1. Behavior of structural and target materials irradiated in spallation neutron environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbins, J.F.; Wechsler, M.; Borden, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes considerations for selection of structural and target materials for accelerator-driven neutron sources. Due to the operating constraints of proposed accelerator-driven neutron sources, the criteria for selection are different than those commonly applied to fission and fusion systems. Established irradiation performance of various alloy systems is taken into account in the selection criteria. Nevertheless, only limited materials performance data are available which specifically related to neutron energy spectra anticipated for spallation sources

  2. Bulk-shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1982-07-01

    The accelerator-based Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility will provide a high-fluence, fusion-like radiation environment for the testing of materials. While the neutron spectrum produced in the forward direction by the 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a flowing lithium target is characterized by a broad peak around 14 MeV, a high energy tail extends up to about 50 MeV. Some shield design considerations are reviewed

  3. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettger, H.; Hardt, P. von der; Tas, A.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to January 1981

  4. Behavior of structural and target materials irradiated in spallation neutron environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Wechsler, M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Borden, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes considerations for selection of structural and target materials for accelerator-driven neutron sources. Due to the operating constraints of proposed accelerator-driven neutron sources, the criteria for selection are different than those commonly applied to fission and fusion systems. Established irradiation performance of various alloy systems is taken into account in the selection criteria. Nevertheless, only limited materials performance data are available which specifically related to neutron energy spectra anticipated for spallation sources.

  5. International fusion materials irradiation facility and neutronic calculations for its test modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1997-01-01

    The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a projected high intensity neutron source for material testing. Neutron transport calculations for the IFMIF project are performed for variety of here explained reasons. The results of MCNP neutronic calculations for IFMIF test modules with NaK and He cooled high flux test cells are presented in this paper. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Effect of material variables on the irradiation performance of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Boron carbide pellets were fabricated with variations in material parameters. These pellets were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) to determine the effect of these variations on the performance. Helium release from the material and swelling of the pellets are the primary measures of performance. It was determined that material with a smaller grain size released more helium and swelled less. The pellets with boron-to-carbon ratios greater than 4 to 1 did not perform well. Iron additions improved the performance of the material while density variations had little effect

  7. Oxidation/volatilization rates in air for candidate fusion reactor blanket materials, PCA and HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kraus, H.G.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large uncertainties exist in the quantity of neutron-induced activation products that can be mobilized in potential fusion accidents. The accidental combination of high temperatures and oxidizing conditions might lead to mobilization of a significant amount of activation products from structural materials. Here, the volatilization of constituents of PCA and HT-9 resulting from oxidation in air was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 600 to 1300 0 C for 1, 5, or 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy. Molybdenum and manganese were the radiologically significant primary constituents most volatilizized, suggesting that molybdenum and manganese should be minimized in fusion steel compositions. Higher chromium content appears beneficial in reducing hazards from mobile activation products. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the oxide layer on samples. (orig.)

  8. The stability of candidate buffer materials for a low-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, J.; Buckley, L.P.; Burton, G.R.; Tosello, N.B.; Maves, S.R.; Blimkie, M.E.; Donaldson, J.R.

    1989-11-01

    Inorganic ion-exchangers, clinoptilolite and clay, will be placed on the floor of a low-level radioactive waste repository to be built at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. The stability of these ion-exchange materials for a range of potential chemical environments in the repository was investigated. The leaching of waste forms and concrete and biological activity may create acidic or basic environment. The dissolution mechanisms of the ion exchangers for both acid and alkali conditions were established. Changes in distribution coefficients occurred shortly after the commencement of the treatment and were due to changes in the counter-ion content of the ion exchangers. No evidence was found to suggest gradual selective destruction of exchange sites responsible for the high distribution coefficients observed

  9. Oxidation/volatilization rates in air for candidate fusion reactor blanket materials, PCA and HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Kraus, H.G.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Jones, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Large uncertainties exist in the quantity of neutron-induced activation products that can be mobilized in potential fusion accidents. The accidental combination of high temperatures and oxidizing conditions might lead to mobilization of a significant amount of activation products from structural materials. Here, the volatilization of constituents of PCA and HT-9 resulting from oxidation in air was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 600 to 1300 0 C for 1, 5, or 20 hours. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy. Molybdenum and manganese were the radiologically significant primary constituents most volatilized, suggesting that molybdenum and manganese should be minimized in fusion steel compositions. Higher chromium content appears beneficial in reducing hazards from mobile activation products. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the oxide layer on samples

