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Sample records for irradiate target volumes

  1. Irradiation of target volumes with concave outlines

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    De Neve, W; Fortan, L; Derycke, S; Van Duyse, B; DE Wagter, C [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    A heuristic planning procedure allowing to obtain a 3-dimensional conformal dose distribution for target volumes with concavities has been investigated. The procedure divides the planning problem into a number of sub-problems each solvable by known methods. By patching together the solutions to the sub-problems, a solution with a predictable dosimetric outcome can be obtained. The procedure can be applied to most 3-dimensional systems. The procedure is described and its applications to the irradiation of neoplasms are discussed. (A.S.).

  2. Irradiation of target volumes with concave outlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Neve, W.; Fortan, L.; Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; DE Wagter, C.

    1995-01-01

    A heuristic planning procedure allowing to obtain a 3-dimensional conformal dose distribution for target volumes with concavities has been investigated. The procedure divides the planning problem into a number of sub-problems each solvable by known methods. By patching together the solutions to the sub-problems, a solution with a predictable dosimetric outcome can be obtained. The procedure can be applied to most 3-dimensional systems. The procedure is described and its applications to the irradiation of neoplasms are discussed. (A.S.)

  3. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leij, F. van der; Elkhuizen, P.H.M.; Janssen, T.M.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Sangen, M. van der; Scholten, A.N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van; Boersma, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of

  5. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: Less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leij, Femke van der; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Janssen, Tomas M.; Poortmans, Philip; Sangen, Maurice van der; Scholten, Astrid N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of twenty-four breast cancer patients

  6. Interobserver variations of target volume delineation and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation with intraoperative interstitial breast implant

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    Ritu Raj Upreti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the interobserver variations in delineation of lumpectomy cavity (LC and clinical target volume (CTV, and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation using intraoperative multicatheter brachytherapy. Material and methods : Delineation of LC and CTV was done by five radiation oncologists on planning computed tomography (CT scans of 20 patients with intraoperative interstitial breast implant. Cavity visualization index (CVI, four-point index ranging from (0 = poor to (3 = excellent was created and assigned by observers for each patient. In total, 200 contours for all observers and 100 treatment plans were evaluated. Spatial concordance (conformity index, CI common , and CIgen, average shift in the center of mass (COM, and ratio of maximum and minimum volumes (V max /V min of LC and CTV were quantified among all observers and statistically analyzed. Variation in active dwell positions (0.5 cm step for each catheter, total reference air kerma (TRAK, volume enclosed by prescription isodose (V100% among observers and its spatial concordance were analyzed. Results : The mean ± SD CI common of LC and CTV was 0.54 ± 0.09, and 0.58 ± 0.08, respectively. Conformity index tends to increase, shift in COM and V max /V min decrease significantly (p < 0.05, as CVI increased. Out of total 309 catheters, 29.8% catheters had no change, 29.8% and 17.5% catheters had variations of 1 and 2 dwell positions (0.5 cm and 1 cm, respectively. 9.3% catheters shown variations ≥ 10 dwell positions (5 cm. The mean ± SD CI common of V100% was 0.75 ± 0.11. The mean observed V max /V min of prescription isodose and TRAK was 1.18 (range, 1.03 to 1.56 and 1.11 (range, 1.03 to 1.35, respectively. Conclusions : Interobserver variability in delineation of target volume was found to be significantly related to CVI. Smaller variability was observed with excellent visualization of LC. Interobserver variations showed dosimetric

  7. Intravesical markers for delineation of target volume during external focal irradiation of bladder carcinomas

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    Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.c.hulshof@amc.uva.nl; Andel, George van [Department of Urology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bel, Arjen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gangel, Pieter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kamer, Jeroen B. van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-07-15

    A clip forceps was developed which can insert markers at the border of a bladder tumour through a rigid cystoscope. This technique proved to be simple and safe and is of help for delineation of the target volume during CT simulation for focal boost irradiation of bladder cancer.

  8. Intravesical markers for delineation of target volume during external focal irradiation of bladder carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Andel, George van; Bel, Arjen; Gangel, Pieter; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de

    2007-01-01

    A clip forceps was developed which can insert markers at the border of a bladder tumour through a rigid cystoscope. This technique proved to be simple and safe and is of help for delineation of the target volume during CT simulation for focal boost irradiation of bladder cancer

  9. Intravesical markers for delineation of target volume during external focal irradiation of bladder carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Andel, George; Bel, Arjen; Gangel, Pieter; van de Kamer, Jeroen B

    2007-07-01

    A clip forceps was developed which can insert markers at the border of a bladder tumour through a rigid cystoscope. This technique proved to be simple and safe and is of help for delineation of the target volume during CT simulation for focal boost irradiation of bladder cancer.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Target Volume Considerations, Dose Constraints, and Competing Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, William; Filion, Edith; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of an analysis of dose received to tissues and organs outside the target volume, in the setting of spinal axis irradiation for the treatment of medulloblastoma, using three treatment techniques. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans (total dose, 23.4 Gy) for a standard two-dimensional (2D) technique, a three-dimensional (3D) technique using a 3D imaging-based target volume, and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique, were compared for 3 patients in terms of dose-volume statistics for target coverage, as well as organ at risk (OAR) and overall tissue sparing. Results: Planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity was superior for the IMRT plans for V 95% (IMRT, 100%; 3D, 96%; 2D, 98%) and V 107% (IMRT, 3%; 3D, 38%; 2D, 37%). In terms of OAR sparing, the IMRT plan was better for all organs and whole-body contour when comparing V 10Gy , V 15Gy , and V 20Gy . The 3D plan was superior for V 5Gy and below. For the heart and liver in particular, the IMRT plans provided considerable sparing in terms of V 10Gy and above. In terms of the integral dose, the IMRT plans were superior for liver (IMRT, 21.9 J; 3D, 28.6 J; 2D, 38.6 J) and heart (IMRT, 9 J; 3D, 14.1J; 2D, 19.4 J), the 3D plan for the body contour (IMRT, 349 J; 3D, 337 J; 2D, 555 J). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a valid treatment option for spinal axis irradiation. We have shown that IMRT results in sparing of organs at risk without a significant increase in integral dose

  11. A spreadsheet to determine the volume ratio for target and breast in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, T.; Willis, D.; Miller, J.; Hubbard, P.; Oliver, M.; Chua, B.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The technical feasibility of Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) using external beam radiotherapy depends on the ratio between the evaluation planning target volume (PTV e val) and the whole breast volume (PBI volume ratio = PVR). We aimed to develop a simple method to determine PVR using measurements performed at the time of the planning CT scan. A PVR calculation tool was developed using a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to determine the PTV from three orthogonal dimensions of the seroma cavity and a given margin on the CT scans. The breast volume is estimated from the separation and breast height in five equally spaced CT slices. The PTV e val and whole breast volume were determined for 29 patients from two centres using the spreadsheet calculation tool and compared to volumes delineated on computerised treatment planning systems. Both the PTV e val and whole breast volumes were underestimated by approximately 25% using the spreadsheet. The resulting PVRs were 1.05 +/- 0.35 (mean +/- 1 S D) times larger than the ones determined from planning. Estimations of the PVR using the calculation tool were achievable in around 5 minutes at the time of CT scanning and allow a prompt decision on the suitability of the patients for PBI.

  12. Customized Computed Tomography-Based Boost Volumes in Breast-Conserving Therapy: Use of Three-Dimensional Histologic Information for Clinical Target Volume Margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanbeukers, Bianca; Borger, Jacques; Ende, Piet van den; Ent, Fred van der; Houben, Ruud; Jager, Jos; Keymeulen, Kristien; Murrer, Lars; Sastrowijoto, Suprapto; Vijver, Koen van de; Boersma, Liesbeth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the difference in size between computed tomography (CT)-based irradiated boost volumes and simulator-based irradiated volumes in patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and to analyze whether the use of anisotropic three-dimensional clinical target volume (CTV) margins using the histologically determined free resection margins allows for a significant reduction of the CT-based boost volumes. Patients and Methods: The CT data from 49 patients were used to delineate a planning target volume (PTV) with isotropic CTV margins and to delineate a PTV sim that mimicked the PTV as delineated in the era of conventional simulation. For 17 patients, a PTV with anisotropic CTV margins was defined by applying customized three-dimensional CTV margins, according to the free excision margins in six directions. Boost treatment plans consisted of conformal portals for the CT-based PTVs and rectangular fields for the PTV sim . Results: The irradiated volume (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose [V 95 ]) for the PTV with isotropic CTV margins was 1.6 times greater than that for the PTV sim : 228 cm 3 vs. 147 cm 3 (p 95 was similar to the V 95 for the PTV sim (190 cm 3 vs. 162 cm 3 ; p = NS). The main determinant for the irradiated volume was the size of the excision cavity (p < .001), which was mainly related to the interval between surgery and the planning CT scan (p = .029). Conclusion: CT-based PTVs with isotropic margins for the CTV yield much greater irradiated volumes than fluoroscopically based PTVs. Applying individualized anisotropic CTV margins allowed for a significant reduction of the irradiated boost volume.

  13. Role of choline PET/CT in guiding target volume delineation for irradiation of prostate cancer

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    Schwarzenboeck, S.M.; Kurth, J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Gocke, C.; Kuhnt, T.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Krause, B.J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Choline PET/CT has shown limitations for the detection of primary prostate cancer and nodal metastatic disease, mainly due to limited sensitivity and specificity. Conversely in the restaging of prostate cancer recurrence, choline PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the detection of local regional and nodal recurrence with an impact on therapy management. This review highlights current literature on choline PET/CT for radiation treatment planning in primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Due to limited sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between benign and malignant prostatic tissues in primary prostate cancer, there is little enthusiasm for target volume delineation based on choline PET/CT. Irradiation planning for the treatment of single lymph node metastases on the basis of choline PET/CT is controversial due to its limited lesion-based sensitivity in primary nodal staging. In high-risk prostate cancer, choline PET/CT might diagnose lymph node metastases, which potentially can be included in the conventional irradiation field. Prior to radiation treatment of recurrent prostate cancer, choline PET/CT may prove useful for patient stratification by excluding distant disease which would require systemic therapy. In patients with local recurrence, choline PET/CT can be used to delineate local sites of recurrence within the prostatic resection bed allowing a boost to PET-positive sites. In patients with lymph node metastases outside the prostatic fossa and regional metastatic lymph nodes, choline PET/CT might influence radiation treatment planning by enabling extension of the target volume to lymphatic drainage sites with or without a boost to PET-positive lymph nodes. Further clinical randomized trials are required to assess treatment outcomes following choline-based biological radiation treatment planning in comparison with conventional radiation treatment planning. (orig.)

  14. Biological modelling of fuzzy target volumes in 3D radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, S.; Kampen, M. van; Waschek, T.; Engenhart, R.; Schlegel, W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The outcome of each radiotherapy depends critically on the optimal choice of the target volume. The goal of the radiotherapist is to include all tumor spread at the same time as saving as much healthy tissue as possible. Even when the information of all imaging modalities is combined, the diagnostic techniques are not sensitive and specific enough to visualize all microscopic tumor cell spread. Due to this lack of information there is room for different interpretations concerning the extend of the target volume, leading to a fuzzy target volume. The aim of this work is to develop a model to score different target volume boundaries within the region of diagnostic uncertainty in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Materials and Methods: In order to assess the region of diagnostic uncertainty, the radiotherapist defines interactively a minimal planning target volume that absolutely must be irradiated according to the diagnostic information available and a maximal planning target volume outside which no tumor cell spread is expected. For the NTCP calculation we use the Lyman 4 parameter model to estimate the response of an organ at risk to a uniform partial volume irradiation. The TCP calculation is based on the Poisson model of cell killing. The TCP estimation depends not only on volume, dose, clonogenic cell density and the α parameter of the linear quadratic model but also on the probability to find clonogenic cells in the considered volume. Inside the minimal PTV this probability is 1, outside the maximal PTV it is 0. Therefore all voxels inside the minimal PTV are assigned the value of 1 with respect to the target volume, all voxels outside the maximal PTV the value of 0. For voxels in the region of uncertainty in between, a 3D linear interpolation is performed. Here we assume the probability to follow the interpolated values. Starting with the minimal PTV, the expected gain in TCP and

  15. Target volume determination in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer-facts and questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, L.; Bujko, K.

    2003-01-01

    Although the precise target volume definition in conformal radiotherapy is required by ICRU Report 50 and 62, this task in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often controversial and strict accordance with ICRU requirements is hard to achieve. The Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) definition depends mainly on the imaging method used. We discuss the use of new imaging modalities, like PET, in GTV definition. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) definition remains a separate, and still unresolved problem, especially in the part concerning the Elective Nodal Irradiation (ENI). Nowadays, there is no unified attitude among radiation oncologists regarding the necessity and extent of ENI. The common use of combined treatment modalities and the tendency to dose escalation, both increasing the potential toxicity, result in the more frequent use of involved-fields techniques. Problems relating to margins during Planning Target Volume (PTV) of lung cancer irradiation are also discussed. Another issue is the Interclinician variability in target volumes definition, especially when there is data indicating that the GTV, as defined by 3 D-treatment planning in NSCLC radiotherapy, may be highly prognostic for survival. We postulate that special attention should be paid to detailed precision of target volume determination in departmental and trial protocols. Careful analysis of patterns of failures from ongoing protocols will enable us to formulate the guidelines for target volume definition in radiotherapy for lung cancer. (author)

  16. Analytical dose modeling for preclinical proton irradiation of millimetric targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstalle, Marie; Constanzo, Julie; Karakaya, Yusuf; Finck, Christian; Rousseau, Marc; Brasse, David

    2018-01-01

    Due to the considerable development of proton radiotherapy, several proton platforms have emerged to irradiate small animals in order to study the biological effectiveness of proton radiation. A dedicated analytical treatment planning tool was developed in this study to accurately calculate the delivered dose given the specific constraints imposed by the small dimensions of the irradiated areas. The treatment planning system (TPS) developed in this study is based on an analytical formulation of the Bragg peak and uses experimental range values of protons. The method was validated after comparison with experimental data from the literature and then compared to Monte Carlo simulations conducted using Geant4. Three examples of treatment planning, performed with phantoms made of water targets and bone-slab insert, were generated with the analytical formulation and Geant4. Each treatment planning was evaluated using dose-volume histograms and gamma index maps. We demonstrate the value of the analytical function for mouse irradiation, which requires a targeting accuracy of 0.1 mm. Using the appropriate database, the analytical modeling limits the errors caused by misestimating the stopping power. For example, 99% of a 1-mm tumor irradiated with a 24-MeV beam receives the prescribed dose. The analytical dose deviations from the prescribed dose remain within the dose tolerances stated by report 62 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements for all tested configurations. In addition, the gamma index maps show that the highly constrained targeting accuracy of 0.1 mm for mouse irradiation leads to a significant disagreement between Geant4 and the reference. This simulated treatment planning is nevertheless compatible with a targeting accuracy exceeding 0.2 mm, corresponding to rat and rabbit irradiations. Good dose accuracy for millimetric tumors is achieved with the analytical calculation used in this work. These volume sizes are typical in mouse

  17. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric L.; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r 2 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm 3 , the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm 3 , using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema

  18. Investigations on the necessity of dose calculations for several planes of the target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.

    1987-01-01

    In radiotherapy planning, the shape of a target volume can at present be exactly delimited by means of computed tomography. A method often applied is to project the largest target volume scan on the plane of the central ray and to calculate the dose in this plane. This method does not allow to take into account any change of the target volume scan which will be mainly due to the body contours of the patient. The results of dose calculations made in several planes for pharyngeal and laryngeal tumors are presented. With this procedure, 33 out of 60 irradiation techniques for nine tumor sites meet the requirements with regard to the central ray plane. If several planes are regarded, this is only true for ten irradiation plans. If is therefore absolutely necessary to calculate the doses of several planes if the target volume has an irregular shape or if the body contours vary considerably. This is the only way to prevent a false treatment caused by possibly severe dose excesses or dose insufficiencies in radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  19. Re-irradiation after gross total resection of recurrent glioblastoma. Spatial pattern of recurrence and a review of the literature as a basis for target volume definition

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    Straube, Christoph; Elpula, Greeshma [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Gerhardt, Julia; Meyer, Bernhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Bette, Stefanie; Zimmer, Claus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Schmidt-Graf, Friederike [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute for Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Currently, patients with gross total resection (GTR) of recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) undergo adjuvant chemotherapy or are followed up until progression. Re-irradiation, as one of the most effective treatments in macroscopic rGBM, is withheld in this situation, as uncertainties about the pattern of re-recurrence, the target volume, and also the efficacy of early re-irradiation after GTR exist. Imaging and clinical data from 26 consecutive patients with GTR of rGBM were analyzed. The spatial pattern of recurrences was analyzed according to the RANO-HGG criteria (''response assessment in neuro-oncology criteria for high-grade gliomas''). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Furthermore, a systematic review was performed in PubMed. All but 4 patients underwent adjuvant chemotherapy after GTR. Progression was diagnosed in 20 of 26 patients and 70% of recurrent tumors occurred adjacent to the resection cavity. The median extension beyond the edge of the resection cavity was 20 mm. Median PFS was 6 months; OS was 12.8 months. We propose a target volume containing the resection cavity and every contrast enhancing lesion as the gross tumor volume (GTV), a spherical margin of 5-10 mm to generate the clinical target volume (CTV), and a margin of 1-3 mm to generate the planning target volume (PTV). Re-irradiation of this volume is deemed to be safe and likely to prolong PFS. Re-irradiation is worth considering also after GTR, as the volumes that need to be treated are limited and re-irradiation has already proven to be a safe treatment option in general. The strategy of early re-irradiation is currently being tested within the GlioCave/NOA 17/Aro 2016/03 trial. (orig.) [German] Patienten mit einem rezidivierten Glioblastom (rGBM) werden, wenn eine komplette Resektion (GTR) des makroskopischen Rezidivs durchgefuehrt wurde, aktuell meist systemisch adjuvant behandelt oder einer engmaschigen Nachsorge

  20. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volume: soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, E.; Kantor, G.; Lagarde, P.; Taieb, S.; Ceugnart, L.; Vilain, M.O.; Penel, N.; Depadt, G.

    2001-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities are currently treated with more conservative and functional approaches, combining surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The role of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy has been defined through randomized studies performed in the 80's and 90's. However, the ubiquity of tumour location for these tumours makes difficult a systematic definition of local treatments. Tumour volume definition is based on pre and post surgical imaging (MRI) and on described pathological report. The clinical target volume will take into account quality of the resection and anatomical barriers and will be based on an anatomy and not only on safety margins around the tumour bed. General rules for this irradiation (doses, volumes) and principal results will be presented. (authors)

  1. Volume dose of organs at risk in the irradiated volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio; Tanaka, Shinichi; Miura, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Absorbed dose of organs at risk in the 50% irradiated volume needs to be carefully monitored because there is high risk of radiation injury. This paper reports on the histogram of threedimensional volume dose of organs at risk, which is obtained by computer calculation of CT scans. In order to obtain this histogram, CT is first performed in the irradiation field. The dose in each pixel is then examined by the computer as to each slice. After the pixels of all slices in the organ at risk of the irradiated field are classified according to the doses, the number of pixels in the same dose class is counted. The result is expressed in a histogram. The histogram can show the differences of influence to organs at risk given by various radiation treatment techniques. Total volume dose of organs at risk after radiotherapy can also be obtained by integration of each dose of different treatment techniques. (author)

  2. Method for the irradiation of single targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmel, E.; Dullnig, H.

    1977-01-01

    The invention pertains to a system for the irradiation of single targets with particle beams. The targets all have frames around them. The system consists of an automatic advance leading into a high-vacuum chamber, and a positioning element which guides one target after the other into the irradiation position, at right angles to the automatic advance, and back into the automatic advance after irradiation. (GSCH) [de

  3. P04.02 Analysis of 18F-DOPA PET imaging for target volume definition in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelio, D.; Scartoni, D.; Palucci, A.; Vennarini, S.; Giacomelli, I.; Lemoine, S.; Donner, D.; Farace, P.; Chierichetti, F.; Amichetti, M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Target volume definition is of critical relevance when re-irradiation is delivered and steep dose gradient irradiation techniques, such as proton therapy (PT), are employed. Aim of the study is to investigate the impact of 18F-DOPA on target volume contouring in recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) patients (pts) undergoing re-irradiation with PT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated the differences in volume and relationship of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- vs. DOPA PET-derived gross tumor volumes (GTVs) of 14 rGBM pts re-irradiated with PT between January and November 2016. All pts had been previously treated with photon radiotherapy (60 Gy) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. All the pts received morphological MRI with contrast enhancement medium administration and 18F-DOPA PET-CT study. We used the pathological distribution of 18F-DOPA in brain tissue to identify the so-called Biological Tumor Volume (BTV). Such areas were assessed using a tumor to normal brain ratio > 2. Moreover, any area of contrast enhancement on MRI was used to identify the MRI-based GTV (MRGTV). Definitive GTV included MRGTV plus BTV. Clinical target volume was generated by adding to GTV a 3-mm uniform margin manually corrected in proximity of anatomical barriers. CTV was expanded by 4 mm to create planning target volume. All pts received 36 GyRBE in 18 fractions. Mean values of differently delineated GTVs were compared each other by paired Student’s t-test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. To further compare MRGTV and BTV, the overlapping (MRGTV ^ BTV) and the composite (MRGTV U BTV) volumes were calculated, and a concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlap and composite volumes. Results: MRGTV (mean 14.9 ± 14.5 cc) was larger than BTV (mean 10.9 ± 9.8 cc) although this difference was not statistically significant. The composite volume (mean 20.9 ± 14.7 cc) was significantly larger than each single volume (p < 0

  4. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife

  5. A prospective three-dimensional analysis about the impact of differences in the clinical target volume in prostate cancer irradiation on normal-tissue exposure. A potential for increasing the benefit/risk ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, A.; Toews, N.; Schmidberger, H.; Hess, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: rectal toxicity following external-beam irradiation of prostate cancer correlates with the exposed percentage of rectal volume. Recently, it has been recommended to reduce the volume of the seminal vesicles that should be included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact of this CTV reduction on the expected rectal and bladder dose sparing. Patients and methods: 14 patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. The prostate, the prostate + entire seminal vesicles, or the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles were delineated as CTV. Treatment plans were generated and compared concerning rectum and bladder dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Results: the exposure of rectum and bladder volume was significantly lower in case of irradiation of the prostate only compared to inclusion of the proximal or entire seminal vesicles into the CTV. The reduction of the CTV from prostate + entire seminal vesicles to prostate + proximal seminal vesicles led to a significant reduction of the rectal and bladder dose exposure. Conclusion: reduction of the CTV to the prostate only, or to the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles led to significant rectal and bladder dose sparing compared to irradiation of the prostate + entire seminal vesicles. In patients with a higher risk for seminal vesicles involvement, irradiation of the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles should be preferred. In case of a need for irradiation of the entire seminal vesicles, patients should be informed about a higher risk for chronic rectal toxicity and, possibly, for bladder complications. (orig.)

  6. Recovery of uranium from an irradiated solid target after removal of molybdenum-99 produced from the irradiated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-10-17

    A process for minimizing waste and maximizing utilization of uranium involves recovering uranium from an irradiated solid target after separating the medical isotope product, molybdenum-99, produced from the irradiated target. The process includes irradiating a solid target comprising uranium to produce fission products comprising molybdenum-99, and thereafter dissolving the target and conditioning the solution to prepare an aqueous nitric acid solution containing irradiated uranium. The acidic solution is then contacted with a solid sorbent whereby molybdenum-99 remains adsorbed to the sorbent for subsequent recovery. The uranium passes through the sorbent. The concentrations of acid and uranium are then adjusted to concentrations suitable for crystallization of uranyl nitrate hydrates. After inducing the crystallization, the uranyl nitrate hydrates are separated from a supernatant. The process results in the purification of uranyl nitrate hydrates from fission products and other contaminants. The uranium is therefore available for reuse, storage, or disposal.

  7. Motion-specific internal target volumes for FDG-avid mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, James M.; Robinson, Clifford G.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To quantify the benefit of motion-specific internal target volumes for FDG-avid mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes generated using 4D-PET, vs. conventional internal target volumes generated using non-respiratory gated PET and 4D-CT scans. Materials and methods: Five patients with FDG-avid tumors metastatic to 11 hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes were imaged with respiratory-correlated FDG-PET (4D-PET) and 4D-CT. FDG-avid nodes were contoured by a radiation oncologist in two ways. Standard-of-care volumes were contoured using conventional un-gated PET, 4D-CT, and breath-hold CT. A second, motion-specific, set of volumes were contoured using 4D-PET.Contours based on 4D-PET corresponded directly to an internal target volume (ITV 4D ), whereas contours based on un-gated PET were expanded by a series of exploratory isotropic margins (from 5 to 13 mm) based on literature recommendations on lymph node motion to form internal target volumes (ITV 3D ). Results: A 13 mm expansion of the un-gated PET nodal volume was needed to cover the ITV 4D for 10 of 11 nodes studied. The ITV 3D based on a 13 mm expansion included on average 45 cm 3 of tissue that was not included in the ITV 4D . Conclusions: Motion-specific lymph-node internal target volumes generated from 4D-PET imaging could be used to improve accuracy and/or reduce normal-tissue irradiation compared to the standard-of-care un-gated PET based internal target volumes

  8. Clinical target volume delineation including elective nodal irradiation in preoperative and definitive radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caravatta Luciana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT is widely used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Currently, recommendation has been given for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV in adjuvant RT. Based on recently reviewed pathologic data, the aim of this study is to propose criteria for the CTV definition and delineation including elective nodal irradiation (ENI in the preoperative and definitive treatment of pancreatic cancer. Methods The anatomical structures of interest, as well as the abdominal vasculature were identified on intravenous contrast-enhanced CT scans of two different patients with pancreatic cancer of the head and the body. To delineate the lymph node area, a margin of 10 mm was added to the arteries. Results We proposed a set of guidelines for elective treatment of high-risk nodal areas and CTV delineation. Reference CT images were provided. Conclusions The proposed guidelines could be used for preoperative or definitive RT for carcinoma of the head and body of the pancreas. Further clinical investigations are needed to validate the defined CTVs.

  9. Pressure control of a proton beam-irradiated water target through an internal flow channel-induced thermosyphon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bong Hwan; Jung, In Su

    2017-07-01

    A water target was designed to enhance cooling efficiency using a thermosyphon, which is a system that uses natural convection to induce heat exchange. Two water targets were fabricated: a square target without any flow channel and a target with a flow channel design to induce a thermosyphon mechanism. These two targets had the same internal volume of 8 ml. First, visualization experiments were performed to observe the internal flow by natural convection. Subsequently, an experiment was conducted to compare the cooling performance of both water targets by measuring the temperature and pressure. A 30-MeV proton beam with a beam current of 20 μA was used to irradiate both targets. Consequently, the target with an internal flow channel had a lower mean temperature and a 50% pressure drop compared to the target without a flow channel during proton beam irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relapse patterns after radiochemotherapy of glioblastoma with FET PET-guided boost irradiation and simulation to optimize radiation target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, Marc D.; Galldiks, Norbert; Pinkawa, Michael; Holy, Richard; Stoffels, Gabriele; Ermert, Johannes; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Shah, N. Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef; Eble, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    O-(2-18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine-(FET)-PET may be helpful to improve the definition of radiation target volumes in glioblastomas compared with MRI. We analyzed the relapse patterns in FET-PET after a FET- and MRI-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of glioblastomas to perform an optimized target volume definition. A relapse pattern analysis was performed in 13 glioblastoma patients treated with radiochemotherapy within a prospective phase-II-study between 2008 and 2009. Radiotherapy was performed as an integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IB-IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 Gy for the boost target volume, based on baseline FET-PET (FET-1) and 60 Gy for the MRI-based (MRI-1) standard target volume. The single doses were 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively. Location and volume of recurrent tumors in FET-2 and MRI-2 were analyzed related to initial tumor, detected in baseline FET-1. Variable target volumes were created theoretically based on FET-1 to optimally cover recurrent tumor. The tumor volume overlap in FET and MRI was poor both at baseline (median 12 %; range 0–32) and at time of recurrence (13 %; 0–100). Recurrent tumor volume in FET-2 was localized to 39 % (12–91) in the initial tumor volume (FET-1). Over the time a shrinking (mean 12 (5–26) ml) and shifting (mean 6 (1–10 mm) of the resection cavity was seen. A simulated target volume based on active tumor in FET-1 with an additional safety margin of 7 mm around the FET-1 volume covered recurrent FET tumor volume (FET-2) significantly better than a corresponding target volume based on contrast enhancement in MRI-1 with a same safety margin of 7 mm (100 % (54–100) versus 85 % (0–100); p < 0.01). A simulated planning target volume (PTV), based on FET-1 and additional 7 mm margin plus 5 mm margin for setup-uncertainties was significantly smaller than the conventional, MR-based PTV applied in this study (median 160 (112–297) ml versus 231 (117–386) ml, p < 0

  11. Converging stereotactic radiotherapy using kilovoltage X-rays: experimental irradiation of normal rabbit lung and dose-volume analysis with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  12. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  13. Frequency Distribution of Second Solid Cancer Locations in Relation to the Irradiated Volume Among 115 Patients Treated for Childhood Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diallo, Ibrahima; Haddy, Nadia; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Samand, Akhtar; Quiniou, Eric; Chavaudra, Jean; Alziar, Iannis; Perret, Nathalie; Guerin, Sylvie; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Vathaire, Florent de

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide better estimates of the frequency distribution of second malignant neoplasm (SMN) sites in relation to previous irradiated volumes, and better estimates of the doses delivered to these sites during radiotherapy (RT) of the first malignant neoplasm (FMN). Methods and Materials: The study focused on 115 patients who developed a solid SMN among a cohort of 4581 individuals. The homemade software package Dos E G was used to estimate the radiation doses delivered to SMN sites during RT of the FMN. Three-dimensional geometry was used to evaluate the distances between the irradiated volume, for RT delivered to each FMN, and the site of the subsequent SMN. Results: The spatial distribution of SMN relative to the irradiated volumes in our cohort was as follows: 12% in the central area of the irradiated volume, which corresponds to the planning target volume (PTV), 66% in the beam-bordering region (i.e., the area surrounding the PTV), and 22% in regions located more than 5 cm from the irradiated volume. At the SMN site, all dose levels ranging from almost zero to >75 Gy were represented. A peak SMN frequency of approximately 31% was identified in volumes that received <2.5 Gy. Conclusion: A greater volume of tissues receives low or intermediate doses in regions bordering the irradiated volume with modern multiple-beam RT arrangements. These results should be considered for risk-benefit evaluations of RT.

  14. Interfractional Target Variations for Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Robbins, Jared; Christian, Robert; Godley, Andrew; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, we quantify the interfractional variations in the shape of the clinical target volume (CTV) by analyzing the daily CT data acquired during CT-guided partial breast irradiation (PBI) and compare the effectiveness of various repositioning alignment strategies considered to account for the variations. Methods and Materials: The daily CT data for 13 breast cancer patients treated with PBI in either prone (10 patients) or supine (3 patients) with daily kV CT guidance using CT on Rails (CTVision, Siemens, Malvern, PA) were analyzed. For approximately 25 points on the surface of the CTV, deformation vectors were calculated by means of deformable image registration and verified by visual inspection. These were used to calculate the distances along surface normals (DSN), which directly related to the required margin expansions for each point. The DSN values were determined for seven alignment methods based on volumetric imaging and also two-dimensional projections (portal imaging). Results: The margin expansion necessary to cover 99% of all points for all days was 2.7 mm when utilizing the alignment method based on deformation field data (the best alignment method). The center-of-mass based alignment yielded slightly worse results (a margin of 4.0 mm), and shifts obtained by operator placement (7.9 mm), two-dimensional-based methods (7.0–10.1 mm), and skin marks (13.9 mm) required even larger margin expansions. Target shrinkage was evident for most days by the negative values of DSN. Even with the best alignment, the range of DSN values could be as high as 7 mm, resulting in a large amount of normal tissue irradiation, unless adaptive replanning is employed. Conclusion: The appropriate alignment method is important to minimize the margin requirement to cover the significant interfractional target deformations observed during PBI. The amount of normal tissue unnecessarily irradiated is still not insignificant, and can be minimized if adaptive

  15. The method of estimating the irradiated lung volume in primary breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Miguel Torres Teixeira; Marques, Iara Silva; Geraldo, Jony Marques

    1999-01-01

    Tangential breast fields irradiation usually includes some volume of lung and it is occasionally associated with pneumonitis. The estimation of the amount of lung irradiated can be determined measuring the central lung distance (CLD) by the port films, and it must be inferior to 2.5 cm. The purpose of this study was to determine through a linear regression analysis the relationship between CLD and the geometrical parameters of the treatment, and to develop an equation to predict this volume. The studied population consisted of 100 patients who received definitive radiation for clinical stage I and II breast cancer between January, 1996 and June, 1997. According to the contour of the breast and thorax was determined the angle of the tangential fields. In 71% of the patients the CLD measured by the portal films were superior to 2.5 cm, requiring a new beam arrangement. We develop a simple and convenient quantitative model to predict the irradiated lung volume based on portal films. We need further analysis in order to include variables and antomical variations. (author)

  16. WE-D-17A-04: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAuley, G; Slater, J [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Wroe, A [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the advantages of magnetic focusing for small volume proton irradiations and the potential clinical benefits for radiosurgery targets. The primary goal is to create narrow elongated proton beams of elliptical cross section with superior dose delivery characteristics compared to current delivery modalities (eg, collimated beams). In addition, more general beam shapes are also under investigation. Methods: Two prototype magnets consisting of 24 segments of samarium-cobalt (Sm2Co17) permanent magnetic material adhered into hollow cylinders were manufactured for testing. A single focusing magnet was placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table and 15 mm diameter proton beams with energies and modulation relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications (127 to 186 MeV, and 0 to 30 mm modulation) were delivered to a terminal water tank. Beam dose distributions were measured using a PTW diode detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Longitudinal and transverse dose profiles were analyzed and compared to data from Monte Carlo simulations analogous to the experimental setup. Results: The narrow elongated focused beam spots showed high elliptical symmetry indicating high magnet quality. In addition, when compared to unfocused beams, peak-to-entrance depth dose ratios were 11 to 14% larger (depending on presence or extent of modulation), and minor axis penumbras were 11 to 20% smaller (again depending on modulation) for focused beams. These results suggest that the use of rare earth magnet assemblies is practical and could improve dose-sparing of normal tissue and organs at risk while delivering enhanced dose to small proton radiosurgery targets. Conclusion: Quadrapole rare earth magnetic assemblies are a promising and inexpensive method to counteract particle out scatter that tends to degrade the peak to entrance performance of small field proton beams. Knowledge gained from current experiments will inform the design of a prototype treatment

  17. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  18. Reduced cost design of liquid lithium target for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is being jointly planned to provide an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source to produce intense high energy neutrons (2 MW/m 2 ) up to 200 dpa and a sufficient irradiation volume (500 cm 3 ) for testing the candidate materials and components up to about a full lifetime of their anticipated use in ITER and DEMO. To realize such a condition, 40 MeV deuteron beam with a current of 250 mA is injected into high speed liquid lithium flow with a speed of 20 m/s. Following Conceptual Design Activity (1995-1998), a design study with focus on cost reduction without changing its original mission has been done in 1999. The following major changes to the CAD target design have been considered in the study and included in the new design: i) number of the Li target has been changed from 2 to 1, ii) spare of impurity traps of the Li loop was removed although the spare will be stored in a laboratory for quick exchange, iii) building volume was reduced via design changes in lithium loop length. This paper describes the reduced cost design of the lithium target system and recent status of Key Element Technology activities. (author)

  19. Shiva target irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manes, K.R.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Coleman, L.W.; Storm, E.K.; Glaze, J.A.; Hurley, C.A.; Rienecker, F.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The first laser/plasma studies performed with the Shiva laser system will be two sided irradiations extending the data obtained by other LLL lasers to higher powers. The twenty approximately 1 TW laser pulses will reach the target simultaneously from above and below in nested pentagonal clusters. The upper and lower clusters of ten beams each are radially polarized so that they strike the target in p-polarization and maximize absorption. This geometry introduces laser system isolation problems which will be briefly discussed. The layout and types of target diagnostics will be described and a brief status report on the facility given

  20. Sonographic determination of the irradiated pulmonary volume in case of irradiation of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittich, G.; Hohenberg, G.; Seitz, W.; Vienna Univ.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine the irradiated pulmonary volume, comparative examinations by sonography and computed tomography were made in ten patients submitted to postoperative radiotherapy for mammary carcinoma. The physical and anatomical conditions of sonographic volumetry are discussed. In all cases irradiated with tangential contralateral fields, the irradiated pulmonary volume was less than 200 ccm (118 ccm on an average). The sonographic results did not differ essentially from those of computed tomography, so that the sonographic examination can be offered as a simple and sufficient precise method of documentation within the frame of an individual therapy planning. (orig.) [de

  1. Targeting carbonic anhydrase IX by nitroimidazole based sulfamides enhances the therapeutic effect of tumor irradiation: A new concept of dual targeting drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, Ludwig; Peeters, Sarah G.J.A.; Kuijk, Simon J.A. van; Yaromina, Ala; Lieuwes, Natasja G.; Saraya, Ruchi; Biemans, Rianne; Rami, Marouan; Parvathaneni, Nanda Kumar; Vullo, Daniela; Vooijs, Marc; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) plays an important role in pH regulation processes critical for tumor cell growth and metastasis. We hypothesize that a dual targeting bioreductive nitroimidazole based anti-CAIX sulfamide drug (DH348) will reduce tumor growth and sensitize tumors to irradiation in a CAIX dependent manner. Material and methods: The effect of the dual targeting anti-CAIX (DH348) and its single targeting control drugs on extracellular acidification and radiosensitivity was examined in HT-29 colorectal carcinoma cells. Tumor growth and time to reach 4× start volume (T4×SV) was monitored for animals receiving DH348 (10 mg/kg) combined with tumor single dose irradiation (10 Gy). Results: In vitro, DH348 reduced hypoxia-induced extracellular acidosis, but did not change hypoxic radiosensitivity. In vivo, DH348 monotherapy decreased tumor growth rate and sensitized tumors to radiation (enhancement ratio 1.50) without systemic toxicity only for CAIX expressing tumors. Conclusions: A newly designed nitroimidazole and sulfamide dual targeting drug reduces hypoxic extracellular acidification, slows down tumor growth at nontoxic doses and sensitizes tumors to irradiation all in a CAIX dependent manner, suggesting no “off-target” effects. Our data therefore indicate the potential utility of a dual drug approach as a new strategy for tumor-specific targeting

  2. Computational Modeling of Ablation on an Irradiated Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2017-11-01

    Computational modeling of pulsed nanosecond laser interaction with an irradiated metallic target is presented. The model formulation involves ablation of the metallic target irradiated by pulsed high intensity laser at normal atmospheric conditions. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented along with its relevance for the development of protective shields. In this context, the available results for a representative irradiation from 1064 nm laser pulse is used to analyze various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  3. The BLAIRR Irradiation Facility Hybrid Spallation Target Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos N.; Hanson A.; Brown, D.; Elbakhshawn, M.

    2016-04-11

    BLAIRR STUDY STATUS OVERVIEW Beamline Complex Evaluation/Assessment and Adaptation to the Goals Facility Radiological Constraints ? Large scale analyses of conventional facility and integrated shield (concrete, soil)Target Optimization and Design: Beam-target interaction optimization Hadronic interaction and energy deposition limitations Single phase and Hybrid target concepts Irradiation Damage Thermo-mechanical considerations Spallation neutron fluence optimization for (a) fast neutron irradiation damage (b) moderator/reflector studies, (c) NTOF potential and optimization (d) mono-energetic neutron beam

  4. Definition of internal target volume and domestric study for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Mian; Liu Mengzhong; Deng Xiaowu; Zhang Li; Huang Xiaoyan; Cai Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To define individualized internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional (4D) CT, and to compare the differences in target volume definition and dose distribution among 3D, 4D and respiratory-gated plans. Methods: 4DCT scanning was obtained for 12 patients with hepatocellular. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and normal tissues were contoured on all 10 respiratory phases of 4DCT images. The 3D, 4D and gated treatment plans were prepared for each patient using three different planning target volumes (PTVs): 1) PTV 3D was derived from a single CTV plus conventional margins; 2) PTV 4D was derived from ITV 4D , which encompassed all 10 CTVs plus setup margins (SMs); 3) PT Gating was derived from ITV Gating , which encompassed 3 CTVs within gating-window at end-expiration plus SMs. The PTV volume and dose distribution were compared among different plans. Results: The PTV3D was the largest in all 12 patients, but still missed partial target volume in 5 patients when comparing with PTV4D. Both the 4D plans and the gated plans spared more normal tissues than the 3D plans, especially the liver. Without increasing normal tissue dose, the 4D plans allowed for increasing the calculated dose from (50.8 ± 2.0) Gy (3D plans) to (54.7 ± 3.3) Gy, and the gated plans could further increase the dose to (58.0 ± 3.9) Gy. Conclusions: The 4DCT-based plans can ensure optimal target coverage with less irradiation of normal tissues and allow dose escalation when compared with 3D plans. Respiratory gated radiotherapy can further reduce the target volumes to spare more surrounding tissues, especially for patients with large extent of respiratory mobility. (authors)

  5. Preliminary Beam Irradiation Test for RI Production Targets at KOMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Cho, Yong Sub; Seol, Kyung Tae; Song, Young Gi; Kim, Dae Il; Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung; Min, Yi Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The new beamline and target irradiation facility has been constructed for the production of therapeutic radio-isotope. Sr-82 and Cu-67 were selected as the target isotope in this facility, they are promising isotope for the PET imaging and cancer therapy. For the facility commissioning, the irradiation test for the prototype-target was conducted to confirm the feasibility of radio-isotope production, the proto-type targets are made of RbCl pellet and the natural Zn metal for Sr-82 and Cu-67 production respectively, In this paper, an introduction to the RI production targetry system and the results of the preliminary beam irradiation test are discussed. the low-flux beam irradiation tests for proto-type RI target have been conducted. As a result of the beam irradiation tests, we could obtain the evidence of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production, have confirmed the feasibility of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production at KOMAC RI production facility.

  6. Preliminary Beam Irradiation Test for RI Production Targets at KOMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Cho, Yong Sub; Seol, Kyung Tae; Song, Young Gi; Kim, Dae Il; Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung; Min, Yi Sub

    2016-01-01

    The new beamline and target irradiation facility has been constructed for the production of therapeutic radio-isotope. Sr-82 and Cu-67 were selected as the target isotope in this facility, they are promising isotope for the PET imaging and cancer therapy. For the facility commissioning, the irradiation test for the prototype-target was conducted to confirm the feasibility of radio-isotope production, the proto-type targets are made of RbCl pellet and the natural Zn metal for Sr-82 and Cu-67 production respectively, In this paper, an introduction to the RI production targetry system and the results of the preliminary beam irradiation test are discussed. the low-flux beam irradiation tests for proto-type RI target have been conducted. As a result of the beam irradiation tests, we could obtain the evidence of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production, have confirmed the feasibility of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production at KOMAC RI production facility

  7. Analysis of influence factors on the volume of pelvic bowel irradiated for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yuxiang; Cai Yong; Zhu Xianggao; Han Shukui; Xu Bo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate influence of prone/ supine position, gender, operation, bladder distension on bowel irradiated for patients with rectal cancer during pelvic radiotherapy. Methods: 36 patients with rectal cancer were investigated. Treatment plans were created with three dimensional treatment planning system. The dose and volume of bowel irradiated were analyzed according to dose-volume histograms (DVH) for every patient. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy. Results: The extent of bladder distension significantly influenced the mean doses and the V 45 high dose volumes of bowel irradiated. The treatment position and gender significantly influenced the V 15 low dose volume of bowel irradiated, the operation significantly influenced the mean doses of bowel. Either prone and supine position, or preoperative and postoperative, the doses of bowel irradiated for good bladder distension were lower and the volumes were smaller than that for bad bladder distension. The V 45 high dose volume of bowel irradiated for bad and good bladder distension at prone position were 15.3% and 7.4% (P=0.023), respectively, and at postoperative 14.1% and 7.2% (P=0.014), respectively. Conclusions: The doses and volumes of pelvic bowel irradiated were significantly influenced by the extent of bladder distension, and partly influenced by the prone/supine position, gender and operation. (authors)

  8. What margins should be added to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy treatment planning of lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, L.; Wittgren, L.; Holmberg, O.

    1995-01-01

    When defining the planning target volume (PTV) in radiotherapy treatment planning, it is vital to add geometrical margins of normal tissue around the clinical target volume (CTV). This is to ensure that the whole CTV will receive the planned absorbed dose taking into account both set-up deviations and target movements as well as other geometrical variations in the treatment chain. The problem is our limited knowledge of how large these margins should be. To assess the size of needed margins around the CTV in conformal radiotherapy of lung cancer, electronic portal imaging was employed in 232 irradiation field set-ups of 14 patients. This was done in order to quantify the uncertainty in the execution of treatment considering patient movement and set-up displacements. For an estimation of the added geometrical variation from target movement during irradiation, fluoroscopy was used at the simulation of the irradiation fields. The set-up study showed an average systematic deviation for all individual fields of 3.1 mm and an average maximal systematic deviation (in either transversal or craniocaudal direction) of 4.8 mm. The random errors can be described by an average standard deviation of 2.8 mm for all fields in either direction. Major gradual displacements as a function of time was also detected in one of the patients. CTV-movements of several millimetres during respiration could be observed. It was also seen that heartbeats could add to CTV-movements during irradiation with an equal magnitude. The combined effect of these factors are considered when making an overall estimation of margins that should be added to the CTV

  9. High-vacuum chamber for the irradiation of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmel, E.; Dullnig, H.

    1975-01-01

    The high vacuum chamber for irradiating targets with X-rays, electron or ion beams is connected to a magazine storage vessel for the targets through a loading duct which can be evacuated. This duct is traversed by a carriage transporting a magazine to the irradiation position. The duct can be closed by a closing valve. Inside the chamber there is a grip attached to a swivel arm which takes a frame with a target from the magazine, or vice versa, and moves it into the irradiation position. This means that the chamber must always be kept at a constant internal pressure. The swiveling shaft for the swivel arm and the transport pinion of the carriage in addition are magnetically coupled to drive shafts located outside the chamber, which obviates the need for any seals. The grip may also deposit the frame on a goniometer, which allows the target to be aligned in the irradiation position. In addition, the measuring probes used to record the amount of reflected radiation are installed in the chamber under electrically insulated conditions relative to the chamber. (DG/RF) [de

  10. Post-Irradiation Examination of Array Targets - Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2004-01-23

    During FY 2001, two arrays, each containing seven neptunium-loaded targets, were irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho to examine the influence of multi-target self-shielding on {sup 236}Pu content and to evaluate fission product release data. One array consisted of seven targets that contained 10 vol% NpO{sub 2} pellets, while the other array consisted of seven targets that contained 20 vol % NpO{sub 2} pellets. The arrays were located in the same irradiation facility but were axially separated to minimize the influence of one array on the other. Each target also contained a dosimeter package, which consisted of a small NpO{sub 2} wire that was inside a vanadium container. After completion of irradiation and shipment back to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, nine of the targets (four from the 10 vol% array and five from the 20 vol% array) were punctured for pressure measurement and measurement of {sup 85}Kr. These nine targets and the associated dosimeters were then chemically processed to measure the residual neptunium, total plutonium production, {sup 238}Pu production, and {sup 236}Pu concentration at discharge. The amount and isotopic composition of fission products were also measured. This report provides the results of the processing and analysis of the nine targets.

  11. The irradiation lung volume in tangential fields for the treatment of a breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y. T.; Kim, J. R.; Kang, H. J.; Sohn, J. H.; Kang, S. H.; Chun, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is one of the complications caused by radiation therapy that includes a portion of the lung tissue. The severity of radiation induced pulmonary dysfunction depends on the irradiated lung volume, total dose, dose rate and underlying pulmonary function. The lung volume was measured for 25 patients with breast cancer irradiated with tangential field from Jan. 1995 to Aug. 1996. Parameters that can predict the irradiated lung volume included; (1) the perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall at the center of the field (CLD); (2) the maximum perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential field edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall (MLD); (3) the greatest perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential edge to the posterior part of anterior chest wall on CT image at the center of the longitudinal field (GPD); (4) the length of the longitudinal field (L). The irradiated lung volume(RV), the entire both lung volume(EV) and the ipsilateral lung volume(IV) were measured using dose volume histogram. The RV is 61-279cc, the RV/EV is 2.9-13.0% and the RV/EN is 4.9-29.6%. The CLD, the MLD and the GPD are 1.9-3.3cm and 1.4-3.1cm respectively. The significant relations between the irradiated lung volume such as RV, RV/EV, RV/IV and parameters such as CLD, MLD, GPD, L, CLD x L, MLD x L and GPD x L are not found with little variances in parameters. The RV/IV of the left breast irradiation is significances. The significant relationship between the irradiated lung volume and predictors is not found with little variation on parameters. The irradiated lung volume in the tangential field is less than 10% of entire lung volume when CLD is less than 3cm. The RV/IV of the left tangential field is larger than that of the right but there was no significant differences in RV/EVs. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis has not occurred during minimum 6 months follow up. (author)

  12. Mapping of nodal disease in locally advanced prostate cancer: Rethinking the clinical target volume for pelvic nodal irradiation based on vascular rather than bony anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Helen A.; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Zietman, Anthony L.; Wolfgang, John A.; Saksena, Mansi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Toxicity from pelvic irradiation could be reduced if fields were limited to likely areas of nodal involvement rather than using the standard 'four-field box.' We employed a novel magnetic resonance lymphangiographic technique to highlight the likely sites of occult nodal metastasis from prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen prostate cancer patients with pathologically confirmed node-positive disease had a total of 69 pathologic nodes identifiable by lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI and semiquantitative nodal analysis. Fourteen of these nodes were in the para-aortic region, and 55 were in the pelvis. The position of each of these malignant nodes was mapped to a common template based on its relation to skeletal or vascular anatomy. Results: Relative to skeletal anatomy, nodes covered a diffuse volume from the mid lumbar spine to the superior pubic ramus and along the sacrum and pelvic side walls. In contrast, the nodal metastases mapped much more tightly relative to the large pelvic vessels. A proposed pelvic clinical target volume to encompass the region at greatest risk of containing occult nodal metastases would include a 2.0-cm radial expansion volume around the distal common iliac and proximal external and internal iliac vessels that would encompass 94.5% of the pelvic nodes at risk as defined by our node-positive prostate cancer patient cohort. Conclusions: Nodal metastases from prostate cancer are largely localized along the major pelvic vasculature. Defining nodal radiation treatment portals based on vascular rather than bony anatomy may allow for a significant decrease in normal pelvic tissue irradiation and its associated toxicities

  13. Integral dose and evaluation of irradiated tissue volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Kalina, V.K.; Belous, A.K.; Gaevskij, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Two parameters having potentialities of radiotherapy planning improvement are under consideration. One of these two parameters in an integral dose. An efficiency of application of special tables for integral dose estimation is noted. These tables were developed by the Kiev Physician Improvement Institute and the Cybernetics Institute of the Ukrainian SSR Academy of Science. The meaning of the term of ''irradiated tissue volume'' is specified, and the method of calculation of the irradiated tissue effective mass is considered. It is possible to evaluate with higher accuracy tolerance doses taking into account the irradiated mass

  14. Target volume definition for external beam partial breast radiotherapy: Clinical, pathological and technical studies informing current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna M.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Yarnold, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is currently under investigation in several phase III trials and, following a recent consensus statement, its use off-study may increase despite ongoing uncertainty regarding optimal target volume definition. We review the clinical, pathological and technical evidence for target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (EB-PBI). The optimal method of tumour bed (TB) delineation requires X-ray CT imaging of implanted excision cavity wall markers. The definition of clinical target volume (CTV) as TB plus concentric 15 mm margins is based on the anatomical distribution of multifocal and multicentric disease around the primary tumour in mastectomy specimens, and the clinical locations of local tumour relapse (LR) after breast conservation surgery. If the majority of LR originate from foci of residual invasive and/or intraduct disease in the vicinity of the TB after complete microscopic resection, CTV margin logically takes account of the position of primary tumour within the surgical resection specimen. The uncertain significance of independent primary tumours as sources of preventable LR, and of wound healing responses in stimulating LR, increases the difficulties in defining optimal CTV. These uncertainties may resolve after long-term follow-up of current PBI trials. By contrast, a commonly used 10 mm clinical to planning target volume (PTV) margin has a stronger evidence base, although departmental set-up errors need to be confirmed locally. A CTV-PTV margin >10 mm may be required in women with larger breasts and/or large seromas, whilst the role of image-guided radiotherapy with or without TB markers in reducing CTV-PTV margins needs to be explored.

  15. Equivalent uniform dose concept evaluated by theoretical dose volume histograms for thoracic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J L; Lorchel, F; Perrot, Y; Aletti, P; Noel, A; Wolf, D; Courvoisier, P; Bosset, J F

    2007-03-01

    The goal of our study was to quantify the limits of the EUD models for use in score functions in inverse planning software, and for clinical application. We focused on oesophagus cancer irradiation. Our evaluation was based on theoretical dose volume histograms (DVH), and we analyzed them using volumetric and linear quadratic EUD models, average and maximum dose concepts, the linear quadratic model and the differential area between each DVH. We evaluated our models using theoretical and more complex DVHs for the above regions of interest. We studied three types of DVH for the target volume: the first followed the ICRU dose homogeneity recommendations; the second was built out of the first requirements and the same average dose was built in for all cases; the third was truncated by a small dose hole. We also built theoretical DVHs for the organs at risk, in order to evaluate the limits of, and the ways to use both EUD(1) and EUD/LQ models, comparing them to the traditional ways of scoring a treatment plan. For each volume of interest we built theoretical treatment plans with differences in the fractionation. We concluded that both volumetric and linear quadratic EUDs should be used. Volumetric EUD(1) takes into account neither hot-cold spot compensation nor the differences in fractionation, but it is more sensitive to the increase of the irradiated volume. With linear quadratic EUD/LQ, a volumetric analysis of fractionation variation effort can be performed.

