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Sample records for iron-sulfur fe-s proteins

  1. ErpA, an iron sulfur (Fe S) protein of the A-type essential for respiratory metabolism in E.coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loiseau, L.; Gerez, C.; Bekker, M.; Ollagnier-de Choudens, S.; Py, B.; Sanakis, Y.; Teixeira De Mattos, M.J.; Fontecave, M.; Barras, F.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins is relevant to many fields, including bioenergetics, gene regulation, and cancer research. Several multiprotein complexes assisting Fe-S assembly have been identified in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we identify in Escherichia coli

  2. Altered sterol metabolism in budding yeast affects mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane M; Chen, Opal S; Li, Liangtao; Kaplan, Jerry; Bhuiyan, Shah Alam; Natarajan, Selvamuthu K; Bard, Martin; Cox, James E

    2018-05-17

    Ergosterol synthesis is essential for cellular growth and viability of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and intracellular sterol distribution and homeostasis are therefore highly regulated in this species. Erg25 is an iron-containing C4-methyl sterol oxidase that contributes to the conversion of 4,4-dimethylzymosterol to zymosterol, a precursor of ergosterol. The ERG29 gene encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein, and here we identified a role for Erg29 in the methyl sterol oxidase step of ergosterol synthesis. ERG29 deletion resulted in lethality in respiring cells, but respiration-incompetent (Rho- or Rho0) cells survived, suggesting that Erg29 loss leads to accumulation of oxidized sterol metabolites that affect cell viability. Down-regulation of ERG29 expression in Δerg29 cells indeed led to accumulation of methyl sterol metabolites, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxidants and a decreased ability of mitochondria to synthesize iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters due to reduced levels of Yfh1, the mammalian frataxin homolog, which is involved in mitochondrial Fe metabolism. Using a high-copy genomic library, we identified suppressor genes that permitted growth of Δerg29 cells on respiratory substrates, and these included genes encoding the mitochondrial proteins Yfh1, Mmt1, Mmt2, and Pet20, which reversed all phenotypes associated with loss of ERG29. Of note, loss of Erg25 also resulted in accumulation of methyl sterol metabolites and also increased mitochondrial oxidants and degradation of Yfh1. We propose that accumulation of toxic intermediates of the methyl sterol oxidase reaction increase mitochondrial oxidants, which affect Yfh1 protein stability. These results indicate an interaction between sterols generated by ER proteins and mitochondrial iron metabolism. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Research field development ou iron-sulfur proteins by the Moessbauer spectroscopy and EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenio, T.P.; Taft, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    A research line on iron sulfides (chemical and structurally seemed with the iron-sulfur proteins), implanted and developed at CBPF-Brazil, using the same theoretical and experimental models used in the development of the research field on iron-sulfur proteins is reported. The techniques used are Moessbauer spectroscopy and EPR. (L.C.) [pt

  4. The role of mitochondria in cellular iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Roland; Hoffmann, Bastian; Molik, Sabine; Pierik, Antonio J; Rietzschel, Nicole; Stehling, Oliver; Uzarska, Marta A; Webert, Holger; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in iron metabolism in that they synthesize heme, assemble iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, and participate in cellular iron regulation. Here, we review the latter two topics and their intimate connection. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery consists of 17 proteins that operate in three major steps of the maturation process. First, the cysteine desulfurase complex Nfs1-Isd11 as the sulfur donor cooperates with ferredoxin-ferredoxin reductase acting as an electron transfer chain, and frataxin to synthesize an [2Fe-2S] cluster on the scaffold protein Isu1. Second, the cluster is released from Isu1 and transferred toward apoproteins with the help of a dedicated Hsp70 chaperone system and the glutaredoxin Grx5. Finally, various specialized ISC components assist in the generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters and cluster insertion into specific target apoproteins. Functional defects of the core ISC assembly machinery are signaled to cytosolic or nuclear iron regulatory systems resulting in increased cellular iron acquisition and mitochondrial iron accumulation. In fungi, regulation is achieved by iron-responsive transcription factors controlling the expression of genes involved in iron uptake and intracellular distribution. They are assisted by cytosolic multidomain glutaredoxins which use a bound Fe/S cluster as iron sensor and additionally perform an essential role in intracellular iron delivery to target metalloproteins. In mammalian cells, the iron regulatory proteins IRP1, an Fe/S protein, and IRP2 act in a post-transcriptional fashion to adjust the cellular needs for iron. Thus, Fe/S protein biogenesis and cellular iron metabolism are tightly linked to coordinate iron supply and utilization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies of Iron Sulfur (FeS)m- (m = 2-8) Cluster Anions: Coexisting Multiple Spin States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2017-10-05

    Iron sulfur cluster anions (FeS) m - (m = 2-8) are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) at 3.492 eV (355 nm) and 4.661 eV (266 nm) photon energies, and by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The most probable structures and ground state spin multiplicities for (FeS) m - (m = 2-8) clusters are tentatively assigned through a comparison of their theoretical and experiment first vertical detachment energy (VDE) values. Many spin states lie within 0.5 eV of the ground spin state for the larger (FeS) m - (m ≥ 4) clusters. Theoretical VDEs of these low lying spin states are in good agreement with the experimental VDE values. Therefore, multiple spin states of each of these iron sulfur cluster anions probably coexist under the current experimental conditions. Such available multiple spin states must be considered when evaluating the properties and behavior of these iron sulfur clusters in real chemical and biological systems. The experimental first VDEs of (FeS) m - (m = 1-8) clusters are observed to change with the cluster size (number m). The first VDE trends noted can be related to the different properties of the highest singly occupied molecular orbitals (NBO, HSOMOs) of each cluster anion. The changing nature of the NBO/HSOMO of these (FeS) m - (m = 1-8) clusters from a p orbital on S, to a d orbital on Fe, and to an Fe-Fe bonding orbital is probably responsible for the observed increasing trend for their first VDEs with respect to m.

  6. Dual localized AtHscB involved in iron sulfur protein biogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ming Xu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous structures which act as prosthetic groups for numerous proteins involved in several fundamental biological processes including respiration and photosynthesis. Although simple in structure both the assembly and insertion of clusters into apoproteins requires complex biochemical pathways involving a diverse set of proteins. In yeast, the J-type chaperone Jac1 plays a key role in the biogenesis of iron sulfur clusters in mitochondria.In this study we demonstrate that AtHscB from Arabidopsis can rescue the Jac1 yeast knockout mutant suggesting a role for AtHscB in iron sulfur protein biogenesis in plants. In contrast to mitochondrial Jac1, AtHscB localizes to both mitochondria and the cytosol. AtHscB interacts with AtIscU1, an Isu-like scaffold protein involved in iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and through this interaction AtIscU1 is most probably retained in the cytosol. The chaperone AtHscA can functionally complement the yeast Ssq1knockout mutant and its ATPase activity is enhanced by AtHscB and AtIscU1. Interestingly, AtHscA is also localized in both mitochondria and the cytosol. Furthermore, AtHscB is highly expressed in anthers and trichomes and an AtHscB T-DNA insertion mutant shows reduced seed set, a waxless phenotype and inappropriate trichome development as well as dramatically reduced activities of the iron-sulfur enzymes aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase.Our data suggest that AtHscB together with AtHscA and AtIscU1 plays an important role in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins in both mitochondria and the cytosol.

  7. The Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein: Import and Assembly into the Cytochrome bc 1 Complex of Yeast Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Laura; Zara, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The Rieske iron-sulfur protein, one of the catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc 1 complex, is involved in electron transfer at the level of the inner membrane of yeast mitochondria. The Rieske iron-sulfur protein is encoded by nuclear DNA and, after being synthesized in the cytosol, is imported into mitochondria with the help of a cleavable N-terminal presequence. The imported protein, besides incorporating the 2Fe-2S cluster, also interacts with other catalytic and non-catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc 1 complex, thereby assembling into the mature and functional respiratory complex. In this paper, we summarize the most recent findings on the import and assembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein into Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, also discussing a possible role of this protein both in the dimerization of the cytochrome bc 1 complex and in the interaction of this homodimer with other complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:21716720

  8. The Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein: Import and Assembly into the Cytochrome bc(1) Complex of Yeast Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Laura; Zara, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The Rieske iron-sulfur protein, one of the catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, is involved in electron transfer at the level of the inner membrane of yeast mitochondria. The Rieske iron-sulfur protein is encoded by nuclear DNA and, after being synthesized in the cytosol, is imported into mitochondria with the help of a cleavable N-terminal presequence. The imported protein, besides incorporating the 2Fe-2S cluster, also interacts with other catalytic and non-catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, thereby assembling into the mature and functional respiratory complex. In this paper, we summarize the most recent findings on the import and assembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein into Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, also discussing a possible role of this protein both in the dimerization of the cytochrome bc(1) complex and in the interaction of this homodimer with other complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  9. 1H NMR of High-Potential Iron-Sulfur Protein from the Purple Non-Sulfur Bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciurli, Stefano; Cremonini, Mauro Andrea; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    residues bound to the [4Fe-4S]3+/2+ cluster have been performed using one-dimensional NOE and exchange spectroscopy experiments. 1H-NMR hyperfine shifts and relaxation rates of cluster-bound Cys β-CH2 protons indicate that in the [4Fe-4S]3+ cluster one iron ion can be formally described as Fe(III), while......Oxidized and reduced forms of high-potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) from the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodoferux fermentans have been characterized using 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Pairwise and sequence-specific assignments of hyperfine-shifted 1H-NMR signals to protons of cysteine...... longitudinal relaxation rates of Cys β-CH2 protons in HiPIPs from six different sources as a function of the Fe-S-Cβ-Cα dihedral angle, indicate that the major contribution is due to a dipolar metal-centered mechanism, with a non-negligeable contribution from a ligand-centered dipolar mechanism which involves...

  10. Analysis of NFU-1 metallocofactor binding-site substitutions-impacts on iron-sulfur cluster coordination and protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Nathaniel A; Wachnowsky, Christine; Fidai, Insiya; Cowan, J A

    2017-11-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters are ancient prosthetic groups found in numerous metalloproteins and are conserved across all kingdoms of life due to their diverse, yet essential functional roles. Genetic mutations to a specific subset of mitochondrial Fe/S cluster delivery proteins are broadly categorized as disease-related under multiple mitochondrial dysfunction syndrome (MMDS), with symptoms indicative of a general failure of the metabolic system. Multiple mitochondrial dysfunction syndrome 1 (MMDS1) arises as a result of the missense mutation in NFU1, an Fe/S cluster scaffold protein, which substitutes a glycine near the Fe/S cluster-binding pocket to a cysteine (p.Gly208Cys). This substitution has been shown to promote protein dimerization such that cluster delivery to NFU1 is blocked, preventing downstream cluster trafficking. However, the possibility of this additional cysteine, located adjacent to the cluster-binding site, serving as an Fe/S cluster ligand has not yet been explored. To fully understand the consequences of this Gly208Cys replacement, complementary substitutions at the Fe/S cluster-binding pocket for native and Gly208Cys NFU1 were made, along with six other variants. Herein, we report the results of an investigation on the effect of these substitutions on both cluster coordination and NFU1 structure and function. The data suggest that the G208C substitution does not contribute to cluster binding. Rather, replacement of the glycine at position 208 changes the oligomerization state as a result of global structural alterations that result in the downstream effects manifest as MMDS1, but does not perturb the coordination chemistry of the Fe-S cluster. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Natalia P. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Bulteau, Anne Laure [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Salazar, Julio [Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Etienne C. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Nunez, Marco T., E-mail: mnunez@uchile.cl [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  12. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. → Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. → Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. → Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that inhibition of complex

  13. EPR spectroscopy of complex biological iron-sulfur systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Wilfred R

    2018-02-21

    From the very first discovery of biological iron-sulfur clusters with EPR, the spectroscopy has been used to study not only purified proteins but also complex systems such as respiratory complexes, membrane particles and, later, whole cells. In recent times, the emphasis of iron-sulfur biochemistry has moved from characterization of individual proteins to the systems biology of iron-sulfur biosynthesis, regulation, degradation, and implications for human health. Although this move would suggest a blossoming of System-EPR as a specific, non-invasive monitor of Fe/S (dys)homeostasis in whole cells, a review of the literature reveals limited success possibly due to technical difficulties in adherence to EPR spectroscopic and biochemical standards. In an attempt to boost application of System-EPR the required boundary conditions and their practical applications are explicitly and comprehensively formulated.

  14. Growth-promoting effect on iron-sulfur proteins on axenic cultures of Entamoeba dispar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifa S.A.M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A growth-promoting factor (GPF that promotes the growth of Entamoeba dispar under axenic culture conditions was found in fractions of mitochondria (Mt, hydrogenosomes (Hg and chloroplasts (Cp obtained from cells of six different protozoan, mammalian and plant species. We were able to extract the GPF from the Cp-rich leaf cells of a plant (spiderwort: Commelina communis L. in an acetone-soluble fraction as a complex of chlorophyll with low molecular weight proteins (molecular weight [MW] approximately 4,600. We also found that on treatment with 0.6 % complexes of 2-mercapthoethanol (2ME, complexes of chlorophyll-a with iron-sulphur (Fe-S proteins (e.g., ferredoxins [Fd] from spinach and Clostridium pasteurianum and noncomplex rubredoxin (Rd from C. pasteurianum have a growth-promoting effect on E. dispar. These findings suggest that E. dispar may lack a sufficient quantity of some essential components of Fe-S proteins, such as Fe-S center.

  15. Isolation, Characterization, and Functional Role of the High-Potential Iron-Sulfur Protein (HiPIP) from Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochkoeppler, A.; Kofod, P.; Ferro, G.

    1995-01-01

    A new high-potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) has been isolated and purified to homogeneity from the soluble fraction obtained from light-grown cells of the facultative photoheterotrophic bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans. The new protein was identified as a HiPIP by virtue of its molecular...... other sources and, in particular, the iron content is consistent with the presence of one [Fe4S4] cubane cluster per molecule. The isoelectric pH values of the two redox forms are consistent with a basic protein. Kinetic studies of HiPIP oxidation, performed by monitoring the absorbance changes induced...

  16. 2010 IRON-SULFUR ENZYMES GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 6-11, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-11

    Iron-sulfur (FeS) centers are essential for biology and inspirational in chemistry. These protein cofactors are broadly defined as active sites in which Fe is coordinated by S-donor ligands, often in combination with extra non-protein components, for example, additional metal atoms such as Mo and Ni, and soft ligands such as CN{sup -} and CO. Iron-sulfur centers are inherently air sensitive: they are found in essentially all organisms and it is possible that they were integral components of the earliest forms of life, well before oxygen (O{sub 2}) appeared. Proteins containing FeS cofactors perform a variety of biological functions ranging across electron transfer, acid-base catalysis, and sensing where they are agents for cell regulation through transcription (DNA) or translation (RNA). They are redox catalysts for radical-based reactions and the activation of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, processes that offer scientific and economic challenges for industry. Iron-sulfur centers provide the focus for fundamental investigations of chemical bonding, spectroscopy and paramagnetism, and their functions have numerous implications for health and medicine and applications for technology, including renewable energy. The 2010 Iron-Sulfur Enzymes GRC will bring together researchers from different disciplines for in-depth discussions and presentations of the latest developments. There will be sessions on structural and functional analogues of FeS centers, advances in physical methods, roles of FeS centers in energy and technology, catalysis (including radical-based rearrangements and the activation of nitrogen, hydrogen and carbon), long-range electron transfer, FeS centers in health and disease, cellular regulation, cofactor assembly, their relevance in industry, and experiments and hypotheses relating to the origins of life.

  17. 2008 GRC Iron Sulfur Enzymes-Conference to be held June 8-13, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, Stephen [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Gray, Nancy Ryan [Gordon Research Conferences, West Kingston, RI (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins are among the most common and ancient enzymes and electron-transfer agents in nature. They play key roles in photosynthesis, respiration, and the metabolism of small molecules such as H2, CO, and N2. The Iron Sulfur Enzyme Gordon Research Conference evolved from an earlier GRC on Nitrogen Fixation that began in 1994. The scope of the current meeting has broadened to include all enzymes or metalloproteins in which Fe-S bonds play a key role. This year's meeting will focus on the biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters, as well as the structure and mechanism of key Fe-S enzymes such as hydrogenase, nitrogenase and its homologues, radical SAM enzymes, and aconitase-related enzymes. Recent progress on the role of Fe-S enzymes in health, disease, DNA/RNA-processing, and alternative bio-energy systems will also be highlighted. This conference will assemble a broad, diverse, and international group of biologists and chemists who are investigating fundamental issues related to Fe-S enzymes, on atomic, molecular, organism, and environmental scales. The topics to be addressed will include: Biosynthesis & Genomics of Fe-S Enzymes; Fundamental Fe-S Chemistry; Hydrogen and Fe-S Enzymes; Nitrogenase & Homologous Fe-S Enzymes; Fe-S Enzymes in Health & Disease; Radical SAM and Aconitase-Related Fe-S Enzymes; Fe-S Enzymes and Synthetic Analogues in BioEnergy; and Fe-S Enzymes in Geochemistry and the Origin of Life.

  18. Frataxin Is Localized to Both the Chloroplast and Mitochondrion and Is Involved in Chloroplast Fe-S Protein Function in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria R Turowski

    Full Text Available Frataxin plays a key role in eukaryotic cellular iron metabolism, particularly in mitochondrial heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. However, its precise role has yet to be elucidated. In this work, we studied the subcellular localization of Arabidopsis frataxin, AtFH, using confocal microscopy, and found a novel dual localization for this protein. We demonstrate that plant frataxin is targeted to both the mitochondria and the chloroplast, where it may play a role in Fe-S cluster metabolism as suggested by functional studies on nitrite reductase (NIR and ferredoxin (Fd, two Fe-S containing chloroplast proteins, in AtFH deficient plants. Our results indicate that frataxin deficiency alters the normal functioning of chloroplasts by affecting the levels of Fe, chlorophyll, and the photosynthetic electron transport chain in this organelle.

  19. How Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae build Fe/S proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, Frédéric; Loiseau, Laurent; Py, Béatrice

    2005-01-01

    Owing to the versatile electronic properties of iron and sulfur, iron sulfur (Fe/S) clusters are perfectly suited for sensing changes in environmental conditions and regulating protein properties accordingly. Fe/S proteins have been recruited in a wide array of diverse biological processes, including electron transfer chains, metabolic pathways and gene regulatory circuits. Chemistry has revealed the great diversity of Fe/S clusters occurring in proteins. The question now is to understand how iron and sulfur come together to form Fe/S clusters and how these clusters are subsequently inserted into apoproteins. Iron, sulfide and reducing conditions were found to be sufficient for successful maturation of many apoproteins in vitro, opening the possibility that insertion might be a spontaneous event. However, as in many other biological pathways such as protein folding, genetic analyses revealed that Fe/S cluster biogenesis and insertion depend in vivo upon auxiliary proteins. This was brought to light by studies on Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase, which, in particular, led to the concept of scaffold proteins, the role of which would be to allow transient assembly of Fe/S cluster. These studies paved the way toward the identification of the ISC and SUF systems, subjects of the present review that allow Fe/S cluster assembly into apoproteins of most organisms. Despite the recent discovery of the SUF and ISC systems, remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of their molecular composition and biochemical mechanisms. Such a rapid increase in our knowledge arose from a convergent interest from researchers engaged in unrelated fields and whose complementary expertise covered most experimental approaches used in biology. Also, the high conservation of ISC and SUF systems throughout a wide array of organisms helped cross-feeding between studies. The ISC system is conserved in eubacteria and most eukaryotes, while the SUF system arises in eubacteria, archaea

  20. Hsc66 substrate specificity is directed toward a discrete region of the iron-sulfur cluster template protein IscU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin G; Ta, Dennis T; Tapley, Tim L; Silberg, Jonathan J; Vickery, Larry E

    2002-07-26

    Hsc66 and Hsc20 comprise a specialized chaperone system important for the assembly of iron-sulfur clusters in Escherchia coli. Only a single substrate, the Fe/S template protein IscU, has been identified for the Hsc66/Hsc20 system, but the mechanism by which Hsc66 selectively binds IscU is unknown. We have investigated Hsc66 substrate specificity using phage display and a peptide array of IscU. Screening of a heptameric peptide phage display library revealed that Hsc66 prefers peptides with a centrally located Pro-Pro motif. Using a cellulose-bound peptide array of IscU we determined that Hsc66 interacts specifically with a region (residues 99-103, LPPVK) that is invariant among all IscU family members. A synthetic peptide (ELPPVKIHC) corresponding to IscU residues 98-106 behaves in a similar manner to native IscU, stimulating the ATPase activity of Hsc66 with similar affinity as IscU, preventing Hsc66 suppression of bovine rhodanese aggregation, and interacting with the peptide-binding domain of Hsc66. Unlike native IscU, however, the synthetic peptide is not bound by Hsc20 and does not synergistically stimulate Hsc66 ATPase activity with Hsc20. Our results indicate that Hsc66 and Hsc20 recognize distinct regions of IscU and further suggest that Hsc66 will not bind LPPVK motifs with high affinity in vivo unless they are in the context of native IscU and can be directed to Hsc66 by Hsc20.

  1. Rieske iron-sulfur protein of the cytochrome bc(1) complex: a potential target for fungicide discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Chao; Li, Hui; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-07-23

    The cytochrome bc(1) complex (complex III, cyt bc(1)) is an essential component of cellular respiration. Cyt bc(1) has three core subunits that are required for its catalytic activity: cytochrome b, cytochrome c(1), and the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (ISP). Although most fungicides inhibit this enzyme by binding to the cytochrome b subunit, resistance to these fungicides has developed rapidly due to their widespread application. Resistance is mainly associated with mutations in cytochrome b, the only subunit encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Recently, the flexibility and motion of the ISP and its essential role in electron transfer have received intense attention; this leads us to propose a new classification of cyt bc(1) inhibitors (three types of Q(o) inhibitors) that mobilize, restrict, or fix the rotation of the ISP. Importantly, the strengths of the ISP-inhibitor interactions correlate with inhibitor activity and the development of resistance to Q(o) inhibitors, thereby offering clues for designing novel cyt bc(1) inhibitors with high potency and a low risk of resistance. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. MicroRNA-210 regulates mitochondrial free radical response to hypoxia and krebs cycle in cancer cells by targeting iron sulfur cluster protein ISCU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Favaro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in cancers results in the upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 and a microRNA, hsa-miR-210 (miR-210 which is associated with a poor prognosis.In human cancer cell lines and tumours, we found that miR-210 targets the mitochondrial iron sulfur scaffold protein ISCU, required for assembly of iron-sulfur clusters, cofactors for key enzymes involved in the Krebs cycle, electron transport, and iron metabolism. Down regulation of ISCU was the major cause of induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS in hypoxia. ISCU suppression reduced mitochondrial complex 1 activity and aconitase activity, caused a shift to glycolysis in normoxia and enhanced cell survival. Cancers with low ISCU had a worse prognosis.Induction of these major hallmarks of cancer show that a single microRNA, miR-210, mediates a new mechanism of adaptation to hypoxia, by regulating mitochondrial function via iron-sulfur cluster metabolism and free radical generation.

  3. Mutations in iron-sulfur cluster proteins that improve xylose utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Allan; Henningsen, Brooks; Covalla, Sean; Zelle, Rintze M.

    2018-03-20

    There is provided an engineered host cells comprising (a) one or more mutations in one or more endogenous genes encoding a protein associated with iron metabolism; and (b) at least one gene encoding a polypeptide having xylose isomerase activity, and methods of their use thereof.

  4. Purification and characterization of acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus, a tungsten iron-sulfur protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, B M; Schink, B

    1995-10-01

    Acetylene hydratase of the mesophilic fermenting bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus catalyzes the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Growth of P. acetylenicus with acetylene and specific acetylene hydratase activity depended on tungstate or, to a lower degree, molybdate supply in the medium. The specific enzyme activity in cell extract was highest after growth in the presence of tungstate. Enzyme activity was stable even after prolonged storage of the cell extract or of the purified protein under air. However, enzyme activity could be measured only in the presence of a strong reducing agent such as titanium(III) citrate or dithionite. The enzyme was purified 240-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and a second anion-exchange chromatography step, with a yield of 36%. The protein was a monomer with an apparent molecular mass of 73 kDa, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point was at pH 4.2. Per mol of enzyme, 4.8 mol of iron, 3.9 mol of acid-labile sulfur, and 0.4 mol of tungsten, but no molybdenum, were detected. The Km for acetylene as assayed in a coupled photometric test with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase and NADH was 14 microM, and the Vmax was 69 mumol.min-1.mg of protein-1. The optimum temperature for activity was 50 degrees C, and the apparent pH optimum was 6.0 to 6.5. The N-terminal amino acid sequence gave no indication of resemblance to any enzyme protein described so far.

  5. [Nitrogen oxide is involved in the regulation of the Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of biofilms by Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, S V; Streltsova, D A; Starostina, I A; Sanina, N A

    2013-01-01

    The functions of nitrogen oxide (NO) in the regulation of the reversible processes of Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms have been investigated. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and crystalline nitrosyl complexes of iron with sulfur-containing aliphatic ligands cisaconite (CisA) and penaconite have been used as NO donors for the first time. Wild-type E. coli cells of the strain MC4100, mutants deltaiscA and deltasufA, and the double paralog mutant deltaiscA/sufA with deletions in the alternative pathways of Fe2+ supply for cluster assembly (all derived from the above-named strain) were used in this study. Plankton growth of bacterial cultures, the mass of mature biofilms, and the expression of the SoxRS[2Fe-2S] regulon have been investigated and shown to depend on strain genotype, the process of Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins, NO donor structure, and the presence of Fe2+ chelator ferene in the incubation medium. The antibiotic ciprofloxacine (CF) was used as an inhibitor of E. coli biofilm formation in the positive control. NO donors regulating Fe-S cluster assembly in E. coli have been shown to control plankton growth of the cultures and the process of mature biofilm formation; toxic doses of NO caused a dramatic (3- to 4-fold) stimulation of cell entry into biofilms as a response to nitrosative stress; NO donors CisA and GSNO in physiological concentrations suppressed the formation of mature biofilms, and the activity of these compounds was comparable to that of CE Regulation of both Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins and biofilm formation by NO is indicative of the connection between these processes in E. coli.

  6. Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in mammalian cells: new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cluster delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, Nunziata; Rouault, Tracey. A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are ancient, ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. The combination of the chemical reactivity of iron and sulfur, together with many variations of cluster composition, oxidation states and protein environments, enables Fe-S clusters to participate in numerous biological processes. Fe-S clusters are essential to redox catalysis in nitrogen fixation, mitochondrial respiration and photosynthesis, to regulatory sensing in key metabolic pathways (i. e. cellular iron homeostasis and oxidative stress response), and to the replication and maintenance of the nuclear genome. Fe-S cluster biogenesis is a multistep process that involves a complex sequence of catalyzed protein- protein interactions and coupled conformational changes between the components of several dedicated multimeric complexes. Intensive studies of the assembly process have clarified key points in the biogenesis of Fe-S proteins. However several critical questions still remain, such as: what is the role of frataxin? Why do some defects of Fe-S cluster biogenesis cause mitochondrial iron overload? How are specific Fe-S recipient proteins recognized in the process of Fe-S transfer? This review focuses on the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis, drawing attention to recent advances achieved on the identification of molecular features that guide selection of specific subsets of nascent Fe-S recipients by the cochaperone HSC20. Additionally, it outlines the distinctive phenotypes of human diseases due to mutations in the components of the basic pathway. PMID:25245479

  7. Structural studies of the Enterococcus faecalis SufU [Fe-S] cluster protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazzon Jeverson

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous and evolutionarily ancient inorganic prosthetic groups, the biosynthesis of which depends on complex protein machineries. Three distinct assembly systems involved in the maturation of cellular Fe-S proteins have been determined, designated the NIF, ISC and SUF systems. Although well described in several organisms, these machineries are poorly understood in Gram-positive bacteria. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the Enterococcus spp. genus have recently assumed importance in clinical microbiology being considered as emerging pathogens for humans, wherein Enterococcus faecalis represents the major species associated with nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phylogenetic analysis in Enterococcus faecalis V583 and a structural and conformational characterisation of it SufU protein. Results BLAST searches of the Enterococcus genome revealed a series of genes with sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SUF machinery of [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis, namely sufB, sufC, sufD and SufS. In addition, the E. coli IscU ortholog SufU was found to be the scaffold protein of Enterococcus spp., containing all features considered essential for its biological activity, including conserved amino acid residues involved in substrate and/or co-factor binding (Cys50,76,138 and Asp52 and, phylogenetic analyses showed a close relationship with orthologues from other Gram-positive bacteria. Molecular dynamics for structural determinations and molecular modeling using E. faecalis SufU primary sequence protein over the PDB:1su0 crystallographic model from Streptococcus pyogenes were carried out with a subsequent 50 ns molecular dynamic trajectory. This presented a stable model, showing secondary structure modifications near the active site and conserved cysteine residues. Molecular modeling using Haemophilus influenzae IscU primary sequence over the PDB:1su0 crystal followed by a MD

  8. A missed Fe-S cluster handoff causes a metabolic shakeup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteau, Olivier

    2018-05-25

    The general framework of pathways by which iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are assembled in cells is well-known, but the cellular consequences of disruptions to that framework are not fully understood. Crooks et al. report a novel cellular system that creates an acute Fe-S cluster deficiency, using mutants of ISCU, the main scaffold protein for Fe-S cluster assembly. Surprisingly, the resultant metabolic reprogramming leads to the accumulation of lipid droplets, a situation encountered in many poorly understood pathological conditions, highlighting unanticipated links between Fe-S assembly machinery and human disease. © 2018 Berteau.

  9. Interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 proteins of cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly reveals a stable complex formation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Anwar

    Full Text Available Iron-Sulfur (Fe-S proteins are involved in many biological functions such as electron transport, photosynthesis, regulation of gene expression and enzymatic activities. Biosynthesis and transfer of Fe-S clusters depend on Fe-S clusters assembly processes such as ISC, SUF, NIF, and CIA systems. Unlike other eukaryotes which possess ISC and CIA systems, amitochondriate Entamoeba histolytica has retained NIF & CIA systems for Fe-S cluster assembly in the cytosol. In the present study, we have elucidated interaction between two proteins of E. histolytica CIA system, Cytosolic Fe-S cluster deficient 1 (Cfd1 protein and Nucleotide binding protein 35 (Nbp35. In-silico analysis showed that structural regions ranging from amino acid residues (P33-K35, G131-V135 and I147-E151 of Nbp35 and (G5-V6, M34-D39 and G46-A52 of Cfd1 are involved in the formation of protein-protein complex. Furthermore, Molecular dynamic (MD simulations study suggested that hydrophobic forces surpass over hydrophilic forces between Nbp35 and Cfd1 and Van-der-Waal interaction plays crucial role in the formation of stable complex. Both proteins were separately cloned, expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by affinity column chromatography. Physical interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 proteins was confirmed in vitro by co-purification of recombinant Nbp35 with thrombin digested Cfd1 and in vivo by pull down assay and immunoprecipitation. The insilico, in vitro as well as in vivo results prove a stable interaction between these two proteins, supporting the possibility of its involvement in Fe-S cluster transfer to target apo-proteins through CIA machinery in E. histolytica. Our study indicates that initial synthesis of a Fe-S precursor in mitochondria is not necessary for the formation of Cfd1-Nbp35 complex. Thus, Cfd1 and Nbp35 with the help of cytosolic NifS and NifU proteins can participate in the maturation of non-mitosomal Fe-S proteins

  10. Anaerobic Copper Toxicity and Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guoqiang; Yang, Jing; Li, Tang; Zhao, Jin; Sun, Shujuan; Li, Xiaokang; Lin, Chuxian; Li, Jianghui; Zhou, Huaibin; Lyu, Jianxin; Ding, Huangen

    2017-08-15

    While copper is an essential trace element in biology, pollution of groundwater from copper has become a threat to all living organisms. Cellular mechanisms underlying copper toxicity, however, are still not fully understood. Previous studies have shown that iron-sulfur proteins are among the primary targets of copper toxicity in Escherichia coli under aerobic conditions. Here, we report that, under anaerobic conditions, iron-sulfur proteins in E. coli cells are even more susceptible to copper in medium. Whereas addition of 0.2 mM copper(II) chloride to LB (Luria-Bertani) medium has very little or no effect on iron-sulfur proteins in wild-type E. coli cells under aerobic conditions, the same copper treatment largely inactivates iron-sulfur proteins by blocking iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in the cells under anaerobic conditions. Importantly, proteins that do not have iron-sulfur clusters (e.g., fumarase C and cysteine desulfurase) in E. coli cells are not significantly affected by copper treatment under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, indicating that copper may specifically target iron-sulfur proteins in cells. Additional studies revealed that E. coli cells accumulate more intracellular copper under anaerobic conditions than under aerobic conditions and that the elevated copper content binds to the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins IscU and IscA, which effectively inhibits iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. The results suggest that the copper-mediated inhibition of iron-sulfur proteins does not require oxygen and that iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis is the primary target of anaerobic copper toxicity in cells. IMPORTANCE Copper contamination in groundwater has become a threat to all living organisms. However, cellular mechanisms underlying copper toxicity have not been fully understood up to now. The work described here reveals that iron-sulfur proteins in Escherichia coli cells are much more susceptible to copper in medium under anaerobic conditions than they

  11. Controlled expression of nif and isc iron-sulfur protein maturation components reveals target specificity and limited functional replacement between the two systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Patricia C; Johnson, Deborah C; Ragle, Brook E; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Dean, Dennis R

    2007-04-01

    The nitrogen-fixing organism Azotobacter vinelandii contains at least two systems that catalyze formation of [Fe-S] clusters. One of these systems is encoded by nif genes, whose products supply [Fe-S] clusters required for maturation of nitrogenase. The other system is encoded by isc genes, whose products are required for maturation of [Fe-S] proteins that participate in general metabolic processes. The two systems are similar in that they include an enzyme for the mobilization of sulfur (NifS or IscS) and an assembly scaffold (NifU or IscU) upon which [Fe-S] clusters are formed. Normal cellular levels of the Nif system, which supplies [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase, cannot also supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of other cellular [Fe-S] proteins. Conversely, when produced at the normal physiological levels, the Isc system cannot supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase. In the present work we found that such target specificity for IscU can be overcome by elevated production of NifU. We also found that NifU, when expressed at normal levels, is able to partially replace the function of IscU if cells are cultured under low-oxygen-availability conditions. In contrast to the situation with IscU, we could not establish conditions in which the function of IscS could be replaced by NifS. We also found that elevated expression of the Isc components, as a result of deletion of the regulatory iscR gene, improved the capacity for nitrogen-fixing growth of strains deficient in either NifU or NifS.

  12. Roles of Fe-S proteins: from cofactor synthesis to iron homeostasis to protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Fe-S cluster assembly is an essential process for all cells. Impairment of Fe-S cluster assembly creates diseases in diverse and surprising ways. In one scenario, the loss of function of lipoic acid synthase, an enzyme with Fe-S cluster cofactor in mitochondria, impairs activity of various lipoamide-dependent enzymes with drastic consequences for metabolism. In a second scenario, the heme biosynthetic pathway in red cell precursors is specifically targeted, and iron homeostasis is perturbed, but lipoic acid synthesis is unaffected. In a third scenario, tRNA modifications arising from action of the cysteine desulfurase and/or Fe-S cluster proteins are lost, which may lead to impaired protein synthesis. These defects can then result in cancer, neurologic dysfunction or type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Fe/S Cluster Assembly Protein Isd11 Is Essential for tRNA Thiolation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paris, Zdeněk; Changmai, Piya; RUBIO, M. A. T.; Zíková, Alena; Stuart, K. D.; Alfonzo, J. D.; Lukeš, Julius

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 285, č. 29 (2010), s. 22394-22402 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : IRON-SULFUR PROTEINS * SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE * CYSTEINE DESULFURASE * THIO- MODIFICATION * FRATAXIN Subject RIV: EB - Genetic s ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.328, year: 2010

  14. Model Prebiotic Iron-Sulfur Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfio, C.; Scintilla, S.; Shah, S.; Evans, D. J.; Jin, L.; Szostak, J. W.; Sasselov, D. D.; Sutherland, J. D.; Mansy, S. S.

    2017-07-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters form easily in aqueous solution in the presence of thiolates and iron ions. Polymerization of short, iron-sulfur binding tripeptide sequences leads to ferredoxin-like ligand spacing and activity.