  10. Data on post irradiation experiments of heat resistant ceramic composite materials. PIE for 97M-13A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shin-ichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Souzawa, Shizuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Sekino, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The research on the radiation damage mechanism of heat resistant ceramic composite materials is one of the research subjects of the innovative basic research in the field of high temperature engineering, using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Three series of irradiation tests on the heat resistant ceramic composite materials, first to third irradiation test program, were carried out using the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR). This is a summary report on the first irradiation test program; irradiation induced dimensional change, thermal expansion coefficient, X-ray diffraction and {gamma}-ray spectrum are reported. (author)

  11. Change in properties of superconducting magnet materials by fusion neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Arata; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Takeuchi, Takao; Nishitani, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    A fusion reactor will generate a lot of high energy neutron and much energy will be taken out of the neutrons by a blanket system. Since some neutrons will stream out of a plasma vacuum vessel through neutral beam injection ports and penetrate a blanket system, a superconducting magnet system, which provides high magnetic field to confirm high energy particles, will be irradiated by a certain amount of neutrons. By developing the new NBI system or by reducing the penetration, the neutron fluence to the superconducting magnet will be able to be reduced. However, it is not easy to achieve the lower streaming and penetration at the present. Therefore, investigations on irradiation behavior of superconducting magnet materials are desired and some novel researches have been performed from 1970s. In general, the critical current of the superconducting wire increases under fast neutron environment comparing with that of the non-irradiated wire, and then decreased to almost zero as an increase of neutron fluence. On the other hand, the critical temperature of the wire starts to get down around 10 22 n/m 2 of neutron fluence and the temperature margin will be decreased during the operation by the neutron irradiation. In this paper, some aspects of irradiated materials will be overviewed and general tendency will be discussed focussing on knock-on effect of fast neutron and long range ordering of A15 compounds

  12. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Lucon, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 10 11 n/cm 2 /s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 10 19 n/cm 2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 10 13 n/cm 2 /s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 10 19 n/cm 2 . The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT 0 , were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  13. The development of fuel pins and material specimens mixed loading irradiation test rig in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. The development of the fuel-material hybrid rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, Yasuko; Someya, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, there were many tests using the irradiation rigs that it was possible to be set irradiation conditions for each compartment independently. In case of no alternative fuel element to irradiate after unloading the irradiated compartments, the irradiation test was restarted with the dummy compartment which the fuel elements was not mounted. If the material specimens are mounted in this space, it is possible to use the irradiation space effectively. For these reasons, the irradiation rig (hybrid rig) is developed that is consolidated with material specimens compartment and fuel elements compartment. Fuel elements and material specimens differ greatly with heat generation, so that the most important issue in developing of hybrid rig is being able to distribute appropriately the coolant flow which satisfies irradiation conditions. The following is described by this report. (1) It was confirmed that the flow distribution of loading the same irradiation rig with the compartment from which a flow demand differs could be satisfied. (2) It was confirmed that temperature setting range of hybrid rig could be equivalent to that of irradiation condition. (3) By standardizing the coolant entrance structure of the compartment lower part, the prospect which can perform easily recombination of the compartment from which a type differs between irradiation rigs was acquired. (author)

  14. Charged particle and laser irradiation of selected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svendsen, W.E.

    1996-11-01

    The main topics of the present thesis are the processes governing electronic sputtering of insulators and laser ablation of metals and insulators. The sputtering yield for electron bombardment of solid deuterium was investigated using quartz crystal microbalances as the measuring technique. The sputtering yield was measured with varying electron energy and deuterium film thickness. Laser ablation measurements of silver and nickel were carried out using a Nd:YAG laser. The effect of various experimental parameters such as background gas pressure (Ar, N 2 ), position of quartz crystals with respect to target position and the optimal number of laser shots for carrying out the experiments were investigated. The deposition rate was measured with varying laser wavelength and laser fluence. The angular distribution of the ablated material was measured for silver as well. A theoretical model based on the thermal properties of laser interaction with metals was applied in the initial phase of ablation. For the non-thermal processes governing laser interaction with the ablated plasma plume, a model developed by Phipps and Dreyfus was used to interpret the results. Laser ablation measurements of water-ice were carried using a Nitrogen laser. Attempts were made to measure the deposition rate for various the laser wavelengths and energies. (au) 8 tabs., 49 ills., 77 refs