  16. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  17. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo

    2011-01-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce 99 Mo- 99m Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl x dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of 235 U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  18. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for radiation therapy of benign skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.P.; Liguoro, D.; San Galli, F.

    2001-01-01

    Skull base tumours represent a out 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate: it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimensional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. (authors)

  19. An analytic solution for calculating the beam intensity profiles useful to irradiate target volumes with bi-concave outlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Neve, W; Derycke, S; De Wagter, C [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    A heuristic planing procedure allowing to obtain a 3-dimensional conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy for target volumes with a bi-concave or multi-concave shape has been developed. The described method is tested on a phantom simulating a pelvic target, described by Brahme.

  20. SU-F-T-113: Inherent Functional Dependence of Spinal Cord Doses of Variable Irradiated Volumes in Spine SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L; Braunstein, S; Chiu, J [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Spinal cord tolerance for SBRT has been recommended for the maximum point dose level or at irradiated volumes such as 0.35 mL or 10% of contoured volumes. In this study, we investigated an inherent functional relationship that associates these dose surrogates for irradiated spinal cord volumes of up to 3.0 mL. Methods: A hidden variable termed as Effective Dose Radius (EDR) was formulated based on a dose fall-off model to correlate dose at irradiated spinal cord volumes ranging from 0 mL (point maximum) to 3.0 mL. A cohort of 15 spine SBRT cases was randomly selected to derive an EDR-parameterized formula. The mean prescription dose for the studied cases was 21.0±8.0 Gy (range, 10–40Gy) delivered in 3±1 fractions with target volumes of 39.1 ± 70.6 mL. Linear regression and variance analysis were performed for the fitting parameters of variable EDR values. Results: No direct correlation was found between the dose at maximum point and doses at variable spinal cord volumes. For example, Pearson R{sup 2} = 0.643 and R{sup 2}= 0.491 were obtained when correlating the point maximum dose with the spinal cord dose at 1 mL and 3 mL, respectively. However, near perfect correlation (R{sup 2} ≥0.99) was obtained when corresponding parameterized EDRs. Specifically, Pearson R{sup 2}= 0.996 and R{sup 2} = 0.990 were obtained when correlating EDR (maximum point dose) with EDR (dose at 1 mL) and EDR(dose at 3 mL), respectively. As a result, high confidence level look-up tables were established to correlate spinal cord doses at the maximum point to any finite irradiated volumes. Conclusion: An inherent functional relationship was demonstrated for spine SBRT. Such a relationship unifies dose surrogates at variable cord volumes and proves that a single dose surrogate (e.g. point maximum dose) is mathematically sufficient in constraining the overall spinal cord dose tolerance for SBRT.

  1. Method for mounting laser fusion targets for irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, R. Jay; Farnum, Eugene H.; McCall, Gene H.

    1977-07-26

    Methods for preparing laser fusion targets of the ball-and-disk type are disclosed. Such targets are suitable for irradiation with one or two laser beams to produce the requisite uniform compression of the fuel material.

  2. Effect of electron-irradiation on the free volume of PEEK studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Haraya, K.; Hattori, S.; Sasuga, T.

    1994-01-01

    A good linear correlation was found between the size of a cavity where ortho-positronium (o-Ps) annihilates by the pick-off mechanism and the total free volume of molecular liquids and polymers. Based on the correlation, the free volume of poly(aryl ether-ether ketone) (PEEK) was evaluated as a function of electron irradiation dose and the result was compared with that obtained from gas diffusivity measurements. It was found that the effect of irradiation on the free volume of PEEK was rather small; the free volume was decreased only by a few percent (relative value) when the samples were irradiated with a dose of 50 MGy in air. ((orig.))

  3. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenwirth, C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Drexler, S.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); Girst, S.; Reindl, J. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Walsh, D.W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Friedl, A.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); and others

    2015-04-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future.

  4. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebenwirth, C.; Greubel, C.; Drexler, S.E.; Girst, S.; Reindl, J.; Walsh, D.W.M.; Dollinger, G.; Friedl, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future

  5. Outcome and patterns of failure following limited-volume irradiation for malignant astrocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, A.S.; Maor, M.H.; Yung, W.K.A.; Bruner, J.M.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Moser, R.P.; Lee, Ya-Yen (Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Between January 1982 and June 1986, 60 consecutive patients with high-grade astrocytomas (39 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 21 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA)) were treated with radiation therapy after biopsy (13 patients) or resection (47 patients). 53 patients were treated with limited-volume irradiation, 7 received whole-brain irradiation. The mean tumor dose was 65.4 Gy. In 35 patients, chemotherapy was given as part of their initial treatment. The 1- and 2-year survivals for GBM patients were 40 and 14 percent, respectively. Survival figures for AA patients were 76 and 52 percent at 1 and 2 years, respectively. The progression-free rate at 1 year was 13 percent in GBM and 29 percent in AA patients. 34 of 48 patients who received limited-volume irradiation had evidence of progression on postirradiation CT scans. 6 patients (3 GBM, 3 AA) had evidence of a new intracranial metastatic site on CT scan. In 3 patients the metastasis was within the previously irradiated volume, and in 3 other patients, it was outside this volume. All 6 had evidence of progression of their primary tumor at the original location on CT scan prior to the discovery of the metastatic site. 21 patients (15 GBM, 6 AA) had at least 1 postirradiation reoperation for a recurrent mass. 19 patients had recurrent tumors in the primary site, and 2 patients had necrosis but no tumor. Patients who received limited-volume irradiation for high-grade astrocytomas achieved the same survival results as patients treated previously with whole brain irradiation. New intra-cranial metastases did not influence the outcome, since these were always antedated by tumor progression at the primary site. (author). 16 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs.

  6. Validation of a new design of tellurium dioide-irradiated target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fllaoui, Aziz; Ghamad, Younes; Zoubir, Brahim; Ayaz, Zinel Abidine; El Morabiti, Aissam; Amayoud, Hafid [Centre National de l' Energie des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires, Rabat (Morocco); Chakir, El Mahjoub [Nuclear Physics Department, University Ibn Toufail, Kenitra (Morocco)

    2016-10-15

    Production of iodine-131 by neutron activation of tellurium in tellurium dioxide (TeO{sub 2}) material requires a target that meets the safety requirements. In a radiopharmaceutical production unit, a new lid for a can was designed, which permits tight sealing of the target by using tungsten inert gas welding. The leakage rate of all prepared targets was assessed using a helium mass spectrometer. The accepted leakage rate is ≤ 10 - 4 mbr.L/s, according to the approved safety report related to iodine-131 production in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor (TRIGA: Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics). To confirm the resistance of the new design to the irradiation conditions in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor's central thimble, a study of heat effect on the sealed targets for 7 hours in an oven was conducted and the leakage rates were evaluated. The results show that the tightness of the targets is ensured up to 600 .deg. C with the appearance of deformations on lids beyond 450 .deg. C. The study of heat transfer through the target was conducted by adopting a one-dimensional approximation, under consideration of the three transfer modes-convection, conduction, and radiation. The quantities of heat generated by gamma and neutron heating were calculated by a validated computational model for the neutronic simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. Using the heat transfer equations according to the three modes of heat transfer, the thermal study of I-131 production by irradiation of the target in the central thimble showed that the temperatures of materials do not exceed the corresponding melting points. To validate this new design, several targets have been irradiated in the central thimble according to a preplanned irradiation program, going from 4 hours of irradiation at a power level of 0.5 MW up to 35 hours (7 h/d for 5 days a week) at 1.5 MW. The results show that the irradiated targets are

  7. Validation of a New Design of Tellurium Dioxide-Irradiated Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Fllaoui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of iodine-131 by neutron activation of tellurium in tellurium dioxide (TeO2 material requires a target that meets the safety requirements. In a radiopharmaceutical production unit, a new lid for a can was designed, which permits tight sealing of the target by using tungsten inert gas welding. The leakage rate of all prepared targets was assessed using a helium mass spectrometer. The accepted leakage rate is ≤ 10−4 mbr.L/s, according to the approved safety report related to iodine-131 production in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor (TRIGA: Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics. To confirm the resistance of the new design to the irradiation conditions in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor's central thimble, a study of heat effect on the sealed targets for 7 hours in an oven was conducted and the leakage rates were evaluated. The results show that the tightness of the targets is ensured up to 600°C with the appearance of deformations on lids beyond 450°C. The study of heat transfer through the target was conducted by adopting a one-dimensional approximation, under consideration of the three transfer modes—convection, conduction, and radiation. The quantities of heat generated by gamma and neutron heating were calculated by a validated computational model for the neutronic simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. Using the heat transfer equations according to the three modes of heat transfer, the thermal study of I-131 production by irradiation of the target in the central thimble showed that the temperatures of materials do not exceed the corresponding melting points. To validate this new design, several targets have been irradiated in the central thimble according to a preplanned irradiation program, going from 4 hours of irradiation at a power level of 0.5 MW up to 35 hours (7 h/d for 5 days a week at 1.5 MW. The results show that the irradiated targets are

  8. Influence of volume on intraoperatively irradiated canine ureters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, S.M.; Powers, B.E.; Thames, H.D.; Vujaskovic, Z.; LaRue, S.M.; Park, R.D.; Gillette, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is used to deliver high single doses of radiation to the tumor bed following surgical removal of various abdominal malignancies. The advantage of IORT is the ability to remove sensitive normal tissues from the treatment field and limit the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The purpose of this study was to determine dose-volume relationships for retroperitoneal tissues. Materials and methods: 134 adult beagle dogs were irradiated to the surgically exposed paraaortic area. Normal tissues included in the treatment field were aorta, peripheral nerve, ureter, bone and the muscle. Groups of 4 - 8 dogs were irradiated to doses ranging from 18 - 54 Gy for a 2x5 cm field, from 12 - 46 Gy for a 4x5 cm field, and 12 - 42 Gy to an 8x5 cm field. The radiations were done using 6 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. Dogs were observed for three years after radiation at which time they were euthanatized, perfused and tissues taken for histologic and histomorphometric evaluation. Transverse sections of the ureter were taken from the proximal, middle and distal segments. Histologically, proximal portions of the ureters with greater than 5 times normal diameter were considered to have severe hydroureter. Ureteral strictures and hydroneophrosis were evaluated by excretory urograms. Excretory urograms were done prior to treatment and annually after treatment or prior to necropsy for each dog in the experiments. A grading system was devised for predicting ureteral stenosis based on ureteral and renal pelvic dilatation. Results: A strong dose and volume relationship was identified for ureteral injury using the mixture model analysis which takes into account latency as well as dose. Subsequent to earlier edema, fibrin and vessel damage, progressive fibrosis developed and likely caused uteral stricture resulting in hydroureter. Severe hydroureter was observed as early as three months. The ED 50 for hydroureter determined

  9. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Vees, Hansjoerg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We evaluate the contribution of 18 F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median = 5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of 18 F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the 18 F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV man ) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV 40% and GTV 50% ), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV SBR ), and a region growing (GTV RG ) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p = 0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Conclusions: Semi-automated segmentation techniques for 18 F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  10. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-11-01

    We evaluate the contribution of (18)F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median=5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of (18)F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the (18)F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), and a region growing (GTV(RG)) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p=0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Semi-automated segmentation techniques for (18)F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  11. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Fiedler, F; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, F; Perali, I; Sterpin, E

    2015-01-01

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation. (paper)

  12. Topography of π--irradiated volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueche, G.

    1976-02-01

    The charge exchange reaction π - p → π 0 n and the radiative capture of negative pions π - p → nγ can be used to control the range of π - in matter like human tissue. The calculations reported in this paper demonstrate that it is possible to construct range monitors which allow the radiation therapist immediate control of the π - beam setting with respect to the tumor volume. This monitoring of range can be achieved from outside the body within short times compared to irradiation times which are typical in therapy. (orig.) [de

  13. Diffuse scattering from laser-irradiated plane targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.G.M. van; Olsen, J.N.; Sachsenmaier, P.; Sigel, R.; Eidmann, K.; Godwin, R.P.

    1976-11-01

    Optical calorimetry of the laser radiation scattered from plane targets irradiated by 0.3 Joule/30 ps Nd-laser pulses with intensities up to 10 16 W cm -2 has been performed with an emphasis on diffuse scattering. Diffuse scattering outside the solid angle of the focusing lens is found to be a major reflection loss from the target. A fraction of 0.3 to 0.5 of the incident pulse energy was absorbed in the target with only a very weak dependence on pulse energy and target material. (orig.) [de

  14. The development of radiocaries after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willich, N.; Gundacker, K.; Rohloff, R.

    1988-01-01

    39 patients, who were irradiated with doses of 50 to 70 Gy for ENT-tumors over a period of 3.5 months to three years prior to the examination, showed a rapidly progressing caries of the teeth inside the target volume. The teeth outside the target volume developed a caries of less extent. Radiation induced xerostomia, effects of the irradiation of the soft tissues, nutrition habits and hygienics are discussed as causes for the damage of the teeth. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiotherapy of lung cancer: Any room left for elective mediastinal irradiation in 2011?; Radiotherapie des cancers bronchiques: place de l'irradiation mediastinale prophylactique en 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Houtte, P.; Roelandts, M. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, institut Jules-Bordet, 121, boulevard de Waterloo, 1000 Bruxelles (Belgium); Faculte de medecine, universite libre de Bruxelles, campus erasme, route de Lennik 808, 1070 Bruxelles (Belgium); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69310 Pierre-Benite (France); EA3738, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-1, domaine Rockefeller, 8, avenue Rockefeller, 69373 Lyon cedex 08 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Traditionally, the target volumes of curative-intent radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer include all uninvolved mediastinal nodes. However, an improvement in tumour control requires an increase of the total dose to the macroscopic target volume. This is only achievable if the irradiation of the organs at risk is reduced, i.e. elective irradiation of the mediastinum is omitted. The available data suggest that elective mediastinal irradiation may be safely omitted, provided that an adequate staging procedure, including FDG PET-CT, has been performed. (authors)

  16. Irradiation uniformity of spherical targets by multiple uv beams from OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beich, W.; Dunn, M.; Hutchison, R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct-drive laser fusion demands extremely high levels of irradiation uniformity to ensure uniform compression of spherical targets. The assessment of illumination uniformity of targets irradiated by multiple beams from the OMEGA facility is made with the aid of multiple beams spherical superposition codes, which take into account ray tracing and absorption and a detailed knowledge of the intensity distribution of each beam in the target plane. In this report, recent estimates of the irradiation uniformity achieved with 6 and 12 uv beams of OMEGA will be compared with previous measurements in the IR, and predictions will be made for the uv illumination uniformity achievable with 24 beams of OMEGA

  17. Technique for sparing previously irradiated critical normal structures in salvage proton craniospinal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W; Wolanski, Mark R; Simmons, Joseph W; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C

    2013-01-01

    Cranial reirradiation is clinically appropriate in some cases but cumulative radiation dose to critical normal structures remains a practical concern. The authors developed a simple technique in 3D conformal proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) to block organs at risk (OAR) while minimizing underdosing of adjacent target brain tissue. Two clinical cases illustrate the use of proton therapy to provide salvage CSI when a previously irradiated OAR required sparing from additional radiation dose. The prior radiation plan was coregistered to the treatment planning CT to create a planning organ at risk volume (PRV) around the OAR. Right and left lateral cranial whole brain proton apertures were created with a small block over the PRV. Then right and left lateral “inverse apertures” were generated, creating an aperture opening in the shape of the area previously blocked and blocking the area previously open. The inverse aperture opening was made one millimeter smaller than the original block to minimize the risk of dose overlap. The inverse apertures were used to irradiate the target volume lateral to the PRV, selecting a proton beam range to abut the 50% isodose line against either lateral edge of the PRV. Together, the 4 cranial proton fields created a region of complete dose avoidance around the OAR. Comparative photon treatment plans were generated with opposed lateral X-ray fields with custom blocks and coplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy optimized to avoid the PRV. Cumulative dose volume histograms were evaluated. Treatment plans were developed and successfully implemented to provide sparing of previously irradiated critical normal structures while treating target brain lateral to these structures. The absence of dose overlapping during irradiation through the inverse apertures was confirmed by film. Compared to the lateral X-ray and IMRT treatment plans, the proton CSI technique improved coverage of target brain tissue while providing the least

  18. Irradiation of blood, blood compounds and cell culture in equipment of radiotherapy of clinical usage. Study about volume and ideal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Pereira, Adelino Jose; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1996-01-01

    The irradiation of blood bags with the objective of minimizing the graft-versus-host disease in the proceedings of blood transfusion has been consolidated as an indispensable step in the advances of hematopoietic system diseases therapeutics. This practice performed in the great oncological treatment centers requires appropriate equipment (cell irradiators), that due to the high coast, is inaccessible to the majority of the services. The main objective of this work is the show the technique developed by the Radiological Physics Service of the Hospital A. C. Camargo Radiation Department, using the teletherapy equipment of clinical usage available at the Institution. The literature shows that a total dose of 2000 to 3500 c Gy must be administered to all target volume to get an ideal dose/volume relation that proportionates better therapeutic results, neutralizing the cells which are causative of post transfusion reactions of rejection, without prejudicing the other cells that are necessary to the maintenance and preservation of the transplanted person's hematopoietic system functions. With the technic developed for optimization of the irradiation. it is possible to conclude that the utilization of radiotherapy equipment of clinical usage for blood irradiation, substituting cells irradiators, is a good option, permitting safe transfusion of products irradiated with adequate dose. (author)

  19. Small volume target for F-18 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicioli, M.; Schuler, J.; Marchand, P.; Brasse, D.

    2017-05-01

    In order to reduce the volume of O-18 enriched water used for each F-18 production for research a small volume target of 1 ml has been designed at IPHC. The designed is derived from ACSI 3.8ml F-18 target and uses both water and Helium cooling. After one year of use production yield is reported.

  20. Transcranial sonography: integration into target volume definition for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Becker, Georg; Flentje, Michael; Richter, Susanne; Goerttler-Krauspe, Irene; Koelbl, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies indicate that transcranial sonography (TCS) reliably displays the extension of malignant brain tumors. The effect of integrating TCS into radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was investigated herein. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients subtotally resected for GBM underwent TCS during radiotherapy planning and were conventionally treated (54 to 60 Gy). Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and stereotactic boost planning target volumes (PTVs, 3-mm margin) were created, based on contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT) only (PTV CT ) or the combined CT and TCS information (PTV CT+TCS ). Noncoplonar conformal treatment plans for both PTVs were compared. Tumor progression patterns and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were related to both PTVs. Results: A sufficient temporal bone window for TCS was present in 11 of 13 patients. GTVs as defined by TCS were considerably larger than the respective CT volumes: Of the composite GTV CT+TCS (median volume 42 ml), 23%, 13%, and 66% (medians) were covered by the overlap of both methods, CT only and TCS only, respectively. Median sizes of PTV CT and PTV CT+TCS were 34 and 74 ml, respectively. Addition of TCS to CT information led to a median increase of the volume irradiated within the 80% isodose by 32 ml (median factor 1.51). PTV CT+TCS volume was at median 24% of a 'conventional' MRI(T2)-based PTV. Of eight progressions analyzed, three and six occurred inside the 80% isodose of the plans for PTV CT and for PTV CT+TCS , respectively. Conclusion: Addition of TCS tumor volume to the contrast-enhancing CT volume in postoperative radiotherapy planning for GBM increases the treated volume by a median factor of 1.5. Since a high frequency of marginal recurrences is reported from dose-escalation trials of this disease, TCS may complement established methods in PTV definition

  1. Structural and volume changes and their correlation in electron irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavenda, Tadeáš; Gedeon, Ondrej; Jurek, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Volume changes were correlated with both incubation dose and Raman spectra. • Irradiation decreases Si-O-Si angle and increases the amount of three-membered rings. • Levelling of the pits depends on the dose below and above incubation dose. • Restoration of the original structure was limited to low-frequency region. - Abstract: Two binary alkali silicate glasses (15K 2 O·85SiO 2 – denoted as K15 and 15Li 2 O·85SiO 2 – denoted as Li15) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 2.1–15.9 kC/m 2 . Volume changes induced by electron irradiation were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Raman spectra were taken from the irradiated spots to observe structural changes. Volume compaction observed at lower doses was correlated with the increase of the D2 peak. Volume expansion at higher doses was related to migration of alkali ions. Irradiated glasses were annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C for 60 min. After annealing irradiated spots were again examined by AFM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine volume and structural relaxation of radiation induced changes. Annealing at higher temperatures resulted in the levelling of the pits created by irradiation, but only for doses below incubation dose. The pits created by doses above incubation dose were not levelled. Annealing caused decrease of D2 peak and shift of the Si-O-Si vibrations band in direction to original structure. Low-frequency region of annealed Li15 glass was undistinguishable from that of pristine glass, while annealing of K15 glass did not result in the full reversion to the original shape. The differences between glasses were attributed to higher T g of K15 glass. Q-motives bands of both glasses were not completely restored after annealing due to the absence of alkali ions.

  2. Structural and volume changes and their correlation in electron irradiated alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavenda, Tadeáš, E-mail: gavendat@vscht.cz [Department of Glass and Ceramics, University of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Gedeon, Ondrej [Department of Glass and Ceramics, University of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Jurek, Karel [Institute of Physics, Academy of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Volume changes were correlated with both incubation dose and Raman spectra. • Irradiation decreases Si-O-Si angle and increases the amount of three-membered rings. • Levelling of the pits depends on the dose below and above incubation dose. • Restoration of the original structure was limited to low-frequency region. - Abstract: Two binary alkali silicate glasses (15K{sub 2}O·85SiO{sub 2} – denoted as K15 and 15Li{sub 2}O·85SiO{sub 2} – denoted as Li15) were irradiated by 50 keV electron beams with doses within the range of 2.1–15.9 kC/m{sup 2}. Volume changes induced by electron irradiation were monitored by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Raman spectra were taken from the irradiated spots to observe structural changes. Volume compaction observed at lower doses was correlated with the increase of the D2 peak. Volume expansion at higher doses was related to migration of alkali ions. Irradiated glasses were annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C for 60 min. After annealing irradiated spots were again examined by AFM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine volume and structural relaxation of radiation induced changes. Annealing at higher temperatures resulted in the levelling of the pits created by irradiation, but only for doses below incubation dose. The pits created by doses above incubation dose were not levelled. Annealing caused decrease of D2 peak and shift of the Si-O-Si vibrations band in direction to original structure. Low-frequency region of annealed Li15 glass was undistinguishable from that of pristine glass, while annealing of K15 glass did not result in the full reversion to the original shape. The differences between glasses were attributed to higher T{sub g} of K15 glass. Q-motives bands of both glasses were not completely restored after annealing due to the absence of alkali ions.

  3. Proton therapy of iris melanoma with 50 CGE. Influence of target volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechardt, Aline I.; Joussen, Antonia M. [Charite University of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Berlin (Germany); Karle, Bettina [Helios Klinikum Emil-von-Behring, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Cordini, Dino; Heufelder, Jens [Charite University of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Lise-Meitner-Campus, Berlin-Protonen, Berlin (Germany); Budach, Volker [Charite University of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Gollrad, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Lise-Meitner-Campus, Berlin-Protonen, Berlin (Germany); Charite University of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local tumour control, incidence of radiation-induced glaucoma and associated interventions of sector-based and whole anterior segment proton beam therapy (PBT) for the treatment of iris melanoma. We retrospectively analysed the data of 77 patients with iris melanoma who underwent PBT applied as 50 CGE in four daily fractions. Of the patients, 47 received PBT with a circular-shaped collimator and 30 with a conformal sector-shaped target volume. Local control, eye preservation and secondary glaucoma were evaluated. Median follow-up time was 54.9 months. Local tumour control was 100% in patients receiving whole anterior segment irradiation. Two patients developed pigment dispersion in the non-irradiated area after sector-based PBT and received whole anterior segment salvage PBT. The mean volume of ciliary body irradiated was 89.0% and 34.9% for whole anterior segment and lesion-based irradiation, respectively. At the end of follow-up, secondary glaucoma was found in 74.3% of the patients with whole anterior segment irradiation and in 19.2% with sector-based irradiation. Patients with sector-based PBT had a stable visual acuity of logMAR 0.1, while it declined from logMAR 0.1 to 0.4 after whole anterior segment irradiation. We found a significant reduction in radiation-induced secondary glaucoma and glaucoma-associated surgical interventions and stable visual acuity after sector-based irradiation compared with whole anterior segment irradiation. Sector-based irradiation revealed a higher risk for local recurrence, but selected patients with well-circumscribed iris melanoma benefit from applying a lesion-based target volume when treated with sector-based PBT. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, nach Irismelanomtherapie durch sektorielle oder Ganzfeldbestrahlung mittels Protonentherapie mit 50 CGE (Cobalt-Gray-Aequivalent) Tumorkontrolle, Inzidenz des strahleninduzierten Glaukoms und damit assoziierte Interventionen auszuwerten

  4. Post-Irradiation Examination of 237Np Targets for 238Pu Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Hobbs, Randy W [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is recovering the US 238Pu production capability and the first step in the process has been to evaluate the performance of a 237Np target cermet pellet encased in an aluminum clad. The process proceeded in 3 steps; the first step was to irradiate capsules of single pellets composed of NpO2 and aluminum power to examine their shrinkage and gas release. These pellets were formed by compressing sintered NpO2 and aluminum powder in a die at high pressure followed by sintering in a vacuum furnace. Three temperatures were chosen for sintering the solution precipitated NpO2 power used for pellet fabrication. The second step was to irradiate partial targets composed of 8 pellets in a semi-prototypical arrangement at the two best performing sintering temperatures to determine which temperature gave a pellet that performed the best under the actual planned irradiation conditions. The third step was to irradiate ~50 pellets in an actual target configuration at design irradiation conditions to assess pellet shrinkage and gas release, target heat transfer, and dimensional stability. The higher sintering temperature appeared to offer the best performance after one cycle of irradiation by having the least shrinkage, thus keeping the heat transfer gap between the pellets and clad small minimizing the pellet operating temperature. The final result of the testing was a target that can meet the initial production goals, satisfy the reactor safety requirements, and can be fabricated in production quantities. The current focus of the program is to verify that the target can be remotely dissembled, the pellets dissolved, and the 238Pu recovered. Tests are being conducted to examine these concerns and to compare results to code predictions. Once the performance of the full length targets has been quantified, the pellet 237Np loading will be revisited to determine if it can be

  5. Delineation of Internal Mammary Nodal Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jethwa, Krishan R.; Kahila, Mohamed M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hunt, Katie N. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Brown, Lindsay C.; Corbin, Kimberly S.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Boughey, Judy C. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert W., E-mail: mutter.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: The optimal clinical target volume for internal mammary (IM) node irradiation is uncertain in an era of increasingly conformal volume-based treatment planning for breast cancer. We mapped the location of gross internal mammary lymph node (IMN) metastases to identify areas at highest risk of harboring occult disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of IMN disease were identified from a breast cancer registry. The IMN location was transferred onto the corresponding anatomic position on representative axial computed tomography images of a patient in the treatment position and compared with consensus group guidelines of IMN target delineation. Results: The IMN location in 67 patients with 130 IMN metastases was mapped. The location was in the first 3 intercostal spaces in 102 of 130 nodal metastases (78%), whereas 18 of 130 IMNs (14%) were located caudal to the third intercostal space and 10 of 130 IMNs (8%) were located cranial to the first intercostal space. Of the 102 nodal metastases within the first 3 intercostal spaces, 54 (53%) were located within the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group consensus volume. Relative to the IM vessels, 19 nodal metastases (19%) were located medially with a mean distance of 2.2 mm (SD, 2.9 mm) whereas 29 (28%) were located laterally with a mean distance of 3.6 mm (SD, 2.5 mm). Ninety percent of lymph nodes within the first 3 intercostal spaces would have been encompassed within a 4-mm medial and lateral expansion on the IM vessels. Conclusions: In women with indications for elective IMN irradiation, a 4-mm medial and lateral expansion on the IM vessels may be appropriate. In women with known IMN involvement, cranial extension to the confluence of the IM vein with the brachiocephalic vein with or without caudal extension to the fourth or fifth interspace may be considered provided that normal tissue constraints are met.

  6. Communicating the non-targeted effects of radiation from irradiated to non-irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiakis, E.C.; Morgan, W.F.

    2005-01-01

    For many years, the central dogma in radiobiology has been that energy deposited in the cell nucleus is responsible for the biological effects associated with radiation exposure. However, non-targeted and delayed effects of radiation have shifted this belief. The studies of radiation-induced genomic instability, the bystander and abscopal effects, clastogenic factors, and the Death Inducing Effect have dominated the interest of the radiobiology field of late. The passing of signals from irradiated to non-irradiated cells can be accomplished through cell-to-cell gap junction communication or secretion of molecules, which in turn can elicit a response through activation of signal transduction pathways. Proposed mediators of this phenotype include proteins involved with inflammation. Given their size and connection with oxidative stress, cytokines are an attractive candidate as mediators of the induction of the non-targeted effects of radiation. Here we review the evidence for a possible connection between these delayed non-targeted effects of radiation and the cytokine cascades associated with inflammation. (author)

  7. Blood, blood compounds and cell cultures irradiation in clinical radiotherapy equipment: studies on ideal volume and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Marco Antonio R.; Pereira, Adelino Jose; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors present the technic and equipment used by the Physical Radiologic Service of Radiation Therapy Department of A.C. Camargo Hospital to irradiate blood and blood compounds. The practical routine is illustrated. The results from others Institutions are presented, discussing about the homogeneity of dose of 2000 to 3500 c Gy to all target volume, sufficient to neutralize cells responsible by graft-versus-host disease from blood transfusions. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. CT-guided intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison of conventional point A plan with clinical target volume-based three-dimensional plan using dose-volume parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyun; Cho, Jung Keun; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Chie, Eui Kyu; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) plan comparison between the conventional point A plan (conventional plan) and computed tomography (CT)-guided clinical target volume-based plan (CTV plan) by analysis of the quantitative dose-volume parameters and irradiated volumes of organs at risk in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty plans for 192 Ir high-dose-rate ICR after 30-40-Gy external beam radiotherapy were investigated. CT images were acquired at the first ICR session with artifact-free applicators in place. The gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV), point A, and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 rectal and bladder points were defined on reconstructed CT images. A fractional 100% dose was prescribed to point A in the conventional plan and to the outermost point to cover all CTVs in the CTV plan. The reference volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V ref ), and the dose-volume parameters of the coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were calculated from the dose-volume histogram. The bladder, rectal point doses, and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the prescribed dose were also analyzed. Results: Conventional plans were performed, and patients were categorized on the basis of whether the 100% isodose line of point A prescription dose fully encompassed the CTV (Group 1, n = 20) or not (Group 2, n = 10). The mean gross tumor volume (11.6 cm 3 ) and CTV (24.9 cm 3 ) of Group 1 were smaller than the corresponding values (23.7 and 44.7 cm 3 , respectively) for Group 2 (p = 0.003). The mean V ref for all patients was 129.6 cm 3 for the conventional plan and 97.0 cm 3 for the CTV plan (p = 0.003). The mean V ref in Group 1 decreased markedly with the CTV plan (p < 0.001). For the conventional and CTV plans in all patients, the mean coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were 0.98 and 1.0, 0.23 and 0.34, and 3.86 and

  9. Comprehensive irradiation of head and neck cancer using conformal multisegmental fields: assessment of target coverage and noninvolved tissue sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Marsh, Lon H.; Martel, Mary K.; Ship, Jonathan A.; Haken, Randall ten; Pu, Anthony T.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Lichter, Allen S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal treatment using static multisegmental intensity modulation was developed for patients requiring comprehensive irradiation for head and neck cancer. The major aim is sparing major salivary gland function while adequately treating the targets. To assess the adequacy of the conformal plans regarding target coverage and dose homogeneity, they were compared with standard irradiation plans. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with stage III/IV head and neck cancer requiring comprehensive, bilateral neck irradiation participated in this study. CT-based treatment plans included five to six nonopposed fields, each having two to four in-field segments. Fields and segments were devised using beam's eye views of the planning target volumes (PTVs), noninvolved organs, and isodose surfaces, to achieve homogeneous dose distribution that encompassed the targets and spared major salivary gland tissue. For comparison, standard three-field radiation plans were devised retrospectively for each patient, with the same CT-derived targets used for the clinical (conformal) plans. Saliva flow rates from each major salivary gland were measured before and periodically after treatment. Results: On average, the minimal dose to the primary PTVs in the conformal plans [95.2% of the prescribed dose, standard deviation (SD) 4%] was higher than in the standard plans (91%, SD 7%; p = 0.02), and target volumes receiving <95% or <90% of the prescribed dose were smaller in the conformal plans (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively). Similar advantages of the conformal plans compared to standard plans were found in ipsilateral jugular nodes PTV coverage. The reason for underdosing in the standard treatment plans was primarily failure of electron beams to fully encompass targets. No significant differences were found in contralateral jugular or posterior neck nodes coverage. The minimal dose to the retropharyngeal nodes was higher in the standard plans. However, all conformal plans

  10. Critical combinations of radiation dose and volume predict intelligence quotient and academic achievement scores after craniospinal irradiation in children with medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Thomas E; Schreiber, Jane E; Wu, Shengjie; Lukose, Renin; Xiong, Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-11-01

    To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm(2)). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help estimate the value of newer methods of irradiation. Copyright © 2014

  11. Somatic radiation risk in case of irradiation of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocken, U.; Ewen, K.; Makoski, H.B.

    1983-09-01

    The somatic dose index for irradiation of the brain was determined for the 10 MeV bremsstrahlung of a linear electron-accelerator. A small volume rotation technique and the irradiation of the total neurocranium were chosen as extreme conditions for the radiation exposure of the skull. On the basis of a target volume dose of 50 Gy for the total irradiation series, the somatic dose index of the small volume technique is within the scope of coronarography. In case of irradiation of the total neurocranium, however, the somatic dose index largely exceeds the maximum values of X-ray diagnosis.

  12. Utilization of cone-beam CT for offline evaluation of target volume coverage during prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluska, Petr; Hanus, Josef; Sefrova, Jana; Rouskova, Lucie; Grepl, Jakub; Jansa, Jan; Kasaova, Linda; Hodek, Miroslav; Zouhar, Milan; Vosmik, Milan; Petera, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    To assess target volume coverage during prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy alignment and to assess possibility of safety margin reduction. Implementation of IGRT should influence safety margins. Utilization of cone-beam CT provides current 3D anatomic information directly in irradiation position. Such information enables reconstruction of the actual dose distribution. Seventeen prostate patients were treated with daily bony anatomy image-guidance. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired once a week immediately after bony anatomy alignment. After the prostate, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladder were contoured, the delivered dose distribution was reconstructed. Target dose coverage was evaluated by the proportion of the CTV encompassed by the 95% isodose. Original plans employed a 1 cm safety margin. Alternative plans assuming a smaller 7 mm margin between CTV and PTV were evaluated in the same way. Rectal and bladder volumes were compared with the initial ones. Rectal and bladder volumes irradiated with doses higher than 75 Gy, 70 Gy, 60 Gy, 50 Gy and 40 Gy were analyzed. In 12% of reconstructed plans the prostate coverage was not sufficient. The prostate underdosage was observed in 5 patients. Coverage of seminal vesicles was not satisfactory in 3% of plans. Most of the target underdosage corresponded to excessive rectal or bladder filling. Evaluation of alternative plans assuming a smaller 7 mm margin revealed 22% and 11% of plans where prostate and seminal vesicles coverage, respectively, was compromised. These were distributed over 8 and 7 patients, respectively. Sufficient dose coverage of target volumes was not achieved for all patients. Reducing of safety margin is not acceptable. Initial rectal and bladder volumes cannot be considered representative for subsequent treatment.

  13. WEBEXPIR: Windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Marc; Schuurmans, Paul; Heyse, Jan; Rosseel, Kris; Tichelen, Katrien Van; Nactergal, Benoit; Vandeplassche, Dirk; Aoust, Thierry; Abs, Michel; Guertin, Arnaud; Buhour, Jean-Michel; Cadiou, Arnaud; Abderrahim, Hamid Ait

    2008-01-01

    The windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation (WEBEXPIR) program was set-up as part of the MYRRHA/XT-ADS R and D effort on the spallation target design to investigate the interaction of a proton beam with a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) free surface. In particular, possible free surface distortion or shockwave effects in nominal conditions and during sudden beam on/off transient situations, as well as possible enhanced evaporation were assessed. An experiment was conceived at the IBA TT-1000 Rhodotron, where a 7 MeV electron beam was used to simulate the high power deposition at the MYRRHA/XT-ADS LBE free surface. The geometry and the LBE flow characteristics in the WEBEXPIR set-up were made as representative as possible of the actual situation in the MYRRHA/XT-ADS spallation target. Irradiation experiments were carried out at beam currents of up to 10 mA, corresponding to 40 times the nominal beam current necessary to reproduce the MYRRHA/XT-ADS conditions. Preliminary analyses show that the WEBEXPIR free surface flow was not disturbed by the interaction with the electron beam and that vacuum conditions stayed well within the design specifications

  14. X-ray imaging of targets irradiated by the Nike KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Serlin, V.; Sethian, J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Holland, G.

    1997-01-01

    Foil targets irradiated by the Naval Research Laboratory Nike KrF laser were imaged in the x-ray region with two-dimensional spatial resolution in the 2 endash 10 μm range. The images revealed the smoothness of the emission from target and backlighter foils, the acceleration of the target foils, and the growth of Rayleigh endash Taylor instabilities that were seeded by patterns on the irradiated sides of CH foils

  15. Effects of smoking and irradiated volume on inflammatory response in the lung of irradiated breast cancer patients evaluated with bronchoalveolar lavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjermer, L.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Nilsson, K.; Angstroem, T.H.; Henriksson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the effects of irradiation on normal tissues in humans have been hard to obtain because most tissues are inaccessible and/or direct responses are difficult to quantify in a nondestructive manner. Pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disease are adverse effects seen in varying intensity in patients treated with radiotherapy for carcinomas of the thorax, e.g., breast cancer. In the present study the aim was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction in the underlying parenchyma following postoperative irradiation with bronchoalveolar lavage technique. Twenty-one patients with breast cancer stage T1N0M0 received radiotherapy with photons to a target dose of 56 Gy following breast conservative surgery. Nineteen healthy controls were also included. The results showed a clear elevation of neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the total irradiated groups, compared to controls. When subclassifying the material according to smoking habit, it was obvious that the smokers displayed a significantly decreased inflammatory reaction, i.e., reduced levels of mast cells and lymphocytes, compared to both nonsmoking controls and patients. Eosinophils were seen in an elevated number in all irradiated patients. Radiological signs of pneumonitis were observed in three patients, all in the nonsmoking group. No correlation was found between the volume of lung irradiated and the inflammatory response. It is concluded that bronchoalveolar lavage is a suitable and sensitive method for investigating radiotherapy-induced reactions in the human lung. Furthermore, ongoing smoking during the treatment depressed the inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma induced by irradiation. The present study as well as earlier observations justify further studies concerning the possibility of interaction of smoking with cancer treatment

  16. Implications of improved diagnostic imaging of small nodal metastases in head and neck cancer: Radiotherapy target volume transformation and dose de-escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Sven; Vogel, Wouter V; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P; Dijkema, Tim; Terhaard, Chris H J; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2018-05-03

    Diagnostic imaging continues to evolve, and now has unprecedented accuracy for detecting small nodal metastasis. This influences the tumor load in elective target volumes and subsequently has consequences for the radiotherapy dose required to control disease in these volumes. Small metastases that used to remain subclinical and were included in elective volumes, will nowadays be detected and included in high-dose volumes. Consequentially, high-dose volumes will more often contain low-volume disease. These target volume transformations lead to changes in the tumor burden in elective and "gross" tumor volumes with implications for the radiotherapy dose prescribed to these volumes. For head and neck tumors, nodal staging has evolved from mere palpation to combinations of high-resolution imaging modalities. A traditional nodal gross tumor volume in the neck typically had a minimum diameter of 10-15 mm, while nowadays much smaller tumor deposits are detected in lymph nodes. However, the current dose levels for elective nodal irradiation were empirically determined in the 1950s, and have not changed since. In this report the radiobiological consequences of target volume transformation caused by modern imaging of the neck are evaluated, and theoretically derived reductions of dose in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are proposed. The concept of target volume transformation and subsequent strategies for dose adaptation applies to many other tumor types as well. Awareness of this concept may result in new strategies for target definition and selection of dose levels with the aim to provide optimal tumor control with less toxicity. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dose distribution of non-coplanar irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Toshiharu; Wada, Yoichi; Takenaka, Eiichi

    1987-02-01

    Non-coplanar irradiations were applied to the treatment of brain tumor. The dose distribution around the target area due to non-coplanar irradiation was half less than the dose when coplanar irradiation used. Integral volume dose due to this irradiation was not always less than that due to conventional opposing or rotational irradiation. This irradiation has the better application to the following;as a boost therapy, glioblastoma multiforme;as a radical therapy, recurrent brain tumor, well differentiated brain tumor such as craniopharyngioma, hypophyseal tumor etc and AV-malformation.

  18. Clinical target volume localization using conventional methods (anatomy and palpation) and ultrasonography in early breast cancer post-operative external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Italia, Corrado; Montanaro, Paolo; Ciocca, Mario; Morandi, Giovanni; Salvadori, Bruno

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of three methods, anatomy (A), palpation (P) and ultrasounds (US) in localizing the clinical target volume (CTV) in patients (pts) with early breast cancer (EBC) undergoing breast external irradiation as part of conservation therapy. Material and methods: One hundred consecutive pts with EBC (T is 1%, T 1 78%, T 2 21%, N- 68%, N+ 32%), treated with conservation surgery and breast irradiation with opposed tangential portals, were prospectively analyzed. Anatomically, palpatory or ultrasound defined field borders for CTV localizations were determined in the same position thanks to the utilization of a vacuum-formed cellulose acetate immobilization cast, removed during CTV definitions. Results: P and US CTV localizations have been found to coincide on the four margins (superior, inferior, medial, lateral) in only(1(100)) pts, while no pt showed identical A and US CTV localizations. Only (31(397)) (8%) field measurements with A, and(98(395)) (25%) with P corresponded to US border definition. If mean and median values of each field border were considered, the CTV was generally over-estimated with P appearing more accurate than A in a gross definition of the target (P < 0.01). However, a geographical miss of at least one field border of CTV occurred in 55% of pts with A and in 36% of pts with P. The most critical margin to be defined with conventional methods was the superior one: an underestimation of the cranial border of CTV with A was observed in 51% and with P in 22% of pts (22% and 8%, respectively, when an underestimation by more than 1.5 cm was considered). When pre-menopausal and peri/post-menopausal groups of pts were separately analyzed, conventional methods were highly inaccurate to define the superior border in younger pts, in which a geographical miss was noted with A in 62% and with P in 35% of cases (P < 0.05). When an underestimation of more than 1.5 cm was evaluated, these values were reduced to 33% and 12

  19. P08.52 Proton therapy re-Irradiation in large-volume recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelio, D.; Widesott, L.; Vennarini, S.; Fellin, F.; Maines, F.; Righetto, R.; Lorentini, S.; Farace, P.; Schwarz, M.; Amichetti, M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To report preliminary results of re-irradiation with proton therapy (PT) in large-volume recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM). Matherial/Methods: Between January and December 2015 ten patients (pts) with rGBM were re-irradiated with PT. All pts were previously treated with photon radiotherapy (60 Gy) with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ for 1–20 cycles (median, 7). Seven pts were re-irradiated at first relapse/progression. Four patients were re-irradiated after partial tumor resection. Median age and Karnofsky performance status at re-irradiation were 57 years (range, 41–68) and 80%, (range, 70–100), respectively. Median time between prior radiotherapy and PT was 9 months (range, 5–24). Target definition was based on CT, MR, and 18F-DOPA PET imaging. GTV included any area of contrast enhancement after contrast medium administration plus any pathological PET uptake regions. CTV was generated by adding to GTV a 3-mm uniform margin manually corrected in proximity of anatomical barriers. CTV was expanded by 4 mm to create PTV. Median PTV volume was 90 cc (range, 46–231). All pts received 36 GyRBE in 18 fractions. Four pts also received concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m2/die, 7 days/week). All pts were treated with active beam scanning PT using 2–3 fields with single field optimization technique. Results: All pts completed the treatment without breaks. Registered acute side effects (according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 - CTCAE) include grade 1–2 skin erythema, alopecia, fatigue, conjunctivitis, concentration impairment, dysphasia, and headache. There were no grade 3 or higher toxicities. One patient developed grade 1 neutropenia. Five pts started PT under steroids (2–7 mg/daily); two of them reduced the dose during PT, while three kept the same steroids dose. None of remaining pts needed steroids therapy. Registered late side effects (according to CTCAE version 4.0) include grade 1–2 alopecia, fatigue

  20. Dose volume relationships for intraoperatively irradiated saphenous nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; Powers, B.E.; Gillette, S.M.; Thames, H.D.; Childs, G.; Vujaskovic, Z.; LaRue, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is used to deliver high single doses of radiation to the tumor bed following surgical removal of various abdominal malignancies. The advantage of IORT is the ability to remove sensitive normal tissues from the treatment field and to limit the volume of normal tissue irradiated. The purpose of this study was to determine dose-volume relationships for retroperitoneal tissues. Materials and methods: 134 adult beagle dogs were irradiated to the surgically exposed paraaortic area. Normal tissues included in the treatment field were aorta, peripheral nerve, ureter, bone and muscle. Groups of 4 - 8 dogs were irradiated to doses ranging from 18 - 54 Gy for a 2x5 cm field, from 12 - 46 Gy for a 4x5 cm field, and 12 - 42 Gy to an 8x5 cm field. The radiations were done using 6 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. Dogs were observed for three years after radiation. Electrophysiologic procedures were done prior to irradiation and annually following irradiation. The procedures included electromyography of the pelvic limb and paralumbar muscles supplied by the L1 to S1 spinal nerves to determine presence and degree of motor unit disease. Motor nerve conduction velocities of the proximal and distal sciatic nerves were determined. Sensory nerve conduction velocities of the saphenous nerve were also determined. Evoked lumbosacral and thoraco-lumbar spinal cord potentials were evaluated following stimulation of the left sciatic nerve. In addition to electrophysiologic studies, neurologic examinations were done prior to treatment and at six month intervals for the three year observation period. At the three year time period, dogs were euthanatized, sections of peripheral nerve taken, routinely processed, stained with Masson's trichrome and evaluated histomorphometrically using point count techniques. Results: Twenty-two dogs were euthanatized prior to the three year observation period due to peripheral nerve damage

  1. World-volumes and string target spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    String duality suggests a fascinating juxtoposition of world-volume and target-space dynamics. This is particularly apparent in the D-brane description of stringy solitons that forms a major focus of this article (which is not intended to be a comprehensive review of this extensive and sophisticated subject). The article is divided into four sections: the oligarchy of string world-sheets; p-branes and world-volumes; world-sheets for world-volumes; boundary states. D-branes and space-time supersymmetry (orig.)

  2. Recovery of hafnium radioisotopes from a proton irradiated tantalum target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.A.; Garcia, J.G.; Hamilton, V.T.; Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J.; Ott, M.A.; Philips, D.R.; Radzinski, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    The 178m2 Hf nucleus, with its long half-life (31 y) and high-spin isomeric state (16 + ) is desired for new and exotic nuclear physics studies. The Los Alamos Radioisotope Program irradiated a kilogram of natural tantalum at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility in early 1981. After fifteen years of decay, this target was ideal for the recovery of 178m2 Hf. There was more than a millicurie of 178m2 Hf produced during this irradiation and there has been a sufficient period of time for most of the other hafnium radioisotopes to decayed away. Traditionally, separation techniques for recovering hafnium isotopes from tantalum targets employ solvent extractions with reagents that are considered hazardous. These techniques are no longer condoned because they generate a mixed-waste (radioactive and hazardous components) that can not be treated for disposal. In this paper we describe a new and unique procedure for the recovery of hafnium radioisotopes from a highly radioactive, proton irradiated, tantalum target using reagents that do not contribute a hazardous waste component. (author)

  3. Margin estimation and disturbances of irradiation field in layer-stacking carbon-ion beams for respiratory moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Shinya; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Mizukami, Tomohiro; Tsukishima, Chihiro; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-ion therapy by layer-stacking irradiation for static targets has been practised in clinical treatments. In order to apply this technique to a moving target, disturbances of carbon-ion dose distributions due to respiratory motion have been studied based on the measurement using a respiratory motion phantom, and the margin estimation given by the square root of the summation Internal margin2+Setup margin2 has been assessed. We assessed the volume in which the variation in the ratio of the dose for a target moving due to respiration relative to the dose for a static target was within 5%. The margins were insufficient for use with layer-stacking irradiation of a moving target, and an additional margin was required. The lateral movement of a target converts to the range variation, as the thickness of the range compensator changes with the movement of the target. Although the additional margin changes according to the shape of the ridge filter, dose uniformity of 5% can be achieved for a spherical target 93 mm in diameter when the upward range variation is limited to 5 mm and the additional margin of 2.5 mm is applied in case of our ridge filter. Dose uniformity in a clinical target largely depends on the shape of the mini-peak as well as on the bolus shape. We have shown the relationship between range variation and dose uniformity. In actual therapy, the upper limit of target movement should be considered by assessing the bolus shape. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  4. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Sharon M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn

    2012-01-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6–1 and 8–1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10–1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3–1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura

  5. Critical Combinations of Radiation Dose and Volume Predict Intelligence Quotient and Academic Achievement Scores After Craniospinal Irradiation in Children With Medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Schreiber, Jane E. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistcs, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistcs, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Gajjar, Amar [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm{sup 2}). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. Results: A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. Conclusions: The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help

  6. Critical Combinations of Radiation Dose and Volume Predict Intelligence Quotient and Academic Achievement Scores After Craniospinal Irradiation in Children With Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Schreiber, Jane E.; Wu, Shengjie; Lukose, Renin; Xiong, Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm 2 ). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. Results: A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. Conclusions: The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help estimate

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  8. A wide temperature range irradiation cryostat for reasearch on solid state targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeve, Scott; Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Runkel, Stefan; Voge, Thomas [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    To qualitatively improve the data obtained in asymmetry measurements of scattering experiments the figure of merit (FOM) plays a major role and can reduce the data acquisition time when a certain precision in the measurement is needed. One of the defining factors for the improvement of the polarised experiment lies in the target choice and preparation, in particular the method employed to introduce the paramagnetic defects for the use of dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP). To this end the Polarized Target Group in Bonn has developed a wide range temperature cryostat for the irradiation of potential target materials in which materials can be irradiated to varying doses at specified temperatures. The stable irradiation temperature of the materials can be controlled to within {+-}1 K over a range of 90 K

  9. Survival of alpha particle irradiated cells as a function of the shape and size of the sensitive volume (nucleus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Roeske, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Microdosimetry is the study of the stochastic variation of energy deposited within sub-cellular targets. As such, the size and shape of the critical target (i.e. cell nucleus) are essential when considering microdosimetric quantities. In this work, a microdosimetric analysis examines the expected cell survival as a function of the size and shape of the cell nucleus under conditions of irradiation emitting alpha particles. The results indicate that, in general, cell survival is relatively insensitive to changes in the shape of the cell nucleus when the volume is held constant. However, cell survival is a strong function of the variation in the size of the target. These results are useful when analysing the results of cell survival experiments for alpha particle emitters. (Author)

  10. Irradiation tests of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Suripto, A.; Nasution, H.; Lufti-Amin, D.; Gogo, A.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99 mTc for medical purposes is currently produced from the decay of 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal foils for the HEU UO 2 used in current target designs will allow equivalent 99 Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium alloy and aluminide in other target designs will also allow the conversion of HEU to LEU. Several uranium-metal-foil targets have been fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination of the initial test indicated that design modifications were required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. The latest test has shown good irradiation behavior, satisfactory dismantling and foil removal when the U-foil is separated from its containment by metallic, fission-recoil absorbing barriers. (author)

  11. Irradiation tests of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Suripto, A.; Nasution, H.; Lufti-Amin, D.; Gogo, A.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99m Tc for medical purposes is currently produced form the decay of 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal foils for the HEU UO 2 used in current target designs will allow equivalent 99 Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium alloy and aluminide in other target designs will also allow the conversion of HEU to LEU. Several uranium-metal-foil targets have been fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination of the initial test indicated that design modifications were required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. The latest test has shown good irradiation behavior, satisfactory dismantling and foil removal when the U-foil is separated from its containment by metallic, fission-recoil absorbing barriers

  12. Use of computed tomography for irradiation planning in practical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riessbeck, K.H.; Achtert, J.; Hegewald, H.

    1985-01-01

    Experience of several years comprising computed tomography into irradiation planning resulted in substantial and organizational arrangements in practical radiotherapy. Precising the individual topography of patient, target volume, and risk organs in the central radiation plane as well as in other planes beeing of interest, permits to optimize the irradiation area. In patients whose radiotherapy requires a complicated field adjustment (for instance head fields, bronchial esophagical cancer) and in all patients who receive an irradiation in motion the irradiation planning is done by the help of CT examination without omitting the localization diagnosis procedure approved. The method of irradiation planning in one plane is represented in which the spatial dimension of target volume can be considered yet after superprojection into the planning plane. However, the topometric gain alone can not result in new irradiation methods. Approved irradiation methods should be modified only in connection with increased knowledge on pathobiology of tumors and on tolerance of healthy tissue with regard to keeping or improving the ratio of curing to complication rate. (author)

  13. Petawatt laser and target irradiation system at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Brown, C.G.; Herman, S.; Homer, J.; Miller, J.L.; Stuart, B.C.; Tietbohl, G.; Van Lue, J.; Yanovsky, V.