  15. The Yeast Nbp35-Cfd1 Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Scaffold Is an ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camire, Eric J; Grossman, John D; Thole, Grace J; Fleischman, Nicholas M; Perlstein, Deborah L

    2015-09-25

    Nbp35 and Cfd1 are prototypical members of the MRP/Nbp35 class of iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster scaffolds that function to assemble nascent FeS clusters for transfer to FeS-requiring enzymes. Both proteins contain a conserved NTPase domain that genetic studies have demonstrated is essential for their cluster assembly activity inside the cell. It was recently reported that these proteins possess no or very low nucleotide hydrolysis activity in vitro, and thus the role of the NTPase domain in cluster biogenesis has remained uncertain. We have reexamined the NTPase activity of Nbp35, Cfd1, and their complex. Using in vitro assays and site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the Nbp35 homodimer and the Nbp35-Cfd1 heterodimer are ATPases, whereas the Cfd1 homodimer exhibited no or very low ATPase activity. We ruled out the possibility that the observed ATP hydrolysis activity might result from a contaminating ATPase by showing that mutation of key active site residues reduced activity to background levels. Finally, we demonstrate that the fluorescent ATP analog 2'/3'-O-(N'-methylanthraniloyl)-ATP (mantATP) binds stoichiometrically to Nbp35 with a KD = 15.6 μM and that an Nbp35 mutant deficient in ATP hydrolysis activity also displays an increased KD for mantATP. Together, our results demonstrate that the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly scaffold is an ATPase and pave the way for interrogating the role of nucleotide hydrolysis in cluster biogenesis by this large family of cluster scaffolding proteins found across all domains of life. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Fe/S protein biogenesis in trypanosomes — A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Julius; Basu, Somsuvro

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1853, č. 6 (2015), s. 1481-1492 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Fe/S cluster * Trypanosoma brucei * protists * Kinetoplastida Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.128, year: 2015

  17. NIF-type iron-sulfur cluster assembly system is duplicated and distributed in the mitochondria and cytosol of Mastigamoeba balamuthi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nývltová, Eva; Šuták, Robert; Harant, Karel; Šedinová, Miroslava; Hrdy, Ivan; Paces, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Tachezy, Jan

    2013-04-30

    In most eukaryotes, the mitochondrion is the main organelle for the formation of iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters. This function is mediated through the iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery, which was inherited from the α-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria. In Archamoebae, including pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and free-living Mastigamoeba balamuthi, the complex iron-sulfur cluster machinery has been replaced by an ε-proteobacterial nitrogen fixation (NIF) system consisting of two components: NifS (cysteine desulfurase) and NifU (scaffold protein). However, the cellular localization of the NIF system and the involvement of mitochondria in archamoebal FeS assembly are controversial. Here, we show that the genes for both NIF components are duplicated within the M. balamuthi genome. One paralog of each protein contains an amino-terminal extension that targets proteins to mitochondria (NifS-M and NifU-M), and the second paralog lacks a targeting signal, thereby reflecting the cytosolic form of the NIF machinery (NifS-C and NifU-C). The dual localization of the NIF system corresponds to the presence of FeS proteins in both cellular compartments, including detectable hydrogenase activity in Mastigamoeba cytosol and mitochondria. In contrast, E. histolytica possesses only single genes encoding NifS and NifU, respectively, and there is no evidence for the presence of the NIF machinery in its reduced mitochondria. Thus, M. balamuthi is unique among eukaryotes in that its FeS cluster formation is mediated through two most likely independent NIF machineries present in two cellular compartments.

  18. Characterization of the photolyase-like iron sulfur protein PhrB from Agrobacterium tumefaciens by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, T. O.; Graf, D.; Lamparter, T.; Schünemann, V.

    2014-04-01

    High field Mössbauer spectroscopy has been used to characterize the [4Fe-4S] 2 +cluster of the protein PhrB from Agrobacterium tumefaciens which belongs to the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF) and which biological function has previously been shown to be DNA repair. Mössbauer spectra taken of the as prepared protein reveal δ = 0. 42 mms - 1, and Δ E Q = 1. 26 mms - 1as well as an asymmetry parameter of η = 0. 8. These parameters are characteristic for a ferredoxin-type [4Fe-4S] 2 +cluster. In order to investigate whether this cluster is involved in DNA-repair the protein has also been studied in its photoactivated state during DNA binding. The so obtained data sets exhibit essentially the same Mössbauer parameters as those of the non-activated PhrB. This indicates that during DNA repair the [4Fe-4S] 2 +cluster of PhrB has no significant amounts of transition states which have conformational changes compared to the resting state of the protein and which have life times of several seconds or longer.

  19. The iron-sulfur cluster assembly machineries in plants: current knowledge and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jérémy; Touraine, Brigitte; Briat, Jean-François; Gaymard, Frédéric; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Many metabolic pathways and cellular processes occurring in most sub-cellular compartments depend on the functioning of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins, whose cofactors are assembled through dedicated protein machineries. Recent advances have been made in the knowledge of the functions of individual components through a combination of genetic, biochemical and structural approaches, primarily in prokaryotes and non-plant eukaryotes. Whereas most of the components of these machineries are conserved between kingdoms, their complexity is likely increased in plants owing to the presence of additional assembly proteins and to the existence of expanded families for several assembly proteins. This review focuses on the new actors discovered in the past few years, such as glutaredoxin, BOLA and NEET proteins as well as MIP18, MMS19, TAH18, DRE2 for the cytosolic machinery, which are integrated into a model for the plant Fe-S cluster biogenesis systems. It also discusses a few issues currently subjected to an intense debate such as the role of the mitochondrial frataxin and of glutaredoxins, the functional separation between scaffold, carrier and iron-delivery proteins and the crosstalk existing between different organelles. PMID:23898337

  20. Regulation of the HscA ATPase reaction cycle by the co-chaperone HscB and the iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein IscU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberg, Jonathan J; Tapley, Tim L; Hoff, Kevin G; Vickery, Larry E

    2004-12-24

    The ATPase activity of HscA, a specialized hsp70 molecular chaperone from Escherichia coli, is regulated by the iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein IscU and the J-type co-chaperone HscB. IscU behaves as a substrate for HscA, and HscB enhances the binding of IscU to HscA. To better understand the mechanism by which HscB and IscU regulate HscA, we examined binding of HscB to the different conformational states of HscA and the effects of HscB and IscU on the kinetics of the individual steps of the HscA ATPase reaction cycle. Affinity sensor studies revealed that whereas IscU binds both ADP (R-state) and ATP (T-state) HscA complexes, HscB interacts only with an ATP-bound state. Studies of ATPase activity under single-turnover and rapid mixing conditions showed that both IscU and HscB interact with the low peptide affinity T-state of HscA (HscA++.ATP) and that both modestly accelerate (3-10-fold) the rate-determining steps in the HscA reaction cycle, k(hyd) and k(T-->R). When present together, IscU and HscB synergistically stimulate both k(hyd) (approximately = 500-fold) and k(T-->R) (approximately = 60-fold), leading to enhanced formation of the HscA.ADP-IscU complex (substrate capture). Following ADP/ATP exchange, IscU also stimulates k(R-->T) (approximately = 50-fold) and thereby accelerates the rate at which the low peptide affinity HscA++.ATP T-state is regenerated. Because HscA nucleotide exchange is fast, the overall rate of the chaperone cycle in vivo will be determined by the availability of the IscU-HscB substrate-co-chaperone complex.

  1. The iron-sulfur cluster assembly network component NARFL is a key element in the cellular defense against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Monique V; Rockx, Davy A P; Oostra, Anneke B; Joenje, Hans; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to explore cellular changes associated with increased resistance to atmospheric oxygen using high-resolution DNA and RNA profiling combined with functional studies. Two independently selected oxygen-resistant substrains of HeLa cells (capable of proliferating at >80% O2, i.e. hyperoxia) were compared with their parental cells (adapted to growth at 20% O2, but unable to grow at >80% O2). A striking consistent alteration found to be associated with the oxygen-resistant state appeared to be an amplified and overexpressed region on chromosome 16p13.3 harboring 21 genes. The driver gene of this amplification was identified by functional studies as NARFL, which encodes a component of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly system. In line with this result we found the cytosolic c-aconitase activity as well as the nuclear protein RTEL1, both Fe-S dependent proteins, to be protected by NARFL overexpression under hyperoxia. In addition, we observed a protective effect of NARFL against hyperoxia-induced loss of sister-chromatid cohesion. NARFL thus appeared to be a key factor in the cellular defense against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress in human cells. Our findings suggest that new insight into age-related degenerative processes may come from studies that specifically address the involvement of iron-sulfur proteins. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fe-S Cluster Biogenesis in Isolated Mammalian Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Alok; Pain, Jayashree; Ghosh, Arnab K.; Dancis, Andrew; Pain, Debkumar

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are essential cofactors, and mitochondria contain several Fe-S proteins, including the [4Fe-4S] protein aconitase and the [2Fe-2S] protein ferredoxin. Fe-S cluster assembly of these proteins occurs within mitochondria. Although considerable data exist for yeast mitochondria, this biosynthetic process has never been directly demonstrated in mammalian mitochondria. Using [35S]cysteine as the source of sulfur, here we show that mitochondria isolated from Cath.A-derived cells, a murine neuronal cell line, can synthesize and insert new Fe-35S clusters into aconitase and ferredoxins. The process requires GTP, NADH, ATP, and iron, and hydrolysis of both GTP and ATP is necessary. Importantly, we have identified the 35S-labeled persulfide on the NFS1 cysteine desulfurase as a genuine intermediate en route to Fe-S cluster synthesis. In physiological settings, the persulfide sulfur is released from NFS1 and transferred to a scaffold protein, where it combines with iron to form an Fe-S cluster intermediate. We found that the release of persulfide sulfur from NFS1 requires iron, showing that the use of iron and sulfur for the synthesis of Fe-S cluster intermediates is a highly coordinated process. The release of persulfide sulfur also requires GTP and NADH, probably mediated by a GTPase and a reductase, respectively. ATP, a cofactor for a multifunctional Hsp70 chaperone, is not required at this step. The experimental system described here may help to define the biochemical basis of diseases that are associated with impaired Fe-S cluster biogenesis in mitochondria, such as Friedreich ataxia. PMID:25398879

  3. Knock-downs of mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins IscS and IscU down-regulate the active mitochondrion of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, O.; Horáková, Eva; Vilímová, V.; Hrdý, I.; Cammack, R.; Horváth, A.; Lukeš, Julius; Tachezy, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 39 (2006), s. 28679-28686 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/04/0435; GA AV ČR IAA5022302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : IscS * IscU * FeS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.808, year: 2006

  4. Plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopic evidence for differential binding of oxidized and reduced rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c(2) to the cytochrome bc(1) complex mediated by the conformation of the rieske iron-sulfur protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, S.; Salamon, Z.; Tollin, G.; Fitch, J.C.; Meyer, T.E.; Berry, E.A.; Cusanovich, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The dissociation constants for the binding of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c2 and its K93P mutant to the cytochrome bc1 complex embedded in a phospholipid bilayer were measured by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy in the presence and absence of the inhibitor stigmatellin. The reduced form of cytochrome c2 strongly binds to reduced cytochrome bc1 (Kd = 0.02 M) but binds much more weakly to the oxidized form (Kd = 3.1 M). In contrast, oxidized cytochrome c2 binds to oxidized cytochrome bc1 in a biphasic fashion with Kd values of 0.11 and 0.58 M. Such a biphasic interaction is consistent with binding to two separate sites or conformations of oxidized cytochrome c2 and/or cytochrome bc1. However, in the presence of stigmatellin, we find that oxidized cytochrome c2 binds to oxidized cytochrome bc1 in a monophasic fashion with high affinity (Kd = 0.06 M) and reduced cytochrome c2 binds less strongly (Kd = 0.11 M) but ∼30-fold more tightly than in the absence of stigmatellin. Structural studies with cytochrome bc1, with and without the inhibitor stigmatellin, have led to the proposal that the Rieske protein is mobile, moving between the cytochrome b and cytochrome c1 components during turnover. In one conformation, the Rieske protein binds near the heme of cytochrome c1, while the cytochrome c2 binding site is also near the cytochrome c1 heme but on the opposite side from the Rieske site, where cytochrome c2 cannot directly interact with Rieske. However, the inhibitor, stigmatellin, freezes the Rieske protein iron-sulfur cluster in a conformation proximal to cytochrome b and distal to cytochrome c1. We conclude from this that the dual conformation of the Rieske protein is primarily responsible for biphasic binding of oxidized cytochrome c2 to cytochrome c1. This optimizes turnover by maximizing binding of the substrate, oxidized cytochrome c2, when the iron-sulfur cluster is proximal to cytochrome b and minimizing binding of the product, reduced cytochrome c

  5. Characterization of Glutaredoxin Fe-S Cluster-Binding Interactions Using Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albetel, Angela-Nadia; Outten, Caryn E

    2018-01-01

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) with a conserved Cys-Gly-Phe-Ser (CGFS) active site are iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster-binding proteins that interact with a variety of partner proteins and perform crucial roles in iron metabolism including Fe-S cluster transfer, Fe-S cluster repair, and iron signaling. Various analytical and spectroscopic methods are currently being used to monitor and characterize glutaredoxin Fe-S cluster-dependent interactions at the molecular level. The electronic, magnetic, and vibrational properties of the protein-bound Fe-S cluster provide a convenient handle to probe the structure, function, and coordination chemistry of Grx complexes. However, some limitations arise from sample preparation requirements, complexity of individual techniques, or the necessity for combining multiple methods in order to achieve a complete investigation. In this chapter, we focus on the use of UV-visible circular dichroism spectroscopy as a fast and simple initial approach for investigating glutaredoxin Fe-S cluster-dependent interactions. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. TLR-activated repression of Fe-S cluster biogenesis drives a metabolic shift and alters histone and tubulin acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wing-Hang; Maio, Nunziata; Zhang, De-Liang; Palmieri, Erika M; Ollivierre, Hayden; Ghosh, Manik C; McVicar, Daniel W; Rouault, Tracey A

    2018-05-22

    Given the essential roles of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cofactors in mediating electron transfer in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and supporting heme biosynthesis, mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature in a growing list of human Fe-S cluster biogenesis disorders, including Friedreich ataxia and GLRX5-related sideroblastic anemia. Here, our studies showed that restriction of Fe-S cluster biogenesis not only compromised mitochondrial oxidative metabolism but also resulted in decreased overall histone acetylation and increased H3K9me3 levels in the nucleus and increased acetylation of α-tubulin in the cytosol by decreasing the lipoylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, decreasing levels of succinate dehydrogenase and the histone acetyltransferase ELP3, and increasing levels of the tubulin acetyltransferase MEC17. Previous studies have shown that the metabolic shift in Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated myeloid cells involves rapid activation of glycolysis and subsequent mitochondrial respiratory failure due to nitric oxide (NO)-mediated damage to Fe-S proteins. Our studies indicated that TLR activation also actively suppresses many components of the Fe-S cluster biogenesis machinery, which exacerbates NO-mediated damage to Fe-S proteins by interfering with cluster recovery. These results reveal new regulatory pathways and novel roles of the Fe-S cluster biogenesis machinery in modifying the epigenome and acetylome and provide new insights into the etiology of Fe-S cluster biogenesis disorders.

  7. Architecture of the Yeast Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery: THE SUB-COMPLEX FORMED BY THE IRON DONOR, Yfh1 PROTEIN, AND THE SCAFFOLD, Isu1 PROTEIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, Wasantha; Gakh, Oleksandr; Galeano, Belinda K; Smith, Douglas Y; Söderberg, Christopher A G; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-05-06

    The biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters is a vital process involving the delivery of elemental iron and sulfur to scaffold proteins via molecular interactions that are still poorly defined. We reconstituted a stable, functional complex consisting of the iron donor, Yfh1 (yeast frataxin homologue 1), and the Fe-S cluster scaffold, Isu1, with 1:1 stoichiometry, [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction of this complex at a resolution of ∼17 Å. In addition, via chemical cross-linking, limited proteolysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified protein-protein interaction surfaces within the complex. The data together reveal that [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 is a roughly cubic macromolecule consisting of one symmetric Isu1 trimer binding on top of one symmetric Yfh1 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Furthermore, molecular modeling suggests that two subunits of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1, may bind symmetrically on top of two adjacent Isu1 trimers in a manner that creates two putative [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly centers. In each center, conserved amino acids known to be involved in sulfur and iron donation by Nfs1 and Yfh1, respectively, are in close proximity to the Fe-S cluster-coordinating residues of Isu1. We suggest that this architecture is suitable to ensure concerted and protected transfer of potentially toxic iron and sulfur atoms to Isu1 during Fe-S cluster assembly. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Axial Ligation and Redox Changes at the Cobalt Ion in Cobalamin Bound to Corrinoid Iron-Sulfur Protein (CoFeSP or in Solution Characterized by XAS and DFT.

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    Peer Schrapers

    Full Text Available A cobalamin (Cbl cofactor in corrinoid iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP is the primary methyl group donor and acceptor in biological carbon oxide conversion along the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Changes of the axial coordination of the cobalt ion within the corrin macrocycle upon redox transitions in aqua-, methyl-, and cyano-Cbl bound to CoFeSP or in solution were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS at the Co K-edge in combination with density functional theory (DFT calculations, supported by metal content and cobalt redox level quantification with further spectroscopic methods. Calculation of the highly variable pre-edge X-ray absorption features due to core-to-valence (ctv electronic transitions, XANES shape analysis, and cobalt-ligand bond lengths determination from EXAFS has yielded models for the molecular and electronic structures of the cobalt sites. This suggested the absence of a ligand at cobalt in CoFeSP in α-position where the dimethylbenzimidazole (dmb base of the cofactor is bound in Cbl in solution. As main species, (dmbCoIII(OH2, (dmbCoII(OH2, and (dmbCoIII(CH3 sites for solution Cbl and CoIII(OH2, CoII(OH2, and CoIII(CH3 sites in CoFeSP-Cbl were identified. Our data support binding of a serine residue from the reductive-activator protein (RACo of CoFeSP to the cobalt ion in the CoFeSP-RACo protein complex that stabilizes Co(II. The absence of an α-ligand at cobalt not only tunes the redox potential of the cobalamin cofactor into the physiological range, but is also important for CoFeSP reactivation.

  9. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The Δgrx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1 + gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5 + and hsc1 + genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2 + , but not isu1 + and ssc1 + , complemented the growth phenotype of Δgrx5 mutant as isa1 + did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  10. In vivo fluorescent detection of Fe-S clusters coordinated by human GRX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin G; Culler, Stephanie J; Nguyen, Peter Q; McGuire, Ryan M; Silberg, Jonathan J; Smolke, Christina D

    2009-12-24

    A major challenge to studying Fe-S cluster biosynthesis in higher eukaryotes is the lack of simple tools for imaging metallocluster binding to proteins. We describe the first fluorescent approach for in vivo detection of 2Fe2S clusters that is based upon the complementation of Venus fluorescent protein fragments via human glutaredoxin 2 (GRX2) coordination of a 2Fe2S cluster. We show that Escherichia coli and mammalian cells expressing Venus fragments fused to GRX2 exhibit greater fluorescence than cells expressing fragments fused to a C37A mutant that cannot coordinate a metallocluster. In addition, we find that maximal fluorescence in the cytosol of mammalian cells requires the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins ISCU and NFS1. These findings provide evidence that glutaredoxins can dimerize within mammalian cells through coordination of a 2Fe2S cluster as observed with purified recombinant proteins. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The N-terminal domain of human DNA helicase Rtel1 contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Aaron P; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN) expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of -248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0). The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  12. The N-Terminal Domain of Human DNA Helicase Rtel1 Contains a Redox Active Iron-Sulfur Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron P. Landry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of −248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0. The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss and double-stranded (ds DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  13. The E. coli monothiol glutaredoxin GrxD forms homodimeric and heterodimeric FeS cluster containing complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, N; Gold, B; Liu, N L; Prathapam, R; Sterling, H J; Willams, E R; Butland, G

    2011-10-18

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (mono-Grx) represent a highly evolutionarily conserved class of proteins present in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. Mono-Grxs have been implicated in iron sulfur (FeS) cluster biosynthesis as potential scaffold proteins and in iron homeostasis via an FeS-containing complex with Fra2p (homologue of E. coli BolA) in yeast and are linked to signal transduction in mammalian systems. However, the function of the mono-Grx in prokaryotes and the nature of an interaction with BolA-like proteins have not been established. Recent genome-wide screens for E. coli genetic interactions reported the synthetic lethality (combination of mutations leading to cell death; mutation of only one of these genes does not) of a grxD mutation when combined with strains defective in FeS cluster biosynthesis (isc operon) functions [Butland, G., et al. (2008) Nature Methods 5, 789-795]. These data connected the only E. coli mono-Grx, GrxD to a potential role in FeS cluster biosynthesis. We investigated GrxD to uncover the molecular basis of this synthetic lethality and observed that GrxD can form FeS-bound homodimeric and BolA containing heterodimeric complexes. These complexes display substantially different spectroscopic and functional properties, including the ability to act as scaffold proteins for intact FeS cluster transfer to the model [2Fe-2S] acceptor protein E. coli apo-ferredoxin (Fdx), with the homodimer being significantly more efficient. In this work, we functionally dissect the potential cellular roles of GrxD as a component of both homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes to ultimately uncover if either of these complexes performs functions linked to FeS cluster biosynthesis. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Synthetic modeling chemistry of iron-sulfur clusters in nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Jessica; Kim, Eunsuk

    2015-08-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule that is involved in many physiological and pathological functions. Iron-sulfur proteins are one of the main reaction targets for NO, and the [Fe-S] clusters within these proteins are converted to various iron nitrosyl species upon reaction with NO, of which dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) are the most prevalent. Much progress has been made in identifying the origin of cellular DNIC generation. However, it is not well-understood which other products besides DNICs may form during [Fe-S] cluster degradation nor what effects DNICs and other degradation products can have once they are generated in cells. Even more elusive is an understanding of the manner by which cells cope with unwanted [Fe-S] modifications by NO. This Account describes our synthetic modeling efforts to identify cluster degradation products derived from the [2Fe-2S]/NO reaction in order to establish their chemical reactivity and repair chemistry. Our intent is to use the chemical knowledge that we generate to provide insight into the unknown biological consequences of cluster modification. Our recent advances in three different areas are described. First, new reaction conditions that lead to the formation of previously unrecognized products during the reaction of [Fe-S] clusters with NO are identified. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous signaling molecule, can be generated from the reaction between [2Fe-2S] clusters and NO in the presence of acid or formal H• (e(-)/H(+)) donors. In the presence of acid, a mononitrosyl iron complex (MNIC) can be produced as the major iron-containing product. Second, cysteine analogues can efficiently convert MNICs back to [2Fe-2S] clusters without the need for any other reagents. This reaction is possible for cysteine analogues because of their ability to labilize NO from MNICs and their capacity to undergo C-S bond cleavage, providing the necessary sulfide for [2Fe-2S] cluster formation. Lastly, unique dioxygen

  15. Fe-S cluster coordination of the chromokinesin KIF4A alters its sub-cellular localization during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shimon, Lilach; Paul, Viktoria D; David-Kadoch, Galit; Volpe, Marina; Stümpfig, Martin; Bill, Eckhard; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland; Ben-Aroya, Shay

    2018-05-30

    Fe-S clusters act as co-factors of proteins with diverse functions, e.g. in DNA repair. Down-regulation of the cytosolic iron-sulfur protein assembly (CIA) machinery promotes genomic instability by the inactivation of multiple DNA repair pathways. Furthermore, CIA deficiencies are associated with so far unexplained mitotic defects. Here, we show that CIA2B and MMS19, constituents of the CIA targeting complex involved in facilitating Fe-S cluster insertion into cytosolic and nuclear target proteins, co-localize with components of the mitotic machinery. Down-regulation of CIA2B and MMS19 impairs the mitotic cycle. We identify the chromokinesin KIF4A as a mitotic component involved in these effects. KIF4A binds a Fe-S cluster in vitro through its conserved cysteine-rich domain. We demonstrate in vivo that this domain is required for the mitosis-related KIF4A localization and for the mitotic defects associated with KIF4A knockout. KIF4A is the first identified mitotic component carrying such a post-translational modification. These findings suggest that the lack of Fe-S clusters in KIF4A upon down-regulation of the CIA targeting complex contributes to the mitotic defects. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Leimkühler, Silke; Missirlis, Fanis

    2018-01-01

    Iron sulfur (Fe-S) clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i) mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii) increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide dismutase, which

  17. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Marelja

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron sulfur (Fe-S clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide

  18. Genetics Home Reference: myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Myopathy with deficiency of iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme is an inherited disorder that primarily affects muscles ...

  19. Regulation of human Nfu activity in Fe-S cluster delivery-characterization of the interaction between Nfu and the HSPA9/Hsc20 chaperone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachnowsky, Christine; Liu, Yushi; Yoon, Taejin; Cowan, J A

    2018-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis is a complex, but highly regulated process that involves de novo cluster formation from iron and sulfide ions on a scaffold protein, and subsequent delivery to final targets via a series of Fe-S cluster-binding carrier proteins. The process of cluster release from the scaffold/carrier for transfer to the target proteins may be mediated by a dedicated Fe-S cluster chaperone system. In human cells, the chaperones include heat shock protein HSPA9 and the J-type chaperone Hsc20. While the role of chaperones has been somewhat clarified in yeast and bacterial systems, many questions remain over their functional roles in cluster delivery and interactions with a variety of human Fe-S cluster proteins. One such protein, Nfu, has recently been recognized as a potential interaction partner of the chaperone complex. Herein, we examined the ability of human Nfu to function as a carrier by interacting with the human chaperone complex. Human Nfu is shown to bind to both chaperone proteins with binding affinities similar to those observed for IscU binding to the homologous HSPA9 and Hsc20, while Nfu can also stimulate the ATPase activity of HSPA9. Additionally, the chaperone complex was able to promote Nfu function by enhancing the second-order rate constants for Fe-S cluster transfer to target proteins and providing directionality in cluster transfer from Nfu by eliminating promiscuous transfer reactions. Together, these data support a hypothesis in which Nfu can serve as an alternative carrier protein for chaperone-mediated cluster release and delivery in Fe-S cluster biogenesis and trafficking. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. The crystal structure of TrxA(CACA): Insights into the formation of a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster in an Escherichia coli thioredoxin mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Jean-Francois; Peisach, Daniel; Bardwell, James C A; Xu, Zhaohui

    2005-07-01

    Escherichia coli thioredoxin is a small monomeric protein that reduces disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic proteins. Two cysteine residues present in a conserved CGPC motif are essential for this activity. Recently, we identified mutations of this motif that changed thioredoxin into a homodimer bridged by a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster. When exported to the periplasm, these thioredoxin mutants could restore disulfide bond formation in strains lacking the entire periplasmic oxidative pathway. Essential for the assembly of the iron-sulfur was an additional cysteine that replaced the proline at position three of the CGPC motif. We solved the crystalline structure at 2.3 Angstroms for one of these variants, TrxA(CACA). The mutant protein crystallized as a dimer in which the iron-sulfur cluster is replaced by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. The catalytic site, which forms the dimer interface, crystallized in two different conformations. In one of them, the replacement of the CGPC motif by CACA has a dramatic effect on the structure and causes the unraveling of an extended alpha-helix. In both conformations, the second cysteine residue of the CACA motif is surface-exposed, which contrasts with wildtype thioredoxin where the second cysteine of the CXXC motif is buried. This exposure of a pair of vicinal cysteine residues apparently allows thioredoxin to acquire an iron-sulfur cofactor at its active site, and thus a new activity and mechanism of action.

  1. The crystal structure of TrxA(CACA): Insights into the formation of a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster in an Escherichia coli thioredoxin mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collet, Jean-Francois; Peisach, Daniel; Bardwell, James C.A.; Xu, Zhaohui [Michigan

    2010-07-13

    Escherichia coli thioredoxin is a small monomeric protein that reduces disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic proteins. Two cysteine residues present in a conserved CGPC motif are essential for this activity. Recently, we identified mutations of this motif that changed thioredoxin into a homodimer bridged by a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster. When exported to the periplasm, these thioredoxin mutants could restore disulfide bond formation in strains lacking the entire periplasmic oxidative pathway. Essential for the assembly of the iron-sulfur was an additional cysteine that replaced the proline at position three of the CGPC motif. We solved the crystalline structure at 2.3 {angstrom} for one of these variants, TrxA(CACA). The mutant protein crystallized as a dimer in which the iron-sulfur cluster is replaced by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. The catalytic site, which forms the dimer interface, crystallized in two different conformations. In one of them, the replacement of the CGPC motif by CACA has a dramatic effect on the structure and causes the unraveling of an extended {alpha}-helix. In both conformations, the second cysteine residue of the CACA motif is surface-exposed, which contrasts with wildtype thioredoxin where the second cysteine of the CXXC motif is buried. This exposure of a pair of vicinal cysteine residues apparently allows thioredoxin to acquire an iron-sulfur cofactor at its active site, and thus a new activity and mechanism of action.

  2. Zinc and the iron donor frataxin regulate oligomerization of the scaffold protein to form new Fe-S cluster assembly centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, B K; Ranatunga, W; Gakh, O; Smith, D Y; Thompson, J R; Isaya, G

    2017-06-21

    Early studies of the bacterial Fe-S cluster assembly system provided structural details for how the scaffold protein and the cysteine desulfurase interact. This work and additional work on the yeast and human systems elucidated a conserved mechanism for sulfur donation but did not provide any conclusive insights into the mechanism for iron delivery from the iron donor, frataxin, to the scaffold. We previously showed that oligomerization is a mechanism by which yeast frataxin (Yfh1) can promote assembly of the core machinery for Fe-S cluster synthesis both in vitro and in cells, in such a manner that the scaffold protein, Isu1, can bind to Yfh1 independent of the presence of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1. Here, in the absence of Yfh1, Isu1 was found to exist in two forms, one mostly monomeric with limited tendency to dimerize, and one with a strong propensity to oligomerize. Whereas the monomeric form is stabilized by zinc, the loss of zinc promotes formation of dimer and higher order oligomers. However, upon binding to oligomeric Yfh1, both forms take on a similar symmetrical trimeric configuration that places the Fe-S cluster coordinating residues of Isu1 in close proximity of iron-binding residues of Yfh1. This configuration is suitable for docking of Nfs1 in a manner that provides a structural context for coordinate iron and sulfur donation to the scaffold. Moreover, distinct structural features suggest that in physiological conditions the zinc-regulated abundance of monomeric vs. oligomeric Isu1 yields [Yfh1]·[Isu1] complexes with different Isu1 configurations that afford unique functional properties for Fe-S cluster assembly and delivery.

  3. Tuning the oxidative power of free iron-sulfur clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sandra M; Zhou, Shaodong; Schwarz, Helmut

    2017-03-15

    The gas-phase reactions between a series of di-iron sulfur clusters Fe 2 S x + (x = 1-3) and the small alkenes C 2 H 4 , C 3 H 6 , and C 4 H 8 have been investigated by means of Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. For all studied alkenes, the reaction efficiency is found to increase in the order Fe 2 S + desulfurization of the cluster and formation of H 2 S. This indicates an increased propensity to induce oxidation reactions, i.e. oxidative power, of Fe 2 S 3 + that is attributed to an increased formal oxidation state of the iron atoms. Furthermore, the ability of Fe 2 S 3 + to activate and dissociate the C-H bonds of the alkenes is observed to increase with increasing size of the alkene and thus correlates with the alkene ionization energy.

  4. Iron-sulfur clusters as biological sensors: the chemistry of reactions with molecular oxygen and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crack, Jason C; Green, Jeffrey; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E

    2014-10-21

    Iron-sulfur cluster proteins exhibit a range of physicochemical properties that underpin their functional diversity in biology, which includes roles in electron transfer, catalysis, and gene regulation. Transcriptional regulators that utilize iron-sulfur clusters are a growing group that exploit the redox and coordination properties of the clusters to act as sensors of environmental conditions including O2, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and metabolic nutritional status. To understand the mechanism by which a cluster detects such analytes and then generates modulation of DNA-binding affinity, we have undertaken a combined strategy of in vivo and in vitro studies of a range of regulators. In vitro studies of iron-sulfur cluster proteins are particularly challenging because of the inherent reactivity and fragility of the cluster, often necessitating strict anaerobic conditions for all manipulations. Nevertheless, and as discussed in this Account, significant progress has been made over the past decade in studies of O2-sensing by the fumarate and nitrate reduction (FNR) regulator and, more recently, nitric oxide (NO)-sensing by WhiB-like (Wbl) and FNR proteins. Escherichia coli FNR binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster under anaerobic conditions leading to a DNA-binding dimeric form. Exposure to O2 converts the cluster to a [2Fe-2S] form, leading to protein monomerization and hence loss of DNA binding ability. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies have shown that the conversion proceeds via at least two steps and involves a [3Fe-4S](1+) intermediate. The second step involves the release of two bridging sulfide ions from the cluster that, unusually, are not released into solution but rather undergo oxidation to sulfane (S(0)) subsequently forming cysteine persulfides that then coordinate the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Studies of other [4Fe-4S] cluster proteins that undergo oxidative cluster conversion indicate that persulfide formation and coordination may be more common than previously

  5. Interaction of J-protein co-chaperone Jac1 with Fe-S scaffold Isu is indispensible in vivo and conserved in evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Szymon; Schilke, Brenda; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Bigelow, Lance; Mulligan, Rory; Majewska, Julia; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A.; Dutkiewicz, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous mitochondrial J-protein Jac1, called HscB in Escherichia coli, and its partner Hsp70 play a critical role in the transfer of Fe-S clusters from the scaffold protein Isu to recipient proteins. Biochemical results from eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems indicate that formation of the Jac1-Isu complex is important for both targeting of the Isu for Hsp70 binding and stimulation of Hsp70’s ATPase activity. However, in apparent contradiction, we previously reported that an 8 fold decrease in Jac1’s affinity for Isu1 is well tolerated in vivo, raising the question as to whether the Jac1:Isu interaction actually plays an important biological role. Here we report the determination of the structure of Jac1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Taking advantage of this information and recently published data from the homologous bacterial system, a total of eight surface exposed residues were determined to play a role in Isu binding, as assessed by a set of biochemical assays. A variant having alanines substituted for these eight residues was unable to support growth of a jac1-Δ strain. However, replacement of three residues caused partial loss of function, resulting in a significant decrease in the Jac1:Isu1 interaction, a slow growth phenotype and a reduction in the activity of Fe-S cluster containing enzymes. Thus, we conclude that the Jac1:Isu1 interaction plays an indispensible role in the essential process of mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biogenesis. PMID:22306468

  6. Interaction of J-protein co-chaperone Jac1 with Fe-S scaffold Isu is indispensable in vivo and conserved in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schilke, Brenda A; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Bigelow, Lance; Mulligan, Rory; Majewska, Julia; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A; Dutkiewicz, Rafal

    2012-03-16

    The ubiquitous mitochondrial J-protein Jac1, called HscB in Escherichia coli, and its partner Hsp70 play a critical role in the transfer of Fe-S clusters from the scaffold protein Isu to recipient proteins. Biochemical results from eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems indicate that formation of the Jac1-Isu complex is important for both targeting of the Isu for Hsp70 binding and stimulation of Hsp70's ATPase activity. However, in apparent contradiction, we previously reported that an 8-fold decrease in Jac1's affinity for Isu1 is well tolerated in vivo, raising the question as to whether the Jac1:Isu interaction actually plays an important biological role. Here, we report the determination of the structure of Jac1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Taking advantage of this information and recently published data from the homologous bacterial system, we determined that a total of eight surface-exposed residues play a role in Isu binding, as assessed by a set of biochemical assays. A variant having alanines substituted for these eight residues was unable to support growth of a jac1-Δ strain. However, replacement of three residues caused partial loss of function, resulting in a significant decrease in the Jac1:Isu1 interaction, a slow growth phenotype, and a reduction in the activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Thus, we conclude that the Jac1:Isu1 interaction plays an indispensable role in the essential process of mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron Sulfur Proteins and their Synthetic Analogues: Structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and functions at a molecular level through model system~ are described. .... analysis of this structure and the tri-iron cluster was corrected as having a non planar Fe3S4 .... couple has potentials of -300 m V difference from the corresponding ...

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I: [Fe-S] cluster-driven protein rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.E.; Burgess, B.K.; Stout, C.D.; Cash, V.L.; Dean, D.R.; Jensen, G.M.; Stephens, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I is a small protein that contains one [4Fe-4S] cluster and one [3Fe-4S] cluster. Recently the x-ray crystal structure has been redetermined and the fdxA gene, which encodes the protein, has been cloned and sequenced. Here the authors report the site-directed mutation of Cys-20, which is a ligand of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the native protein, to alanine and the characterization of the protein product by x-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic methods. The data show that the mutant protein again contains one [4Fe-4S] cluster and one [3Fe-4S] cluster. The new [4Fe-4S] cluster obtains its fourth ligand from Cys-24, a free cysteine in the native structure. The formation of this [4Fe-4S] cluster drives rearrangement of the protein structure

  9. Minimal cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery of Giardia intestinalis is partially associated with mitosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pyrih, J.; Pyrihová, E.; Kolisko, M.; Stojanovova, D.; Basu, Somsuvro; Harant, K.; Haindrich, Alexander C.; Doležal, P.; Lukeš, Julius; Roger, A.; Tachezy, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 4 (2016), s. 701-714 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * protein maturation * abc transporter * Trichomonas vaginalis * cfd1-nbp35 complex * DNA metabolism * Fe/S proteins * mitochondrion * biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.898, year: 2016

  10. Assembling Fe/S-clusters and modifying tRNAs: ancient co-factors meet ancient adaptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonzo, Juan D; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-06-01

    Trypanosoma brucei undergoes two clearly distinct develomental stages: in the insect vector (procyclic stage) the cells generate the bulk of their energy through respiration, whereas in the bloodstream of the mammalian host (bloodstream stage) they grow mostly glycolytically. Several mitochondrial respiratory proteins require iron-sulfur clusters for activity, and their activation coincides with developmental changes. Likewise some tRNA modification enzymes either require iron-sulfur clusters or use components of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly pathway for activity. These enzymes affect the anticodon loop of various tRNAs and can impact protein synthesis. Herein, the possibility of these pathways being integrated and exploited by T. brucei to carefully coordinate energy demands to translational rates in response to enviromental changes is examined.