  15. Charged particle and laser irradiation of selected materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, W E

    1996-11-01

    The main topics of the present thesis are the processes governing electronic sputtering of insulators and laser ablation of metals and insulators. The sputtering yield for electron bombardment of solid deuterium was investigated using quartz crystal microbalances as the measuring technique. The sputtering yield was measured with varying electron energy and deuterium film thickness. Laser ablation measurements of silver and nickel were carried out using a Nd:YAG laser. The effect of various experimental parameters such as background gas pressure (Ar, N{sub 2}), position of quartz crystals with respect to target position and the optimal number of laser shots for carrying out the experiments were investigated. The deposition rate was measured with varying laser wavelength and laser fluence. The angular distribution of the ablated material was measured for silver as well. A theoretical model based on the thermal properties of laser interaction with metals was applied in the initial phase of ablation. For the non-thermal processes governing laser interaction with the ablated plasma plume, a model developed by Phipps and Dreyfus was used to interpret the results. Laser ablation measurements of water-ice were carried using a Nitrogen laser. Attempts were made to measure the deposition rate for various the laser wavelengths and energies. (au) 8 tabs., 49 ills., 77 refs.

  16. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO 2 , 20 mass % Na 2 O, 10 mass % Al 2 O 3 , 8 mass % B 2 O 3 , and 1.5 mass % K 2 O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  17. The future supply of and demand for candidate materials for the fabrication of nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, L.K.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a literature survey carried out to assess the future world supply of and demand for titanium, copper and lead. These metals are candidate materials for the fabrication of containers for the immobilization and disposal of Canada's nuclear used-fuel waste for a reference Used-fuel Disposal Centre. Such a facility may begin operation by approximately 2020, and continue for about 40 years. The survey shows that the world has abundant supplies of titanium minerals (mostly in the form of ilmenite), which are expected to last up to at least 2110. However, for copper and lead the balance between supply and demand may warrant increased monitoring beyond the year 2000. A number of factors that can influence future supply and demand are discussed in the report

  18. SPECTER-ANL, Neutron Damage for Material Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SPECTER calculates spectral- averaged displacements, recoil spectra, gas production, and total damage energy (Kerma) for 41 pure elements using ENDF/B-V derived cross sections. The user need only specify a neutron energy spectrum. Because SPECTER does not handle compounds, SPECOMP was developed to determine displacement damage for alloys, insulators, and breeder materials. 2 - Method of solution: In SPECTER elastic scattering is treated exactly including angular distributions from ENDF/B-V. Inelastic scattering calculations consider both discrete and continuous nuclear level distributions. Multiple (n,xn) reactions use a Monte Carlo technique to derive the recoil distributions. The (n,d) and (n,t) reactions are treated as (n,p) and (n, 3 He) as (n, 4 He). The neutron-gamma reaction and subsequent beta-decay are also included, using a new treatment of gamma-gamma coincidences, angular correlations, beta-neutrino correlations and the incident neutron energy. The Lindhard model was used to compute the energy available for nuclear displacement at each recoil energy. SPECOMP reads the required files from SPECTER, computes secondary displacement functions for each combination of recoil and matrix atom, and then integrates over recoil energy to find the net displacement cross section at each neutron energy. Damage due to neutron, gamma-ray and beta decay events is then added in and the results are summed to obtain the total dpa cross section. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The DISCS computer code was used to process ENDF/B-V data for 41 pure elements for use with SPECTER-ANL. SPECOMP can use any combination of four elements in a single run

  19. Safety design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yamaki, Daiju; Katsuta, Hiroji; Moeslang, Anton; Jameson, R.A.; Martone, Marcello; Shannon, T.E.