    1997-01-01

    In May, 1996, we demonstrated the production over a petawatt of peak power in the Nova/Petawatt Laser Facility, generating 620 J in ∼ 430 fs. Results of the first focused irradiance tests, and recent deployment of a novel targeting system will be presented

  14. Thermal analysis of LEU modified Cintichem target irradiated in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, A; Toma, C.

    2009-01-01

    Actions conceived during last years at international level for conversion of Molybdenum fabrication process from HEU to LEU targets utilization created opportunities for INR to get access to information and participating to international discussions under IAEA auspices. Concrete steps for developing fission Molybdenum technology were facilitated. Institute of Nuclear Research bringing together a number of conditions like suitable irradiation possibilities, direct communication between reactor and hot cell facility, handling capacity of high radioactive sources, and simultaneously the existence of an expanding internal market, decided to undertake the necessary steps in order to produce fission molybdenum. Over the course of last years of efforts in this direction we developed the steps for fission Molybdenum technology development based on modified Cintichem process in accordance with the Argonne National Laboratory proved methodology. Progress made by INR to heat transfer computations of annular target using is presented. An advanced thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to estimate the heat removal capability for an enriched uranium (LEU) foil annular target irradiated in TRIGA reactor core. As a result, the present analysis provides an upper limit estimate of the LEU-foil and external target surface temperatures during irradiation in TRIGA 14 MW reactor. (authors)

  15. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of LEU targets irradiated in a research reactor for Molybdenum-99 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Daeseong; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Kim, Hong-Chul; Chae, Heetaek

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of irradiated fuel plates for Molybdenum-99. • Heat production during and after irradiation was evaluated using MCNP and ORIGEN-APR. • Cooling capacities under various cooling conditions were evaluated using TMAP. • Natural convective cooling was adequate for the decay power after 0.03 h from withdrawal. • Maximum temperature of the target decayed for 24 h does not exceed the blistering threshold. - Abstract: Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of irradiated fuel plates for Molybdenum-99 production in a research reactor were performed to investigate (1) the heat production during irradiation, (2) decay heat after irradiation, and (3) cooling capacities under various cooling conditions. The heat production on the target plates irradiated in the core was evaluated using the MCNP code. The decay heat after irradiation was evaluated using the ORIGEN-APR code, and compared against ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979. The cooling capacities of forced convective cooling during irradiation and natural convective cooling after irradiation were estimated using the TMAP code. An equilibrium core with different core statuses i.e., BOC, MOC, and EOC was used to evaluate power released from the targets and the axial power distribution. Based on the neutronic calculations, thermal margins i.e., the maximum wall temperature, minimum ONB temperature margin, and minimum CHF ratio were estimated, and the cooling strategy of the fission Mo targets was discussed. The targets were cooled by forced convective cooling during irradiation, and cooled by natural convective cooling after irradiation. For a further production process, the targets transported to a hot cell were exposed to the air, and cooled by natural convection cooling in air. As a result, the maximum wall temperature remained below the ONB temperature while the targets were under water, and the maximum wall temperature remained under the blistering limit while the targets

  16. A New Suggestion for the Radiation Target Volume After a Subtotal Gastrectomy in Patients With Stomach Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Heerim; Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Sung; Kang, Won Ki; Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Chan Hyung; Park, Chul Keun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment results between the use of two different radiation fields including and excluding remnant stomach and suggest new target volumes excluding remnant stomach after subtotal gastrectomy (STG) in patients with stomach cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 291 patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after STG and D2 dissection at the Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. Eighty-three patients registered from 1995 to 1997 underwent irradiation according to the INT 0116 protocol that recommended the inclusion of remnant stomach within the target volume (Group A). After this period, we excluded remnant stomach from the target volume for 208 patients (Group B). Median follow-up was 67 months. Results: Treatment failure developed in 93 patients (32.0%). Local and regional recurrence rates for Group A vs. Group B were 10.8% vs. 5.3% (p = not significant) and 9.6% vs. 6.3% (p = not significant), and recurrence rates for remnant stomach were 7.2% vs. 1.4% (p = 0.018), respectively. Overall and disease-free survival rates were not different between the two groups. Grade 3 or 4 vomiting and diarrhea developed more frequently in Group A than Group B (4.8% vs. 1.4% and 6.0% vs. 1.9%, respectively; p = 0.012; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Exclusion of remnant stomach from the radiation field had no effect on failure rates or survival, and a low complication rate occurred in patients treated excluding remnant stomach. We suggest that remnant stomach be excluded from the radiation target volume for patients with stomach cancer who undergo STG and D2 dissection

  17. Relationship between free volume and mechanical properties of polyurethane irradiated by gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heliang Sui; Xin Ju; Xueyong Liu; Fachun Zhong; Xiaoyan Li; Baoyi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane was irradiated at various gamma radiation doses up to 1,000 kGy at room temperature in nitrogen. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, tensile test and dynamic mechanical analysis were used to find the relationship between free volume and mechanical properties. An increase of the free volume fraction in soft segments (SS) and a decrease of the free volume fraction in hard segments (HS) during gamma radiation was observed and analyzed. The results showed that HS in polyurethane had the excellent resistance to gamma radiation, whereas SS had a tendency to degrade. The reason for the decrease of the strain at break and the ultimate tensile strength was analyzed, which showed the changes in the mechanical properties of polyurethane irradiated by gamma rays were mainly determined by the changes of free volume in SS. If the resistance properties of polyurethanes exposed to radiations need to be improved, SS should be paid more attention to. (author)

  18. Feasibility of omitting clinical target volume for limited-disease small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shuhua; Shi, Anhui; Yu, Rong; Zhu, Guangying

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the feasibility of omitting clinical target volume (CTV) for limited small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy. 89 patients were treated from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2011, 54 cases were irradiated with target volume without CTV, and 35 cases were irradiated with CTV. Both arms were irradiated post chemotherapy tumor extent and omitted elective nodal irradiation; dose prescription was 95% PTV56-63 Gy/28-35 F/5.6-7 weeks. In the arm without CTV and arm with CTV, the local relapse rates were 16.7% and 17.1% (p = 0.586) respectively. In the arm without CTV, of the 9 patients with local relapse, 6 recurred in-field, 2 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. In the arm with CTV, of the 6 patients with local relapse, 4 recurred in-field, 1 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. The distant metastases rates were 42.6% and 51.4% (p = 0.274) respectively. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicity and radiation esophagitis had no statistically significant, but grade 3-4 radiation pneumonia was observed in only 7.4% in the arm without CTV, compared 22.9% in the arm with CTV (p = 0.040). The median survival in the arm without CTV had not reached, compared with 38 months in the with CTV arm. The l- years, 2- years, 3- years survival rates of the arm without CTV and the arm with CTV were 81.0%, 66.2%, 61.5% and 88.6%, 61.7%, 56.6% (p = 0.517). The multivariate analysis indicated that the distant metastases (p = 0.000) and PCI factor (p = 0.004) were significantly related to overall survival. Target delineation omitting CTV for limited-disease small cell lung cancer received IMRT was feasible. The distant metastases and PCI factor were significantly related to overall survival

  19. Study on irradiation conditions of producing 153Sm with natural abundance samarium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jin; Jin Xiaohai; Bai Hongsheng; Liu Yuemin; Chen Daming; Wang Fan

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation conditions of natural abundance 152 Sm targets in different forms are studied in the heavy water reactor and the light water swimming pool reactor at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The result shows that the specific activity of 153 Sm in liquid form target irradiated in the light water swimming pool reactor is two times greater than that in solid form target. The radionuclide purity of 153 Sm is more than 99%, which can meet the needs of clinical application

  20. Analysis of Mo99 production irradiating 20% U targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, C. Ruben; Grant, Carlos R.; Marajofsky, Andres; Parkansky, David G.

    1999-01-01

    At present time, the National Atomic Energy Commission is producing about 800 Ci of Mo99 per week irradiating 90% enriched uranium-aluminum alloy plate targets in the RA-3 reactor, a 5 MW. Mtr type one. In order to change to 20% enriched uranium, and to increase the production to about 3000 Ci per week some configurations were studied with rod and plate geometry with uranium (20% enriched) -aluminum targets. The first case was the irradiation of a plate target element in the normal reactor configuration. Results showed a good efficiency, but both reactivity value and power density were too high. An element with rods was also analyzed, but results showed a poor efficiency, too much aluminum involved in the process, although a low reactivity and an acceptable rod power density. Finally, a solution consisting of plate elements with a Zircaloy cladding was adopted, which has shown not only a good efficiency, but it is also acceptable from the viewpoint of safety, heat transference criteria and feasibility

  1. Antitumor bystander effect induced by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Jin Chufeng; Wu Yican; Ge Shenfang; Wu Lijun; FDS Team

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the bystander effect of the tumor and normal cells surrounding the target region caused by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α-particle irradiation. The receptor tumor cell A549 and normal cell MRC-5 were co-cultured with the donor cells irradiated to 0.5 Gy or the non-irradiated donor cells, and their survival and apoptosis fractions were evaluated. The results showed that the combined treatment of Ad-ET and particle irradiation could induce synergistic antitumor effect on A549 tumor cell, and the survival fraction of receptor cells co-cultured with the irradiated cells decreased by 6%, compared with receptor cells co-cultured with non-irradiated cells, and the apoptosis fraction increased in the same circumstance, but no difference was observed with the normal cells. This study demonstrates that Ad-ET combined with α-particle irradiation can significantly cause the bystander effect on neighboring tumor cells by inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis, without obvious toxicity to normal cells. This suggests that combining radiation-inducible TRAIL gene therapy and irradiation may improve tumor treatment efficacy by specifically targeting tumor cells and even involving the neighboring tumor cells. (authors)

  2. Time-resolved x-ray spectra of laser irradiated high-Z targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Attwood, D.T.; Boyle, M.J.; Campbell, E.M.; Coleman, L.C.; Kornblum, H.N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results obtained by using the Livermore 15 psec x-ray streak camera to record x-ray emission from laser-irradiated high-z targets in the 1-20 keV range are reported. Nine to eleven K-edge filter channels were used for the measurements. In the lower energy channels, a dynamic range of x-ray emission intensity of better than three orders of magnitude have been recorded. Data will be presented which describe temporally and spectrally resolved x-ray spectra of gold disk targets irradiated by laser pulses from the Argus facility, including the temporal evolution of the superthermal x-ray tail

  3. Volume pinning force and upper critical field of irradiated Nb3Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, P.; Seibt, E.

    1981-01-01

    Irradiation by neutrons and ions in A15 superconductors (Nb 3 Sn, V 3 Ga) exerts a stronger influence on the pinning behavior than in nonordered alloys (NbTi). In this work it is shown for deuteron irradiated Nb 3 /Sn wires prepared by the bronze process that the dose curve of the volume pinning force P/sub V/ can be conveniently described by a sum of two terms, due to the grain boundary pinning and to the radiation pinning, respectively. After deduction of the contribution by the radiation-induced pinning centers, good agreement is obtained between the measured P/sub V/ values and those calculated using the upper critical field B/sub c/2 and the transition temperature T/sub c/ on the basis of the irradiation fluence. The use of a theoretical relationship between B/sub c/2 and T/sub c/ is supported by measured values. Application to multifilamentary superconductors with high current carrying capabilities simplifies the calculation of P/sub V/, since the radiation induced volume pinning force can be neglected

  4. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Azria, D.; Gerard, J.P.; Hennequin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  5. Flat cladding and pellets in the design of an irradiation target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yorio, Daniel; Denis, Alicia C.; Soba, Alejandro; Beuter, Oscar; Marajofsky, Adolfo

    2003-01-01

    The design of an enriched uranium irradiation target made of flat pellets and cladding is proposed in order to improve the fission Mo 99 production. The variation range of each one of the parameters is studied and the basic design of the target is given

  6. Compaction and sintering of nickel powder used encapsulation of irradiation targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyano, Rosana S.L.; Guimaraes, Raquel R.F.L.; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: rosatac@gmail.com, E-mail: raquel.lucchesi@icloud.com, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCTM/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais; Wendhausen, Paulo A.P.; Evangelista, Leandro L., E-mail: paulo.wendhausen@ufsc.br, E-mail: leandro.materiais@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an alternative way to produce targets for irradiation containing uranium, for the pair of {sup 99}Mo production {sup 99m}Tc radionuclide. These targets were obtained by powder metallurgy, the compact serving as means for encapsulation a uranium cylinder to be irradiated. The targets were compacted in an axial hydraulic press applying different pressures up to 800 MPa. The sintering temperature was 600 °C in hydrogen atmosphere and it was used two sintering cycles, one for 4 h and the for 4 h plus 8 h time. The nickel powder was of high purity, that in order to provide the sealing of the fissile content within the compacted. The bulk density of compacted was evaluated by the method geometric. The porosity was measured by mercury porosimetry technique. The microstructure was investigated by optical microscopy. The results obtained with sintering powders involving confirm the feasibility of achieving a casing for uranium targets. (author)

  7. Compaction and sintering of nickel powder used encapsulation of irradiation targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Rosana S.L.; Guimaraes, Raquel R.F.L.; Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Wendhausen, Paulo A.P.; Evangelista, Leandro L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an alternative way to produce targets for irradiation containing uranium, for the pair of 99 Mo production 99m Tc radionuclide. These targets were obtained by powder metallurgy, the compact serving as means for encapsulation a uranium cylinder to be irradiated. The targets were compacted in an axial hydraulic press applying different pressures up to 800 MPa. The sintering temperature was 600 °C in hydrogen atmosphere and it was used two sintering cycles, one for 4 h and the for 4 h plus 8 h time. The nickel powder was of high purity, that in order to provide the sealing of the fissile content within the compacted. The bulk density of compacted was evaluated by the method geometric. The porosity was measured by mercury porosimetry technique. The microstructure was investigated by optical microscopy. The results obtained with sintering powders involving confirm the feasibility of achieving a casing for uranium targets. (author)

  8. Comparison of two sus clavicular irradiation techniques in the breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhelif, W.; Henni, M.; Abrous-Anane, S.; Maisonobe, J.A.; Klotz, S.; Leignel, D.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Giraud, P.; Durdux, C.; Housset, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to compare the irradiation of the sub clavicular area by a non coplanar beam with the irradiation by a classical beam in the breast cancer. Conclusion: In the breast cancer, the non coplanar irradiation of sub clavicular ganglions allows to better protect the lungs comparatively to the classical irradiation and that without modifying the coverage of the sub clavicular target volume. (N.C.)

  9. Shock dynamics induced by double-spot laser irradiation of layered targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliverdiev Abutrab A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the interaction of a double-spot laser beam with targets using the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS iodine laser working at 0.44 μm wavelength and intensity of about 1015 W/cm2. Shock breakout signals were recorder using time-resolved self-emission from target rear side of irradiated targets. We compared the behavior of pure Al targets and of targets with a foam layer on the laser side. Results have been simulated using hydrodynamic numerical codes.

  10. Accumulation of the radionuclides in a target irradiated in the reactor of tajoura nuclear research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdunnobi, A.R.; Arebi, B.

    1998-01-01

    One of the main stages of radionuclides production in reactor is the distinguishing of a regime on target irradiation in order to acquire the sufficient activity and the purity of radioisotope required. The authors have derived formula for calculating radionuclidic accumulation on a target irradiated in the reactor operating 10 hours per day, 4 days a week during 4 weeks. The results of I-131 and other radionuclide accumulation are illustrated by a tellurium target irradiation in the reactor operating continuously or with interruptions

  11. Semi-automatic determination of the optimum irradiation parameters in stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, C.; Manens, J.P.; Croci, S.; Scarabin, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    For stereotactic radiosurgery of large lesions or of lesions with irregular shape, the only technique that generates favourable dose distribution is multi-isocentric. The problem is to determine the position of the isocenters that minimize dose heterogeneity within the target volume and maximize the dose gradient outside the target volume. This study was made for two photons energies: γ-rays of Cobalt-60 and 25 MV X-rays. A lead collimator generates circular irradiation beams of diameters 7 to 30 mm at the machine isocenter. By hypothesis, we considered for each isocenter a spherical dose distribution based on an irradiation space defined by sagittal and coronal angular openings of 140 deg. each for 8 equally spaced arcs. The irradiation parameters to be determined are then: the collimator diameter, the number and position of the planes on which the isocenters are placed, and the number and position of the isocenters. We also supposed equidistant isocenters in a linear, triangular, square or complex geometry. The minimum dose point, corresponding to the intersection of the bissectors of the segments joining two consecutive isocenters is inside the geometry. A methodology and rules to determine the irradiation parameters leading to a dose distribution with a reference isodose perfectly adapted to the outlines of the target volume were defined. The collimator diameter is simply correlated to the thickness and the height of the volume to be treated. To determine the number and position of the isocenters we have established simple graphs. These graphs are function of the collimator diameter and the geometric criteria of the volume to be treated (length, thickness, and height). To obtain a dose gradient outside the target volume superior or equal to 5% dose/mm, the collimator diameters must be smaller than or equal to 19 mm for the Cobalt-60 γ-rays and 17 mm for the 25 MV X-rays. For a collimator diameter smaller than or equal to these values, and whatever the photon

  12. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant.

  13. SU-E-T-578: On Definition of Minimum and Maximum Dose for Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Xiao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the impact of different minimum and maximum dose definitions in radiotherapy treatment plan quality evaluation criteria by using tumor control probability (TCP) models. Methods: Dosimetric criteria used in RTOG 1308 protocol are used in the investigation. RTOG 1308 is a phase III randomized trial comparing overall survival after photon versus proton chemoradiotherapy for inoperable stage II-IIIB NSCLC. The prescription dose for planning target volume (PTV) is 70Gy. Maximum dose (Dmax) should not exceed 84Gy and minimum dose (Dmin) should not go below 59.5Gy in order for the plan to be “per protocol” (satisfactory).A mathematical model that simulates the characteristics of PTV dose volume histogram (DVH) curve with normalized volume is built. The Dmax and Dmin are noted as percentage volumes Dη% and D(100-δ)%, with η and d ranging from 0 to 3.5. The model includes three straight line sections and goes through four points: D95%= 70Gy, Dη%= 84Gy, D(100-δ)%= 59.5 Gy, and D100%= 0Gy. For each set of η and δ, the TCP value is calculated using the inhomogeneously irradiated tumor logistic model with D50= 74.5Gy and γ50=3.52. Results: TCP varies within 0.9% with η; and δ values between 0 and 1. With η and η varies between 0 and 2, TCP change was up to 2.4%. With η and δ variations from 0 to 3.5, maximum of 8.3% TCP difference is seen. Conclusion: When defined maximum and minimum volume varied more than 2%, significant TCP variations were seen. It is recommended less than 2% volume used in definition of Dmax or Dmin for target dosimetric evaluation criteria. This project was supported by NIH grants U10CA180868, U10CA180822, U24CA180803, U24CA12014 and PA CURE Grant

  14. A treatment planning comparison of four target volume contouring guidelines for locally advanced pancreatic cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Eccles, Cynthia; Patel, Neel; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Warren, Samantha; McKenna, W. Gillies; Brunner, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Contouring of target volumes varies significantly in radiotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). There is a lack of consensus as to whether elective lymph nodes (eLN’s) should be included or not in the planning target volume (PTV). In the present study we analyzed the dosimetric coverage of the eLN’s and organs at risk (OAR) by comparing four different contouring guidelines. Methods and materials: PTVs were delineated with (Oxford and RTOG guidelines) or without (Michigan and SCALOP guidelines) including the eLNs in eleven patients with PDAC. eLNs included the peripancreatic, paraaortic, paracaval, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric and portal vein clinical target volumes (CTVs). A 3D-CRT plan (50.40 Gy in 28 fractions) was performed to analyze and compare the dosimetric coverage of all eLNs and OAR between the 4 contouring guidelines. Results: The size of Oxford and RTOG PTVs was comparable and significantly larger than the SCALOP and Michigan PTVs. Interestingly the eLNs received a significant amount of incidental dose irradiation by PTV-based plans that only aimed to treat the tumor without the eLNs. The dosimetric coverage of eLN presented a large variability according to the respective contouring methods. The difference in the size of the 4 PTVs was reflected to the dose distribution at the OAR. Conclusions: Our study provides important information regarding the impact of different contouring guidelines on the dose distribution to the eLNs and the OAR in patients with locally advanced PDAC treated with radiotherapy

  15. Post Irradiation Examination Results of the NT-02 Graphite Fins NUMI Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Sidorov, V. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab; Asner, D. M. [PNL, Richland; Casella, Casella,A.M [PNL, Richland; Edwards, D. J. [PNL, Richland; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L. [PNL, Richland; Senor, D. J. [PNL, Richland

    2017-02-10

    The NT-02 neutrino target in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab is a 95 cm long target made up of segmented graphite fins. It is the longest running NuMI target, which operated with a 120 GeV proton beam with maximum power of 340 kW, and saw an integrated total proton on target of 6.1 1020. Over the last half of its life, gradual degradation of neutrino yield was observed until the target was replaced. The probable causes for the target performance degradation are attributed to radiation damage, possibly including cracking caused by reduction in thermal shock resistance, as well as potential localized oxidation in the heated region of the target. Understanding the long-termstructural response of target materials exposed to proton irradiation is critical as future proton accelerator sources are becoming increasingly more powerful. As a result, an autopsy of the target was carried out to facilitate post-irradiation examination of selected graphite fins. Advanced microstructural imaging and surface elemental analysis techniques were used to characterize the condition of the fins in an effort to identify degradation mechanisms, and the relevant findings are presented in this paper.

  16. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Vuijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the depth-dose profile rather than the Bragg peak. Four different lengths of the spinal cord (2, 4, 8, and 20 mm) were irradiated with variable doses. The endpoint for estimating dose-volume effects was paralysis of fore or hind limbs. Results: The results obtained with a high-precision proton beam showed a marginal increase of ED 50 when decreasing the irradiated cord length from 20 mm (ED 50 = 20.4 Gy) to 8 mm (ED 50 = 24.9 Gy), but a steep increase in ED 50 when further decreasing the length to 4 mm (ED 50 = 53.7 Gy) and 2 mm (ED 50 = 87.8 Gy). These results generally confirm data obtained previously in a limited series with 4-6-MV photons, and for the first time it was possible to construct complete dose-response curves down to lengths of 2 mm. At higher ED 50 values and shorter lengths irradiated, the latent period to paralysis decreased from 125 to 60 days. Conclusions: Irradiation of variable lengths of rat cervical spinal cord with protons showed steeply increasing ED 50 values for lengths of less than 8 mm. These results suggest the presence of a critical migration distance of 2-3 mm for cells involved in regeneration processes

  17. Chemical recovery of palladium-103 from irradiated silver target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapshina, E.V.; Kokhanyuk, V.M.; Zhuikov, B.L.; Myasoedova, G.V.; Zakhartchenko, E.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop an extraction method of no-carrier-added palladium-103 from silver. Metallic silver targets may be irradiated by protons with energy of 60-200 MeV or more to generate palladium-103 simultaneously with other radioactive isotopes of rhodium, ruthenium, technetium, palladium and silver. According to the dependence experimental production yield of Pd-103 and isotopes of other elements in thick silver target vs. Proton energy the most suitable energy for maximum yield of Pd-103 and minimum yield of other elements is from about 100 to about 140 MeV. Activity of radionuclides produced in silver target depends from many factors (target thickness, irradiation time, etc.). Two methods of Pd-103 recovering from irradiated silver target are considered in this work: (1) Silver target is dissolved in nitric acid followed by silver precipitation in the form of silver chloride by addition of HCl. The solution containing Pd, Rh and other radionuclides is passed through the layer of fibrous sorbent POLYORGS-15n. Then the sorbent is washed and Pd is desorbed by hot 12 M hydrochloric acid; (2) Silver target is dissolved in nitric acid followed by passing of the obtained solution (2 M HNO 3 ) through a disk set of complex forming sorbent POLYORGS-33n. Under these conditions palladium is sorbed by the sorbent while silver, rhodium, ruthenium and technetium are passed through the sorbent. Then the sorbent is washed with 2M nitric acid, and Pd is desorbed by 12 M hydrochloric acid. Extraction of palladium is occurred during the formation of palladium complex with a chelate sorbent specific to palladium in acidic solutions. Such a sorbent makes possible separation of palladium from accompanying radionuclides such as rhodium, ruthenium and technetium. The polymeric complex-forming sorbent of fibrous structure with the groups of 3(5)-methylpyrazole (POLYORGS-15) is used. The distinctive feature of the sorbents in the form of fibrous 'filled' material is

  18. THE ACHIEVABILITY OF TARGET CONVECTION VOLUMES IN ON-LINE HEMODIAFILTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Sabodash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the achievability of recommended convection volumes in hemodiafiltration (HDF and impeding factors. Materials and methods. In short interventional one-center study among 67 stable prevalent dialysis patients we succeeded in achieving convection volume of more than 24 l/session in 60 patients (90%. Results. Substitution volume rose in the whole group from 21.1 ± 1.6 to 23.8 ± 1.2 l/session (p < 0.01. 12 patients, who didn`t achieve target volume had similar age, duration of renal replacement therapy and ultrafiltration rate as those who did. They differed from 55 patients who achieved target volume by substitution volume at first session in evaluation period (22.2 ± 1.7 vs. 23.6 ± 1.5 liters, р = 0.004, by transmembrane pressure (170 ± 40 vs. 146 ± 24 mmHg, р = 0.009 and by session duration (248 ± 15 vs. 262 ± 17 min, р = 0.0017. Blood flow rate also differed at the start of the study between the achievers and non-achievers: 353 ± 21 vs. 339 ± 19 ml/min, р = 0.035. The pressure in venous segment was lower in the achievers (154 ± 25 vs. 176 ± 36, р = 0.02 as well as transmembrane pressure (144 ± 24 vs. 164 ± 36, р = 0.014 which has been rising session by session in nonachievers. In non-achievers the membrane surface area was lower: 1.75 ± 0.2 vs. 1.91 ± 0.2 m2 (p = 0.02. In the multiple binary logistic regression model the session duration and membrane surface area were positive factors while the transmembrane pressure was negative one. Session prolonged by 15 min was associated with increase in relative chance to achieve target volume by 39% (95% CI 5–82%; р = 0.02. The membrane surface area enlarged by 0.1 m2 was linked with increase of chance by 4.2% (95% CI 0.2–8.4%; р = 0.04. The transmembrane pressure increased by 10 mmHg was associated with decreased chance to achieve target volume by 17% (95% CI 0–70%; р = 0.05. Conclusion. To achieve convection volume of 24 l/session one needs to afford

  19. Spontaneous recombination volumes of Frenkel defects in neutron-irradiated non-fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Mansel, W.; Boening, K.; Rosner, P.; Vogl, G.

    1979-01-01

    Production and production-rate curves for the non-fcc metals Fe, Mo, Ta, W, Zr, and Sn are obtained by electrical-resistivity measurements taken at 4.6 K during reactor neutron irradiations. The saturation concentration of Frenkel defects, c/sub s/, and the recombination volume v/sub o/ are evaluated. A parabolic relation between the spontaneous recombination volume v 0 and the compressibility kappa for a series of bcc metals is found

  20. Volume Fraction Dependent Thermal Performance of UAlx-Al Dispersion Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Eui Hyun; Tahk, Young Wook; Kim, Hyun Jung; Oh, Jae Yong; Yim, Jeong Sik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Unlike U-Al alloys, properties of UAl{sub x}-Al dispersion target can be highly sensitive to volume fraction of UAlx in a target meat due to the interface resistance between target particles and matrix. The interface resistance effects on properties of the target meat including thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat, elastic modulus and so on. Thermal performances of a dispersion target meat were theoretically evaluated under normal operation condition of KJRR (Kijang Research Reactor) during short effective full power days (EFPD) of 7 days, based on reported measured thermal conductivities of UAl{sub x}-Al dispersion fuels. Effective thermal conductivity determines maximum temperature of dispersion target plate. And for that volume fraction of UAlx in target meat has to be determined considering manufacturing of target plate without degradation of physical and mechanical characteristics.

  1. The target theory applied to the analysis of irradiation damages in organic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de

    2005-01-01

    The Target Theory was used to explain the radiation damage in samples containing 1% (g//L) of 2,5-diphenyl-oxazolyl (PPO) diluted in toluene and irradiated with 60 Co (1.8 Gy/s). The survival molecules of irradiated PPO obeys the bi-exponential mathematical model [74.3 x exp(-D/104.3) + 25.7 x exp(-D/800,0)]. It indicates that 74.3% of the molecules decay with D37=104.3 kGy and 25.7% decay with D37=800 kGy. From the Target Theory it was inferred the energies involved in the irradiation damages which were 0.239 ± 0.031 eV (G=418.4 ± 54.1. damages/100 eV) and 1.83 ± 0.30 eV (54.5 ± 8.9 damages/100 eV). The diameter of PPO molecule estimated from the Target Theory is in the interval of 45.5 to 64.9 angstrom. (author)

  2. [Definition of nodal volumes in breast cancer treatment and segmentation guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirova, Y M; Castro Pena, P; Dendale, R; Campana, F; Bollet, M A; Fournier-Bidoz, N; Fourquet, A

    2009-06-01

    To assist in the determination of breast and nodal volumes in the setting of radiotherapy for breast cancer and establish segmentation guidelines. Materials and methods. Contrast metarial enhanced CT examinations were obtained in the treatment position in 25 patients to clearly define the target volumes. The clinical target volume (CTV) including the breast, internal mammary nodes, supraclavicular and subclavicular regions and axxilary region were segmented along with the brachial plexus and interpectoral nodes. The following critical organs were also segmented: heart, lungs, contralateral breast, thyroid, esophagus and humeral head. A correlation between clinical and imaging findings and meeting between radiation oncologists and breast specialists resulted in a better definition of irradiation volumes for breast and nodes with establishement of segmentation guidelines and creation of an anatomical atlas. A practical approach, based on anatomical criteria, is proposed to assist in the segmentation of breast and node volumes in the setting of breast cancer treatment along with a definition of irradiation volumes.

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation in the Wistar rat: technique and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; de Jong, J.

    1983-01-01

    The technical and dosimetric aspects of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in the Wistar rat were evaluated as part of a set-up to develop a new model for tumor xenotransplantation. Information obtained from anatomical dissections, radionuclide imaging of the spleen, lymphography and chromolymphography was used to standardize the localization portals cut out in a lead plate. The two portals encompassed the lymphoid tissue above and below the diaphragm. A specially designed masonite phantom was used to measure the dose distribution in the simulated target volumes. Ionization chamber dosimetery, thermoluminescence dosimetry and film densitometry were used for measuring exposure and absorbed dose. Irradiation was performed with 250 kV X rays (HVL 3.1 mm Cu). The dose rate was regulated by adjusting the treatment distance. The dose inhomogeneity measured in the target volumes varied between 80-100%. The side scatter dose to non target tissues under the shielded area between the two portals ranged between 20-30%. The technique and dosimetry of total lymphoid irradiation in Wistar rats are now standardized and validated and pave the way for tumor xenotransplantation experiments

  4. Optimum combination of targeted 131I and total body irradiation for treatment of disseminated cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Amin E.; Wheldon, Tom E.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Gaze, Mark N.; Barrett, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Radiobiological modeling was used to explore optimum combination strategies for treatment of disseminated malignancies of differing radiosensitivity and differing patterns of metastatic spread. The purpose of the study was to derive robust conclusions about the design of combination strategies that incorporate a targeting component. Preliminary clinical experience of a neuroblastoma treatment strategy, which is based upon general principles obtained from modelling, is briefly described. Methods and Materials: The radiobiological analysis was based on an extended (dose-rate dependent) formulation of the linear quadratic model. Radiation dose and dose rate for targeted irradiation of tumors of differing size was in part based on microdosimetric considerations. The analysis was applied to several tumor types with postulated differences in the pattern of metastatic spread, represented by the steepness of the slope of the relationship between numbers of tumors present and tumor diameter. The clinical pilot study entailed the treatment of five children with advanced neuroblastoma using a combination of 131 I metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) and total body irradiation followed by bone marrow rescue. Results: The theoretical analysis shows that both intrinsic radiosensitivity and pattern of metastatic spread can influence the composition of the ideal optimum combination strategy. High intrinsic radiosensitivity generally favors a high proportion of targeting component in the combination treatment, while a strong tendency to micrometastatic spread favors a major contribution by total body irradiation. The neuroblastoma patients were treated using a combination regimen with an initially low targeting component (2 Gy whole body dose from targeting component plus 12 Gy from total body irradiation). The treatment was tolerable and resulted in remissions in excess of 9 months in each of these advanced neuroblastoma patients. Conclusions: Radiobiological analysis, which

  5. The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luijk, Peter van; Faber, Hette; Meertens, Harm; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung

  6. High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Complete Target Immobilization and Reduction of Planning Target Volume in Stereotactic High Single-Dose Irradiation of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Lung Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Peter; Kraus, Hans-Joerg; Muehlnickel, Werner; Sassmann, Volker; Hering, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of complete target immobilization by means of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV); and to show that the saving of planning target volume (PTV) on the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) under HFJV, compared with SBRT with respiratory motion, can be predicted with reliable accuracy by computed tomography (CT) scans at peak inspiration phase. Methods and Materials: A comparison regarding different methods for defining the PTV was carried out in 22 patients with tumors that clearly moved with respiration. A movement span of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by fusing respiration-correlated CT scans. The PTV enclosed the GTV positions with a safety margin throughout the breathing cycle. To create a PTV from CT scans acquired under HFJV, the same margins were drawn around the immobilized target. In addition, peak inspiration phase CT images (PIP-CTs) were used to approximate a target immobilized by HFJV. Results: The resulting HFJV-PTVs were between 11.6% and 45.4% smaller than the baseline values calculated as respiration-correlated CT-PTVs (median volume reduction, 25.4%). Tentative planning by means of PIP-CT PTVs predicted that in 19 of 22 patients, use of HFJV would lead to a reduction in volume of ≥20%. Using this threshold yielded a positive predictive value of 0.89, as well as a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.5. Conclusions: In all patients, SBRT under HFJV provided a reliable immobilization of the GTVs and achieved a reduction in PTVs, regardless of patient compliance. Tentative planning facilitated the selection of patients who could better undergo radiation in respiratory standstill, both with greater accuracy and lung protection.

  7. A longitudinal analysis of regional brain volumes in macaques exposed to X-irradiation in early gestation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Aldridge

    Full Text Available Early gestation represents a period of vulnerability to environmental insult that has been associated with adult psychiatric disease. However, little is known about how prenatal perturbation translates into adult brain dysfunction. Here, we use a longitudinal study design to examine the effects of disruption of early gestational neurogenesis on brain volume in the non-human primate.Five Rhesus macaques were exposed to x-irradiation in early gestation (E30-E41, and four control monkeys were sham-irradiated at comparable ages. Whole brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 6 months, 12 months, and 3 and 5 years of age. Volumes of whole cerebrum, cortical gray matter, caudate, putamen, and thalamus were estimated using semi-automated segmentation methods and high dimensional brain mapping. Volume reductions spanning all ages were observed in irradiated monkeys in the putamen (15-24%, p = 0.01 and in cortical gray matter (6-15%, p = 0.01. Upon covarying for whole cerebral volume, group differences were reduced to trend levels (putamen: p = 0.07; cortical gray matter: p = 0.08. No group-by-age effects were significant.Due to the small number of observations, the conclusions drawn from this study must be viewed as tentative. Early gestational irradiation may result in non-uniform reduction of gray matter, mainly affecting the putamen and cerebral cortex. This may be relevant to understanding how early prenatal environmental insult could lead to brain morphological differences in neurodevelopmental diseases.

  8. The alpha-particle irradiator set up at the ISS for radiobiological studies on targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, G.; Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Simone, G.; Sorrentino, E.; Tabocchini, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe the alpha-particle irradiator that has been set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS) for controlled exposure of cultured mammalian cells. It can be equipped with two different sources, namely 2'4'4'Cm and 2'4'1'Am, allowing irradiation at different dose-rates (typically 1-100 mGy/min). The irradiator has dimensions small enough to be inserted into a standard cell culture incubator to perform irradiation of cultured cells in physiological conditions. The dose uniformity is such that the variations in the irradiation area are less than ± 12% of the average dose value on different irradiation areas up to ∼ 25 cm'2. Moreover, in the framework of the FP6 Euratom Integrated Project Non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation (NOTE), Petri dishes were realized for housing permeable membrane insert(s) to be used in co-culture experiments. Aluminium shields were also realized for half shield irradiation experiments. The alpha-particle irradiator of the ISS has been successfully used for studying DNA damage, namely double strand breaks (DSB, as measured by the γ-H2AX assay), in directly hit and in bystander primary human fibroblasts [it

  9. Change in volume of lumpectomy cavity during external-beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Geraldine; Betts, Vicki; Smith, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Definition of the lumpectomy cavity is an important component of irradiation of the breast. We use computed tomography (CT)-based planning and contour the lumpectomy volume on the planning CT. We obtained a second CT in the 4th or 5th week of treatment for boost planning and compared the volume change with the first planning-CT scan. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the planning-CT data for 20 patients. In the first CT, images were obtained from the mandible to 2 cm below the breast in 3-mm slices. In the second CT, for the boost, images were obtained from the top to the bottom of the clinically defined breast, in 3-mm slices. Lumpectomy cavities were contoured on both CT scans and volumes compared. Results: Sixteen of the 20 patients (80%) had more than a 20% decrease from the first to the second volume, with a corresponding 95% confidence interval. The mean decrease was 16.13 cc, with a standard deviation of 14.05. The Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.18 did not show a significant correlation between the initial volume and the percent change. Conclusions: During external breast irradiation, many patients will have significant volume reduction in the lumpectomy cavity. Because CT-based definition of the lumpectomy cavity can influence the planning of a boost technique, further study appears warranted

  10. Search for Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser irradiated layered thin foil targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Hares, J.D.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    An experiment to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the vacuum-ablation surface of laser irradiated layered targets by time resolved x-ray spectroscopy is described. The time taken to burn through a layer of material is measured to be the same for massive targets as for thin foil accelerating targets. It is inferred that the thin foil targets might be Rayleigh-Taylor stable despite the values of γtauapproximately equal to15 calculated from classical theory. (author)

  11. Automation in irradiating target systems for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Sumair G.; Sciani, Valdir; Almeida, Rosemeire S.

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, two cyclotron are being operated at IPEN-CNEN/SP: one model CV-28, capable of accelerating p, d, 3 He 4 and α, with energies of 24, 14, 36 and 28 MeV, respectively, and beam currents up to 30 μA; the other one, model cyclone 30, accelerates protons with energy of 30 MeV and currents up to 350 μ A. Both have the objective of irradiating targets both for radioisotope production for use in Nuclear Medicine, such as 67 Ga, 201 Tl, 111 In, 123 I, 18 F, and general research. The development of irradiating systems completely automatized was the objective of this work, always aiming to reduce the radiation exposition dose to the workers and to increasing the reliability of use of these systems, because very high activities are expected in these processes. In the automation, a Programmable Logical Controller (PLC) was used connected to a feedback net, to manage all the variables involved in the irradiation processes. The program of the PLC was developed using Simatic Step Seven (S7), Software from Siemens, where all the steps are supervised in screens at a microcomputer. The assembling and sequence of leading were developed using the software from Unisoft, that keeps the operator informed about the work being carried out, at any time. (author)

  12. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, Eelco, E-mail: e.lens@amc.uva.nl; Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V{sub 95%} >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 40Gy}, D{sub mean} and D{sub 2cc} for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D{sub 2cc} of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors.

  13. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lens, Eelco; Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V 95% >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V 10Gy , V 20Gy , V 30Gy , V 40Gy , D mean and D 2cc for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D 2cc of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors

  14. Distributions of hit-numbers in single targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J F [Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1966-07-01

    Very general models can be proposed for relating the surviving proportion of an irradiated population of cells or bacteria to the absorbed dose, but if the number of free parameters is large the model can never be tested experimentally (Zimmer; Zirkie; Tobias). A relatively simple model is therefore proposed here, based on the physical facts of energy deposition in small volumes which are currently under active investigation (Rossi), and on cell-survival experiments over a wide range of LET (e.g. Barendsen et al.; Barendsen). It is not suggested that the model is correct or final, but only that its shortcomings should be demonstrated by comparison with experimental results before more complicated models are worth pursuing. It is basically a multihit model applied first to a single target volume, but also applicable to the situation where only one out of many potential target volumes has to be inactivated to kill the organism. It can be extended to two or more target volumes if necessary. Emphasis is placed upon the amount of energy locally deposited in certain sensitive volumes called 'target volumes'.

  15. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  16. Chemical recovery of a palladium-103 from irradiated silver target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapshina, E.V.; Kokhanyuk, V.M.; Zhuikov, B.L.; Myasoedova, G.V.; Zakhartchenko, E.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop an extraction method of no-carrier-added palladium-103 from silver. Metallic silver targets were irradiated by protons with the energy of 60-140 MeV to generate palladium-103. Other radioactive isotopes of rhodium, ruthenium, technetium, palladium and silver are also formed at the same time. Two methods of Pd-103 recovering from irradiated silver target are considered. The first one includes the dissolving of the irradiated silver target in nitric acid followed by adding of hydrochloric acid to the solution. Palladium with rhodium, ruthenium and technetium completely remained in solution while silver was precipitated in the form of silver chloride. Extraction of palladium from the obtained solution was provided by the formation of palladium complex with a chelate sorbent which is specific to palladium in acidic solutions. The sorbent makes it possible to separate palladium from admixtures of rhodium, ruthenium and technetium isotopes. The polymeric complex-forming sorbent of fibrous structure with the groups of 3 (5) - methylpyrazole (POLYORGS-15n) is used. An other possible method has been also studied. It includes again dissolving of metallic silver in nitric acid, but does not need silver chloride precipitation. Silver may be sorbed by the complex-forming sorbents, but its sorption is very sensitive to acid concentration. Chelate sorbents of fibrous structure with the groups of amidoxime and hydrazidine (POLYORGS-33n) have been successfully used in our experiments. A high efficiency of palladium extraction by POLYORGS-33n from 2-4 M nitric acid solutions was achieved. Concentrated hydrochloric acid (without heating) was used for palladium desorption with higher yield than in the first method. (authors)

  17. Comparative evaluation of respiratory-gated and ungated FDG-PET for target volume definition in radiotherapy treatment planning for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Nakamoto, Yuji; Itasaka, Satoshi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Togashi, Kaori; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (4D-PET) in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy treatment planning (RTTP). Fourteen patients with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid pancreatic tumours were evaluated between December 2013 and March 2015. Two sets of volumes were contoured for the pancreatic tumour of each patient. The biological target volume in three-dimensional RTTP (BTV3D) was contoured using conventional respiratory un-gated PET. The BTV3D was then expanded using population-based margins to generate a series of internal target volume 3D (ITV3D) values. The ITV 4D (ITV4D) was contoured using 4D-PET. Each of the five phases of 4D-PET was used for 4D contouring, and the ITV4D was constructed by summing the volumes defined on the five individual 4D-PET images. The relative volumes and normalized volumetric overlap were computed between ITV3D and ITV4D. On average, the FDG-avid tumour volumes were 1.6 (range: 0.8-2.3) fold greater in the ITV4D than in the BTV3D. On average, the ITV3D values were 2.0 (range: 1.1-3.4) fold larger than the corresponding ITV4D values. The ITV generated from 4D-PET can be used to improve the accuracy or reduce normal tissue irradiation compared with conventional un-gated PET-based ITV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of haemolymph volume of irradiated and normal males and females of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.Y.Y.; Kloft, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The haemolymph volume of Tenebrio molitor L. adults was determined by a radioisotope dilution technique. Two myl (14)C-inulin were injected into the haemolymph with a micro-syringe. After sufficient time for through mixing, the labelled haemolymph was collected individually under separation of sexes. Total haemolymph was calculated by a conventional formula for radioisotope dilution. The mean haemolymph volume of normal newly emerged males was 61.1+-14.2 myl and remained constant between day 2 (61.2 +-2.1) and day 3 (55.6+-9.2) after emergence. In comparison newly emerged females had a volume of 53.5+-2.3 myl which increased to 69.4+-11.7 myl day 2 resp. 64.0+-16.7 myl by day 3. The haemolymph volume of X-irradiated (5000 R) males remains almost constant. However in case of irradiated females the haemolymph volume also remains constant in contrast to unirradiated individuals

  19. Total scalp irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, Nigel; Jaradat, Hazim; Welsh, James; Tome, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Homogeneous irradiation of the scalp poses technical and dosimetric challenges due to the extensive, superficial, curved treatment volume. Conventional treatments on a linear accelerator use multiple matched electron fields or a combination of electron and photon fields. Problems with these techniques include dose heterogeneity in the target due to varying source-to-skin distance (SSD) and angle of beam incidence, significant dose to the brain, and the potential for overdose or underdose at match lines between the fields. Linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans have similar problems. This work presents treatment plans for total scalp irradiation on a helical tomotherapy machine. Helical tomotherapy is well-suited for scalp irradiation because it has the ability to deliver beamlets that are tangential to the scalp at all points. Helical tomotherapy also avoids problems associated with field matching and use of more than one modality. Tomotherapy treatment plans were generated and are compared to plans for treatment of the same patient on a linac. The resulting tomotherapy plans show more homogeneous target dose and improved critical structure dose when compared to state-of-the-art linac techniques. Target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the best tomotherapy plan was slightly higher than for the linac plan, while the volume of brain tissue receiving over 30 Gy was reduced by two thirds. Furthermore, the tomotherapy plan can be more reliably delivered than linac treatments, because the patient is aligned prior to each treatment based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)

  20. Tolerance of the central nervous system to photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigg, D.R.; Murray, R.M.L.; Koschel, K.

    1982-01-01

    Dose-response isoeffect equations have been determined for hypothalamic pituitary insufficiency following cranial irradiation. Of particular importance is the occurrence of complications at doses substantially less than those commonly used for the treatment of central nervous system tumors. Such complications may be severe and potentially life threatening. These complications occur when a small midline 'target' volume containing the pituitary gland, infundibulum and adjacent inferior hypothalamic structures is irradiated. Direct pituitary irradiation is unlikely to be a factor, at least in some cases. The possible role of incidental hypothalamic irradiation in the control of acromegaly and pituitary dependent Cushing's syndrome is discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Phantom study of radiation doses outside the target volume brachytherapy versus external radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt; Persson, Essie; Westman, Gunnar; Persliden, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is sometimes suggested as an adjuvant treatment after surgery of some tumours. When introducing this, it would be useful to have an estimate of the dose distribution to different body sites, both near and distant to target, comparing conventional external irradiation to brachytherapy. The aim of the present study was to determine radiation doses with both methods at different body sites, near and distant to target, in an experimental situation on an operated left sided breast cancer on a female Alderson phantom. Methods: Five external beam treatments with isocentric tangential fields were given by a linear accelerator. A specified dose of 1.0 Gy was given to the whole left sided breast volume. Five interstitial brachytherapy treatments were given to the upper, lateral quadrant of the left breast by a two plane, 10 needles implant. A dose of 1.0 Gy specified according to the Paris system was administered by a pulsed dose rate afterloading machine. Absorbed dose in different fixed dose points were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results: Both methods yielded an absorbed dose of the same size to the bone marrow and internal organs distant to target, 1.0-1.4% of the prescribed dose. There was a trend of lower doses to the lower half of the trunk and higher doses to the upper half of the trunk, respectively, by brachytherapy. A 90% reduction of absorbed dose with brachytherapy compared to external irradiation was found in the near-target region within 5 cm from target boundary where parts of the left lung and the heart are situated. If an adjuvant dose of 50 Gy is given with the external radiotherapy and brachytherapy, the absorbed dose in a part of the myocardium could be reduced from 31.8 to 2.1 Gy. Conclusions: Near target, brachytherapy yielded a considerably lower absorbed dose which is of special importance when considering radiation effects on the myocard and lungs. We could not demonstrate any difference of

  2. Specification of absorbed dose for reporting a therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Chassagne, D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of dose specification in external beam therapy with photons and electrons has been dealt with in ICRU Report 29 (1978). This problem arises from the fact that the absorbed dose distribution is usually not uniform in the target volume and that for the purpose of treatment reporting a nominal absorbed dose - which will be called target absorbed dose - has to be selected. When comparing the clinical results obtained between radiotherapy centres, the differences in the reported target absorbed doses which can be introduced by differences in the methods of dose specification often are much larger than the differences related to the dosimetric procedures themselves. This shows the importance of the problem. In this paper, some definitions of terms and concepts currently used in radiotherapy are first recalled: tumour volume, target volume, treatment volume, etc. These definitions have been proposed in ICRU Report 29 for photon and electron beams; they can be extended to any kind of irradiation. For external beam therapy with photons and electrons, the target absorbed dose is defined as the absorbed dose at selected point(s) (specification point(s)) having a meaningful relation to the target volume and/or the irradiation beams. Examples are discussed for typical cases. As far as interstitial and intracavitary therapy is concerned, the problem is more complex and no recommendations have so far been made by the ICRU Commission. A major difficulty arises from the sharp dose gradient as a function of the distance to the sources. The particular case of the treatment of cervix carcinoma is considered and some possible methods of specification are discussed: (1) the indication of the sources (in adequate units) and the duration of the application, (2) the absorbed doses at selected reference points (bladder, rectum, bony structures) and (3) the description of the tissue volume (height, width, thickness) encompassed by a given isodose surface (60Gy). (author)

  3. ISAC target operation with high proton currents

    CERN Document Server

    Dombsky, M; Schmor, P; Lane, M

    2003-01-01

    The TRIUMF-ISAC facility target stations were designed for ISOL target irradiations with up to 100 mu A proton beam currents. Since beginning operation in 1998, ISAC irradiation currents have progressively increased from initial values of approx 1 mu A to present levels of up to 40 mu A on refractory metal foil targets. In addition, refractory carbide targets have operated at currents of up to 15 mu A for extended periods. The 1-40 mu A operational regime is achieved by tailoring each target to the thermal requirements dictated by material properties such as beam power deposition, thermal conductivity and maximum operating temperature of the target material. The number of heat shields on each target can be varied in order to match the effective emissivity of the target surface for the required radiative power dissipation. Targets of different thickness, surface area and volume have been investigated to study the effect of diffusion and effusion delays on the yield of radioisotopes. For yields of short-lived p...

  4. Methods of thallium-201 preparation from proton irradiated thallium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlova, M.D.; Sevast'yanova, A.S.; Malinin, A.B.; Kurenkov, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods of thallium-201 preparation from Tl-targets irradiated by protons: oxidation-extraction (1) and extraction (2) - are developed. At first radioactive lead is separated from the target material - thallium macroquantities during ∼32 hours, then thallium-201 was separated from residual activity of lead radioisotopes and transformed it into the necessary chemical formula. The 1st and 2nd methods differ from each other by the 1st stage of target retreatment; only extraction was used to separate radioactive lead in the 2nd method. The target was solved in H 2 SO 4 . The 1st method permits to separate thallium-201 with chemical yield not less than 90 %, the 2nd one - higher than 95 %. Volumetric activity of thallium-201 prepared is more than 55 MBq/ml. 5 refs

  5. Experimental study on ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laser-irradiated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, Keisuke; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiko; Otani, Kazuto; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Tamari, Yohei; Okuno, Kazuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2004-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are key issues of the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Among the instabilities, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is the most important because it gives the largest growth factor in the ICF targets. Perturbations on the laser irradiated surface grow exponentially, but the growth rate is reduced by ablation flow. The growth rate γ is written as Takabe-Betti formula: γ = [kg/(1+kL)]1/2-βkm/pa, where k is wave number of the perturbation, g is acceleration, L is density scale-length, β is a coefficient, m is mass ablation rate per unit surface, and ρa is density at the ablation front. We experimentally measured all the parameters in the formula for polystyrene (CH) targets. Experiments were done on the HIPER laser facility at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. We found that the β value in the formula is ~ 1.7, which is in good agreements with the theoretical prediction, whereas the β for certain perturbation wavelengths are larger than the prediction. This disagreement between the experiment and the theory is mainly due to the deformation of the cutoff surface, which is created by non-uniform ablation flow from the ablation surface. We also found that high-Z doped plastic targets have multiablation structure, which can reduce the RT growth rate. When a low-Z target with high-Z dopant is irradiated by laser, radiation due to the high-Z dopant creates secondary ablation front deep inside the target. Since, the secondary ablation front is ablated by x-rays, the mass ablation rate is larger than the laser-irradiated ablation surface, that is, further reduction of the RT growth is expected. We measured the RT growth rate of Br-doped polystyrene targets. The experimental results indicate that of the CHBr targets show significantly small growth rate, which is very good news for the design of the ICF targets.

  6. SU-F-T-150: Comparing Normal Tissue Irradiated Volumes for Proton Vs. Photon Treatment Plans On Lung Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A; Mohan, R; Liao, Z [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to compare the “irradiated volume” (IRV) of normal tissues receiving 5, 20, 50, 80 and 90% or higher of the prescription dose with passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) vs. IMRT of lung cancer patients. The overall goal of this research is to understand the factors affecting outcomes of a randomized PSPT vs. IMRT lung trial. Methods: Thirteen lung cancer patients, selected randomly, were analyzed. Each patient had PSPT and IMRT 74 Gy (RBE) plans meeting the same normal tissue constraints generated. IRVs were created for pairs of IMRT and PSPT plans on each patient. The volume of iGTV, (respiratory motion-incorporated GTV) was subtracted from each IRV to create normal tissue irradiated volume IRVNT. The average of IRVNT DVHs over all patients was also calculated for both modalities and inter-compared as were the selected dose-volume indices. Probability (p value) curves were calculated based on the Wilcoxon matched-paired signed-rank test to determine the dose regions where the statistically significant differences existed. Results: As expected, the average 5, 20 and 50% IRVNT’s for PSPT was found to be significantly smaller than for IMRT (p < 0.001, 0.01, and 0.001 respectively). However, the average 90% IRVNT for PSPT was greater than for IMRT (p = 0.003) presumably due to larger penumbra of protons and the long range of protons in lower density media. The 80% IRVNT for PSPT was also larger but not statistically distinguishable (p = .224). Conclusion: PSPT modality has smaller irradiated volume at lower doses, but larger volume at high doses. A larger cohort of lung patients will be analyzed in the future and IRVNT of patients treated with PSPT and IMRT will be compared to determine if the irradiated volumes (the magnitude of “dose bath”) correlate with outcomes.