  11. Unifying principles in homodimeric type I photosynthetic reaction centers: properties of PscB and the FA, FB and FX iron-sulfur clusters in green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H

    2008-12-01

    The photosynthetic reaction center from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum (CbRC) was solubilized from membranes using Triton X-100 and isolated by sucrose density ultra-centrifugation. The CbRC complexes were subsequently treated with 0.5 M NaCl and ultrafiltered over a 100 kDa cutoff membrane. The resulting CbRC cores did not exhibit the low-temperature EPR resonances from FA- and FB- and were unable to reduce NADP+. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis showed that the PscB subunit, which harbors the FA and FB clusters, had become dissociated, and was now present in the filtrate. Attempts to rebind PscB onto CbRC cores were unsuccessful. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that recombinant PscB contains a heterogeneous mixture of [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and other types of Fe/S clusters tentatively identified as [2Fe-2S]2+,1+ clusters and rubredoxin-like Fe3+,2+ centers, and that the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ clusters which were present were degraded at high ionic strength. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the amount of iron and sulfide in the recombinant protein was sub-stoichiometric. A heme-staining assay indicated that cytochrome c551 remained firmly attached to the CbRC cores. Low-temperature EPR spectroscopy of photoaccumulated CbRC complexes and CbRC cores showed resonances between g=5.4 and 4.4 assigned to a S=3/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and at g=1.77 assigned to a S=1/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster, both from FX-. These results unify the properties of the acceptor side of the Type I homodimeric reaction centers found in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria: in both, the FA and FB iron-sulfur clusters are present on a salt-dissociable subunit, and FX is present as an interpolypeptide [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster with a significant population in a S=3/2 ground spin state.

  12. Interpretation of the photoelectron spectra of FeS(2)(-) by a multiconfiguration computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clima, Sergiu; Hendrickx, Marc F A

    2007-11-01

    The ground states of FeS(2) and FeS(2)(-), and several low-lying excited electronic states of FeS(2) that are responsible for the FeS(2)(-) photoelectron spectrum, are calculated. At the B3LYP level an open, quasi-linear [SFeS](-) conformation is found as the most stable structure, which is confirmed at the ab initio CASPT2 computational level. Both the neutral and the anionic unsaturated complexes possess high-spin electronic ground states. For the first time a complete assignment of the photoelectron spectrum of FeS(2)(-) is proposed. The lowest energy band in this spectrum is ascribed to an electron detachment from the two highest-lying 3dpi antibonding orbitals (with respect to the iron-sulfur bonding) of iron. The next-lowest experimental band corresponds to an electron removal from nonbonding, nearly pure sulfur orbitals. The two highest bands in the spectra are assigned as electron detachments from pi and sigma bonding mainly sulfur orbitals.

  13. Architecture of the Yeast Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, Wasantha; Gakh, Oleksandr; Galeano, Belinda K.; Smith, Douglas Y.; Söderberg, Christopher A. G.; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R.; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters is a vital process involving the delivery of elemental iron and sulfur to scaffold proteins via molecular interactions that are still poorly defined. We reconstituted a stable, functional complex consisting of the iron donor, Yfh1 (yeast frataxin homologue 1), and the Fe-S cluster scaffold, Isu1, with 1:1 stoichiometry, [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24. Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction of this complex at a resolution of ∼17 Å. In addition, via chemical cross-linking, limited proteolysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified protein-protein interaction surfaces within the complex. The data together reveal that [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 is a roughly cubic macromolecule consisting of one symmetric Isu1 trimer binding on top of one symmetric Yfh1 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Furthermore, molecular modeling suggests that two subunits of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1, may bind symmetrically on top of two adjacent Isu1 trimers in a manner that creates two putative [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly centers. In each center, conserved amino acids known to be involved in sulfur and iron donation by Nfs1 and Yfh1, respectively, are in close proximity to the Fe-S cluster-coordinating residues of Isu1. We suggest that this architecture is suitable to ensure concerted and protected transfer of potentially toxic iron and sulfur atoms to Isu1 during Fe-S cluster assembly. PMID:26941001

  14. Orientations of Iron-Sulfur Clusters FA and FB in the Homodimeric Type-I Photosynthetic Reaction Center of Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Matsuoka, Masahiro; Azai, Chihiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2016-05-12

    Orientations of the FA and FB iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters in a structure-unknown type-I homodimeric heriobacterial reaction center (hRC) were studied in oriented membranes of the thermophilic anaerobic photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacterium modesticaldum by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and compared with those in heterodimeric photosystem I (PS I). The Rieske-type FeS center in the cytochrome b/c complex showed a well-oriented EPR signal. Illumination at 14 K induced an FB(-) signal with g-axes of gz = 2.066, gy = 1.937, and gx = 1.890, tilted at angles of 60°, 60°, and 45°, respectively, with respect to the membrane normal. Chemical reduction with dithionite produced an additional signal of FA(-), which magnetically interacted with FB(-), with gz = 2.046, gy = 1.942, and gx = 1.911 at 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. The angles and redox properties of FA(-) and FB(-) in hRC resemble those of FB(-) and FA(-), respectively, in PS I. Therefore, FA and FB in hRC, named after their g-value similarities, seem to be located like FB and FA, not like FA and FB, respectively, in PS I. The reducing side of hRC could resemble those in PS I, if the names of FA and FB are interchanged with each other.

  15. Polymersomes containing iron sulfide (FeS) as primordial cell model : for the investigation of energy providing redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpermann, Theodor; Rüdel, Kristin; Rüger, Ronny; Steiniger, Frank; Nietzsche, Sandor; Filiz, Volkan; Förster, Stephan; Fahr, Alfred; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    According to Wächtershäuser's "Iron-Sulfur-World" one major requirement for the development of life on the prebiotic Earth is compartmentalization. Vesicles spontaneously formed from amphiphilic components containing a specific set of molecules including sulfide minerals may have lead to the first autotrophic prebiotic units. The iron sulfide minerals may have been formed by geological conversions in the environment of deep-sea volcanos (black smokers), which can be observed even today. Wächtershäuser postulated the evolution of chemical pathways as fundamentals of the origin of life on earth. In contrast to the classical Miller-Urey experiment, depending on external energy sources, the "Iron-Sulfur-World" is based on the catalytic and energy reproducing redox system FeS+H2S-->FeS2+H2. The energy release out of this redox reaction (∆RG°=-38 kJ/mol, pH 0) could be the cause for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic molecules and the precondition for the development of more complex units similar to cells known today. Here we show the possibility for precipitating iron sulfide inside vesicles composed of amphiphilic block-copolymers as a model system for a first prebiotic unit. Our findings could be an indication for a chemoautotrophic FeS based origin of life.

  16. Fe-S Clusters Emerging as Targets of Therapeutic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Vernis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe-S centers exhibit strong electronic plasticity, which is of importance for insuring fine redox tuning of protein biological properties. In accordance, Fe-S clusters are also highly sensitive to oxidation and can be very easily altered in vivo by different drugs, either directly or indirectly due to catabolic by-products, such as nitric oxide species (NOS or reactive oxygen species (ROS. In case of metal ions, Fe-S cluster alteration might be the result of metal liganding to the coordinating sulfur atoms, as suggested for copper. Several drugs presented through this review are either capable of direct interaction with Fe-S clusters or of secondary Fe-S clusters alteration following ROS or NOS production. Reactions leading to Fe-S cluster disruption are also reported. Due to the recent interest and progress in Fe-S biology, it is very likely that an increasing number of drugs already used in clinics will emerge as molecules interfering with Fe-S centers in the near future. Targeting Fe-S centers could also become a promising strategy for drug development.

  17. Architecture of the Human Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakh, Oleksandr; Ranatunga, Wasantha; Smith, Douglas Y.; Ahlgren, Eva-Christina; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R.; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Fe-S clusters, essential cofactors needed for the activity of many different enzymes, are assembled by conserved protein machineries inside bacteria and mitochondria. As the architecture of the human machinery remains undefined, we co-expressed in Escherichia coli the following four proteins involved in the initial step of Fe-S cluster synthesis: FXN42–210 (iron donor); [NFS1]·[ISD11] (sulfur donor); and ISCU (scaffold upon which new clusters are assembled). We purified a stable, active complex consisting of all four proteins with 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry. Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional model of the complex with ∼14 Å resolution. Molecular dynamics flexible fitting of protein structures docked into the EM map of the model revealed a [FXN42–210]24·[NFS1]24·[ISD11]24·[ISCU]24 complex, consistent with the measured 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry of its four components. The complex structure fulfills distance constraints obtained from chemical cross-linking of the complex at multiple recurring interfaces, involving hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, or hydrophobic interactions between conserved residues. The complex consists of a central roughly cubic [FXN42–210]24·[ISCU]24 sub-complex with one symmetric ISCU trimer bound on top of one symmetric FXN42–210 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Binding of 12 [NFS1]2·[ISD11]2 sub-complexes to the surface results in a globular macromolecule with a diameter of ∼15 nm and creates 24 Fe-S cluster assembly centers. The organization of each center recapitulates a previously proposed conserved mechanism for sulfur donation from NFS1 to ISCU and reveals, for the first time, a path for iron donation from FXN42–210 to ISCU. PMID:27519411

  18. The intermembrane space protein Erv1 of Trypanosoma brucei is essential for mitochondrial Fe-S cluster assembly and operates alone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindrich, Alexander C.; Boudova, M.; Vancová, Marie; Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Horáková, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 214, JUN (2017), s. 47-51 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21974S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18699S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma * Erv1 * Fe-S cluster assembly * mitochondrion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2016

  19. The Molecular Bases of the Dual Regulation of Bacterial Iron Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis by CyaY and IscX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Adinolfi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IscX (or YfhJ is a protein of unknown function which takes part in the iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery, a highly specialized and essential metabolic pathway. IscX binds to iron with low affinity and interacts with IscS, the desulfurase central to cluster assembly. Previous studies have suggested a competition between IscX and CyaY, the bacterial ortholog of frataxin, for the same binding surface of IscS. This competition could suggest a link between the two proteins with a functional significance. Using a hybrid approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance, small angle scattering and biochemical methods, we show here that IscX is a modulator of the inhibitory properties of CyaY: by competing for the same site on IscS, the presence of IscX rescues the rates of enzymatic cluster formation which are inhibited by CyaY. The effect is stronger at low iron concentrations, whereas it becomes negligible at high iron concentrations. These results strongly suggest the mechanism of the dual regulation of iron sulfur cluster assembly under the control of iron as the effector.

  20. A new point mutation in the iron-sulfur subunit of succinate dehydrogenase confers resistance to boscalid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Duan, Yabing; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    Research has established that mutations in highly conserved amino acids of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex in various fungi confer SDH inhibitor (SDHI) resistance. For Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, a necrotrophic fungus with a broad host range and a worldwide distribution, boscalid resistance has been attributed to the mutation H132R in the highly conserved SdhD subunit protein of the SDH complex. In our previous study, however, only one point mutation, A11V in SdhB (GCA to GTA change in SdhB), was detected in S. sclerotiorum boscalid-resistant (BR) mutants. In the current study, replacement of the SdhB gene in a boscalid-sensitive (BS) S. sclerotiorum strain with the mutant SdhB gene conferred resistance. Compared with wild-type strains, BR and GSM (SdhB gene in the wild-type strain replaced by the mutant SdhB gene) mutants were more sensitive to osmotic stress, lacked the ability to produce sclerotia and exhibited lower expression of the pac1 gene. Importantly, the point mutation was not located in the highly conserved sequence of the iron-sulfur subunit of SDH. These results suggest that resistance based on non-conserved vs. conserved protein domains differs in mechanism. In addition to increasing our understanding of boscalid resistance in S. sclerotiorum, the new information will be useful for the development of alternative antifungal drugs. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  1. The function and properties of the iron-sulfur center in spinach ferredoxin: Thioredoxin reductase: A new biological role for iron-sulfur clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, C.R.; Ameyibor, E.; Fu, Weiguang; Johnson, M.K. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-03

    Thioredoxin reduction in chloroplasts in catalyzed by a unique class of disulfide reductases which use a [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+/+} ferredoxin as the electron donor and contain an Fe-S cluster as the sole prosthetic group in addition to the active-site disulfide. The nature, properties, and function of the Fe-S cluster in spinach ferredoxin: thioredoxin reductase (FTR) have been investigated by the combination of UV/visible absorption, variable-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), EPR, and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies. 66 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Assembling Fe/S-clusters and modifying tRNAs: ancient co-factors meet ancient adaptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alfonzo, J. D.; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2011), 234-237 ISSN 1471-4922 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129; GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : IRON-SULFUR CLUSTERS * TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI * MITOCHONDRIAL * PROTEIN * FRATAXIN * BIOSYNTHESIS * SYNTHETASES * BIOGENESIS * THIOLATION * ANTICODON Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.144, year: 2011

  3. Structure and Characterization of Proteins and Enzymes Involved in Nucleotide Metabolism and Iron-Sulfur Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Ooi, Bee Lean

    , a program named MyCrystals has been developed to keep track of crystallization trials and results. The program combines pictures with crystallization conditions and is able to sort the pictures based on selected conditions. MyCrystals was used extensively throughout this work and allows for an overview...

  4. Enhanced leaf photosynthesis as a target to increase grain yield: insights from transgenic rice lines with variable Rieske FeS protein content in the cytochrome b6 /f complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Kondo, Eri; Sugiura, Daisuke; Terashima, Ichiro; Suzuki, Yuji; Makino, Amane

    2016-01-01

    Although photosynthesis is the most important source for biomass and grain yield, a lack of correlation between photosynthesis and plant yield among different genotypes of various crop species has been frequently observed. Such observations contribute to the ongoing debate whether enhancing leaf photosynthesis can improve yield potential. Here, transgenic rice plants that contain variable amounts of the Rieske FeS protein in the cytochrome (cyt) b6 /f complex between 10 and 100% of wild-type levels have been used to investigate the effect of reductions of these proteins on photosynthesis, plant growth and yield. Reductions of the cyt b6 /f complex did not affect the electron transport rates through photosystem I but decreased electron transport rates through photosystem II, leading to concomitant decreases in CO2 assimilation rates. There was a strong control of plant growth and grain yield by the rate of leaf photosynthesis, leading to the conclusion that enhancing photosynthesis at the single-leaf level would be a useful target for improving crop productivity and yield both via conventional breeding and biotechnology. The data here also suggest that changing photosynthetic electron transport rates via manipulation of the cyt b6 /f complex could be a potential target for enhancing photosynthetic capacity in higher plants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Iron-Sulfur Cluster of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is the Electron Acceptor for Electron Transfer Flavoprotein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael A.; Usselman, Robert J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the ubiquinone-pool. It contains one [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and one FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. In the porcine protein, threonine 367 is hydrogen bonded to N1 and O2 of the flavin ring of the FAD. The analogous site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO is asparagine 338. Mutations N338T and N338A were introduced into the R. sphaeroides protein by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the impact of hydrogen bonding at this site on redox potentials and activity. The mutations did not alter the optical spectra, EPR g-values, spin-lattice relaxation rates, or the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ to FAD point-dipole interspin distances. The mutations had no impact on the reduction potential for the iron-sulfur cluster, which was monitored by changes in the continuous wave EPR signals of the [4Fe-4S]+ at 15 K. For the FAD semiquinone, significantly different potentials were obtained by monitoring the titration at 100 or 293 K. Based on spectra at 293 K the N338T mutation shifted the first and second midpoint potentials for the FAD from +47 mV and −30 mV for wild type to −11 mV and −19 mV, respectively. The N338A mutation decreased the potentials to −37 mV and −49 mV. Lowering the midpoint potentials resulted in a decrease in the quinone reductase activity and negligible impact on disproportionation of ETF1e− catalyzed by ETF-QO. These observations indicate that the FAD is involved in electron transfer to ubiquinone, but not in electron transfer from ETF to ETF-QO. Therefore the iron-sulfur cluster is the immediate acceptor from ETF. PMID:18672901

  6. Characterization of the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase of Dehalobacter restrictus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillard, J.; Schumacher, W.; Vazquez, F.; Regeard, C.; Hagen, W.R.; Holliger, C.

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-bound tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase (PCE-RDase) (PceA; EC 1.97.1.8), the terminal component of the respiratory chain of Dehalobacter restrictus, was purified 25-fold to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a

  7. Purification and characterization of acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus, a tungsten iron-sulfur protein

    OpenAIRE

    Rosner, Bettina M.; Schink, Bernhard

    1995-01-01

    Acetylene hydratase of the mesophilic fermenting bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus catalyzes the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Growth of P. acetylenicus with acetylene and specific acetylene hydratase activity depended on tungstate or, to a lower degree, molybdate supply in the medium. The specific enzyme activity in cell extract was highest after growth in the presence of tungstate. Enzyme activity was stable even after prolonged storage of the cell extract or of the purified prote...

  8. Identification of the iron-sulfur center of spinach ferredoxin-nitrite reductase as a tetranuclear center, and preliminary EPR studies of mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, J R; Vega, J M; Kamin, H; Orme-Johnson, N R; Orme-Johnson, W H; Krueger, R J; Siegel, L M

    1979-02-25

    EPR spectroscopic and chemical analyses of spinach nitrite reductase show that the enzyme contains one reducible iron-sulfur center, and one site for binding either cyanide or nitrite, per siroheme. The heme is nearly all in the high spin ferric state in the enzyme as isolated. The extinction coefficient of the enzyme has been revised to E386 = 7.6 X 10(4) cm-1 (M heme)-1. The iron-sulfur center is reduced with difficulty by agents such as reduced methyl viologen (equilibrated with 1 atm of H2 at pH 7.7 in the presence of hydrogenase) or dithionite. Complexation of the enzyme with CO (a known ligand for nitrite reductase heme) markedly increases the reducibility of the iron-sulfur center. New chemical analyses and reinterpretation of previous data show that the enzyme contains 6 mol of iron and 4 mol of acid-labile S2-/mol of siroheme. The EPR spectrum of reduced nitrite reductase in 80% dimethyl sulfoxide establishes clearly that the enzyme contains a tetranuclear iron-sulfur (Fe4S4) center. The ferriheme and Fe4S4 centers are reduced at similar rates (k = 3 to 4 s-1) by dithionite. The dithionite-reduced Fe4S4 center is rapidly (k = 100 s-1) reoxidized by nitrite. These results indicate a role for the Fe4S4 center in catalysis.

  9. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron-Binding Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.; Bencze, K.; Jankovic, A.; Crater, A.; Busch, C.; Bradley, P.; Stemmler, A.; Spaller, M.; Stemmler, T.

    2006-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50 000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron

  10. Spectroscopic and functional characterization of iron-sulfur cluster-bound forms of Azotobacter vinelandii (Nif)IscA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapolelo, Daphne T; Zhang, Bo; Naik, Sunil G; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K

    2012-10-16

    The mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on A-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins, in general, and the specific role of (Nif)IscA in the maturation of nitrogen fixation proteins are currently unknown. To address these questions, in vitro spectroscopic studies (UV-visible absorption/CD, resonance Raman and Mössbauer) have been used to investigate the mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on Azotobacter vinelandii(Nif)IscA, and the ability of (Nif)IscA to accept clusters from NifU and to donate clusters to the apo form of the nitrogenase Fe-protein. The results show that (Nif)IscA can rapidly and reversibly cycle between forms containing one [2Fe-2S](2+) and one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster per homodimer via DTT-induced two-electron reductive coupling of two [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters and O(2)-induced [4Fe-4S](2+) oxidative cleavage. This unique type of cluster interconversion in response to cellular redox status and oxygen levels is likely to be important for the specific role of A-type proteins in the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic growth or oxidative stress conditions. Only the [4Fe-4S](2+)-(Nif)IscA was competent for rapid activation of apo-nitrogenase Fe protein under anaerobic conditions. Apo-(Nif)IscA was shown to accept clusters from [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound NifU via rapid intact cluster transfer, indicating a potential role as a cluster carrier for delivery of clusters assembled on NifU. Overall the results support the proposal that A-type proteins can function as carrier proteins for clusters assembled on U-type proteins and suggest that they are likely to supply [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] for the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic or oxidative stress growth conditions.

  11. Sulfidization of Organic Freshwater Flocs from a Minerotrophic Peatland: Speciation Changes of Iron, Sulfur, and Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ThomasArrigo, Laurel K; Mikutta, Christian; Lohmayer, Regina; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-04-05

    Iron-rich organic flocs are frequently observed in surface waters of wetlands and show a high affinity for trace metal(loid)s. Under low-flow stream conditions, flocs may settle, become buried, and eventually be subjected to reducing conditions facilitating trace metal(loid) release. In this study, we reacted freshwater flocs (704-1280 mg As/kg) from a minerotrophic peatland (Gola di Lago, Switzerland) with sulfide (5.2 mM, S(-II)spike/Fe = 0.75-1.62 mol/mol) at neutral pH and studied the speciation changes of Fe, S, and As at 25 ± 1 °C over 1 week through a combination of synchrotron X-ray techniques and wet-chemical analyses. Sulfidization of floc ferrihydrite and nanocrystalline lepidocrocite caused the rapid formation of mackinawite (52-81% of Fesolid at day 7) as well as solid-phase associated S(0) and polysulfides. Ferrihydrite was preferentially reduced over lepidocrocite, although neoformation of lepidocrocite from ferrihydrite could not be excluded. Sulfide-reacted flocs contained primarily arsenate (47-72%) which preferentially adsorbed to Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides, despite abundant mackinawite precipitation. At higher S(-II)spike/Fe molar ratios (≥1.0), the formation of an orpiment-like phase accounted for up to 35% of solid-phase As. Despite Fe and As sulfide precipitation and the presence of residual Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides, mobilization of As was recorded in all samples (Asaq = 0.45-7.0 μM at 7 days). Aqueous As speciation analyses documented the formation of thioarsenates contributing up to 33% of Asaq. Our findings show that freshwater flocs from the Gola di Lago peatland may become a source of As under sulfate-reducing conditions and emphasize the pivotal role Fe-rich organic freshwater flocs play in trace metal(loid) cycling in S-rich wetlands characterized by oscillating redox conditions.

  12. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  13. The iron uptake repressor Fep1 in the fission yeast binds Fe-S cluster through conserved cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kang-Lok; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye, E-mail: jhroe@snu.ac.kr

    2016-09-09

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated since iron is an essential but toxic element in the cell. The GATA-type transcription factor Fep1 and its orthologs contribute to iron homeostasis in many fungi by repressing genes for iron uptake when intracellular iron is high. Even though the function and interaction partners of Fep1 have been elucidated extensively In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the mechanism behind iron-sensing by Fep1 remains elusive. It has been reported that Fep1 interacts with Fe-S-containing monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and Grx4-Fra2 complex. In this study, we demonstrate that Fep1 also binds iron, in the form of Fe-S cluster. Spectroscopic and biochemical analyses of as isolated and reconstituted Fep1 suggest that the dimeric Fep1 binds Fe-S clusters. The mutation study revealed that the cluster-binding depended on the conserved cysteines located between the two zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. EPR analyses revealed [Fe-S]-specific peaks indicative of mixed presence of [2Fe-2S], [3Fe-4S], or [4Fe-4S]. The finding that Fep1 is an Fe-S protein fits nicely with the model that the Fe-S-trafficking Grx4 senses intracellular iron environment and modulates the activity of Fep1. - Highlights: • Fep1, a prototype fungal iron uptake regulator, was isolated stably from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. • Fep1 exhibits UV–visible absorption spectrum, characteristic of [Fe-S] proteins. • The iron and sulfide contents in purified or reconstituted Fep1 also support [Fe-S]. • The conserved cysteines are critical for [Fe-S]-binding. • EPR spectra at 5 K and 123 K suggest a mixed population of [Fe-S].

  14. Defining the Architecture of the Core Machinery for the Assembly of Fe-S Clusters in Human Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakh, Oleksandr; Ranatunga, Wasantha; Galeano, Belinda K; Smith, Douglas S; Thompson, James R; Isaya, Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Although Fe-S clusters may assemble spontaneously from elemental iron and sulfur in protein-free systems, the potential toxicity of free Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , and S 2- ions in aerobic environments underscores the requirement for specialized proteins to oversee the safe assembly of Fe-S clusters in living cells. Prokaryotes first developed multiprotein systems for Fe-S cluster assembly, from which mitochondria later derived their own system and became the main Fe-S cluster suppliers for eukaryotic cells. Early studies in yeast and human mitochondria indicated that Fe-S cluster assembly in eukaryotes is centered around highly conserved Fe-S proteins (human ISCU) that serve as scaffolds upon which new Fe-S clusters are assembled from (i) elemental sulfur, provided by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent cysteine desulfurase (human NFS1) and its stabilizing-binding partner (human ISD11), and (ii) elemental iron, provided by an iron-binding protein of the frataxin family (human FXN). Further studies revealed that all of these proteins could form stable complexes that could reach molecular masses of megadaltons. However, the protein-protein interaction surfaces, catalytic mechanisms, and overall architecture of these macromolecular machines remained undefined for quite some time. The delay was due to difficulties inherent in reconstituting these very large multiprotein complexes in vitro or isolating them from cells in sufficient quantities to enable biochemical and structural studies. Here, we describe approaches we developed to reconstitute the human Fe-S cluster assembly machinery in Escherichia coli and to define its remarkable architecture. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis from molecular understanding to clinical disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadhel, Majid; Nashabat, Marwan; Ali, Qais Abu; Hundallah, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Iron–sulfur clusters (ISCs) are known to play a major role in various protein functions. Located in the mitochondria, cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus, they contribute to various core cellular functions. Until recently, only a few human diseases related to mitochondrial ISC biogenesis defects have been described. Such diseases include Friedreich ataxia, combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 19, infantile complex II/III deficiency defect, hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis and mitochondrial muscle myopathy, lipoic acid biosynthesis defects, multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndromes and non ketotic hyperglycinemia due to glutaredoxin 5 gene defect. Disorders of mitochondrial import, export and translation, including sideroblastic anemia with ataxia, EVEN-PLUS syndrome and mitochondrial complex I deficiency due to nucleotide-binding protein-like protein gene defect, have also been implicated in ISC biogenesis defects. With advances in next generation sequencing technologies, more disorders related to ISC biogenesis defects are expected to be elucidated. In this article, we aim to shed the light on mitochondrial ISC biogenesis, related proteins and their function, pathophysiology, clinical phenotypes of related disorders, diagnostic approach, and future implications. PMID:28064324

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory studies of (FeS)mH- (m = 2-4) cluster anions: effects of the single hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2017-12-20

    Single hydrogen containing iron hydrosulfide cluster anions (FeS) m H - (m = 2-4) are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) at 3.492 eV (355 nm) and 4.661 eV (266 nm) photon energies, and by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The structural properties, relative energies of different spin states and isomers, and the first calculated vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of different spin states for these (FeS) m H - (m = 2-4) cluster anions are investigated at various reasonable theory levels. Two types of structural isomers are found for these (FeS) m H - (m = 2-4) clusters: (1) the single hydrogen atom bonds to a sulfur site (SH-type); and (2) the single hydrogen atom bonds to an iron site (FeH-type). Experimental and theoretical results suggest such available different SH- and FeH-type structural isomers should be considered when evaluating the properties and behavior of these single hydrogen containing iron sulfide clusters in real chemical and biological systems. Compared to their related, respective pure iron sulfur (FeS) m - clusters, the first VDE trend of the diverse type (FeS) m H 0,1 - (m = 1-4) clusters can be understood through (1) the different electron distribution properties of their highest singly occupied molecular orbital employing natural bond orbital analysis (NBO/HSOMO), and (2) the partial charge distribution on the NBO/HSOMO localized sites of each cluster anion. Generally, the properties of the NBO/HSOMOs play the principal role with regard to the physical and chemical properties of all the anions. The change of cluster VDE from low to high is associated with the change in nature of their NBO/HSOMO from a dipole bound and valence electron mixed character, to a valence p orbital on S, to a valence d orbital on Fe, and to a valence p orbital on Fe or an Fe-Fe delocalized valence bonding orbital. For clusters having the same properties for NBO/HSOMOs, the partial charge distributions at the NBO/HSOMO localized sites additionally

  17. Role of IscX in Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hae; Bothe, Jameson R.; Frederick, Ronnie O.; Holder, Johneisa C.; Markley, John L. [UW

    2014-08-20

    The Escherichia coli isc operon encodes key proteins involved in the biosynthesis of iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters. Whereas extensive studies of most ISC proteins have revealed their functional properties, the role of IscX (also dubbed YfhJ), a small acidic protein encoded by the last gene in the operon, has remained in question. Previous studies showed that IscX binds iron ions and interacts with the cysteine desulfurase (IscS) and the scaffold protein for cluster assembly (IscU), and it has been proposed that IscX functions either as an iron supplier or a regulator of Fe–S cluster biogenesis. We have used a combination of NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), chemical cross-linking, and enzymatic assays to enlarge our understanding of the interactions of IscX with iron ions, IscU, and IscS. We used chemical shift perturbation to identify the binding interfaces of IscX and IscU in their complex. NMR studies showed that Fe2+ from added ferrous ammonium sulfate binds IscX much more avidly than does Fe3+ from added ferric ammonium citrate and that Fe2+ strengthens the interaction between IscX and IscU. We found that the addition of IscX to the IscU–IscS binary complex led to the formation of a ternary complex with reduced cysteine desulfurase activity, and we determined a low-resolution model for that complex from a combination of NMR and SAXS data. We postulate that the inhibition of cysteine desulfurase activity by IscX serves to reduce unproductive conversion of cysteine to alanine. By incorporating these new findings with results from prior studies, we propose a detailed mechanism for Fe–S cluster assembly in which IscX serves both as a donor of Fe2+ and as a regulator of cysteine desulfurase activity.

  18. An active Mitochondrial Complex II Present in Mature Seeds Contains an Embryo-Specific Iron-Sulfur Subunit Regulated by ABA and bZIP53 and Is Involved in Germination and Seedling Establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restovic, Franko; Espinoza-Corral, Roberto; Gómez, Isabel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Jordana, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) is an essential mitochondrial enzyme involved in both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the respiratory chain. In Arabidopsis thaliana , its iron-sulfur subunit (SDH2) is encoded by three genes, one of them ( SDH2.3 ) being specifically expressed during seed maturation in the embryo. Here we show that seed SDH2.3 expression is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and we define the promoter region (-114 to +49) possessing all the cis -elements necessary and sufficient for high expression in seeds. This region includes between -114 and -32 three ABRE (ABA-responsive) elements and one RY-enhancer like element, and we demonstrate that these elements, although necessary, are not sufficient for seed expression, our results supporting a role for the region encoding the 5' untranslated region (+1 to +49). The SDH2.3 promoter is activated in leaf protoplasts by heterodimers between the basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP53 (group S1) and bZIP10 (group C) acting through the ABRE elements, and by the B3 domain transcription factor ABA insensitive 3 (ABI3). The in vivo role of bZIP53 is further supported by decreased SDH2.3 expression in a knockdown bzip53 mutant. By using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and sdh2 mutants we have been able to conclusively show that complex II is already present in mature embryos before imbibition, and contains mainly SDH2.3 as iron-sulfur subunit. This complex plays a role during seed germination sensu-stricto since we have previously shown that seeds lacking SDH2.3 show retarded germination and now we demonstrate that low concentrations of thenoyltrifluoroacetone, a complex II inhibitor, also delay germination. Furthermore, complex II inhibitors completely block hypocotyl elongation in the dark and seedling establishment in the light, highlighting an essential role of complex II in the acquisition of photosynthetic competence and the transition from heterotrophy to autotrophy.

  19. Charge density study of two FeS2 polymorphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Jørgensen, Mads Ry Vogel; Bjerg, Lasse

    Experimental charge density studies of inorganic solids have proven to be a difficult task due to systematic errors related to data collection such as absorption and extinction; however, the use of synchrotron radiation has the potential to minimize these problems. [1] One of the pioneering...... experimental electron density studies of an inorganic solid containing a transition metal was presented by Stevens et al. [2] who investigated the effect of crystal-field splitting of the partially filled iron d-orbitals in the pyrite structure of FeS2. Other studies of various FeS2 structures, including...... pyrite, has been performed by Gibbs et al. [3], however, these are all based on theoretical calculations rather than experiment. In the current study we revisit FeS2 through an experimental charge density study of the two low-spin iron FeS2 structures, pyrite and marcasite. High-quality, low...

  20. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  1. Emerging critical roles of Fe-S clusters in DNA replication and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Jill O.; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Ishida, Justin P.; Tainer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-S clusters are partners in the origin of life that predate cells, acetyl-CoA metabolism, DNA, and the RNA world. The double helix solved the mystery of DNA replication by base pairing for accurate copying. Yet, for genome stability necessary to life, the double helix has equally important implications for damage repair. Here we examine striking advances that uncover Fe-S cluster roles both in copying the genetic sequence by DNA polymerases and in crucial repair processes for genome maintenance, as mutational defects cause cancer and degenerative disease. Moreover, we examine an exciting, controversial role for Fe-S clusters in a third element required for life – the long-range coordination and regulation of replication and repair events. By their ability to delocalize electrons over both Fe and S centers, Fe-S clusters have unbeatable features for protein conformational control and charge transfer via double-stranded DNA that may fundamentally transform our understanding of life, replication, and repair. PMID:25655665

  2. Synthesis and electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline tetragonal FeS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Shu-Lin; Wang Hui-Xian; Dong Cheng

    2014-01-01

    A convenient method for synthesis of tetragonal FeS using iron powder as iron source, is reported. Nanocrystalline tetragonal FeS samples were successfully synthesized by reacting metallic iron powder with sodium sulfide in acetate buffer solution. The obtained sample is single-phase tetragonal FeS with lattice parameters a = 0.3767 nm and c = 0.5037 nm, as revealed by X-ray diffraction. The sample consists of flat nanosheets with lateral dimensions from 20 nm up to 200 nm and average thickness of about 20 nm. We found that tetragonal FeS is a fairly good conductor from the electrical resistivity measurement on a pellet of the nanosheets. The temperature dependence of conductivity of the pellet was well fitted using an empirical equation wherein the effect of different grain boundaries was taken into consideration. This study provides a convenient, economic way to synthesize tetragonal FeS in a large scale and reports the first electrical conductivity data for tetragonal FeS down to liquid helium temperature. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  3. Vertical variability of arsenic concentrations under the control of iron-sulfur-arsenic interactions in reducing aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Kunfu; Wang, Yanxin; Postma, Dieke; Ma, Teng; Su, Chunli; Xie, Xianjun

    2018-06-01

    High spatial variability of arsenic (As) concentration in geogenic As-contaminated groundwater has been commonly observed worldwide, but the underlying reasons remain not well understood. Selecting a sulfate-containing, As-affected aquifer at the Datong Basin, northern China as the study area and combining hydrogeochemical investigation and sediment extraction with reactive transport modeling, this work elucidated the roles of Fe-S-As interactions in regulating the vertical variation of As concentration in the groundwater. Dissolved As concentration varied between 0.05 and 18 μmol/L, but generally increased in the depth of 20-25 m and then decreased in 25-30 m. The high-As groundwater contained low Fe(II) (groundwater devoid of sulfate reduction. The reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe(III) oxides coupled to the degradation of organic matter with an estimated maximum rate of 0.22 mmol C/L/yr, mainly accounted for the depth-dependent increase of As concentration in the upper part of the shallow aquifer (groundwater but also probably co-precipitated As to prompt As decrease in the depth of 25-30 m. Arsenite adsorbed on remaining Fe(III) oxides and newly-formed Fe(II) sulfides is another important pool of As in the aquifer, which varies in response to the extents of Fe(III)-oxide and sulfate reduction and consequently alters As distribution coefficient between the solid and the aqueous phases. This study highlights the importance of coupled geochemical cycling of Fe, S and As for As mobilization and reveals how it regulates As partitioning between groundwater and sediments.

  4. Identification of a multi-protein reductive dehalogenase complex in Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 suggests a protein-dependent respiratory electron transport chain obviating quinone involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublik, Anja; Deobald, Darja; Hartwig, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), gel filtration and ultrafiltration an active dehalogenating protein complex with a molecular mass of 250–270 kDa was identified. The active subunit of reductive dehalogenase (RdhA) colocalised with a complex iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme (CISM) subunit (CbdbA195) and an iron-sulfur cluster...... of the dehalogenating complex prior to membrane solubilisation. Taken together, the identification of the respiratory dehalogenase protein complex and the absence of indications for quinone participation in the respiration suggest a quinone-independent protein-based respiratory electron transfer chain in D. mccartyi....

  5. Relaxation-phenomena in LiAl/FeS-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borger, W.; Kappus, W.; Panesar, H. S.

    A theoretical model of the capacity of strongly relaxing electrochemical systems is applied to the LiAl/FeS system. Relaxation phenomena in LiAl and FeS electrodes can be described by this model. Experimental relaxation data indicate that lithium transport through the alpha-LiAl layer to the particle surface is the capacity limiting process at high discharge current density in the LiAl electrode in LiCl-KCl and LiF-LiCl-LiBr mixtures. Strong relaxation is observed in the FeS electrode with LiCl-KCl electrolyte caused by lithium concentration gradients and precipitation of KCl in the pores.

  6. Biochemistry of the normal dura mater of the human brain determination of water, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron, sulfur and nitrogen contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio M. Canelas

    1969-06-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of water, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron, sulfur, and nitrogen were determined in samples of apparently normal dura mater removed from 18 subjects recently dead by craniocerebral trauma. The average concentrations expressed in dry weight were: water 79.55 g/100 g ± 2.52; sodium 1.63 mequiv/100 g ±0.27; potassium 3.68 mequiv/100 g ± 0.66; calcium 119.84 mg/100 g ± 107.40; phosphorus 68.2 mg/100 g ± 34.5; magnesium 0.61 mequiv/100 g ± 0.37; copper 249.8 /xg/100 g ± 109.4; iron 0.82 mg/100 g ± 0.28; sulfur 490.7 mg/100 g ± 22.5; nitrogen 3.33 g/100 g ± 0.17.