    1997-11-01

    In the Conceptual Design Activity of the IFMIF, major subsystems, as well as the entire facility is carefully designed to satisfy the safety requirements for any possible construction sites. Each subsystem is qualitatively analyzed to identify possible hazards to the workers, public and environments using Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). The results are reflected in the design and operation procedure. Shielding of radiation, particularly neutron around the test cell is one of the most important issue in normal operation. Radiation due to beam halo and activation is a hazard for operation personnel in the accelerator system. For the maintenance, remote handling technology is designed to be applied in various facilities of the IFMIF. Lithium loop and target system hold the majority of the radioactive material in the facility. Tritium and beryllium-7 are generated by the nuclear reaction during operation and thus needed to be removed continuously. They are also the potential hazards of airborne source in off-normal events. Minimization of inventory, separation and immobilization, and multiple confinement are considered in the design. Generation of radioactive waste is anticipated to be minor, but waste treatment systems for gas, liquid and solid wastes are designed to minimize the environmental impact. Lithium leak followed by a fire is a major concern, and extensive prevention plan is made in the target design. One of the design option considered is composed of; primary enclosure of the lithium loop, secondary containment filled with positive pressure argon, and an air tight lithium cell made of concrete with a steel lining. This study will report some technical issues considered in the design of IFMIF. It was concluded that the IFMIF can be designed and constructed to meet or exceed current safely standards for workers, public and the environment with existing technology and reasonable construction cost. (J.P.N.)

  20. Thermophysical and heat transfer properties of phase change material candidate for waste heat transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizawa, Akihide; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Atsushi; Kamano, Hiroomi; Jozuka, Tetsuji; Senda, Takeshi; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2008-05-01

    A waste heat transportation system trans-heat (TH) system is quite attractive that uses the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM). The purpose of this paper is to study the thermophysical properties of various sugars and sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) as PCMs for a practical TH system and the heat transfer property between PCM selected and heat transfer oil, by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and a heat storage tube. As a result, erythritol, with a large latent heat of 344 kJ/kg at melting point of 117°C, high decomposition point of 160°C and excellent chemical stability under repeated phase change cycles was found to be the best PCM among them for the practical TH system. In the heat release experiments between liquid erythritol and flowing cold oil, we observed foaming phenomena of encapsulated oil, in which oil droplet was coated by solidification of PCM.

  1. Tensile properties of candidate structural materials for high power spallation sources at high helium contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, P.; Henry, J.; Chen, J.

    2005-08-01

    Low activation 9%Cr martensitic steels EUROFER97, pure tantalum, and low carbon austenitic stainless steel 316L were homogeneously implanted with helium to concentrations up to 5000 appm at temperatures from 70 °C to 400 °C. The specimens were tensile tested at room temperature and at the respective implantation temperatures. In all materials the helium caused an increased in strength and reduction in ductility, with both changes being generally larger at lower implantation and testing temperatures. After implantation some work hardening was retained in 316L and in tantalum, while it almost completely disappeared in EUROFER97. After tensile testing, fracture surfaces were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Implantation caused reduction of necking, but up to concentrations of 2500 appm He fracture surface still showed transgranular ductile appearance. Completely brittle intergranular fracture was observed in tantalum at 9000 appm He and is also expected for EUROFER97 at this concentration, according to previous results on similar 9%Cr steels.

  2. Laboratory scale development of coating for improving characteristics of candidate materials for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwala, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Application of coatings of refractory low atomic number materials on to different components of Tokamak type controlled thermonuclear reactor are expected to provide a degree of design flexibility. The project envisages to deal with the challenging problem on laboratory scale. Coatings investigated include carbon, beryllium, boron, titanium carbide and alumina and substrates chosen have been 304, 316 stainless steels, monel-400, molybdenum, copper, graphite, etc. For their deposition, different techniques (e.g. evaporation, sputtering and their different variants) have been tried, appropriate ones chosen and their parameters optimized. The coating composition has been analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Surface morphology has been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sebastian coating adherence tester has been used for adhesion measurement and Wilson's Tukon microhardness tester for their microhardness measurement. The coatings have been subjected to pulses from YAG laser to evaluate their thermal cycling behaviour. Deuterium ion bombardment (Energy: 20-120 keV; doses: 10 19 -9.3x10 20 ions/cm 2 ) behaviour has also been studied. In general, adherent and hard coatings capable of withstanding thermal cycling could be deposited. Out of the coatings studied, titanium carbide shows best results. The following pages are reprints and not mircrofiched: p. 25-32, 39-41, 57-81. Bibliographic description is on page 13