  7. Optimization of the testing volumes with respect to neutron flux levels in the two-target high flux D-Li neutron source for the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Varsamis, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    An economic and fusion-relevant source of high-energy neutrons is an essential element in the fusion nuclear technology and development program. This source can be generated by directing a high energy deuteron beam onto a flowing liquid lithium target, producing neutrons via the D-Lithium stripping reaction. Previous work on this type of source concentrated on a design employing one deuteron beam of modest amperage. This design was shown to have a relatively small testing volume with high flux gradients and was therefor considered somewhat unattractive from a materials testing standpoint. A design using two lithium targets and two high-amperage beams has recently been proposed. This two beam design has been examined in an effort to maximize the test volume while minimizing the flux gradients and minimizing the effect of radiation damage on one target due to the other. A spatial, energy and angle dependent neutron source modeling the D-Lithium source was developed. Using this source, a 3-dimensional map of uncollided flux within the test volume was calculated. The results showed that the target separation has little effect on the available experimental volume and that a testing volume of ∼35 liters is available with a volume averaged flux above 10 14 n/cm 2 /s. The collided flux within the test volume was then determined by coupling the source model with a Monte Carlo code. The spectral effects of the high-energy tail in the flux were examined and evaluated as to possible effects on materials response. Calculations comparing the radiation damage to materials from the D-Lithium source to that cause by a standard DT fusion first-wall neutron flux spectrum showed that the number of appm and dpa, as well as the ratio appm/dpa and dpa/MW/m 2 are within 30% for the two sources. 8 refs., 8 figs

  8. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  9. A local contrast based approach to threshold segmentation for PET target volume delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drever, Laura; Robinson, Don M.; McEwan, Alexander; Roa, Wilson

    2006-01-01

    Current radiation therapy techniques, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy rely on the precise delivery of high doses of radiation to well-defined volumes. CT, the imaging modality that is most commonly used to determine treatment volumes cannot, however, easily distinguish between cancerous and normal tissue. The ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to more readily differentiate between malignant and healthy tissues has generated great interest in using PET images to delineate target volumes for radiation treatment planning. At present the accurate geometric delineation of tumor volumes is a subject open to considerable interpretation. The possibility of using a local contrast based approach to threshold segmentation to accurately delineate PET target cross sections is investigated using well-defined cylindrical and spherical volumes. Contrast levels which yield correct volumetric quantification are found to be a function of the activity concentration ratio between target and background, target size, and slice location. Possibilities for clinical implementation are explored along with the limits posed by this form of segmentation

  10. Recurrence pattern of squamous cell carcinoma in the midthoracic esophagus: implications for the clinical target volume design of postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2016-10-01

    stations 2, 4, 5, and 7 LNs should be delineated as clinical target volume of postoperative prophylactic irradiation, and upper abdominal LNs should be excluded. While for midthoracic ESCC with three or more positive nodes, upper abdominal LNs should also be included. The length of tumor and histological differentiation should be considered comprehensively to design the clinical target volume for radiotherapy. Keywords: esophagus cancer, radiotherapy, recurrence and metastasis, clinical target volume

  11. Defining internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X, Mian; Liu Mengzhong; Deng Xiaowu; Zhang Li; Huang Xiaoyan; Liu Hui; Li Qiaoqiao; Hu Yonghong; Cai Ling; Cui Nianji

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To define individualized internal target volume (ITV) for hepatocellular carcinoma using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Materials and methods: Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and clinical target volumes (CTVs) were contoured on all 10 respiratory phases of 4DCT scans in 10 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The 3D and 4D treatment plans were performed for each patient using two different planning target volumes (PTVs): (1) PTV 3D was derived from a single CTV plus conventional margins; (2) PTV 4D was derived from ITV 4D , which encompassed all 10 CTVs plus setup margins (SMs). The volumes of PTVs and dose distribution were compared between the two plans. Results: The average PTV volume of the 4D plans (328.4 ± 152.2 cm 3 ) was less than 3D plans (407.0 ± 165.6 cm 3 ). The 4D plans spared more surrounding normal tissues than 3D plans, especially normal liver. Compared with 3D plans, the mean dose to normal liver (MDTNL) decreased from 22.7 to 20.3 Gy. Without increasing the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the 4D plans allowed for increasing the calculated dose from 50.4 ± 1.3 to 54.2 ± 2.6 Gy, an average increase of 7.5% (range 4.0-16.0%). Conclusions: The conventional 3D plans can result in geometric miss and include excess normal tissues. The 4DCT-based plans can reduce the target volumes to spare more normal tissues and allow dose escalation compared with 3D plans

  12. Patterns of failure after the reduced volume approach for elective nodal irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Ki Ho; Lee, Jeong Eun

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the patterns of nodal failure after radiotherapy (RT) with the reduced volume approach for elective neck nodal irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty-six NPC patients who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy with the reduced volume approach for ENI were reviewed. The ENI included retropharyngeal and level II lymph nodes, and only encompassed the echelon inferior to the involved level to eliminate the entire neck irradiation. Patients received either moderate hypofractionated intensity-modulated RT for a total of 72.6 Gy (49.5 Gy to elective nodal areas) or a conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal RT for a total of 68.4-72 Gy (39.6-45 Gy to elective nodal areas). Patterns of failure, locoregional control, and survival were analyzed. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 3 to 80 months). The out-of-field nodal failure when omitting ENI was none. Three patients developed neck recurrences (one in-field recurrence in the 72.6 Gy irradiated nodal area and two in the elective irradiated region of 39.6 Gy). Overall disease failure at any site developed in 11 patients (19.6%). Among these, there were six local failures (10.7%), three regional failures (5.4%), and five distant metastases (8.9%). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 87.1%, and the distant failure-free rate was 90.4%; disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years was 80% and 86.8%, respectively. No patient developed nodal failure in the omitted ENI site. Our investigation has demonstrated that the reduced volume approach for ENI appears to be a safe treatment approach in NPC.

  13. Patterns of failure after the reduced volume approach for elective nodal irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Ki Ho; Lee, Jeong Eun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the patterns of nodal failure after radiotherapy (RT) with the reduced volume approach for elective neck nodal irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty-six NPC patients who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy with the reduced volume approach for ENI were reviewed. The ENI included retropharyngeal and level II lymph nodes, and only encompassed the echelon inferior to the involved level to eliminate the entire neck irradiation. Patients received either moderate hypofractionated intensity-modulated RT for a total of 72.6 Gy (49.5 Gy to elective nodal areas) or a conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal RT for a total of 68.4-72 Gy (39.6-45 Gy to elective nodal areas). Patterns of failure, locoregional control, and survival were analyzed. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 3 to 80 months). The out-of-field nodal failure when omitting ENI was none. Three patients developed neck recurrences (one in-field recurrence in the 72.6 Gy irradiated nodal area and two in the elective irradiated region of 39.6 Gy). Overall disease failure at any site developed in 11 patients (19.6%). Among these, there were six local failures (10.7%), three regional failures (5.4%), and five distant metastases (8.9%). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 87.1%, and the distant failure-free rate was 90.4%; disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years was 80% and 86.8%, respectively. No patient developed nodal failure in the omitted ENI site. Our investigation has demonstrated that the reduced volume approach for ENI appears to be a safe treatment approach in NPC.

  14. Patterns of failure after the reduced volume approach for elective nodal irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Ki Ho; Lee, Jeong Eun

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of nodal failure after radiotherapy (RT) with the reduced volume approach for elective neck nodal irradiation (ENI) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty-six NPC patients who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy with the reduced volume approach for ENI were reviewed. The ENI included retropharyngeal and level II lymph nodes, and only encompassed the echelon inferior to the involved level to eliminate the entire neck irradiation. Patients received either moderate hypofractionated intensity-modulated RT for a total of 72.6 Gy (49.5 Gy to elective nodal areas) or a conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal RT for a total of 68.4-72 Gy (39.6-45 Gy to elective nodal areas). Patterns of failure, locoregional control, and survival were analyzed. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 3 to 80 months). The out-of-field nodal failure when omitting ENI was none. Three patients developed neck recurrences (one in-field recurrence in the 72.6 Gy irradiated nodal area and two in the elective irradiated region of 39.6 Gy). Overall disease failure at any site developed in 11 patients (19.6%). Among these, there were six local failures (10.7%), three regional failures (5.4%), and five distant metastases (8.9%). The 3-year locoregional control rate was 87.1%, and the distant failure-free rate was 90.4%; disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years was 80% and 86.8%, respectively. No patient developed nodal failure in the omitted ENI site. Our investigation has demonstrated that the reduced volume approach for ENI appears to be a safe treatment approach in NPC

  15. Thermal transport measurements of uv laser irradiated spherical targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; Delettrez, J.; Henke, B.L.; Richardson, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    New measurements are presented of thermal transport in spherical geometry using time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy. We determine the time dependence of the mass ablation rate m(dot) by following the progress of the ablation surface through thin layers of material embedded at various depths below the surface of the target. These measurements made with 6 and 12 uv (351 nm) beams from OMEGA are compared to previous thermal transport data and are in qualitative agreement with detailed LILAC hydrodynamic code simulations which predict a sharp decrease in m(dot) after the peak of the laser pulse. Non-uniform laser irradiation of the target results in the anomalously high values of m(dot) measured in these experiments

  16. Design and Characterization of High Power Targets for RIB Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    In this article, thermal modeling techniques are used to simulate ISOL targets irradiated with high power proton beams. Beam scattering effects, nuclear reactions and beam power deposition distributions in the target were computed with the Monte Carlo simulation code, GEANT4. The power density information was subsequently used as input to the finite element thermal analysis code, ANSYS, for extracting temperature distribution information for a variety of target materials. The principal objective of the studies was to evaluate techniques for more uniformly distributing beam deposited heat over the volumes of targets to levels compatible with their irradiation with the highest practical primary-beam power, and to use the preferred technique to design high power ISOL targets. The results suggest that radiation cooling, in combination, with primary beam manipulation, can be used to control temperatures in practically sized targets, to levels commensurate with irradiation with 1 GeV, 100 kW proton beams

  17. Long-lived isotopes production in Pb-Bi target irradiated by high energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korovin, Y.A.; Konobeyev, A.Y.; Pereslavtsev, P.E. [Obninsk Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-10-01

    Concentration of long-lived isotopes has been calculated for lead and lead-bismuth targets irradiated by protons with energy 0.4, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.6 GeV. The time of irradiation is equal from 1 month up to 2 years. The data libraries BROND, ADL and MENDL have been used to obtain the rate of nuclide transmutation. All calculations have been performed using the SNT code.

  18. Design, simulation and manufacture of a multi leaf collimator to confirm the target volumes in intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali-Asl, A.; Batooli, A. H.; Harriri, S.; Salman-Rezaee, F.; Shahmardan, F.; Yavari, L.

    2010-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy is one of the cancer treatment methods. It is important to selectively aim at the target in this way, which can be performed using a multi leaf collimator. Materials and Methods: In order to specifically irradiate the target volume in radiotherapy to reduce the patient absorbed dose, the use of multi leaf collimator has been investigated in this work. Design and simulation of an multi leaf collimator was performed by a Monte Carlo method and the optimum material for manufacturing the leaves was determined using MCNP4C. After image processing (CT or MRI) in this system, the tumor configuration is determined. Then the linear accelerator is switched on and the beam irradiates the cancerous cells. When the multi leaf collimator leaves receive a command from the micro controller, they start to move and absorb the radiation and modulate its intensity. Consequently, the tumor receives maximum intensity of radiation but minimum intensity is delivered to healthy tissues. Results: According to the simulations and calculations, the best material to manufacture the leaves from is tungsten alloy containing copper and nickel which absorbs a large amount of the radiation; by using a 8.65 cm thickness of alloy, 10.55% of radiation will transmit through the leaves. Discussion and Conclusion: Lead blocks are conventionally used in radiotherapy. However, they have some problems like cost, storage and manufacture for every patient. Certainly, the multi leaf collimator is the most efficient device to specifically irradiate the tumor in Intensity modulated radiation therapy. Furthermore, it facilitates treating the target in different views by rotation around the patient. Thus the patient's absorbed dose will decrease and the tumor will receive maximum dose.

  19. High-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DEFIN) for spherical irradiation of thermonuclear targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Danilov, A.E.; Krokhin, O.N.; Kruglov, B.V.; Mikhailov, Yu.A.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Fedotov, S.I.; Fedorov, A.N.

    This paper describes a high-energy, twelve-channel laser facility (DELFIN) intended for high-temperature heating of thermonuclear targets with spherical symmetry. The facility includes a neodymium-glass laser with the ultimate radiation energy of 10 kJ, a pulse length of approximately 10 -10 to 10 -9 s, beam divergence of 5 x 10 -4 radians, a vacuum chamber in which laser radiation interacts with the plasma, and a system of diagnostic instrumentation for the observation of laser beam and plasma parameters. Described are the optical scheme and construction details of the laser facility. Presented is an analysis of focusing schemes for target irradiation and described is the focusing scheme of the DELFIN facility, which is capable of attaining a high degree of spherical symmetry in irradiating targets with maximum beam intensity at the target surface of approximately 10 15 W/cm 2 . This paper examines the most important problems connected with the physical investigations of thermonuclear laser plasma and the basic diagnostic problems involved in their solution

  20. A nationwide Dutch study regarding treatment portals for elective neck irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dieren, E B [Integraal Kankercentrum, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Nowak, P J.C.M.; Van Soernsen de Koste, J.R.; Van Est, H; Heijmen, B J.M.; Levendag, P C

    1995-12-01

    The variation in treatment portals for elective radiotherapy of the neck, and the three-dimensional dosimetric consequences of this variation was assessed. Therefore, 16 experienced radiation oncologists from all major head and neck cooperative groups in the Netherlands (n=11) were asked to define RT-portals on a lateral and/or AP simulation film, for (routine) elective neck irradiation for a T2 tumor of the mobile tongue and a T3 tumor of the supraglottic larynx. Treatment portals were compared and evaluated using a three-dimensional treatment planning system and CT data with contoured critical structures and target volume. The CT-defined clinical target volume was mutually agreed upon by ENT-surgeons and radiation oncologists. Large differences were seen in treated volume (a factor of five). In addition, due to the variation in the cranial boundary of the RT-portals, the estimated NTCP varied considerably (0-50%). Moreover, several of the RT-portals did not adequately cover the CT-defined target volume. Even amongst experienced head and neck radiation oncologists, little agreement was observed with respect to treatment technique and size of the treatment portals in case of elective neck irradiation. This results in a considerable variation in treated volume. As a consequence, a large difference exists in the anticipated probability of normal tissue complication, and possibly in tumor control probability. Therefore, a definition of target volume and, consequently, a standardization of elective neck portals in mandatory. This is even more important if the primary tumor and clinically node-negative neck are to be treated by 3D conformal RT using multiple CT-slices for target delineation and positioning of BEV blocks in order to spare the normal tissue function with maximum tumor control probability.

  1. A nationwide Dutch study regarding treatment portals for elective neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dieren, E.B.; Nowak, P.J.C.M.; Van Soernsen de Koste, J.R.; Van Est, H.; Heijmen, B.J.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The variation in treatment portals for elective radiotherapy of the neck, and the three-dimensional dosimetric consequences of this variation was assessed. Therefore, 16 experienced radiation oncologists from all major head and neck cooperative groups in the Netherlands (n=11) were asked to define RT-portals on a lateral and/or AP simulation film, for (routine) elective neck irradiation for a T2 tumor of the mobile tongue and a T3 tumor of the supraglottic larynx. Treatment portals were compared and evaluated using a three-dimensional treatment planning system and CT data with contoured critical structures and target volume. The CT-defined clinical target volume was mutually agreed upon by ENT-surgeons and radiation oncologists. Large differences were seen in treated volume (a factor of five). In addition, due to the variation in the cranial boundary of the RT-portals, the estimated NTCP varied considerably (0-50%). Moreover, several of the RT-portals did not adequately cover the CT-defined target volume. Even amongst experienced head and neck radiation oncologists, little agreement was observed with respect to treatment technique and size of the treatment portals in case of elective neck irradiation. This results in a considerable variation in treated volume. As a consequence, a large difference exists in the anticipated probability of normal tissue complication, and possibly in tumor control probability. Therefore, a definition of target volume and, consequently, a standardization of elective neck portals in mandatory. This is even more important if the primary tumor and clinically node-negative neck are to be treated by 3D conformal RT using multiple CT-slices for target delineation and positioning of BEV blocks in order to spare the normal tissue function with maximum tumor control probability

  2. Irradiation of the chest wall and regional nodes as an integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer after mastectomy: from dosimetry to clinical side-effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jinli; Li Jiongxiong; Zhu Chuanying

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss dosimetric characteristics of an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique for treating the chest wall and regional nodes as an integrated volume after modified radical mastectomy (MRM), and observe acute side-effects following irradiation. Methods: From June 2009 to August 2010, 75 patients were randomly enrolled. Of these, 41 had left-sided breast cancer. Each eligible patient had a planning CT in treatment position, on which the chest wall, supraclavicular,and infraclavicular nodes, +/-internal mammary region, were contoured as an integrated volume. A multi-beam IMRT plan was designed with the target either as a whole or two segments divided at below the clavicle head. A dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was prescribed to cover at least 90% of the PTV. Internal mammary region was included in 31 cases. Dose volume histograms were used to evaluate the IMRT plans. The acute side effects were followed up regularly during and after irradiation. The independent two-sample t-test was used to compare the dosimetric parameters between integrated and segmented plans. Results: Planning design was completed for all patients, including 55 integrated and 20 segmented plans, with median number of beams of 8. The conformity index and homogeneity index was 1.43 ± 0.15 and 0.14 ± 0.02, respectively. Patients with internal mammary region included in PTV had higher homogeneity index PT. The percent volume of PTV receiving > 110% prescription dose was max , D mean V 107% , and V 110% , between integrated and segmented plans (t=2.19 -2.53, P=0.013-0.031). ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis was identified in 3 2 patients (grade 2 in 22 patients, grade 3 in 10 patients), mostly occurred within 1 - 2 weeks after treatment. The sites of moist desquamation were anterior axillary fold (27/37) and chest wall (10/37). Only 2 patients developed grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The IMRT technique applied after MRM with integrated locoregional target volume

  3. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in tangential field irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Fowble, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Radiation pneumonitis and cardiac effects are directly related to the irradiated lung and heart volumes in the treatment fields. The central lung distance (CLD) from a tangential breast radiograph is shown to be a significant indicator of ipsilateral irradiated lung volume based on empirically derived functions which accuracy depends on the actual measured volume in treatment position. A simple and accurate linear relationship with CLD and retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose volume of lung and heart is presented with actual volume data from a CT simulator in the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: The heart and lung volumes in the tangential treatment fields were analyzed in 45 consecutive (22 left and 23 right breast) patients referred for CT simulation of the cone down treatment. All patients in this study were immobilized and placed on an inclined breast board in actual treatment setup. Both arms were stretched over head uniformly to avoid collision with the scanner aperture. Radiopaque marks were placed on the medial and lateral borders of the tangential fields. All patients were scanned in spiral mode with slice width and thickness of 3 mm each, respectively. The lung and heart structures as well as irradiated areas were delineated on each slice and respective volumes were accurately measured. The treatment beam parameters were recorded and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for the CLD and analysis. Results: Table 1 shows the volume statistics of patients in this study. There is a large variation in the lung and heart volumes among patients. Due to differences in the shape of right and left lungs the percent irradiated volume (PIV) are different. The PIV data have shown to correlate with CLD with 2nd and 3rd degree polynomials; however, in this study a simple straight line regression is used to provide better confidence than the higher order polynomial. The regression lines for the left and right

  4. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P.; Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the corresponding posterior mediastinum. In

  5. Target Centroid Position Estimation of Phase-Path Volume Kalman Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjun Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of easily losing track target when obstacles appear in intelligent robot target tracking, this paper proposes a target tracking algorithm integrating reduced dimension optimal Kalman filtering algorithm based on phase-path volume integral with Camshift algorithm. After analyzing the defects of Camshift algorithm, compare the performance with the SIFT algorithm and Mean Shift algorithm, and Kalman filtering algorithm is used for fusion optimization aiming at the defects. Then aiming at the increasing amount of calculation in integrated algorithm, reduce dimension with the phase-path volume integral instead of the Gaussian integral in Kalman algorithm and reduce the number of sampling points in the filtering process without influencing the operational precision of the original algorithm. Finally set the target centroid position from the Camshift algorithm iteration as the observation value of the improved Kalman filtering algorithm to fix predictive value; thus to make optimal estimation of target centroid position and keep the target tracking so that the robot can understand the environmental scene and react in time correctly according to the changes. The experiments show that the improved algorithm proposed in this paper shows good performance in target tracking with obstructions and reduces the computational complexity of the algorithm through the dimension reduction.

  6. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  7. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume; Cancers du rectum: volumes cible de la radiotherapie, bases rationnelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Jean-Minjoz, 3, boulevard Fleming, 25030 Besancon (France); Crehange, G. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Pr-Marion, 21079 Dijon cedex (France); Azria, D. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Val-d' Aurelle, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Gerard, J.P. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue Valombrose, 06189 Nice (France); Hennequin, C. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  8. A treatment planning comparison of two different 3D conformal techniques for irradiation of head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstevska, Valentina; Lukarski, Dusko; Petkovska, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this treatment planning study was to compare two different three dimensional conformal irradiation techniques for head and neck cancer patients. For 33 patients with head and neck carcinoma, irradiated according to the classical technique, we computed and evaluated a second irradiation technique in order to optimize the treatment planning protocol. The classical technique, termed 'electron-photon fields', employed two lateral semi-fields (23 fractions) for irradiation of the upper part of the planning target volume that should receive 50 Gy (PTV50) and an anterior and posterior field for the lower part. After the 23rd fraction the lateral fields were reduced from the dorsal side (2 fractions), in order to exclude the spinal cord from them. At the same time the dose to the shielded part of the target volume was delivered with matched electron fields. Finally, after the 25th fraction, the high risk volume was irradiated to the desired dose with plan where the spinal cord was completely shielded. In the new technique, termed 'oblique photon fields', 4 oblique isocentric photon fields were used (25 fractions): two anterior fields that covered the entire target volume that should receive 50 Gy and two posterior fields that covered only half of the target volume in order to shield the spinal cord. Thus, the necessity for using electron fields is eliminated. We kept the plan for irradiation of the high risk planning target volume the same as in the classical technique. The prescribed dose per fraction in all plans was 2 Gy. In both techniques the plans were optimized to the same maximal point dose and the same dose to the spinal cord. The oblique fields plan showed better coverage and homogeneity of the PTV50, except for the patients with positive resection margins receiving postoperative radiotherapy (receiving 66 Gy), where the coverage did not differ significantly. The conformity in both techniques did not differ significantly. The mean dose to the

  9. MRI definition of target volumes using fuzzy logic method for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; Vial, Stephane; Gibon, David; Kulik, Carine; Fournier, Charles; Castelain, Bernard; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Rousseau, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) volume determination is one of the most important problems in conformal radiation therapy. Techniques of volume determination from tomographic medical imaging are usually based on two-dimensional (2D) contour definition with the result dependent on the segmentation method used, as well as on the user's manual procedure. The goal of this work is to describe and evaluate a new method that reduces the inaccuracies generally observed in the 2D contour definition and 3D volume reconstruction process. Methods and Materials: This new method has been developed by integrating the fuzziness in the 3D volume definition. It first defines semiautomatically a minimal 2D contour on each slice that definitely contains the volume and a maximal 2D contour that definitely does not contain the volume. The fuzziness region in between is processed using possibility functions in possibility theory. A volume of voxels, including the membership degree to the target volume, is then created on each slice axis, taking into account the slice position and slice profile. A resulting fuzzy volume is obtained after data fusion between multiorientation slices. Different studies have been designed to evaluate and compare this new method of target volume reconstruction and a classical reconstruction method. First, target definition accuracy and robustness were studied on phantom targets. Second, intra- and interobserver variations were studied on radiosurgery clinical cases. Results: The absolute volume errors are less than or equal to 1.5% for phantom volumes calculated by the fuzzy logic method, whereas the values obtained with the classical method are much larger than the actual volumes (absolute volume errors up to 72%). With increasing MRI slice thickness (1 mm to 8 mm), the phantom volumes calculated by the classical method are increasing exponentially with a maximum absolute error up to 300%. In contrast, the absolute volume errors are less than 12% for phantom

  10. Free volume modifications in chalcone chromophore doped PMMA films by electron irradiation: Positron annihilation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayil; Ravindrachary, V.; Praveena, S. D.; Mahesha, M. G.

    2018-03-01

    The free volume related fluorescence behaviour in electron beam irradiated chalcone chromophore doped Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composite films have been studied using FTIR, UV-Visible, XRD and Positron Annihilation techniques. From the FTIR spectral study it is found that the formation of polarons and bipolaron takes place due to cross linking as well as chain scission processes at lower and higher doses respectively. It reveals that the formation of various polaronic defect levels upon irradiation is responsible for the creation of three optical energy band gaps within the polymer films as obtained from UV-Visible spectra. The crosslinking process at lower doses increases the distance between the pendant groups to reduce the interchain distance and chain scission process at higher doses decreases interchain separation to enhance the number of polarons in the polymer composites as suggested by XRD studies. The fluorescence studies show the enhancement of fluorescence emission at lower doses and reduction at higher doses under electron irradiation. The positron annihilation study suggests that the low radiation doses induce crosslinking which affect the free volume properties and in turn hinders the chalcone molecular rotation within the polymer composite. At higher doses chain scission process support polymer matrix relaxation and facilitates non-radiative transition of the chromophore upon excitation. This study shows that fluorescence enhancement and mobility of chromophore within the polymer matrix is directly related to the free volume around it.

  11. [Novel irradiation techniques in the treatment of solid tumours. Radiotherapy for metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Arpád; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2014-02-23

    Novel developments in percutaneous radiotherapy, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography, adaptive radiation planning, intensity modulation radiotherapy and intensity modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), as well as the newer generation of image control (cone-beam computed tomography) and image guided radiotherapy ensure increased dosages of planning target volume and clinical target volume of solid tumours without damaging surrounding tissues and providing maximal protection. By raising the dosages of planned target volume and clinical target volume, these novel technical developments have created new indications in the treatment of solid tumours. With the aid of the cone-beam computed tomography and image guided radiotherapy the organ metastasis (lung, liver, spinal cord) and the primary tumour can be treated safety and effectively. Hypofractionation, dose escalation and the use of stereotactic devices can probably decrease radiation damage. The authors review the most common forms of evidence-based fractionation schemes used in irradiation therapy.

  12. International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium Consensus Guidelines for Target Volume Definition in Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Brett W.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lovelock, Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Lis, Eric; Ryu, Samuel; Sheehan, Jason; Gerszten, Peter C.; Chang, Eric; Gibbs, Iris; Soltys, Scott; Sahgal, Arjun; Deasy, Joe; Flickinger, John; Quader, Mubina; Mindea, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used to manage spinal metastases. However, target volume definition varies considerably and no consensus target volume guidelines exist. This study proposes consensus target volume definitions using common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Seven radiation oncologists and 3 neurological surgeons with spinal radiosurgery expertise independently contoured target and critical normal structures for 10 cases representing common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Each set of volumes was imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. Optimized confidence level consensus contours were identified using histogram agreement analysis and characterized to create target volume definition guidelines. Results: Mean STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity was 0.76 (range, 0.67-0.84) and 0.97 (range, 0.94-0.99), respectively, for gross tumor volume (GTV) and 0.79 (range, 0.66-0.91) and 0.96 (range, 0.92-0.98), respectively, for clinical target volume (CTV). Mean kappa agreement was 0.65 (range, 0.54-0.79) for GTV and 0.64 (range, 0.54-0.82) for CTV (P<.01 for GTV and CTV in all cases). STAPLE histogram agreement analysis identified optimal consensus contours (80% confidence limit). Consensus recommendations include that the CTV should include abnormal marrow signal suspicious for microscopic invasion and an adjacent normal bony expansion to account for subclinical tumor spread in the marrow space. No epidural CTV expansion is recommended without epidural disease, and circumferential CTVs encircling the cord should be used only when the vertebral body, bilateral pedicles/lamina, and spinous process are all involved or there is extensive metastatic

  13. Dose-volume analysis of hypothyroidism in patients irradiated to the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Te, Vuong; Liu, Mitchell C.C.; Parker, William; Curtin-Savard, Arthur J.; Clark, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if the incidence of hypothyroidism in patients who have received radiation therapy to the neck region has any relationship with the total dose to the thyroid and volume of thyroid irradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1988 to 1996, TSH levels were measured at regular intervals of every 3 to 6 months in 528 patients with head and neck cancers or lymphomas (Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin) who had received radiation therapy to the neck region. Hypothyroidism was defined by TSH of ≥ 5 (normal range: 0.5 - 4mU/L). Medical charts, radiotherapy charts, treatment planning films, dosimetry and CT scans/MRI were reviewed. Thyroid volume was determined utilizing treatment planning films and CT scans/MRI. Four hundred and six patients had normal TSH prior to radiation and sufficient information to be eligible for analysis. There were 264 (65%) male and 142 (35%) female, median age was 59 yr (range: 12 - 85). Median follow-up was 39.5 months (range: 1 - 289 months). Results: Out of the 406 eligible patients, 152 (37%) had developed hypothyroidism. The actuarial incidence of hypothyroidism at 1 yr, 3 yr and 5 yr are 9.1%, 29% and 38.5%, respectively. Analysis of volume effect and dose effect are as follows: When the radiation dose to the thyroid and the volume of thyroid irradiated are analyzed together, the group of patients who received ≥ 60Gy to half of thyroid or received ≥ 30Gy to the whole thyroid has increased risk of developing hypothyroidism as compared to those receiving <60Gy to half the thyroid or <30Gy to the whole thyroid (p=.0001). Conclusions: The actuarial incidence of hypothyroidism at 5 year in patients who had received radiation to the neck is 38.5%. Patients who received ≥ 60Gy to half the thyroid or received ≥ 30Gy to the whole thyroid are at higher risk of developing hyperthyroidism

  14. Recovery and purification of nickel-63 from HFIR-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.F.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Porter, C.E.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1993-06-01

    The production of large quantities of high-specific-activity 63 Ni (>10 Ci/g) requires both a highly enriched 62 Ni target and a long irradiation period at high neutron flux. Trace impurities in the nickel and associated target materials are also activated and account for a significant fraction of the discharged activity and essentially all of the gamma activity. While most of these undesirable activation products can be removed as chloride complexes during anion exchange, chromium, present at 51 Cr, and scandium, present as 46 Sc, are exceptions and require additional processing to achieve the desired purity. Optimized flowsheets are discussed based upon the current development and production experience

  15. Radiological safety research of food irradiation with 7.5 MeV X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bin; Tang Weidong; Zhang Yue; Xu Tao; Jin Jianqiao; Ye Mingyang

    2012-01-01

    China and America both have 7.5 MeV high energy X-ray accelerator. The radiological safety of food irradiated with 7.5 MeV X-rays (bremsstrahlung) has been investigated. Samples of meat and meat ash were located in a large volume of fresh meat at the position of the highest photoneutron fluence and irradiated to an X-ray dose of 15 kGy, twice the maximum dose allowed by the US FDA for meat irradiation. An evaluation of the corresponding radiation exposure from ingestion of the irradiated product has been compared to natural background radiation. The paper concludes that the risk to individuals from intake of food irradiated with X-rays from 7.5 MeV electrons, even with a broad energy spectrum, would be trivial. The common target materials are Au, Ta and W. The U.S, requires only Au and Ta can be used as food irradiation target materials and China has not yet relevant provisions. The first 7.5 MeV accelerator for food irradiation in China is under built, and will do the explore research for the choice of target material. (authors)

  16. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP1-03: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Radiosurgery Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Wroe, AJ [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small volume proton radiosurgery targets using a triplet combination of quadrupole rare earth permanent magnet Halbach cylinder assemblies Methods: Fourteen quadrupole magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into k=3 Halbach cylinders with various field gradients (100 to 250 T/m) were designed and manufactured. Triplet combinations of the magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Unmodulated 127 MeV proton beams with initial diameters of 3 to 20 mm were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth and transverse dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and EBT3 film, respectively. This data was compared with unfocused passively collimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further investigate the potential of triplet magnetic focusing. Results: Experimental results using 150 T/m gradient magnets and 15 to 20 mm initial diameter beams show peak to entrance dose ratios that are ∼ 43 to 48 % larger compared with spot size matched 8 mm collimated beams (ie, transverse profile full-widths at 90% maximum dose match within 0.5 mm of focused beams). In addition, the focusing beams were ∼ 3 to 4.4 times more efficient per MU in dose to target delivery. Additional results using different magnet combinations will also be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that triplet magnetic focusing could reduce entrance dose and beam number while delivering dose to small (∼≤ 10 mm diameter) radiosurgery targets in less time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however other treatment sites can be also envisioned. This project was sponsored with funding from the Department of Defense (DOD# W81XWH-BAA-10-1).

  17. Momenta of particles emitted by target at intensive irradiation by low-energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Beshenkov, V G; Marchenko, V A

    2002-01-01

    One measured the aggregate momenta of the target emitted particles at the intensive sputtering by E sub 0 approx = 0.5 keV energy heavy inert gases. For liquid and being under premelting temperature Ga target the measured values are close to the expected momenta of sputtered metallic atoms and reflection ions, for Cu and Zr targets they are essentially higher. One assumes that sputtering of atoms of gas-diffuser implanted into the target causes the surplus momentum. The estimated average energy of these atoms approx = 20 eV. Under Ga irradiation the implanted atoms diffuse mainly towards the surface and are desorbed

  18. In vitro and in vivo ion beam targeted micro-irradiation for radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianna, Francois

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of radiobiology is to understand the effects of ionizing radiations on the living. These past decades, ion microbeams have shown to be important tools to study for example the effects of low dose exposure, or the bystander effect. Since 2003, the CENBG has been equipped with a system to perform targeted micro-irradiation of living samples. Recently, microbeams applications on this subject have diversified and the study of DNA repair mechanisms at the cellular and multicellular scales, in vitro and in vivo, has become possible thanks to important evolutions of fluorescence imaging techniques and cellular biology. To take into account these new approaches, the CENBG micro-irradiation beamline has been entirely redesigned and rebuilt to implement new features and to improve the existing ones. My PhD objectives were i) commissioning the facility, ii) characterizing the system on track etch detectors, and on living samples, iii) implementing protocols to perform targeted irradiations of living samples with a con-trolled delivered dose, at the cellular and multicellular scales, and to visualize the early consequences online, iv) modelling these irradiations to explain the biological results using the calculated physical data. The work of these past years has allowed us i) to measure the performances of our system: a beam spot size of about 2 μm and a targeting accuracy of ± 2 μm, and to develop ion detection systems for an absolute delivered dose control, ii) to create highly localized radiation-induced DNA damages and to see online the recruitment of DNA repair proteins, iii) to apply these protocols to generate radiation-induced DNA damages in vivo inside a multicellular organism at the embryonic stage: Caenorhabditis elegans. These results have opened up many perspectives on the study of the interaction between ionizing radiations and the living, at the cellular and multicellular scales, in vitro and in vivo. (author) [fr

  19. Cyclotron production of radioactive gas from gaseous targets: inhomogeneity of the target activity - optimum flow rate of the carrier gas - cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.-M.; Fiore, G. del; Quaglia, L.; Depresseux, J.-C.; Bartsch, P.

    1979-01-01

    When short-lived radioactive gases are produced by cyclotron-irradiated gaseous targets, the yield of activity, at the site of delivery, depends on the flow rate in the gas-carrying line. The authors improve a preliminarily published previous single model by the introduction of a supplementary hypothesis which takes into account the inhomogeneity of the activity in the gaseous target. By substituting the NTP volume of the gas in the irradiation cell Vsub(c) by a visible volume Vsub(a) depending on the flow rate and expressed by Vsub(a) = Vsub(infinity) +(V 0 - Vsub(infinity))exp(-kDsub(p)), they derive the following general expression for the optimum flow rate D which gives a maximum yield of production. D 2 -bD-bc-D 2 akexp(-kD)-abexp(-kD) = 0, a=lambda(V 0 -Vsub(infinity)), b = lambdaVsub(r), c = lambdaVsub(infinity), lambda = the decay constant of the radionuclide produced,Vsub(r) the inner volume of the gas-carrying line. The unknown parameters Vsub(r), Vsub(a), V 0 , Vsub(infinity), and k can be determined experimentally. The authors also suggest a new method for the determination of experimental cross sections with their gaseous target. (Auth.)

  20. Quantitative evaluation of potential irradiation geometries for carbon-ion beam grid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Toshiro; Henry, Thomas; Ureba, Ana; Valdman, Alexander; Bassler, Niels; Siegbahn, Albert

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy using grids containing cm-wide beam elements has been carried out sporadically for more than a century. During the past two decades, preclinical research on radiotherapy with grids containing small beam elements, 25 μm-0.7 mm wide, has been performed. Grid therapy with larger beam elements is technically easier to implement, but the normal tissue tolerance to the treatment is decreasing. In this work, a new approach in grid therapy, based on irradiations with grids containing narrow carbon-ion beam elements was evaluated dosimetrically. The aim formulated for the suggested treatment was to obtain a uniform target dose combined with well-defined grids in the irradiated normal tissue. The gain, obtained by crossfiring the carbon-ion beam grids over a simulated target volume, was quantitatively evaluated. The dose distributions produced by narrow rectangular carbon-ion beams in a water phantom were simulated with the PHITS Monte Carlo code. The beam-element height was set to 2.0 cm in the simulations, while the widths varied from 0.5 to 10.0 mm. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) was then created for each beam element in the grid, to cover the target volume with dose in the depth direction. The dose distributions produced by the beam-grid irradiations were thereafter constructed by adding the dose profiles simulated for single beam elements. The variation of the valley-to-peak dose ratio (VPDR) with depth in water was thereafter evaluated. The separation of the beam elements inside the grids were determined for different irradiation geometries with a selection criterion. The simulated carbon-ion beams remained narrow down to the depths of the Bragg peaks. With the formulated selection criterion, a beam-element separation which was close to the beam-element width was found optimal for grids containing 3.0-mm-wide beam elements, while a separation which was considerably larger than the beam-element width was found advantageous for grids containing 0.5-mm

  1. Target volume definition in radiation oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this book is to provide radiation oncologists with a clear, up-to-date guide to tumor delineation and contouring of organs at risk. With this in mind, a detailed overview of recent advances in imaging for radiation treatment planning is presented. Novel concepts for target volume delineation are explained, taking into account the innovations in imaging technology. Special attention is paid to the role of the newer imaging modalities, such as positron emission tomography and diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. All of the most important tumor entities treate

  2. MRI-assisted versus conventional treatment planning in brachytherapy of cervical and endometrial carcinoma: The impact of individual anatomy on dose distribution in target volume and organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, Joern; Sauer, Otto A.; Herbolsheimer, Michael; Oppitz, Ulrich; Flentje, Michael

    1996-01-01

    endometrial carcinoma showed, that only 37.5% (min. 35%, max. 39%, volume range from 69cc to 250 cc) of target volume was covered by the reference isodose. The dose to organs at risk, identified with MRI-data, peaked generally higher compared to the estimated or measured dose in conventional treatment planning. MRI-assisted calculated maximum dose to the dorsal bladder wall was 10.35 Gy/fx at mean in cervical- and 6.67 Gy/fx in endometrial carcinoma, while the equivalent doses calculated as ICRU-reference point were 5.4 Gy/fx (cervical-ca.) resp. 5.1 Gy/fx (endometrial-ca). Mean irradiated bladder volume at 7 Gy isodose was 2.9 cc in cervical- and 5 cc in endometrial carcinoma. The mean of the maximum dose to the ventral rectum wall was 8.5 Gy/fx (MRI) vs. 5.1 Gy/fx (ICRU-point) in cervical- and 10.34 Gy/fx (MRI) vs. 2.4 Gy/fx (ICRU) in endometrial carcinoma. The irradiated volume at 7 Gy isodose was smaller than 1 cc in both entities. The irradiated volume and dose to small intestine was not relevant in most patients, however, the 7Gy isodose included 6 cc of small intestine in one patient. Conclusion: Pelvic anatomy differs widely among patients with cervical and endometrial cancer. Standard dose prescription fits only about 50% of patients and might be hazardous for patients with small and insufficient for patients with large uteri. Dose calculation to organs at risk in conventional treatment planning relies on the position of bladder and rectum catheters, where MRI identifies the organs at risk most adjacent to high dose isodose. MRI helps to identify those patients with small or large uteri, who could benefit from an individualized dose prescription. Furthermore, MRI information on dose to target and organs at risk might provide new insight in dose-volume relationships and could improve tumor control probability without compromise to normal tissue complication probability

  3. Study of intense pulse irradiation effects on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, O.

    1994-12-01

    This study aim was centered on morphological and structural alterations induced by laser irradiation on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors. First we recalled the main high light intensity effects on the condensed matter. Then we presented the experimental aspects. The experimental studies were achieved on two sample types: SiO 2 /Si and Si. Two topics were studied: the defect chronology according to wavelength and pulse length, and the crystalline quality as well as the structure defects of irradiated zones by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, irradiation of Si targets by intense pulsed beams may lead to material fusion. This phenomenon is particularly easy when the material is absorbent, when the pulse is short and when the material is superficially oxidized. (MML). 204 refs., 93 figs., 21 tabs., 1 appendix

  4. The target volume concept at the recording of external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Glaeser, L.

    1981-01-01

    With the aim of complete, exact and reproducible manual recording and documentation of external beam radiotherapy a concept is proposed providing treatment planning and recording related to space and time for target volumes of different order corresponding to Ist, IInd or IIIrd part of treatment course, regarding all dose limiting organs at risk. The record consists of the dosage plan for medical treatment planning, the treatment plan for physical dose distribution planning and the treatment record of absorbed doses delivered as well as a checklist for patient and machine set-up, and labels for intended actions during treatment development. A clear arrangement of the record form in logical order was found, demanding exact specification of target(s) and beam(s) and their relation in space and time; asking for verbal and graphical description of target volumes, organs at risk, patient positioning, beam portals and dose reference points in terms of patients' anatomy; emphasizing the most important medical data by marked areas and leaving enough empty space for additional data, remarks or comments. During several years of clinical use these record forms proved to be suitable for all cases of external beam therapy, for complex situations of target volumes and treatment-scheduling, for all treatment techniques and radiation qualities and for all ways of physical treatment planning. They can be extended to automatic treatment verification, monitoring and recording as well as to the application of in-vivo-measurements of absorbed doses. (orig.) [de

  5. Tolerance of the central nervous system to photon irradiation. Endocrine complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigg, D.R.; Murray, R.M.L.; Koschel, K. (Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia))

    1982-01-01

    Dose-response isoeffect equations have been determined for hypothalamic pituitary insufficiency following cranial irradiation. Of particular importance is the occurrence of complications at doses substantially less than those commonly used for the treatment of central nervous system tumors. Such complications may be severe and potentially life threatening. These complications occur when a small midline 'target' volume containing the pituitary gland, infundibulum and adjacent inferior hypothalamic structures is irradiated. Direct pituitary irradiation is unlikely to be a factor, at least in some cases. The possible role of incidental hypothalamic irradiation in the control of acromegaly and pituitary dependent Cushing's syndrome is discussed.

  6. Nondestructive post-irradiation examination of Loop-1, S1 and B1 rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratton, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    As a part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Tritium Target Development Program, eleven tritium target rods were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory during 1991. Both nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination on all eleven rods was planned under the Tritium Target Development Program. Funding for the program was reduced in 1991 resulting in the early removal of the program experiments before reaching their irradiation goals. Post-irradiation examination was only performed on one of the irradiated rods at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory before the program was terminated in 1992. On December 6, 1995, the Secretary of Energy announced the pursuit of the Commercial Light-Water Reactor option for producing tritium establishing the Tritium Target Qualification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This program decided to pursue nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination of the ten remaining rods from the previous program. The ten rods comprise three experiments. The Loop-1 experiment irradiated eight target rods in a loop configuration for 217 irradiation days. The other two rods were irradiated in two separate irradiation experiments, designated as S1 and B1 for 143 effective full-power days, but at different power levels. After the ten rods were transferred from the ATR Canal to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility, the following examinations were performed: (1) visual examination and photography; (2) neutron radiography; (3) axial gamma scanning; (4) contact profilometry measurement; (5) bow and length measurements; (6) rod puncture and plenum gas analysis/measurement of plenum gas quantity; (7) void volume determination; and (8) internal pressure determination. This report presents the data collected during these examinations

  7. Change of tumor target volume during waiting time for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Yi Junlin; Gao Li; Xu Guozhen; Huang Xiaodong; Zhang Zhong; Luo Jingwei; Li Suyan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of change in tumor target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) while waiting for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: From March 2005 to December 2005, 31 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma received IMRT as the initial treatment at the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academic of Medical Sciences. The original simulation CT scan was acquired before IMRT planning. A second CT scan was acquired before the start of radiotherapy. Wait- ing time was defined as the duration between CT simulation and start of radiotherapy. CT-CT fusion was used to minimize the error of delineation between the first tumor target volume (GTV) and the second tumor target volume (sGTV). Tumor target volume was calculated by treatment planning system. T test was carried out to analyse the difference between GTV and sGTV. Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression was used to analyse the influence factor of the change betweent GTV and sGTV. Results: Median waiting time was 18 days (range, 9-27 days). There were significant differences between GTV and sGTV of both primary tumor (P=0.009) and metastatic lymphoma (P=0.005 ). Both Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression showed that the change of primary tumor target volume had significant correlation with the first tumor target volume but had no significant correlation with the waiting time, sex, age, T stage and N stage (1992 Chinese Fuzhou Staging Classification). Conclusions: Within the range of the waiting time ob- served in our study, large volume primary tumor would have had a significant increase in volume, but whether the therapeutic effect would be influenced or not would need to be proved by study of large number of cases. Patients with large volume tumor should be considered to reduce the influence of waiting time by enlarging gross target volume and clinical targe volume and by neoadjuveant chemotherapy. For avoiding the unnecessary high-dose to normal

  8. Craniospinal Irradiation for Trilateral Retinoblastoma Following Ocular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Bentel, Gunilla; Sherouse, George W.; Spencer, David P.; Light, Kim

    2015-01-15

    A case study is presented. Craniospinal radiotherapy and a three-field pineal boost for trilateral retinoblastoma were delivered to a patient previously irradiated for ocular retinoblastoma. The availability of CT-based three-dimensional treatment planning provided the capability of identifying the previously irradiated volume as a three-dimensional anatomic structure and of designing a highly customized set of treatment beams that minimized reirradiation of that volume.

  9. Negative pressure and spallation in graphite targets under nano- and picosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, R S; Khishchenko, K V [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasyuk, I K; Semenov, A Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I A [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rinecker, T; Schoenlein, A [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rosmej, O N [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Germany, 64291 Darmstadt, Planckstraße, 1 (Germany); Tomut, M [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, 64289 Darmstadt, Karolinenplatz, 5 (Germany)

    2015-05-31

    We present the results of experiments on the spallation phenomena in graphite targets under shock-wave nano- and picosecond irradiation, which have been performed on Kamerton-T (GPI, Moscow, Russia) and PHELIX (GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) laser facilities. In the range of the strain rates of 10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, the data on the dynamic mechanical strength of the material at rapure (spallation) have been for the first time obtained. With a maximal strain rate of 1.4 × 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, the spall strength of 2.1 GPa is obtained, which constitutes 64% of the theoretical ultimate tensile strength of graphite. The effect of spallation is observed not only on the rear side of the target, but also on its irradiated (front) surface. With the use of optical and scanning electron microscopes, the morphology of the front and rear surfaces of the targets is studied. By means of Raman scattering of light, the graphite structure both on the target front surface under laser exposure and on its rear side in the spall zone is investigated. A comparison of the dynamic strength of graphite and synthetic diamond is performed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  10. Influence of neutron energy on formation of radioisotopes during the irradiation of targets in reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Vorona

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Method of calculation of nuclear transformations in irradiated targets is realized for selection of optimal conditions for accumulation of radioisotopes in reactor, taking into account contributions of different energy neutrons (thermal, resonance and fast. Wide potentialities of program complex MCNP-4C based on the method of statistical testing (Monte Carlo method were used. Positive in proposed method is that all calculations starting from spectra and fluxes of neutrons in reactor and completing by quantity of accumulating nuclei carry out within the framework of the same methodological approach. It was shown by the example of radioactive 98Mo production in Mo98Mo(n, γ99Mo reaction that for achievement of maximal yield of target radionuclide. it is necessary to irradiate start targets of Molybdenum in hard spectrum with essential contribution of resonance neutrons.

  11. Post-Irradiation Properties of Candidate Materials for High-Power Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, H.G.; Ludewig, H.; Mausner, L.F.; Simos, N.; Thieberger, P.; Brookhaven; Hayato, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; McDonald, K.T.; Sheppard, J.; Trung, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    The desire of the high-energy-physics community for more intense secondary particle beams motivates the development of multi-megawatt, pulsed proton sources. The targets needed to produce these secondary particle beams must be sufficiently robust to withstand the intense pressure waves arising from the high peak-energy deposition which an intense pulsed beam will deliver. In addition, the materials used for the targets must continue to perform in a severe radiation environment. The effect of the beam-induced pressure waves can be mitigated by use of target materials with high-yield strength and/or low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) [1, 2, 3]. We report here first results of an expanded study of the effects of irradiation on several additional candidate materials with high strength (AlBeMet, beryllium, Ti-V6-Al4) or low CTE (a carbon-carbon composite, a new Toyota ''gum'' metal alloy [4], Super-Invar)

  12. Anatomy, gross tumor volume and clinical target volume: tumors of the lower third of the esophagus and the gastro esophageal junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calais, G.; Asquier, E.; Louisot, P.

    2001-01-01

    The esophagus is divided into four regions: cervical esophagus, intrathoracic esophagus with upper, mid and lower thoracic portion. Cancer may occur on each of these regions. Computed tomography of the thorax and superior abdomen and endoscopic ultrasound are necessary for reliable staging. CT simulation allows accurate definition of tumor volume. GTV includes tumor volume and regional lymph nodes. CTV encompasses GTV plus safety margin and lymph nodes areas considered to harbor potential microscopic disease. The extent of prophylactic lymph node irradiation depends on the anatomic location of the primary tumor. (author)

  13. Irradiation promotes Akt-targeting therapeutic gene delivery to the tumor vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonveaux, Pierre; Frerart, Francoise; Bouzin, Caroline; Brouet, Agnes; Wever, Julie de; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Gallez, Bernard; Feron, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced increases in nitric oxide (NO) production can influence tumor blood flow and improve delivery of Akt-targeting therapeutic DNA lipocomplexes to the tumor. Methods and Materials: The contribution of NO to the endothelial response to radiation was identified using NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors and endothelial NOS (eNOS)-deficient mice. Reporter-encoding plasmids complexed with cationic lipids were used to document the tumor vascular specificity and the efficacy of in vivo lipofection after irradiation. A dominant-negative Akt gene construct was used to evaluate the facilitating effects of radiotherapy on the therapeutic transgene delivery. Results: The abundance of eNOS protein was increased in both irradiated tumor microvessels and endothelial cells, leading to a stimulation of NO release and an associated increase in tumor blood flow. Transgene expression was subsequently improved in the irradiated vs. nonirradiated tumor vasculature. This effect was not apparent in eNOS-deficient mice and could not be reproduced in irradiated cultured endothelial cells. Finally, we combined low-dose radiotherapy with a dominant-negative Akt gene construct and documented synergistic antitumor effects. Conclusions: This study offers a new rationale to combine radiotherapy with gene therapy, by directly exploiting the stimulatory effects of radiation on NO production by tumor endothelial cells. The preferential expression of the transgene in the tumor microvasculature underscores the potential of such an adjuvant strategy to limit the angiogenic response of irradiated tumors

  14. Postoperative radiation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and target volume delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingming Zhu,* Minghuan Li,* Li Kong, Jinming Yu Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and patients who are treated with surgery alone, without neoadjuvant therapies, experience frequent relapses. Whether postoperative therapies could reduce the recurrence or improve overall survival is still controversial for these patients. The purpose of our review is to figure out the value of postoperative adjuvant therapy and address the disputes about target volume delineation according to published data. Based on the evidence of increased morbidity and disadvantages on patient survival caused by postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT alone provided by studies in the early 1990s, the use of postoperative adjuvant therapies in cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has diminished substantially and has been replaced gradually by neoadjuvant chemoradiation. With advances in surgery and RT, accumulating evidence has recently rekindled interest in the delivery of postoperative RT or chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage T3/T4 or N1 (lymph node positive carcinomas after radical surgery. However, due to complications with the standard radiation field, a nonconforming modified field has been adopted in most studies. Therefore, we analyze different field applications and provide suggestions on the optimization of the radiation field based on the major sites of relapse and the surgical non-clearance area. For upper and middle thoracic esophageal carcinomas, the bilateral supraclavicular and superior mediastinal areas remain common sites of recurrence and should be encompassed within the clinical target volume. In contrast, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding lower thoracic esophageal carcinomas; the

  15. Analysis of uranium and thorium thin targets irradiated at the PSI accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger, H.U.; Botta, F.; Chawla, R.; Daum, M.; Gavillet, D.; Hegedues, F.; Ingold, F.; Kopajtic, Z.; Ledergerber, G.; Linder, H.P.; Roellin, S.; Wichser, J.; Wyss, F.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the ATHENA programme at PSI is to provide experimental data for the validation of theoretical models in nucleon-meson transport codes used for accelerator-based transmutation studies. Emphasis is placed on the mass yield distribution of spallation and fission products for irradiated thin actinide targets. This paper presents results of an irradiation experiment carried out with 238 UO 2 and 232 ThO 2 . Isobaric production cross-sections of fission and spallation products based on mass spectrometric measurements and γ-spectroscopy are compared with calculations carried out using the HETC code and the RAL high-energy fission model. (author) 6 figs., 8 refs

  16. A comparative study on the volume and localization of the internal gross target volume defined using the seroma and surgical clips based on 4DCT scan for external-beam partial breast irradiation after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yun; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Suzhen; Wang, Jinzhi; Ma, Zhifang; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min

    2014-01-01

    To explore the volume and localization of the internal gross target volume defined using the seroma and/or surgical clips based on the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during free-breathing. Fifteen breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were recruited for EB-PBI. On the ten sets CT images, the gross target volume formed by the clips, the seroma, both the clips and seroma delineated by one radiation oncologist and defined as GTVc, GTVs and GTVc + s, respectively. The ten GTVc, GTVs and GTVc + s on the ten sets CT images produced the IGTVc, IGTVs, IGTVc + s, respectively. The IGTV volume and the distance between the center of IGTVc, IGTVs, IGTVc + s were all recorded. Conformity index (CI), degree of inclusion (DI) were calculated for IGTV/IGTV, respectively. The volume of IGTVc + s were significantly larger than the IGTVc and IGTVs (p < 0.05). There was significant difference between the DIs of IGTVc vs IGTVc + s, the DIs of IGTVs vs IGTVc + s. There was significant difference among the CIs of IGTV/IGTV. The DIs and CIs of IGTV/IGTV were negatively correlated with their centroid distance (r < 0, p < 0.05). There were volume difference and spatial mismatch between the IGTVs delineated based on the surgical clips and seroma. The IGTV defined as the seroma and surgical clips provided the best overall representation of the ‘true’ moving GTV

  17. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV 0 ) and the set of CBCTs ({CTV 1 –CTV 25 }). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV 0 with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV 1 –CTV 25 was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1–16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm 3 ) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm 3 ) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm 3 ) (p 0 , 5–10 mm along the interfaces of CTV 0 with the bladder and rectum, and 10–14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV 0 at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and clinical trials.