  7. Deficiency of Functional Iron-Sulfur Domains in ABCE1 Inhibits the Proliferation and Migration of Lung Adenocarcinomas By Regulating the Biogenesis of Beta-Actin In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ATP-binding cassette transporter E1 (ABCE1, a unique ABC superfamily member that bears two Fe-S clusters, is essential for metastatic progression in lung cancer. Fe-S clusters within ABCE1 are crucial for ribosome dissociation and translation reinitiation; however, whether these clusters promote tumor proliferation and migration is unclear. Methods: The interaction between ABCE1 and β-actin was confirmed using GST pull-down. The lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD cell line A549 was transduced with lentiviral packaging vectors overexpressing either wild-type ABCE1 or ABCE1 with Fe-S cluster deletions (ΔABCE1. The role of Fe-S clusters in the viability and migration of cancer cells was evaluated using clonogenic, MTT, Transwell and wound healing assays. Cytoskeletal rearrangement was determined using immunofluorescent techniques. Results: Fe-S clusters were the key domains in ABCE1 involved in binding to β-actin. The proliferative and migratory capacity increased in cells overexpressing ABCE1. However, the absence of Fe-S clusters reversed these effects. A549 cells overexpressing ABCE1 exhibited irregular morphology and increased levels of cytoskeletal polymerization as indicated by the immunofluorescence images. In contrast, cells expressing the Fe-S cluster deletion mutant presented opposing effects. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the indispensable role of Fe-S clusters when ABCE1 participates in the proliferation and migration of LUADs by interacting with β-actin. The Fe-S clusters of ABCE1 may be potential targets for the prevention of lung cancer metastasis.

  8. The Impact of FeS Mineralogy on TCE Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions are often encountered in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems that are constructed to remove TCE from groundwater, which usually leads to the accumulation of FeS mineral phases in the matrix of the PRB. Poorly crystalline mackinawite (Fe...

  9. Impact of FeS Mineralogy on TCE Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions are often encountered in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems that are constructed to remove TCE from groundwater, which usually leads to the accumulation of FeS mineral phases in the matrix of the PRB. Poorly crystalline mackinawite (Fe...

  10. Evolution of Fe/S cluster biogenesis in the anaerobic parasite Blastocystis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsaousis, A.D.; de Choudens, S. O.; Gentekaki, E.; Long, Shaojun; Gaston, D.; Stechmann, A.; Vinella, D.; Py, B.; Fontecave, M.; Barras, F.; Lukeš, Julius; Roger, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 26 (2012), s. 10426-10431 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : iron/sulfur cluster biosynthesis * lateral gene transfer * parasite evolution * sulfur-mobilization machinery * oxygen stress adaptation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  11. Expression and Characterisation of Recombinant Rhodocyclus tenuis High Potential Iron-Sulphur Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Bjerg; Bennet, K.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2000-01-01

    The high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) from Rhodocyclus tenuis strain 2761 has been overproduced in Escherichia coli from its structural gene, purified to apparent homogeneity, and then characterized by an array of methods. UV-visible spectra of the reduced and oxidized recombinant protein...

  12. Structure and property correlations in FeS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, S.J. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics , University of Notre Dame , Notre Dame , IN 46556 (United States); Kidder, M.K. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); Parker, D.S. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); Cruz, C. dela [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); McGuire, M.A.; Chance, W.M.; Li, Li [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); Debeer-Schmitt, L. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); Ermentrout, J. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); Littrell, K.C. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States); Eskildsen, M.R. [Department of Physics , University of Notre Dame , Notre Dame , IN 46556 (United States); Sefat, A.S. [Materials Science & Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory , Oak Ridge , TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Similar to other iron chalcogenides of FeSe and FeTe, the structure and composition of FeS is highly correlated to its superconductivity. For iron-sulfide (FeS), we report the correlation between the structural details with its magnetic and superconducting properties. • While our FeS with a = 3.6772(7) Å is a filamentary superconductor coexisting with an antiferromagnetic phase, previously reported samples with a > 3.68 Å are bulk superconductors with no magnetism, and those with a ≈ 3.674 Å show magnetic properties. The a lattice of ≥3.68 Å seem to be crucial for causing bulk superconductivity in the tetragonal phase, which is relevant to iron stoichiometry and sulfur height from the iron plane. • For Fe{sub 0.93}S, we report evidence for the coexistence of antiferromagnetism at T{sub N} = 116 and filamentary superconductivity below T{sub c} = 4 K. While temperature neutron diffraction data reveals antiferromagnetic commensurate ordering with wave vector k{sub m} = (0.25,0.25,0), our magnetization results shows shielding and diamagnetism. - Abstract: For iron-sulfide (FeS), we investigate the correlation between the structural details, including its dimensionality and composition, with its magnetic and superconducting properties. We compare, theoretically and experimentally, the two-dimensional (2D) layered tetragonal (“t-FeS”) phase with the 3D hexagonal ('h-FeS') phase. X-ray diffraction reveals iron-deficient chemical compositions of t-Fe{sub 0.93(1)}S and h-Fe{sub 0.84(1)}S that show no low-temperature structural transitions. First-principles calculations reveal a high sensitivity of the 2D structure to the electronic and magnetic properties, predicting marginal antiferromagnetic instability for our compound (sulfur height of z{sub S} = 0.252) with an ordering energy of about 11 meV/Fe, while the 3D phase is magnetically stable. Experimentally, h-Fe{sub 0.84}S orders magnetically well above room

  13. Comparison of FeS, FeS + S and solid superacid catalytic properties for coal hydro-liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhicai Wang; Hengfu Shui; Dexiang Zhang; Jinsheng Gao [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). College of Resource and Environment Engineering

    2007-03-15

    Catalyst plays an important role in direct coal liquefaction. This paper focuses on the catalytic behavior of a novel SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2} superacid catalyst in coal hydro-liquefaction. A series of hydro-liquefaction experiments were conducted under mild conditions - 400{sup o}C, 30 min and H{sub 2} initial pressure 4 MPa in a batch autoclave with a volume of 100 ml. The catalytic property of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2} was compared with FeS and FeS + S by Shenhua coal. The liquefaction products catalyzed by different catalysts were analyzed by FTIR spectrum, {sup 1}H NMR spectrum and element analysis. In addition, the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2} solid superacid was characterized. The results indicated that the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2} solid superacid shows outstanding catalytic property for direct liquefaction of coal and gives the highest coal conversion and gas + oil yield compared to other two catalysts. The THF conversion and the extraction yield of CS{sub 2}/NMP mixed solvent of liquefied coal catalyzed with SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2} are 76.3%, daf and 81.2%, daf respectively, and the yield of gas + oil is 62.5%, daf under the condition used in this study. The pyrolysis of coal macromolecular clusters can be promoted by catalysts such as FeS, FeS + S and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2}. There may be only the pyrolysis of volatile matter and the relaxation of the structure of coal macromolecular clusters in non-catalytic liquefaction at 400{sup o}C. Added sulfur in FeS can improve the catalytic activity of hydrogenation. SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}/ZrO{sub 2} is a notable catalyst in the study of coal direct liquefaction because it shows excellent catalytic activities for the pyrolysis and the hydrogenation. In addition, it has been found that the C-O bond is the most stable group in coal liquefaction reaction except for the covalent bond between carbon and carbon. 34 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Overexpression of the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1): contrasting effects on iron-sulfur cluster assembly, heme synthesis and resistance to oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seguin, Alexandra; Bayot, Aurélien; Dancis, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    of 2muYFH1 cells compared to wild-type cells. To our knowledge, this work is the first description where major frataxin-related phenotypes ([Fe-S] cluster assembly and heme synthesis) can be split in vivo, suggesting that frataxin has independent roles in both processes, and that the optimal conditions......Friedreich's ataxia is generally associated with defects in [Fe-S] cluster assembly/stability and heme synthesis and strong susceptibility to oxidative stress. We used the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model of Friedreich's ataxia to study the physiological consequences of modulating...... for these independent roles are different....

  15. Mixed Contaminants Removal Efficiency Using Bio-FeS Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyunhee; Roh, Yul

    2018-02-01

    Advances in nanotechnology has provided diverse industrial applications including an environmental remediation field. In particular, bio-nanotechnology gives extended eco-friendly remediation practice. Among diverse bio-nanoparticles synthesized by microorganisms, the iron based nanoparticles (NPs) are of great interest because of their availability, low cost and toxicity to human health and the environment. In this study, iron based nanoparticles were biologically synthesized and mineralogically identified. Also, the removal efficiency of mixed contaminants, high As(III)-low Cr(VI) and high As(V)-low Cr(VI), using these bio-nanoparticles were conducted. As a result, biologically synthesized NPs were identified as FeS complex and their catalytic capacity showed highly effective to immobilize more than 97% of mixed contaminants by adsorption/mineralization.

  16. Thermoluminescence kinetics of pyrite (FeS2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, A.N; Levy, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Thermoluminescence of pyrite (FeS 2 ) has been investigated to study the kinetics of single peak glow curves. The material used normally exhibits one large and four small peaks. However a glow curve can be obtained with only the large single peak that is suitable for testing thermoluminescence kinetics. Glow curves from aliquots of a single natural pyrite crystal studied in detail contain two low intensity thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at ∼90 degree and ∼250 degree C, and two chemiluminescence (CL) peaks at ∼350 degree and ∼430 degree C. The CL peaks are largely removable by initially heating the sample chamber under vacuum, pumping through liquid nitrogen traps, and recording glow curves immediately after helium is introduced, procedures which reduce system contaminants that react with pyrite. The shape, the variation of the temperature of the peak maximum (T max ) with dose, and the retrapping to recombination cross section ratio σ of the large 250 degree C peak are better described by the general one trap (GOT) kinetic equation, the basic equation from which the 1st and 2nd order kinetic equations are obtained as special cases (see text), than by the 1st and 2nd order equations. 12 refs., 7 figs

  17. Saturation and negative temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity in liquid iron-sulfur alloys at high densities from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Fabian; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; de Koker, Nico

    2018-03-01

    We report results on electronic transport properties of liquid Fe-S alloys at conditions of planetary cores, computed using first-principle techniques in the Kubo-Greenwood formalism. We describe a combined effect of resistivity saturation due to temperature, compression, and chemistry by comparing the electron mean free path from the Drude response of optical conductivity to the mean interatomic distance. At high compression and high sulfur concentration the Ioffe-Regel condition is satisfied, and the temperature coefficient of resistivity changes sign from positive to negative. We show that this happens due to a decrease in the d density of states at the Fermi level in response to thermal broadening.

  18. Transfer of sulfur from IscS to IscU during Fe/S cluster assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, H D; Silberg, J J; Hoff, K G; Vickery, L E

    2001-11-30

    The cysteine desulfurase enzymes NifS and IscS provide sulfur for the biosynthesis of Fe/S proteins. NifU and IscU have been proposed to serve as template or scaffold proteins in the initial Fe/S cluster assembly events, but the mechanism of sulfur transfer from NifS or IscS to NifU or IscU has not been elucidated. We have employed [(35)S]cysteine radiotracer studies to monitor sulfur transfer between IscS and IscU from Escherichia coli and have used direct binding measurements to investigate interactions between the proteins. IscS catalyzed transfer of (35)S from [(35)S]cysteine to IscU in the absence of additional thiol reagents, suggesting that transfer can occur directly and without involvement of an intermediate carrier. Surface plasmon resonance studies and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements further revealed that IscU binds to IscS with high affinity (K(d) approximately 2 microm) in support of a direct transfer mechanism. Transfer was inhibited by treatment of IscU with iodoacetamide, and (35)S was released by reducing reagents, suggesting that transfer of persulfide sulfur occurs to cysteinyl groups of IscU. A deletion mutant of IscS lacking C-terminal residues 376-413 (IscSDelta376-413) displayed cysteine desulfurase activity similar to the full-length protein but exhibited lower binding affinity for IscU, decreased ability to transfer (35)S to IscU, and reduced activity in assays of Fe/S cluster assembly on IscU. The findings with IscSDelta376-413 provide additional support for a mechanism of sulfur transfer involving a direct interaction between IscS and IscU and suggest that the C-terminal region of IscS may be important for binding IscU.

  19. Role of protein-glutathione contacts in defining glutaredoxin-3 [2Fe-2S] cluster chirality, ligand exchange and transfer chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sambuddha; Cowan, J A

    2017-10-01

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx) serve as intermediate cluster carriers in iron-sulfur cluster trafficking. The [2Fe-2S]-bound holo forms of Grx proteins display cysteinyl coordination from exogenous glutathione (GSH), in addition to contact from protein-derived Cys. Herein, we report mechanistic studies that investigate the role of exogenous glutathione in defining cluster chirality, ligand exchange, and the cluster transfer chemistry of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grx3. Systematic perturbations were introduced to the glutathione-binding site by substitution of conserved charged amino acids that form crucial electrostatic contacts with the glutathione molecule. Native Grx3 could also be reconstituted in the absence of glutathione, with either DTT, BME or free L-cysteine as the source of the exogenous Fe-S ligand contact, while retaining full functional reactivity. The delivery of the [2Fe-2S] cluster to Grx3 from cluster donor proteins such as Isa, Nfu, and a [2Fe-2S](GS) 4 complex, revealed that electrostatic contacts are of key importance for positioning the exogenous glutathione that in turn influences the chiral environment of the cluster. All Grx3 derivatives were reconstituted by standard chemical reconstitution protocols and found to transfer cluster to apo ferredoxin 1 (Fdx1) at rates comparable to native protein, even when using DTT, BME or free L-cysteine as a thiol source in place of GSH during reconstitution. Kinetic analysis of cluster transfer from holo derivatives to apo Fdx1 has led to a mechanistic model for cluster transfer chemistry of native holo Grx3, and identification of the likely rate-limiting step for the reaction.

  20. Resilient carbon encapsulation of iron pyrite (FeS2) cathodes in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Tara S.; Tussing, Matthew; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan

    2015-01-01

    Converting iron pyrite (FeS2) from a non-cyclable to a cyclable cathode material for lithium ion batteries has been an ongoing challenge in recent years. Herein we report a promising mitigation strategy: wet-chemistry based conformal encapsulation of synthetic FeS2 nanocrystals in a resilient carbon (RC) matrix (FeS2@RC). The FeS2@RC composite was fabricated by dispersing autoclave-synthesized FeS2 nanocrystals in an aqueous glucose solution, polymerizing the glucose in a hydrothermal reactor, and finally heating the polymer/FeS2 composite in a tube furnace to partially carbonize the polymer. The FeS2@RC electrodes showed superior cyclability compared with the FeS2 electrodes, that is, 25% versus 1% of retention at the 20th cycle. Based on electrochemical analysis, XRD study, and SEM characterization, the performance enhancement was attributed to RC's ability to accommodate volume fluctuation, enhance charge transfer, alleviate detrimental side reactions, and suppress loss of the active material. Furthermore, the remaining issues associated with the current system were identified and future research directions were proposed.

  1. Research progress in photolectric materials of CuFeS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Mingxing; Li, Jing; Liu, Kegao

    2018-03-01

    CuFeS2 as a photoelectric material, there are many advantages, such as high optical absorption coefficient, direct gap semiconductor, thermal stability, no photo-recession effect and so on. Because of its low price, abundant reserves and non-toxic, CuFeS2 has attracted extensive attention of scientists.Preparation method of thin film solar cells are included that Electrodeposition, sputtering, thermal evaporation, thermal spraying method, co-reduction method.In this paper, the development of CuFeS2 thin films prepared by co-reduction method and co-reduction method is introduced.In this paper, the structure and development of solar cells, advantages of CuFeS2 as solar cell material, the structure and photoelectric properties and magnetic properties of CuFeS2, preparation process analysis of CuFeS2 thin film, research and development of CuFeS2 in solar cells is included herein. Finally, the development trend of CuFeS2 optoelectronic materials is analyzed and further research directions are proposed.

  2. Effects of metal ions on the reactivity and corrosion electrochemistry of Fe/FeS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Turcio-Ortega, David; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2014-04-01

    Nano-zerovalent iron (nZVI) formed under sulfidic conditions results in a biphasic material (Fe/FeS) that reduces trichloroethene (TCE) more rapidly than nZVI associated only with iron oxides (Fe/FeO). Exposing Fe/FeS to dissolved metals (Pd(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Mn(2+)) results in their sequestration by coprecipitation as dopants into FeS and FeO and/or by electroless precipitation as zerovalent metals that are hydrogenation catalysts. Using TCE reduction rates to probe the effect of metal amendments on the reactivity of Fe/FeS, it was found that Mn(2+) and Cu(2+) decreased TCE reduction rates, while Pd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) increased them. Electrochemical characterization of metal-amended Fe/FeS showed that aging caused passivation by growth of FeO and FeS phases and poisoning of catalytic metal deposits by sulfide. Correlation of rate constants for TCE reduction (kobs) with electrochemical parameters (corrosion potentials and currents, Tafel slopes, and polarization resistance) and descriptors of hydrogen activation by metals (exchange current density for hydrogen reduction and enthalpy of solution into metals) showed the controlling process changed with aging. For fresh Fe/FeS, kobs was best described by the exchange current density for activation of hydrogen, whereas kobs for aged Fe/FeS correlated with electrochemical descriptors of electron transfer.

  3. Redox Behavior of the S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-Binding Fe-S Cluster in Methylthiotransferase RimO, toward Understanding Dual SAM Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Thibaut; Moreau, Yohann; Clemancey, Martin; Forouhar, Farhad; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Duraffourg, Nicolas; Fourmond, Vincent; Latour, Jean-Marc; Gambarelli, Serge; Mulliez, Etienne; Atta, Mohamed

    2016-10-18

    RimO, a radical-S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme, catalyzes the specific C 3 methylthiolation of the D89 residue in the ribosomal S 12 protein. Two intact iron-sulfur clusters and two SAM cofactors both are required for catalysis. By using electron paramagnetic resonance, Mössbauer spectroscopies, and site-directed mutagenesis, we show how two SAM molecules sequentially bind to the unique iron site of the radical-SAM cluster for two distinct chemical reactions in RimO. Our data establish that the two SAM molecules bind the radical-SAM cluster to the unique iron site, and spectroscopic evidence obtained under strongly reducing conditions supports a mechanism in which the first molecule of SAM causes the reoxidation of the reduced radical-SAM cluster, impeding reductive cleavage of SAM to occur and allowing SAM to methylate a HS - ligand bound to the additional cluster. Furthermore, by using density functional theory-based methods, we provide a description of the reaction mechanism that predicts the attack of the carbon radical substrate on the methylthio group attached to the additional [4Fe-4S] cluster.

  4. Stability of the high pressure phase Fe3S2 up to Earth's core pressures in the Fe-S-O and the Fe-S-Si systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Davis, A.; Brauser, N.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's core is comprised of an iron-nickel alloy that contains 5-15% of a light element component. The abundance and alloying capability of sulfur, silicon and oxygen in the bulk Earth make them important core alloy candidates; therefore, the high-pressure phase equilibria of the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems are relevant for understanding the possible chemistry of Earth's core. Previously, a Fe3S2 phase was recognized as a low-pressure intermediate phase in the Fe-FeS system that is stable from 14-21 GPa, but the structure of this phase has not been resolved. We report in-situ XRD and chemical analysis of recovered samples to further examine the stability and structure of Fe3S2 as it coexists with other phases in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems. In situ high P-T synchrotron XRD experiments were conducted in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell to determine the equilibrium phases in Fe75S7O18 and Fe80S5Si15 compositions between 30 and 174 GPa and up to 3000 K. In the S,O-rich samples, an orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase coexists with hcp-Fe, Fe3S and FeO and undergoes two monoclinic distortions between 60 and 174 GPa. In the S,Si-rich samples, the orthorhombic Fe3S2 phase was observed up to 115 GPa. With increasing pressure, the Fe3S2 phase becomes stable to higher temperatures in both compositions, suggesting possible Fe3(S,O)2 or Fe3(S,Si)2 solid solutions. SEM analysis of a laser heated Fe75S7O18 sample recovered from 40 GPa and 1450 K confirms a Fe3(S,O)2 phase with O dissolved into the structure. Based on the current melting data in the Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si systems, the Fe3(S,O)2 stability field intersects the solidus in the outer core and could be a possible liquidus phase in Fe,S,O-rich planetary cores, whereas Fe3S is the stable sulfide at outer core pressures in Fe,S,Si-rich systems.

  5. Anti-friction performance of FeS nanoparticle synthesized by biological method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lu Hai, E-mail: lhzhou@t.shu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Wei, Xi Cheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ma, Zi Jian [Pipe and Bar Division of Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., Shanghai 200941 (China); Mei, Bin [Shanghai Medical Instrumentation College, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • FeS nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a biological method. • The anti-friction performance of prepared nanoparticle under oil lubricating and dry condition were analyzed. • The anti-friction mechanism of FeS nanoparticle was discussed. - Abstract: FeS nanoparticle is prepared by a biological method. The size, morphology and structure of the FeS nanoparticle are characterized by the means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The anti-friction behavior of the FeS nanoparticle as a lubricating oil additive is evaluated in the engine oil by using a face-to-face contact mode. The worn surface is characterized by using the scanning electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy in order to find the reasons resulting in the reduction of friction coefficient due to the addition of the FeS nanoparticle. The anti-friction mechanism of the FeS nanoparticle is elucidated based on the experimental results.

  6. Immobilization of aqueous Hg(II) by mackinawite (FeS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianrong; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.; Devai, Istvan; DeLaune, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    As one of the major constituents of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) in anoxic sediments, mackinawite (FeS) is known for its ability to scavenge trace metals. The interaction between aqueous Hg(II) (added as HgCl 2 ) and synthetic FeS was studied via batch sorption experiments conducted under anaerobic conditions. Due to the release of H + during formation of hydrolyzed Hg(II) species which is more reactive than Hg 2+ in surface adsorption, the equilibrium pH decreased with the increase in Hg(II)/FeS molar ratio. Counteracting the loss of FeS solids at lower pH, the maximum capacity for FeS to remove aqueous Hg(II) was approximately 0.75 mol Hg(II) (mol FeS) -1 . The comparison of X-ray power diffraction (XRPD) patterns of synthetic FeS sorbent before and after sorption showed that the major products formed from the interaction between FeS and the aqueous Hg(II) were metacinnabar, cinnabar, and mercury iron sulfides. With the addition of FeS at 0.4 g L -1 to a 1 mM Hg(II) solution with an initial pH of 5.6, Fe 2+ release was approximately 0.77 mol Fe 2+ per mol Hg(II) removed, suggesting that 77% of Hg(II) was removed via precipitation reaction under these conditions, with 23% of Hg(II) removed by adsorption. Aeration does not cause significant release of Hg(II) into the water phase

  7. Correction to: Fe-S cluster assembly in the supergroup Excavata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Lukeš, Julius

    2018-05-29

    The article "Fe-S cluster assembly in the supergroup Excavata", written by Priscila Peña‑Diaz, Julius Lukeš was originally published electronically on the publisher's internet portal (currently SpringerLink) without open access.

  8. Low cost, Lightweight, FeS2-Based Photovoltaic Devices by On Demand Ink Jet Printing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research projects seeks to develop novel synthesis for iron pyrite, FeS2, nanocrystals and nanorods. The synthesis of the material includes investigating the...

  9. Concentrations and Fractionation of Carbon, Iron, Sulfur, Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Mangrove Sediments Along an Intertidal Gradient (Semi-Arid Climate, New Caledonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Deborde

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In mangrove ecosystems, strong reciprocal interactions exist between plant and substrate. Under semi-arid climate, Rhizophora spp. are usually predominant, colonizing the seashore, and Avicennia marina develops at the edge of salt-flats, which is the highest zone in the intertidal range. Along this zonation, distribution and speciation of C, Fe, S, N, and P in sediments and pore-waters were investigated. From the land-side to the sea-side of the mangrove, sediments were characterized by I/ increase in: (i water content; (ii TOC; (iii mangrove-derived OM; II/ and decrease in: (i salinity; (ii redox; (iii pH; (iv solid Fe and solid P. Beneath Avicennia and Rhizophora, TS accumulated at depth, probably as a result of reduction of iron oxides and sulfate. The loss of total Fe observed towards the sea-side may be related to sulfur oxidation and to more intense tidal flushing of dissolved components. Except the organic forms, dissolved N and P concentrations were very low beneath Avicennia and Rhizophora stands, probably as a result of their uptake by the root systems. However, in the unvegetated salt-flat, NH4+ can accumulate in organic rich and anoxic layers. This study shows: (i the evolution of mangrove sediment biogeochemistry along the intertidal zone as a result of the different duration of tidal inundation and organic enrichment; and (ii the strong links between the distribution and speciation of the different elements.

  10. Interactions of iron-bound frataxin with ISCU and ferredoxin on the cysteine desulfurase complex leading to Fe-S cluster assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kai; Frederick, Ronnie O; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2018-06-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is involved in mitochondrial iron‑sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis and serves to accelerate Fe-S cluster formation. FXN deficiency is associated with Friedreich ataxia, a neurodegenerative disease. We have used a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy to investigate interactions among the components of the biological machine that carries out the assembly of iron‑sulfur clusters in human mitochondria. Our results show that FXN tightly binds a single Fe 2+ but not Fe 3+ . While FXN (with or without bound Fe 2+ ) does not bind the scaffold protein ISCU directly, the two proteins interact mutually when each is bound to the cysteine desulfurase complex ([NFS1] 2 :[ISD11] 2 :[Acp] 2 ), abbreviated as (NIA) 2 , where "N" represents the cysteine desulfurase (NFS1), "I" represents the accessory protein (ISD11), and "A" represents acyl carrier protein (Acp). FXN binds (NIA) 2 weakly in the absence of ISCU but more strongly in its presence. Fe 2+ -FXN binds to the (NIA) 2 -ISCU 2 complex without release of iron. However, upon the addition of both l-cysteine and a reductant (either reduced FDX2 or DTT), Fe 2+ is released from FXN as consistent with Fe 2+ -FXN being the proximal source of iron for Fe-S cluster assembly. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparation of FeS2 nanotube arrays based on layer-by-layer assembly and their photoelectrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mudan; Xue, Dongpeng; Qin, Haiying; Zhang, Lei; Ling, Guoping; Liu, Jiabin; Fang, Youtong; Meng, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe 2 O 3 nanotube arrays are prepared via layer-by-layer assembly. • Pyrite FeS 2 nanotube arrays are obtained by sulfurizing Fe 2 O 3 nanotube arrays. • Various electrochemical properties are characterized. • A comparison between FeS 2 nanotube and nanoparticle films is conducted. • Nanotube arrays show enhanced corrosion resistance and photoresponse. - Abstract: Well-aligned one-dimensional iron pyrite FeS 2 nanotube arrays have been fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly technique on ZnO nanorod arrays in combination with subsequent sulfurization. The as-prepared products were confirmed to be pure phase pyrite FeS 2 with Fe/S ratio approaching 1/2. Typical nanotube structure was observed for the FeS 2 with average outer diameter of 150 ± 20 nm and wall thickness of 50 ± 5 nm. Comparisons of photoelectrochemical properties between FeS 2 nanotubes and FeS 2 nanoparticles were conducted. Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicate that FeS 2 nanotubes possess high corrosion resistance and electrochemical stability. The J–V curves show that the photocurrent at 1.0 V for FeS 2 nanotubes is more than five times larger than that of FeS 2 nanoparticles, indicating enhanced photoresponse and rapid charge transfer performances of 1-D nanotube structure. The enhanced photoelectrochemical properties mainly benefit from the unique architecture features of nanotube array structure.

  12. Early diagenesis in the sediments of the Congo deep-sea fan dominated by massive terrigenous deposits: Part II - Iron-sulfur coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S.; Cathalot, Cécile; Michalopoulos, Panagiotis; Corvaisier, Rudolph; Kiriazis, Nicole; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Pastor, Lucie; Rabouille, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    Deep-sea fans are well known depot centers for organic carbon that should promote sulfate reduction. At the same time, the high rates of deposition of unconsolidated metal oxides from terrigenous origin may also promote metal-reducing microbial activity. To investigate the eventual coupling between the iron and sulfur cycles in these environments, shallow sediment cores (Congo River deep-sea fan ( 5000 m) were profiled using a combination of geochemical methods. Interestingly, metal reduction dominated suboxic carbon remineralization processes in most of these sediments, while dissolved sulfide was absent. In some 'hotspot' patches, however, sulfate reduction produced large sulfide concentrations which supported chemosynthetic-based benthic megafauna. These environments were characterized by sharp geochemical boundaries compared to the iron-rich background environment, suggesting that FeS precipitation efficiently titrated iron and sulfide from the pore waters. A companion study demonstrated that methanogenesis was active in the deep sediment layers of these patchy ecosystems, suggesting that sulfate reduction was promoted by alternative anaerobic processes. These highly reduced habitats could be fueled by discrete, excess inputs of highly labile natural organic matter from Congo River turbidites or by exhumation of buried sulfide during channel flank erosion and slumping. Sulfidic conditions may be maintained by the mineralization of decomposition products from local benthic macrofauna or bacterial symbionts or by the production of more crystalline Fe(III) oxide phases that are less thermodynamically favorable than sulfate reduction in these bioturbated sediments. Overall, the iron and sulfur biogeochemical cycling in this environment is unique and much more similar to a coastal ecosystem than a deep-sea environment.

  13. Melting phase relations in the Fe-S and Fe-S-O systems at core conditions in small terrestrial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Anne; Laurenz, Vera; Davies, Christopher J.; Frost, Daniel J.

    2018-05-01

    We report an experimental investigation of phase equilibria in the Fe-S and Fe-S-O systems. Experiments were performed at high temperatures (1400-1850 °C) and high pressures (14 and 20 GPa) using a multi-anvil apparatus. The results of this study are used to understand the effect of sulfur and oxygen on core dynamics in small terrestrial bodies. We observe that the formation of solid FeO grains occurs at the Fe-S liquid - Fe solid interface at high temperature ( > 1400 °C at 20 GPa). Oxygen fugacities calculated for each O-bearing sample show that redox conditions vary from ΔIW = -0.65 to 0. Considering the relative density of each phase and existing evolutionary models of terrestrial cores, we apply our experimental results to the cores of Mars and Ganymede. We suggest that the presence of FeO in small terrestrial bodies tends to contribute to outer-core compositional stratification. Depending on the redox and thermal history of the planet, FeO may also help form a transitional redox zone at the core-mantle boundary.

  14. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schmidt, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homolog located in the chromosome 5q...

  15. Electronic, magnetic structure and water splitting reactivity of the iron-sulfur dimers and their hexacarbonyl complexes: A density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzunova, Ellie L., E-mail: ellie@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Mikosch, Hans [Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/E164-EC, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-28

    The iron sulfide dimers (FeS){sub 2} and their persulfide isomers with S–S bonds are studied with the B3LYP density functional as bare clusters and as hexacarbonyls. The disulfides are more stable than the persulfides as bare clusters and the persulfide ground state lies at 3.2 eV above the global minimum, while in the hexacarbonyl complexes this order is reversed: persulfides are more stable, but the energy gap between disulfides and persulfides becomes much smaller and the activation barrier for the transition persulfide → disulfide is 1.11 eV. Carbonylation also favors a non-planar Fe{sub 2}S{sub 2} ring for both the disulfides and the persulfides and high electron density in the Fe{sub 2}S{sub 2} core is induced. The diamagnetic ordering is preferred in the hexacarbonyls, unlike the bare clusters. The hexacarbonyls possess low-lying triplet excited states. In the persulfide, the lowest singlet-to-triplet state excitation occurs by electron transition from the iron centers to an orbital located predominantly at S{sub 2} via metal-to-ligand charge transfer. In the disulfide this excitation corresponds to ligand-to-metal charge transfer from the sulfur atoms to an orbital located at the iron centers and the Fe–Fe bond. Water splitting occurs on the hexacarbonyls, but not on the bare clusters. The singlet and triplet state reaction paths were examined and activation barriers were determined: 50 kJ mol{sup −1} for HO–H bond dissociation and 210 kJ mol{sup −1} for hydrogen evolution from the intermediate sulfoxyl-hydroxyl complexes Fe{sub 2}S(OH)(SH)(CO){sub 6} formed. The lowest singlet-singlet excitations in the hexacarbonyls, the water adsorption complexes and in the reaction intermediates, formed prior to dihydrogen release, fall in the visible light region. The energy barrier of 210 kJ mol{sup −1} for the release of one hydrogen molecule corresponds to one visible photon of 570 nm. The dissociation of a second water molecule, followed by H{sub 2

  16. Synthesis, delivery and regulation of eukaryotic heme and Fe-S cluster cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barupala, Dulmini P; Dzul, Stephen P; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela Jo; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2016-02-15

    In humans, the bulk of iron in the body (over 75%) is directed towards heme- or Fe-S cluster cofactor synthesis, and the complex, highly regulated pathways in place to accomplish biosynthesis have evolved to safely assemble and load these cofactors into apoprotein partners. In eukaryotes, heme biosynthesis is both initiated and finalized within the mitochondria, while cellular Fe-S cluster assembly is controlled by correlated pathways both within the mitochondria and within the cytosol. Iron plays a vital role in a wide array of metabolic processes and defects in iron cofactor assembly leads to human diseases. This review describes progress towards our molecular-level understanding of cellular heme and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, focusing on the regulation and mechanistic details that are essential for understanding human disorders related to the breakdown in these essential pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Arsenic sorption to nanoparticulate mackinawite (FeS): An examination of phosphate competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Burton, Edward D

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticulate mackinawite (FeS) can be an important host-phase for arsenic (As) in sulfidic, subsurface environments. Although not previously investigated, phosphate (PO 4 3- ) may compete with As for available sorption sites on FeS, thereby enhancing As mobility in FeS-bearing soils, sediments and groundwater systems. In this study, we examine the effect of PO 4 3- on sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) to nanoparticulate FeS at pH 6, 7 and 9. Results show that PO 4 3- (at 0.01-1.0 mM P) did not significantly affect sorption of either As(V) or As(III) to nanoparticulate FeS at initial aqueous As concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 1.0 mM. At pH 9 and 7, sorption of both As(III) and As(V) to nanoparticulate FeS was similar, with distribution coefficient (K d ) values spanning 0.76-15 L g -1 (which corresponds to removal of 87-98% of initial aqueous As(III) and As(V) concentrations). Conversely, at pH 6, the sorption of As(III) was characterized by substantially higher K d values (6.3-93.4 L g -1 ) than those for As(V) (K d  = 0.21-0.96 L g -1 ). Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy indicated that up to 52% of the added As(V) was reduced to As(III) in As(V) sorption experiments, as well as the formation of minor amounts of an As 2 S 3 -like species. In As(III) sorption experiments, XANES spectroscopy also demonstrated the formation of an As 2 S 3 -like species and the partial oxidation of As(III) to As(V) (despite the strictly O 2 -free experimental conditions). Overall, the XANES data indicate that As sorption to nanoparticulate FeS involves several redox transformations and various sorbed species, which display a complex dependency on pH and As loading but that are not influenced by the co-occurrence of PO 4 3- . This study shows that nanoparticulate FeS can help to immobilize As(III) and As(V) in sulfidic subsurface environments where As co-exists with PO 4 3- . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Mitochondrial and Nucleolar Localization of Cysteine Desulfurase Nfs and the Scaffold Protein Isu in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Julie; Horáková, Eva; Changmai, Piya; Vancová, Marie; Lukeš, Julius

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2014), s. 353-362 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : transfer RNA * iron sulfur protein * blood stream forms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.820, year: 2014

  19. Biomass carbon composited FeS2 as cathode materials for high-rate rechargeable lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Meng, Zhen; Zhu, Xueling; Zhang, Shunlong; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2018-03-01

    Pyrite FeS2 has long been used as commercial primary lithium batteries at room temperature. To achieve rechargeable FeS2 battery, biomass-carbon@FeS2 composites are prepared using green and renewable auricularia auricula as carbon source through the process of carbonization and sulfuration. The auricularia auricula has strong swelling characteristics to absorb aqueous solution which can effectively absorb Fe ions into its body. FeS2 homogeneously distributed in biomass carbon matrix performs high electronic and ionic conductivity. The specific capacity of biomass-carbon@FeS2 composites remains 850 mAh g-1 after 80 cycles at 0.5C and 700 mAh g-1 at the rate of 2C after 150 cycles. Biomass-carbon@FeS2 composites exhibit high-rate capacity in lithium-ion battery.

  20. Controlled soft-template synthesis of ultrathin C@FeS nanosheets with high-Li-storage performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Zeng, Yi; Rui, Xianhong; Xiao, Ni; Zhu, Jixin; Zhang, Wenyu; Chen, Jing; Liu, Weiling; Tan, Huiteng; Hng, Huey Hoon; Yan, Qingyu

    2012-06-26

    We report a facile approach to prepare carbon-coated troilite FeS (C@FeS) nanosheets via surfactant-assisted solution-based synthesis. 1-Dodecanethiol is used as both the sulfur source and the surfactant, which may form different-shaped micelles to direct the growth of nanostructures. Under appropriate growth conditions, the iron and sulfur atoms react to form thin layers of FeS while the hydrocarbon tails of 1-dodecanethiol separate the thin FeS layers, which turn to carbon after annealing in Ar. Such an approach can be extended to grow C@FeS nanospheres and nanoplates by modifying the synthesis parameters. The C@FeS nanosheets display excellent Li storage properties with high specific capacities and stable charge/discharge cyclability, especially at fast charge/discharge rates.