  3. Candidate solar cell materials for photovoltaic conversion in a solar power satellite /SPS/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, P. E.; Almgren, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    In recognition of the obstacles to solar-generated baseload power on earth, proposals have been made to locate solar power satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO), where solar energy would be available 24 hours a day during most of the time of the year. In an SPS, the electricity produced by solar energy conversion will be fed to microwave generators forming part of a planar phase-array transmitting antenna. The antenna is designed to precisely direct a microwave beam of very low intensity to one or more receiving antennas at desired locations on earth. At the receiving antenna, the microwave energy will be safely and efficiently reconverted to electricity and then be transmitted to consumers. An SPS system will include a number of satellites in GEO. Attention is given to the photovoltaic option for solar energy conversion in GEO, solar cell requirements, the availability of materials, the implication of large production volumes, requirements for high-volume manufacture of solar cell arrays, and the effects of concentration ratio on solar cell array area.

  4. Effect of gamma rays on crystalline materials during irradiation in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaenko, V.A.; Karpukhin, V.I.; Gordeev, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The article presents and discusses the results of experiments to determine the effect of gamma rays on the change in the properties of diamond, graphite, and structural steel. The materials were irradiated in a VVER type reactor. For diamonds, the effect on the annealing of defects was investigated. As gamma ray intensity increased, the crystal lattice expansion and defect concentration increased. Graphite lattice expansion and the mechanical properties of structural steel were also examined. Graphite lattice expansion increased with increased neutron flux and decreased irradiation temperature. Changes in the impact toughness of structural steel correlated precisely to the gamma ray flux in the experiments. 6 refs., 3 figs

  5. Comparison of pad detectors produced on different silicon materials after irradiation with neutrons, protons and pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2010-01-01

    A set of 44 pad detectors produced on p- and n-type MCz and Fz wafers was irradiated with 23 GeV protons, 200 MeV pions and reactor neutrons up to the equivalent fluences of Φ eq =3x10 15 cm -2 . The evolution of the full depletion voltage and the leakage current were monitored during short- and long-term annealing. At selected representative annealing steps, charge collection measurements were performed for all samples with LHC speed electronics. Measurements of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency were compared for different irradiation particles and silicon materials.

  6. Comparison of pad detectors produced on different silicon materials after irradiation with neutrons, protons and pions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, G., E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.s [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-01-01

    A set of 44 pad detectors produced on p- and n-type MCz and Fz wafers was irradiated with 23 GeV protons, 200 MeV pions and reactor neutrons up to the equivalent fluences of PHI{sub eq}=3x10{sup 15}cm{sup -2}. The evolution of the full depletion voltage and the leakage current were monitored during short- and long-term annealing. At selected representative annealing steps, charge collection measurements were performed for all samples with LHC speed electronics. Measurements of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency were compared for different irradiation particles and silicon materials.

  7. Control of helium effects in irradiated materials based on theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.; Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Helium produced in materials by (n,α) transmutation reactions during neutron irradiations or subjected in ion bombardment experiments causes substantial changes in the response to displacement damage. In particular, swelling, phase transformations and embrittlement are strongly affected. Present understanding of the mechanisms underlying these effects is reviewed. Key theoretical relationships describing helium effects on swelling and helium diffusion are described. Experimental data in the areas of helium effects on swelling and precipitation is reviewed with emphasis on critical experiments that have been designed and evaluated in conjunction with theory. Confirmed principles for alloy design to control irradiation performance are described

  8. Recommendations on the measurement of irradiation received by the structural materials of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genthon, J.P.; Mas, P.; Wright, S.B.; Zijp, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    The recommendations have been compiled by a working group Radiation Damage which has been set up by the Euratom Working Group for reactor Dosimetry. The parameters are indicated which must be defined for the characterisation of the neutron dose causing radiation-induced damage in construction materials important for reactor technique. Following an explanation of some theoretical aspects, practical guidelines for neutron metrology on irradiation of graphite and of metals are given. A thorough knowledge of the spectrum of the incident neutrons is required for a proper interpretation of the results of irradiation experiments