  18. Effects of irradiation on the vascularity of lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K; Takegawa, Y; Nagase, M; Akiyama, H [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-06-01

    Effects of irradiation on the intravascular volume of the lung were studied with respect to changes in intravascular volume over a period of time after irradiation, the effect of fractionation of the dose and the influence of the irradiation dose rate. After a single irradiation with 1000 rad or 3000 rad, applied locally to the lung, the intravascular volume decreased significantly in 1 to 3 months after irradiation. The changes in the intravascular volumes of lungs could be lessened by fractionation of the dose or by low dose rate irradiation.

  19. Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the laser-irradiated target surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y T; Lin, X X; Liu, B C; Du, F; Wang, S J; Li, C; Zhou, M L; Zhang, L; Liu, X; Wang, J; Liu, X L; Chen, L M; Wang, Z H; Ma, J L; Wei, Z Y; Zhang, J; Liu, F; Liu, F

    2010-01-01

    Lateral propagation of fast electrons at the target surfaces irradiated by femtosecond intense laser pulses is measured by k α x-ray imaging technique when a preplasma is presented. An annular halo surrounding a bright spot is observed in the x-ray images when the scale length of the electron density is large. For an incidence angle of 70 0 the x-ray images show a non-symmetrical distribution peaked to the laser propagation direction. The x-ray photons in the halo are mainly excited by the fast electrons that flow in the preplasma when their paths intersect the high density regions near the target surface.

  20. In vivo assessment of the tolerance dose of small liver volumes after single-fraction HDR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricke, Jens; Seidensticker, Max; Luedemann, Lutz; Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Hengst, Susanne; Mohnike, Konrad; Cho, Chie Hee; Lopez Haenninen, Enrique; Al-Abadi, Hussain; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess a dose-response relationship for small volumes of liver parenchyma after single-fraction irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five liver metastases were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 1 day before and 3 days and 6, 12, and 24 weeks after therapy. MR sequences included T1-w gradient echo (GRE) enhanced by hepatocyte-targeted gadobenate dimeglumine. All MRI data sets were merged with 3D dosimetry data and evaluated by two radiologists. The reviewers indicated the border of hyperintensity on T2-w images (edema) or hypointensity on T1-w images (loss of hepatocyte function). Based on the total 3D data, a dose-volume histogram was calculated. We estimated the threshold dose for either edema or function loss as the D 90 , i.e., the dose achieved in at least 90% of the pseudolesion volume. Results: Between 3 days and 6 weeks, the extension of the edema increased significantly from the 12.9 Gy isosurface to 9.9 Gy (standard deviation [SD], 3.3 and 2.6). No significant change was detected between 6 and 12 weeks. After 24 weeks, the edematous tissue had shrunk significantly to 14.7 Gy (SD, 4.2). Three days postbrachytherapy, the D 90 for hepatocyte function loss reached the 14.9 Gy isosurface (SD, 3.9). At 6 weeks, the respective zone had increased significantly to 9.9 Gy (SD, 2.3). After 12 and 24 weeks, the dysfunction volume had decreased significantly to the 11.9 Gy and 15.2 Gy isosurface, respectively (SD, 3 and 4.1). Conclusions: The 95% interval from 7.6 to 12.2 Gy found as the minimal hepatocyte tolerance after 6 weeks accounts for the radiobiologic variations found in CT-guided brachytherapy, including heterogeneous dose rates by variable catheter arrays

  1. Dosimetry of blood irradiator - 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.; Shinde, S.H.; Bhat, R.M.; Rao, Suresh; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Blood transfusion to an immunodeficient or immunosuppressed patient has a high risk involved due to occurrence of Transfusion Graft Versus Host Disease (T-GVHD). In order to eliminate this problem, blood is routinely exposed to ionizing radiation (gamma) prior to transfusion. Doses ranging from 15 Gy to 50 Gy can prevent T-GVHD. Aim of the present work was to perform dosimetry of 60 Co Blood Irradiator-2000 developed by Board of Radiation and isotope Technology (BRIT), India; using FBX dosimetric system. Dose-rate measured by FBX dosimeter was intercompared with Fricke dosimeter, which is a Reference Standard dosimeter. Experiments included measurement of dose-rate at the centre of irradiation volume, dose mapping in the central vertical plane within the irradiation volume and measurement of average dose received by blood sample using blood bags filled with FBX dosimeter by simulating actual irradiation conditions. During irradiation, the sample chamber is retracted into a cylindrical source cage, so that the sample is irradiated from all sides uniformly. Blood irradiator-2000 has sample rotation facility for increasing the dose uniformity during irradiation. The performance of this was investigated by measuring the central vertical plane dose profile in stationary state as well in rotation using the sample rotation facility (60 rpm). FBX being an aqueous dosimetric system fills container of irregular shape being irradiated hence can be used to integrate the dose over the volume. Dose-rate measured by FBX dosimeter was intercompared with Fricke dosimeter, which was in good agreement. Average dose-rate at the centre of irradiation volume and within the blood bag was measured by FBX and Fricke dosimeters. It was observed that dose profiles measured by FBX and Fricke dosimeters agreed within ± 2%. Dose uniformity within the irradiation volume was found to reduce from 21% to 17% when the sample rotation facility was used. Thus, it is suggested by the

  2. Multi-MW accelerator target material properties under proton irradiation at Brookhaven National Laboratory linear isotope producer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, N.; Ludewig, H.; Kirk, H.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Zhong, Z.; Zhong, H.; Makimura, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Bennett, J. R. J.; Kotsinas, G.; Kotsina, Z.; McDonald, K. T.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of proton beams irradiating materials considered for targets in high-power accelerator experiments have been studied using the Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) 200 MeV proton linac. A wide array of materials and alloys covering a wide range of the atomic number (Z) are being scoped by the high-power accelerator community prompting the BNL studies to focus on materials representing each distinct range, i.e. low-Z, mid-Z and high-Z. The low range includes materials such as beryllium and graphite, the midrange alloys such as Ti-6Al-4V, gum metal and super-Invar and finally the high-Z range pure tungsten and tantalum. Of interest in assessing proton irradiation effects are (a) changes in physiomechanical properties which are important in maintaining high-power target functionality, (b) identification of possible limits of proton flux or fluence above which certain materials cease to maintain integrity, (c) the role of material operating temperature in inducing or maintaining radiation damage reversal, and (d) phase stability and microstructural changes. The paper presents excerpt results deduced from macroscopic and microscopic post-irradiation evaluation (PIE) following several irradiation campaigns conducted at the BNL 200 MeV linac and specifically at the isotope producer beam-line/target station. The microscopic PIE relied on high energy x-ray diffraction at the BNL NSLS X17B1 and NSLS II XPD beam lines. The studies reveal the dramatic effects of irradiation on phase stability in several of the materials, changes in physical properties and ductility loss as well as thermally induced radiation damage reversal in graphite and alloys such as super-Invar.

  3. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  4. Study of an automatized experimental device for the irradiation of a radioactive target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claverie, G.

    1996-01-01

    In order to solve the enigma of solar neutrinos, a team of physicians of the nuclear research center of Bordeaux-Gradignan and of the center of nuclear spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy of Orsay (France) decided to measure again the cross section of the beryllium-proton nuclear reaction at the lowest possible energies. This measurement requires the design of an automatized experimental device to irradiate in a specific way a beryllium target with an accelerated proton beam. The aim of this work is the study of such a device for an energy range of 800 to 300 KeV. This device comprises a particle multi-detector and a shutter for the irradiation of the target and the counting of the reaction products according to a programmable time sequence. The advantage of this setup is to allow an important bombardment of the target and to ensure its cooling. This device is automatically controlled thanks to a micro-controller, actuators (step motors and electrostatic deflector). It includes some beam diagnosis elements controlled by step motors and a target temperature monitoring system controlling a safety valve. The management of the experiment cell vacuum has led to the design of a vacuum monitor allowing the precise follow up of the vacuum and the control of the safety valves of the device. The nuclear instrumentation necessary to be implemented for this measurement is also presented. (J.S.)

  5. HTCAP-1: a program for calcuating operating temperatures in HFIR target irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Howard, A.M.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal modeling code, HTCAP-1, calculates in-reactor operating temperatures of fueled specimens contained in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target irradiation experiments (HT-series). Temperature calculations are made for loose particle and bonded fuel rod specimens. Maximum particle surface temperatures are calculated for the loose particles and centerline and surface temperatures for the fuel rods. Three computational models are employed to determine fission heat generation rates, capsule heat transfer analysis, and specimen temperatures. This report is also intended to be a users' manual, and the application of HTCAP-1 to the HT-34 irradiation capsule is presented

  6. Dosimetry and irradiation methods for the ANSTO gamma technology research irradiator (GATRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, M.E.

    1988-07-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's gamma technology research irradiator (GATRI) at Lucas Heights, New South Wales, has been modified for use as a research and small-scale commercial irradiation facility to be available to government agencies and private industry for the technical and economic evaluation of irradiation processing. The new source rack was designed around existing mechanical components to optimise the limited space available within the irradiation cell. Irradiation parameters investigated during commissioning included the effect of source-to-target distance on relative dose rates within targets of the same density; effect of density on dose-rate distribution within targets irradiated at the same distance from the source; and the contribution of transit dose to low absorbed doses as the source is raised and lowered. The efficiency of the irradiator was determined for various target densities and overdose ratios

  7. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET in definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Wenli; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging modality, which can give some biological information of tumor. PET is more and more important in the definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning. Depending on its sensitivity and specificity, 18 F-fluorideoxyglucose 18 F-FDG PET has been shown to influence the selection of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancers, for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas or for esophageal tumors. On the other hand, for tumors such as rectal carcinomas, convincing data on the value of 18 F-FDG PET for target volume selection are still lacking. However, the application of 18 F-FDG PET in many aspects of radiotherapy is still controversy. Further researches in its clinical application are still needed to investigate whether 18 F-FDG PET for treatment planning should be routine because of the lack of prospective studies. (authors)

  8. Integrating respiratory-gated PET-based target volume delineation in liver SBRT planning, a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, Olivier; Thariat, Juliette; Serrano, Benjamin; Azria, David; Paulmier, Benoit; Villeneuve, Remy; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Artenie, Antonella; Ortholan, Cécile; Faraggi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and benefit of integrating four-dimensional (4D) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) – computed tomography (CT) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning. 8 patients with 14 metastases were accrued in the study. They all underwent a non-gated PET and a 4D PET centered on the liver. The same CT scan was used for attenuation correction, registration, and considered the planning CT for SBRT planning. Six PET phases were reconstructed for each 4D PET. By applying an individualized threshold to the 4D PET, a Biological Internal Target Volume (BITV) was generated for each lesion. A gated Planning Target Volume (PTVg) was created by adding 3 mm to account for set-up margins. This volume was compared to a manual Planning Target Volume (PTV) delineated with the help of a semi-automatic Biological Target Volume (BTV) obtained from the non-gated exam. A 5 mm radial and a 10 mm craniocaudal margins were applied to account for tumor motion and set-up margins to create the PTV. One undiagnosed liver metastasis was discovered thanks to the 4D PET. The semi-automatic BTV were significantly smaller than the BITV (p = 0.0031). However, after applying adapted margins, 4D PET allowed a statistically significant decrease in the PTVg as compared to the PTV (p = 0.0052). In comparison to non-gated PET, 4D PET may better define the respiratory movements of liver targets and improve SBRT planning for liver metastases. Furthermore, non respiratory-gated PET exams can both misdiagnose liver metastases and underestimate the real internal target volumes

  9. Can involved-field irradiation replace elective nodal irradiation in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Miao, Chuanwang; Chen, Zhen; Li, Wanhu; Yuan, Shuanghu; Yu, Jinming; Hu, Xudong

    2017-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the most common treatment for inoperable esophageal cancer. However, there is no consensus on the delineation of the clinical target volume. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) is recommended for inoperable esophageal cancer. A few studies have reported a decrease in the incidence of radiation-related toxicity of involved-field irradiation (IFI) for esophageal cancer. A systematic review and pooled analysis were performed to determine whether IFI in definitive chemoradiotherapy was more beneficial than ENI for esophageal cancer. The results showed no significant differences in the overall survival and local control rates between the IFI and ENI arms. Meanwhile, the incidences of esophageal and lung toxicities were significantly decreased in the IFI arm. These results suggest that IFI is a feasible treatment option for locally advanced esophageal cancer, especially to minimize irradiation-related toxicity.

  10. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Erik W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV, absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. Results With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. Conclusion The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on

  12. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V; Maduro, John H; Korevaar, Erik W; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2008-01-01

    The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D)-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT)-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV), absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on clinical data confirming tumour control probability and normal

  13. Low-Dose Irradiation Enhances Gene Targeting in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Seigo; Subramanian, Aparna; Mandefro, Berhan; Ren, Songyang; Kim, Ho Won; Tang, Jie; Funari, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H; Sareen, Dhruv; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Svendsen, Clive N

    2015-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are now being used for both disease modeling and cell therapy; however, efficient homologous recombination (HR) is often crucial to develop isogenic control or reporter lines. We showed that limited low-dose irradiation (LDI) using either γ-ray or x-ray exposure (0.4 Gy) significantly enhanced HR frequency, possibly through induction of DNA repair/recombination machinery including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, histone H2A.X and RAD51 proteins. LDI could also increase HR efficiency by more than 30-fold when combined with the targeting tools zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats. Whole-exome sequencing confirmed that the LDI administered to hPSCs did not induce gross genomic alterations or affect cellular viability. Irradiated and targeted lines were karyotypically normal and made all differentiated lineages that continued to express green fluorescent protein targeted at the AAVS1 locus. This simple method allows higher throughput of new, targeted hPSC lines that are crucial to expand the use of disease modeling and to develop novel avenues of cell therapy. The simple and relevant technique described in this report uses a low level of radiation to increase desired gene modifications in human pluripotent stem cells by an order of magnitude. This higher efficiency permits greater throughput with reduced time and cost. The low level of radiation also greatly increased the recombination frequency when combined with developed engineered nucleases. Critically, the radiation did not lead to increases in DNA mutations or to reductions in overall cellular viability. This novel technique enables not only the rapid production of disease models using human stem cells but also the possibility of treating genetically based diseases by correcting patient-derived cells. ©AlphaMed Press.

  14. Development and clinical application of respiration gated irradiation system (ReGIS) in heavy ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaka, Yasuhiro; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu

    1999-01-01

    In order to achieve maximal radiation dose concentration for thoraco-abdominal tumors and spare normal surrounding tissue in heavy ion therapy, compensation for respiration-related movement is desirable. Hence, a respiration-gated irradiation system (ReGIS) was introduced to the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in June 1996. In this report, the development and clinical application of ReGIS, as well as the analysis of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volumes are described. When using ReGIS, a sensor emitting infrared rays is attached to the thoracic or abdominal wall to measure respiratory movement. A position-sensitive device (camera) senses these rays to detect sensor locations and data are forwarded to a computer system. A curve representing respiratory cycles is displayed, upon which a trigger level that is part of a respiratory cycle (about a fourth or fifth of the expiratory phase). Beams can be delivered while the respiratory curve is under the trigger level. Thirty-five patients involving 37 irradiated sites (19 lung cancers, 13 hepatomas, 2 mediastinal tumors, and 3 metastatic lung tumors) were retrospectively analyzed. Target volumes were reduced an average of 29.5% (11.0 to 57.9%) using ReGIS. Average tumor respiration-related movement in gated phase was 3.7 mm (0 mm to 14.6 mm). Although irradiation using ReGIS took more time to perform (average 1.62 times non-gated irradiation), it was considered to be acceptable for routine heavy ion therapy. ReGIS has proved to be useful for compensation of respiration-related movement and reduction of target volume in radiotherapy, and this method is sufficiently simple for practical clinical application. (author)

  15. Volume-Targeted Ventilation in the Neonate: Benchmarking Ventilators on an Active Lung Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Tobias J; Wald, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Mechanically ventilated neonates have been observed to receive substantially different ventilation after switching ventilator models, despite identical ventilator settings. This study aims at establishing the range of output variability among 10 neonatal ventilators under various breathing conditions. Relative benchmarking test of 10 neonatal ventilators on an active neonatal lung model. Neonatal ICU. Ten current neonatal ventilators. Ventilators were set identically to flow-triggered, synchronized, volume-targeted, pressure-controlled, continuous mandatory ventilation and connected to a neonatal lung model. The latter was configured to simulate three patients (500, 1,500, and 3,500 g) in three breathing modes each (passive breathing, constant active breathing, and variable active breathing). Averaged across all weight conditions, the included ventilators delivered between 86% and 110% of the target tidal volume in the passive mode, between 88% and 126% during constant active breathing, and between 86% and 120% under variable active breathing. The largest relative deviation occurred during the 500 g constant active condition, where the highest output machine produced 147% of the tidal volume of the lowest output machine. All machines deviate significantly in volume output and ventilation regulation. These differences depend on ventilation type, respiratory force, and patient behavior, preventing the creation of a simple conversion table between ventilator models. Universal neonatal tidal volume targets for mechanical ventilation cannot be transferred from one ventilator to another without considering necessary adjustments.

  16. Separation of Plutonium from Irradiated Fuels and Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Leonard W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holliday, Kiel S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murray, Alice [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Thompson, Major [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Thorp, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yarbro, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Hanford Site, Benton County, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Spent nuclear fuel from power production reactors contains moderate amounts of transuranium (TRU) actinides and fission products in addition to the still slightly enriched uranium. Originally, nuclear technology was developed to chemically separate and recover fissionable plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuel for military purposes. Military plutonium separations had essentially ceased by the mid-1990s. Reprocessing, however, can serve multiple purposes, and the relative importance has changed over time. In the 1960’s the vision of the introduction of plutonium-fueled fast-neutron breeder reactors drove the civilian separation of plutonium. More recently, reprocessing has been regarded as a means to facilitate the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, and thus requires development of radically different technical approaches. In the last decade or so, the principal reason for reprocessing has shifted to spent power reactor fuel being reprocessed (1) so that unused uranium and plutonium being recycled reduce the volume, gaining some 25% to 30% more energy from the original uranium in the process and thus contributing to energy security and (2) to reduce the volume and radioactivity of the waste by recovering all long-lived actinides and fission products followed by recycling them in fast reactors where they are transmuted to short-lived fission products; this reduces the volume to about 20%, reduces the long-term radioactivity level in the high-level waste, and complicates the possibility of the plutonium being diverted from civil use – thereby increasing the proliferation resistance of the fuel cycle. In general, reprocessing schemes can be divided into two large categories: aqueous/hydrometallurgical systems, and pyrochemical/pyrometallurgical systems. Worldwide processing schemes are dominated by the aqueous (hydrometallurgical) systems. This document provides a historical review of both categories of reprocessing.

  17. Utilize target motion to cover clinical target volume (ctv) - a novel and practical treatment planning approach to manage respiratory motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Kong Fengming; Ryu, Samuel; Chetty, Indrin J.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To use probability density function (PDF) to model motion effects and incorporate this information into treatment planning for lung cancers. Material and methods: PDFs were calculated from the respiratory motion traces of 10 patients. Motion effects were evaluated by convolving static dose distributions with various PDFs. Based on a differential dose prescription with relatively lower dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) than to the gross tumor volume (GTV), two approaches were proposed to incorporate PDFs into treatment planning. The first approach uses the GTV-based internal target volume (ITV) as the planning target volume (PTV) to ensure full dose to the GTV, and utilizes the motion-induced dose gradient to cover the CTV. The second approach employs an inhomogeneous static dose distribution within a minimized PTV to best match the prescription dose gradient. Results: Motion effects on dose distributions were minimal in the anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral directions: a 10-mm motion only induced about 3% of dose reduction in the peripheral target region. The motion effect was remarkable in the cranial-caudal direction. It varied with the motion amplitude, but tended to be similar for various respiratory patterns. For the first approach, a 10-15 mm motion would adequately cover the CTV (presumed to be 60-70% of the GTV dose) without employing the CTV in planning. For motions 15-mm. An example of inhomogeneous static dose distribution in a reduced PTV was given, and it showed significant dose reduction in the normal tissue without compromising target coverage. Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose gradient can be utilized to cover the CTV and minimize the lung dose without the need for more sophisticated technologies

  18. A prospective evaluation of hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory deficits following cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting Martin; Grimm, Jimm; McIntyre, Riley; Anderson-Keightly, Heather; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Hales, Russell K; Moore, Joseph; Vannorsdall, Tracy; Redmond, Kristin J

    2017-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory decline following cranial irradiation. Effects of hippocampal radiation over a wide range of doses were investigated by combining data from three prospective studies. In one, adults with small cell lung cancer received hippocampal-avoidance prophylactic cranial irradiation. In the other two, adults with glioblastoma multiforme received neural progenitor cell sparing radiation or no sparing with extra dose delivered to subventricular zone. Memory was measured by the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 6 months after radiation. Dose-volume histograms were generated and dose-response data were fitted to a nonlinear model. Of 60 patients enrolled, 30 were analyzable based on HVLT-R DR testing completion status, baseline HVLT-R DR and intracranial metastasis/recurrence or prior hippocampal resection status. We observed a dose-response of radiation to the hippocampus with regard to decline in HVLT-R DR. D50% of the bilateral hippocampi of 22.1 Gy is associated with 20% risk of decline. This prospective study demonstrates an association between hippocampal dose volume effects and memory decline measured by HVLT-R DR over a wide dose range. These data support a potential benefit of hippocampal sparing and encourage continued trial enrollment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Blood vessel damage correlated with irradiance for in vivo vascular targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinde; Tan, Zou; Niu, Xiangyu; Lin, Linsheng; Lin, Huiyun; Li, Buhong

    2016-10-01

    Vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) has been widely utilized for the prevention or treatment of vascular-related diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, port-wine stains and prostate cancer. In order to quantitative assessment the blood vessel damage during V-PDT, nude mice were implanted with Titanium dorsal skin window chambers for in vivo V-PDT studies. For treatments, various irradiances including 50, 75, 100 and 200 mW/cm2 provided by a 532 nm semiconductor laser were performed with the same total light dose of 30 J/cm2 after the mice were intravenously injection of Rose Bengal for 25 mg/Kg body weight. Laser speckle imaging and microscope were used to monitor blood flow dynamics and vessel constriction during and after V-PDT, respectively. The V-PDT induced vessel damages between different groups were compared. The results show that significant difference in blood vessel damage was found between the lower irradiances (50, 75 and 100 mW/cm2) and higher irradiance (200 mW/cm2), and the blood vessel damage induced by V-PDT is positively correlated with irradiance. This study implies that the optimization of irradiance is required for enhancing V-PDT therapeutic efficiency.

  20. Conformal irradiation of the prostate: estimating long-term rectal bleeding risk using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Adams, Judith A.; Urie, Marcia M.; Shipley, William U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) may be very useful tools for estimating probability of normal tissue complications (NTCP), but there is not yet an agreed upon method for their analysis. This study introduces a statistical method of aggregating and analyzing primary data from DVHs and associated outcomes. It explores the dose-volume relationship for NTCP of the rectum, using long-term data on rectal wall bleeding following prostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Previously published data were reviewed and updated on 41 patients with Stages T3 and T4 prostatic carcinoma treated with photons followed by perineal proton boost, including dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient's anterior rectal wall and data on the occurrence of postirradiation rectal bleeding (minimum FU > 4 years). Logistic regression was used to test whether some individual combination of dose and volume irradiated might best separate the DVHs into categories of high or low risk for rectal bleeding. Further analysis explored whether a group of such dose-volume combinations might be superior in predicting complication risk. These results were compared with results of the 'critical volume model', a mathematical model based on assumptions of underlying radiobiological interactions. Results: Ten of the 128 tested dose-volume combinations proved to be 'statistically significant combinations' (SSCs) distinguishing between bleeders (14 out of 41) and nonbleeders (27 out of 41), ranging contiguously between 60 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) to 70% of the anterior rectal wall and 75 CGE to 30%. Calculated odds ratios for each SSC were not significantly different across the individual SSCs; however, analysis combining SSCs allowed segregation of DVHs into three risk groups: low, moderate, and high. Estimates of probabilities of normal tissue complications (NTCPs) based on these risk groups correlated strongly with observed data (p = 0.003) and with biomathematical model-generated NTCPs

  1. A general methodology for three-dimensional analysis of variation in target volume delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remeijer, P.; Rasch, C.; Lebesque, J. V.; van Herk, M.

    1999-01-01

    A generic method for three-dimensional (3-D) evaluation of target volume delineation in multiple imaging modalities is presented. The evaluation includes geometrical and statistical methods to estimate observer differences and variability in defining the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in relation to the

  2. Analytical solutions for thermal transient profile in solid target irradiated with low energy and high beam current protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Henrique B. de; Brazao, Nei G.; Sciani, Valdir

    2009-01-01

    There were obtained analytical solutions for thermal transient in solid targets, used in short half-life radioisotopes production, when irradiated with low energy and high beam current protons, in the cyclotron accelerator Cyclone 30 of the Institute for Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN/CNEN-SP). The beam spatial profile was considered constant and the time depended heat distribution equation was resolved for a continuous particles flow entering the target. The problem was divided into two stages: a general solution was proposed which is the sum of two functions, the first one related to the thermal equilibrium situation and the second one related to a time dependent function that was determinate by the setting of the contour conditions and the initial conditions imposed by the real problem. By that one got an analytic function for a complete description of the heat transport phenomenon inside the targets. There were used both, numerical and symbolic computation methods, to obtain temperature maps and thermal gradients and the results showed an excellent agreement when compared with purely numerical models. The results were compared with obtained data from Gallium-67 and Thallium-201 irradiation routines conducted by the IPEN Cyclotrons accelerators center, showing excellent agreement. The objective of this paper is to develop solid targets irradiation systems (metals and oxides) so that one can operate with high levels of current beam, minimizing the irradiation time and maximizing the final returns. (author)

  3. Cone-Beam CT Localization of Internal Target Volumes for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiheng; Wu, Q. Jackie; Marks, Lawrence B.; Larrier, Nicole; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigate a technique of matching internal target volumes (ITVs) in four-dimensional (4D) simulation computed tomography (CT) to the composite target volume in free-breathing on-board cone-beam (CB) CT. The technique is illustrated by using both phantom and patient cases. Methods and Materials: A dynamic phantom with a target ball simulating respiratory motion with various amplitude and cycle times was used to verify localization accuracy. The dynamic phantom was scanned using simulation CT with a phase-based retrospective sorting technique. The ITV was then determined based on 10 sets of sorted images. The size and epicenter of the ITV identified from 4D simulation CT images and the composite target volume identified from on-board CBCT images were compared to assess localization accuracy. Similarly, for two clinical cases of patients with lung cancer, ITVs defined from 4D simulation CT images and CBCT images were compared. Results: For the phantom, localization accuracy between the ITV in 4D simulation CT and the composite target volume in CBCT was within 1 mm, and ITV was within 8.7%. For patient cases, ITVs on simulation CT and CBCT were within 8.0%. Conclusion: This study shows that CBCT is a useful tool to localize ITV for targets affected by respiratory motion. Verification of the ITV from 4D simulation CT using on-board free-breathing CBCT is feasible for the target localization of lung tumors

  4. [Doses to organs at risk in conformational radiotherapy and stereotaxic irradiation: The heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendorpe, B; Servagi Vernat, S; Ramiandrisoa, F; Bazire, L; Kirova, Y M

    2017-10-01

    Radiation therapy of breast cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, lung cancer and others thoracic irradiations induce an ionizing radiation dose to the heart. Irradiation of the heart, associated with patient cardiovascular risk and cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity, increase cardiovascular mortality. The long survival after breast or Hodgkin lymphoma irradiation requires watching carefully late treatment toxicity. The over-risk of cardiac events is related to the dose received by the heart and the irradiated cardiac volume. The limitation of cardiac irradiation should be a priority in the planning of thoracic irradiations. Practices have to be modified, using modern techniques to approach of the primary objective of radiotherapy which is to optimize the dose to the target volume, sparing healthy tissues, in this case the heart. We have reviewed the literature on cardiac toxicity induced by conformational tridimensional radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy or stereotactic body radiation therapy, in order to evaluate the possibilities to limit cardiotoxicity. Finally, we summarise the recommendations on dose constraints to the heart and coronary arteries. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoio, A., E-mail: Annamaria.Muoio@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Schillaci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Trifirò, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser–matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  6. Demonstration of a neonlike argon soft-x-ray laser with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2001-09-15

    We demonstrate a neonlike argon-ion x-ray laser, using a short-pulse laser-irradiated gas puff target. The gas puff target was formed by pulsed injection of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in the form of a narrow slit and irradiated with a combination of long, 600-ps and short, 6-ps high-power laser pulses with a total of 10 J of energy in a traveling-wave excitation scheme. Lasing was observed on the 3p (1)S(0)?3s (1)P(1) transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d (1)P(1)?3p (1)P(1) transition at 45.1 nm. A gain of 11 cm(-1) was measured on these transitions for targets up to 0.9 cm long.

  7. Comparison of internal target volumes defined on 3-dimensional, 4-dimensonal, and cone-beam CT images of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li F

    2016-11-01

    , and ITVMIP not included in ITVCBCT were 57.08%, 48.89%, and 20.04%, respectively. Conclusion: The use of the individual ITV derived from 4DCT merely based on bony registration in radiotherapy may result in a target miss. The ITVs derived from 3DCT with isotropic margins have a good coverage of the ITV from CBCT, but the use of those would result in a high proportion of normal tissue being irradiated unnecessarily. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, cone-beam CT, four-dimensional CT, three-dimensional CT, internal target volume, volume comparison

  8. CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, Peter M.; Kirikuta, Ion C.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study was performed to compare the accuracy of clinical treatment set-up and CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer. Material and methods: Between September 1993 and October 1994, 45 women who underwent breast conserving surgery and irradiation containing a boost to the tumour bed were investigated. Prospective evaluation of CT planning of the boost was carried out. The target volume/boost field, electron energy and treatment set-up had been defined on the basis of clinical examination, initial and postsurgical mammograms by one radiotherapist. Next, a planning CT was performed in treatment position and a CT-based treatment plan was calculated according to a target volume defined by another radiotherapist. The clinical treatment set-up was imported into our computer planning system and the resulting isodose plots were compared with those from CT planning and reviewed critically. Results: The clinically defined treatment set-up had to be modified in 80% of the patients. Most discrepancies observed were related to the size of the boost field itself and the chosen electron energy. Minor changes had to be made with respect to angle of table and gantry. Conclusions: Critical review of the isodose plots from both methods showed clear advantages for CT planning. Guidelines for target definition in CT planning of boost irradiation and subgroups of patients benefiting from this technique are described

  9. Impact of pelvic nodal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy on treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Robert A.; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Horwitz, Eric; Buyyounouski, Mark; Ruth, Karen J.; Ma, C.-M.; Pollack, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of treating the pelvic lymphatic regions during prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with respect to our routine acceptance criteria. Methods and Materials: A series of 10 previously treated prostate patients were randomly selected and the pelvic lymphatic regions delineated on the fused magnetic resonance/computed tomography data sets. A targeting progression was formed from the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles only to the inclusion of all pelvic lymphatic regions and presacral region resulting in 5 planning scenarios of increasing geometric difficulty. IMRT plans were generated for each stage for two accelerator manufacturers. Dose volume histogram data were analyzed with respect to dose to the planning target volumes, rectum, bladder, bowel, and normal tissue. Analysis was performed for the number of segments required, monitor units, 'hot spots,' and treatment time. Results: Both rectal endpoints were met for all targets. Bladder endpoints were not met and the bowel endpoint was met in 40% of cases with the inclusion of the extended and presacral lymphatics. A significant difference was found in the number of segments and monitor units with targeting progression and between accelerators, with the smaller beamlets yielding poorer results. Treatment times between the 2 linacs did not exhibit a clinically significant difference when compared. Conclusions: Many issues should be considered with pelvic lymphatic irradiation during IMRT delivery for prostate cancer including dose per fraction, normal structure dose/volume limits, planning target volumes generation, localization, treatment time, and increased radiation leakage. We would suggest that, at a minimum, the endpoints used in this work be evaluated before beginning IMRT pelvic nodal irradiation

  10. Behavior of structural and target materials irradiated in spallation neutron environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Wechsler, M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Borden, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes considerations for selection of structural and target materials for accelerator-driven neutron sources. Due to the operating constraints of proposed accelerator-driven neutron sources, the criteria for selection are different than those commonly applied to fission and fusion systems. Established irradiation performance of various alloy systems is taken into account in the selection criteria. Nevertheless, only limited materials performance data are available which specifically related to neutron energy spectra anticipated for spallation sources.

  11. Behavior of structural and target materials irradiated in spallation neutron environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbins, J.F.; Wechsler, M.; Borden, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes considerations for selection of structural and target materials for accelerator-driven neutron sources. Due to the operating constraints of proposed accelerator-driven neutron sources, the criteria for selection are different than those commonly applied to fission and fusion systems. Established irradiation performance of various alloy systems is taken into account in the selection criteria. Nevertheless, only limited materials performance data are available which specifically related to neutron energy spectra anticipated for spallation sources

  12. Fixation of patients during irradiations of the neurocranium and visceral cranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohndorf, W.; Richter, E.

    1983-12-01

    Only few patients are able to exactly maintain during the irradiation a given position of the head without fixation. However, every movement of the head leads to a dose decrease up to 50% within the target volume. Today, fixation and reproducable field adjustment are the conditions of curative radiotherapy. The Wuerzburg model is presented.

  13. [Fixation of patients during irradiation of the neurocranium and visceral cranium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohndorf, W; Richter, E

    1983-12-01

    Only few patients are able to exactly maintain during the irradiation a given position of the head without fixation. However, every movement of the head leads to a dose decrease up to 50% within the target volume. Today, fixation and reproducible field adjustment are the conditions of curative radiotherapy. The Würzburg model is presented.

  14. Results of four one-day electron-accelerator irradiations of enriched Mo-100 targets for the production of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jonah, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, V. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tkac, P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Virgo, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, G. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A series of four one-day irradiations was conducted with 100Mo-enriched disk targets. After irradiation, the enriched disks were removed from the target and dissolved. The resulting solution was processed using a NorthStar RadioGenix™ 99mTc generator either at Argonne National Laboratory or at the NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes facility. Runs on the RadioGenix system produced inconsistent analytical results for 99mTc in the Tc/Mo solution. These inconsistencies were attributed to the impurities in the solution or improper column packing. During the irradiations, the performance of the optic transitional radiation (OTR) and infrared cameras was tested in high radiation field. The OTR cameras survived all irradiations, while the IR cameras failed every time. The addition of X-ray and neutron shielding improved camera survivability and decreased the number of upsets.

  15. Laser polarization dependence of proton emission from a thin foil target irradiated by a 70 fs, intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumi, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Li, Z.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Kado, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Mori, M.; Bulanov, S.V.; Esirkepov, T.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Noda, A.; Nakamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    A study of proton emission from a 3-μm-thick Ta foil target irradiated by p-, s-, and circularly polarized laser pulses with respect to the target plane has been carried out. Protons with energies up to 880 keV were observed in the target normal direction under the irradiation by the p-polarized laser pulse, which yielded the highest efficiency for proton emission. In contrast, s- and circularly polarized laser pulses gave the maximum energies of 610 and 680 keV, respectively. The difference in the maximum energy between the p- and s-polarized cases was associated with the difference between the sheath fields estimated from electron spectra

  16. Laser irradiation of disk targets at 0.53 μm wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, W.C.; Campbell, E.M.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1981-01-01

    We present results and analysis for laser-irradiations of Be, CH, Ti, and Au disk targets with 0.53 μm light in 3 to 35 J, 600 ps pulses, at nominal intensities from 3 x 10 13 to approx. 4 x 10 15 W/cm 2 . The measured absorptions are higher than observed in similar 1.06 μm irradiations, and are largely consistent with modeling which shows the importance of inverse bremsstrahlung and Brillouin scattering. Observed red-shifted back-reflected light shows that Brillouin is operating at low to moderate levels. The measured fluxes of multi-keV x-rays indicate low hot-electron fractions, with temperatures which are consistent with resonance absorption. Measurements show efficient conversion of absorbed light into sub-keV x-rays, with time-, angular-, and spatial-emission distributions which are generally consistent with non-LTE modeling using inhibited thermal electron transport

  17. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  18. Endoscopic clipping for gastrointestinal tumors. A method to define the target volume more precisely

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepl, M.; Klautke, G.; Fehr, R.; Fietkau, R.; Pietsch, A.

    2000-01-01

    Background: In many cases it is not possible to exactly define the extension of carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract with the help of computertomography scans made for 3-D-radiation treatment planning. Consequently, the planning of external beam radiotherapy is made more difficult for the gross tumor volume as well as, in some cases, also for the clinical target volume. Patients and Methods: Eleven patients with macrosocpic tumors (rectal cancer n = 5, cardiac cancer n = 6) were included. Just before 3-D planning, the oral and aboral border of the tumor was marked endoscopically with hemoclips. Subsequently, CT scans for radiotherapy planning were made and the clinical target volume was defined. Five to 6 weeks thereafter, new CT scans were done to define the gross tumor volume for boost planning. Two investigators independently assessed the influence of the hemoclips on the different planning volumes, and whether the number of clips was sufficient to define the gross tumor volume. Results: In all patients, the implantation of the clips was done without complications. Start of radiotherapy was not delayed. With the help of the clips it was possible to exactly define the position and the extension of the primary tumor. The clinical target volume was modified according to the position of the clips in 5/11 patients; the gross tumor volume was modified in 7/11 patients. The use of the clips made the documentation and verification of the treatment portals by the simulator easier. Moreover, the clips helped the surgeon to define the primary tumor region following marked regression after neoadjuvant therapy in 3 patients. Conclusions: Endoscopic clipping of gastrointestinal tumors helps to define the tumor volumes more precisely in radiation therapy. The clips are easily recognized on the portal films and, thus, contribute to quality control. (orig.) [de

  19. Optical emission from Al target irradiated by FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stránský, M; Rohlena, K

    2014-01-01

    The following text touches on some peculiarities in optical emission spectroscopy results from experiments on the free-electron laser FLASH [1, 2]. Aluminum targets were irradiated with 13.5 nm ∼ 25 fs pulses at intensities of 10 13 and 10 16 W/cm 2 (20 and 1 μm foci). Surprisingly, only neutral atom lines for the case with wider focus and traces of ion lines in the tighter focus case were observed with the optical emission spectroscopy (200–600 nm range), [2]. The motivating idea behind this work is the suggestion in [1] by Zastrau that the optical spectrometer sees only emissions from a cold expanding lower-density (< 10 22 cm −3 ) plasma plume. In this contribution the notion of UV range screening is analyzed in detail.

  20. Impact of Different CT Slice Thickness on Clinical Target Volume for 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Ganesh, Tharmar; Rath, Goura K.; Julka, Pramod K.; Sridhar, Pappiah S.; Joshi, Rakesh C.; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the variation of clinical target volume (CTV) with different computed tomography (CT) slice thicknesses and the impact of CT slice thickness on 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Fifty patients with brain tumors were selected and CT scans with 2.5-, 5-, and 10-mm slice thicknesses were performed with non-ionic contrast enhancement. The patients were selected with tumor volume ranging from 2.54 cc to 222 cc. Three-dimensional treatment planning was performed for all three CT datasets. The target coverage and the isocenter shift between the treatment plans for different slice thickness were correlated with the tumor volume. An important observation from our study revealed that for volume 25 cc, the target underdosage was less than 6.7% for 5-mm slice thickness and 8% for 10-mm slice thickness. For 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning (3DCRT), a CT slice thickness of 2.5 mm is optimum for tumor volume 25 cc

  1. Irradiation cryostat for LiH and LiD polarized solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, S.

    1991-01-01

    Scattering experiments with polarized nucleon targets are an important tool to understand the nuclear spin structure. Pion photoproduction experiments on polarized protrons and neutrons as well as measurements of the neutron and deuteron formfactors will be performed at ELSA. 7 LiH and 6 LiD seem to be attractive target materials for these experiments, because they offer high proton and deuteron polarisation, respectively. Expecially 6 LiD has further very important advantages compared to the common deuteron target materials as d-Butanol and ND 3 . This work describes the mechanism of DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) in LiH and LiD and gives a view on the nature of the so-called paramagnetic impurities in these materials. In order to maximize the nuclear polarization, the production of these radicals have to take place under well defined temperature conditions. Therefore the first version of an irradiation cryostat was built and tested in regard to its cooling power and temperature adjustment. (orig.)

  2. Irradiated target cooling using circular air jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaraj, P.; Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Baskaran, V.; Sundararajan, T.

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of irradiation on materials, sample coupons are irradiated in cyclotron facilities. During the irradiation process, these samples produce significant heat. This heat needs to be continuously removed from the samples in order to avoid melting of the samples as well as to keep the samples at a particular temperature during irradiation. The area available for heat transfer is limited due to the small size of the samples. To increase the heat transfer rate, jet cooling is used as it provides large heat transfer co-efficient. To understand the heat transfer characteristics of jet cooling under these conditions, experiments have been carried out. Electric Joule heating is adopted to simulate irradiation heat in stainless steel samples. An array of circular nozzles is used to create air jet. From the study the values of the parameters correspond to the maximum heat removal rate are found out. The results are also compared with an empirical correlation from the literature. (author)

  3. Soviet paper on laser target heating, symmetry of irradiation, and two-dimensional effects on compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlin, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    Included is a paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Plasma Physics Division of the American Physical Society in San Francisco on November 19, 1976. The paper discusses some theoretical problems of laser target irradiation and compression investigated at the laboratory of quantum radiophysics of Lebedev Physical Institute. Of significant interest was the absorption and reflection of laser radiation in the corona plasma of a laser target

  4. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  5. Scrotal Irradiation in Primary Testicular Lymphoma: Review of the Literature and In Silico Planning Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, Charlotte L.; Wiesendanger, Esther M.; Hulst, Peter C. van der; Imhoff, Gustaaf W. van; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Beijert, Max

    2013-01-01

    We examined adjuvant irradiation of the scrotum in primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) by means of a literature review in MEDLINE, a telephone survey among Dutch institutes, and an in silico planning comparative study on scrotal irradiation in PTL. We did not find any uniform adjuvant irradiation technique assuring a safe planning target volume (PTV) coverage in published reports, and the definition of the clinical target volume is unclear. Histopathologic studies of PTL show a high invasion rate of the tunica albuginea, the epididymis, and the spermatic cord. In retrospective studies, a prescribed dose of at least 30 Gy involving the scrotum is associated with best survival. The majority of Dutch institutes irradiate the whole scrotum without using a planning computed tomography scan, with a single electron beam and a total dose of 30 Gy. The in silico planning comparative study showed that all evaluated approaches met a D 95% scrotal dose of at least 85% of the prescription dose, without exceeding the dose limits of critical organs. Photon irradiation with 2 oblique beams using wedges resulted in the best PTV coverage, with a mean value of 95% of the prescribed dose, with lowest maximum dose. Adjuvant photon or electron irradiation of the whole scrotum including the contralateral testicle with a minimum dose of 30 Gy is recommended in PTL. Computed tomography-based radiation therapy treatment planning with proper patient positioning and position verification guarantees optimal dose coverage.

  6. Microwave radiation mechanism in a pulse-laser-irradiated Cu foil target revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Li Jun; Peng Qixian

    2011-01-01

    The microwave radiation mechanism in a Cu-based foil target irradiated by an intense laser pulse has been investigated. Microwave emission in the frequency range 0.5-4 GHz has been observed from a 200 ps laser pulse of intensity about 10 12 W cm -2 normally incident on the target surface. The total microwave power and energy emitted from the interaction were found to be about 0.4 W and 2 nJ, respectively, corresponding to an efficiency of coupling laser energy to microwave energy of 2x10 -8 . The result agrees well with quadrupole radiation calculated based on a circuit model of a laser plasma, which indicates that the radiative process can be explained by magnetic dipole or electric quadrupole radiation from the laser-produced symmetric poloidal current distribution at the plasma-target interface.

  7. Microwave radiation mechanism in a pulse-laser-irradiated Cu foil target revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Li Jun; Peng Qixian, E-mail: ziyuch@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2011-05-01

    The microwave radiation mechanism in a Cu-based foil target irradiated by an intense laser pulse has been investigated. Microwave emission in the frequency range 0.5-4 GHz has been observed from a 200 ps laser pulse of intensity about 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} normally incident on the target surface. The total microwave power and energy emitted from the interaction were found to be about 0.4 W and 2 nJ, respectively, corresponding to an efficiency of coupling laser energy to microwave energy of 2x10{sup -8}. The result agrees well with quadrupole radiation calculated based on a circuit model of a laser plasma, which indicates that the radiative process can be explained by magnetic dipole or electric quadrupole radiation from the laser-produced symmetric poloidal current distribution at the plasma-target interface.

  8. SU-F-BRA-14: Optimization of Dosimetric Guidelines for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) Using the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooney, K; Altman, M; Garcia-Ramirez, J; Thomas, M; Zoberi, I; Mullen, D; DeWees, T; Esthappan, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment planning guidelines for accelerated partial breast irradiation (ABPI) using the strut-adjusted volume implant (SAVI) are inconsistent between the manufacturer and NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Furthermore neither set of guidelines accounts for different applicator sizes. The purpose of this work is to establish guidelines specific to the SAVI that are based on clinically achievable dose distributions. Methods: Sixty-two consecutive patients were implanted with a SAVI and prescribed to receive 34 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily using high dose-rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy. The target (PTV-EVAL) was defined per NSABP. The treatments were planned and evaluated using a combination of dosimetric planning goals provided by the NSABP, the manufacturer, and our prior clinical experience. Parameters evaluated included maximum doses to skin and ribs, and volumes of PTV-EVAL receiving 90%, 95%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription (V90, etc). All target parameters were evaluated for correlation with device size using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Revised dosimetric guidelines for target coverage and heterogeneity were determined from this population. Results: Revised guidelines for minimum target coverage (ideal in parentheses): V90≥95%(97%), V95≥90%(95%), V100≥88%(91%). The only dosimetric parameters that were significantly correlated (p<0.05) with device size were V150 and V200. Heterogeneity criteria were revised for the 6–1 Mini/6-1 applicators to V150≤30cc and V200≤15cc, and unchanged for the other sizes. Re-evaluation of patient plans showed 90% (56/62) met the revised minimum guidelines and 76% (47/62) met the ideal guidelines. All and 56/62 patients met our institutional guidelines for maximum skin and rib dose, respectively. Conclusions: We have optimized dosimetric guidelines for the SAVI applicators, and found that implementation of these revised guidelines for SAVI treatment planning yielded target coverage exceeding

  9. UV-C irradiation of HSV-1 infected fibroblasts (HSV-FS) enhances human natural killer (NK) cell activity against these targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettera, L.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P.

    1991-01-01

    Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene products has been bound to be sufficient for NK cell mediated lysis of HSV-1 infected FS. To block the targets at various stages in the infectious cycle, HSV-FS were irradiated with UV light for 1 min at 2, 6, and 20 hr post-infection. NK mediated lysis of 2 hr and 5 hr UV treated HSV-FS was 2-fold higher than non-UV treated HSV-FS despite a >99% inhibition in virus yield. In contrast, 20 hr infected targets were lysed less well than 2 and 6 hr targets despite strong glycoprotein expression and induction of high levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production by effector PBMC's; this lysis was not enhanced by UV treatment. Since NK lysis of HSV-FS has been found to be dependent on an HLA-DR + accessory cell (AC), lysis of irradiated HSV-FS by PBMC's depleted of AC was measured. Such depletion eradicated NK lysis of the UV treated HSV-FS indicating that irradiation does not overcome the AC requirement for NK lysis. UV irradiation of another HLA-DR + dependent target, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infected FS led to a dramatic reduction in both NK lysis and IFN-α induction. HSV-1 is a DNA virus whose genes are expressed in a cascade fashion whereas VSV is an RNA virus. The authors hypothesize that the enhancement in AC dependent NK activity observed for UV irradiated HSV-FS, but not VSV-FS, targets is due to overproduction of either a cellular or viral gene product which specifically occurs early in the HSV-1 infectious cycle and is downregulated by 20 hr post-infection

  10. Target volume delineation variation in radiotherapy for early stage rectal cancer in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Haas-Kock, Danielle F.M. de; Beukema, Jannet C.; Neelis, Karen J.; Woutersen, Dankert; Ceha, Heleen; Rozema, Tom; Slot, Annerie; Vos-Westerman, Hanneke; Intven, Martijn; Spruit, Patty H.; Linden, Yvette van der; Geijsen, Debby; Verschueren, Karijn; Herk, Marcel B. van; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to measure and improve the quality of target volume delineation by means of national consensus on target volume definition in early-stage rectal cancer. Methods and materials: The CTV’s for eight patients were delineated by 11 radiation oncologists in 10 institutes according to local guidelines (phase 1). After observer variation analysis a workshop was organized to establish delineation guidelines and a digital atlas, with which the same observers re-delineated the dataset (phase 2). Variation in volume, most caudal and cranial slice and local surface distance variation were analyzed. Results: The average delineated CTV volume decreased from 620 to 460 cc (p < 0.001) in phase 2. Variation in the caudal CTV border was reduced significantly from 1.8 to 1.2 cm SD (p = 0.01), while it remained 0.7 cm SD for the cranial border. The local surface distance variation (cm SD) reduced from 1.02 to 0.74 for anterior, 0.63 to 0.54 for lateral, 0.33 to 0.25 for posterior and 1.22 to 0.46 for the sphincter region, respectively. Conclusions: The large variation in target volume delineation could significantly be reduced by use of consensus guidelines and a digital delineation atlas. Despite the significant reduction there is still a need for further improvement.