  1. Enhanced photoresponse of FeS2 films: the role of Marcasite-Pyrite phase junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, L.; Dzade, N.Y.; Gao, L.; Scanlon, D.O.; Öztürk, Z.; Hollingsworth, N.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Hensen, E.J.M.; De Leeuw, N.H.; Hofmann, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial role of marcasite in iron-sulfide-based photo-electrochemical applications is reported for the first time. A spectacular improvement of the photoresponse observed experimentally for mixed pyrite/marcasite-FeS2 films can be ascribed to the presence of p/m phase junctions at the

  2. Enhanced Photoresponse of FeS2 Films : The Role of Marcasite–Pyrite Phase Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Longfei; Dzade, N.Y.; Gao, L.; Scanlon, D. O.; Özturk, Zafer; Hollingsworth, N.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Hensen, E. J. M.; de Leeuw, Nora H.; Hofmann, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial role of marcasite in iron sulfide-based photo-electrochemical applications is reported for the first time. A spectacular improvement of the photoresponse observed experimentally for mixed pyrite/marcasite-FeS2 films can be ascribed to the presence of p/m phase junctions at the

  3. An improved glycerol biosensor with an Au-FeS-NAD-glycerol-dehydrogenase anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Aishwarya; Fernando, Sandun

    2017-06-15

    An improved glycerol biosensor was developed via direct attachment of NAD + -glycerol dehydrogenase coenzyme-apoenzyme complex onto supporting gold electrodes, using novel inorganic iron (II) sulfide (FeS)-based single molecular wires. Sensing performance factors, i.e., sensitivity, a detection limit and response time of the FeS and conventional pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-based biosensor were evaluated by dynamic constant potential amperometry at 1.3V under non-buffered conditions. For glycerol concentrations ranging from 1 to 25mM, a 77% increase in sensitivity and a 53% decrease in detection limit were observed for the FeS-based biosensor when compared to the conventional PQQ-based counterpart. The electrochemical behavior of the FeS-based glycerol biosensor was analyzed at different concentrations of glycerol, accompanied by an investigation into the effects of applied potential and scan rate on the current response. Effects of enzyme stimulants ((NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O) concentrations and buffers/pH (potassium phosphate buffer pH 6-8, Tris buffer pH 8-10) on the current responses generated by the FeS-based glycerol biosensor were also studied. The optimal detection conditions were 0.03M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and 0.3µm MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O in non-buffered aqueous electrolyte under stirring whereas under non-stirring, Tris buffer at pH 10 with 0.03M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and 30µm MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O were found to be optimal detection conditions. Interference by glucose, fructose, ethanol, and acetic acid in glycerol detection was studied. The observations indicated a promising enhancement in glycerol detection using the novel FeS-based glycerol sensing electrode compared to the conventional PQQ-based one. These findings support the premise that FeS-based bioanodes are capable of biosensing glycerol successfully and may be applicable for other enzymatic biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of the HSPA9/HSC20 chaperone pair in promoting directional human iron-sulfur cluster exchange involving monothiol glutaredoxin 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Joshua A; Cowan, J A

    2018-07-01

    Iron‑sulfur clusters are essential cofactors found across all domains of life. Their assembly and transfer are accomplished by highly conserved protein complexes and partners. In eukaryotes a [2Fe-2S] cluster is first assembled in the mitochondria on the iron‑sulfur cluster scaffold protein ISCU in tandem with iron, sulfide, and electron donors. Current models suggest that a chaperone pair interacts with a cluster-bound ISCU to facilitate cluster transfer to a monothiol glutaredoxin. In humans this protein is glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) and the cluster can then be exchanged with a variety of target apo proteins. By use of circular dichroism spectroscopy, the kinetics of cluster exchange reactivity has been evaluated for human GLRX5 with a variety of cluster donor and acceptor partners, and the role of chaperones determined for several of these. In contrast to the prokaryotic model, where heat-shock type chaperone proteins HscA and HscB are required for successful and efficient transfer of a [2Fe-2S] cluster from the ISCU scaffold to a monothiol glutaredoxin. However, in the human system the chaperone homologs, HSPA9 and HSC20, are not necessary for human ISCU to promote cluster transfer to GLRX5, and appear to promote the reverse transfer. Cluster exchange with the human iron‑sulfur cluster carrier protein NFU1 and ferredoxins (FDX's), and the role of chaperones, has also been evaluated, demonstrating in certain cases control over the directionality of cluster transfer. In contrast to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, NFU1 is identified as a more likely physiological donor of [2Fe-2S] cluster to human GLRX5 than ISCU. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Regulatory Circuit Composed of a Transcription Factor, IscR, and a Regulatory RNA, RyhB, Controls Fe-S Cluster Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Mandin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fe-S clusters are cofactors conserved through all domains of life. Once assembled by dedicated ISC and/or SUF scaffolds, Fe-S clusters are conveyed to their apo-targets via A-type carrier proteins (ATCs. Escherichia coli possesses four such ATCs. ErpA is the only ATC essential under aerobiosis. Recent studies reported a possible regulation of the erpA mRNA by the small RNA (sRNA RyhB, which controls the expression of many genes under iron starvation. Surprisingly, erpA has not been identified in recent transcriptomic analysis of the iron starvation response, thus bringing into question the actual physiological significance of the putative regulation of erpA by RyhB. Using an sRNA library, we show that among 26 sRNAs, only RyhB represses the expression of an erpA-lacZ translational fusion. We further demonstrate that this repression occurs during iron starvation. Using mutational analysis, we show that RyhB base pairs to the erpA mRNA, inducing its disappearance. In addition, IscR, the master regulator of Fe-S homeostasis, represses expression of erpA at the transcriptional level when iron is abundant, but depleting iron from the medium alleviates this repression. The conjunction of transcriptional derepression by IscR and posttranscriptional repression by RyhB under Fe-limiting conditions is best described as an incoherent regulatory circuit. This double regulation allows full expression of erpA at iron concentrations for which Fe-S biogenesis switches from the ISC to the SUF system. We further provide evidence that this regulatory circuit coordinates ATC usage to iron availability.

  6. Metal-semiconductor transition materials. FeS and VO{sub 2} thin films by RF reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Ganhua

    2007-06-15

    In the present work, two MST systems, FeS and VO{sub 2} thin films were investigated. Iron sulfide thin films over a range of composition were prepared by reactive sputtering. The influence of the substrate, sputter power, substrate temperature and stoichiometry on the structure and MST of iron sulfide films was investigated. Iron sulfide films deposited at different temperatures show temperature dependent structure and MST. FeS films on float glass show (110) and (112) orientations when the substrate temperature is 200 and 500 C, respectively. The transition temperature and width of the hysteresis loop determined from the temperature dependent conductivity curves of iron sulfide films decrease with the substrate temperature. Fe and S excess in FeS films both result in the decrease of the transition temperature and width of the hysteresis loop. The vacuum-annealing affects the MST of FeS films significantly. When FeS films were annealed below the deposition temperature, the transition temperature decreases; otherwise increases. The residual stress plays an important role during the annealing process. The higher the residual stress inside the FeS films is, the higher the transition temperature of FeS films. With the increase of the annealing temperature, the residual stress in FeS films is first released and then enhances, which gives rise first to the decrease and then increase of the transition temperature of FeS films. At high substrate temperatures, the residual stress is higher. In addition, the MST of FeS films was influenced by the ambient aging. With the increase of the aging time, the transition temperature first increases and then decreases. FeS films with different thicknesses were prepared. The correlation between the film thickness (grain size) and the MST switching characteristics of FeS films was established. With the decrease of the grain size, the density of grain boundaries increases, causing the increase of the conductivity of the semiconducting

  7. Metal-semiconductor transition materials. FeS and VO2 thin films by RF reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Ganhua

    2007-06-01

    In the present work, two MST systems, FeS and VO 2 thin films were investigated. Iron sulfide thin films over a range of composition were prepared by reactive sputtering. The influence of the substrate, sputter power, substrate temperature and stoichiometry on the structure and MST of iron sulfide films was investigated. Iron sulfide films deposited at different temperatures show temperature dependent structure and MST. FeS films on float glass show (110) and (112) orientations when the substrate temperature is 200 and 500 C, respectively. The transition temperature and width of the hysteresis loop determined from the temperature dependent conductivity curves of iron sulfide films decrease with the substrate temperature. Fe and S excess in FeS films both result in the decrease of the transition temperature and width of the hysteresis loop. The vacuum-annealing affects the MST of FeS films significantly. When FeS films were annealed below the deposition temperature, the transition temperature decreases; otherwise increases. The residual stress plays an important role during the annealing process. The higher the residual stress inside the FeS films is, the higher the transition temperature of FeS films. With the increase of the annealing temperature, the residual stress in FeS films is first released and then enhances, which gives rise first to the decrease and then increase of the transition temperature of FeS films. At high substrate temperatures, the residual stress is higher. In addition, the MST of FeS films was influenced by the ambient aging. With the increase of the aging time, the transition temperature first increases and then decreases. FeS films with different thicknesses were prepared. The correlation between the film thickness (grain size) and the MST switching characteristics of FeS films was established. With the decrease of the grain size, the density of grain boundaries increases, causing the increase of the conductivity of the semiconducting phase

  8. FeS-coated sand for removal of arsenic(III) under anaerobic conditions in permeable reactive barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y.-S.; Gallegos, T.J.; Demond, A.H.; Hayes, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron sulfide (as mackinawite, FeS) has shown considerable promise as a material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions. However, as a nanoparticulate material, synthetic FeS is not suitable for use in conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). This study developed a methodology for coating a natural silica sand to produce a material of an appropriate diameter for a PRB. Aging time, pH, rinse time, and volume ratios were varied, with a maximum coating of 4.0 mg FeS/g sand achieved using a pH 5.5 solution at a 1:4 volume ratio (sand: 2 g/L FeS suspension), three days of aging and no rinsing. Comparing the mass deposited on the sand, which had a natural iron-oxide coating, with and without chemical washing showed that the iron-oxide coating was essential to the formation of a stable FeS coating. Scanning electron microscopy images of the FeS-coated sand showed a patchwise FeS surface coating. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a partial oxidation of the Fe(II) to Fe(III) during the coating process, and some oxidation of S to polysulfides. Removal of As(III) by FeS-coated sand was 30% of that by nanoparticulate FeS at pH 5 and 7. At pH 9, the relative removal was 400%, perhaps due to the natural oxide coating of the sand or a secondary mineral phase from mackinawite oxidation. Although many studies have investigated the coating of sands with iron oxides, little prior work reports coating with iron sulfides. The results suggest that a suitable PRB material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions can be produced through the deposition of a coating of FeS onto natural silica sand with an iron-oxide coating. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of FeS: First principle and Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouachraoui, Rachid; El Hachimi, Abdel Ghafour; Ziat, Younes; Bahmad, Lahoucine; Tahiri, Najim

    2018-06-01

    Electronic and magnetic properties of hexagonal Iron (II) Sulfide (hexagonal FeS) have been investigated by combining the Density functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations (MCS). This compound is constituted by magnetic hexagonal lattice occupied by Fe2+ with spin state (S = 2). Based on ab initio method, we calculated the exchange coupling JFe-Fe between two magnetic atoms Fe-Fe in different directions. Also phase transitions, magnetic stability and magnetizations have been investigated in the framework of Monte Carlo simulations. Within this method, a second phase transition is observed at the Néel temperature TN = 450 K. This finding in good agreement with the reported data in the literature. The effect of the applied different parameters showed how can these parameters affect the critical temperature of this system. Moreover, we studied the density of states and found that the hexagonal FeS will be a promoting material for spintronic applications.

  10. Energetic characterization of the photoactive FeS/sub 2/ (pyrite) interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennaoui, A.; Tributsch, H.

    1986-12-01

    The electronic properties of synthetic single crystalline pyrite (100) orientation are investigated. The spectral response of the photoconductivity was determined by the four point probe technique. The carrier concentration and the flat band potential are calculated from capacitance measurements, the minority carrier diffusion length is determined by photocurrent and capacitance vs voltage measurements. The results allow the construction of an energy band diagram for the FeS/sub 2//electrolyte contact. The parameters determined explain the high quantum efficiency (approx. 90%) obtained with FeS/sub 2//I/sup -/, I/sub 3//sup -/, photoelectrochemical cells (PECs). The reasons for the main deficiency (photopotentials not exceeding 200 mV at AM0) are elaborated: photogenerated charges in the interface shift the flatband potential and trap-assisted electron transfer through the barrier short-circuits it. 32 refs.

  11. Photoinduced reduction of the medial FeS center in the hydrogenase small subunit HupS from Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleiras, Patrícia; Hammarström, Leif; Lindblad, Peter; Styring, Stenbjörn; Magnuson, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The small subunit from the NiFe uptake hydrogenase, HupSL, in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133, has been isolated in the absence of the large subunit (P. Raleiras, P. Kellers, P. Lindblad, S. Styring, A. Magnuson, J. Biol. Chem. 288 (2013) 18,345-18,352). Here, we have used flash photolysis to reduce the iron-sulfur clusters in the isolated small subunit, HupS. We used ascorbate as electron donor to the photogenerated excited state of Ru(II)-trisbipyridine (Ru(bpy)3), to generate Ru(I)(bpy)3 as reducing agent. Our results show that the isolated small subunit can be reduced by the Ru(I)(bpy)3 generated through flash photolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Re-Fe-S system at 1200, 1100, 1000 and 900 degree C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup-Møller, Sven; Makovicky, E.

    1999-01-01

    Phase relations in the dry condensed phase system Fe-Re-S from 1200oC down to 900oC involve S-poor Fe-S melt with up to 0.2 at.% dissolved Re, S-rich melt with 0.3-0.4 at.% dissolved Re at 1200oC, Fe1-xS with Re contents growing from nil for troilite to 0.2 at.% for S-richer compositions, gFe wit...

  13. The WAGGS project - I. The WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Christopher; Pastorello, Nicola; Bellstedt, Sabine; Alabi, Adebusola; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chevalier, Leonie; Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Penny, Samantha; Foster, Caroline; McDermid, Richard M.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Villaume, Alexa

    2017-07-01

    We present the WiFeS Atlas of Galactic Globular cluster Spectra, a library of integrated spectra of Milky Way and Local Group globular clusters. We used the WiFeS integral field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope to observe the central regions of 64 Milky Way globular clusters and 22 globular clusters hosted by the Milky Way's low-mass satellite galaxies. The spectra have wider wavelength coverage (3300-9050 Å) and higher spectral resolution (R = 6800) than existing spectral libraries of Milky Way globular clusters. By including Large and Small Magellanic Cloud star clusters, we extend the coverage of parameter space of existing libraries towards young and intermediate ages. While testing stellar population synthesis models and analysis techniques is the main aim of this library, the observations may also further our understanding of the stellar populations of Local Group globular clusters and make possible the direct comparison of extragalactic globular cluster integrated light observations with well-understood globular clusters in the Milky Way. The integrated spectra are publicly available via the project website.

  14. Irradiation of FeS: Implications for the Lifecycle of Sulfur in the Interstellar Medium and Presolar FeS Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Loeffler, M. J.; Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R.

    2010-01-01

    Fe(Ni) sulfides are ubiquitous in chondritic meteorites and cometary samples where they are the dominant host of sulfur. Despite their abundance in these early solar system materials, their presence in interstellar and circumstellar environments is poorly understood. Fe-sulfides have been reported from astronomical observations of pre- and post-main sequence stars [1, 2] and occur as inclusions in bonafide circumstellar silicate grains [3, 4]. In cold, dense molecular cloud (MC) environments, sulfur is highly depleted from the gas phase [e.g. 5], yet observations of sulfur-bearing molecules in dense cores find a total abundance that is only a small fraction of the sulfur seen in diffuse regions [6], therefore the bulk of the depletion must reside in an abundant unobserved phase. In stark contrast, sulfur is essentially undepleted from the gas phase in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) [7-9], indicating that little sulfur is incorporated into solid grains in this environment. This is a rather puzzling observation unless Fe-sulfides are not produced in significant quantities in stellar outflows, or their lifetime in the ISM is very short due to rapid destruction. The main destruction mechanism is sputtering due to supernova shocks in the warm, diffuse ISM [10]. This process involves the reduction of Fe-sulfide with the production of Fe metal as a by-product and returning S to the gas phase. In order to test this hypothesis, we irradiated FeS and analyzed the resulting material using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  15. Novel bacterial gas sensor proteins with transition metal-containing prosthetic groups as active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Shigetoshi

    2012-04-01

    Gas molecules function as signaling molecules in many biological regulatory systems responsible for transcription, chemotaxis, and other complex physiological processes. Gas sensor proteins play a crucial role in regulating such biological systems in response to gas molecules. New sensor proteins that sense oxygen or nitric oxide have recently been found, and they have been characterized by X-ray crystallographic and/or spectroscopic analysis. It has become clear that the interaction between a prosthetic group and gas molecules triggers dynamic structural changes in the protein backbone when a gas sensor protein senses gas molecules. Gas sensor proteins employ novel mechanisms to trigger conformational changes in the presence of a gas. In gas sensor proteins that have iron-sulfur clusters as active sites, the iron-sulfur clusters undergo structural changes, which trigger a conformational change. Heme-based gas sensor proteins reconstruct hydrogen-bonding networks around the heme and heme-bound ligand. Gas sensor proteins have two functional states, on and off, which are active and inactive, respectively, for subsequent signal transduction in response to their physiological effector molecules. To fully understand the structure-function relationships of gas sensor proteins, it is vital to perform X-ray crystal structure analyses of full-length proteins in both the on and off states.

  16. Chemical vapour transport of pyrite (FeS 2) with halogen (Cl, Br, I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, S.; Mai, J.; Ennaoui, A.; Szacki, W.

    1986-12-01

    A systematic study of chemical vapour transport (CVT) of pyrite with halogen, hydrogen halides and ammonium halides as transporting agents has shown that the transport with chlorine and bromine in a temperature gradient Δ T = 920-820 K yields the highest transport rates (˜6 mg/h) with crystals up to 5 mm edge length. Computing thermochemical equilibria and flux functions in the system Fe-S-Hal (Hal = Cl, Br, I) it has been confirmed that the transport velocity of pyrite is limited by the concentration of FeHal 2 in the vapour phase, the equilibrium position between FeHal 2(g) and FeHal 3(g) and the flux directions of the iron gas species.

  17. Exploring hierarchical FeS2/C composite nanotubes arrays as advanced cathode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, G. X.; Cao, F.; Xia, X. H.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2016-11-01

    Rational construction of advanced FeS2 cathode is one of research hotspots, and of great importance for developing high-performance lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Herein we report a facile hydrolysis-sulfurization method for fabrication of FeS2/C nanotubes arrays with the help of sacrificial Co2(OH)2CO3 nanowires template and glucose carbonization. Self-supported FeS2/C nanotubes consist of interconnected nanoburrs of 5-20 nm, and show hierarchical porous structure. The FeS2/C nanotubes arrays are demonstrated with enhanced cycling life and noticeable high-rate capability with capacities ranging from 735 mAh g-1 at 0.25 C to 482 mAh g-1 at 1.5 C, superior to those FeS2 counterparts in the literature. The composite nanotubes arrays architecture plays positive roles in the electrochemical enhancement due to combined advantages of large electrode-electrolyte contact area, good strain accommodation, improved electrical conductivity, and enhanced structural stability.

  18. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Wrapped FeS2 Composite as Anode for High-Performance Sodium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghong; Guo, Can; Zhu, Yuxuan; He, Jiapeng; Wang, Hongqiang

    2018-06-01

    Iron disulfide is considered to be a potential anode material for sodium-ion batteries due to its high theoretical capacity. However, its applications are seriously limited by the weak conductivity and large volume change, which results in low reversible capacity and poor cycling stability. Herein, reduced graphene oxide-wrapped FeS2 (FeS2/rGO) composite was fabricated to achieve excellent electrochemical performance via a facile two-step method. The introduction of rGO effectively improved the conductivity, BET surface area, and structural stability of the FeS2 active material, thus endowing it with high specific capacity, good rate capability, as well as excellent cycling stability. Electrochemical measurements show that the FeS2/rGO composite had a high initial discharge capacity of 1263.2 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1 and a high discharge capacity of 344 mAh g-1 at 10 A g-1, demonstrating superior rate performance. After 100 cycles at 100 mA g-1, the discharge capacity remained at 609.5 mAh g-1, indicating the excellent cycling stability of the FeS2/rGO electrode.

  19. Insights into Mercury's Core Evolution from the Thermodynamic Properties of Fe-S-Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, A.; Vocadlo, L.; Stixrude, L. P.; Wood, I. G.; Lord, O. T.

    2015-12-01

    The structure, composition and evolution of Mercury, the innermost planet, are puzzling, as its high uncompressed density implies a body highly enriched in metallic iron, whilst the existence of Mercury's magnetic field and observations of its longitude librations [1] suggest at least a partially molten core. This study uses a combination of experimental and ab-initio computer simulation techniques to determine the properties of Fe-S-Si (relative atomic percentages, 80:10:10) throughout the conditions of the interior of the planet Mercury, and evaluates the implications of this material for the structure and evolution of the planet's core. Previous studies have considered the addition of sulphur to the pure iron system, as this can significantly depress the melting curve of iron, and so may possibly allow Mercury's core to remain molten to the present day [2]. However, important constraints placed by the MESSENGER spacecraft on Mercury's surface abundance of iron [3] suggest that the planet formed in highly reduced conditions, in which significant amounts of silicon could have also dissolved into the core [4]. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of the thermodynamic properties of liquid Fe-S-Si, alongside laser-heated diamond-anvil-cell experiments to determine the melting behaviour of the same composition, reveal the slopes of the adiabatic gradient and melting curve respectively, which together may allow insight into the evolution of our solar system's smallest planet. [1] Margot, J. L. et al. (2007) Science, 316: 710-714[2] Schubert, G. et al. (1988) in 'Mercury' 429-460[3] Nittler, L. R. et al. (2011) Science, 333, 1847-1850[4] Malavergne, V. et al. (2010) Icarus, 206:199-209

  20. Low-Light Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and Fe-S-Biogeochemistry in a Microbial Mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sebastian; de Beer, Dirk; Klatt, Judith M; Fink, Artur; Rench, Rebecca McCauley; Hamilton, Trinity L; Meyer, Volker; Kakuk, Brian; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    We report extremely low-light-adapted anoxygenic photosynthesis in a thick microbial mat in Magical Blue Hole, Abaco Island, The Bahamas. Sulfur cycling was reduced by iron oxides and organic carbon limitation. The mat grows below the halocline/oxycline at 30 m depth on the walls of the flooded sinkhole. In situ irradiance at the mat surface on a sunny December day was between 0.021 and 0.084 μmol photons m -2 s -1 , and UV light (97% sequence identity) of clones affiliated with Prosthecochloris , a genus within the green sulfur bacteria (GSB), which are obligate anoxygenic phototrophs. Typical photopigments of brown-colored GSB, bacteriochlorophyll e and (β-)isorenieratene, were abundant in mat samples and their absorption properties are well-adapted to harvest light in the available green and possibly even UV-A spectra. Sulfide from the water column (3-6 μmol L -1 ) was the main source of sulfide to the mat as sulfate reduction rates in the mats were very low (undetectable-99.2 nmol cm -3 d -1 ). The anoxic water column was oligotrophic and low in dissolved organic carbon (175-228 μmol L -1 ). High concentrations of pyrite (FeS 2 ; 1-47 μmol cm -3 ) together with low microbial process rates (sulfate reduction, CO 2 fixation) indicate that the mats function as net sulfide sinks mainly by abiotic processes. We suggest that abundant Fe(III) (4.3-22.2 μmol cm -3 ) is the major source of oxidizing power in the mat, and that abiotic Fe-S-reactions play the main role in pyrite formation. Limitation of sulfate reduction by low organic carbon availability along with the presence of abundant sulfide-scavenging iron oxides considerably slowed down sulfur cycling in these mats.

  1. A Regulatory Circuit Composed of a Transcription Factor, IscR, and a Regulatory RNA, RyhB, Controls Fe-S Cluster Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandin, Pierre; Chareyre, Sylvia; Barras, Frédéric

    2016-09-20

    Fe-S clusters are cofactors conserved through all domains of life. Once assembled by dedicated ISC and/or SUF scaffolds, Fe-S clusters are conveyed to their apo-targets via A-type carrier proteins (ATCs). Escherichia coli possesses four such ATCs. ErpA is the only ATC essential under aerobiosis. Recent studies reported a possible regulation of the erpA mRNA by the small RNA (sRNA) RyhB, which controls the expression of many genes under iron starvation. Surprisingly, erpA has not been identified in recent transcriptomic analysis of the iron starvation response, thus bringing into question the actual physiological significance of the putative regulation of erpA by RyhB. Using an sRNA library, we show that among 26 sRNAs, only RyhB represses the expression of an erpA-lacZ translational fusion. We further demonstrate that this repression occurs during iron starvation. Using mutational analysis, we show that RyhB base pairs to the erpA mRNA, inducing its disappearance. In addition, IscR, the master regulator of Fe-S homeostasis, represses expression of erpA at the transcriptional level when iron is abundant, but depleting iron from the medium alleviates this repression. The conjunction of transcriptional derepression by IscR and posttranscriptional repression by RyhB under Fe-limiting conditions is best described as an incoherent regulatory circuit. This double regulation allows full expression of erpA at iron concentrations for which Fe-S biogenesis switches from the ISC to the SUF system. We further provide evidence that this regulatory circuit coordinates ATC usage to iron availability. Regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as major actors in the control of gene expression in the last few decades. Relatively little is known about how these regulators interact with classical transcription factors to coordinate genetic responses. We show here how an sRNA, RyhB, and a transcription factor, IscR, regulate expression of an essential gene, erpA, in the bacterium E

  2. Low-Light Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and Fe-S-Biogeochemistry in a Microbial Mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Haas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report extremely low-light-adapted anoxygenic photosynthesis in a thick microbial mat in Magical Blue Hole, Abaco Island, The Bahamas. Sulfur cycling was reduced by iron oxides and organic carbon limitation. The mat grows below the halocline/oxycline at 30 m depth on the walls of the flooded sinkhole. In situ irradiance at the mat surface on a sunny December day was between 0.021 and 0.084 μmol photons m-2 s-1, and UV light (<400 nm was the most abundant part of the spectrum followed by green wavelengths (475–530 nm. We measured a light-dependent carbon uptake rate of 14.5 nmol C cm-2 d-1. A 16S rRNA clone library of the green surface mat layer was dominated (74% by a cluster (>97% sequence identity of clones affiliated with Prosthecochloris, a genus within the green sulfur bacteria (GSB, which are obligate anoxygenic phototrophs. Typical photopigments of brown-colored GSB, bacteriochlorophyll e and (β-isorenieratene, were abundant in mat samples and their absorption properties are well-adapted to harvest light in the available green and possibly even UV-A spectra. Sulfide from the water column (3–6 μmol L-1 was the main source of sulfide to the mat as sulfate reduction rates in the mats were very low (undetectable-99.2 nmol cm-3 d-1. The anoxic water column was oligotrophic and low in dissolved organic carbon (175–228 μmol L-1. High concentrations of pyrite (FeS2; 1–47 μmol cm-3 together with low microbial process rates (sulfate reduction, CO2 fixation indicate that the mats function as net sulfide sinks mainly by abiotic processes. We suggest that abundant Fe(III (4.3–22.2 μmol cm-3 is the major source of oxidizing power in the mat, and that abiotic Fe-S-reactions play the main role in pyrite formation. Limitation of sulfate reduction by low organic carbon availability along with the presence of abundant sulfide-scavenging iron oxides considerably slowed down sulfur cycling in these mats.

  3. The interface of the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the nonmagnetic semiconductor FeS2

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, S.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2010-01-01

    semiconductor shows a metallic character. The CoS2 stays close to half-metallicity at the interface, while the FeS2 becomes metallic. The magnetic moment of the Co atoms at the interface slightly decreases as compared to the bulk value and a small moment

  4. First-principles studies of electronic, transport and bulk properties of pyrite FeS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipendra Banjara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present results from first principle, local density approximation (LDA calculations of electronic, transport, and bulk properties of iron pyrite (FeS2. Our non-relativistic computations employed the Ceperley and Alder LDA potential and the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO formalism. The implementation of the LCAO formalism followed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams (BZW method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF. We discuss the electronic energy bands, total and partial densities of states, electron effective masses, and the bulk modulus. Our calculated indirect band gap of 0.959 eV (0.96, using an experimental lattice constant of 5.4166 Å, at room temperature, is in agreement with the measured indirect values, for bulk samples, ranging from 0.84 eV to 1.03 ± 0.05 eV. Our calculated bulk modulus of 147 GPa is practically in agreement with the experimental value of 145 GPa. The calculated, partial densities of states reproduced the splitting of the Fe d bands to constitute the dominant upper most valence and lower most conduction bands, separated by the generally accepted, indirect, experimental band gap of 0.95 eV.

  5. Iron Isotopic Compositions of Troilite (FeS) Inclusions from Iron Meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David L.; Schönbächler, Maria, E-mail: david.cook@erdw.ethz.ch [Institut für Geochemie und Petrologie, ETH Zürich, Clausiusstrasse 25, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-01

    We report non-mass-dependent Fe isotopic data for troilite (FeS) inclusions from 10 iron meteorites, representing both non-magmatic (IAB) and magmatic groups (IIAB, IIIAB, IVA). No resolvable variations are present in the most neutron-rich isotope ({sup 58}Fe), but small deficits (≈−0.1 ε ) in {sup 56}Fe were observed in several inclusions. With the exception of several Ca–Al-rich inclusions in primitive meteorites, these are the first reported non-mass-dependent variations in Fe isotopes for material formed in the early solar system. Nucleosynthetic variations in Ni isotopes were previously reported in these same samples. The effects in Fe isotopes are not correlated with those in Ni, which suggests that the origins of the isotopic variations are decoupled from one another. The {sup 56}Fe deficits may represent incomplete mixing of the precursor dust in the protoplanetary disk. Alternatively, a parent body process (e.g., irradiation by galactic cosmic rays) may have modified the Fe isotopic compositions of some inclusions, which initially had homogeneous Fe isotopic compositions.

  6. Spatial Mapping for Managing Oxidized Pyrite (FeS2 in South Sumatra Wetlands, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Edi Armanto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to analyze spatial mapping for managing oxidized pyrite (FeS2 in South Sumatra wetlands, Indonesia. The field observations are done by exploring several transect on land units. The field description refers to Soil Survey Staff (2014. Water and soil samples were taken from selected key areas for laboratory analysis. The vegetation data was collected by making sample plots (squares method placed on each vegetation type with plot sizes depending on the vegetation type, namely 10 x 10 m for secondary forests and 5 x 5 m for shrubs and grass. The observations of surface water level were done during the river receding with units of m above sea level (m asl. The research results showed that pyrite formation is largely determined by the availability of natural vegetation as Sulfur (S donors, climate and uncontrolled water balance and supporting fauna such as crabs and mud shrimp.  Climate and water balance as well as supporting faunas is the main supporting factors to accelerate the process of pyrite formation. Oxidized pyrite serves to increase soil acidity, becomes toxic to fish ponds and arable soils, plant growth and disturbing the water and soil nutrient balances. Oxidized pyrite is predominantly accelerated by the dynamics of river water and disturbed natural vegetation by human activities.  The pyrite oxidation management approach is divided into three main components of technologies, namely water management, land management and commodity management.

  7. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide.

  8. Methylarsenic Sorption to Mackinawite (FeS) and Implications for Methylarsenic Mobility in Wetland Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. C.; Vallat, F.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Pena, J.

    2017-12-01

    The fate and transport of arsenic (As) in terrestrial environments is determined by its chemical speciation. Specifically, microorganisms play key roles in mediating transformations between inorganic and methylarsenic species as well as influencing the formation of soil minerals with which As interacts. Biomethylation reactions are an important component of the As biogeochemical cycle, particularly in paddy soil environments where methylarsenic species can accumulate in rice. Methylarsenic concentrations in rice paddy and other wetland porewaters are typically quite low, however, despite the fact that microbes harboring arsM genes that catalyze As methylation are prevalent. This contribution examines the role of methylarsenic sorption to mackinawite (FeS) in immobilizing methylarsenic species produced in reducing soil environments. Mackinawite is the first Fe(II) sulfide mineral to form under iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions, and is an important biogenic mineral in reducing soil and sediment environments. We report results from a laboratory study of monomethylarsonic acid (MMAs(V)) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)) sorption onto the surface of synthetic mackinawite. Sorption kinetics for MMAs(V) were faster than those for arsenite (As(III)). MMAs(V) and DMAs(V) sorption data at pH 6.5 were fit with a Langmuir isotherm. Sorption capacities of the methylarsenic species were comparable. However, DMAs(V) exhibited a greater affinity constant than MMAs(V). Affinity constants for methylarsenic species were two to four times lower than previously reported values for arsenite and ten to twenty times lower than values for arsenate [1], suggesting greater mobility of methylarsenic species in sulfidic environments relative to their inorganic precursors. [1] M. Wolthers et al. 2005, GCA 69 (14), 3483-3492

  9. Magnetic ordering in tetragonal FeS: Evidence for strong itinerant spin fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.D.; Refson, K.; Bone, S.; Qiao, R.; Yang, W.; Liu, Z.; Sposito, G.

    2010-11-01

    Mackinawite is a naturally occurring layer-type FeS mineral important in biogeochemical cycles and, more recently, in the development of microbial fuel cells. Conflicting results have been published as to the magnetic properties of this mineral, with Moessbauer spectroscopy indicating no magnetic ordering down to 4.2 K but density functional theory (DFT) predicting an antiferromagnetic ground state, similar to the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors with which it is isostructural and for which it is known that magnetism is suppressed by strong itinerant spin fluctuations. We investigated this latter possibility for mackinawite using photoemission spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and DFT computations. Our Fe 3{sub s} core-level photoemission spectrum of mackinawite showed a clear exchange-energy splitting (2.9 eV) consistent with a 1 {micro}{sub B} magnetic moment on the Fe ions, while the Fe L-edge x-ray absorption spectrum indicated rather delocalized Fe 3{sub d} electrons in mackinawite similar to those in Fe metal. Our DFT computations demonstrated that the ground state of mackinawite is single-stripe antiferromagnetic, with an Fe magnetic moment (2.7 {micro}{sub B}) that is significantly larger than the experimental estimate and has a strong dependence on the S height and lattice parameters. All of these trends signal the existence of strong itinerant spin fluctuations. If spin fluctuations prove to be mediators of electron pairing, we conjecture that mackinawite may be one of the simplest Fe-based superconductors.

  10. The interface of the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the nonmagnetic semiconductor FeS2

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, S.

    2010-11-05

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the cubic pyriteCoS2/FeS2interface are studied using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method. We find that this contact between a ferromagneticmetal and a nonmagnetic semiconductor shows a metallic character. The CoS2 stays close to half-metallicity at the interface, while the FeS2 becomes metallic. The magnetic moment of the Co atoms at the interface slightly decreases as compared to the bulk value and a small moment is induced on the Fe atoms. Furthermore, at the interfaceferromagnetic ordering is found to be energetically favorable as compared to antiferromagnetic ordering.

  11. Top-down freezing in a Fe-FeS core and Ganymede's present-day magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückriemen, Tina; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2018-06-01

    Ganymede's core most likely possesses an active dynamo today, which produces a magnetic field at the surface of ∼ 719 nT. Thermochemical convection triggered by cooling of the core is a feasible power source for the dynamo. Experiments of different research groups indicate low pressure gradients of the melting temperatures for Fe-FeS core alloys at pressures prevailing in Ganymede's core ( < 10 GPa). This may entail that the core crystallizes from the top instead of from the bottom as is expected for Earth's core. Depending on the core sulfur concentration being more iron- or more sulfur-rich than the eutectic concentration either snowing iron crystals or a solid FeS layer can form at the top of the core. We investigate whether these two core crystallization scenarios are capable of explaining Ganymede's present magnetic activity. To do so, we set up a parametrized one-dimensional thermal evolution model. We explore a wide range of parameters by running a large set of Monte Carlo simulations. Both freezing scenarios can explain Ganymede's present-day magnetic field. Dynamos of iron snow models are rather young ( < 1 Gyr), whereas dynamos below the FeS layer can be both young and much older ( ∼ 3.8 Gyr). Successful models preferably contain less radiogenic heat sources in the mantle than the chondritic abundance and show a correlation between the reference viscosity in the mantle and the initial core sulfur concentration.

  12. Ab initio calculations of the electron spectrum and density of states of TlFeS{sub 2} and TlFeSe{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismayilova, N. A., E-mail: ismayilova-narmin-84@mail.ru; Orudjev, H. S.; Jabarov, S. H. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

    2017-04-15

    The results of ab initio calculations of the electron spectrum of TlFeS{sub 2} and TlFeSe{sub 2} crystals in the antiferromagnetic phase are reported. Calculations are carried out in the context of the density functional theory. The origin of the bands of s, p, and d electron states of Tl, Fe, S, and Se atoms is studied. It is established that, in the antiferromagnetic phase, the crystals possess semiconductor properties. The band gaps are found to be 0.05 and 0.34 eV for TlFeS{sub 2} and TlFeSe{sub 2} crystals, respectively.

  13. Photoelectrochemical energy conversion obtained with ultrathin organo-metallic-chemical-vapor-deposition layer of FeS2 (pyrite) on TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennaoui, A.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H.; Giersig, M.; Vogel, R.; Weller, H.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrathin (10 to 20 nm thick), polycrystalline films of FeS 2 (pyrite) were grown on TiO 2 (anatase) by chemical vapor deposition. The FeS 2 films were characterized using optical absorption and high-resolution electron microscopy. Photoelectrochemical solar cells, using TiO 2 (anatase) coated with FeS 2 ultrathin films, generated high open-circuit photo-voltages, of up to 600 mV, compared with a single crystal of pyrite electrode (200 mV). The photoelectrochemical behavior shows a strong dependence of photovoltage and photocurrent on the pH of the solution. This paper reports that it is explained by electron injection from the conduction band of FeS 2 to the conduction band of TiO 2 . Regeneration of holes is taking place by electron transfer from the redox system in the electrolyte

  14. Photoelectrochemical energy conversion obtained with ultrathin organo-metallic-chemical-vapor-deposition layer of FeS[sub 2] (pyrite) on TiO[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennaoui, A.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H. (Abt. Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Inst., D-1000 Berlin 39 (Germany)); Giersig, M.; Vogel, R.; Weller, H. (Abt. Photochemie, Hahn-Meitner-Inst., D-1000 Berlin 39 (Germany))

    1992-09-01

    Ultrathin (10 to 20 nm thick), polycrystalline films of FeS[sub 2] (pyrite) were grown on TiO[sub 2] (anatase) by chemical vapor deposition. The FeS[sub 2] films were characterized using optical absorption and high-resolution electron microscopy. Photoelectrochemical solar cells, using TiO[sub 2] (anatase) coated with FeS[sub 2] ultrathin films, generated high open-circuit photo-voltages, of up to 600 mV, compared with a single crystal of pyrite electrode (200 mV). The photoelectrochemical behavior shows a strong dependence of photovoltage and photocurrent on the pH of the solution. This paper reports that it is explained by electron injection from the conduction band of FeS[sub 2] to the conduction band of TiO[sub 2]. Regeneration of holes is taking place by electron transfer from the redox system in the electrolyte.