  9. Investigation on candidates of principal facilities for exposure dose to public for the facilities using nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Yosuke; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Takada, Shoji; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2015-01-01

    HTTR holds the nuclear fuel material use facilities in its reactor facilities, for the purpose of study on the fracture behavior of fuel and release behavior of fission products, development of high-performance fuel, and measurement of neutron flux. Due to the revision of the 'Act on the regulation of nuclear source material, nuclear fuel material and reactor', the facilities having the 'Important safety-related facilities' among the facilities applicable to the Enforcement Ordinance Article 41 (Article 41 facilities) has come to need to conform to the 'Regulations concerning standards for the location, structure, and equipment of used facilities and others'. In this case, actions such as modification by all possible means are required. The nuclear fuel substance use facilities of HTTR correspond to Article 41 facilities. So, whether it is a candidate for the 'Important safety-related facilities' has been examined. As a result, it is confirmed that the facilities are not correspond to the 'Important safety-related facilities', and it has been concluded that modification measures for the purpose of conforming to this approval standard rule are not necessary as of the present. (A.O.)

  10. Consequences of the improvement of fast reactor material behavior under irradiation on fuel element performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclere, J.; Dupouy, J.M.; Marcon, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The most important problems in fast reactor fuel element come from the excessive swelling of the structural materials used. The limitations of irradiation time for a given reactor result from the cladding or hexagonal wrapper deformations. Irradiation creep plays a major role, either in inducing additional deformations, or in providing possible ways of accommodation of bending stresses. Progress has been made in designing swelling resistant and/or low irradiation creep modulus materials. For instance in FRANCE, annealed 316 SS has been eliminated from pin and subassembly, and replaced by cold worked 316; we are now considering introduction of stabilizing elements in 316 SS as a further improvement and studying different alloys (nickel alloys, or ferritic steels). It has to be checked that the improvement of irradiation characteristic is not counterbalanced by losses on other properties (embrittlement for instance). Considering that pushing off or eliminating a limit may lead to the onset of a new one, it is porposed to make a review of the consequences of substantial improvement of structural material behavior

  11. Study of PDMS conformation in PDMS-based hybrid materials prepared by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancastre, J.J.H.; Fernandes, N.; Margaça, F.M.A.; Miranda Salvado, I.M.; Ferreira, L.M.; Falcão, A.N.; Casimiro, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane-silicate based hybrid materials have recognized properties (high flexibility, low elastic modulus or high mechanical strength) for which there are a large number of applications in development, such as for the bioapplications field. The hybrids addressed in the present study were prepared by gamma irradiation of a mixture of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and zirconium propoxide (PrZr) without addition of any solvent or other product. The materials are homogeneous, transparent, monolithic and flexible. The structure dependence on the PrZr content is addressed. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) was used. The results reveal that the polymer in the hybrids prepared with PrZr, in a content≤5 wt%, shows a structure similar to that in the irradiated pure polymer sample. In these samples the presence of ordered polymer regions is clearly found. For samples prepared with higher content of Zr almost no ordered polymer regions are observed. The addition of PrZr plays an important role on polymer conformation in these hybrid materials. - Highlights: ► PDMS-based hybrid materials were prepared by γ-irradiation. ► FTIR, ATR/FT-IR and XRD techniques were used to characterize the materials. ► Changes in FTIR bands reflect growth of crosslinking network. ► Above certain Zr concentration regions of Zr-silicate oxide are formed. ► Zr content determines conformation of the polymer chain network.

  12. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Siv; Karnland, Ola

    2009-12-01

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the 63 μm. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K 2 O) of the Na>Mg>>K. The 2 O) which indicates that also this smectite may be interstratified with a few percent illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite but in this case Fe predominates over Mg in the octahedral sheet. The structural formula suggests that this smectite has the lowest total layer charge of the smectites examined. Kutch BF 04 contains essentially no particles >63 μm. The bentonite has a high content of titanium and iron-rich accessory minerals, such as anatase, magnetite, hematite and goethite. Other accessory minerals of significance are feldspars and quartz, whereas the content of sulphur

  13. A TEM method for analyzing local strain fields in irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennetch, J.I.; Jesser, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Of great interest to the field of fracture mechanics is the strain field in front of a crack tip. In irradiated materials, cavities which naturally form as a result of radiation provide convenient internal markers. If a miniaturized irradiated tensile sample is pulled in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), both the relative displacement of these cavities and their distortion in shape provide information on localized strain on a microscopic level. In addition, the TEM method allows direct correlation of active slip systems with crack propagation characteristics. To illustrate this method a strain field map was constructed about a crack propagating in a helium irradiated type 316 stainless steel sample containing large cavities. (orig.)