  11. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  12. MR coronary angiography with breath-hold targeted volumes: preliminary clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); H.G. de Bruin (Hein); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); M. Hulshoff (Maarten); P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To assess the clinical value of a magnetic resonance (MR) coronary angiography strategy involving a small targeted volume to image one coronary segment in a single breath hold for the detection of greater than 50% stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  13. The effect of obesity levels on irradiated small bowel volume in belly board with small bowel displacement device for rectal cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se Young; Kim, Joo Ho; Park, Hyo Kuk; Cho, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    For radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients treated with small bowel displacement device (SBDD) and belly board, We will suggest new indication of using SBDD depending on obesity index by analyzing correlation between obesity and irradiated small bowel volume. In this study, We reviewed 29 rectal cancer patients who received pelvic radiation therapy with belly board and SBDD from January to April in 2012. We only analyzed those patients treated with three-field technique (PA and both LAT) on 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fx). We measured patients' height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and divided BMI into two groups.(≥23:BMI=group 1, <23:BMI=group 2) We performed a statistical analysis to evaluate correlation between total volume of bladder (TV{sub bldder}), obesity index and high dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 90% of prescribed dose, HDV{sub sb}), low dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 33% of prescribed dose, LDV{sub sb}). The result shows, gender, WHR and status of pre operative or post operative do not greatly affect HDV{sub sb} and LDV{sub sb}. Statistical result shows, there are significant correlation between HDV{sub sb} and BMI (p<0.04), HDV{sub sb} and TV{sub bladder} (p<0.01), LDV{sub sb} and TV{sub bladder} (p<0.01). BMI seems to correlate with HDV{sub sb} but does not with LDV{sub sb} (p>0.05). There are negative correlation between HDV{sub sb} and BMI, TV{sub bladder} and HDV{sub sb}, TV{sub bladder} and LDV{sub sb} . Especially, BMI group1 has more effective and negative correlation with HDV{sub sb} (p=0.027) than in BMI group 2. In the case of BMI group 1, TV{sub bladder} has significant negative correlation with HDV{sub sb} and LDV{sub sb} (p<0.04). In conclusions, we confirmed that Using SBDD with belly board in BMI group 1 could more effectively reduce irradiated small bowel volume in radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Therefore, We suggest using belly board with SBDD in order

  14. The effect of obesity levels on irradiated small bowel volume in belly board with small bowel displacement device for rectal cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Young; Kim, Joo Ho; Park, Hyo Kuk; Cho, Jeong Hee

    2013-01-01

    For radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients treated with small bowel displacement device (SBDD) and belly board, We will suggest new indication of using SBDD depending on obesity index by analyzing correlation between obesity and irradiated small bowel volume. In this study, We reviewed 29 rectal cancer patients who received pelvic radiation therapy with belly board and SBDD from January to April in 2012. We only analyzed those patients treated with three-field technique (PA and both LAT) on 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fx). We measured patients' height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and divided BMI into two groups.(≥23:BMI=group 1, <23:BMI=group 2) We performed a statistical analysis to evaluate correlation between total volume of bladder (TV bldder ), obesity index and high dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 90% of prescribed dose, HDV sb ), low dose volume of small bowel (small bowel volume irradiated at 33% of prescribed dose, LDV sb ). The result shows, gender, WHR and status of pre operative or post operative do not greatly affect HDV sb and LDV sb . Statistical result shows, there are significant correlation between HDV sb and BMI (p<0.04), HDV sb and TV bladder (p<0.01), LDV sb and TV bladder (p<0.01). BMI seems to correlate with HDV sb but does not with LDV sb (p>0.05). There are negative correlation between HDV sb and BMI, TV bladder and HDV sb , TV bladder and LDV sb . Especially, BMI group1 has more effective and negative correlation with HDV sb (p=0.027) than in BMI group 2. In the case of BMI group 1, TV bladder has significant negative correlation with HDV sb and LDV sb (p<0.04). In conclusions, we confirmed that Using SBDD with belly board in BMI group 1 could more effectively reduce irradiated small bowel volume in radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Therefore, We suggest using belly board with SBDD in order to reduce the small bowel toxicity in rectal radiotherapy, if patients' BMI is above 23

  15. The disintegration and vaporization of plastic targets irradiated by high-power laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greig, J.R.; Pechacek, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the disintegration of polyethylene and polystyrene targets irradiated by 100-J 40-nsec Nd/glass laser pulses. At power densities of approximately-less-than10 12 W/cm 2 relatively massive targets (6 x 10 -5 to 5 x 10 -4 cm 3 ) are totally disintegrated to produce finely divided target material and un-ionized vapor. Both the size of the target and the presence or absence of a laser prepulse strongly influence the proportions of finely divided target material and un-ionized vapor, especially within the first few microseconds after peak laser power. This disintegration is always preceded by the emission of a hot fully ionized plasma, but only 1% of the target material is contained in the hot plasma. Typically, (1--3) x 10 19 atoms of un-ionized vapor are released as a slowly expanding (vapprox.10 5 cm/sec) cold dense gas cloud (n/sub o/>10 19 cm -3 ) surrounding the initial target position. This cloud of target material has subsequently been heated by absorption of a 300-J 100-nsec CO 2 laser pulse to produce an approximately fully ionized plasma

  16. Irradiator design with large-volume source cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichholz, G.G.; Craft, T.F.; Suh, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    To provide for economic utilization of prospective vitrified cesium-137 waste elements, a study was conducted for a conceptual irradiator system based on these elements for the commercial sterilization of sewage sludge for land spreading as fertilizer. A literature study showed that dried sludge could be sterilized more efficiently than wet. Adequate destruction of E. coli in sludge could be obtained with radiation doses as low as 150 kR. However, a dose of about 1 megarad is generally regarded as mandatory. Two cesium waste concentrations had been proposed. The one incorporating lower concentrations of Cs-137 and a surface dose of 20 kR/h was insufficiently active. Work, therefore, concentrated on the more active source cylinders, which are 18 cm in diameter with a specific activity of 16 to 17 Ci/cc. The conceptual design envisages the dry sludge passing horizontally by a conveyor system, past two rows of source elements in a three-pass array. A computer program has been developed to produce isodose contours and to calculate integrated doses for various source-target configurations

  17. Volume-Dependent Expression of In-Field and Out-of-Field Effects in the Proton-Irradiated Rat Lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, Robert P.; Muijs, Christina T.; Faber, Hette; Gross, Sascha; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Luijk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether occurance of early radiation effects in lung tissue depends on local close only. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five percent. 50%, 66%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using single fractions of 150-MeV protons. For all volumes, in-field and out-of-field

  18. Locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with an anatomy-based target definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ariji, Takaki; Kameoka, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer using a target definition along with anatomical boundaries. Forty patients with biopsy-proven squamous cell or non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy between April 2006 and November 2009 were reviewed. There were 10 females and 30 males with a median age of 48 years (range, 17-74 years). More than half of the patients had T3/4 (n=21) and/or N2/3 (n=24) disease. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was administered as 70 Gy/33 fractions with or without concomitant chemotherapy. The clinical target volume was contoured along with muscular fascia or periosteum, and the prescribed radiotherapy dose was determined for each anatomical compartment and lymph node level in the head and neck. One local recurrence was observed at Meckel's cave on the periphery of the high-risk clinical target volume receiving a total dose of <63 Gy. Otherwise, six locoregional failures were observed within irradiated volume receiving 70 Gy. Local and nodal control rates at 3 years were 91 and 89%, respectively. Adverse events were acceptable, and 25 (81%) of 31 patients who were alive without recurrence at 2 years had xerostomia of ≤ Grade 1. The overall survival rate at 3 years was 87%. Target definition along with anatomically defined boundaries was feasible without compromise of the therapeutic ratio. It is worth testing this method further to minimize the unnecessary irradiated volume and to standardize the target definition in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  19. Prostate cancer: Doses and volumes of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Rivera, S.; Quero, L.; Latorzeff, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is nowadays a major therapeutic option in prostate cancer. Technological improvements allowed dose escalation without increasing late toxicity. Some randomized trials have shown that dose escalation decreases the biochemical failure rate, without any benefit in survival with the present follow-up. However, some studies indicate that the distant metastases rate is also decreased. Most of these studies have been done without hormonal treatment, and the role of dose escalation in case of long-term androgen deprivation is unknown. The target volume encompassed the whole gland: however, complete or partial focal treatment of the prostate can be done with sophisticated IMRT technique and must be evaluated. Proximal part of the seminal vesicles must be included in the target volumes. The role of nodal irradiation is another debate, but it could be logically proposed for the unfavourable group. (authors)

  20. Evidence of interaction between a relativistic electron beam and solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, Fl.; Scarlat, F.S.; Mitru, E.

    2002-01-01

    The investigation of the X ray production mechanism by the relativistic electron beams (REB) is an important keypoint for increasing the output of electron X ray conversion. This paper presents the image of a platinum target optically observed by its radiography (after irradiation by a REB of 31 MeV). The image is processed by means of a scanner and computer. The paper presents the distributions of the absorbed dose in a target volume

  1. Synthesis of Specific Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging Tumor Angiogenesis Using Electron-Beam Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizza, G.; Deshayes, S.; Maurizot, V.; Clochard, M. -C.; Berthelot, T.; Baudin, C.; Déléris, G., E-mail: giancarlo.rizza@polytechnique.edu [Commissariat à l' énergie atomique (CEA), Institut Rayonnement Matière de Saclay (IRaMIS), B.P. 52, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    We have succeeded to synthesize PVDF nanoparticles by nanoemulsion polymerization and their functionalization with a peptide that presents an anti-angiogenic activity. Resulted nanoparticles present a radius of 60 nm. From FESEM images and light scattering measurements, we deduced that they were spherical and monodisperse. The alkyl radicals induced from electron beam irradiation combine immediately with the oxygen to form peroxide radicals. Because of a high specific area and small crystallite size, the radical decay with time is evidenced from EPR measurements. Despite this radical decay, electron beam irradiation allows us to graft PAA by radical polymerization onto freshly irradiated PVDF nanoparticles and then to immobilize CBO-P11 by click chemistry via a spacer arm. Evidences of grafting were shown using HRMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Nanoparticles functionalized with an angiogenesis-targeting agent are an attractive option for anti-tumor therapy.

  2. Synthesis of Specific Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging Tumor Angiogenesis Using Electron-Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizza, G.; Deshayes, S.; Maurizot, V.; Clochard, M.-C.; Berthelot, T.; Baudin, C.; Déléris, G.

    2010-01-01

    We have succeeded to synthesize PVDF nanoparticles by nanoemulsion polymerization and their functionalization with a peptide that presents an anti-angiogenic activity. Resulted nanoparticles present a radius of 60 nm. From FESEM images and light scattering measurements, we deduced that they were spherical and monodisperse. The alkyl radicals induced from electron beam irradiation combine immediately with the oxygen to form peroxide radicals. Because of a high specific area and small crystallite size, the radical decay with time is evidenced from EPR measurements. Despite this radical decay, electron beam irradiation allows us to graft PAA by radical polymerization onto freshly irradiated PVDF nanoparticles and then to immobilize CBO-P11 by click chemistry via a spacer arm. Evidences of grafting were shown using HRMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Nanoparticles functionalized with an angiogenesis-targeting agent are an attractive option for anti-tumor therapy

  3. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikstroem, Johan; Hjelstuen, Mari H.B.; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  4. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikstroem, Johan; Hjelstuen, Mari H.B.; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Stavanger Univ. Hospital, Stavanger (Norway)), e-mail: vijo@sus.no

    2011-01-15

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  5. 800-MeV proton irradiation of thorium and depleted uranium targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, G.J.; Brun, T.O.; Pitcher, E.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    As part of the Los Alamos Fertile-to-Fissile-Conversion (FERFICON) program in the late 1980`s, thick targets of the fertile materials thorium and depleted uranium were bombarded by 800-MeV protons to produce the fissile materials {sup 233}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. The amount of {sup 233}U made was determined by measuring the {sup 233}Pa activity, and the yield of {sup 239}Pu was deduced by measuring the activity of {sup 239}Np. For the thorium target, 4 spallation products and 34 fission products were also measured. For the depleted uranium target, 3 spallation products and 16 fission products were also measured. The number of fissions in each target was deduced from fission product mass-yield curves. In actuality, axial distributions of the products were measured, and the distributions were then integrated over the target volume to obtain the total number of products for each reaction.

  6. Targeting pro-apoptotic trail receptors sensitizes HeLa cervical cancer cells to irradiation-induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John H.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Meersma, Gert-Jan; Hougardy, Brigitte M. T.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; De Jong, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of irradiation in combination with drugs targeting the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor (DR)4 and DR5 and their mechanism of action in a cervical cancer cell line. Methods and Materials: Recombinant human TRAIL

  7. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Daniel J.; Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha; Goddu, S. Murty; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose–volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average (± standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 ± 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 ± 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 ± 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  8. Improvement of dose distribution of esophageal irradiation using the field-within-a-field technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Tsugunori; Okabe, Keigo; Yamato, Hidetada; Murakami, Jyunji; Nakazawa, Yasuo; Kato, Mitsuyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The wide radiation field for mediastinal dose distribution should be inhomogeneous with the usual simple opposed beam irradiation. The purpose of this study was to improve the dose distribution of the mediastinum using a conventional planning system with a dose-volume histogram (DVH) and the field-in-field technique. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is obtained in bilateral opposed-field irradiation. An overdose area obtained from the 3D dose distribution is defined and reprojected into the irradiation field. A new reduced field is created by removing the reprojected overdose area. A 3D dose distribution is again obtained and compared with the results from first one. Procedures were repeated until each of the target volumes was within ±5% of the prescribed dose and the irradiation volume within 107% or less of the prescribed dose. From the DVH analysis, our field-within-a-field technique resulted in a more uniform dose distribution within the conventional planning. The field-within-a-field technique involves many parameters, and an inverse planning algorithm is suitable for computation. However, with our method, the forward planning system is adequate for planning, at least in a relatively straightforward planning system such as bilateral opposed fields therapy. (author)

  9. Membrane-Dependent Bystander Effect Contributes to Amplification of the Response to Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Targeted and Nontargeted Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, Maite; Hoarau, Jim; Carriere, Marie; Angulo, Jaime F.; Khodja, Hicham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response. This study investigated their origin as well as their temporal and spatial impacts in the bystander effect. Methods and Materials: We employed a precise alpha-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of subconfluent osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). γH2AX-53BP1 foci, oxidative metabolism changes, and micronuclei induction in targeted and bystander cells were assessed. Results: Cellular membranes and mitochondria were identified as two distinct reactive oxygen species producers. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after cells were treated with filipin, evidence for the primal role of membrane in the bystander effect. To determine the membrane's impact at a cellular level, micronuclei yield was measured when various fractions of the cell population were individually targeted while the dose per cell remained constant. Induction of micronuclei increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells and was attenuated by filipin treatment, demonstrating a role for bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Conclusions: A complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals leads to a membrane-dependent amplification of cell responses that could influence therapeutic outcomes in tissues exposed to low doses or to environmental exposure.

  10. Brevion: the new small-scale industrial gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, Dan; Perrins, Robert; Gibson, Wayne; Levesque, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The economical processing of low-volume products has been a challenge to the gamma industry since inception, influencing customers to send their products to contractors or choose alternative technologies. With the introduction of the Brevion irradiator (patent pending), economical gamma processing of low annual volume product lines is now possible. This innovative design is specifically targeted at plants processing product volumes of up to 20,000 m 3 /yr. Brevion provides good cobalt efficiency and good dose uniformity, thus processing these volumes efficiently and economically. The Brevion facility has the distinct advantage of a low capital cost, compared to medium-sized automatic tote plants, while maintaining similar performance. Lead-time for the construction phase is also considerably shorter, resulting in significantly lower start-up costs. Companies with low-volume product lines can now achieve the control provided by in-house processing, and eliminate transportation time and costs associated with shipping products off-site

  11. Solvent extraction of no-carrier-added 103Pd from irradiated rhodium target with α-furyldioxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdi Sadeghi; Behrouz Shirazi; Nami Shadanpour

    2006-01-01

    Solvent extraction of no-carrier-added 103 Pd was investigated from irradiated rhodium target with a-furyldioxime in chloroform from diluted hydrochloric acid. Extraction yield was 85.3% for a single extraction from 0.37M HCl and 103 Pd purity was better than 99%. (author)

  12. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October - December 2007). Volume 113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuegel, Jonathan D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    2007-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October–December 2007, features “High-Intensity Laser–Plasma Interactions in the Refluxing Limit,” by P. M. Nilson, W. Theobald, J. Myatt, C. Stoeckl, M. Storm, O. V. Gotchev, J. D. Zuegel, R. Betti, D. D. Meyerhofer, and T. C. Sangster. In this article (p. 1), the authors report on target experiments using the Multi-Terawatt (MTW) Laser Facility to study isochoric heating of solid-density targets by fast electrons produced from intense, short-pulse laser irradiation. Electron refluxing occurs due to target-sheath field effects and contains most of the fast electrons within the target volume. This efficiently heats the solid-density plasma through collisions. X-ray spectroscopic measurements of absolute Kα (x-radiation) photon yields and variations of the Kβ/Kα b emission ratio both indicate that laser energy couples to fast electrons with a conversion efficiency of approximately 20%. Bulk electron temperatures of at least 200 eV are inferred for the smallest mass targets.

  13. Comparison of planning target volumes based on three-dimensional and four-dimensional CT imaging of thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang, Jianbin Li, Yingjie Zhang, Qian Shao, Min Xu, Tingyong Fan, Jinzhi Wang Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: To investigate the definition of planning target volumes (PTVs based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT compared with conventional PTV definition and PTV definition using asymmetrical margins for thoracic primary esophageal cancer. Materials and methods: Forty-three patients with esophageal cancer underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing. The motions of primary tumors located in the proximal (group A, middle (group B, and distal (group C thoracic esophagus were obtained from the 4DCT scans. PTV3D was defined on 3DCT using the tumor motion measured based on 4DCT, PTV conventional (PTVconv was defined on 3DCT by adding a 1.0 cm margin to the clinical target volume, and PTV4D was defined as the union of the target volumes contoured on the ten phases of the 4DCT images. The centroid positions, volumetric differences, and dice similarity coefficients were evaluated for all PTVs. Results: The median centroid shifts between PTV3D and PTV4D and between PTVconv and PTV4D in all three dimensions were <0.3 cm for the three groups. The median size ratios of PTV4D to PTV3D were 0.80, 0.88, and 0.71, and PTV4D to PTVconv were 0.67, 0.73, and 0.76 (χ2=–3.18, –2.98, and –3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002 for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The dice similarity coefficients were 0.87, 0.90, and 0.81 between PTV4D and PTV3D and 0.80, 0.84, and 0.83 between PTV4D and PTVconv (χ2=–3.18, –2.98, and –3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002 for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The difference between the degree of inclusion of PTV4D in PTV3D and that of PTV4D in PTVconv was <2% for all groups. Compared with PTVconv, the amount of irradiated normal tissue

  14. Development of a PVD-based manufacturing process of monolithic LEU irradiation targets for {sup 99}Mo production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmer, Tobias

    2015-08-03

    {sup 99}Mo is the most important radioisotope in nuclear medicine. It is produced by fission of uranium in irradiation targets. The usage of cylindrical monolithic targets can ensure a safe supply of {sup 99}Mo and at the same reduce the amount of highly radioactive waste generated during production. To manufacture these targets, a novel PVD-based technique was developed. Both the feasibility and the high efficiency of this process were demonstrated in a prototype apparatus.

  15. Physiological and biochemical principles underlying volume-targeted therapy--the "Lund concept".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Carl-Henrik

    2005-01-01

    The optimal therapy of sustained increase in intracranial pressure (ICP) remains controversial. The volume-targeted therapy ("Lund concept") discussed in this article focuses on the physiological volume regulation of the intracranial compartments. The balance between effective transcapillary hydrostatic and osmotic pressures constitutes the driving force for transcapillary fluid exchange. The low permeability for sodium and chloride combined with the high crystalloid osmotic pressure (approximately 5700 mmHg) on both sides of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) counteracts fluid exchange across the intact BBB. Additionally, variations in systemic blood pressure generally are not transmitted to these capillaries because cerebral intracapillary hydrostatic pressure (and blood flow) is physio-logically tightly autoregulated. Under pathophysiological conditions, the BBB may be partially disrupted. Transcapillary water exchange is then determined by the differences in hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressure between the intra- and extracapillary compartments. Pressure autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is likely to be impaired in these conditions. A high cerebral perfusion pressure accordingly increases intracapillary hydrostatic pressure and leads to increased intracerebral water content and an increase in ICP. The volume-targeted "Lund concept" has been evaluated in experimental and clinical studies to examine the physiological and biochemical (utilizing intracerebral microdialysis) effects, and the clinical experiences have been favorable.

  16. Characterization of Target Volume Changes During Breast Radiotherapy Using Implanted Fiducial Markers and Portal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Yarnold, John R.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Evans, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine target volume changes by using volume and shape analysis for patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery and to compare different methods of automatically identifying changes in target volume, position, size, and shape during radiotherapy for use in adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy had fiducial markers sutured into the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Patients underwent imaging using computed tomography (for planning and at the end of treatment) and during treatment by using portal imaging. A marker volume (MV) was defined by using the measured marker positions. Changes in both individual marker positions and MVs were identified manually and using six automated similarity indices. Comparison of the two types of analysis (manual and automated) was undertaken to establish whether similarity indices can be used to automatically detect changes in target volumes. Results: Manual analysis showed that 3 patients had significant MV reduction. This analysis also showed significant changes between planning computed tomography and the start of treatment for 9 patients, including single and multiple marker movement, deformation (shape change), and rotation. Four of the six similarity indices were shown to be sensitive to the observed changes. Conclusions: Significant changes in size, shape, and position occur to the fiducial marker-defined volume. Four similarity indices can be used to identify these changes, and a protocol for their use in adaptive radiotherapy is suggested

  17. MR coronary angiography with breath-hold targeted volumes : Preliminary clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruin, Hein G.; Rensing, B J; Hulshoff, Marc; van Ooijen, P M; de Feyter, P J; Oudkerk, M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the clinical value of a magnetic resonance (MR) coronary angiography strategy involving a small targeted volume to image one coronary segment in a single breath hold for the detection of greater than 50% stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients referred for elective

  18. Quantitative assessment of inter-observer variability in target volume delineation on stereotactic radiotherapy treatment for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Ogita, Mikio; Yamashita, Koichi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Shiomi, Hiroya; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Nishimura, Takuya; Aibe, Norihiro; Udono, Hiroki; Nishikata, Manabu; Baba, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    To assess inter-observer variability in delineating target volume and organs at risk in benign tumor adjacent to optic tract as a quality assurance exercise. We quantitatively analyzed 21 plans made by 11 clinicians in seven CyberKnife centers. The clinicians were provided with a raw data set (pituitary adenoma and meningioma) including clinical information, and were asked to delineate the lesions and create a treatment plan. Their contouring and plans (10 adenoma and 11 meningioma plans), were then compared. In addition, we estimated the influence of differences in contouring by superimposing the respective contours onto a default plan. The median planning target volume (PTV) and the ratio of the largest to the smallest contoured volume were 9.22 cm 3 (range, 7.17 - 14.3 cm 3 ) and 1.99 for pituitary adenoma, and 6.86 cm 3 (range 6.05 - 14.6 cm 3 ) and 2.41 for meningioma. PTV volume was 10.1 ± 1.74 cm 3 for group 1 with a margin of 1 -2 mm around the CTV (n = 3) and 9.28 ± 1.8 cm 3 (p = 0.51) for group 2 with no margin (n = 7) in pituitary adenoma. In meningioma, group 1 showed larger PTV volume (10.1 ± 3.26 cm 3 ) than group 2 (6.91 ± 0.7 cm 3 , p = 0.03). All submitted plan keep the irradiated dose to optic tract within the range of 50 Gy (equivalent total doses in 2 Gy fractionation). However, contours superimposed onto the dose distribution of the default plan indicated that an excessive dose 23.64 Gy (up to 268% of the default plan) in pituitary adenoma and 24.84 Gy (131% of the default plan) in meningioma to the optic nerve in the contours from different contouring. Quality assurance revealed inter-observer variability in contour delineation and their influences on planning for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

  19. Solvent extraction of irradiated neptunium targets. I. Valence stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.H.; Thompson, M.C.

    1977-01-01

    Solvent extraction of 237 Np and 238 Pu from irradiated neptunium is being investigated as a possible replacement for the currently used anion exchange process at the Savannah River Plant. Solvent extraction would reduce separations costs and waste volume and increase the production rate. The major difficulty in solvent extraction processing is maintaining neptunium and plutonium in the extractable IV or VI valence states during initial extraction. This study investigated the stability of these states. Results show that: The extractable M(IV) valence states of neptunium and plutonium are mutually unstable in plant dissolver solution (2 g/l 237 Np, 0.4 g/l 238 Pu, 1.2M Al 3+ , 4.6M NO 3 - , and 1M H + ). The reaction rates producing inextractable species from extractable M(IV) or M(VI) are fast enough that greater than or equal to 99.9 percent extractable species in 237 Np-- 238 Pu mixtures cannot be maintained for a practicable processing period

  20. Separation of protactinum, actinium, and other radionuclides from proton irradiated thorium target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Michael E.; Radchenko, Valery

    2018-04-24

    Protactinium, actinium, radium, radiolanthanides and other radionuclide fission products were separated and recovered from a proton-irradiated thorium target. The target was dissolved in concentrated HCl, which formed anionic complexes of protactinium but not with thorium, actinium, radium, or radiolanthanides. Protactinium was separated from soluble thorium by loading a concentrated HCl solution of the target onto a column of strongly basic anion exchanger resin and eluting with concentrated HCl. Actinium, radium and radiolanthanides elute with thorium. The protactinium that is retained on the column, along with other radionuclides, is eluted may subsequently treated to remove radionuclide impurities to afford a fraction of substantially pure protactinium. The eluate with the soluble thorium, actinium, radium and radiolanthanides may be subjected to treatment with citric acid to form anionic thorium, loaded onto a cationic exchanger resin, and eluted. Actinium, radium and radiolanthanides that are retained can be subjected to extraction chromatography to separate the actinium from the radium and from the radio lanthanides.

  1. Dosimetric investigation depending on tumor location in patient breast in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Joo; Park, So Hyun; Jung, Joo Young; Woong, Cho; Suh, Tae Suk

    2012-01-01

    The Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique, which involves radiation beam delivery techniques that use a limited range of treatment volumes, has been a challenging approach that is worthy of consideration compared to whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Because of a small target volumes used in the PBI technique, the radiation dose can be safely delivered to the targeted tissue without the unwanted delivery of radiation to normal breast tissues and organ at risk (OAR), such as contralateral breast, lung and heart.Through PBI technique, better cosmetic outcomes and minimizing damages to OARs could be expected and also the daily dose can be increased with smaller number of fractionation in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects according to tumor locations in patient's breast for Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique using three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT), Electron Beam Radiation therapy (EBRT) and Helical-tomotherapy (H-TOMO). Dosimetric comparisons of PBI technique for 3DCRT, EBRT, and H-TOMO depending on the classified tumor locations were performed. H-TOMO delivered the low dose to lager volume to surrounding normal tissue, such as the heart and lungs compared to 3DCRT and EBRT although it had the same degree of target coverage as the other methods (3DCRT, EBRT). EBRT had a curative effect for early-stage breast cancers located in the lower and inner sections (LIQ-S, LIQ-D)

  2. Blast-Wave Generation and Propagation in Rapidly Heated Laser-Irradiated Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, S. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Solodov, A. A.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy was used to study the creation and propagation of a >100-Mbar blast wave in a target irradiated by an intense (>1018WWcm2 cm2) laser pulse. Blast waves provide a platform to generate immense pressures in the laboratory. A temporal double flash of XUV radiation was observed when viewing the rear side of the target, which is attributed to the emergence of a blast wave following rapid heating by a fast-electron beam generated from the laser pulse. The time-history of XUV emission in the photon energy range of 50 to 200 eV was recorded with an x-ray streak camera with 7-ps temporal resolution. The heating and expansion of the target was simulated with an electron transport code coupled to 1-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The temporal delay between the two flashes measured in a systematic study of target thickness and composition was found to evolve in good agreement with a Sedov-Taylor blast-wave solution. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and Department of Energy Office of Science Award Number DE-SC-0012317.

  3. Evaluation of radiation protection after the alteration of 60Co irradiation equipment and the augmentation of 60Co load volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hongfu

    1990-01-01

    In order to carry out the irradiation sterilization of medical devices, the authors have augmented the 60 Co load volume to 2.32 pBq, improved the properties of the radiation field and altered the radiation room. All these changes have been checked and accepted by the authorities concerned of Jiangsu Province and Suzhou City. The alteration increases safety and improves the uniformity of high-range dose distribution in the radiation field. The uniformity turns from the original 1.95 to the present 1.34 within the height of 2000 mm from the ground surface and thus can be compared with that of automatic irradiation conveyor abroad. The alteration makes it possible to carry out irradiation treatment of industrial scale by means of 60 Co irradiation equipment designed for biomedial experiments

  4. LLE Review: Volume 63. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craxton, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of April--June 1995, includes a description of the initial performance results of the upgraded OMEGA laser system. A series of acceptance tests were completed, demonstrating that all 60 beams can irradiate targets with more energy and better beam balance than was required by the Department of Energy's acceptance criteria. Other articles in this volume include a description of a novel energy measurement system used to diagnose all 60 OMEGA beams; a theoretical calculation of the cutoff wave number of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability, applicable to both direct and indirect drive; a description of a new algorithm used for designing distributed phase plates that will produce super-Gaussian focal-plane irradiance profiles: a study of the photoresponse of high-T c YBCO thin films; and a description of magnetorheological finishing, a new process for optics polishing

  5. Ten-Year Survival Results of a Randomized Trial of Irradiation of Internal Mammary Nodes After Mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, Christophe; Bossard, Nadine; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Maingon, Philippe; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Datchary, Jean; Carrie, Christian; Roullet, Bernard; Suchaud, Jean-Philippe; Teissier, Eric; Lucardi, Audrey; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Belot, Aurélien

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of irradiation of internal mammary nodes (IMN) on 10-year overall survival in breast cancer patients after mastectomy. Methods and Patients: This multicenter phase 3 study enrolled patients with positive axillary nodes (pN+) or central/medial tumors with or without pN+. Other inclusion criteria were age <75 and a Karnofsky index ≥70. All patients received postoperative irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular nodes and were randomly assigned to receive IMN irradiation or not. Randomization was stratified by tumor location (medial/central or lateral), axillary lymph node status, and adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy vs no chemotherapy). The prescribed dose of irradiation to the target volumes was 50 Gy or equivalent. The first 5 intercostal spaces were included in the IMN target volume, and two-thirds of the dose (31.5 Gy) was given by electrons. The primary outcome was overall survival at 10 years. Disease-free survival and toxicity were secondary outcomes. Results: T total of 1334 patients were analyzed after a median follow-up of 11.3 years among the survivors. No benefit of IMN irradiation on the overall survival could be demonstrated: the 10-year overall survival was 59.3% in the IMN-nonirradiated group versus 62.6% in the IMN-irradiated group (P=.8). According to stratification factors, we defined 6 subgroups (medial/central or lateral tumor, pN0 [only for medial/central] or pN+, and chemotherapy or not). In all these subgroups, IMN irradiation did not significantly improve overall survival. Conclusions: In patients treated with 2-dimensional techniques, we failed to demonstrate a survival benefit for IMN irradiation. This study cannot rule out a moderate benefit, especially with more modern, conformal techniques applied to a higher risk population

  6. Stereotactic Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (SAPBI for Early Stage Breast Cancer: Rationale, Feasibility and Early Experience using the CyberKnife Radiosurgery Delivery Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola eOBAYOMI-DAVIES

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI utilizing brachytherapy or conventional external beam radiation has been studied in early stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery. Data regarding stereotactic treatment approaches are emerging. The CyberKnife linear accelerator enables excellent dose conformality to target structures while adjusting for target and patient motion. We report our institutional experience on the technical feasibility and rationale for SAPBI delivery using the CyberKnife radiosurgery system.Methods: Ten patients completed CyberKnife SAPBI in 2013 at Georgetown University Hospital. Four gold fiducials were implanted around the lumpectomy cavity prior to treatment under ultrasound guidance. The synchrony system tracked intrafraction motion of the fiducials. The clinical target volume (CTV was defined on contrast enhanced CT scans using surgical clips and post-operative changes. A 5 mm expansion was added to create the planning treatment volume (PTV. A total dose of 30 Gy was delivered to the PTV in 5 consecutive fractions. Target and critical structure doses were assessed as per the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39 study.Results: At least 3 fiducials were tracked in 100% of cases. The Mean treated PTV was 70 cm3 and the mean prescription isodose line was 80%. Mean dose to target volumes and constraints are as follows: 100% of the PTV received the prescription dose (PTV30. The volume of the ipsilateral breast receiving 30 Gy (V30 and above 15 Gy (V>15 was 14% and 31% respectively. The ipsilateral lung volume receiving 9 Gy (V9 was 3% and the contralateral lung volume receiving 1.5 Gy (V1.5 was 8%. For left sided breast cancers, the volume of heart receiving 1.5 Gy (V1.5 was 31%. Maximum skin dose was 36 Gy. At a median follow up of 1.3 years, all patients have experienced excellent/good breast cosmesis outcomes, and no breast events have been recorded

  7. Advantages of the technique with segmented fields for tangential breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovski, Zoran; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Petrova, Deva; Lazarova, Emilija

    2013-01-01

    In the case of breast cancer, the prominent role of radiation therapy is an established fact. Depending on the stage of the disease, the breast is most often irradiated with two tangential fields and a direct supraclavicular field. Planning target volume is defined through the recommendations in ICRU Reports 50 and 62. The basic ‘dogma’ of radiotherapy requires the dose in the target volume to be homogenous. The favorable situation would be if the dose width was between 95% and 107%; this, however, is often not possible to be fulfilled. A technique for enhancement of homogeneity of isodose distribution would be using one or more additional fields, which will increase the dose in the volume where it is too low. These fields are called segmented fields (a technique also known as ‘field in field’) because they occupy only part of the primary fields. In this study we will show the influence of this technique on the dose homogeneity improvement in the PTV region. The mean dose in the target volume was increased from 49.51 Gy to 50.79 Gy in favor of the plans with segmented fields; and the dose homogeneity (measured in standard deviations) was also improved - 1.69 vs. 1.30. The increase in the target volume, encompassed by 95% isodose, was chosen as a parameter to characterize overall planning improvement. Thus, in our case, the improvement of dose coverage was from 93.19% to 97.06%. (Author)

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of total marrow irradiation using 2 different planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalichowski, Adrian; Eagle, Don G.; Burmeister, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This study compared 2 different treatment planning systems (TPSs) for quality and efficiency of total marrow irradiation (TMI) plans. The TPSs used in this study were VOxel-Less Optimization (VoLO) (Accuray Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) using helical dose delivery on a Tomotherapy Hi-Art treatment unit and Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems Inc, Palo Alto, CA) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose delivery on a Varian iX treatment unit. A total dose of 1200 cGy was prescribed to cover 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The plans were optimized and calculated based on a single CT data and structure set using the Alderson Rando phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) and physician contoured target and organ at risk (OAR) volumes. The OARs were lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, and small bowel. The plans were evaluated based on plan quality, time to optimize the plan and calculate the dose, and beam on time. The resulting mean and maximum doses to the PTV were 1268 and 1465 cGy for VoLO and 1284 and 1541 cGy for Eclipse, respectively. For 5 of 6 OAR structures the VoLO system achieved lower mean and D10 doses ranging from 22% to 52% and 3% to 44%, respectively. Total computational time including only optimization and dose calculation were 0.9 hours for VoLO and 3.8 hours for Eclipse. These times do not include user-dependent target delineation and field setup. Both planning systems are capable of creating high-quality plans for total marrow irradiation. The VoLO planning system was able to achieve more uniform dose distribution throughout the target volume and steeper dose fall off, resulting in superior OAR sparing. VoLO's graphics processing unit (GPU)–based optimization and dose calculation algorithm also allowed much faster creation of TMI plans.

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of total marrow irradiation using 2 different planning systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalichowski, Adrian, E-mail: nalichoa@karmanos.org [Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Eagle, Don G. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Burmeister, Jay [Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This study compared 2 different treatment planning systems (TPSs) for quality and efficiency of total marrow irradiation (TMI) plans. The TPSs used in this study were VOxel-Less Optimization (VoLO) (Accuray Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) using helical dose delivery on a Tomotherapy Hi-Art treatment unit and Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems Inc, Palo Alto, CA) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose delivery on a Varian iX treatment unit. A total dose of 1200 cGy was prescribed to cover 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The plans were optimized and calculated based on a single CT data and structure set using the Alderson Rando phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) and physician contoured target and organ at risk (OAR) volumes. The OARs were lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, and small bowel. The plans were evaluated based on plan quality, time to optimize the plan and calculate the dose, and beam on time. The resulting mean and maximum doses to the PTV were 1268 and 1465 cGy for VoLO and 1284 and 1541 cGy for Eclipse, respectively. For 5 of 6 OAR structures the VoLO system achieved lower mean and D10 doses ranging from 22% to 52% and 3% to 44%, respectively. Total computational time including only optimization and dose calculation were 0.9 hours for VoLO and 3.8 hours for Eclipse. These times do not include user-dependent target delineation and field setup. Both planning systems are capable of creating high-quality plans for total marrow irradiation. The VoLO planning system was able to achieve more uniform dose distribution throughout the target volume and steeper dose fall off, resulting in superior OAR sparing. VoLO's graphics processing unit (GPU)–based optimization and dose calculation algorithm also allowed much faster creation of TMI plans.

  10. Esophageal gel-shifting technique facilitating eradicative boost or reirradiation to upper mediastinal targets of recurrent nerve lymph node without damaging esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazushi; Iida, Takeshi; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Nakai, Motoki; Sato, Morio; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new technique using hyaluronic gel injection as a spacer to safely move the esophagus away from the high-dose area during interstitial brachytherapy of a mediastinal target close to the esophagus. We percutaneously injected a high-molecular-weight hyaluronic gel mixed with contrast medium to create a space between the esophagus and the target during interstitial brachytherapy. We applied this technique to two cases of relapsed recurrent nerve lymph node metastasis from esophageal cancer: one refractory tumor after 50 Gy of radiotherapy, and one recurrence after mediastinal radiotherapy of total 64 Gy. We prescribed 20 Gy and 18 Gy in one fraction to each target, with calculated esophageal D 2cc (the minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of 2 cc) of 4.0 Gy and 6.8 Gy, respectively. Calculated enhancement factor by gel shifting in equivalent dose was 2.69 and 2.34, respectively. In each patient, accumulated esophageal D 1cc (minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of p cc. minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of 1 cc) was 74.4 Gy and 85.6 Gy without shifting, and 59.1 Gy and 37.6 Gy with shifting, respectively. There were no procedure-related complications. Four months after the brachytherapy, each tumor was remarkably diminished. No evidence of recurrences or late complications were observed 8 months and 9 months after the procedure, respectively. The esophageal gel-shifting technique may facilitate eradicative brachytherapy to upper mediastinal targets without damaging the esophagus, and can be used in conjunction with boost irradiation or reirradiation to overcome the problem of salvage failure. (author)

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberat, Jatta; Remonda, Luca [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Neuro-radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); McNamara, Jane; Rogers, Susanne [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T{sub 1}-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T{sub 1Gd}), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T{sub 2}-weighted CTV (T{sub 2}-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T{sub 2}-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T{sub 2}-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung (DTI) ist eine MR-Technik, die dank der Erfassung des peritumoralen Bereichs eine Verbesserung bezueglich MRI bringt. Unser Ziel war die Pruefung der Machbarkeit der Verwendung der DTI fuer die Zielvolumenabgrenzung fuer Patienten mit

  12. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  13. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the “failure of ignition” of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  14. Phantom study on three-dimensional target volume delineation by PET/CT-based auto-contouring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tiejiao; Sakaguchi, Yuichi; Mitsumoto, Katsuhiko; Mitsumoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tachiya, Yosuke; Ohya, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine an appropriate threshold value for delineation of the target volume in positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and to investigate whether we could delineate a target volume by phantom studies. A phantom consisted of six spheres (φ10-37 mm) filled with 18 F solution. Data acquisition was performed PET/CT in non-motion and motion status with high 18 F solution and in non-motion status with low 18 F solution. In non-motion phantom experiments, we determined two types of threshold value, an absolute SUV (T SUV ) and a percentage of the maximum SUV (T % ). Delineation using threshold values was applied for all spheres and for selected large spheres (a diameter of 22 mm or larger). In motion phantom experiments, data acquisition was performed in a static mode (sPET) and a gated mode (gPET). CT scanning was performed with helical CT (HCT) and 4-dimentional CT (4DCT). The appropriate threshold values were aT % =27% and aT SUV =2.4 for all spheres, and sT % =30% and sT SUV =4.3 for selected spheres. For all spheres in sPET/HCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 84%-129% by the aT % and 34%-127% by the aT SUV . In gPET/4DCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 94-103% by the aT % and 51-131% by the aT SUV . For low radioactivity spheres, the delineated volumes were all underestimated. A threshold value of T % =27% was proposed for auto-contouring of lung tumors. Our results also suggested that the respiratory gated data acquisition should be performed in both PET and CT for target volume delineation. (author)

  15. Pattern of relapse in surgical treated patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its possible impact on target delineation for postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wenjie; Xin Peiling

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Background data: The irradiation target volume is important for effective postoperative treatment of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: One hundred forty patients with recurrent or metastatic thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had been treated with radical surgery but not with postoperative radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The information of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis for these patients was analyzed. Results: The median time to progression in the 140 patients with recurrence or metastasis was 18.3 months (range 15.4-21.1 months). Anastomotic recurrence accounted for 13.6% of treatment failures. The supraclavicular and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes had high metastasis rates for esophageal squamous cell carcinomas in all locations. The order from highest to lowest metastasis rate for the station 3 and 4 lymph nodes was middle, upper and lower thoracic esophageal regions and the order for upper abdominal lymph nodes was lower, middle, and upper thoracic esophageal regions. Locoregional recurrence was the most common type of recurrence. Conclusions: For upper and middle thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the anastomosis, supraclavicular, and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume with upper abdominal lymph nodes excluded; for lower thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, anastomosis, supraclavicular, station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes and upper abdominal lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume.

  16. Neutron-irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source-I for fusion magnet materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The decommissioning of reactor-based neutron sources in the USA has led to the development of a new generation of neutron sources that employ high-energy accelerators. Among the accelerator-based neutron sources presently in operation, the highest-flux source is the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), a user facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Neutrons in this source are produced by the interaction of 400 to 500 MeV protons with either of two 238 U target systems. In the Radiation Effects Facility (REF), the 238 U target is surrounded by Pb for neutron generatjion and reflection. The REF has three separate irradiation thimbles. Two thimbles provide irradiation temperatures between that of liquid He and several hundred degrees centigrade. The third thimble operates at ambient temperature. The large irradiation volume, the neutron spectrum and flux, the ability to transfer samples without warm up, and the dedication of the facilities during the irradiation make this ideally suited for radiation damage studies on components for superconducting fusion magnets. Possible experiments for fusion magnet materials are discussed on cyclic irradiation and annealing of stabilizers in a high magnetic field, mechanical tests on organic insulation irradiated at 4 K, and superconductors measured in high fields after irradiation

  17. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  18. Portable gamma-irradiator - a modified model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandev, I.N.; Christova, M.G.; Stefanov, S.D.; Gentchev, N.V.; Bakardjiev, S.T.; Christov, C.D.; Genov, D.T.

    1983-01-01

    A new modification of a portable gamma-irradiator has been designed with a relatively large irradiation volume, good homogeneity of the gamma field, small overall dimension, light biological shielding, and simple mechanics. It is possible to irradiate materials in two cylindrical volumes (3 l and 6 l) with different dose rates. 137 Cs is used as a radiation source. Depending on application, the irradiator can be charged with various total activities up to 6.66 x 10 14 Bq (18 kCi). The dose rate can be also charged up to the maximum by different positions of the source element. The gamma-irradiator can be used for scientific studies and for industrial purposes. (author)

  19. The need for rotational margins in intensity-modulated radiotherapy and a new method for planning target volume design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Mark Peter; Papiez, Lech; Spirydovich, Siarhei; Thai, Van

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of rotational errors on the coverage of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is examined. A new planning target volume (PTV) construction that considers the individual paths traced by movements of the target boundary points is developed. Methods and Materials: A standard uniform margin expansion was compared with a PTV constructed from the space swept out by a concave moving target. A new method formed the PTV by aggregating the separate convex hulls taken of the positions of the individual target boundary points in a sampling of CTV displacements. Results: A 0.5-cm uniform margin adequate for translations was inadequate given CTV rotation about a fixed off-center axis. A PTV formed of the target's swept-out area was 22% smaller than needed for coverage by a uniform margin, but computationally is not readily extended to translations combined with rotations about a shifting axis. Forming instead the union of convex hulls of the boundary points in a sampling of CTV displacements represented these movements in the PTV design and retained the target's concave shape. Conclusions: Planning target volumes should accommodate target rotation. The union of convex hulls of the boundary point positions in a sampling of displacements can effectively represent multiple sources of deviations while preserving target concavities

  20. 'Compromise position' image alignment to accommodate independent motion of multiple clinical target volumes during radiotherapy: A high risk prostate cancer example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewall, Tara; Yan, Jing; Alasti, Hamideh; Cerase, Carla; Bayley, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion of multiple independently moving clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the irradiated volume causes an image guidance conundrum. The purpose of this research was to use high risk prostate cancer as a clinical example to evaluate a 'compromise' image alignment strategy. The daily pre-treatment orthogonal EPI for 14 consecutive patients were included in this analysis. Image matching was performed by aligning to the prostate only, the bony pelvis only and using the 'compromise' strategy. Residual CTV surrogate displacements were quantified for each of the alignment strategies. Analysis of the 388 daily fractions indicated surrogate displacements were well-correlated in all directions (r 2  = 0.95 (LR), 0.67 (AP) and 0.59 (SI). Differences between the surrogates displacements (95% range) were -0.4 to 1.8 mm (LR), -1.2 to 5.2 mm (SI) and -1.2 to 5.2 mm (AP). The distribution of the residual displacements was significantly smaller using the 'compromise' strategy, compared to the other strategies (p 0.005). The 'compromise' strategy ensured the CTV was encompassed by the PTV in all fractions, compared to 47 PTV violations when aligned to prostate only. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a compromise position image guidance strategy to accommodate simultaneous displacements of two independently moving CTVs. Application of this strategy was facilitated by correlation between the CTV displacements and resulted in no geometric excursions of the CTVs beyond standard sized PTVs. This simple image guidance strategy may also be applicable to other disease sites that concurrently irradiate multiple CTVs, such as head and neck, lung and cervix cancer. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation of high-grade glioma in a phase I dose- and volume escalation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Costa, Junia

    2017-01-01

    .1-3.5) and the median overall survival was 7.0 months (95%CI: 3.5-10.5). Early side effects were mild and included headache and fatigue. Seven patients were progression-free beyond 10 weeks and were evaluable for late toxicity. Among these patients, three (43%) suffered late adverse events which included radionecrosis......INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PET and MRI guided re-irradiation of recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) and to assess the impact of radiotherapy dose, fractionation and irradiated volume. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with localized, recurrent HGG...... (grades III-IV) and no other treatment options were eligible for a prospective phase I trial. Gross tumor volumes for radiotherapy were defined using T1-contrast enhanced MRI and (18)F-fluoro-ethyl tyrosine PET. Radiotherapy was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy with a 2-mm margin. The dose...

  2. Volume arc therapy of gynaecological tumours: target volume coverage improvement without dose increase for critical organs; Arctherapie volumique des tumeurs gynecologiques: amelioration de la couverture du volume cible sans augmentation de la dose aux organes critiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducteil, A.; Kerr, C.; Idri, K.; Fenoglietto, P.; Vieillot, S.; Ailleres, N.; Dubois, J.B.; Azria, D. [CRLC Val-d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the application of conventional intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) and volume arc-therapy (RapidArc) for the treatment of cervical cancers, with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Dosimetric plans associated with each of these techniques have been compared. Dose-volume histograms of these three plans have also been compared for the previsional target volume (PTV), organs at risk, and sane tissue. IMCT techniques are equivalent in terms of sparing of organs at risk, and improve target volume coverage with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Arc-therapy reduces significantly treatment duration. Short communication

  3. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy; Les volumes-cibles de la radiotherapie des adenocarcinomes gastriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Cancerologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P. [Hopital Clarac, Service de Radiotherapie et de Cancerologie, 97 - Fort de France (France)

    2001-10-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the

  4. Planning target volume (PTV) definition and its effects in the radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poli, Maria Esmeralda Ramos

    2007-01-01

    Tills work intends to study the margins required to define a planning target volume (PTV) for adequate treatment of the mobile tumors such as prostate or those located in areas with less mobility as the ones in head and neck region, in the absence of daily localization imaging based. It is also intends to evaluate the impact caused by the PTV, in terms of dose, to the critical structures surrounding the PTV and its influence when inverse planning is used in the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Data from 387 prostate patients were analyzed retrospectively. Every patient in the study received daily pre-treatment localization with 2D ultrasound resulting in a total of 10,327 localizations, each comprising of an isocenter displacement in 3 directions: anterior-posterior (AP), right-left lateral (RL), and superior-inferior (SI). The mean displacement and standard deviation (SD) for each direction for each patient was computed from daily treatment records. The uncertainties (SD) in the target position were 4.4 mm (AP), 3.6 mm (RL), and 4.5 mm (SI). A study of the uncertainties in the daily positioning of 78 head and neck patients who used thermoplastic mask to immobilize them, evaluated with electronic portal imaging device (EPID), showed variations (SD) in the isocenter treatment position of 3.1 mm (AP), 1.5 mm (RL), and 4.5 mm (SI). By applying these shifts in an anthropomorphic phantom it was studied the dose-volume histograms resultant of the isocenter displacement in the daily treatment. The result showed the importance of putting margins in the clinical target volume to assure an adequate treatment and also showed that isocenter daily variation can cause an increase to the dose greater than the tolerance level to the critical organs. (author)

  5. The development of uranium foil farication technology utilizing twin roll method for Mo-99 irradiation target

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C K; Park, H D

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion in Canada, occupying about 75% of global supply of Mo-99 isotope, has provided the irradiation target of Mo-99 using the rod-type UAl sub x alloys with HEU(High Enrichment Uranium). ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) through co-operation with BATAN in Indonesia, leading RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program substantially for nuclear non-proliferation, has designed and fabricated the annular cylinder of uranium targets, and successfully performed irradiation test, in order to develop the fabrication technology of fission Mo-99 using LEU(Low Enrichment Uranium). As the uranium foils could be fabricated in laboratory scale, not in commercialized scale by hot rolling method due to significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the development of new technology. Under these circumstances, the invention of uranium foil fabrication technology utilizing twin-roll casting method in KAERI is found to be able to fabricate LEU or...

  6. Variation in radiotherapy target volume definition, dose to organs at risk and clinical target volumes using anatomic (computed tomography) versus combined anatomic and molecular imaging (positron emission tomography/computed tomography): intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered using a tomotherapy Hi Art machine: final results of the VortigERN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S; Frew, J; Mott, J; McCallum, H; Stevenson, P; Maxwell, R; Wilsdon, J; Kelly, C G

    2012-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the current standard for delineating tumours of the head and neck for radiotherapy. Although metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in recent years, the studies were non-confirmatory in establishing its routine role in radiotherapy planning in the modern era. This study explored the difference in gross tumour volume and clinical target volume definitions for the primary and nodal volumes when FDG PET/CT was used as compared with CECT in oropharyngeal cancer cases. Twenty patients with oropharyngeal cancers had a PET/CT scan in the treatment position after consent. Target volumes were defined on CECT scans by a consultant clinical oncologist who was blind to the PET scans. After obtaining inputs from a radiologist, another set of target volumes were outlined on the PET/CT data set. The gross and clinical target volumes as defined on the two data sets were then analysed. The hypothesis of more accurate target delineation, preventing geographical miss and comparative overlap volumes between CECT and PET/CT, was explored. The study also analysed the volumes of intersection and analysed whether there was any TNM stage migration when PET/CT was used as compared with CECT for planning. In 17 of 20 patients, the TNM stage was not altered when adding FDG PET information to CT. PET information prevented geographical miss in two patients and identified distant metastases in one case. PET/CT gross tumour volumes were smaller than CECT volumes (mean ± standard deviation: 25.16 cm(3) ± 35.8 versus 36.56 cm(3) ± 44.14; P standard deviation: CECT versus PET/CT 32.48 cm(3) ± 36.63 versus 32.21 cm(3) ± 37.09; P > 0.86) were not statistically different. Similarity and discordance coefficients were calculated and are reported. PET/CT as compared with CECT could provide more clinically relevant information and prevent geographical miss when used for radiotherapy planning for advanced oropharyngeal

  7. The modified inverse hockey stick technique for adjuvant irradiation after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukolowicz, P.; Selerski, B.; Kuszewski, T.; Wieczorek, A.