  15. Virtual half-metallicity at the CoS2/FeS2 interface induced by strain

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2013-01-01

    Spin polarized ab initio calculations based on density functional theory are performed to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of the interface between the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the nonmagnetic semiconductor FeS2. Relaxation of the interface structure is taken into account by atomic force minimization. We find that both Co and Fe are close to half-metallicity at the interface. Tensile strain is shown to strongly enhance the spin polarization so that a virtually half-metallic interface can be achieved, for comparably moderate strain. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Classification of PSN J13505285-3017097 as an old Type Ia SN with WiFeS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, M.; Scalzo, R.; Tucker, B.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B.; Klotz, A.; Conseil, E.

    2013-06-01

    We report spectroscopic classification of PSN J13505285-3017097 with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS - Dopita et al., 2007, ApSS, 310, 255) on the ANU 2.3m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, NSW Australia, using the B3000/R3000 gratings (3500-9800 A, 1 A resolution). PSN J13505285-3017097 was discovered by Conseil on 2013 May 02.22 at mag 18.4 on TAROT images, and photometric follow up shows the light curve peaks in brightness at mag 16 on 2013 May 15.

  17. Melting relations in the Fe-rich portion of the system FeFeS at 30 kb pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, R.; Bell, P.M.

    1969-01-01

    The melting relations of FeFeS mixtures covering the composition range from Fe to Fe67S33 have been determined at 30 kb pressure. The phase relations are similar to those at low pressure. The eutectic has a composition of Fe72.9S27.1 and a temperature of 990??C. Solubility of S in Fe at elevated temperatures at 30 kb is of the same order of magnitude as at low pressure. Sulfur may have significantly lowered the melting point of iron in the upper mantle during the period of coalescence of metal prior to core formation in the primitive earth. ?? 1969.

  18. Stage-specific requirement for Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei and heterologous rescue by human and Blastocystis orthologues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Long, Shaojun; Changmai, Piya; Tsaousis, A.D.; Skalický, Tomáš; Verner, Zdeněk; Wen, Yan-Zi; Roger, A. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 6 (2011), 1403-1418 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : IRON-SULFUR CLUSTER * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * ASSEMBLY PROTEIN * SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE * AZOTOBACTER-VINELANDII * CYSTEINE DESULFURASE * CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE * BINDING ACTIVITY * GENE-CLUSTER Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.010, year: 2011

  19. Crystal structure of the FeS cluster-containing nucleotide excision repair helicase XPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie C Wolski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage recognition by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires an initial step identifying helical distortions in the DNA and a proofreading step verifying the presence of a lesion. This proofreading step is accomplished in eukaryotes by the TFIIH complex. The critical damage recognition component of TFIIH is the XPD protein, a DNA helicase that unwinds DNA and identifies the damage. Here, we describe the crystal structure of an archaeal XPD protein with high sequence identity to the human XPD protein that reveals how the structural helicase framework is combined with additional elements for strand separation and DNA scanning. Two RecA-like helicase domains are complemented by a 4Fe4S cluster domain, which has been implicated in damage recognition, and an alpha-helical domain. The first helicase domain together with the helical and 4Fe4S-cluster-containing domains form a central hole with a diameter sufficient in size to allow passage of a single stranded DNA. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how DNA is bound to the XPD protein, and can rationalize several of the mutations in the human XPD gene that lead to one of three severe diseases, xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, and trichothiodystrophy.

  20. Rescuing the Rescuer: On the Protein Complex between the Human Mitochondrial Acyl Carrier Protein and ISD11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, María Georgina; Pignataro, María Florencia; Noguera, Martín Ezequiel; Cruz, Karen Magalí; Santos, Javier

    2018-05-16

    Iron-sulfur clusters are essential cofactors in many biochemical processes. ISD11, one of the subunits of the protein complex that carries out the cluster assembly in mitochondria, is necessary for cysteine desulfurase NFS1 stability and function. Several authors have recently provided evidence showing that ISD11 interacts with the acyl carrier protein (ACP). We carried out the coexpression of human mitochondrial ACP and ISD11 in E. coli. This work shows that ACP and ISD11 form a soluble, structured, and stable complex able to bind to the human NFS1 subunit modulating its activity. Results suggest that ACP plays a key-role in ISD11 folding and stability in vitro. These findings offer the opportunity to study the mechanism of interaction between ISD11 and NFS1.

  1. Bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite for in situ SERS monitoring and degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Shuzhen; Cai, Qian; Lu, Kailing; Liao, Fan, E-mail: fliao@suda.edu.cn; Shao, Mingwang, E-mail: mwshao@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University (China)

    2016-01-15

    The bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite was fabricated by in situ reducing Au nanoparticles onto the surface of FeS (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The as-prepared FeS possessed a multi-structure composed of plenty of nanoplates, which were coated by Au nanoparticles with an average size of ∼47.5 nm. While the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} showed a thin hexagonal sheet containing Au nanoparticles on its surface with an average size of ∼79.0 nm. Both the as-prepared Au/FeS and Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites exhibited excellent SERS performance, capable of enhancing the Raman signals of R6G molecules with the enhancement factor up to 1.81 × 10{sup 6} and 7.60 × 10{sup 4}, respectively. Moreover, Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite also has been verified to have intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, which could decompose H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into hydroxyl radicals and then degrade organic pollutants into small molecules. Therefore, SERS can be used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation process of R6G molecules, employing the Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite both as SERS substrate and catalyst. Graphical abstract: SERS was used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation of R6G, employing the Au/FeS and Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites both as SERS substrates and catalysts.

  2. Easy solid-phase synthesis of pH-insensitive heterogeneous CNTs/FeS Fenton-like catalyst for the removal of antibiotics from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Mingxuan; Yu, Fei; Chen, Junhong

    2015-04-15

    We report a facile solid method to synthesize efficient carbon-based Fenton-like catalyst (CNTs/FeS) using as-prepared carbon nanotubes (APCNTs), which makes full use of the iron nanoparticles in APCNTs without needless purification. Furthermore, the CNTs/FeS was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric (TG) and other analysis techniques, and then the CNTs/FeS was used as a Fenton-like catalyst for removing ciprofloxacin from aqueous solution. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied to find the effect of the reaction parameter and the optimum operating condition. Results shows the catalytic reaction had better suitability than previous studies in a wide range of pH values (pH 3-8) and the Fenton-like catalyst CNTs/FeS exhibits good catalytic activity for removing of antibiotic, which be attributed to the synergistic effect of adsorption-advanced oxidation and significantly improves efficiency of advanced oxidation. More importantly, the CNTs/FeS catalyst exhibit good regeneration performance and retains a high catalytic capacity (>75%) even after four reaction cycles. The catalytic mechanism were also studied further, the removal mechanism of ciprofloxacin by a CNTs/FeS heterogeneous Fenton-like process primarily involves three removal pathways occurring simultaneously: (a) adsorption removal by CNTs, (b) Fenton-like degradation catalyzed by FeS, (c) catalytic degradation by CNTs catalyst. And these actions also have synergistic effects for ciprofloxacin removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In-situ Density and Thermal Expansion Measurements of Fe and Fe-S Alloying Liquids Under Planetary Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Z.; Chantel, J.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Liquid iron is likely the dominant constituent in the cores of terrestrial planets and icy satellites such as Earth, Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Ganymede, and Io. Suggested by geophysical and geochemical observations, light elements such as S, C, Si, etc., are likely present in planetary cores. These light elements can significantly reduce the density and melting temperature of the Fe cores, and hence their abundances are crucial to our understanding of the structure and thermal history of planetary cores, as well as the generation of intrinsic magnetic fields. Knowledge on the density of Fe-light element alloying liquids at high pressures is critical to place constraints on the composition of planetary cores. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited in pressure and composition and are sometimes controversial. In this study, we extend the density dataset for Fe-rich liquids by measuring the density of Fe, Fe-10wt%S, Fe-20wt%S, Fe-27wt%S, and FeS liquids using the X-ray absorption technique in a DIA-type multianvil apparatus up to 7 GPa and 2173 K. An ion chamber (1D-detector) and a CCD camera (2D-detector) were used to measure intensities of transmitted monochromatic X-rays through molten samples, with the photon energy optimized at 40 keV. The densities were then determined from the Beer-Lambert law using the mass absorption coefficients, calibrated by solid standards using X-ray diffraction. At each pressure, density measurements were conducted at a range of temperatures above the liquidus of the samples, enabling the determination of thermal expansion. Combined with our previous results on the sound velocity of Fe and Fe-S liquids at high pressures (Jing et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 396, 78-87), these data provide tight constraints on the equation of state and thermodynamic properties such as the adiabatic temperature gradient for Fe-S liquids. We will discuss these results with implications to planetary

  4. Experimental studies on the electronic structure of pyrite FeS2 films prepared by thermally sulfurizing iron films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Wang Baoyi; Zhang Rengang; Zhang Zhe; Wei Long; Qian Haijie; Su Run; Kui Rexi

    2006-01-01

    Pyrite FeS 2 films have been prepared by thermally sulfurizing iron films deposited by magnetron sputtering. The electronic structures were studies by X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray photoemission spectrum. The results show that an S 3p valence band with relatively higher intensity compared to the calculation exists in 2-10 eV range and a high density below the Fermi level of Fe 3d states were detected. A second gap of 2.8 eV in the unoccupied density of states was found above the conduction band which was 2.4 eV by experimentally calculation. The difference between t 2g and e g which were formed in an octahedral crystal field was computed to be 2.1 eV. (authors)

  5. Full Wave Function Optimization with Quantum Monte Carlo and Its Effect on the Dissociation Energy of FeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi Mood, Kaveh; Lüchow, Arne

    2017-08-17

    Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations with partial and full optimization of the guide function are carried out for the dissociation of the FeS molecule. For the first time, quantum Monte Carlo orbital optimization for transition metal compounds is performed. It is demonstrated that energy optimization of the orbitals of a complete active space wave function in the presence of a Jastrow correlation function is required to obtain agreement with the experimental dissociation energy. Furthermore, it is shown that orbital optimization leads to a 5 Δ ground state, in agreement with experiments but in disagreement with other high-level ab initio wave function calculations which all predict a 5 Σ + ground state. The role of the Jastrow factor in DMC calculations with pseudopotentials is investigated. The results suggest that a large Jastrow factor may improve the DMC accuracy substantially at small additional cost.

  6. Preparation and development of FeS2 Quantum Dots on SiO2 nanostructures immobilized in biopolymers and synthetic polymers as nanoparticles and nanofibers catalyst for antibiotic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Razavi, Razieh; Fakhri, Ali

    2018-03-22

    The FeS 2 Quantum Dots (QDs) decorated SiO 2 nanostructure were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method. Chitosan and polypyrrole as polymers were used for the immobilization process. The characteristic structure of prepared samples was analyzed using several techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmittance electron microscopy, photoluminescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The mean crystallite sizes of FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 nanocomposites, FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 -chitosan nanocomposites and FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 -polypyrrole nanohybrids are 56.12, 76.38, and 83.24nm, respectively. The band gap energy of FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 nanocomposites, FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 -chitosan nanocomposites and FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 -polypyrrole nanohybrids were found out to be 3.0, 2.8, and 2.7eV, respectively. The photocatalysis properties were investigated by degradation of ampicillin under UV light illumination. The effect of experimental variables, such as, pH and time, on photo-degradation efficiency was studied. The results show that the three prepared samples nanopowders under UV light was in pH3 at 60min. As it could be seen that the amount of ampicillin degradation was increased with the loading of FeS 2 QDs on SiO 2 and FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 on chitosan nanoparticles and polypyrrole nanofiber. The antibacterial experiment was investigated under visible light illumination and the FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 -chitosan nanocomposites and FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 -polypyrrole nanohybrids demonstrate good antibacterial compared to FeS 2 QDs/SiO 2 nanocomposites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of surface Fe-S hybrid structure on the activity of the perfect and reduced α-Fe2O3(001) for chemical looping combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xianbin; Qin, Wu; Wang, Jianye; Li, Junhao; Dong, Changqing

    2018-05-01

    Sulfurization of the gradually reduced Fe2O3 surfaces is inevitable while Fe2O3 is used as an oxygen carrier (OC) for coal chemical looping combustion (CLC), which will result in formation of Fe-S hybrid structure on the surfaces. The Fe-S hybrid structure will directly alter the reactivity of the surfaces. Therefore, detailed properties of Fe-S hybrid structure over the perfect and reduced Fe2O3(001) surfaces, and its effect on the interfacial interactions, including CO oxidization and decomposition on the surfaces, were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The S atom prefers to chemically bind to Fe site with electron transfer from the surfaces to the S atom, and a deeper reduction of Fe2O3(001) leads to an increasing interaction between S and Fe. The formation of Fe-S hybrid structure alters the electronic properties of the gradually reduced Fe2O3(001) surfaces, promoting CO oxidation on the surfaces ranging from Fe2O3 to FeO, but depressing carbon deposition on the surfaces ranging from FeO to Fe. The sulfurized FeO acts as a watershed to realize relatively high CO oxidation rate and low carbon deposition. Results provided a fundamental understanding for controlling and optimizing the CLC processes.

  8. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/TiO2 Mesoporous Hybrid Photoanode with Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Thin Films Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Bayram; Turkdogan, Sunay; Astam, Aykut; Ozer, Oguz Can; Asgin, Mansur; Cebeci, Hulya; Urk, Deniz; Mucur, Selin Pravadili

    2016-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/TiO2 mesoporous networks can be employed as a new alternative photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By using the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous as photoanodes in DSSC, we demonstrate that the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous photoanode is promising alternative to standard FTO/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSC due to larger specific surface area and high electrochemical activity. We also show that iron pyrite (FeS2) thin films can be used as an efficient counter electrode (CE), an alternative to the conventional high cost Pt based CE. We are able to synthesis FeS2 nanostructures utilizing a very cheap and easy hydrothermal growth route. MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSCs with FeS2 CE achieved a high solar conversion efficiency of 7.27% under 100 mW cm-2 (AM 1.5G 1-Sun) simulated solar irradiance which is considerably (slightly) higher than that of A-CNT/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSCs with Pt CE. Outstanding performance of the FeS2 CE makes it a very promising choice among the various CE materials used in the conventional DSSC and it is expected to be used more often to achieve higher photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies.

  9. Magnetron-sputter deposition of Fe3S4 thin films and their conversion into pyrite (FeS2) by thermal sulfurization for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongfei; Chi Dongzhi

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of FeS 2 (pyrite) thin films by sulfurizing Fe 3 S 4 that were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering at room temperature. Under the selected sputtering conditions, Fe 3 S 4 nanocrystal films are obtained and the nanocrystals tend to locally cluster and closely pack into ricelike nanoparticles with an increase in film thickness. Meanwhile, the film tends to crack when the film thickness is increased over ∼1.3 μm. The film cracking can be effectively suppressed by an introduction of a 3-nm Cu intermediate layer prior to Fe 3 S 4 deposition. However, an introduction of a 3-nm Al intermediate layer tends to enhance the film cracking. By post-growth thermal sulfurization of the Fe 3 S 4 thin films in a tube-furnace, FeS 2 with high phase purity, as determined by using x ray diffraction, is obtained. Optical absorption spectroscopy was employed to characterize the resultant FeS 2 thin films, which revealed two absorption edges at 0.9 and 1.2 eV, respectively. These two absorption edges are assigned to the direct bandgap (0.9 eV) and the indirect allowed transitions (1.2 eV) of FeS 2 , respectively.

  10. Activation and dissociation of CO2 on the (001), (011), and (111) surfaces of mackinawite (FeS): A dispersion-corrected DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzade, N.Y.; Roldan, Alberto; de Leeuw, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    Iron sulfide minerals, including mackinawite (FeS), are relevant in origin of life theories, due to their potential catalytic activity towards the reduction and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic molecules, which may be applicable to the production of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals.

  11. Visualizing changes in electron distribution in coupled chains of cytochrome bc(1) by modifying barrier for electron transfer between the FeS cluster and heme c(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieluch, Ewelina; Pietryga, Krzysztof; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2010-02-01

    Cytochrome c(1) of Rhodobacter (Rba.) species provides a series of mutants which change barriers for electron transfer through the cofactor chains of cytochrome bc(1) by modifying heme c(1) redox midpoint potential. Analysis of post-flash electron distribution in such systems can provide useful information about the contribution of individual reactions to the overall electron flow. In Rba. capsulatus, the non-functional low-potential forms of cytochrome c(1) which are devoid of the disulfide bond naturally present in this protein revert spontaneously by introducing a second-site suppression (mutation A181T) that brings the potential of heme c(1) back to the functionally high levels, yet maintains it some 100 mV lower from the native value. Here we report that the disulfide and the mutation A181T can coexist in one protein but the mutation exerts a dominant effect on the redox properties of heme c(1) and the potential remains at the same lower value as in the disulfide-free form. This establishes effective means to modify a barrier for electron transfer between the FeS cluster and heme c(1) without breaking disulfide. A comparison of the flash-induced electron transfers in native and mutated cytochrome bc(1) revealed significant differences in the post-flash equilibrium distribution of electrons only when the connection of the chains with the quinone pool was interrupted at the level of either of the catalytic sites by the use of specific inhibitors, antimycin or myxothiazol. In the non-inhibited system no such differences were observed. We explain the results using a kinetic model in which a shift in the equilibrium of one reaction influences the equilibrium of all remaining reactions in the cofactor chains. It follows a rather simple description in which the direction of electron flow through the coupled chains of cytochrome bc(1) exclusively depends on the rates of all reversible partial reactions, including the Q/QH2 exchange rate to/from the catalytic sites

  12. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Effect of capping ligands on the optical properties and electronic energies of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Guangmei, E-mail: zhaiguangmei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Solar Cell Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Xie, Rongwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jitao; Yang, Yongzhen; Wang, Hua; Li, Xuemin [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Xu, Bingshe [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China)

    2016-07-25

    In this work, the optical and electronic properties of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films with various capping ligands were systematically investigated by UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and current density–voltage characteristic measurements. The iron pyrite nanocrystals with various ligands have an indirect band gap of around 1.05 eV and broad absorption spanning into the near-infrared region, exhibiting favorable optical properties for their photovoltaic applications. The electron affinities and ionization potentials of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals determined through cyclic voltammetry measurements show strong ligand dependence. An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained among the pyrite nanocrystals capped with the ligands employed in this work. The iron pyrite nanocrystal films capped with iodide and 1,2-ethanedithiol exhibit the largest band edge energy shift and conductivity, respectively. Our results not only provide several useful optical and electronic parameters of pyrite nanocrystals for their further use in optoelectronic devices as active layers and/or infrared optical absorption materials, but also highlight the relationship between their surface chemistry and electronic energies. - Highlights: • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with various ligands were determined via electrochemical measurements. • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals showed strong ligand-dependence. • An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained for the pyrite nanocrystals studied in the work. • The conductivities of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with different ligands were obtained by current density–voltage measurements.

  14. Effect of capping ligands on the optical properties and electronic energies of iron pyrite FeS2 nanocrystals and solid thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Guangmei; Xie, Rongwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jitao; Yang, Yongzhen; Wang, Hua; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the optical and electronic properties of iron pyrite FeS 2 nanocrystals and solid thin films with various capping ligands were systematically investigated by UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and current density–voltage characteristic measurements. The iron pyrite nanocrystals with various ligands have an indirect band gap of around 1.05 eV and broad absorption spanning into the near-infrared region, exhibiting favorable optical properties for their photovoltaic applications. The electron affinities and ionization potentials of FeS 2 nanocrystals determined through cyclic voltammetry measurements show strong ligand dependence. An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained among the pyrite nanocrystals capped with the ligands employed in this work. The iron pyrite nanocrystal films capped with iodide and 1,2-ethanedithiol exhibit the largest band edge energy shift and conductivity, respectively. Our results not only provide several useful optical and electronic parameters of pyrite nanocrystals for their further use in optoelectronic devices as active layers and/or infrared optical absorption materials, but also highlight the relationship between their surface chemistry and electronic energies. - Highlights: • The energy levels of FeS 2 nanocrystals with various ligands were determined via electrochemical measurements. • The energy levels of FeS 2 nanocrystals showed strong ligand-dependence. • An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained for the pyrite nanocrystals studied in the work. • The conductivities of FeS 2 nanocrystals with different ligands were obtained by current density–voltage measurements.

  15. Divergence of Erv1-Associated Mitochondrial Import and Export Pathways in Trypanosomes and Anaerobic Protists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basu, Somsuvro; Leonard, J.C.; Desai, N.; Mavridou, D.A.I.; Tang, K.H.; Goddard, A.D.; Ginger, M. L.; Lukeš, Julius; Allen, J.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2013), s. 343-355 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dependent sulfhydryl oxidase * inducible expression system * cytosolic fe/s proteins * iron-sulfur proteins * blood-stream forms * cytochrome-c * intermembrane space * liver-regeneration * entamoeba-histolytica * electron-transfer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  16. Strong 3D and 1D magnetism in hexagonal Fe-chalcogenides FeS and FeSe vs. weak magnetism in hexagonal FeTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, David S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-13

    We present a comparative theoretical study of the hexagonal forms of the Fe-chalcogenides FeS, FeSe and FeTe with their better known tetragonal forms. While the tetragonal forms exhibit only an incipient antiferromagnetism and experimentally show superconductivity when doped, the hexagonal forms of FeS and FeSe display a robust magnetism. We show that this strong magnetism arises from a van Hove singularity associated with the direct Fe-Fe c-axis chains in the generally more three-dimensional NiAs structure. We also find that hexagonal FeTe is much less magnetic than the other two hexagonal materials, so that unconventional magnetically-mediated superconductivity is possible, although a large Tc value is unlikely.

  17. Strong 3D and 1D magnetism in hexagonal Fe-chalcogenides FeS and FeSe vs. weak magnetism in hexagonal FeTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David S

    2017-06-13

    We present a comparative theoretical study of the hexagonal forms of the Fe-chalcogenides FeS, FeSe and FeTe with their better known tetragonal forms. While the tetragonal forms exhibit only an incipient antiferromagnetism and experimentally show superconductivity when doped, the hexagonal forms of FeS and FeSe display a robust magnetism. We show that this strong magnetism arises from a van Hove singularity associated with the direct Fe-Fe c-axis chains in the generally more three-dimensional NiAs structure. We also find that hexagonal FeTe is much less magnetic than the other two hexagonal materials, so that unconventional magnetically-mediated superconductivity is possible, although a large T c value is unlikely.

  18. Formation mechanism and yield of molecules ejected from ZnS, CdS, and FeS2 during ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikzad, S.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Gruen, D.M.; Tombrello, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    Neutral species ejected from single crystals of ZnS, CdS, and FeS 2 during ion bombardment by 3 keV Ar + were detected by laser post-ionization followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. While metal atoms (Fe, Zn, Cd) and S 2 were the dominant species observed, substantial amounts of S, FeS, Zn 2 , ZnS, Cd 2 , and CdS were also detected. The experimental results demonstrate that molecules represent a larger fraction of the sputtered yield than was previously believed from secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments. In addition, the data suggest that the molecules are not necessarily formed from adjacent atoms in the solid and that a modified form of the recombination model could provide a mechanism for their formation

  19. Simultaneous depletion of Atm and Mdl rebalances cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly but not heme import into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková, Eva; Changmai, Piya; Paris, Zdeněk; Salmon, D.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 21 (2015), s. 4157-4175 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA ČR GJ15-21450Y; GA MŠk LH12104 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Atm * Fe-S cluster * heme * Mdl * Trypanosoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.237, year: 2015

  20. Phase relations in the metal-rich portions of the phase system Pt-Ir-Fe-S at 1000 degrees C and 1100 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makovicky, E.; Karup-Møller, Sven

    2000-01-01

    Phase relations in the S-poor portions of the dry condensed Pt-Ir-Fe-S system were determined at 1000 degrees and 1100 degreesC with a particular emphasis on delineation of the solid solubility fields of the Pt-Ir-Fe alloys. At both temperatures, a broad field of gamma (Ir,Fe,Pt) alloy coexists...... with gamma-(Pt,Fe), Pt3Fe and PtFe which dissolve respectively at least 5.1, 29.3 and 24.0 at.% Ir at 1100 degreesC (2.2, 23.6 and less than or equal to 17.2 at.% Ir at 1000 degreesC). Gaps between the nearly Ir-free Pt-Fe alloys gamma (Pt,Fe), Pt3Fe s.s., PtFe s.s. and gamma (Fe,Pt) were estimated as 20......-23 at.%, 40-42 at.% and 54.2-similar to 57 at.% Fe at 1100 degreesC (18-23, 39.5-42.5 and 59-62 at.% Fe at 1000 degreesC). The first gap agrees with data from natural phases by Cabri et ni. (1996). The Fe-rich sulphide melt dissolves only traces of Pt and Ir; Fe1-xS dissolves up to 5.8 at.% Ir at 1100...

  1. Granzyme A Cleaves a Mitochondrial Complex I Protein to Initiate Caspase-Independent Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinvalet, Denis; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Ferrini, Roger; Lieberman, Judy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The killer lymphocyte protease granzyme A (GzmA) triggers caspase-independent target cell death with morphological features of apoptosis. We previously showed that GzmA acts directly on mitochondria to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disrupt the transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) but does not permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane. Mitochondrial damage is critical to GzmA-induced cell death since cells treated with superoxide scavengers are resistant to GzmA. Here we find that GzmA accesses the mitochondrial matrix to cleave the complex I protein NDUFS3, an iron-sulfur subunit of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex I, after Lys56 to interfere with NADH oxidation and generate superoxide anions. Target cells expressing a cleavage site mutant of NDUFS3 are resistant to GzmA-mediated cell death but remain sensitive to GzmB. PMID:18485875

  2. Na7 [Fe2S6 ] , Na2 [FeS2 ] and Na2 [FeSe2 ] : New 'reduced' sodium chalcogenido ferrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüble, Pirmin; Peschke, Simon; Johrendt, Dirk; Röhr, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    Three new 'reduced' FeII containing sodium chalcogenido ferrates were obtained applying a reductive synthetic route. The mixed-valent sulfido ferrate Na7 [Fe2S6 ] , which forms bar-shaped crystals with metallic greenish luster, was synthesized in pure phase from natural pyrite and elemental sodium at a maximum temperature of 800 °C. Its centrosymmetric triclinic structure (SG P 1 bar , a = 764.15(2), b = 1153.70(2), c = 1272.58(3) pm, α = 62.3325 (7) , β = 72.8345 (8) , γ = 84.6394 (8) ° , Z = 3, R1 = 0.0185) exhibits two crystallographically different [Fe2S6 ] 7 - dimers of edge-sharing [FeS4 ] tetrahedra, with somewhat larger Fe-S distances than in the fully oxidized FeIII dimers of e.g. Na6 [Fe2III S6 ] . In contrast to the localized AFM ordered pure di-ferrates(III), the Curie-Weiss behavior of the magnetic susceptibility proves the rarely observed valence-delocalized S = 9/2 state of the mixed-valent FeIII /FeII dimer. The nearly spin-only value of the magnetic moment combined with the chemical bonding not generally differing from that in pure ferrates(II) and (III), provides a striking argument, that the reduction of the local Fe spin moments observed in all condensed sulfido ferrate moieties is connected with the AFM spin ordering. The two isotypic ferrates(II) Na2 [FeS2 ] and Na2 [FeSe2 ] with chain-like structural units (SG Ibam, a = 643.54(8)/ 660.81(1), b = 1140.2(2)/1190.30(2) c = 562.90(6)/585.59(1) pm, Z = 4, R1 = 0.0372/0.0466) crystallize in the K2 [ZnO2 ] -type structure. Although representing merely further members of the common series of chalcogenido metallates(II) Na2 [MIIQ2 ] , these two new phases, together with Na6 [FeS4 ] and Li2 [FeS2 ] , are the only examples of pure FeII alkali chalcogenido ferrates. The new compounds allow for a general comparison of di- and chain ferrates(II) and (III) and mixed-valent analogs concerning the electronic and magnetic properties (including Heisenberg super-exchange and double-exchange interactions

  3. Probing the reaction mechanism of IspH protein by x-ray structure analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Gräwert, Tobias

    2009-12-28

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) represent the two central intermediates in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. The recently discovereddeoxyxylulose 5-phosphate pathway generates a mixture of IPP and DMAPP in its final step by reductive dehydroxylation of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl- 2-butenyl 4-diphosphate. This conversion is catalyzed by IspH protein comprising a central iron-sulfur cluster as electron transfer cofactor in the active site. The five crystal structures of IspH in complex with substrate, converted substrate, products and PPi reported in this article provide unique insights into the mechanism of this enzyme. While IspH protein crystallizes with substrate bound to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, crystals of IspH in complex with IPP, DMAPP or inorganic pyrophosphate feature [3Fe-4S] clusters. The IspH:substrate complex reveals a hairpin conformation of the ligand with the C(1) hydroxyl group coordinated to the unique site in a [4Fe-4S] cluster of aconitase type. The resulting alkoxide complex is coupled to a hydrogen-bonding network, which serves as proton reservoir via a Thr167 proton relay. Prolonged x-ray irradiation leads to cleavage of the C(1)-O bond (initiated by reducing photo electrons). The data suggest a reaction mechanism involving a combination of Lewis-acid activation and proton coupled electron transfer. The resulting allyl radical intermediate can acquire a second electron via the iron-sulfur cluster. The reaction may be terminated by the transfer of a proton from the β-phosphate of the substrate to C(1) (affording DMAPP) or C(3) (affording IPP).

  4. Probing the reaction mechanism of IspH protein by x-ray structure analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Grä wert, Tobias; Span, Ingrid; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Eppinger, Jö rg; Bacher, Adelbert; Groll, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) represent the two central intermediates in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. The recently discovereddeoxyxylulose 5-phosphate pathway generates a mixture of IPP and DMAPP in its final step by reductive dehydroxylation of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl- 2-butenyl 4-diphosphate. This conversion is catalyzed by IspH protein comprising a central iron-sulfur cluster as electron transfer cofactor in the active site. The five crystal structures of IspH in complex with substrate, converted substrate, products and PPi reported in this article provide unique insights into the mechanism of this enzyme. While IspH protein crystallizes with substrate bound to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, crystals of IspH in complex with IPP, DMAPP or inorganic pyrophosphate feature [3Fe-4S] clusters. The IspH:substrate complex reveals a hairpin conformation of the ligand with the C(1) hydroxyl group coordinated to the unique site in a [4Fe-4S] cluster of aconitase type. The resulting alkoxide complex is coupled to a hydrogen-bonding network, which serves as proton reservoir via a Thr167 proton relay. Prolonged x-ray irradiation leads to cleavage of the C(1)-O bond (initiated by reducing photo electrons). The data suggest a reaction mechanism involving a combination of Lewis-acid activation and proton coupled electron transfer. The resulting allyl radical intermediate can acquire a second electron via the iron-sulfur cluster. The reaction may be terminated by the transfer of a proton from the β-phosphate of the substrate to C(1) (affording DMAPP) or C(3) (affording IPP).

  5. Activation and dissociation of CO2 on the (001), (011), and (111) surfaces of mackinawite (FeS): A dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzade, N Y; Roldan, A; de Leeuw, N H

    2015-09-07

    Iron sulfide minerals, including mackinawite (FeS), are relevant in origin of life theories, due to their potential catalytic activity towards the reduction and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic molecules, which may be applicable to the production of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. However, the fundamental understanding of CO2 adsorption, activation, and dissociation on FeS surfaces remains incomplete. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations, corrected for long-range dispersion interactions (DFT-D2), to explore various adsorption sites and configurations for CO2 on the low-index mackinawite (001), (110), and (111) surfaces. We found that the CO2 molecule physisorbs weakly on the energetically most stable (001) surface but adsorbs relatively strongly on the (011) and (111) FeS surfaces, preferentially at Fe sites. The adsorption of the CO2 on the (011) and (111) surfaces is shown to be characterized by significant charge transfer from surface Fe species to the CO2 molecule, which causes a large structural transformation in the molecule (i.e., forming a negatively charged bent CO2 (-δ) species, with weaker C-O confirmed via vibrational frequency analyses). We have also analyzed the pathways for CO2 reduction to CO and O on the mackinawite (011) and (111) surfaces. CO2 dissociation is calculated to be slightly endothermic relative to the associatively adsorbed states, with relatively large activation energy barriers of 1.25 eV and 0.72 eV on the (011) and (111) surfaces, respectively.

  6. A Hybrid Mineral Battery: Energy Storage and Dissolution Behavior of CuFeS2 in a Fixed Bed Flow Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Kashif Mairaj; Asselin, Edouard

    2018-05-09

    The development of a hybrid system capable of storing energy and the additional benefit of Cu extraction is discussed in this work. A fixed bed flow cell (FBFC) was used in which a composite negative electrode containing CuFeS 2 (80 wt %) and carbon black (20 wt %) in graphite felt was separated from a positive (graphite felt) electrode by a proton-exchange membrane. The anolyte (0.2 m H 2 SO 4 ) and catholyte (0.5 m Fe 2+ in 0.2 m H 2 SO 4 with or without 0.1 m Cu 2+ ) were circulated in the cell. The electrochemical activity of the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ redox couple over graphite felt significantly improved after the addition of Cu 2+ in the catholyte. Ultimately, in the CuFeS 2 ∥Fe 2+ /Cu 2+ (CFeCu) FBFC system, the specific capacity increased continuously to 26.4 mAh g -1 in 500 galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) cycles, compared to the CuFeS 2 ∥Fe 2+ (CFe) system (13.9 mAh g -1 ). Interestingly, the specific discharge energy gradually increased to 3.6 Wh kg -1 in 500 GCD cycles for the CFeCu system compared to 3.29 Wh kg -1 for the CFe system in 150 cycles. In addition to energy storage, 10.75 % Cu was also extracted from the mineral, which is an important feature of the CFeCu system as it would allow Cu extraction and recovery through hydrometallurgical methods. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Defect of Fe-S cluster binding by DNA polymerase δ in yeast suppresses UV-induced mutagenesis, but enhances DNA polymerase ζ - dependent spontaneous mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenkova, E I; Tarakhovskaya, E R; Siebler, H M; Pavlov, Y I

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are duplicated by a complex machinery, utilizing high fidelity replicative B-family DNA polymerases (pols) α, δ and ε. Specialized error-prone pol ζ, the fourth B-family member, is recruited when DNA synthesis by the accurate trio is impeded by replication stress or DNA damage. The damage tolerance mechanism dependent on pol ζ prevents DNA/genome instability and cell death at the expense of increased mutation rates. The pol switches occurring during this specialized replication are not fully understood. The loss of pol ζ results in the absence of induced mutagenesis and suppression of spontaneous mutagenesis. Disruption of the Fe-S cluster motif that abolish the interaction of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the catalytic subunit of pol ζ with its accessory subunits, which are shared with pol δ, leads to a similar defect in induced mutagenesis. Intriguingly, the pol3-13 mutation that affects the Fe-S cluster in the CTD of the catalytic subunit of pol δ also leads to defective induced mutagenesis, suggesting the possibility that Fe-S clusters are essential for the pol switches during replication of damaged DNA. We confirmed that yeast strains with the pol3-13 mutation are UV-sensitive and defective in UV-induced mutagenesis. However, they have increased spontaneous mutation rates. We found that this increase is dependent on functional pol ζ. In the pol3-13 mutant strain with defective pol δ, there is a sharp increase in transversions and complex mutations, which require functional pol ζ, and an increase in the occurrence of large deletions, whose size is controlled by pol ζ. Therefore, the pol3-13 mutation abrogates pol ζ-dependent induced mutagenesis, but allows for pol ζ recruitment for the generation of spontaneous mutations and prevention of larger deletions. These results reveal differential control of the two major types of pol ζ-dependent mutagenesis by the Fe-S cluster present in replicative pol δ. Copyright © 2016

  8. Preparation of Carbon Nanotube/TiO2 Mesoporous Hybrid Photoanode with Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Thin Films Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bayram Kilic; Sunay Turkdogan; Aykut Astam; Oguz Can Ozer; Mansur Asgin; Hulya Cebeci; Deniz Urk; Selin Pravadili Mucur

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/TiO2 mesoporous networks can be employed as a new alternative photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By using the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous as photoanodes in DSSC, we demonstrate that the MWCNT/TiO2 mesoporous photoanode is promising alternative to standard FTO/TiO2 mesoporous based DSSC due to larger specific surface area and high electrochemical activity. We also show that iron pyrite (FeS2) thin films can be used as an efficient counter electrode...

  9. Small-volume potentiometric titrations: EPR investigations of Fe-S cluster N2 in mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John J; Salvadori, Enrico; Bridges, Hannah R; Hirst, Judy; Roessler, Maxie M

    2016-09-01

    EPR-based potentiometric titrations are a well-established method for determining the reduction potentials of cofactors in large and complex proteins with at least one EPR-active state. However, such titrations require large amounts of protein. Here, we report a new method that requires an order of magnitude less protein than previously described methods, and that provides EPR samples suitable for measurements at both X- and Q-band microwave frequencies. We demonstrate our method by determining the reduction potential of the terminal [4Fe-4S] cluster (N2) in the intramolecular electron-transfer relay in mammalian respiratory complex I. The value determined by our method, E m7 =-158mV, is precise, reproducible, and consistent with previously reported values. Our small-volume potentiometric titration method will facilitate detailed investigations of EPR-active centres in non-abundant and refractory proteins that can only be prepared in small quantities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of the LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/FeS(2) System for Potential Use as a Geothermal Borehole Power Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.