  14. DBMS Development of Irradiated Materials and Spare parts on master-slave manipulator in IMEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Y. S.; Kim, D. S.; Jung, Y. H.; Kim, H. M.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Hong, K. P.; Ahn, S. B.; Ryu, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The data of irradiated specimens(include nuclear fuel) which are transported from research reactor and commercial power reactor and the spare parts of the master-slave manipulator for the IMEF facility, which is operated since 1996, were controlled and managed through the Hangul and Excel software. But it is recommended to use a special program, which is developed for DBMS, for the beneficial control and systematic management of all irradiated specimens, especially assuming the increase of specimen's kind and amount by increasing customers in the near future. This report summarized the whole logical and physical processes and results about following items : - Management System of Irradiated Materials including nuclear fuel - Management System of spare parts for the master-slave manipulator.

  15. Growth and instability of charged dislocation loops under irradiation in ceramic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazanov, A I; Kinoshita, C; Klaptsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the physical mechanisms of the growth and stability of charged dislocation loops in ceramic materials with very strong different mass of atoms (stabilized cubic zirconia) under different energies and types of irradiation conditions: 100-1000 keV electrons, 100 keV He sup + and 300 keV O sup + ions. The anomalous formation of extended defect clusters (charged dislocation loops) has been observed by TEM under electron irradiation subsequent to ion irradiation. It is demonstrated that very strong strain field (contrast) near charged dislocation loops is formed. The dislocation loops grow up to a critical size and after then become unstable. The instability of the charged dislocation loop leads to the multiplication of dislocation loops and the formation of dislocation network near the charged dislocation loops. A theoretical model is suggested for the explanation of the growth and stability of the charged dislocation loop, taking the charge state of point defects. The calculated distribution...

  16. Observation of He bubbles in ion irradiated fusion materials by conductive atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyu [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Li, Ruihuan [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Deming [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Wu, Yunfeng; Niu, Jinhai; Yang, Qi [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Zhao, Jijun [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Dongping, E-mail: dongping.liu@dlnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Fujian Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Electronic Science, Aeronautics, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Using a non-destructive conductive atomic force microscope combined with the Ar{sup +} etching technique, we demonstrate that nanoscale and conductive He bubbles are formed in the implanted layer of single-crystalline 6H-SiC irradiated with 100 keV He{sup +}. We find that the surface swelling of irradiated SiC samples is well correlated with the growth of elliptic He bubbles in the implanted layer. First-principle calculations are performed to estimate the internal pressure of the He bubble in the void of SiC. Analysis indicates that nanoscale He bubbles acting as a captor capture the He atoms diffusing along the implanted layer at an evaluated temperature and result in the surface swelling of irradiated SiC materials.

  17. Standardization of accelerator irradiation procedures for simulation of neutron induced damage in reactor structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lin; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Kim, Hyosim; Garner, Frank A.; Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2017-10-01

    Self-ion irradiation is widely used as a method to simulate neutron damage in reactor structural materials. Accelerator-based simulation of void swelling, however, introduces a number of neutron-atypical features which require careful data extraction and, in some cases, introduction of innovative irradiation techniques to alleviate these issues. We briefly summarize three such atypical features: defect imbalance effects, pulsed beam effects, and carbon contamination. The latter issue has just been recently recognized as being relevant to simulation of void swelling and is discussed here in greater detail. It is shown that carbon ions are entrained in the ion beam by Coulomb force drag and accelerated toward the target surface. Beam-contaminant interactions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. By applying a multiple beam deflection technique, carbon and other contaminants can be effectively filtered out, as demonstrated in an irradiation of HT-9 alloy by 3.5 MeV Fe ions.

  18. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member

  19. IFMIF : International Fusi