    2004-01-01

    To present the technique of irradiation of post-mastectomy patients used in the Holycross Cancer Centre in Kielce.The paper presents a detailed description of the technique which is referred to as the 'modified inverse hockey stick technique (MIHS)'. The dosimetric characteristic of dose distribution for the MIHS technique is presented basing on dose distributions calculated for 40 patients. The measurements used to evaluate dose distribution included standard deviation of the dose in the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the percentage of the PTV volume receiving a dose larger than 110% and smaller than 90%; the lung volume received at least 20 Gy (LV20) and the heart volume received at least 30 Gy (HV30). The distribution of the electron beam energy is also presented. The standard deviation of the dose in the PTV was approx. 10% in a majority of patients. About 12% of the PTV volume received a dose more than 10% smaller than intended and about 10% of the PTV volume received a dose more than 10% greater than intended. For patients irradiated on the left side of the chest wall the LV20 was always lesser than 25% and for patients irradiated on the right side of the chest wall - always less than 35%, except for one patient, in whom it reached 37%. The HV30 was always below 8%. The MIHS technique is a safe and reliable modality. The main advantages of the technique include very convenient and easily repeated positioning of the patient and small doses applied to the organs at risk. The individually calculated bolus plays an important role in diminishing the dose to the lung and heart. The disadvantages of the technique include poor dose homogeneity within the PTV and long matching lines of the electron and photon beams. (author)

  8. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  9. The Dose-Volume Relationship of Small Bowel Irradiation and Acute Grade 3 Diarrhea During Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John M.; Lockman, David; Yan Di; Wallace, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has found a highly significant relationship between the irradiated small-bowel volume and development of Grade 3 small-bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer. This study tested the previously defined parameters in a much larger group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 96 consecutive patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy for rectal cancer had treatment planning computed tomographic scans with small-bowel contrast that allowed the small bowel to be outlined with calculation of a small-bowel dose-volume histogram for the initial intended pelvic treatment to 45 Gy. Patients with at least one parameter above the previously determined dose-volume parameters were considered high risk, whereas those with all parameters below these levels were low risk. The grade of diarrhea and presence of liquid stool was determined prospectively. Results: There was a highly significant association with small-bowel dose-volume and Grade 3 diarrhea (p ≤ 0.008). The high-risk and low-risk parameters were predictive with Grade 3 diarrhea in 16 of 51 high-risk patients and in 4 of 45 low-risk patients (p = 0.01). Patients who had undergone irradiation preoperatively had a lower incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea than those treated postoperatively (18% vs. 28%; p = 0.31); however, the predictive ability of the high-risk/low-risk parameters was better for preoperatively (p = 0.03) than for postoperatively treated patients (p = 0.15). Revised risk parameters were derived that improved the overall predictive ability (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The highly significant dose-volume relationship and validity of the high-risk and low-risk parameters were confirmed in a large group of patients. The risk parameters provided better modeling for the preoperative patients than for the postoperative patients

  10. Effect of spatial nonuniformity of heating on compression and burning of a thermonuclear target under direct multibeam irradiation by a megajoule laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel’kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Vergunova, G. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Garanin, S. G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Kuchugov, P. A., E-mail: pkuchugov@gmail.com; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Direct-drive fusion targets are considered at present as an alternative to targets of indirect compression at a laser energy level of about 2 MJ. In this approach, the symmetry of compression and ignition of thermonuclear fuel play the major role. We report on the results of theoretical investigation of compression and burning of spherical direct-drive targets in the conditions of spatial nonuniformity of heating associated with a shift of the target from the beam center of focusing and possible laser radiation energy disbalance in the beams. The investigation involves numerous calculations based on a complex of 1D and 2D codes RAPID, SEND (for determining the target illumination and the dynamics of absorption), DIANA, and NUT (1D and multidimensional hydrodynamics of compression and burning of targets). The target under investigation had the form of a two-layer shell (ablator made of inertial material CH and DT ice) filled with DT gas. We have determined the range of admissible variation of compression and combustion parameters of the target depending on the variation of the spatial nonuniformity of its heating by a multibeam laser system. It has been shown that low-mode (long-wavelength) perturbations deteriorate the characteristics of the central region due to less effective conversion of the kinetic energy of the target shell into the internal energy of the center. Local initiation of burning is also observed in off-center regions of the target in the case of substantial asymmetry of irradiation. In this case, burning is not spread over the entire volume of the DT fuel as a rule, which considerably reduces the thermonuclear yield as compared to that in the case of spherical symmetry and central ignition.

  11. Colon mucosal cells after high-dose fractional irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorc-Pleskovic, R.; Vraspir-Porenta, O.; Petrovic, D.; Zorc, M.; Pleskovic, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histological and stereological changes in cryptal enterocytes, mucosal lymphocytes and mast cells 10 days after irradiation. For experimental model, 24 Beagle dogs 1-2 years old were used. Twelve dogs were irradiated 20 days with 32 Gy over the whole pelvis and tail. Another 12 dogs represented a control group. For the detection of apoptosis, the TUNEL technique was used. Histological and stereological analyses were performed using a Wild sampling microscope M 1000. In the irradiated group, volume density (P < 0.01), numerical density (P < 0.05) and average volume of lymphocytes (P < 0.001) were significantly lower than in the nonirradiated group. Numerical areal density of mast cells in the irradiated group was also significantly lower (P < 0.05). Volume density (P < 0.001) and average volume of mast cells (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the irradiated group. The results of our experiments show that irradiation causes injury and loss of lymphocytes and mast cells in the colon mucosa. Apoptosis was detected in enterocytes and lymphocytes in the irradiated group and in nonirradiated group in equal numbers (2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3; ns.), suggesting that 10 days after high-dose irradiation, the cell loss is not due to apoptosis. (author)

  12. 80 A/cm2 electron beams from metal targets irradiated by KrCl and XeCl excimer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloglazov, A.; Martino, M.; Nassisi, V.

    1996-05-01

    Due to the growing demand for high-current and long-duration electron-beam devices, laser electron sources were investigated in our laboratory. Experiments on electron-beam generation and propagation from aluminium and copper targets illuminated by XeCl (308 nm) and KrCl (222 nm) excimer lasers, were carried out under plasma ignition due to laser irradiation. This plasma supplied a spontaneous accelerating electric field of about 370 kV/m without an external accelerating voltage. By applying the modified one-dimensional Poisson equation, we computed the expected current and we also estimated the plasma concentration during the accelerating process. At 40 kV of accelerating voltage, an output current pulse of about 80 A/cm2 was detected from an Al target irradiated by the shorter wavelength laser.

  13. Ultra-high vacuum target assembly for charged particle irradiations in the materials research field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressers, J.; Cassanelli, G.; Cat, R. de; Kohnen, H.; Gherardi, G.

    1978-01-01

    A target assembly designed for ion irradiation and ion implantation experiments on different particle accelerators is described. It consists of a target chamber separated from the beam line by a thin metal window, thus allowing implantations to be carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Homogeneous in-depth distribution of the implanted ion species is realized by rotating the target about an axis perpendicular to the ion beam (rocking). The target holder is driven by means of a stepping motor with a constant step angle and a rocking device controller containing the required rocking angle-dwell time relation. Ion beam homogeneity over a sufficiently large target area is arrived at by transforming the Gaussian beam intensity profile into a flat beam intensity distribution by means of an electrostatic ring lens. The beam intensity profile is monitored by means of a specially designed ion beam monitor based on the Nipkov disc principle. A toroidal beam current monitoring transformer continuously measures the total beam current. Beam scanners and current measuring collimators complete the beam analysing equipment

  14. Time-resolved x-ray line emission studies of thermal transport in multiple beam uv-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; Henke, B.L.; Delettrez, J.; Richardson, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal transport in spherical targets irradiated with multiple, nanosecond duration laser beams, has been a topic of much discussion recently. Different inferences on the level of thermal flux inhibition have been drawn from plasma velocity and x-ray spectroscopic diagnostics. We present new measurements of thermal transport on spherical targets made through time-resolved x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the progress of the ablation surface through thin layers of material on the surface of the target. These measurements, made with 6 and 12 uv (351 nm) nanosecond beams from OMEGA, will be compared to previous thermal transport measurements. Transparencies of the conference presentation are given

  15. The accomplishments of lithium target and test facility validation activities in the IFMIF/EVEDA phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeiter, Frederik; Baluc, Nadine; Favuzza, Paolo; Gröschel, Friedrich; Heidinger, Roland; Ibarra, Angel; Knaster, Juan; Kanemura, Takuji; Kondo, Hiroo; Massaut, Vincent; Saverio Nitti, Francesco; Miccichè, Gioacchino; O'hira, Shigeru; Rapisarda, David; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Wakai, Eiichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2018-01-01

    As part of the engineering validation and engineering design activities (EVEDA) phase for the international fusion materials irradiation facility IFMIF, major elements of a lithium target facility and the test facility were designed, prototyped and validated. For the lithium target facility, the EVEDA lithium test loop was built at JAEA and used to test the stability (waves and long term) of the lithium flow in the target, work out the startup procedures, and test lithium purification and analysis. It was confirmed by experiments in the Lifus 6 plant at ENEA that lithium corrosion on ferritic martensitic steels is acceptably low. Furthermore, complex remote handling procedures for the remote maintenance of the target in the test cell environment were successfully practiced. For the test facility, two variants of a high flux test module were prototyped and tested in helium loops, demonstrating their good capabilities of maintaining the material specimens at the desired temperature with a low temperature spread. Irradiation tests were performed for heated specimen capsules and irradiation instrumentation in the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The small specimen test technique, essential for obtaining material test results with limited irradiation volume, was advanced by evaluating specimen shape and test technique influences.

  16. Variation of gross tumor volume and clinical target volume definition for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Li Minghui; Chen Dongdu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the variation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) definition for lung cancer between different doctors. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients with PET-CT simulation were selected from January 2008 to December 2009.GTV and CTV of these patients were defined by four professors or associate professors of radiotherapy independently. Results: The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were 1.66 and 1.65, respectively. The mean coefficients of variation for GTV and CTV were 0.20 and 0.17, respectively. System errors of CTV definition in three dimension were less than 5 mm, which was the largest in inferior and superior (0.48 cm, 0.37 cm, 0.32 cm; F=0.40, 0.60, 0.15, P=0.755, 0.618, 0.928). Conclusions: The variation of GTV and CTV definition for lung cancer between different doctors exist. The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were less than 1.7. The variation was in hilar and mediastinum lymphanode regions. System error of CTV definition was the largest (<5 mm) in cranio-caudal direction. (authors)

  17. Changes in lateral dimensions of irradiated volume and their impact on the accuracy of dose delivery during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senkus-Konefka, Elzbieta; Naczk, Edmund; Borowska, Ilona; Badzio, Andrzej; Jassem, Jacek

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess changes in lateral dimensions of irradiated volume during head and neck cancer radiotherapy and to determine their impact on the accuracy of dose delivery. Patients and methods: Lateral dimensions of irradiated volumes were measured in five predefined points prior to treatment and then bi-weekly. For each measurement, midline dose was calculated and verified using in vivo dosimetry. Early radiation reactions, patient weight changes and the need to modify radiotherapy accessories were also recorded. The study included 33 head and neck cancer patients irradiated using parallel opposed megavoltage fields. Results: Body mass changes during radiotherapy ranged from -18 to +4 kg (median -5). Lateral dimension changes >5 mm (range -37 to +16) occurred in 32 patients (97%). For axis measurements, the degree of lateral dimension changes were correlated with treatment field size (P=0.022) and degree of mucositis (P=0.017). Axis doses calculated for changed dimensions varied from those prescribed by -2.5 to +6% (median +2%). Differences larger than 5% were present in 4.8% of calculations. In 17 patients (52%), radiotherapy accessories had to be modified during treatment. The need to modify radiotherapy accessories correlated with larger treatment portals (P=0.004), more weight loss during treatment (P=0.01) and higher initial N stage (P=0.04). Conclusions: Changes of irradiated volume lateral dimensions during head and neck cancer radiotherapy may lead to considerable dose delivery inaccuracies. Watchful monitoring, corrections to calculated dose when changes observed are significant and radiotherapy accessories modification during the course of treatment are strongly recommended

  18. A novel facility for 3D micro-irradiation of living cells in a controlled environment by MeV ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäckel, V; Meissl, W; Ikeda, T; Clever, M; Meissl, E; Kobayashi, T; Kojima, T M; Imamoto, N; Ogiwara, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel facility for micro-irradiation of living targets with ions from a 1.7 MV tandem accelerator. We show results using 1 MeV protons and 2 MeV He(2+). In contrast to common micro-irradiation facilities, which use electromagnetic or electrostatic focusing and specially designed vacuum windows, we employ a tapered glass capillary with a thin end window, made from polystyrene with a thickness of 1-2 μm, for ion focusing and extraction. The capillary is connected to a beamline tilted vertically by 45°, which allows for easy immersion of the extracted ions into liquid environment within a standard cell culture dish. An inverted microscope is used for simultaneously observing the samples as well as the capillary tip, while a stage-top incubator provides an appropriate environment for the samples. Furthermore, our setup allows to target volumes in cells within a μm(3) resolution, while monitoring the target in real time during and after irradiation.

  19. A consensus-based guideline defining clinical target volume for primary disease in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kaneyasu, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline to define clinical target volume for primary disease (clinical target volume primary) in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. The working subgroup of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) Radiation Therapy Study Group began developing a guideline for primary clinical target volume in November 2009. The group consisted of 10 radiation oncologists and 2 gynecologic oncologists. The process started with comparing the contouring on computed tomographic images of actual cervical cancer cases among the members. This was followed by a comprehensive literature review that included primary research articles and textbooks as well as information on surgical procedures. Extensive discussion occurred in face-to-face meetings (three occasions) and frequent e-mail communications until a consensus was reached. The working subgroup reached a consensus on the definition for the clinical target volume primary. The clinical target volume primary consists of the gross tumor volume, uterine cervix, uterine corpus, parametrium, vagina and ovaries. Definitions for these component structures were determined. Anatomical boundaries in all directions were defined for the parametrium. Examples delineating these boundaries were prepared for the posterior border of the parametrium for various clinical situations (id est (i.e.) central tumor bulk, degree of parametrial involvement). A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume primary was developed for external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. This guideline will serve as a template for radiotherapy protocols in future clinical trials. It may also be used in actual clinical practice in the setting of highly precise external beam radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy. (author)

  20. New conformity indices based on the calculation of distances between the target volume and the volume of reference isodose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J M; Park, S-Y; Ye, S-J; Kim, J H; Carlson, J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present conformity indices (CIs) based on the distance differences between the target volume (TV) and the volume of reference isodose (VRI). Methods: The points on the three-dimensional surfaces of the TV and the VRI were generated. Then, the averaged distances between the points on the TV and the VRI were calculated (CIdistance). The performance of the presented CIs were evaluated by analysing six situations, which were a perfect match, an expansion and a reduction of the distance from the centroid to the VRI compared with the distance from the centroid to the TV by 10%, a lateral shift of the VRI by 3 cm, a rotation of the VRI by 45° and a spherical-shaped VRI having the same volume as the TV. The presented CIs were applied to the clinical prostate and head and neck (H&N) plans. Results: For the perfect match, CIdistance was 0 with 0 as the standard deviation (SD). When expanding and reducing, CIdistance was 10 and −10 with SDs 11. The average value of the CIdistance in the prostate and H&N plans was 0.13 ± 7.44 and 6.04 ± 23.27, respectively. Conclusion: The performance of the CIdistance was equal or better than those of the conventional CIs. Advances in knowledge: The evaluation of target conformity by the distances between the surface of the TV and the VRI could be more accurate than evaluation with volume information. PMID:25225915

  1. A two isocenter IMRT technique with a controlled junction dose for long volume targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G G; Heaton, R K; Catton, C N; Chung, P W; O'Sullivan, B; Lau, M; Parent, A; Jaffray, D A

    2007-01-01

    Most IMRT techniques have been designed to treat targets smaller than the field size of conventional linac accelerators. In order to overcome the field size restrictions in applying IMRT, we developed a two isocenter IMRT technique to treat long volume targets. The technique exploits an extended dose gradient throughout a junction region of 4-6 cm to minimize the impact of field match errors on a junction dose and manipulates the inverse planning and IMRT segments to fill in the dose gradient and achieve dose uniformity. Techniques for abutting both conventional fields with IMRT ('Static + IMRT') and IMRT fields ('IMRT + IMRT') using two separate isocenters have been developed. Five long volume sarcoma cases have been planned in Pinnacle (Philips, Madison, USA) using Elekta Synergy and Varian 2100EX linacs; two of the cases were clinically treated with this technique. Advantages were demonstrated with well-controlled junction target uniformity and tolerance to setup uncertainties. The junction target dose heterogeneity was controlled at a level of ±5%; for 3 mm setup errors at the field edges, the junction target dose changed less than 5% and the dose sparing to organs at risk (OARs) was maintained. Film measurements confirmed the treatment planning results

  2. Bi-tangential hybrid IMRT for sparing the shoulder in whole breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, P; Deidda, M A; Iamundo de Cumis, I; Iamundo de Curtis, I; Deiana, E; Farigu, R; Lay, G; Porru, S

    2013-11-01

    A bi-tangential technique is proposed to reduce undesired doses to the shoulder produced by standard tangential irradiation. A total of 6 patients affected by shoulder pain and reduced functional capacity after whole-breast irradiation were retrospectively analysed. The standard tangential plan used for treatment was compared with (1) a single bi-tangential plan where, to spare the shoulder, the lateral open tangent was split into two half-beams at isocentre, with the superior portion rotated by 10-20° medially with respect to the standard lateral beam; (2) a double bi-tangential plan, where both the tangential open beams were split. The planning target volume (PTV) coverage and the dose to the portion of muscles and axilla included in the standard tangential beams were compared. PTV95 % of standard plan (91.9 ± 3.8) was not significantly different from single bi-tangential plan (91.8 ± 3.4); a small but significant (p < 0.01) decrease was observed with the double bi-tangential plan (90.1 ± 3.7). A marked dose reduction to the muscle was produced by the single bi-tangential plan around 30-40 Gy. The application of the double bi-tangential technique further reduced the volume receiving around 20 Gy, but did not markedly affect the higher doses. The dose to the axilla was reduced both in the single and the double bi-tangential plans. The single bi-tangential technique would have been able to reduce the dose to shoulder and axilla, without compromising target coverage. This simple technique is valuable for irradiation after axillary lymph node dissection or in patients without dissection due to negative or low-volume sentinel lymph node disease.

  3. Bi-tangential hybrid IMRT for sparing the shoulder in whole breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, P.; Deidda, M. A.; Iamundo de Curtis, I.; Deiana, E.; Farigu, R.; Lay, G.; Porru, S. [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radio-Oncology

    2013-11-15

    Background and purpose: A bi-tangential technique is proposed to reduce undesired doses to the shoulder produced by standard tangential irradiation. Patients and methods: A total of 6 patients affected by shoulder pain and reduced functional capacity after whole-breast irradiation were retrospectively analysed. The standard tangential plan used for treatment was compared with (1) a single bi-tangential plan where, to spare the shoulder, the lateral open tangent was split into two half-beams at isocentre, with the superior portion rotated by 10-20 medially with respect to the standard lateral beam; (2) a double bi-tangential plan, where both the tangential open beams were split. The planning target volume (PTV) coverage and the dose to the portion of muscles and axilla included in the standard tangential beams were compared. Results: PTV95 % of standard plan (91.9 {+-} 3.8) was not significantly different from single bi-tangential plan (91.8 {+-} 3.4); a small but significant (p < 0.01) decrease was observed with the double bi-tangential plan (90.1 {+-} 3.7). A marked dose reduction to the muscle was produced by the single bi-tangential plan around 30-40 Gy. The application of the double bi-tangential technique further reduced the volume receiving around 20 Gy, but did not markedly affect the higher doses. The dose to the axilla was reduced both in the single and the double bi-tangential plans. Conclusion: The single bi-tangential technique would have been able to reduce the dose to shoulder and axilla, without compromising target coverage. This simple technique is valuable for irradiation after axillary lymph node dissection or in patients without dissection due to negative or low-volume sentinel lymph node disease. (orig.)

  4. Bi-tangential hybrid IMRT for sparing the shoulder in whole breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, P.; Deidda, M.A.; Iamundo de Curtis, I.; Deiana, E.; Farigu, R.; Lay, G.; Porru, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: A bi-tangential technique is proposed to reduce undesired doses to the shoulder produced by standard tangential irradiation. Patients and methods: A total of 6 patients affected by shoulder pain and reduced functional capacity after whole-breast irradiation were retrospectively analysed. The standard tangential plan used for treatment was compared with (1) a single bi-tangential plan where, to spare the shoulder, the lateral open tangent was split into two half-beams at isocentre, with the superior portion rotated by 10-20 medially with respect to the standard lateral beam; (2) a double bi-tangential plan, where both the tangential open beams were split. The planning target volume (PTV) coverage and the dose to the portion of muscles and axilla included in the standard tangential beams were compared. Results: PTV95 % of standard plan (91.9 ± 3.8) was not significantly different from single bi-tangential plan (91.8 ± 3.4); a small but significant (p < 0.01) decrease was observed with the double bi-tangential plan (90.1 ± 3.7). A marked dose reduction to the muscle was produced by the single bi-tangential plan around 30-40 Gy. The application of the double bi-tangential technique further reduced the volume receiving around 20 Gy, but did not markedly affect the higher doses. The dose to the axilla was reduced both in the single and the double bi-tangential plans. Conclusion: The single bi-tangential technique would have been able to reduce the dose to shoulder and axilla, without compromising target coverage. This simple technique is valuable for irradiation after axillary lymph node dissection or in patients without dissection due to negative or low-volume sentinel lymph node disease. (orig.)

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  6. Effect of geometrical optimization on the treatment volumes and the dose homogeneity of biplane interstitial brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Yavuz; Esassolak, Mustafa; Aydin, Ayhan; Aras, Arif; Olacak, Ibrahim; Haydaroglu, Ayfer

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The isodose distributions of HDR stepping source brachytherapy implants can be modified by changing dwell times and this procedure is called optimization. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of geometrical optimization on the brachytherapy volumes and the dose homogeneity inside the implant and to compare them with non-optimized counterparts. Material and methods: A set of biplane breast implants consisting of 84 different configurations have been digitized by the planning computer and volumetric analysis was performed for both non-optimized and geometrically optimized implants. Treated length (T L ), treated volume (V 100 ), irradiated volume (V 50 ), overdose volume (V 200 ) and quality index (QI) have been calculated for every non-optimized implant and compared to its corresponding geometrically optimized implant having a similar configuration and covering the same target length. Results: The mean T L was 74.48% of the active length (A L ) for non-optimized implants and was 91.87% for optimized implants (P 50 /V 100 value was 2.71 for non-optimized implants and 2.65 for optimized implants (P 200 /V 100 value was 0.09 for non-optimized implants and 0.10 for optimized implants (P < 0.001). Conclusions: By performing geometrical optimization it is possible to implant shorter needles for a given tumour to adequately cover the target volume with the reference isodose and thus surgical damage is reduced. The amount of healthy tissues outside the target receiving considerable radiation is significantly reduced due to the decrease in irradiated volume. Dose homogeneity inside the implant is significantly improved. Although there is a slight increase of overdose volume inside the implant, this increase is considered to be negligible in clinical applications

  7. Tumor bed delineation for external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Tao, Randa; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Li, Guang; Powell, Simon N.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been considered an alternative to whole breast irradiation for patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy. APBI delivers higher doses of radiation in fewer fractions to the post-lumpectomy tumor bed with a 1–2 cm margin, targeting the area at the highest risk of local recurrence while sparing normal breast tissue. However, there are inherent challenges in defining accurate target volumes for APBI. Studies have shown that significant interobserver variation exists among radiation oncologists defining the lumpectomy cavity, which raises the question of how to improve the accuracy and consistency in the delineation of tumor bed volumes. The combination of standardized guidelines and surgical clips significantly improves an observer’s ability in delineation, and it is the standard in multiple ongoing external-beam APBI trials. However, questions about the accuracy of the clips to mark the lumpectomy cavity remain, as clips only define a few points at the margin of the cavity. This paper reviews the techniques that have been developed so far to improve target delineation in APBI delivered by conformal external beam radiation therapy, including the use of standardized guidelines, surgical clips or fiducial markers, pre-operative computed tomography imaging, and additional imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Alternatives to post-operative APBI, future directions, and clinical recommendations were also discussed

  8. Monte Carlo modelling and comparison with experiment of the nuclide production in thick stony targets isotropically irradiated with 600 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aylmer, D.; Herzog, G.F.; Kruse, T.H.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Moniot, R.K.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.; Tuniz, C.

    1987-05-01

    Depth profiles for the production of stable and radioactive nuclides have been measured for a large variety of target elements in three thick spherical stony targets with radii of 5, 15 and 26 cm isotropically irradiated with 600 MeV protons at the CERN synchrocyclotron. These irradiation experiments (CERN SC96) were intended to simulate the irradiation of meteoroids by galactic cosmic ray protons. In order to combine this experimental approach with a theoretical one the intra- and internuclear cascades were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques via the high energy transport code HET/KFA 1. Together with transport calculations for low energy neutrons by the MORSE-CG code the depth dependent spectra of primary and secondary protons and of secondary neutrons were derived. On the basis of these spectra and a set of evaluated experimental excitation functions for p-induced reactions and of theoretical ones for n-induced reactions, calculated by the code ALICE LIVERMORE 82, theoretical depth profiles for the production of stable and radioactive nuclides in the three thick targets were calculated. This report is a comprehensive survey on all those target/product combination for which both experimental and theoretical data are available. It provides the basis for a detailed discussion of the various production modes of residual nuclides and on the depth and size dependence of their production rates in thick stony targets, serving as a simulation of the galactic cosmic ray irradiation of meteoroids in space. On the other hand the comparison of the experimental and theoretical depth profiles validates the high energy transport calculations, making them a promissing tool for further model calculations of the interactions of cosmic rays with matter. (orig.)

  9. High-speed photographic methods for compression dynamics investigation of laser irradiated shell target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Kologrivov, A.A.; Krokhin, O.N.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Three methods are described for a high-speed diagnostics of compression dynamics of shell targets being spherically laser-heated on the installation ''Kal'mar''. The first method is based on the direct investigation of the space-time evolution of the critical-density region for Nd-laser emission (N sub(e) asymptotically equals 10 21 I/cm 3 ) by means of the streak photography of plasma image in the second-harmonic light. The second method involves investigation of time evolution of the second-harmonic spectral distribution by means of a spectrograph coupled with a streak camera. The use of a special laser pulse with two time-distributed intensity maxima for the irradiation of shell targets, and the analysis of the obtained X-ray pin-hole pictures constitute the basis of the third method. (author)

  10. Intracavitary irradiation of prostatic carcinoma by a high dose-rate afterloading technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odelberg-Johnson, O.; Underskog, I.; Johansson, J.E.; Bernshaw, D.; Sorbe, B.; Persson, J.E. (Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Urology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics)

    1991-01-01

    A high dose-rate ({sup 60}Co) afterloading technique was evaluated in a series of 73 patients with prostatic carcinoma stages I-IV. The intraurethral irradiation was combined with external pelvic radiotherapy. A minimum total dose of 78 Gy was delivered to the target volume. In a subgroup of patients extramustine (Estracyt) was given as adjuvant chemohormonal therapy during irradiation. The median follow-up for the whole group was 63 months. The crude 5-year survival rate was 60% and the corrected survival rate 90%. Survival was related to the tumor grade. Local pelvic recurrences were recorded in 17.8%. 'Viable cells' in posttherapy aspiration biopsy were not associated with tumor recurrences or survival. Four patients (5%) had grade 3 late radiation reactions with urethral structure or bladder fibrosis. Urinary tract infections and prior transurethral resections were not associated with a higher frequency of reactions. Concurrent estramustine therapy seemed to increase the frequency of both acute and chronic radiation reactions. Local control, recurrence, and survival were not affected by chemohormonal therapy. The use of tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound as aids to computerized dosimetry may improve local dose distribution and reduce the irradiated volume. (orig.).

  11. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, Juergen; Aaron, A. M.; Bell, Gary L.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Ellis, Ronald James; Giuliano, D.; Howard, R.; Kiggans, James O.; Lessard, Timothy L.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Perkins, Dale E.; Varma, Venugopal Koikal

    2015-01-01

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma-material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a ''. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.'' The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma-material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL's proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL's strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the ''signature facility'' FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady-state heat fluxes of

  12. Damage profiles and ion distribution in Pt-irradiated SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, H.Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Zhang, Y., E-mail: Zhangy1@ornl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhu, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Zhang, W.M. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Bae, I.-T. [Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Weber, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Single crystalline 6H-SiC samples were irradiated at 150 K with 2 MeV Pt ions. The local volume swelling was determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and a nearly sigmoidal dependence on irradiation dose is observed. The disorder profiles and ion distribution were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), transmission electron microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Since the volume swelling reaches 12% over the damage region at high ion fluence, the effect of lattice expansion is considered and corrected for in the analysis of RBS spectra to obtain depth profiles. Projectile and damage profiles are estimated by SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter). When compared with the measured profiles, the SRIM code predictions of ion distribution and the damage profiles are underestimated due to significant overestimation of the electronic stopping power for the slow heavy Pt ions. By utilizing the reciprocity method, which is based on the invariance of the inelastic energy loss in ion-solid collisions against interchange of projectile and target atom, a much lower electronic stopping power is deduced. A simple approach, based on reducing the density of SiC target in SRIM simulation, is proposed to compensate the overestimated SRIM electronic stopping power values, which results in improved agreement between predicted and measured damage profiles and ion ranges.

  13. Sphere of equivalence--a novel target volume concept for intraoperative radiotherapy using low-energy X rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskind, Carsten; Griebel, Jürgen; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated partial breast radiotherapy with low-energy photons from a miniature X-ray machine is undergoing a randomized clinical trial (Targeted Intra-operative Radiation Therapy [TARGIT]) in a selected subgroup of patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. The steep radial dose gradient implies reduced tumor cell control with increasing depth in the tumor bed. The purpose was to compare the expected risk of local recurrence in this nonuniform radiation field with that after conventional external beam radiotherapy. The relative biologic effectiveness of low-energy photons was modeled using the linear-quadratic formalism including repair of sublethal lesions during protracted irradiation. Doses of 50-kV X-rays (Intrabeam) were converted to equivalent fractionated doses, EQD2, as function of depth in the tumor bed. The probability of local control was estimated using a logistic dose-response relationship fitted to clinical data from fractionated radiotherapy. The model calculations show that, for a cohort of patients, the increase in local control in the high-dose region near the applicator partly compensates the reduction of local control at greater distances. Thus a "sphere of equivalence" exists within which the risk of recurrence is equal to that after external fractionated radiotherapy. The spatial distribution of recurrences inside this sphere will be different from that after conventional radiotherapy. A novel target volume concept is presented here. The incidence of recurrences arising in the tumor bed around the excised tumor will test the validity of this concept and the efficacy of the treatment. Recurrences elsewhere will have implications for the rationale of TARGIT.

  14. Target volume delineation for head and neck cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy; Delineation des volumes cibles des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures en radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapeyre, M.; Toledano, I.; Bourry, N. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France); Bailly, C. [Unite de radiodiagnostic, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France); Cachin, F. [Unite de medecine nucleaire, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France)

    2011-10-15

    This article describes the determination and the delineation of the target volumes for head-and-neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The delineation of the clinical target volumes (CTV) on the computerized tomography scanner (CT scan) requires a rigorous methodology due to the complexity of head-and-neck anatomy. The clinical examination with a sketch of pretreatment tumour extension, the surgical and pathological reports and the adequate images (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) are necessary for the delineation. The target volumes depend on the overall strategy: sequential IMRT or simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT (SIB-IMRT). The concept of selectivity of the potential subclinical disease near the primary tumor and the selection of neck nodal targets are described according to the recommendations and the literature. The planing target volume (PTV), mainly reflecting setup errors (random and systematic), results from a uniform 4-5 mm expansion around the CTV. We propose the successive delineation of: (1) the gross volume tumour (GTV); (2) the 'high risk' CTV1 around the GTV or including the postoperative tumour bed in case of positive margins or nodal extra-capsular spread (65-70 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (3) the CTV2 'intermediate risk' around the CTV1 for SIB-IMRT (59-63 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (4) the 'low-risk' CTV3 (54-56 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (5) the PTVs. (authors)

  15. Progress in food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The volume contains reports from 19 countries on the state of the project in the field of food irradiation (fruit, vegetables, meat, spices) by means of gamma rays. The tests ran up to 1982. Microbiological radiosensitivity and mutagenicity tests provide a yard stick for irradiation efficiency.

  16. Spatial distribution of moderated neutrons along a Pb target irradiated by high-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M.; Manolopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Brandt, R.; Westmeier, W.; Kulakov, B.A.; Krivopustov, M.I.; Sosnin, A.N.; Debeauvais, M.; Adloff, J.C.; Zamani Valasiadou, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy protons in the range of 0.5-7.4 GeV have irradiated an extended Pb target covered with a paraffin moderator. The moderator was used in order to shift the hard Pb spallation neutron spectrum to lower energies and to increase the transmutation efficiency via (n,γ) reactions. Neutron distributions along and inside the paraffin moderator were measured. An analysis of the experimental results was performed based on particle production by high-energy interactions with heavy targets and neutron spectrum shifting by the paraffin. Conclusions about the spallation neutron production in the target and moderation through the paraffin are presented. The study of the total neutron fluence on the moderator surface as a function of the proton beam energy shows that neutron cost is improved up to 1 GeV. For higher proton beam energies it remains constant with a tendency to decline

  17. Variations of target volume definition and daily target volume localization in stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage non–small cell lung cancer patients under abdominal compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chunhui, E-mail: chan@coh.org; Sampath, Sagus; Schultheisss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to compare gross tumor volumes (GTV) in 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) simulation and daily cone beam CT (CBCT) with the internal target volume (ITV) in 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) under abdominal compression. We retrospectively selected 10 patients with NSCLC who received image-guided SBRT treatments under abdominal compression with daily CBCT imaging. GTVs were contoured as visible gross tumor on the planning 3DCT and daily CBCT, and ITVs were contoured using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the planning 4DCT. Daily CBCTs were registered with 3DCT and MIP images by matching of bony landmarks in the thoracic region to evaluate interfractional GTV position variations. Relative to MIP-based ITVs, the average 3DCT-based GTV volume was 66.3 ± 17.1% (range: 37.5% to 92.0%) (p < 0.01 in paired t-test), and the average CBCT-based GTV volume was 90.0 ± 6.7% (daily range: 75.7% to 107.1%) (p = 0.02). Based on bony anatomy matching, the center-of-mass coordinates for CBCT-based GTVs had maximum absolute shift of 2.4 mm (left-right), 7.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), and 5.2 mm (superior-inferior [SI]) relative to the MIP-based ITV. CBCT-based GTVs had average overlapping ratio of 81.3 ± 11.2% (range: 45.1% to 98.9%) with the MIP-based ITV, and 57.7 ± 13.7% (range: 35.1% to 83.2%) with the 3DCT-based GTV. Even with abdominal compression, both 3DCT simulations and daily CBCT scans significantly underestimated the full range of tumor motion. In daily image-guided patient setup corrections, automatic bony anatomy-based image registration could lead to target misalignment. Soft tissue-based image registration should be performed for accurate treatment delivery.

  18. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  19. Target volumes in radiation therapy of childhood brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habrand, J.L.; Abdulkarim, B.; Beaudre, A.; El Khouri, M.; Kalifa, C.

    2001-01-01

    Pediatric tumors have enjoyed considerable improvements for the past 30 years. This is mainly due to the extensive use of combined therapeutical modalities in which chemotherapy plays a prominent role. In many children, local treatment including radiotherapy, can nowadays be adapted in terms of target volume and dose to the 'response' to an initial course of chemotherapy almost on a case by case basis. This makes precise recommendation on local therapy highly difficult in this age group. We will concentrate in this paper on brain tumors in which chemotherapy is of limited value and radiotherapy still plays a key-role. (authors)

  20. Mitochondria-Targeted Vitamin E Protects Skin from UVB-Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Serk; Kim, Ikyon; Kim, Wang-Kyun; Choi, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Doo Yeong; Moon, Sung-Guk; Min, Hyung-Keun; Song, Min-Kyu; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E (MVE) is designed to accumulate within mitochondria and is applied to decrease mitochondrial oxidative damage. However, the protective effects of MVE in skin cells have not been identified. We investigated the protective effect of MVE against UVB in dermal fibroblasts and immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). In addition, we studied the wound-healing effect of MVE in animal models. We found that MVE increased the proliferation and survival of fibroblasts at low concentration (i.e., nM ranges). In addition, MVE increased collagen production and downregulated matrix metalloproteinase1. MVE also increased the proliferation and survival of HaCaT cells. UVB increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in fibroblasts and HaCaT cells, while MVE decreased ROS production at low concentration. In an animal experiment, MVE accelerated wound healing from laser-induced skin damage. These results collectively suggest that low dose MVE protects skin from UVB irradiation. Therefore, MVE can be developed as a cosmetic raw material.

  1. The use of phase sequence image sets to reconstruct the total volume occupied by a mobile lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Isabelle M.; Robinson, Don M.; Halperin, Ross; Roa, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The use of phase sequence image (PSI) sets to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target is presented. Isocontrast composite clinical target volumes (CCTVs) may be constructed from PSI sets in order to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target during the course of its travel. The ability of the CCTV technique to properly account for target motion is demonstrated by comparison to contours of the true total volume occupied (TVO) for a number of experimental phantom geometries. Finally, using real patient data, the clinical utility of the CCTV technique to properly account for internal tumor motion while minimizing the volume of healthy lung tissue irradiated is assessed by comparison to the standard approach of applying safety margins. Results of the phantom study reveal that CCTV cross sections constructed at the 20% isocontrast level yield good agreement with the total cross sections (TXO) of mobile targets. These CCTVs conform well to the TVOs of the moving targets examined whereby the addition of small uniform margins ensures complete circumscription of the TVO with the inclusion of minimal amounts of surrounding external volumes. The CCTV technique is seen to be clearly superior to the common practice of the addition of safety margins to individual CTV contours in order to account for internal target motion. Margins required with the CCTV technique are eight to ten times smaller than those required with individual CTVs

  2. 'Compromise position' image alignment to accommodate independent motion of multiple clinical target volumes during radiotherapy: A high risk prostate cancer example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosewall, Tara; Alasti, Hamideh; Bayley, Andrew; Yan, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Inclusion of multiple independently moving clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the irradiated volume causes an image guidance conundrum. The purpose of this research was to use high risk prostate cancer as a clinical example to evaluate a 'compromise' image alignment strategy. The daily pre-treatment orthogonal EPI for 14 consecutive patients were included in this analysis. Image matching was performed by aligning to the prostate only, the bony pelvis only and using the 'compromise' strategy. Residual CTV surrogate displacements were quantified for each of the alignment strategies. Analysis of the 388 daily fractions indicated surrogate displacements were well-correlated in all directions (r 2 = 0.95 (LR), 0.67 (AP) and 0.59 (SI). Differences between the surrogates displacements (95% range) were −0.4 to 1.8 mm (LR), −1.2 to 5.2 mm (SI) and −1.2 to 5.2 mm (AP). The distribution of the residual displacements was significantly smaller using the 'compromise' strategy, compared to the other strategies (p 0.005). The 'compromise' strategy ensured the CTV was encompassed by the PTV in all fractions, compared to 47 PTV violations when aligned to prostate only. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a compromise position image guidance strategy to accommodate simultaneous displacements of two independently moving CTVs. Application of this strategy was facilitated by correlation between the CTV displacements and resulted in no geometric excursions of the CTVs beyond standard sized PTVs. This simple image guidance strategy may also be applicable to other disease sites that concurrently irradiate multiple CTVs, such as head and neck, lung and cervix cancer.

  3. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  4. The Different Volume Effects of Small-Bowel Toxicity During Pelvic Irradiation Between Gynecologic Patients With and Without Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Study With Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, E.-Y.; Sung, C.-C.; Ko, S.-F.; Wang, C.-J.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of abdominal surgery on the volume effects of small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From May 2003 through November 2006, 80 gynecologic patients without (Group I) or with (Group II) prior abdominal surgery were analyzed. We used a computed tomography (CT) planning system to measure the small-bowel volume and dosimetry. We acquired the range of small-bowel volume in 10% (V10) to 100% (V100) of dose, at 10% intervals. The onset and grade of diarrhea during whole-pelvic irradiation were recorded as small-bowel toxicity up to 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions. Results: The volume effect of Grade 2-3 diarrhea existed from V10 to V100 in Group I patients and from V60 to V100 in Group II patients on univariate analyses. The V40 of Group I and the V100 of Group II achieved most statistical significance. The mean V40 was 281 ± 27 cm 3 and 489 ± 34 cm 3 (p 3 and 132 ± 19 cm 3 (p = 0.003). Multivariate analyses revealed that V40 (p = 0.001) and V100 (p = 0.027) were independent factors for the development of Grade 2-3 diarrhea in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Gynecologic patients without and with abdominal surgery have different volume effects on small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation. Low-dose volume can be used as a predictive index of Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients without abdominal surgery. Full-dose volume is more important than low-dose volume for Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients with abdominal surgery

  5. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Sylvain; Bouchard, Myriam; Germain, Isabelle; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Roy, Rene; Gingras, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements

  6. Intensity-modulated tangential beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Hunt, M.; Chui, C.; Spirou, S.; Forster, K.; Lee, H.; Yahalom, J.; Kutcher, G.J.; McCormick, B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefits of intensity modulated tangential beams in the irradiation of the intact breast. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional treatment planning was performed on five left and five right breasts using standard wedged and intensity modulated (IM) tangential beams. Optimal beam parameters were chosen using beams-eye-view display. For the standard plans, the optimal wedge angles were chosen based on dose distributions in the central plane calculated without inhomogeneity corrections, according to our standard protocol. Intensity-modulated plans were generated using an inverse planning algorithm and a standard set of target and critical structure optimization criteria. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and dose volume histograms for the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral lung, coronary arteries, and contralateral breast. Results: Significant improvements in the doses to critical structures were achieved using intensity modulation. Compared with a standard-wedged plan prescribed to 46 Gy, the dose from the IM plan encompassing 20% of the coronary artery region decreased by 25% (from 36 to 27 Gy) for patients treated to the left breast; the mean dose to the contralateral breast decreased by 42% (from 1.2 to 0.7 Gy); the ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 30% (from 10% to 7%); the volume of surrounding soft tissue receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 31% (from 48% to 33%). Dose homogeneity within the target volume improved greatest in the superior and inferior regions of the breast (approximately 8%), although some decrease in the medial and lateral high-dose regions (approximately 4%) was also observed. Conclusion: Intensity modulation with a standard tangential beam arrangement significantly reduces the dose to the coronary arteries, ipsilateral lung, contralateral breast, and surrounding soft tissues. Improvements in dose homogeneity throughout the target volume can also be

  7. U-target irradiation at FRM II aiming the production of Mo-99 - A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenberg, H.; Mueller, C.; Neuhaus, I.; Roehrmoser, A.

    2010-01-01

    Following the shortage in radioisotope availability the Technische Unversitaet Muenchen and the Belgian Institut National des Radioelements conducted a common study on the suitability of the FRM II reactor for the generation of Mo-99 as a fission product. A suitable irradiation channel was determined and neutronic calculations resulted in sufficiently high neutron flux densities to make FRM II a promising candidate for Mo-99 production. In addition the feasibility study provides thermohydraulic calculations as input for the design and integration of the additional cooling circuit into the existing heat removal systems of FRM II. The required in-house processes for a regular uranium target irradiation programme have been defined and necessary upgrades identified. Finally the required investment cost was estimated and a possible time schedule was given. (author)

  8. Genomic instability after targeted irradiation of human lymphocytes: Evidence for inter-individual differences under bystander conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim, Munira A.; Lee, Ryonfa; Moore, Stephen R.; Macdonald, Denise A.; Chapman, Kim L.; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental 222 radon exposure is a human health concern, and many studies demonstrate that very low doses of high LET α-particle irradiation initiate deleterious genetic consequences in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells. One consequence, radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and is often assessed by measuring delayed chromosomal aberrations. We utilised a technique that facilitates transient immobilization of primary lymphocytes for targeted microbeam irradiation and have reported that environmentally relevant doses, e.g. a single 3 He 2+ particle traversal to a single cell, are sufficient to induce RIGI. Herein we sought to determine differences in radiation response in lymphocytes isolated from five healthy male donors. Primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle per cell nucleus. We found evidence for inter-individual variation in radiation response (RIGI, measured as delayed chromosome aberrations). Although this was not highly significant, it was possibly masked by high levels of intra-individual variation. While there are many studies showing a link between genetic predisposition and RIGI, there are few studies linking genetic background with bystander effects in normal human lymphocytes. In an attempt to investigate inter-individual variation in the induction of bystander effects, primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle under conditions where fractions of the population were traversed. We showed a marked genotype-dependent bystander response in one donor after exposure to 15% of the population. The findings may also be regarded as a radiation-induced genotype-dependent bystander effect triggering an instability phenotype.

  9. Genomic instability after targeted irradiation of human lymphocytes: Evidence for inter-individual differences under bystander conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhim, Munira A., E-mail: mkadhim@brookes.ac.uk [School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Lee, Ryonfa [Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Moore, Stephen R.; Macdonald, Denise A. [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Chapman, Kim L. [School of Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom); Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    Environmental {sup 222}radon exposure is a human health concern, and many studies demonstrate that very low doses of high LET {alpha}-particle irradiation initiate deleterious genetic consequences in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander cells. One consequence, radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and is often assessed by measuring delayed chromosomal aberrations. We utilised a technique that facilitates transient immobilization of primary lymphocytes for targeted microbeam irradiation and have reported that environmentally relevant doses, e.g. a single {sup 3}He{sup 2+} particle traversal to a single cell, are sufficient to induce RIGI. Herein we sought to determine differences in radiation response in lymphocytes isolated from five healthy male donors. Primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle per cell nucleus. We found evidence for inter-individual variation in radiation response (RIGI, measured as delayed chromosome aberrations). Although this was not highly significant, it was possibly masked by high levels of intra-individual variation. While there are many studies showing a link between genetic predisposition and RIGI, there are few studies linking genetic background with bystander effects in normal human lymphocytes. In an attempt to investigate inter-individual variation in the induction of bystander effects, primary lymphocytes were irradiated with a single particle under conditions where fractions of the population were traversed. We showed a marked genotype-dependent bystander response in one donor after exposure to 15% of the population. The findings may also be regarded as a radiation-induced genotype-dependent bystander effect triggering an instability phenotype.

  10. 3D-segmentation of the 18F-choline PET signal for target volume definition in radiation therapy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciernik, I Frank; Brown, Derek W; Schmid, Daniel; Hany, Thomas; Egli, Peter; Davis, J Bernard

    2007-02-01

    Volumetric assessment of PET signals becomes increasingly relevant for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Here, we investigate the utility of 18F-choline PET signals to serve as a structure for semi-automatic segmentation for forward treatment planning of prostate cancer. 18F-choline PET and CT scans of ten patients with histologically proven prostate cancer without extracapsular growth were acquired using a combined PET/CT scanner. Target volumes were manually delineated on CT images using standard software. Volumes were also obtained from 18F-choline PET images using an asymmetrical segmentation algorithm. PTVs were derived from CT 18F-choline PET based clinical target volumes (CTVs) by automatic expansion and comparative planning was performed. As a read-out for dose given to non-target structures, dose to the rectal wall was assessed. Planning target volumes (PTVs) derived from CT and 18F-choline PET yielded comparable results. Optimal matching of CT and 18F-choline PET derived volumes in the lateral and cranial-caudal directions was obtained using a background-subtracted signal thresholds of 23.0+/-2.6%. In antero-posterior direction, where adaptation compensating for rectal signal overflow was required, optimal matching was achieved with a threshold of 49.5+/-4.6%. 3D-conformal planning with CT or 18F-choline PET resulted in comparable doses to the rectal wall. Choline PET signals of the prostate provide adequate spatial information amendable to standardized asymmetrical region growing algorithms for PET-based target volume definition for external beam RT.

  11. Novel technique for high-precision stereotactic irradiation of mouse brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, J.; Woelfelschneider, J.; Derer, A.; Fietkau, R.; Gaipl, U.S.; Bert, C.; Frey, B. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Stache, C.; Buslei, R.; Hoelsken, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Neuropathology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Schwarz, M.; Baeuerle, T. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Radiology, Preclinical Imaging Platform Erlangen (PIPE), Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Small animal irradiation systems were developed for preclinical evaluation of tumor therapy closely resembling the clinical situation. Mostly only clinical LINACs are available, so protocols for small animal partial body irradiation using a conventional clinical system are essential. This study defines a protocol for conformal brain tumor irradiations in mice. CT and MRI images were used to demarcate the target volume and organs at risk. Three 6 MV photon beams were planned for a total dose of 10 fractions of 1.8 Gy. The mouse position in a dedicated applicator was verified by an X-ray patient positioning system before each irradiation. Dosimetric verifications (using ionization chambers and films) were performed. Irradiation-induced DNA damage was analyzed to verify the treatment effects on the cellular level. The defined treatment protocol and the applied fractionation scheme were feasible. The in-house developed applicator was suitable for individual positioning at submillimeter accuracy of anesthetized mice during irradiation, altogether performed in less than 10 min. All mice tolerated the treatment well. Measured dose values perfectly matched the nominal values from treatment planning. Cellular response was restricted to the target volume. Clinical LINAC-based irradiations of mice offer the potential to treat orthotopic tumors conformably. Especially with respect to lateral penumbra, dedicated small animal irradiation systems exceed the clinical LINAC solution. (orig.) [German] Kleintierbestrahlungsanlagen wurden entwickelt um praeklinische Studien in der Tumortherapie unter moeglichst klinischen Bedingungen durchzufuehren. Da an den meisten Instituten nur klinische LINACs zur Verfuegung stehen, werden Standardprotokolle zur Kleintierbestrahlung benoetigt, die konventionelle Systeme nutzen. In dieser Studie wird ein solches Protokoll fuer tumorkonforme Hirnbestrahlung von Maeusen definiert. CT- und MRT-Bilder wurden aufgenommen, um Zielvolumen und

  12. Stress relaxation and activation volume at the yield point of cold worked and neutron irradiated copper single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, D.; Diehl, J.

    1979-01-01

    The effective activation volume of slip is studied after neutron irradiation in as-grown crystals as well as in predeformed ones by means of stress relaxation tests between 20 K and 200 K. The activation volume corresponding to the initial strain rate is found to be always higher in predeformed crystals than in as-grown ones. During stress relaxation the flow stress tau decreases linearly with ln(-dtau/dt) (indicating a constant activation volume) only in rare cases. Depending on predeformation and temperature several types of deviations from straight lines are observed: monotoneously bent curves, strong scattering of data points not fitting smooth curves or systematic deviations from straight lines at the beginning of relaxation. Accordingly the effective activation volumes and their dependences on stress seem to behave in a strange manner. By the aid of a previously proposed model for the deformation within the yield point elongation the results can be interpreted qualitatively by taking into account the inhomogeneity of slip and work hardening, allowing a more reliable judgement on the real activation volumes, on which a better understanding of the superposition of the two hardening mechanisms involved here can be based. (author)

  13. Histopathological investigation of radiation necrosis. Coagulation necrosis in the irradiated and non-irradiated brain tumors and in the normal brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, N [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.

    1977-01-01

    Eighty four irradiated tumors (including 59 gliomas) and the surrounding brain tissue were analyzed. In 'normal' brain tissue, typical coagulation necrosis attributable to irradiation was observed in the cerebral white matter, presenting a whitish-yellow color but no remarkable changes in volume. Histologically there was complete desintegration of myelin and axon. Vascular changes included hyalinous thickening, concentric cleavage, fibrinoid degeneration, adventitial fibrosis and edema of small arteries, fibrin thrombi or occlusion of arterioles and capillaries, and telangiectasia of small veins and venules. While other tumors showed hyalinous or fibrous scar tissue and decrease in volume, the gliomas maintained their original volume without residual tumor cells. Massive coagulation necrosis was occasionally found even in full volume, non-irradiated gliomas (controls), although the changes were fewer and not so varied as in typical radiation necrosis. With small dosages, it was difficult to judge whether the necrosis was caused by irradiation or occurred spontaneously. Coagulation necrosis in tumor tissue was found in 25 of 59 cases (42%) of irradiated gliomas, but in only 2 of 49 cases (4%) of the nonirradiated gliomas. In 49 cases no coagulation necrosis of the surrounding tissue was found. Although histopathological judgement is difficult, it is suggested that there is a significant correlation between coagulation necrosis and irradiation. Discussion of the relationship between coagulation necrosis and NSD (nominal standard dose) led to the conclusion that coagulation necrosis will not be caused by irradiation of less than 1400 rets in NSD.

  14. Assessment of dose inhomogeneity at target level by in vivo dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leunens, G.; Verstraete, J.; Dutreix, A.; Schueren, E. van der

    1992-01-01

    Inhomogeneity of dose delivered to the target volume due to irregular body surface and tissue densities remains in many cases unknown, since dose distribution is calculated for most radiation treatments in only one transverse section and assuming the patient to be water equivalent. In this study transmission and target absorbed dose homogeneity is assessed for 11 head-and-neck cancer treatments by in vivo measurements with silicon diodes. Besides the dose to specification point, the dose delivered to 2-4 off-axis points in midline sagittal plane is estimated from entrance and exit dose measurements. Simultaneously made portal films allow to identify anatomical structures passed by the beam before reaching exit diode. Mean deviation from expected transmission is -6.8% for bone, +6% for air cavities and -2.5% for soft tissue. At midplane, mean deviations from expected target dose are respectively -3.5%, +2.3% and -1.9%. Deviations from prescribed dose are larger than 5% in 12/39 target points. Accuracy requirements in target dose delivery of plus or minus 5%, as proposed by ICRU, cannot be fulfilled in 7/11 patients and is mostly due to irregular body contour and tissue densities. as only a limited number of points are considered, inhomogeneity in dose delivered throughout whole irradiated volume is underestimated, as is illustrated from exit dose profiles obtained from portal image. Besides its tremendous value as a quality assurance procedure, in vivo dose measurements are shown to be a valid method for assessing dose delivered to irradiated tissues when dose computations are assumed to be inaccurate or even impossible in current practice. (author). 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  15. Green methods for the radiochemical separations of no-carrier-added 61Cu, 62Zn from 7Li irradiated cobalt target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumita Maiti; Kaustab Ghosh; Susanta Lahiri

    2015-01-01

    A nat Co target was irradiated with 47 MeV 7 Li beam to produce no-carrier-added 61 Cu, 62 Zn in the target matrix. Two new green radiochemical methods were developed for separation of 61 Cu and 62 Zn from the target matrix, (i) liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) technique using room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C 4 mim][PF 6 ]) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) (ii) adsorption on calcium alginate beads. (author)

  16. Temperature distribution in target tumor tissue and photothermal tissue destruction during laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Austin; Hasanjee, Aamr; Pettitt, Alex; Silk, Kegan; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.; Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment modality that has seen much success in treating many different types of cancer, both in animal studies and in clinical trials. The treatment consists of the synergistic interaction between photothermal laser irradiation and the local injection of an immunoadjuvant. As a result of the therapy, the host immune system launches a systemic antitumor response. The photothermal effect induced by the laser irradiation has multiple effects at different temperature elevations which are all required for optimal response. Therefore, determining the temperature distribution in the target tumor during the laser irradiation in laser immunotherapy is crucial to facilitate the treatment of cancers. To investigate the temperature distribution in the target tumor, female Wistar Furth rats were injected with metastatic mammary tumor cells and, upon sufficient tumor growth, underwent laser irradiation and were monitored using thermocouples connected to locally-inserted needle probes and infrared thermography. From the study, we determined that the maximum central tumor temperature was higher for tumors of less volume. Additionally, we determined that the temperature near the edge of the tumor as measured with a thermocouple had a strong correlation with the maximum temperature value in the infrared camera measurement.