    1999-01-01

    We are continuing to study the suitability of modified thermal-battery technology as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications. Previous work focused on the LiSi/FeS(sub 2) couple over a temperature range of 350 C to 400 C with the LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic, which melts at 324.5 C. In this work, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic/FeS(sub 2) thermal cells were studied at temperatures between 250 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. The CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic was selected because of its lower melting point (228.5 C). Incorporation of a quasi-reference electrode allowed the determination of the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization. The results of single-cell tests and limited battery tests are presented, along with preliminary data for battery stacks tested in a simulated geothermal borehole environment

  11. Phase equilibria in the KFeS2-Fe-S system at 300-600 °C and bartonite stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Valentin O.; Voronin, Mikhail V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2018-05-01

    The article deals with phase relations in the KFeS2-Fe-S system studied by the dry synthesis method in the range of 300-600 °C and at a pressure of 1 bar. At the temperature below 513 ± 3 °C, pyrite coexists with rasvumite and there are pyrite-rasvumite-KFeS2 and pyrite-rasvumite-pyrrhotite equilibria established. Above 513 ± 3 °C pyrite and rasvumite react to form KFeS2 and pyrrhotite, limiting the pyrite-rasvumite association to temperatures below this in nature. The experiments also outline the compositional stability range of the copper-free analog of murunskite (K x Fe2- y S2) and suggest that mineral called bartonite is not stable in the Cl-free system, at least at atmospheric pressure and the temperature in the experiments. Chlorbartonite could be easily produced after adding KCl in the experiment. Possible parageneses in the quaternary K-Fe-S-Cl system were described based on the data obtained in this research and found in the previous studies. The factors affecting the formation of potassium-iron sulfides in nature were discussed.

  12. Experimental study and thermodynamic modeling of the phase relation in the Fe-S-Si system with implications for the distribution of S and Si in a partially solidified core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R.; Fei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary cooling leads to solidification of any initially molten metallic core. Some terrestrial cores (e.g. Mercury) are formed and differentiated under relatively reduced conditions, and they are thought to be composed of Fe-S-Si. However, there are limited understanding of the phase relations in the Fe-S-Si system at high pressure and temperature. In this study, we conducted high-pressure experiments to investigate the phase relations in the Fe-S-Si system up to 25 GPa. Experimental results show that the liquidus and solidus in this study are slightly lower than those in the Fe-S binary system for the same S concentration in liquid at same pressure. The Fe3S, which is supposed to be the stable sub-solidus S-bearing phase in the Fe-S binary system above 17 GPa, is not observed in the Fe-S-Si system at 21 GPa. Almost all S prefers to partition into liquid, while the distribution of Si between solid and liquid depends on experimental P and T conditions. We obtained the partition coefficient log(KDSi) by fitting the experimental data as a function of P, T and S concentration in liquid. At a constant pressure, the log(KDSi) linearly decreases with 1/T(K). With increase of pressure, the slopes of linear correlation between log(KDSi) and 1/T(K) decreases, indicating that more Si partitions into solid at higher pressure. In order to interpolate and extrapolate the phase relations over a wide pressure and temperature range, we established a comprehensive thermodynamic model in the Fe-S-Si system. The results will be used to constrain the distribution of S and Si between solid inner core and liquid outer core for a range of planet sizes. A Si-rich solid inner core and a S-rich liquid outer core are suggested for an iron-rich core.

  13. Identification of vital and dispensable sulfur utilization factors in the Plasmodium apicoplast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M Haussig

    Full Text Available Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are ubiquitous and critical cofactors in diverse biochemical processes. They are assembled by distinct [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis pathways, typically in organelles of endosymbiotic origin. Apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, harbor two separate [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis pathways in the their mitochondrion and apicoplast. In this study, we systematically targeted the five nuclear-encoded sulfur utilization factors (SUF of the apicoplast [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis pathway by experimental genetics in the murine malaria model parasite Plasmodium berghei. We show that four SUFs, namely SUFC, D, E, and S are refractory to targeted gene deletion, validating them as potential targets for antimalarial drug development. We achieved targeted deletion of SUFA, which encodes a potential [Fe-S] transfer protein, indicative of a dispensable role during asexual blood stage growth in vivo. Furthermore, no abnormalities were observed during Plasmodium life cycle progression in the insect and mammalian hosts. Fusion of a fluorescent tag to the endogenous P. berghei SUFs demonstrated that all loci were accessible to genetic modification and that all five tagged SUFs localize to the apicoplast. Together, our experimental genetics analysis identifies the key components of the SUF [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast of a malarial parasite and shows that absence of SUFC, D, E, or S is incompatible with Plasmodium blood infection in vivo.

  14. Vapor phase epitaxial growth of FeS sub 2 pyrite and evaluation of the carrier collection in liquid-junction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennaoui, A.; Schlichthoerl, G.; Fiechter, S.; Tributsch, H. (Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Abt. Solare Energetik und Materialforschung, Berlin (Germany))

    1992-01-01

    Photoactive epitaxial layers of FeS{sub 2} were grown using bromine as a transport agent and a simple closed ampoule technique. The substrates used were (100)-oriented slices of natural pyrite 1 mm thick. A vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism was elucidated by means of optical microscopy. Macrosteps, terrace surfaces and protuberances are often accompanied with the presence of liquid FeBr{sub 3} droplets. In the absence of a liquid phase growth hillocks are found. Localized photovoltaic response for the evaluation of carrier collection using a scanning laser spot system has been used to effectively locate and characterize non-uniformities present in the epitaxial thin films. (orig.).

  15. Investigations of CuFeS{sub 2} semiconductor mineral from ocean rift hydrothermal vent fields by Cu NMR in a local field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matukhin, V. L.; Pogoreltsev, A. I.; Gavrilenko, A. N., E-mail: ang-2000@mail.ru; Garkavyi, S. O.; Shmidt, E. V. [Kazan State Power University (Russian Federation); Babaeva, S. F. [All-Russia Research Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources of the World Ocean “VNIIOkeangeologiya” (Russian Federation); Sukhanova, A. A. [Saint-Petersburg Mining University (Russian Federation); Terukov, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The results of investigating natural samples of chalcopyrite mineral CuFeS{sub 2} from massive oceanic sulfide ores of the Mid-Atlantic ridge by the {sup 63}Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR {sup 63}Cu) in a local field at room temperature are presented. The significant width of the resonance lines found in the {sup 63}Cu NMR spectrum directly testifies to a wide distribution of local magnetic and electric fields in the investigated chalcopyrite samples. This distribution can be the consequence of an appreciable deviation of the structure of the investigated chalcopyrite samples from the stoichiometric one. The obtained results show that the pulsed {sup 63}Cu NMR can be an efficient method for studying the physical properties of deep-water polymetallic sulfides of the World Ocean.

  16. Melting relations and elemental distribution of portion of the system Fe-S-Si-O to 32 KB with planetary application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The melting relations and distribution of K and Cs in portions of the system was determined at high pressures. Ferrosilite is stable as a primary phase at high pressures because of the incongruent melting of ferrosilite to quartz plus liquid and the boundary between the one and two liquid fields on the joint Fe(1-x) O-FeS-SiO2 shifts away from silica with increasing pressures. Potassium K was found to have limited solubility in metal sulfide liquids at pressures up to 45 kb. The speculation that K may dissolve significantly in metal-metal sulfide liquids after undergoing first order isomorphic transition was tested by determining the distribution of Cs between sulfide and silicate liquids as an analogy to K. At 45 kb, 1400 C and 27 kb, 1300 C only limited amounts of Cs were detected in quench sulfide liquids even at pressures beyond the isomorphic transition of Cs.

  17. Evidence for the existence of two electronic states in the chalcopyrite-type alloys CuFe(S1-zSez)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaimes, E.; Gonzalez, J.; Woolley, J.C.; Lamarche, G.

    1994-01-01

    Results of Moessbauer spectroscopy for the chalcopyrite-type of alloys CuFe(S 1-z Se z ) 2 in the range of composition 0 ≤ z ≤ 0.45 are presented. Room temperature spectra show two contributions: one is a magnetic spectrum (six lines) with a value of the hyperfine field near to that of chalcopyrite (z = 0, in which an antiferromagnetic order occurs below T = 823 K), the other having only one line. The relative area of the single-line contribution increases as z increases. For z = 0.2, we also made Moessbauer measurements as a function of temperature. The ratio of the two contributions evolves according to a Boltzmann law, in which the single line corresponds to the excited state at 81 K above the antiferromagnetic ground state. (orig.)

  18. Porosity and Organic Carbon Controls on Naturally Reduced Zone (NRZ) Formation Creating Microbial ';Hotspots' for Fe, S, and U Cycling in Subsurface Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. E.; Janot, N.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have illustrated the importance of Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZs) within saturated sediments for the cycling of metals and redox sensitive contaminants. NRZs can provide a source of reducing equivalents such as reduced organic compounds or hydrogen to stimulate subsurface microbial communities. These NRZ's are typically characterized by low permeability and elevated concentrations of organic carbon and trace metals. However, both the formation of NRZs and their importance to the overall aquifer carbon remineralization is not fully understood. Within NRZs the hydrolysis of particulate organic carbon (POC) and subsequent fermentation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to form low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon (LMW-DOC) provides electron donors necessary for the respiration of Fe, S, and in the case of the Rifle aquifer, U. Rates of POC hydrolysis and subsequent fermentation have been poorly constrained and rates in excess and deficit to the rates of subsurface anaerobic respiratory processes have been suggested. In this study, we simulate the development of NRZ sediments in diffusion-limited aggregates to investigate the physical and chemical conditions required for NRZ formation. Effects of sediment porosity and POC loading on Fe, S, and U cycling on molecular and nanoscale are investigated with synchrotron-based Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are used to characterize the transformations in POC and DOC. Sediment aggregates are inoculated with the natural microbial biota from the Rifle aquifer and population dynamics are monitored by 16S RNA analysis. Overall, establishment of low permeability NRZs within the aquifer stimulate microbial respiration beyond the diffusion-limited zones and can limit the transport of U through a contaminated aquifer. However, the long-term stability of

  19. Identification of vital and dispensable sulfur utilization factors in the Plasmodium apicoplast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haussig, J.M.; Matuschewski, K.; Kooij, T.W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are ubiquitous and critical cofactors in diverse biochemical processes. They are assembled by distinct [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis pathways, typically in organelles of endosymbiotic origin. Apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria,

  20. The hybrid-cluster protein ('prismane protein') from Escherichia coli. Characterization of the hybrid-cluster protein, redox properties of the [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-2S-2O] clusters and identification of an associated NADH oxidoreductase containing FAD and[2Fe-2S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den W.A.M.; Hagen, W.R.; Dongen, van W.M.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid-cluster proteins ('prismane proteins') have previously been isolated and characterized from strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria. These proteins contain two types of Fe/S clusters unique in biological systems: a [4Fe-4S] cubane cluster with spin-admixed S = 3/2 ground-state

  1. Biochemistry of the normal dura mater of the human brain determination of water, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron, sulfur and nitrogen contents Estudo bioquímico da dura mater normal do cérebro humano: conteúdo de água, sódio, potássio, cálcio, fósforo, magnésio, cobre ferro, enxôfre e nitrogênio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio M. Canelas

    1969-06-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of water, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, iron, sulfur, and nitrogen were determined in samples of apparently normal dura mater removed from 18 subjects recently dead by craniocerebral trauma. The average concentrations expressed in dry weight were: water 79.55 g/100 g ± 2.52; sodium 1.63 mequiv/100 g ±0.27; potassium 3.68 mequiv/100 g ± 0.66; calcium 119.84 mg/100 g ± 107.40; phosphorus 68.2 mg/100 g ± 34.5; magnesium 0.61 mequiv/100 g ± 0.37; copper 249.8 /xg/100 g ± 109.4; iron 0.82 mg/100 g ± 0.28; sulfur 490.7 mg/100 g ± 22.5; nitrogen 3.33 g/100 g ± 0.17.Foram determinadas as concentrações de água, sódio, potássio, cálcio, fósforo, magnésio, cobre, ferro, enxôfre e nitrogênio de espécimes de dura máter aparentemente normal retirados de 18 indivíduos recentemente falecidos em conseqüência de traumatismo crânio-encefálico. As concentrações médias, expressas em peso seco, foram as seguintes: água 79,55 g/100 g ± 2,52; sódio 1,63 mequiv/100 g ± 0,27; potássio 3,68 mequiv/100 g ± 0,66; cálcio 119,84 mg/100 g ± 107,40; fósforo 68,2 mg/100 g ± 34,5; magnésio 0,61 mequiv/100 g ± 0,37; cobre 249,8 mg/100 ± 109,4; ferro 0,82 mg/100 g ± 0,28; enxôfre 490,7 mg/100 g ± 22,5; nitrogênio 3,33 g/100 g ± 0,17.

  2. First principles studies of electron tunneling in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    A first principles study of electronic tunneling along the chain of seven Fe/S clusters in respiratory complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain, is described. The broken-symmetry states of the Fe/S metal clusters calculated at both DFT and semi-empirical ZINDO levels were utilized to examine both the extremely weak electronic couplings between Fe/S clusters and the tunneling pathways, which provide a detailed atomistic-level description of the charge transfer process in the protein. One-electron tunneling approximation was found to hold within a reasonable accuracy, with only a moderate induced polarization of the core electrons. The method is demonstrated to be able to calculate accurately the coupling matrix elements as small as 10−4 cm−1. A distinct signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as quantum interferences of multiple tunneling pathways. PMID:25383312

  3. Biogeochemical Cycling of Fe, S, C, N, and Mo in the 3.2 Ga ocean: Constraints from DXCL-DP Black Shales from Pilbara, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, K. E.; Naraoka, H.; Ikehara, M.; Ito, T.; Kiyokawa, S.

    2014-12-01

    Records of geochemical cycling of bio-essential, redox-sensitive elements have keys to decipher mysteries of the co-evolution of Earth and life. To obtain insight into biogeochemical cycling of those elements and early evolution of microbial biosphere from high-quality samples, we drilled through Mesoarchean strata in coastal Pilbara (Dixon Island-Cleaverville Drilling Project, see Yamaguchi et al., 2009; Kiyokawa et al., 2012), and obtained 3.2 Ga old drillcores (CL1, CL2, and DX) of sulfide-rich black shales in the Cleaverville Group, Pilbara Supergroup. We conducted a systematic geochemical study involving sequential extractions of Fe, S, C, and N for phase-dependent contents (e.g., pyrite-Fe, reactive-Fe, highly reactive-Fe, unreactive-Fe, pyrite-S, sulfate-S, organic-S, elemental-S, Corg, Ccarb, Norg, and Nclay) and their stable isotope compositions, micro FT-IR and laser Raman spectroscopy for extracted kerogen, in addition to major and trace (redox-sensitive; e.g., Mo) element analysis, for >100 samples. Here we integrate our recent multidisciplinary investigations into the redox state of ocean and nature of microbial biosphere in the ocean 3.2 Ga ago. All of the obtained data are very difficult to explain only by geochemical processes in strictly anoxic environments, where both atmosphere and oceans were completely anoxic, like an environment before the inferred "Great Oxidation Event" when pO2 was lower than 0.00001 PAL (e.g., Holland, 1994). Our extensive data set consistently suggests that oxygenic photosynthesis, bacterial sulfate reduction, and microbially mediated redox-cycling of nitrogen, possibly involving denitrification and N2-fixation, are very likely to have been operating, and may be used as a strong evidence for at least local and temporal existence of oxidized environment as far back as 3.2 Ga ago. Modern-style biogeochemical cycling of Fe, S, C, N, and Mo has been operating since then. The atmosphere-hydrosphere system 3.2 Ga ago would have

  4. Fe-FeS2 adsorbent prepared with iron powder and pyrite by facile ball milling and its application for arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Xiaobo; Li, Yangwenjun; Ke, Yong; Shi, Meiqing; Chai, Liyuan; Xue, Ke

    2017-07-01

    Arsenic is one of the major pollutants and a worldwide concern because of its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. An adsorbent of Fe-FeS 2 mixture for effective arsenic removal was successfully prepared by mechanical ball milling. The products before and after arsenic adsorption were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorbent shows high arsenic removal efficiency when molar ratio of iron to pyrite is 5:5. The experimental data of As(III) adsorption are fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model with a maximal adsorption capacity of 101.123 mg/g. And As(V) data were described perfectly by the Freundlich model with a maximal adsorption capacity of 58.341 L/mg. As(III) is partial oxidized to As(V) during the adsorption process. High arsenic uptake capability and cost-effectiveness of waste make it potentially attractive for arsenic removal.

  5. PONDEROSA, an automated 3D-NOESY peak picking program, enables automated protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Kim, Jin Hae; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2011-06-15

    PONDEROSA (Peak-picking Of Noe Data Enabled by Restriction of Shift Assignments) accepts input information consisting of a protein sequence, backbone and sidechain NMR resonance assignments, and 3D-NOESY ((13)C-edited and/or (15)N-edited) spectra, and returns assignments of NOESY crosspeaks, distance and angle constraints, and a reliable NMR structure represented by a family of conformers. PONDEROSA incorporates and integrates external software packages (TALOS+, STRIDE and CYANA) to carry out different steps in the structure determination. PONDEROSA implements internal functions that identify and validate NOESY peak assignments and assess the quality of the calculated three-dimensional structure of the protein. The robustness of the analysis results from PONDEROSA's hierarchical processing steps that involve iterative interaction among the internal and external modules. PONDEROSA supports a variety of input formats: SPARKY assignment table (.shifts) and spectrum file formats (.ucsf), XEASY proton file format (.prot), and NMR-STAR format (.star). To demonstrate the utility of PONDEROSA, we used the package to determine 3D structures of two proteins: human ubiquitin and Escherichia coli iron-sulfur scaffold protein variant IscU(D39A). The automatically generated structural constraints and ensembles of conformers were as good as or better than those determined previously by much less automated means. The program, in the form of binary code along with tutorials and reference manuals, is available at http://ponderosa.nmrfam.wisc.edu/.

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis Repair of Iron Centres Proteins: The Different Role of Two Paralogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Lígia S; Meloni, Dionigia; Teixeira, Miguel; Viscogliosi, Eric; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative parasite of one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases is, so far, the only protozoan encoding two putative Repair of Iron Centres (RIC) proteins. Homologs of these proteins have been shown to protect bacteria from the chemical stress imposed by mammalian immunity. In this work, the biochemical and functional characterisation of the T. vaginalis RICs revealed that the two proteins have different properties. Expression of ric1 is induced by nitrosative stress but not by hydrogen peroxide, while ric2 transcription remained unaltered under similar conditions. T. vaginalis RIC1 contains a di-iron centre, but RIC2 apparently does not. Only RIC1 resembles bacterial RICs on spectroscopic profiling and repairing ability of oxidatively-damaged iron-sulfur clusters. Unexpectedly, RIC2 was found to bind DNA plasmid and T. vaginalis genomic DNA, a function proposed to be related with its leucine zipper domain. The two proteins also differ in their cellular localization: RIC1 is expressed in the cytoplasm only, and RIC2 occurs both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Therefore, we concluded that the two RIC paralogs have different roles in T. vaginalis, with RIC2 showing an unprecedented DNA binding ability when compared with all other until now studied RICs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-01

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications.Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been

  8. Cellular Assays for Ferredoxins: A Strategy for Understanding Electron Flow through Protein Carriers That Link Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Joshua T; Campbell, Ian; Bennett, George N; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2016-12-27

    The ferredoxin (Fd) protein family is a structurally diverse group of iron-sulfur proteins that function as electron carriers, linking biochemical pathways important for energy transduction, nutrient assimilation, and primary metabolism. While considerable biochemical information about individual Fd protein electron carriers and their reactions has been acquired, we cannot yet anticipate the proportion of electrons shuttled between different Fd-partner proteins within cells using biochemical parameters that govern electron flow, such as holo-Fd concentration, midpoint potential (driving force), molecular interactions (affinity and kinetics), conformational changes (allostery), and off-pathway electron leakage (chemical oxidation). Herein, we describe functional and structural gaps in our Fd knowledge within the context of a sequence similarity network and phylogenetic tree, and we propose a strategy for improving our understanding of Fd sequence-function relationships. We suggest comparing the functions of divergent Fds within cells whose growth, or other measurable output, requires electron transfer between defined electron donor and acceptor proteins. By comparing Fd-mediated electron transfer with biochemical parameters that govern electron flow, we posit that models that anticipate energy flow across Fd interactomes can be built. This approach is expected to transform our ability to anticipate Fd control over electron flow in cellular settings, an obstacle to the construction of synthetic electron transfer pathways and rational optimization of existing energy-conserving pathways.

  9. Key Amino Acids in the Bacterial (6-4) Photolyase PhrB from Agrobacterium fabrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Dominik; Wesslowski, Janine; Ma, Hongju; Scheerer, Patrick; Krauß, Norbert; Oberpichler, Inga; Zhang, Fan; Lamparter, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Photolyases can repair pyrimidine dimers on the DNA that are formed during UV irradiation. PhrB from Agrobacterium fabrum represents a new group of prokaryotic (6-4) photolyases which contain an iron-sulfur cluster and a DMRL chromophore. We performed site-directed mutagenesis in order to assess the role of particular amino acid residues in photorepair and photoreduction, during which the FAD chromophore converts from the oxidized to the enzymatically active, reduced form. Our study showed that Trp342 and Trp390 serve as electron transmitters. In the H366A mutant repair activity was lost, which points to a significant role of His366 in the protonation of the lesion, as discussed for the homolog in eukaryotic (6-4) photolyases. Mutants on cysteines that coordinate the Fe-S cluster of PhrB were either insoluble or not expressed. The same result was found for proteins with a truncated C-terminus, in which one of the Fe-S binding cysteines was mutated and for expression in minimal medium with limited Fe concentrations. We therefore assume that the Fe-S cluster is required for protein stability. We further mutated conserved tyrosines that are located between the DNA lesion and the Fe-S cluster. Mutagenesis results showed that Tyr424 was essential for lesion binding and repair, and Tyr430 was required for efficient repair. The results point to an important function of highly conserved tyrosines in prokaryotic (6-4) photolyases.

  10. Key Amino Acids in the Bacterial (6-4 Photolyase PhrB from Agrobacterium fabrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Graf

    Full Text Available Photolyases can repair pyrimidine dimers on the DNA that are formed during UV irradiation. PhrB from Agrobacterium fabrum represents a new group of prokaryotic (6-4 photolyases which contain an iron-sulfur cluster and a DMRL chromophore. We performed site-directed mutagenesis in order to assess the role of particular amino acid residues in photorepair and photoreduction, during which the FAD chromophore converts from the oxidized to the enzymatically active, reduced form. Our study showed that Trp342 and Trp390 serve as electron transmitters. In the H366A mutant repair activity was lost, which points to a significant role of His366 in the protonation of the lesion, as discussed for the homolog in eukaryotic (6-4 photolyases. Mutants on cysteines that coordinate the Fe-S cluster of PhrB were either insoluble or not expressed. The same result was found for proteins with a truncated C-terminus, in which one of the Fe-S binding cysteines was mutated and for expression in minimal medium with limited Fe concentrations. We therefore assume that the Fe-S cluster is required for protein stability. We further mutated conserved tyrosines that are located between the DNA lesion and the Fe-S cluster. Mutagenesis results showed that Tyr424 was essential for lesion binding and repair, and Tyr430 was required for efficient repair. The results point to an important function of highly conserved tyrosines in prokaryotic (6-4 photolyases.

  11. FeS2-doped MoS2 nanoflower with the dominant 1T-MoS2 phase as an excellent electrocatalyst for high-performance hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xue; Ma, Xiao; Lu, Qingqing; Li, Qun; Han, Ce; Xing, Zhicai; Yang, Xiurong

    2017-01-01

    Well-established methods to improve the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performances include, but are not limited to, tailoring the morphology and electronic structure of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and doping of earth abundant chemicals such as iron pyrite FeS 2 into existing TMDs. In this work, MoS 2 nanoflowers with the majority being octahedral MoS 2 (1T-MoS 2 ) and doped with FeS 2 were prepared and applied to HER. The as-prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray absorption fine structure at the K-edge of Mo, S, and Fe to probe the local electronic structures. The resulting nanomaterial was identified to be FeS 2 doped MoS 2 nanoflower (denoted as Fe-MoS 2 NF) with 66% 1T-MoS 2 which was the metallic phase and could drastically boost the HER properties. The Fe-MoS 2 NF exhibited high HER performance with a Tafel slope of 82 mV dec −1 and it needs 136 mV to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm −2 . The synthesis of Fe-MoS 2 NF with refined morphology and active electronic structure is expected to open a new era for improving the catalytic activity and stability of MoS 2 .

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of Chloroplast Proteins via Random Mutagenesis Using Error-Prone PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Louis; Zito, Francesca; Auroy, Pascaline; Johnson, Xenie; Peltier, Gilles; Alric, Jean

    2018-06-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of chloroplast genes was developed three decades ago and has greatly advanced the field of photosynthesis research. Here, we describe a new approach for generating random chloroplast gene mutants that combines error-prone polymerase chain reaction of a gene of interest with chloroplast complementation of the knockout Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant. As a proof of concept, we targeted a 300-bp sequence of the petD gene that encodes subunit IV of the thylakoid membrane-bound cytochrome b 6 f complex. By sequencing chloroplast transformants, we revealed 149 mutations in the 300-bp target petD sequence that resulted in 92 amino acid substitutions in the 100-residue target subunit IV sequence. Our results show that this method is suited to the study of highly hydrophobic, multisubunit, and chloroplast-encoded proteins containing cofactors such as hemes, iron-sulfur clusters, and chlorophyll pigments. Moreover, we show that mutant screening and sequencing can be used to study photosynthetic mechanisms or to probe the mutational robustness of chloroplast-encoded proteins, and we propose that this method is a valuable tool for the directed evolution of enzymes in the chloroplast. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Three Pseudomonas putida FNR Family Proteins with Different Sensitivities to O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Susan A; Crack, Jason C; Rolfe, Matthew D; Borrero-de Acuña, José Manuel; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E; Schobert, Max; Stapleton, Melanie R; Green, Jeffrey

    2015-07-03

    The Escherichia coli fumarate-nitrate reduction regulator (FNR) protein is the paradigm for bacterial O2-sensing transcription factors. However, unlike E. coli, some bacterial species possess multiple FNR proteins that presumably have evolved to fulfill distinct roles. Here, three FNR proteins (ANR, PP_3233, and PP_3287) from a single bacterial species, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, have been analyzed. Under anaerobic conditions, all three proteins had spectral properties resembling those of [4Fe-4S] proteins. The reactivity of the ANR [4Fe-4S] cluster with O2 was similar to that of E. coli FNR, and during conversion to the apo-protein, via a [2Fe-2S] intermediate, cluster sulfur was retained. Like ANR, reconstituted PP_3233 and PP_3287 were converted to [2Fe-2S] forms when exposed to O2, but their [4Fe-4S] clusters reacted more slowly. Transcription from an FNR-dependent promoter with a consensus FNR-binding site in P. putida and E. coli strains expressing only one FNR protein was consistent with the in vitro responses to O2. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that the local environments of the iron-sulfur clusters in the different P. putida FNR proteins influence their reactivity with O2, such that ANR resembles E. coli FNR and is highly responsive to low concentrations of O2, whereas PP_3233 and PP_3287 have evolved to be less sensitive to O2. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqi Li

    Full Text Available Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57 would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator, member 5 (SLC25A5 and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF. In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation.

  15. Proteomics-based identification of midgut proteins correlated with Cry1Ac resistance in Plutella xylostella (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jixing; Guo, Zhaojiang; Yang, Zezhong; Zhu, Xun; Kang, Shi; Yang, Xin; Yang, Fengshan; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Xu, Weijun; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-09-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is a worldwide pest of cruciferous crops and can rapidly develop resistance to many chemical insecticides. Although insecticidal crystal proteins (i.e., Cry and Cyt toxins) derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been useful alternatives to chemical insecticides for the control of P. xylostella, resistance to Bt in field populations of P. xylostella has already been reported. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms to Bt should be valuable in delaying resistance development. In this study, the mechanisms underlying P. xylostella resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin were investigated using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and ligand blotting for the first time. Comparative analyses of the constitutive expression of midgut proteins in Cry1Ac-susceptible and -resistant P. xylostella larvae revealed 31 differentially expressed proteins, 21 of which were identified by mass spectrometry. Of these identified proteins, the following fell into diverse eukaryotic orthologous group (KOG) subcategories may be involved in Cry1Ac resistance in P. xylostella: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily G member 4 (ABCG4), trypsin, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, actin, glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor attachment 1 protein (GAA1) and solute carrier family 30 member 1 (SLC30A1). Additionally, ligand blotting identified the following midgut proteins as Cry1Ac-binding proteins in Cry1Ac-susceptible P. xylostella larvae: ABC transporter subfamily C member 1 (ABCC1), solute carrier family 36 member 1 (SLC36A1), NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein 3 (NDUFS3), prohibitin and Rap1 GTPase-activating protein 1. Collectively, these proteomic results increase our understanding of the molecular resistance mechanisms to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in P. xylostella and also demonstrate that resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin is complex and multifaceted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  16. PIXE analysis of proteins from a photochemical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, C.; Oliver, A.; Andrade, E.

    1998-03-01

    In oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms, light is absorbed and its energy used for the conversion of chemical products in two photosystems: PSI and PSII. Each photosystem is composed of a protein core which binds a pigment antenna and a Reaction Center (RC). RC of PSI is considered an "Iron-Sulfur" type. There are six components that participate in the charge separation after light absorption occurs in PSI: the center chlorophyll P700, two acceptors A 0 and A 1 and three FeS centers F X, F A and F B. However, the exact number of polypeptides, their exact molecular weight, their relative abundances and the active components associated to those polypeptides remain still to be completely characterized. In particular the FeS centers have been difficult to detect in a direct way in a gel band, because the amount of centers involved is under the detection limits of the conventional techniques. This study has been under-taken to explore the capability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to detect in a qualitative way the presence of Fe in some of the protein bands obtained by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) from the PSI complex. The complex was isolated from membranes of thermophilic cyanobacteria: Synechochoccus sp. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the complex shows eight subunits of 66, 60-65, 14, 13, 9, 8 and 7 KDa. In-air PIXE was performed at 2 MeV and proved to be an adequate tool for direct identification of the iron present in the gel bands.

  17. Rates of proton transfer to Fe-S-based clusters: comparison of clusters containing {MFe(mu(2)-S)(2)}n+ and {MFe(3)(mu(3)-S)(4)}n+ (M = Fe, Mo, or W) cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Katie; Garrett, Brendan; Henderson, Richard A

    2007-12-24

    The rates of proton transfer from [pyrH]+ (pyr = pyrrolidine) to the binuclear complexes [Fe2S2Cl4]2- and [S2MS2FeCl2]2- (M = Mo or W) are reported. The reactions were studied using stopped-flow spectrophotometry, and the rate constants for proton transfer were determined from analysis of the kinetics of the substitution reactions of these clusters with the nucleophiles Br- or PhS- in the presence of [pyrH]+. In general, Br- is a poor nucleophile for these clusters, and proton transfer occurs before Br- binds, allowing direct measure of the rate of proton transfer from [pyrH]+ to the cluster. In contrast, PhS- is a better nucleophile, and a pathway in which PhS- binds preferentially to the cluster prior to proton transfer from [pyrH]+ usually operates. For the reaction of [Fe2S2Cl4]2- with PhS- in the presence of [pyrH]+ both pathways are observed. Comparison of the results presented in this paper with analogous studies reported earlier on cuboidal Fe-S-based clusters allows discussion of the factors which affect the rates of proton transfer in synthetic clusters including the nuclearity of the cluster core, the metal composition, and the nature of the terminal ligands. The possible relevance of these findings to the protonation sites of natural Fe-S-based clusters, including FeMo-cofactor from nitrogenase, are presented.

  18. Quinone exchange at the A{sub 1} site in photosystem I [PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkoff, A.; Brunkan, N.; Snyder, S.W.; Ostafin, A.; Werst, M.; Thurnauer, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Biggins, J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Quinones play an essential role in light-induced electron transport in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC). Study of quinone binding within the protein matrix of the RC is a focal point of understanding the biological optimization of photosynthesis. In plant and cyanobacterial PSI, phylloquinone (K{sub 1}) is believed to be the secondary electron acceptor, A{sub 1}, similar to Q{sub a} in the purple bacterial RC. Photoinduced electron transfer is initiated by reduction of the electron acceptor (A{sub 0}), a chlorophyll species, by the photoexcited primary donor *P{sub 700}. A{sub 1} acts as a transient redox intermediate between A{sub 0} and the iron-sulfur centers (FeS). We have examined the characteristic PSI electron spin polarized (ESP) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal as a marker of the interacting radical pairs developed during electron transfer.

  19. Mechanisms of iron sensing and regulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Perea-García, Ana; Puig, Sergi

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a redox active element that functions as an essential cofactor in multiple metabolic pathways, including respiration, DNA synthesis and translation. While indispensable for eukaryotic life, excess iron can lead to oxidative damage of macromolecules. Therefore, living organisms have developed sophisticated strategies to optimally regulate iron acquisition, storage and utilization in response to fluctuations in environmental iron bioavailability. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription factors Aft1/Aft2 and Yap5 regulate iron metabolism in response to low and high iron levels, respectively. In addition to producing and assembling iron cofactors, mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster biogenesis has emerged as a central player in iron sensing. A mitochondrial signal derived from Fe/S synthesis is exported and converted into an Fe/S cluster that interacts directly with Aft1/Aft2 and Yap5 proteins to regulate their transcriptional function. Various conserved proteins, such as ABC mitochondrial transporter Atm1 and, for Aft1/Aft2, monothiol glutaredoxins Grx3 and Grx4 are implicated in this iron-signaling pathway. The analysis of a wide range of S. cerevisiae strains of different geographical origins and sources has shown that yeast strains adapted to high iron display growth defects under iron-deficient conditions, and highlighted connections that exist in the response to both opposite conditions. Changes in iron accumulation and gene expression profiles suggest differences in the regulation of iron homeostasis genes.

  20. Novel Functions of an Iron-Sulfur Flavoprotein from Trichomonas vaginalis Hydrogenosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smutná, T.; Pilařová, K.; Tarábek, Ján; Tachezy, J.; Hrdý, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2014), s. 3224-3232 ISSN 0066-4804 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GC13-09208J Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Methanosarcina thermophila * nitric oxide * Trichomonas vaginalis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.476, year: 2014

  1. Stabilization of Reduced Molybdenum-Iron-Sulfur Single and Double Cubane Clusters by Cyanide Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Russell P.; Berlinguette, Curtis P.; Holm, R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work has shown that cyanide ligation increases the redox potentials of Fe4S4 clusters, enabling the isolation of [Fe4S4(CN)4]4−, the first synthetic Fe4S4 cluster obtained in the all-ferrous oxidation state (Scott, T. A.; Berlinguette, C. P.; Holm, R. H.; Zhou, H.-C., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2005, 102, 9741). The generality of reduced cluster stabilization has been examined with MoFe3S4 clusters. Reaction of single cubane [(Tp)MoFe3S4(PEt3)3]1+ and edge-bridged double cubane [(Tp)2Mo2Fe6S8(PEt3)4] with cyanide in acetonitrile affords [(Tp)MoFe3S4(CN)3]2− (2) and [(Tp)2Mo2Fe6S8(CN)4]4− (5), respectively. Reduction of 2 with KC14H10 yields [(Tp)MoFe3S4(CN)3]3− (3). Clusters were isolated in ca. 70–90% yields as Et4N+ or Bu4N+ salts; Clusters 3 and 5 contain all-ferrous cores; 3 is the first [MoFe3S4]1+ cluster isolated in substance. The structures of 2 and 3 are very similar; the volume of the reduced cluster core is slightly larger (2.5%), a usual effect upon reduction of cubane-type Fe4S4 and MFe3S4 clusters. Redox potentials and 57Fe isomer shifts of [(Tp)MoFe3S4L3]2−,3 and [(Tp)2Mo2Fe6S8L4]4−,3− clusters with L = CN, PhS, halide, and PEt3 are compared. Clusters with π-donor ligands (L = halide, PhS) exhibit larger isomer shifts and lower (more negative) redox potentials while π-acceptor ligands (L = CN, PEt3) induce smaller isomer shifts and higher (less negative) redox potentials. When potentials of 3/2 and [(Tp)MoFe3S4(SPh)3]3−/2− are compared, cyanide stabilizes 3 by 270 mV vs. the reduced thiolate cluster, commensurate with the 310 mV stabilization of [Fe4S4(CN)4]4− vs. [Fe4S4(SPh)4]4− where four ligands differ. These results demonstrate the efficacy of cyanide stabilization of lower cluster oxidation states. (Tp = hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate(1−)). PMID:17279830

  2. Stabilization of reduced molybdenum-iron-sulfur single- and double-cubane clusters by cyanide ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Russell P; Berlinguette, Curtis P; Holm, R H

    2007-01-22

    Recent work has shown that cyanide ligation increases the redox potentials of Fe(4)S(4) clusters, enabling the isolation of [Fe(4)S(4)(CN)4]4-, the first synthetic Fe(4)S(4) cluster obtained in the all-ferrous oxidation state (Scott, T. A.; Berlinguette, C. P.; Holm, R. H.; Zhou, H.-C. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2005, 102, 9741). The generality of reduced cluster stabilization has been examined with MoFe(3)S(4) clusters. Reaction of single-cubane [(Tp)MoFe(3)S(4)(PEt(3))3]1+ and edge-bridged double-cubane [(Tp)2Mo(2)Fe(6)S(8)(PEt(3))4] with cyanide in acetonitrile affords [(Tp)MoFe(3)S(4)(CN)3]2- (2) and [(Tp)2Mo(2)Fe(6)S(8)(CN)4]4- (5), respectively. Reduction of 2 with KC(14)H(10) yields [(Tp)MoFe(3)S(4)(CN)3]3- (3). Clusters were isolated in approximately 70-90% yields as Et(4)N+ or Bu(4)N+ salts; clusters 3 and 5 contain all-ferrous cores, and 3 is the first [MoFe(3)S(4)]1+ cluster isolated in substance. The structures of 2 and 3 are very similar; the volume of the reduced cluster core is slightly larger (2.5%), a usual effect upon reduction of cubane-type Fe(4)S(4) and MFe(3)S(4) clusters. Redox potentials and 57Fe isomer shifts of [(Tp)MoFe(3)S(4)L3]2-,3- and [(Tp)2Mo(2)Fe(6)S(8)L(4)]4-,3- clusters with L = CN-, PhS-, halide, and PEt3 are compared. Clusters with pi-donor ligands (L = halide, PhS) exhibit larger isomer shifts and lower (more negative) redox potentials, while pi-acceptor ligands (L = CN, PEt3) induce smaller isomer shifts and higher (less-negative) redox potentials. When the potentials of 3/2 and [(Tp)MoFe(3)S(4)(SPh)3]3-/2- are compared, cyanide stabilizes 3 by 270 mV versus the reduced thiolate cluster, commensurate with the 310 mV stabilization of [Fe(4)S(4)(CN)4]4- versus [Fe(4)S(4)(SPh)4]4- where four ligands differ. These results demonstrate the efficacy of cyanide stabilization of lower cluster oxidation states. (Tp = hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate(1-)).