  17. Craniospinal irradiation in patients with central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronska-Gardas, A.; Chojnacka, M.; Pedziwiatr, K.; Morawska-Kaczynska, M.; Dabrowski, R.; Semaniak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the experience of the Department of Radiotherapy (Cancer Centre in Warsaw) in conformal craniospinal radiotherapy (CSR) with CT-based 3D treatment planning. The entire brain (including the cribrum and the meninges) and spinal cord are rendered on CT scans as the clinical target volume (CTV), together with the primary tumour bed with 1.5-2 cm margin as CTV for boost irradiation. The caudal border of the CTV is determined basing on MRI. According to our treatment protocol the entire brain and the upper part of the spinal cord to the level of C3-C4 are treated with two isocentric lateral 6 MV photon fields, with collimator rotation and customised blocks. Spinal cord irradiation is usually performed with posterior 18-21 MeV electron or, rarely, with 4-6 MeV photon fields. Tissue compensators (boluses) are used often. The junctions between the fields are moved at least 1 cm after half of the total dose has been delivered. The primary tumour bed with its margin is boosted with two opposed, two oblique or three noncoplanar 15 MeV photon beams with customised blocks. High dose uniformity all over the target (SD <2%) and acceptable dose levels are achieved in vital structures (pituitary, thyroid gland, cochlea, eyes). For instance the dose to the lens usually does not exceed 15%. Dose evaluation revealed that the average doses to the heart and the thyroid gland are diminished at least by half when the spinal cord is irradiated with electrons, than in the case of photons. CT-based 3D treatment planning of CSR provides the potential to visualise and irradiate the target itself, while avoiding so-called ''geographical'' errors and decreasing the risk of tumour relapse. Irradiation of the spinal cord with electrons decreases the risk of late effects, above all that of hypothyroidism. Between 1.01.1998 and 31.12.1999, 40 children (24 boys and 16 girls; aged between 3 and 15 years; median age 7 years) had undergone CSR according to the described method. (author)

  18. Gold markers for tumor localization and target volume delineation in radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Christiansen, Hans; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Hermann, Robert Michael; Liersch, Thorsten; Ghadimi, Michael; Rothe, Hilka

    2009-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer, neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy is indicated. To improve target volume definition for radiotherapy planning, the potential of implanted gold markers in the tumor region was evaluated. In nine consecutive patients, two to three gold markers were implanted in the tumor region during rigid rectoscopy. Computed tomography scans were performed during treatment planning. All electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) recorded during treatment series were analyzed. All patients underwent complete tumor resection with meticulous histopathologic examination. The gold markers could easily be implanted into the mesorectal tissue at the caudal tumor border without any complications. They were helpful in identifying the inferior border of the planning target volume in order to spare normal tissue (in particular anal structures). No significant shift of the markers was found during the course of therapy. Marker matching of the EPIDs did not improve patient positioning in comparison to bone structure matching. The former position of at least one marker could be identified in all patients during histopathologic examination. The use of gold marker enables a more precise definition of the target volume for radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. This could eventually allow a better protection of anal structures of patients with a tumor localization = 5 cm cranial of the anal sphincter. The implantation of the gold markers improved communication between the surgeon, the radiooncologist and the pathologist resulting in intensified exchange of relevant informations. (orig.)

  19. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  20. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Tessler, M.; Silverman, I.

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm3) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the 7Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ˜200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm2 and volume power density of ˜2 MW/cm3 at a lithium flow of ˜4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF.

  1. Target-plasma production by laser irradiation of a pellet in the Baseball II-T experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, C.C.; Foote, J.H.; Futch, A.H.; Goodman, R.K.; Hornady, R.S.; Osher, J.E.; Porter, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    One way to generate a plasma target that can be used in conjunction with an injected neutral beam to initiate a high-energy plasma in a steady-state, magnetic-mirror field is by the laser irradiation of a solid pellet located within the confinement region. In the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Baseball II-T experiment, a CO 2 laser was used to provide a two-sided irradiation of an ammonia pellet; the maximum laser intensity on the pellet was approximately 4 x 10 12 W/cm 2 . The 150-μm-dia pellets were guided to the laser focal spot in the Baseball II-T magnetic field using steering voltages controlled by a microcomputer-based system. Diagnostics showed complete ionization of the pellet, average ion energies in the keV range, synchronized triggering of the laser and the neutral beam, and rapid expansion of the plasma to a diameter that was a good match to the diameter of the neutral beam. Predictions obtained from the LASNEX code compared well with measured results. Although the laser-pellet approach was proven usable as a target-plasma startup system, it would be much more complicated and expensive than the method in which streaming plasma is used to trap the neutal beams

  2. Practical dosimetric aspects of blood and blood product irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearon, T.C.; Luban, N.L.

    1986-01-01

    The method of choice to reduce susceptibility to transfusion-transmitted graft-versus-host disease is irradiation of allogenic blood and blood products for transfusion to immunosuppressed recipients. Optimal irradiation requires delivery of a known and homogeneous absorbed dose. The use of absorbed dose in air measured at the center of the irradiation volume without proper compensation for sample absorption can lead to approximately 20 percent underexposure. A lucite cylinder was used to provide the delivery of a homogeneous irradiation dose to blood products of different volumes by allowing rotation of the product

  3. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cantono, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Nersisyan, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Brauckmann, S. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Doria, D.; Gwynne, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Macchi, A. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Naughton, K. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Willi, O. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lewis, C.L.S.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a ‘self’ proton probing arrangement – i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Prompt charging of laser irradiated target generates ultra-short EM pulses. • Its ultrafast propagation along a wire was studied by self-proton probing technique. • Self-proton probing technique is the proton probing with one laser pulse. • Pulse temporal profile and speed along the wire were measured with high resolution.

  4. Comparison of different application systems and CT- assisted treatment planning procedures in primary endometrium cancer: Is it technically possible to include the whole uterus volume in the volume treated by brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, U.; Knocke, Th.; Fellner, C.; Poetter, R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is regarded as the definitive component of treatment for inoperable patients with endometrium cancer. In published series the whole uterus has been claimed to represent the target volume independently of the individual tumor spread. The purpose of this work is to compare different planning and application procedures and to analyze the target volumes (whole uterus), treatment volumes and their respective relation for the given various conditions. Material and Methods: In ten patients with primary endometrium cancer the correlation between target- and treatment volume was analysed based on standard one-channel applicators or individual Heyman applicators. A comparative analysis of target volumes resulting from two different planning procedures of Heyman applications was performed. CT was carried out after insertion of the Heyman ovoids. Target volume was estimated by measuring the uterus size at different cross sections of the CT images. Dose calculation was performed with (PLATO-system) or without (NPS-system) transferring these data directly to the planning system. We report on the differences in treatment volumes resulting from the two application and planning systems. Results: The mean value of the uterus volume was 180 ccm (range 57 ccm to 316 ccm). Four out of 10 patients had an asymmetric uterus configuration with a side-difference (in longitudinal or transversal direction) of more than 1 cm. On average 70% (range 48-95%) of the uterus volume was included by the treatment volume when Heymann applicators were used compared to 45 % (range 25-89%) when standard one channel applicators were used. This represents an improvement of 25% (range from 11%-35%). By utilizing the more sophisticated way of treatment planning a more adequate coverage of the uterus volume was achieved in five out of ten patients. The treated volume increased on the average by 20 % (range 11 %-32%). In three cases changes in the irradiation volume were less than 5%. In

  5. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within ±1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 ± 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 ± 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  6. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With IMRT: New Technical Approach and Interim Analysis of Acute Toxicity in a Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livi, Lorenzo; Buonamici, Fabrizio Banci; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Scotti, Vieri; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Compagnucci, Antonella; Paiar, Fabiola; Scoccianti, Silvia; Pallotta, Stefania; Detti, Beatrice; Agresti, Benedetta; Talamonti, Cinzia; Mangoni, Monica; Bianchi, Simonetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Marrazzo, Livia; Bucciolini, Marta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate with a randomized clinical trial the possibility of treating the index quadrant with external intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a selected group of patients with early-stage breast cancer and to analyze the acute toxicity. Methods and Materials: From September 2005, a randomized Phase III clinical trial has been conducted to compare conventional (tangential field) fractionated whole breast treatment (Arm A) with accelerated partial breast irradiation plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (Arm B). For intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the clinical target volume was drawn with a uniform 1-cm margin around the surgical clips in three dimensions. The ipsilateral and contralateral breast, ipsilateral and contralateral lung, heart, and spinal cord were contoured as organs at risk. All the regions of interest were contoured according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements reports 50 and 62 recommendations. Results: In September 2008, 259 patients were randomized and treated. The mean clinical target volume in Arm B was 44 cm 3 and the mean planning target volume was 123 cm 3 . The mean value of the ratio between the planning target volume and the ipsilateral breast volume was 21%. The rate of Grade 1 and Grade 2 acute skin toxicity was 22% and 19% in Arm A (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale), respectively. The tolerance in Arm B was excellent with only 5% Grade 1 and 0.8% Grade 2 acute skin toxicity. The planning constraints were fully satisfied in most patients. In a very few cases, this was not possible because of very unfavorable anatomy. Quality assurance procedures were performed according to our internal quality assurance protocol, with excellent results. Conclusion: In the present preliminary analysis, we have demonstrated that accelerated partial breast irradiation is feasible, with very low acute toxicity.

  7. Chlorin e6 Conjugated Interleukin-6 Receptor Aptamers Selectively Kill Target Cells Upon Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kruspe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT uses the therapeutic properties of light in combination with certain chemicals, called photosensitizers, to successfully treat brain, breast, prostate, and skin cancers. To improve PDT, current research focuses on the development of photosensitizers to specifically target cancer cells. In the past few years, aptamers have been developed to directly deliver cargo molecules into target cells. We conjugated the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (ce6 with a human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R binding RNA aptamer, AIR-3A yielding AIR-3A-ce6 for application in high efficient PDT. AIR-3A-ce6 was rapidly and specifically internalized by IL-6R presenting (IL-6R+ cells. Upon light irradiation, targeted cells were selectively killed, while free ce6 did not show any toxic effect. Cells lacking the IL-6R were also not affected by AIR-3A-ce6. With this approach, we improved the target specificity of ce6-mediated PDT. In the future, other tumor-specific aptamers might be used to selectively localize photosensitizers into cells of interest and improve the efficacy and specificity of PDT in cancer and other diseases.

  8. Target volume definition with 18F-FDG PET-CT in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, K. J.; Hanna, G. G.; Hounsell, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using 18F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTF) purposes, and in particular for defining target volumes. This is a rapidly evolving subject and this review describes the background to this application of PET imaging and discusses the issues involved. (authors)

  9. Probe into rational target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma having been treated with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yingjie; Zhao Chong; Lu Lixia; Wu Shaoxiong; Cui Nianji; Chen Fujin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the local control rate and the dosimetric patterns of local recurrence in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients having been treated with standardized conventional radiotherapy and to evaluate the delineation of rational target volume. Methods: From Jan. 2000 to Dec. 2000, 476 patients with untreated NPC were treated by standardized conventional radiotherapy alone at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The radiation ports were designed on a X-ray simulator. The nasopharyngeal lesion demonstrated by CT scan and the subclinical spread regions adjacent to the nasopharynx were defined as the target volume. Kaplan- Meier method was used to calculate the cumulative local recurrence rate. For patients with local recurrence, the primary and recurrent local tumor volumes(V nx , V recur ) were delineated with three-dimensional treatment planning system(3DTPS), and the dataset of radiation ports and delivered prescription dose to the 3DTPS were transferred according to the first treatment. The dose of radiation received by V recur was calculated and analyzed with dose- volume histogram(DVH). Local recurrence was classified as: 1. 'in-port' with 95% or more of the recurrence volume ( recur V 95 ) was within the 95% isodose; 2. 'marginal' with 20% to 95% of recur V 95 within the 95% isodose; 3. o utside w ith only less than 20% of recur V 95 within the 95% isodose curve. Results: With the median follow- up of 42.5 months (range 8-54 months), 52 patients developed local recurrence. The 1-, 2-, 3 and 4-year cumulative local failure rate was 0.6%, 3.9%, 8.7% and 11.5%, respectively. Among the 42 local recurrent patients who could be analyzed by 3DTPS, 52% were in-port, 40% were marginal and 7% were outside. For most of the marginal recurrence and all the outside recurrence patients, the main reason of recurrence were related to the unreasonable design of the radiation port and inaccuracy in the interpretation image findings. Conclusions: The outcome of

  10. Relapse Analysis of Irradiated Patients Within the HD15 Trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, Jan; Reinartz, Gabriele [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster, Münster (Germany); Dietlein, Markus; Kobe, Carsten; Kuhnert, Georg [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Haverkamp, Heinz [First Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Haverkamp, Uwe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster, Münster (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Lukas, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria); Schmidberger, Heinz [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Staar, Susanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Hegerfeld, Kira [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster, Münster (Germany); Baues, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Engert, Andreas [First Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor, E-mail: hans.eich@ukmuenster.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster, Münster (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of advanced-stage of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), whether relapses occur in the irradiated planning target volume and whether the definition of local radiation therapy (RT) used by the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) is adequate, because there is no harmonization of field and volume definitions among the large cooperative groups in the treatment of advanced-stage HL. Methods and Materials: All patients with residual disease of ≥2.5 cm after multiagent chemotherapy (CTX) were evaluated using additional positron emission tomography (PET), and those with a PET-positive result were irradiated with 30 Gy to the site of residual disease. We re-evaluated all sites of disease before and after CTX, as well as the PET-positive residual tumor that was treated in all relapsed patients. Documentation of radiation therapy (RT), treatment planning procedures, and portal images were carefully analyzed and compared with the centrally recommended RT prescription. The irradiated sites were compared with sites of relapse using follow-up computed tomography scans. Results: A total of 2126 patients were enrolled, and 225 patients (11%) received RT. Radiation therapy documents of 152 irradiated patients (68%) were analyzed, with 28 irradiated patients (11%) relapsing subsequently. Eleven patients (39%) had an in-field relapse, 7 patients (25%) relapsed outside the irradiated volume, and an additional 10 patients (36%) showed mixed in- and out-field relapses. Of 123 patients, 20 (16%) with adequately performed RT relapsed, compared with 7 of 29 patients (24%) with inadequate RT. Conclusions: The frequency and pattern of relapses suggest that local RT to PET-positive residual disease is sufficient for patients in advanced-stage HL. Insufficient safety margins of local RT may contribute to in-field relapses.

  11. Voluntary Deep Inspiration Breath-hold Reduces the Heart Dose Without Compromising the Target Volume Coverage During Radiotherapy for Left-sided Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hammadi, Noora; Caparrotti, Palmira; Naim, Carole; Hayes, Jillian; Rebecca Benson, Katherine; Vasic, Ana; Al-Abdulla, Hissa; Hammoud, Rabih; Divakar, Saju; Petric, Primoz

    2018-03-01

    During radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer, parts of the heart are irradiated, which may lead to late toxicity. We report on the experience of single institution with cardiac-sparing radiotherapy using voluntary deep inspiration breath hold (V-DIBH) and compare its dosimetric outcome with free breathing (FB) technique. Left-sided breast cancer patients, treated at our department with postoperative radiotherapy of breast/chest wall +/- regional lymph nodes between May 2015 and January 2017, were considered for inclusion. FB-computed tomography (CT) was obtained and dose-planning performed. Cases with cardiac V25Gy ≥ 5% or risk factors for heart disease were coached for V-DIBH. Compliant patients were included. They underwent additional CT in V-DIBH for planning, followed by V-DIBH radiotherapy. Dose volume histogram parameters for heart, lung and optimized planning target volume (OPTV) were compared between FB and BH. Treatment setup shifts and systematic and random errors for V-DIBH technique were compared with FB historic control. Sixty-three patients were considered for V-DIBH. Nine (14.3%) were non-compliant at coaching, leaving 54 cases for analysis. When compared with FB, V-DIBH resulted in a significant reduction of mean cardiac dose from 6.1 +/- 2.5 to 3.2 +/- 1.4 Gy (p FB and V-DIBH, respectively (p FB- and V-DIBH-derived mean lung dose (11.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 10.6 +/- 2.6 Gy), lung V20Gy (20.5 +/- 7 vs. 19.5 +/- 5.1 Gy) and V95% for the OPTV (95.6 +/- 4.1 vs. 95.2 +/- 6.3%) were non-significant. V-DIBH-derived mean shifts for initial patient setup were ≤ 2.7 mm. Random and systematic errors were ≤ 2.1 mm. These results did not differ significantly from historic FB controls. When compared with FB, V-DIBH demonstrated high setup accuracy and enabled significant reduction of cardiac doses without compromising the target volume coverage. Differences in lung doses were non-significant.

  12. 11C-methionine PET improves the target volume delineation of meningiomas treated with stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Astner, Sabrina T.; Adam, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of 11 C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) in target volume delineation for meningiomas and to determine the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Two independent observers performed treatment planning in 10 patients according to a prospective written protocol. In the first step, they used coregistered computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the second step, MET-PET was added to CT/MRI (image fusion based on mutual information). Results: The correlation between gross tumor volume (GTVs) delineated by the two observers based on CT/MRI was r = 0.855 (Spearman's correlation coefficient, p = 0.002) and r = 0.988 (p = 0.000) when MET-PET/CT/MRI were used. The number of patients with agreement in more then 80% of the outlined volume increased with the availability of MET-PET from 1 in 10 to 5 in 10. The median volume of intersection between the regions delineated by two observers increased significantly from 69% (from the composite volume) to 79%, by the addition of MET-PET (p = 0.005). The information of MET-PET was useful to delineate GTV in the area of cavernous sinus, orbit, and base of the skull. Conclusions: The hypothesis-generating findings of potential normal tissue sparing and reduced interobserver variability provide arguments for invasive studies of the correlation between MET-PET images and histologic tumor extension and for prospective trials of target volume delineation with CT/MRI/MET-PET image fusion

  13. Characterization of third-harmonic target plan irradiance on the National Ignition Facility Beamlet demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, P.J.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Dixit, S.N.; Henesian, M.A.; Barker, C.E.; Thompson, C.E.; Seppala, L.G.; Caird, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Beamlet laser is a single-aperture prototype for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We have recently installed and activated a 55 m 3 vacuum vessel and associated diagnostic package at the output of the Beamlet that we are using to characterize target plane irradiance at high power. Measurements obtained both with and without a kinoform diffractive optic are reported. Dependences on critical laser parameters including output power, spatial filtering, and wavefront correction are discussed and compared with simulations

  14. Investigation of neutron irradiated reactor vessel steels using post-irradiation annealing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Hayato; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    The matrix damage is known to be a major factor that contributes to embrittlement and hardening of irradiated reactor vessel steels, and is assumed to be composed of the point defect clusters. However field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) and atom probe (AP) could not detect any evidence of the matrix damage. In this study, post irradiation annealing experiments combining positron annihilation lineshape analysis (PALA) and hardness experiments were applied to an actual surveillance test specimen and a sample of reactor vessel steel irradiated in a material test reactor (MTR), in order to investigate the matrix damage recovery behavior and its contribution to hardening. It was confirmed that higher fluence increased the hardness and the volume fraction of open volume defects and that higher flux decreased the thermal stability of matrix damage and the effect on hardening. The contribution of matrix damage to hardening could be estimated to be below 30%. (author)

  15. The incidence of inclusion of the sigmoid colon and small bowel in the planning target volume in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerleer, G.O. de; Vakaet, L.; Neve, W.J. de; Villeirs, G.M.; Delrue, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: in radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is considered the dose-limiting organ. The incidence of overlap between the sigmoid colon and/or small bowel and the planning target volume (PTV) as well as the dose to sigmoid colon and small bowel were investigated. Patients and methods: the CT data of 75 prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of prostate and seminal vesicles. The PTV was defined as a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV with a 10-mm margin in craniocaudal and a 7-mm margin in the other directions. All patients were planned to a mean CTV dose of at least 76 Gy. Minimum CTV dose was set at 70 Gy. Dose inhomogeneity within the CTV was kept between 12% and 17%. Sigmoid colon was defined upward from the level where the rectum turned in a transverse plane. Contrast-filled small bowel was contoured on all slices where it was visible. The presence of sigmoid colon and/or small bowel in close vicinity to or overlapping with the PTV was recorded. For each case, the dose to the sigmoid colon and small bowel was calculated. Results: the PTV was found to overlap with the sigmoid colon in 60% and with the small bowel in 19% of the cases. In these patients, mean maximum dose to the sigmoid colon was 76.2 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 70.0-80.7 Gy). Mean maximum dose to the small bowel was 74.9 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 68.0-80.0 Gy). Conclusion: when systematically investigating the anatomic position of sigmoid colon and small bowel in patients accepted for prostate irradiation, parts of both organs were often observed in close vicinity to the PTV. Apart from the rectum, these organs may be dose-limiting in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  16. The incidence of inclusion of the sigmoid colon and small bowel in the planning target volume in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerleer, G.O. de; Vakaet, L.; Neve, W.J. de [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gent Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Villeirs, G.M.; Delrue, L.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Gent Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium)

    2004-09-01

    Background and purpose: in radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is considered the dose-limiting organ. The incidence of overlap between the sigmoid colon and/or small bowel and the planning target volume (PTV) as well as the dose to sigmoid colon and small bowel were investigated. Patients and methods: the CT data of 75 prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of prostate and seminal vesicles. The PTV was defined as a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV with a 10-mm margin in craniocaudal and a 7-mm margin in the other directions. All patients were planned to a mean CTV dose of at least 76 Gy. Minimum CTV dose was set at 70 Gy. Dose inhomogeneity within the CTV was kept between 12% and 17%. Sigmoid colon was defined upward from the level where the rectum turned in a transverse plane. Contrast-filled small bowel was contoured on all slices where it was visible. The presence of sigmoid colon and/or small bowel in close vicinity to or overlapping with the PTV was recorded. For each case, the dose to the sigmoid colon and small bowel was calculated. Results: the PTV was found to overlap with the sigmoid colon in 60% and with the small bowel in 19% of the cases. In these patients, mean maximum dose to the sigmoid colon was 76.2 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 70.0-80.7 Gy). Mean maximum dose to the small bowel was 74.9 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 68.0-80.0 Gy). Conclusion: when systematically investigating the anatomic position of sigmoid colon and small bowel in patients accepted for prostate irradiation, parts of both organs were often observed in close vicinity to the PTV. Apart from the rectum, these organs may be dose-limiting in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Comparison on the production of radionuclides in 1.4 GeV proton irradiated LBE targets of different thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, Moumita; Mendonça, Tania M; Stora, Thierry; Lahiri, Susanta

    2014-01-01

    This is the first report on the inventory of radionuclides produced in 1.4 GeV proton induced reaction on Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) targets. LBE targets of 6 mm diameter and 1 to 8 mm lengths were irradiated with 1.4 GeV protons. The radionuclides ranging from Be-7 (53.12 days) to Po-207 (5.8 h) were identified in the samples with the help of time resolved gamma-ray spectroscopy. However, there is no signature of formation of At radioisotopes, which can be produced by the interaction of secondary particles, typical for thick targets.

  18. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  19. Target volume geometric change and/or deviation from the cranium during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases: potential pitfalls in image guidance based on bony anatomy alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the potential geometrical change and/or displacement of the target relative to the cranium during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for treating newly developed brain metastases. For 16 patients with 21 lesions treated with image-guided frameless FSRT in 5 or 10 fractions using a 6-degree-of-freedom image guidance system-integrated platform, the unenhanced computed tomography or T2-weighted magnetic resonance images acquired until the completion of FSRT were fused to the planning image datasets for comparison. Significant change was defined as ≥3-mm change in the tumour diameter or displacement of the tumour centroid. FSRT was started 1 day after planning image acquisition. Tumour shrinkage, deviation and both were observed in 2, 1 and 1 of the 21 lesions, respectively, over a period of 7-13 days. Tumour shrinkage or deviation resulted in an increase or decrease in the marginal dose to the tumour, respectively, and a substantial increase in the irradiated volume for the surrounding tissue irrespective of the pattern of alteration. No obvious differences in the clinical and treatment characteristics were noted among the populations with or without significant changes in tumour volume or position. Target deformity and/or deviation can unexpectedly occur even during relatively short-course FSRT, inevitably leading to a gradual discrepancy between the planned and actually delivered doses to the tumour and surrounding tissue. To appropriately weigh the treatment outcome against the planned dose distribution, target deformity and/or deviation should also be considered in addition to the immobilisation accuracy, as image guidance with bony anatomy alignment does not necessarily guarantee accurate target localisation until completion of FSRT. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Automatic definition of targeted biological volumes for the radiotherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatt, M.; Visvikis, D.; Cheze-Le-Rest, C.; Pradier, O.

    2009-01-01

    The proposed method: Fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (F.L.A.B.) showed its reliability and its precision on very complete collection of realistic simulated and real data. Its use in the context of radiotherapy allows to consider easily the studies implementation and scenari of dose painting or dose escalation, including in complex cases of heterogenous fixations. It is conceivable to apply F.L.A.B. on PET images with F.M.I.S.O. ( 18 F fluoro misonidazole) or F.L.T. (fluoro-L-thymidine) to complete the definition of the biological target volume. (N.C.)

  1. Current status of food irradiation overseas. Data update from 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todoriki, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    As the movement of international standards and specifications, the treatment standards related to food irradiation have been summarized on the basis of the ISPM 28 Annex PT-19 of International Plant Protection Convention. As the movement in the United States, there are the following tables: (1) food and radiation dose approved by FDA, (2) lowest radiation dose for the pests of each quarantine target stipulated by the USDA/APHIS as the plant quarantine authorities of the United States Department of Agriculture, (3) items and production sites of vegetables/fruits about which irradiation treatment in import phytosanitary has been approved by USDA, and (4) import volume of irradiated fruits into the United States. The following statistics have also been summarized: (1) materials and irradiation dose permitted FSANZ, which is the food safety regulatory authorities of Australia and New Zealand, and (2) irradiation-treated amount of each food in the EU territory in 2013, and treated amount in each country. In Asia, the amount and facilities of irradiation treatment are described for ten countries including China, Thailand, India, etc. As the contents of the Coordinated Research Programs (CRPs) of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the following are introduced: (1) three items including 'Development of generic irradiation doses for quarantine treatments,' and (2) three items of the contents of 'The Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology for Asia and the Pacific: RCA).' (A.O.)

  2. Preliminary results on neutron production from a Pb/U target irradiated by deuteron beam at 1.25 GeV/amu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M.; Manolopoulou, M.; Jokic, S.; Zamani, M.; Krivopustov, M.; Sosnin, A.; Stoulos, S.

    2008-01-01

    A spallation neutron source consisted of a cylindrical Pb target and surrounded by uranium blanket was irradiated by deuteron beam 1.25 GeV/amu provided from the Nuclotron accelerator at High Energy Laboratory, JINR, Dubna. For radiation protection purpose a polyethylene shielding was placed around the spallation neutron source. Neutron distributions along the surface of the U-blanket were measured by using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) as particle and fission detectors. The neutron distributions appear to be similar to those obtained by proton irradiations. Applying a fitting procedure to the experimental data the inelastic cross section of deuteron in Pb was estimated. The escaping neutron distribution from the polyethylene shielding and parallel to the target was also measured and presented to be two orders of magnitude less than that over the U-blanket surface

  3. Study of intense pulse irradiation effects on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors; Etude des effets d`irradiations pulsees intenses sur des cibles de silicium considere en tant que materiau de base pour detecteurs optiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, O

    1994-12-01

    This study aim was centered on morphological and structural alterations induced by laser irradiation on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors. First we recalled the main high light intensity effects on the condensed matter. Then we presented the experimental aspects. The experimental studies were achieved on two sample types: SiO{sub 2}/Si and Si. Two topics were studied: the defect chronology according to wavelength and pulse length, and the crystalline quality as well as the structure defects of irradiated zones by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, irradiation of Si targets by intense pulsed beams may lead to material fusion. This phenomenon is particularly easy when the material is absorbent, when the pulse is short and when the material is superficially oxidized. (MML). 204 refs., 93 figs., 21 tabs., 1 appendix.

  4. Temperature effect of irradiated target surface on distribution of nanoparticles formed by implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L; Popok, V N

    2001-01-01

    The composition layers, containing the metal nanoparticles, synthesized thorough implantation of the Ag sup + ions with the energy of 60 keV and the dose of 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 ion/cm sup 2 into the sodium-calcium silicate glass by the ion current of 3 mu A/cm sup 2 and the sublayer temperature of 35 deg C are studied. The obtained implantation results are analyzed in dependence on the temperature effects, developing for the glass samples of various thickness. The data on the silver distribution, the metal nanoparticles formation and growth by depth are obtained from the optical reflection spectra. It is demonstrated that minor changes in the surface temperature of the irradiated glass sublayer lead to noticeable diversities in the regularities of the nanoparticles formation in the sample volume

  5. The study of dose variation and change of heart volume using 4D-CT in left breast radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seon Mi; Cheon, Geum Seong; Heo, Gyeong Hun; Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Kwang Seok; Kim, Chang Uk; Kim, Hoi Nam

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the results of changed heart volume and heart dose in the left breast cancer patients while considering the movements of respiration. During the months of March and May in 2012, we designated the 10 patients who had tangential irradiation with left breast cancer in the department of radiation Oncology. With acquired images of free breathing pattern through 3D and 4D CT, we had planed enough treatment filed for covered up the whole left breast. It compares the results of the exposed dose and the volume of heart by DVH (Dose Volume histogram). Although total dose was 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/28 fraction), reirradiated 9 Gy (1.8 Gy/5 Fraction) with PTV (Planning Target Volume) if necessary. It compares the results of heart volume and heart dose with the free breathing in 3D CT and 4D CT. It represents the maximum difference volume of heart is 40.5%. In addition, it indicated the difference volume of maximum and minimum, average are 8.8% and 27.9%, 37.4% in total absorbed dose of heart. In case of tangential irradiation (opposite beam) in left breast cancer patients, it is necessary to consider the changed heart volume by the respiration of patient and the heartbeat of patient

  6. Performance of Leak Compensation in All-Age ICU Ventilators During Volume-Targeted Neonatal Ventilation: A Lung Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Taiga; Bennett, Desmond J; Chenelle, Christopher T; Fisher, Daniel F; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Volume-targeted ventilation is increasingly used in low birthweight infants because of the potential for reducing volutrauma and avoiding hypocapnea. However, it is not known what level of air leak is acceptable during neonatal volume-targeted ventilation when leak compensation is activated concurrently. Four ICU ventilators (Servo-i, PB980, V500, and Avea) were compared in available invasive volume-targeted ventilation modes (pressure control continuous spontaneous ventilation [PC-CSV] and pressure control continuous mandatory ventilation [PC-CMV]). The Servo-i and PB980 were tested with (+) and without (-) their proximal flow sensor. The V500 and Avea were tested with their proximal flow sensor as indicated by their manufacturers. An ASL 5000 lung model was used to simulate 4 neonatal scenarios (body weight 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kg). The ASL 5000 was ventilated via an endotracheal tube with 3 different leaks. Two minutes of data were collected after each change in leak level, and the asynchrony index was calculated. Tidal volume (V T ) before and after the change in leak was assessed. The differences in delivered V T between before and after the change in leak were within ±5% in all scenarios with the PB980 (-/+) and V500. With the Servo-i (-/+), baseline V T was ≥10% greater than set V T during PC-CSV, and delivered V T markedly changed with leak. The Avea demonstrated persistent high V T in all leak scenarios. Across all ventilators, the median asynchrony index was 1% (interquartile range 0-27%) in PC-CSV and 1.8% (0-45%) in PC-CMV. The median asynchrony index was significantly higher in the Servo-i (-/+) than in the PB980 (-/+) and V500 in 1 and 2 kg scenarios during PC-CSV and PC-CMV. The PB980 and V500 were the only ventilators to acclimate to all leak scenarios and achieve targeted V T . Further clinical investigation is needed to validate the use of leak compensation during neonatal volume-targeted ventilation. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  7. System for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The system for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target representing the high-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described Q-meter with series connection and a circuit for measuring system resonance characteristic is used for NMR-absorption signal recording. Measuring coil is produced of a strip conductor in order to obtain uniform system sensitivity to polarization state in all target volume and improve signal-to-noise ratio. Polarization measuring system operates ion-line with the M-6000 computer. The total measuring error for the value of free proton polarization in target taking into account the error caused by local depolarization of working substance under irradiation by high-intense photon beam is <= 6%. Long-term application of the described system for measuring the proton polarization in the LUEh-20000 accelerator target used in the pion photoproduction experiments has demonstrated its high reliability

  8. Impact of systematic errors on DVH parameters of different OAR and target volumes in Intracavitary Brachytherapy (ICBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourya, Ankur; Singh, Gaganpreet; Kumar, Vivek; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study is to analyze the impact of systematic errors on DVH parameters of different OAR and Target volumes in intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). To quantify the changes in dose-volume histogram parameters due to systematic errors in applicator reconstruction of brachytherapy planning, known errors in catheter reconstructions have to be introduced in applicator coordinate system

  9. Whole abdominal irradiation following chemotherapy in advanced ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuten, A.; Stein, M.; Steiner, M.; Rubinov, R.; Epelbaum, R.; Cohen, Y.

    1988-01-01

    One hundred and sixteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma, who underwent primary cytoreductive surgery, received 6-11 courses of chemotherapy by cis-platin (50 mg/m2) and adriamycin (50 mg/m2) every 21 days. This was followed by second look laparotomy in 66 patients with no clinical evidence of disease. Consolidation abdominal irradiation was administered to 43 patients. Two techniques of irradiation were employed: between 1980-1983 whole abdominal irradiation was used and patients were to receive 3000 cGy in 4 weeks (Schedule I). Due to myelosuppression only 13 of 26 patients (50%) completed the planned dose of radiation. Between 1983-1985 the target volume was divided into upper and lower parts. First, the lower abdomen received 3000 cGy in 3 weeks, and then the upper abdomen received the same dose (Schedule II). Sixteen of seventeen patients (94%) thus treated, completed the planned dose of radiation. The actuarial survival for all 116 patients was 28% of 5 years. Irradiated patients with negative second look laparotomy had a survival probability of 100% at 24 months. Irradiated patients with microscopic disease at second look operation had an actuarial 5-year survival of 66%. Patients with minimal residual disease at second look laparotomy, receiving consolidation abdominal irradiation, had an actuarial survival of 5% only at 36 months. It is concluded that consolidation radiotherapy is effective in patients with negative or microscopic residual disease at second-look laparotomy. In regard to bone marrow tolerance, split field technique of irradiation is preferred

  10. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of a device for irradiation of LEU UAlx-Al targets for 99Mo production in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Pedro Julio Batista de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), the product of radioactive decay of molybdenum-99 ( Mo), is one of the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, covering approximately 80% of all radiodiagnosis procedures in the world. Nowadays, Brazil requires an amount of about 450 Ci of 99 Mo per week. Due to the crisis and the shortage of 99 Mo supply chain that has been observed on the world since 2008, IPEN/CNEN-SP decided to develop a project to produce 99 Mo through fission of uranium-235. The objective of this dissertation was the development of neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations to evaluate the operational safety of a device for 99 Mo production to be irradiated in the IEA-Rl reactor core at 5 MW. In this device will be placed ten targets of UAl x -Al dispersion fuel with low enriched uranium (LEU) and density of 2.889 gU/cm 3 . For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION and CITATION and the maximum temperatures reached in the targets were calculated with the code MTRCR-IEA-R1. The analysis demonstrated that the device irradiation will occur without adverse consequences to the operation of the reactor. The total amount of 99 Mo was calculated with the program SCALE and considering that the time needed for the chemical processing and recovering of the 99 Mo will be five days after the irradiation, we have that the 99 Mo activity available for distribution will be 176 Ci for 3 days of irradiation, 236 Ci for 5 days of irradiation and 272 Ci for 7 days of targets irradiation. (author)'

  11. Adaptive radiotherapy in muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer - An effective method to reduce the irradiated bowel volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomikoski, Laura; Collan, Juhani; Keyrilaeinen, Jani; Visapaeae, Harri; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the benefits of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer in decreasing irradiation of small bowel. Material and methods: Five patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer received adaptive radiotherapy to a total dose of 55.8-65 Gy with daily cone-beam computed tomography scanning. The whole bladder was treated to 45-50.4 Gy, followed by a partial bladder boost. The plan of the day was chosen from 3 to 4 pre-planned treatment plans according to the visible extent of bladder wall in cone-beam computed tomography images. Dose volume histograms for intestinal cavity volumes were constructed and compared with corresponding histograms calculated for conventional non-adaptive radiotherapy with single treatment plan of 2 cm CTV-PTV margins. CTV dose coverage in adaptive treatment technique was compared with CTV dose coverage in conventional radiotherapy. Results: The average volume of intestinal cavity receiving ≥45 Gy was reduced from 335 ± 106 cm 3 to 180 ± 113 cm 3 (1SD). The maximum volume of intestinal cavity spared at 45 Gy on a single patient was 240 cm 3 , while the minimum volume was 65 cm 3 . The corresponding reduction in average intestinal cavity volume receiving ≥45 Gy calculated for the whole bladder treatment only was 66 ± 36 cm 3 . CTV dose coverage was improved on two out of five patients and decreased on three patients. Conclusions: Adaptive radiotherapy considerably reduces dose to the small bowel, while maintaining the dose coverage of CTV at similar level when compared to the conventional treatment technique.

  12. Multi-Institution Prospective Trial of Reduced-Dose Craniospinal Irradiation (23.4 Gy) Followed by Conformal Posterior Fossa (36 Gy) and Primary Site Irradiation (55.8 Gy) and Dose-Intensive Chemotherapy for Average-Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wallace, Dana; Chintagumpala, Murali M.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Ashley, David M.; Sexton, Maree; Kellie, Stewart J.; Ahern, Verity M.B.B.S.; Gajjar, Amar

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Limiting the neurocognitive sequelae of radiotherapy (RT) has been an objective in the treatment of medulloblastoma. Conformal RT to less than the entire posterior fossa (PF) after craniospinal irradiation might reduce neurocognitive sequelae and requires evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between October 1996 and August 2003, 86 patients, 3-21 years of age, with newly diagnosed, average-risk medulloblastoma were treated in a prospective, institutional review board-approved, multi-institution trial of risk-adapted RT and dose-intensive chemotherapy. RT began within 28 days of definitive surgery and consisted of craniospinal irradiation (23.4 Gy), conformal PF RT (36.0 Gy), and primary site RT (55.8 Gy). The planning target volume for the primary site included the postoperative tumor bed surrounded by an anatomically confined margin of 2 cm that was then expanded with a geometric margin of 0.3-0.5 cm. Chemotherapy was initiated 6 weeks after RT and included four cycles of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and vincristine. Results: At a median follow-up of 61.2 months (range, 5.2-115.0 months), the estimated 5-year event-free survival and cumulative incidence of PF failure rate was 83.0% ± 5.3% and 4.9% ± 2.4% (± standard error), respectively. The targeting guidelines used in this study resulted in a mean reduction of 13% in the volume of the PF receiving doses >55 Gy compared with conventionally planned RT. The reductions in the dose to the temporal lobes, cochleae, and hypothalamus were statistically significant. Conclusion: This prospective trial has demonstrated that irradiation of less than the entire PF after 23.4 Gy craniospinal irradiation for average-risk medulloblastoma results in disease control comparable to that after treatment of the entire PF

  13. Economic aspects of food irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Osetskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dealing with the irradiated foods world market quantitative and economic volume' estimating in 29 countries. The irradiation exposure technology development is presented in order to prospects in Russia. The main irradiated foods categories such as spices, herbs, dry vegetables, fruits, frozen and chilled meat, including frog legs, seafood, grains and others are identified. It is shown the quantitative dividing irradiated foods world market is between China (37,60%, USA (19,36%, Ukraine (14,74%, Vietnam (12,41%, Brazil (5,62%, South Africa (4,10%, Indonesia (1.30 percent, Japan (1,17%, Belgium (1,10%. The remaining 20 States took a share of 2.6%. The irradiated products world market’ economic volume amounting to 17,136.56 million rubles, is divided between the USA (48,64%, China (16,26%, Brazil (14,53%, South Africa (of 10.18%, Vietnam (of 5.88%, Indonesia (1,04%. The remaining 24 countries took a share of 3.48% while share each of them amounting less than 1%. It is revealed that the most expensive irradiated foods’ category is "spices and herbs", least – "vegetables", "cereals". The research results are shown the Russian potential irradiated foods volume consisting of meat products, the main vegetable crops, food ingredients, spices and food is about 10 million tons, more than 12 million tons, about 200 thousand tons per year respectively. The meat and poultry total production was 9,899.2 thousand tons in carcass weight, yield of grain and leguminous was 120,671.79 thousand tons; spices raw was 97.5 thousand tons, potatoes was 31,107.80 thousand tones, vegetables (excluding melons was 16,283.34 thousand tons, forage crops (except grasses was 27,674.15 thousand tons in 2016 in Russia. Therefore 100% of meat, 74% of vegetables and about 1% of spices and animal feeds may be subjected to radiation in Russia. Despite the advanced technology and status as a leader in the agricultural radiology and radioecology field commercial

  14. Direct flow separation strategy, to isolate no-carrier-added {sup 90}Nb from irradiated Mo or Zr targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, Valery; Roesch, Frank [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Filosofov, Dmitry V.; Dadakhanov, Jakhongir [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Karaivanov, Dimitar V. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy; Marinova, Atanaska [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy; Baimukhanova, Ayagoz [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-11-01

    {sup 90}Nb has an intermediate half-life of 14.6 h, a high positron branching of 53% and optimal β{sup +} emission energy of only E{sub mean} 0.35 MeV per decay. These favorable characteristics suggest it may be a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Our recent aim was to conduct studies on distribution coefficients for Zr{sup IV} and Nb{sup V} in mixtures of HCl/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HCl/oxalic acid for anion exchange resin (AG 1 x 8) and UTEVA resin to develop a ''direct flow'' separation strategy for {sup 90}Nb. The direct flow concept refers to a separation accomplished using a single eluent on multiple columns, effectively streamlining the separation process and increasing the time efficiency. Finally, we also demonstrated that this separation strategy is applicable to the production of the positron emitter {sup 90}Nb via the irradiation of molybdenum targets and isolation of {sup 90}Nb from the irradiated molybdenum target.

  15. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  16. Three-dimensional irradiation planning of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers based on phantom examinations Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esik, Olga; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Doll, Josef; Nemeth, Gyoergy; Lorenz, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional dose distributions were computed for the photon radiotherapy of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers using a pair of symmetrical wedges in a coaxial pair of opposing lateral beams in fixed positions. Treatment plans obtained with wedged and open fields under various irradiation conditions ( 60 Co gamma unit, photon beams from a 6 MeV and a 15 MeV linear accelerator) are analyzed and compared. The homogeneity of dose distribution for the target volume at cobalt gamma ray was moderately improved using wedges. The use of 6 MeV x-ray wedging slightly decreases the uniformity of the tumor dose distribution. At 15 MeV wedging produces no improvement on the homogeneity of the dose delivered to the target volume. Thus it seems that the application of wedges is not advantageous in this field of radiotherapy. (author) 8 refs.; 13 figs

  17. Shielding Aspects of Accelerators, Targets and Irradiation Facilities - SATIF-11 Workshop Proceedings Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last decades from simple devices to powerful machines. In recent years, new technological and research applications have helped to define requirements while the number of accelerator facilities in operation, being commissioned, designed or planned has grown significantly. Their parameters, which include the beam energy, currents and intensities, and target composition, can vary widely, giving rise to new radiation shielding issues and challenges. Particle accelerators must be operated in safe ways to protect operators, the public and the environment. As the design and use of these facilities evolve, so must the analytical methods used in the safety analyses. These workshop proceedings review the state of the art in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities and irradiation targets. They also evaluate progress in the development of modelling methods used to assess the effectiveness of such shielding as part of safety analyses. The transport of radiation through shielding materials is a major consideration in the safety design studies of nuclear power plants, and the modelling techniques used may be applied to many other types of scientific and technological facilities. Accelerator and irradiation facilities represent a key capability in R and D, medical and industrial infrastructures, and they can be used in a wide range of scientific, medical and industrial applications. High-energy ion accelerators, for example, are now used not only in fundamental research, such as the search for new super-heavy nuclei, but also for therapy as part of cancer treatment. While the energy of the incident particles on the shielding of these facilities may be much higher than those found in nuclear power plants, much of the physics associated with the behaviour of the secondary particles produced is similar, as are the computer modelling techniques used to quantify key safety design parameters, such as radiation dose and activation levels

  18. ESTRO ACROP guidelines for target volume definition in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Ricardi, Umberto; Geets, Xavier; Belderbos, Jose; Pöttgen, Christoph; Dziadiuszko, Rafal; Peeters, Stephanie; Lievens, Yolande; Hurkmans, Coen; Slotman, Ben; Ramella, Sara; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; McDonald, Fiona; Manapov, Farkhad; Putora, Paul Martin; LePéchoux, Cécile; Van Houtte, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a major role in the curative treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, the ACROP committee was asked by the ESTRO to provide recommendations on target volume delineation for standard clinical scenarios in definitive (chemo)radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant RT for locally advanced NSCLC. The guidelines given here are a result of the evaluation of a structured questionnaire followed by a consensus discussion, voting and writing procedure within the committee. Hence, we provide advice for methods and time-points of diagnostics and imaging before the start of treatment planning and for the mandatory and optional imaging to be used for planning itself. Concerning target volumes, recommendations are given for GTV delineation of primary tumour and lymph nodes followed by issues related to the delineation of CTVs for definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy. In the context of PTV delineation, recommendations about the management of geometric uncertainties and target motion are given. We further provide our opinions on normal tissue delineation and organisational and responsibility questions in the process of target volume delineation. This guideline intends to contribute to the standardisation and optimisation of the process of RT treatment planning for clinical practice and prospective studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Trial study on design of irradiated fields of radiotherapy in cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zeng Zhifan; Cui Nianji; He Zhichun; Huang Shaomin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare three kinds of irradiation treatment plans for cervical and upper thoracic esophageal cancer, in order to arrived at proper decision for the patient. Methods: From February 2001 to June 2004, 43 such patients were studied with three different simulated treatment plans made including conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan for every one. All plans were evaluated with iso- dose curve and dose-volume histogram. Results: GTV on 95% isodose curve was 99.5%, 98.2% and 87.4% in conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan, respectively; PTV 1 and PTV 2 on 95% isodose with 97.8%, 97.2%, 94.8% and 95.8%, 86.6%, 73.7%. The volume of > 20 Gy dose of left lung accepted was 18.6%, 17.2% and 32.3%, in conformal plan, conventional four-field plan and conventional two-field plan, respectively; the right lung received 20.5% ,19.9% and 35.5%. Conclusions: Conformal plan is the best in radiotherapy, as it can provide ideal dose distribution of irradiated target with adequate protection of the normal tissues. Conventional four-field plan, being easy to carry, out, can replace the conformal plan in most situations. Conventional two-field has the most uneven dose distribution and largest lung volume irradiated. (authors)

  20. New irradiation facilities at the Australian national medical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parcell, S.K.; Arnott, D.W.; Conard, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two new irradiation facilities have been developed at the National Medical Cyclotron for radionuclide production. The first relocates PET irradiations from the cyclotron vault to a dedicated PET beam room, to improve accessibility and reduce radiation exposures associated with target maintenance. This new facility consists of a beam line to transport 16-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to 1 of 8 PET targets mounted on a target rack. The target rack has increased the number of targets available for production and experimentation. The second is a completely independent solid target irradiation facility for SPECT. This facility consists of a beam line to transport 26-30 MeV proton beams from the cyclotron to a dedicated beam room containing one solid target station. A new pneumatic target transfer system was also developed to transport the solid target to and from the existing chemistry hot cells. The beam line and target components are operated under the control of a dedicated PLC with a PC based user interface. The development and some technical aspects of these new irradiation facilities are discussed here. (author)

  1. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  2. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakho [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Zaijing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  3. The paradoxes in patterns and mechanism of bone marrow regeneration after irradiation. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarantino, C.W.; Rubin, P.; Constine, L.S. III

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow regeneration following irradiation has been largely studied as a dose-effect phenomenon, however, a large literature has simultaneously developed utilizing a wide variety of volumes, both in clinical studies and in experimental studies. Volume factors, more than dose, determine patterns of suppression and regeneration which have been documented by a variety of assay systems. Experimental evidence is presented which indicates that high dose irradiation to large volumes of bone marrow does not completely suppress bone marrow regeneration but results in a rapid compensatory response. Comparisons are made between the small and larger volumes at similar doses and indicate a greater overall compensatory response after the larger field irradiation, being more rapid in onset particularly after the 1000 rad dose. Although in-field regeneration of bone marrow occurs after single dose radiation to different volumes of bone marrow, experimental and clinical evidence from protracted conventional doses of irradiation to different volumes of bone marrow indicate significantly different response mechanisms. (Auth.)

  4. Weekly bi-fractionated 40 Gy three-dimensional conformational accelerated partial irradiation of breast: results of a phase II French pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgier, C.; Pichenot, C.; Verstraet, R.; Heymann, S.; Biron, B.; Delaloge, S.; Garbay, J.R.; Marsiglia, H.; Bourhis, J.; Taghian, A.; Marsiglia, H.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the first French experience of three-dimensional conformational and accelerated partial irradiation of breast. Twenty five patients have been concerned by this phase II trial. The prescribed total dose was 40 Gy, was delivered over 5 days in two daily fractions. Irradiation was performed with two 6 MV tangential mini-beams and a 6-22 MeV front electron beams. The planning target volume coverage was very good. Toxicity has been assessed. Healthy tissues (heart, lungs) are considerably protected. The acute and late toxicity is correct. Short communication

  5. Archives decontamination by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratu, E.; Moise, I.V.; Cutrubinis, M.; Negut, D.C.; Virgolici, Marian

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of archives with gamma irradiation is an efficient and environmental friendly alternative for biological decontamination of large volume of archives. It substitutes the use of chemicals for conservation and contributes to safer workplaces. This work is targeting documents from recent archives where the value of information is not obsolete and may become an important historical and cultural testimony. For a successful treatment, an optimal absorbed dose has to be established. An excessive dose may damage papers and an insufficient one will not reduce bioburden to the desired level. An interdisciplinary team was performing various physical and chemical tests in order to evaluate deterioration of paper at high doses. In the case of natural disaster, it is not excluded the '' emergency '' treatment for documents in immediate danger of total destruction. (authors)

  6. A new device for X-ray Diffraction analyses of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valot, Christophe; Blay, Thierry; Caillot, Laurent; Ferroud-Plattet, Marie Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A new X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) equipment is being implemented in the LECA (Cea - Cadarache) hot laboratory. The device will be dedicated to structural characterization on irradiated fuels, as PWR fuels, transmutation targets and innovative fuels. The paper will present the specific design that was decided in order to reduce the number of components in contaminated volume and to make servicing easier. The analytical performances of this new equipment will be illustrated on some model samples: -) micro-diffraction capabilities will be detailed on heterogeneous material; -) strain and stress analyses on fresh uranium oxide pellets. (authors)

  7. On-line cone beam CT image guidance for vocal cord tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Gangsaas, Anne; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We are developing a technique for highly focused vocal cord irradiation in early glottic carcinoma to optimally treat a target volume confined to a single cord. This technique, in contrast with the conventional methods, aims at sparing the healthy vocal cord. As such a technique requires sub-mm daily targeting accuracy to be effective, we investigate the accuracy achievable with on-line kV-cone beam CT (CBCT) corrections. Materials and methods: CBCT scans were obtained in 10 early glottic cancer patients in each treatment fraction. The grey value registration available in X-ray volume imaging (XVI) software (Elekta, Synergy) was applied to a volume of interest encompassing the thyroid cartilage. After application of the thus derived corrections, residue displacements with respect to the planning CT scan were measured at clearly identifiable relevant landmarks. The intra- and inter-observer variations were also measured. Results: While before correction the systematic displacements of the vocal cords were as large as 2.4 ± 3.3 mm (cranial-caudal population mean ± SD Σ), daily CBCT registration and correction reduced these values to less than 0.2 ± 0.5 mm in all directions. Random positioning errors (SD σ) were reduced to less than 1 mm. Correcting only for translations and not for rotations did not appreciably affect this accuracy. The residue random displacements partly stem from intra-observer variations (SD = 0.2-0.6 mm). Conclusion: The use of CBCT for daily image guidance in combination with standard mask fixation reduced systematic and random set-up errors of the vocal cords to <1 mm prior to the delivery of each fraction dose. Thus, this facilitates the high targeting precision required for a single vocal cord irradiation.

  8. Estrogen enhanced cell-cell signalling in breast cancer cells exposed to targeted irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Chunlin; Folkard, Melvyn; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander responses, where cells respond to their neighbours being irradiated are being extensively studied. Although evidence shows that bystander responses can be induced in many types of cells, it is not known whether there is a radiation-induced bystander effect in breast cancer cells, where the radiosensitivity may be dependent on the role of the cellular estrogen receptor (ER). This study investigated radiation-induced bystander responses in estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 and estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The influence of estrogen and anti-estrogen treatments on the bystander response was determined by individually irradiating a fraction of cells within the population with a precise number of helium-3 using a charged particle microbeam. Damage was scored as chromosomal damage measured as micronucleus formation. A bystander response measured as increased yield of micronucleated cells was triggered in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The contribution of the bystander response to total cell