  3. X-ray diffraction study of chalcopyrite CuFeS2, pentlandite (Fe,Ni)9S8 and Pyrrhotite Fe1-xS obtained from Cu-Ni orebodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkoma, J.S.; Ekosse, G.

    1998-05-01

    The X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique is applied to study five samples of Cu-Ni orebodies, and it is shown that they contain chalcopyrite CuFeS 2 as the source of Cu, pentlandite (Fe,Ni) 9 S 8 as the source of Ni and pyrrhotite Fe 1-x S as a dominant compound. There are also other less dominant compounds such as bunsenite NiO, chalcocite Cu 2 S, penrosite (Ni, Cu)Se 2 and magnetite Fe 3 O 4 . Using the obtained XRD data, we obtain the lattice parameters for tetragonal chalcopyrite as a=b=5.3069A and c=10.3836A, cubic pentlandite as a=b=c=10.0487A, and hexagonal pyrrhotite as a=b=6.8820A and c=22.8037A. (author)

  4. La mitocondria como fábrica de cofactores: biosíntesis de grupo hemo, centros Fe-S y nucleótidos de flavina (FMN/FAD)

    OpenAIRE

    Alexa Villavicencio-Queijeiro

    2012-01-01

    Los cofactores hemo, centros Fe-S y los nucleótidos de flavina (FMN y FAD) son esenciales para muchos organismos, existen un gran número de proteínas que dependen de ellos para llevar a cabo sus funciones biológicas. Estos cofactores han sido reconocidos como esenciales para las reacciones de óxido-reducción, pero también están involucrados en otros procesos celulares como la catálisis química, la regulación, la señalización y la detección de señales intra y extra celulares. Diversos grupos d...

  5. Transformations of the FeS Clusters of the Methylthiotransferases MiaB and RimO, Detected by Direct Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The methylthiotransferases (MTTases) represent a subfamily of the S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) radical superfamily of enzymes that catalyze the attachment of a methylthioether (-SCH3) moiety on unactivated carbon centers. These enzymes contain two [4Fe-4S] clusters, one of which participates in the reductive fragmentation of AdoMet to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl 5′-radical and the other of which, termed the auxiliary cluster, is believed to play a central role in constructing the methylthio group and attaching it to the substrate. Because the redox properties of the bound cofactors within the AdoMet radical superfamily are so poorly understood, we have examined two MTTases in parallel, MiaB and RimO, using protein electrochemistry. We resolve the redox potentials of each [4Fe-4S] cluster, show that the auxiliary cluster has a potential higher than that of the AdoMet-binding cluster, and demonstrate that upon incubation of either enzyme with AdoMet, a unique low-potential state of the enzyme emerges. Our results are consistent with a mechanism whereby the auxiliary cluster is transiently methylated during substrate methylthiolation. PMID:27598886

  6. Linear ion-trap mass spectrometric characterization of human pituitary nitrotyrosine-containing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianquan; Desiderio, Dominic M.

    2007-01-01

    The nitric oxide-mediated Tyr-nitration of endogenous proteins is associated with several pathological and physiological processes. In order to investigate the presence - and potential roles - of Tyr-nitration in the human pituitary, a large-format two-dimensional gel separation plus a Western blot against a specific anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody were used to separate and detect nitroproteins from a human pituitary proteome. The nitroproteins were subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion, and high-sensitivity vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (vMALDI) linear ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry was used to analyze the tryptic peptides. Those MS/MS data were used to determine the amino acid sequence and the specific nitration site of each tryptic nitropeptide, and were matched to corresponding proteins with Bioworks TuboSEQUEST software. Compared to our previous study, 16 new nitrotyrosine-immunoreactive positive Western blot spots were found within the area pI 3.0-10 and Mr 10-100 kDa. Four new nitroproteins were discovered: the stanniocalcin 1 precursor--involved in calcium and phosphate metabolism; mitochondrial co-chaperone protein HscB, which might act as a co-chaperone in iron-sulfur cluster assembly in mitochrondria; progestin and adipoQ receptor family member III--a seven-transmembrane receptor; proteasome subunit alpha type 2--involved in an ATP/ubiquitin-dependent non-lysosomal proteolytic pathway. Those data demonstrate that nitric oxide-mediated Tyr-nitration might participate in various biochemical, metabolic, and pathological processes in the human pituitary.

  7. [Structure and evolution of the eukaryotic FANCJ-like proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhe, Jike; Zefeng, Wu; Sanhong, Fan; Xuguang, Xi

    2015-02-01

    The FANCJ-like protein family is a class of ATP-dependent helicases that can catalytically unwind duplex DNA along the 5'-3' direction. It is involved in the processes of DNA damage repair, homologous recombination and G-quadruplex DNA unwinding, and plays a critical role in maintaining genome integrity. In this study, we systemically analyzed FNACJ-like proteins from 47 eukaryotic species and discussed their sequences diversity, origin and evolution, motif organization patterns and spatial structure differences. Four members of FNACJ-like proteins, including XPD, CHL1, RTEL1 and FANCJ, were found in eukaryotes, but some of them were seriously deficient in most fungi and some insects. For example, the Zygomycota fungi lost RTEL1, Basidiomycota and Ascomycota fungi lost RTEL1 and FANCJ, and Diptera insect lost FANCJ. FANCJ-like proteins contain canonical motor domains HD1 and HD2, and the HD1 domain further integrates with three unique domains Fe-S, Arch and Extra-D. Fe-S and Arch domains are relatively conservative in all members of the family, but the Extra-D domain is lost in XPD and differs from one another in rest members. There are 7, 10 and 2 specific motifs found from the three unique domains respectively, while 5 and 12 specific motifs are found from HD1 and HD2 domains except the conserved motifs reported previously. By analyzing the arrangement pattern of these specific motifs, we found that RTEL1 and FANCJ are more closer and share two specific motifs Vb2 and Vc in HD2 domain, which are likely related with their G-quadruplex DNA unwinding activity. The evidence of evolution showed that FACNJ-like proteins were originated from a helicase, which has a HD1 domain inserted by extra Fe-S domain and Arch domain. By three continuous gene duplication events and followed specialization, eukaryotes finally possessed the current four members of FANCJ-like proteins.

  8. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  9. Proteolytic cleavage orchestrates cofactor insertion and protein assembly in [NiFe]-hydrogenase biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Moritz; Stripp, Sven T; Soboh, Basem

    2017-07-14

    Metalloenzymes catalyze complex and essential processes, such as photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrogen fixation. For example, bacteria and archaea use [NiFe]-hydrogenases to catalyze the uptake and release of molecular hydrogen (H 2 ). [NiFe]-hydrogenases are redox enzymes composed of a large subunit that harbors a NiFe(CN) 2 CO metallo-center and a small subunit with three iron-sulfur clusters. The large subunit is synthesized with a C-terminal extension, cleaved off by a specific endopeptidase during maturation. The exact role of the C-terminal extension has remained elusive; however, cleavage takes place exclusively after assembly of the [NiFe]-cofactor and before large and small subunits form the catalytically active heterodimer. To unravel the functional role of the C-terminal extension, we used an enzymatic in vitro maturation assay that allows synthesizing functional [NiFe]-hydrogenase-2 of Escherichia coli from purified components. The maturation process included formation and insertion of the NiFe(CN) 2 CO cofactor into the large subunit, endoproteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal extension, and dimerization with the small subunit. Biochemical and spectroscopic analysis indicated that the C-terminal extension of the large subunit is essential for recognition by the maturation machinery. Only upon completion of cofactor insertion was removal of the C-terminal extension observed. Our results indicate that endoproteolytic cleavage is a central checkpoint in the maturation process. Here, cleavage temporally orchestrates cofactor insertion and protein assembly and ensures that only cofactor-containing protein can continue along the assembly line toward functional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. La mitocondria como fábrica de cofactores: biosíntesis de grupo hemo, centros Fe-S y nucleótidos de flavina (FMN/FAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Villavicencio-Queijeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los cofactores hemo, centros Fe-S y los nucleótidos de flavina (FMN y FAD son esenciales para muchos organismos, existen un gran número de proteínas que dependen de ellos para llevar a cabo sus funciones biológicas. Estos cofactores han sido reconocidos como esenciales para las reacciones de óxido-reducción, pero también están involucrados en otros procesos celulares como la catálisis química, la regulación, la señalización y la detección de señales intra y extra celulares. Diversos grupos de investigación han contribuido al establecimiento de las rutas bioquímicas por las que se sintetizan estos cofactores, así como a la forma en que se transportan y regulan en los diferentes organismos. Todo este conocimiento ha permitido asociar algunas enfermedades con defectos metabólicos en estas rutas de biosíntesis, así como plantear nuevas estrategias terapéuticas y algunas aplicaciones biotecnológicas.

  11. Disease: H00898 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ice mutation in the iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein ISCU causes myopathy with exercise intolerance. ... JOURNAL ... Am J Hum Genet 82:652-60 (2008) DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2007.12.012

  12. MET18 Deficiency Increases the Sensitivity of Yeast to Oxidative Stress and Shortens Replicative Lifespan by Inhibiting Catalase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Qin; Liu, Xin-Guang; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Hongjing; Ruan, Jie; Yuan, Yuan; Tu, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    Yeast MET18 , a subunit of the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein assembly (CIA) machinery which is responsible for the maturation of Fe/S proteins, has been reported to participate in the oxidative stress response. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we constructed a MET18/met18Δ heterozygous mutant yeast strain and found that MET18 deficiency in yeast cells impaired oxidative stress resistance as evidenced by increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP). Mechanistically, the mRNA levels of catalase A (CTA1) and catalase T (CTT1) as well as the total catalase activity were significantly reduced in MET18 -deficient cells. In contrast, overexpression of CTT1 or CTA1 in MET18 -deficient cells significantly increased the intracellular catalase activity and enhanced the resistance ability against H 2 O 2 and CHP. In addition, MET18 deficiency diminished the replicative capacity of yeast cells as evidenced by the shortened replicative lifespan, which can be restored by CTT1 overexpression, but not by CTA1 , in the MET18 -deficient cells. These results suggest that MET18 , in a catalase-dependent manner, plays an essential role in enhancing the resistance of yeast cells to oxidative stress and increasing the replicative capacity of yeast cells.

  13. A cascade of iron-containing proteins governs the genetic iron starvation response to promote iron uptake and inhibit iron storage in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Encinar del Dedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor, but it is also toxic at high levels. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sensor glutaredoxin Grx4 guides the activity of the repressors Php4 and Fep1 to mediate a complex transcriptional response to iron deprivation: activation of Php4 and inactivation of Fep1 leads to inhibition of iron usage/storage, and to promotion of iron import, respectively. However, the molecular events ruling the activity of this double-branched pathway remained elusive. We show here that Grx4 incorporates a glutathione-containing iron-sulfur cluster, alone or forming a heterodimer with the BolA-like protein Fra2. Our genetic study demonstrates that Grx4-Fra2, but not Fep1 nor Php4, participates not only in iron starvation signaling but also in iron-related aerobic metabolism. Iron-containing Grx4 binds and inactivates the Php4 repressor; upon iron deprivation, the cluster in Grx4 is probably disassembled, the proteins dissociate, and Php4 accumulates at the nucleus and represses iron consumption genes. Fep1 is also an iron-containing protein, and the tightly bound iron is required for transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that the cluster-containing Grx4-Fra2 heterodimer constitutively binds to Fep1, and upon iron deprivation the disassembly of the iron cluster between Grx4 and Fra2 promotes reverse metal transfer from Fep1 to Grx4-Fra2, and de-repression of iron-import genes. Our genetic and biochemical study demonstrates that the glutaredoxin Grx4 independently governs the Php4 and Fep1 repressors through metal transfer. Whereas iron loss from Grx4 seems to be sufficient to release Php4 and allow its nuclear accumulation, total or partial disassembly of the Grx4-Fra2 cluster actively participates in iron-containing Fep1 activation by sequestering its iron and decreasing its interaction with promoters.

  14. Observations concerning the quinol oxidation site of the cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Edward A.; Huang, Li-Shar

    2003-09-07

    A direct hydrogen bond between ubiquinone/quinol bound at the QO site and a cluster-ligand histidine of the iron-sulfur protein (ISP) is described as a major determining factor explaining much experimental data on position of the ISP ectodomain, EPR lineshape and midpoint potential of the iron-sulfur cluster, and the mechanism of the bifurcated electron transfer from ubiquinol to the high and low potential chains of the bc1 complex.

  15. Functional Complementation Studies Reveal Different Interaction Partners of Escherichia coli IscS and Human NFS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühning, Martin; Friemel, Martin; Leimkühler, Silke

    2017-08-29

    The trafficking and delivery of sulfur to cofactors and nucleosides is a highly regulated and conserved process among all organisms. All sulfur transfer pathways generally have an l-cysteine desulfurase as an initial sulfur-mobilizing enzyme in common, which serves as a sulfur donor for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules like iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters, thiamine, biotin, lipoic acid, the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), and thiolated nucleosides in tRNA. The human l-cysteine desulfurase NFS1 and the Escherichia coli homologue IscS share a level of amino acid sequence identity of ∼60%. While E. coli IscS has a versatile role in the cell and was shown to have numerous interaction partners, NFS1 is mainly localized in mitochondria with a crucial role in the biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters. Additionally, NFS1 is also located in smaller amounts in the cytosol with a role in Moco biosynthesis and mcm 5 s 2 U34 thio modifications of nucleosides in tRNA. NFS1 and IscS were conclusively shown to have different interaction partners in their respective organisms. Here, we used functional complementation studies of an E. coli iscS deletion strain with human NFS1 to dissect their conserved roles in the transfer of sulfur to a specific target protein. Our results show that human NFS1 and E. coli IscS share conserved binding sites for proteins involved in Fe-S cluster assembly like IscU, but not with proteins for tRNA thio modifications or Moco biosynthesis. In addition, we show that human NFS1 was almost fully able to complement the role of IscS in Moco biosynthesis when its specific interaction partner protein MOCS3 from humans was also present.

  16. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trey K Sato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3, a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK signaling (HOG1, a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA signaling (IRA2, and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster biogenesis (ISU1. Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  17. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Trey K; Tremaine, Mary; Parreiras, Lucas S; Hebert, Alexander S; Myers, Kevin S; Higbee, Alan J; Sardi, Maria; McIlwain, Sean J; Ong, Irene M; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; McGee, Mick A; Dickinson, Quinn; La Reau, Alex; Xie, Dan; Tian, Mingyuan; Reed, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P; Landick, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  18. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitrosylation of Nitric-Oxide-Sensing Regulatory Proteins Containing [4Fe-4S] Clusters Gives Rise to Multiple Iron-Nitrosyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Pauline N. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Wang, Hongxin [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Crack, Jason C. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Prior, Christopher [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Hutchings, Matthew I. [School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Thomson, Andrew J. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Kamali, Saeed [University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahome TN 37388-9700 USA; Yoda, Yoshitaka [Research and Utilization Division, SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo Hyogo 679-5198 Japan; Zhao, Jiyong [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Hu, Michael Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Alp, Ercan E. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Oganesyan, Vasily S. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Le Brun, Nick E. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Cramer, Stephen P. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA

    2016-10-25

    The reaction of protein-bound iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters with nitric oxide (NO) plays key roles in NO-mediated toxicity and signaling. Elucidation of the mechanism of the reaction of NO with DNA regulatory proteins that contain Fe-S clusters has been hampered by a lack of information about the nature of the iron-nitrosyl products formed. Herein, we report nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations that identify NO reaction products in WhiD and NsrR, regulatory proteins that use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to sense NO. This work reveals that nitrosylation yields multiple products structurally related to Roussin's Red Ester (RRE, [Fe2(NO)4(Cys)2]) and Roussin's Black Salt (RBS, [Fe4(NO)7S3]. In the latter case, the absence of 32S/34S shifts in the Fe-S region of the NRVS spectra suggest that a new species, Roussin's Black Ester (RBE), may be formed, in which one or more of the sulfide ligands is replaced by Cys thiolates.

  20. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  1. Iron, Sulfur, Arsenic and Water: Geochemical Implications of Facultative Anoxygenic Photosynthesis in Cyanobacteria and the Slow Rise of Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Johnston, D. T.; Girguis, P. R.; Pearson, A.; Knoll, A. H.

    2008-12-01

    Over geologic time, the global rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) is attributed to the evolution and wide spread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. Specifically, cyanobacteria can use a variety of alternative electron donors, rather than water, that are also readily oxidized. These may include sulfur, iron, and arsenic. Cyanobacteria are thus not uniquely constrained towards O2 production. Changes in the bioavailability of these key elements may have had dramatic consequences for and resulted in the slow accumulation of O2 in the atmosphere. In particular, by using facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis the cells maintain advantageous anaerobic conditions for N2-fixation. Although other types of bacteria are capable of N2-fixation, cyanobacteria singularly possess the dynamic capability of generating and surviving O2. These two processes "pull" the cells in opposite directions, metabolically speaking, around an aerobic-anaerobic continuum. Such a strategy also confers a distinct competitive advantage for cyanobacteria over photosynthetic eukaryotes, as they can endure widespread euxinia and maintain their cellular N quota. In an anoxic and/or sulfidic ocean, cyanobacteria would be expected to dominate over eukaryotic algae. Here we present Bayesian constructed phylogenetic distribution of specific genes and the metabolic role of key enzymes that form the basis of this hypothesis. We further suggest that the consequences of this proposed ecosystem structure altered the redox balance of the fluid Earth (atmosphere and oceans) and can help explain the observed long-term geochemical stasis and slow rates of eukaryotic diversification. We suggest that the underlying control for global oxygenation was a synergistic interplay between the evolution and elastic physiology of cyanobacteria as they impacted the redox state of early Earth.

  2. Synthesis and photochemical properties of a novel iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster derivatized with the pendant chromophore protoporphyrin IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrado, Christa L; Wecksler, Stephen; Egler, Christian; Magde, Douglas; Ford, Peter C

    2004-09-06

    The novel Roussin red-salt ester (PPIX-RSE) with a pendant porphyrin chromophore was prepared and investigated as a precursor for the photochemical generation of nitric oxide. PPIX-RSE has the general formula Fe(2)(NO)(4)[(mu-S,mu-S')P] (where (S,S')P is the bis(2-thiolatoethyl) diester of protoporphyrin IX. The photoexcitation of PPIX-RSE with 436- or 546-nm light in an aerated chloroform solution led to the photodecomposition of the cluster with the respective quantum yields (5.2 +/- 0.7) x 10(-4) and (2.5 +/- 0.5 x 10(-4)) and the concomitant release of NO. PPIX-RSE is a significantly more effective NO generator at longer wavelength excitation than are other Fe(2)(mu-SR)(2)(NO)(4) esters for which R is a simple alkyl group such as CH(3)CH(2)- because of the much higher absorptivity of the pendant PPIX chromophore at these wavelengths and a modestly higher quantum yield. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime data indicate that the photoexcited porphyrin of PPIX-RSE is largely quenched by the energy transfer to the Fe(2)S(2)(NO)(4) cluster's core. However, a small fraction of this emission is not quenched, and it is proposed that PPIX-RSE may exist in solution as two conformers.

  3. The role of iron-sulfides on cycling of organic carbon in the St Lawrence River system: Evidence of sulfur-promoted carbon sequestration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balind, K.; Barber, A.; Gélinas, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycle of sulfur is intimately linked with that of carbon, as well as with that of iron through the formation of iron-sulfur complexes. Iron-sulfide minerals such as mackinawite (FeS) and greigite (Fe3S4) form below the oxic/anoxic redox boundary in marine and lacustrine sediments and soils. Reactive iron species, abundant in surface sediments, can undergo reductive dissolution leading to the formation of soluble Fe(II) which can then precipitate in the form of iron sulfur species. While sedimentary iron-oxides have been thoroughly explored in terms of their ability to sorb and sequester organic carbon (OC) (Lalonde et al.; 2012), the role of FeS in the long-term preservation of OC remains undefined. In this study, we present depth profiles for carbon, iron, and sulfur in the aqueous-phase, along with data from sequential extractions of sulfur speciation in the solid-phase collected from sediment cores from the St Lawrence River and estuarine system, demonstrating the transition from fresh to saltwater sediments. Additionally, we present synthetic iron sulfur sorption experiments using both model and natural organic molecules in order to assess the importance of FeS in sedimentary carbon storage.

  4. Involvement of the Cra global regulatory protein in the expression of the iscRSUA operon, revealed during studies of tricarballylate catabolism in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey A; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Downs, Diana M; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2009-04-01

    In Salmonella enterica, tricarballylate (Tcb) catabolism requires function of TcuB, a membrane-bound protein that contains [4Fe-4S] clusters and heme. TcuB transfers electrons from reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide in the Tcb dehydrogenase (TcuA) to electron acceptors in the membrane. We recently showed that functions needed to assemble [Fe-S] clusters (i.e., the iscRSUA-hscBA-fdx operon) compensate for the lack of ApbC during growth of an apbC strain on Tcb. ApbC had been linked to [Fe-S] cluster metabolism, and we showed that an apbC strain had decreased TcuB activity. Here we report findings that expand our understanding of the regulation of expression of the iscRSUA genes in Salmonella enterica. We investigated why low levels of glucose or other saccharides restored growth of an apbC strain on Tcb. Here we report the following findings. (i) A Cra. (iv) Putative Cra binding sites are present in the regulatory region of the iscRSUA operon. (v) Cra protein binds to all three sites in the iscRSUA promoter region in a concentration-dependent fashion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the involvement of Cra in [Fe-S] cluster assembly.

  5. Membrane complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei involved in syntrophic butyrate degradation and hydrogen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Regis Crable

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and cocultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic

  6. Bacillus cereus Fnr binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster and forms a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbelin Julia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that causes diarrheal disease in humans. Diarrheal syndrome may result from the secretion of various virulence factors including hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin Nhe. Expression of genes encoding Hbl and Nhe is regulated by the two redox systems, ResDE and Fnr, and the virulence regulator PlcR. B. cereus Fnr is a member of the Crp/Fnr family of iron-sulfur (Fe-S proteins. Only its apo-form has so far been studied. A major goal in deciphering the Fnr-dependent regulation of enterotoxin genes is thus to obtain and characterize holoFnr. Results Fnr has been subjected to in vitro Fe-S cluster reconstitution under anoxic conditions. UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic analyses together with the chemical estimation of the iron content indicated that Fnr binds one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster per monomer. Atmospheric O2 causes disassembly of the Fe-S cluster, which exhibited a half-life of 15 min in air. Holo- and apoFnr have similar affinities for the nhe and hbl promoter regions, while holoFnr has a higher affinity for fnr promoter region than apoFnr. Both the apo- and holo-form of Fnr interact with ResD and PlcR to form a ternary complex. Conclusions Overall, this work shows that incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster is not required for DNA binding of Fnr to promoter regions of hbl and nhe enterotoxin genes or for the formation of a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR. This points to some new unusual properties of Fnr that may have physiological relevance in the redox regulation of enterotoxin gene regulation.

  7. The Escherichia coli BolA Protein IbaG Forms a Histidine-Ligated [2Fe-2S]-Bridged Complex with Grx4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouhy, Adrienne C; Li, Haoran; Albetel, Angela-Nadia; Zhang, Bo; Mapolelo, Daphne T; Randeniya, Sajini; Holland, Ashley A; Johnson, Michael K; Outten, Caryn E

    2016-12-13

    Two ubiquitous protein families have emerged as key players in iron metabolism, the CGFS-type monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) and the BolA proteins. Monothiol Grxs and BolA proteins form heterocomplexes that have been implicated in Fe-S cluster assembly and trafficking. The Escherichia coli genome encodes members of both of these proteins families, namely, the monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and two BolA family proteins, BolA and IbaG. Previous work has demonstrated that E. coli Grx4 and BolA interact as both apo and [2Fe-2S]-bridged heterodimers that are spectroscopically distinct from [2Fe-2S]-bridged Grx4 homodimers. However, the physical and functional interactions between Grx4 and IbaG are uncharacterized. Here we show that co-expression of Grx4 with IbaG yields a [2Fe-2S]-bridged Grx4-IbaG heterodimer. In vitro interaction studies indicate that IbaG binds the [2Fe-2S] Grx4 homodimer to form apo Grx4-IbaG heterodimer as well as the [2Fe-2S] Grx4-IbaG heterodimer, altering the cluster stability and coordination environment. Additionally, spectroscopic and mutagenesis studies provide evidence that IbaG ligates the Fe-S cluster via the conserved histidine that is present in all BolA proteins and by a second conserved histidine that is present in the H/C loop of two of the four classes of BolA proteins. These results suggest that IbaG may function in Fe-S cluster assembly and trafficking in E. coli as demonstrated for other BolA homologues that interact with monothiol Grxs.

  8. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  9. Cytosolic iron-sulphur protein assembly is functionally conserved and essential in procyclic and bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basu, Somsuvro; Netz, D. J.; Haindrich, A. C.; Herlerth, N.; Lagny, T. J.; Pierik, A. J.; Lill, R.; Lukeš, Julius

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 5 (2014), s. 897-910 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : inducible expression system * Cfd1- Nbp35 complex * DNA metabolism * Fe/S proteins * transfer-RNA * cluster * mitochondrial * maturation * biogenesis * yeast Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.419, year: 2014

  10. Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Lipiński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways – heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S] – is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  11. [Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiński, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał R; Styś, Agnieszka; Gajowiak, Anna; Staroń, Robert

    2014-01-02

    Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways--heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S])--is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis) as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  12. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  13. Proteins engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    At the - Departement d'Ingenierie et d'etudes de proteines (Deip) of the CEA more than seventy researchers are working hard to understand the function of proteins. For that they use the molecular labelling technique (F.M.)

  14. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reliable information about the safety of taking whey protein if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. Milk allergy: If you are allergic to cow's milk, avoid using whey protein.

  15. Rapid and Complete Reversal of Sensory Ataxia by Gene Therapy in a Novel Model of Friedreich Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piguet, Françoise; de Montigny, Charline; Vaucamps, Nadège; Reutenauer, Laurence; Eisenmann, Aurélie; Puccio, Hélène

    2018-05-28

    Friedreich ataxia (FA) is a rare mitochondrial disease characterized by sensory and spinocerebellar ataxia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and diabetes, for which there is no treatment. FA is caused by reduced levels of frataxin (FXN), an essential mitochondrial protein involved in the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Despite significant progress in recent years, to date, there are no good models to explore and test therapeutic approaches to stop or reverse the ganglionopathy and the sensory neuropathy associated to frataxin deficiency. Here, we report a new conditional mouse model with complete frataxin deletion in parvalbumin-positive cells that recapitulate the sensory ataxia and neuropathy associated to FA, albeit with a more rapid and severe course. Interestingly, although fully dysfunctional, proprioceptive neurons can survive for many weeks without frataxin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that post-symptomatic delivery of frataxin-expressing AAV allows for rapid and complete rescue of the sensory neuropathy associated with frataxin deficiency, thus establishing the pre-clinical proof of concept for the potential of gene therapy in treating FA neuropathy. Copyright © 2018 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aerobic lineage of the oxidative stress response protein rubrerythrin emerged in an ancient microaerobic, (hyperthermophilic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Cardenas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubrerythrins (RBRs are non-heme di-iron proteins belonging to the ferritin-like superfamily (FLSF. They are involved in oxidative stress defense as peroxide scavengers in a wide range of organisms. The vast majority of RBRs, including classical forms of this protein, contain a C-terminal rubredoxin-like domain involved in electron transport that is used during catalysis in anaerobic conditions. Rubredoxin is an ancient and large protein family of short length (<100 residues that contains a Fe-S center involved in electron transfer. However, functional forms of the enzyme lacking the rubredoxin-like domain have been reported (e.g., sulerythrin and ferriperoxin. In this study, phylogenomic evidence is presented that suggests that a complete lineage of rubrerythrins, lacking the rubredoxin-like domain, arose in an ancient microaerobic and (hyperthermophilic environments in the ancestors of the Archaea Thermoproteales and Sulfolobales. This lineage (termed the aerobic-type lineage subsequently evolved to become adapted to environments with progressively lower temperatures and higher oxygen concentrations via the acquisition of two co-localized genes, termed DUF3501 and RFO, encoding a conserved protein of unknown function and a predicted Fe-S oxidoreductase respectively. Proposed Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT events from these archaeal ancestors to Bacteria expanded the opportunities for further evolution of this RBR including adaption to lower temperatures. The second lineage (termed the cyanobacterial lineage is proposed to have evolved in cyanobacterial ancestors, maybe in direct response to the production of oxygen via oxygenic photosynthesis during the Great Oxygen Event (GOE. It is hypothesized that both lineages of RBR emerged in a largely anaerobic world with whiffs of oxygen and that their subsequent independent evolutionary trajectories allowed microorganisms to transition from this anaerobic world to an aerobic one.

  17. Protein politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, Marike

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of the program of the interdisciplinary research group Profetas (protein foods, environment, technology and society). Profetas consists of technological, environmental and socio-economic research projects on protein food systems which result in the development of scenarios and

  18. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  19. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  20. Purification and characterization of two-domain glutaredoxin in the parasitic helminth Fasciola gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankita; Sripa, Banchob; Tripathi, Timir

    2017-08-01

    Glutaredoxins (Grxs) are small thiol-dependent proteins and key elements of redox signaling as they regulate the redox state of important cellular proteins. In the present study, the complete sequence of a glutaredoxin protein, obtained from the liver fluke Fasciola gigantica, was PCR-amplified and cloned. The 690-bp open reading frame (ORF) encodes a 230-amino acid protein with two conserved domains (FgGrxD1 and FgGrxD2) and has similarities with two monothiol Grxs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, i.e., ScGrx3 and ScGrx4. The full-length FgGrx along with its two constituent domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli as hexahistidyl-tagged proteins. The affinity chromatography resulted in almost pure and soluble proteins. The full-length FgGrx and the FgGrxD2 showed reddish-brown color, indicating the presence of bound iron in the second domain. In the insulin based reduction assay, both FgGrx and FgGrxD2 containing the active site motif CGFS exhibited a weak reducing activity, whereas FgGrxD1 was inactive. Additionally, FgGrx did not show any GSH-disulfide transhydrogenase activity when 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (HED) or de-hydroascorbate (DHA) were taken as substrates. These results indicated the probable role of FgGrx in cellular iron-sulfur homeostasis. FgGrx was found to be reversibly S-glutathionylated, suggesting a potential redox regulation that is likely to take place at the active site Cys158. Since there is only one Cys in FgGrxD2, the Cys158 might be involved in FeS binding. This study is the first report on the presence of Grx in platyhelminthic parasites and provides a starting point for further characterization of the redox network in liver flukes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 52-61 General Article. Iron Sulfur Proteins and their Synthetic Analogues: Structure, Reactivity and Redox Properties · B N Anand · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 62-69 Feature Article. Nature Watch - Flightless Young and Meticulous Mother Bats · G Marimuthu · More Details Fulltext PDF.

  2. Accurate Computation of Reduction Potentials of 4Fe−4S Clusters Indicates a Carboxylate Shift in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ooi, Bee Lean; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the computation and accurate reproduction of subtle shifts in reduction potentials for two mutants of the iron-sulfur protein Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin. The computational models involved only first-sphere ligands and differed with respect to one ligand, either acetate (as...

  3. Protein nanoparticles for therapeutic protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Estrada, L P; Champion, J A

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic proteins can face substantial challenges to their activity, requiring protein modification or use of a delivery vehicle. Nanoparticles can significantly enhance delivery of encapsulated cargo, but traditional small molecule carriers have some limitations in their use for protein delivery. Nanoparticles made from protein have been proposed as alternative carriers and have benefits specific to therapeutic protein delivery. This review describes protein nanoparticles made by self-assembly, including protein cages, protein polymers, and charged or amphipathic peptides, and by desolvation. It presents particle fabrication and delivery characterization for a variety of therapeutic and model proteins, as well as comparison of the features of different protein nanoparticles.

  4. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer; RMN de proteines (4Fe-4S): proprietes structurales et transfert electronique intramoleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J G

    1996-10-17

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an {alpha} helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S{sub {gamma}}-C{sub {beta}}-H{sub {beta}})Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven

  5. An Interactome-Centered Protein Discovery Approach Reveals Novel Components Involved in Mitosome Function and Homeostasis in Giardia lamblia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Rout

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan parasites of the genus Giardia are highly prevalent globally, and infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts including humans, with proliferation and pathology restricted to the small intestine. This narrow ecological specialization entailed extensive structural and functional adaptations during host-parasite co-evolution. An example is the streamlined mitosomal proteome with iron-sulphur protein maturation as the only biochemical pathway clearly associated with this organelle. Here, we applied techniques in microscopy and protein biochemistry to investigate the mitosomal membrane proteome in association to mitosome homeostasis. Live cell imaging revealed a highly immobilized array of 30-40 physically distinct mitosome organelles in trophozoites. We provide direct evidence for the single giardial dynamin-related protein as a contributor to mitosomal morphogenesis and homeostasis. To overcome inherent limitations that have hitherto severely hampered the characterization of these unique organelles we applied a novel interaction-based proteome discovery strategy using forward and reverse protein co-immunoprecipitation. This allowed generation of organelle proteome data strictly in a protein-protein interaction context. We built an initial Tom40-centered outer membrane interactome by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, identifying small GTPases, factors with dual mitosome and endoplasmic reticulum (ER distribution, as well as novel matrix proteins. Through iterative expansion of this protein-protein interaction network, we were able to i significantly extend this interaction-based mitosomal proteome to include other membrane-associated proteins with possible roles in mitosome morphogenesis and connection to other subcellular compartments, and ii identify novel matrix proteins which may shed light on mitosome-associated metabolic functions other than Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Functional analysis also revealed conceptual conservation of protein

  6. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Years of meticulous curation of scientific literature and increasingly reliable computational predictions have resulted in creation of vast databases of protein interaction data. Over the years, these repositories have become a basic framework in which experiments are analyzed and new directions...

  7. NIF-type iron-sulfur cluster assembly system is duplicated and distributed in the mitochondria and cytosol of Mastigamoeba balamuthi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nývltová, E.; Šuťák, R.; Harant, K.; Šedinová, M.; Hrdý, I.; Pačes, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Tachezy, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 18 (2013), s. 7371-7376 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/1061 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : hydrogenosome * mitosome * free-living protist Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.809, year: 2013

  8. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-01-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the le...

  9. Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269 3-Ketosteroid 9 alpha-Hydroxylase, a Two-Component Iron-Sulfur-Containing Monooxygenase with Subtle Steroid Substrate Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrusma, M.; Dijkhuizen, L.; van der Geize, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the biochemical characterization of a purified and reconstituted two-component 3-ketosteroid 9 alpha-hydroxylase (KSH). KSH of Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43269, consisting of a ferredoxin reductase (KshB) and a terminal oxygenase (KshA), was heterologously expressed in

  10. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  11. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein

  12. The architecture of metal coordination groups in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Marjorie M

    2004-05-01

    A set of tables is presented and a survey given of the architecture of metal coordination groups in a representative set of protein structures from the Protein Data Bank [Bernstein et al. (1977), J. Mol. Biol. 112, 535-542; Berman et al. (2000), Nucleic Acids Res. 28, 235-242]. The structures have been determined to a resolution of 2.5 A or better; the metals considered are Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Na and K, with particular emphasis on Ca and Zn and the exclusion of haem groups and Fe/S clusters; the proteins are a representative set in which none has more than 30% sequence identity with any other. In them the metal is coordinated by several donor groups from different amino-acid residues in the protein chain and often also by water or other small molecules. The tables, for approximately 600 metal coordination groups, include information on the conformations of the protein chain in the region around the metal and reliability indicators. They illustrate the wide variety of coordination numbers, chelate-loop sizes and other properties and the different characteristics of different metals. They show that glycine has a particular significance in the position adjacent to a donor residue, especially in Ca coordination groups. They also show that metal coordination does not appear to lead to significant distortions of the torsion angles phi, psi from their normally allowed values. Very few metal coordination groups occur more than once in the representative set and when they do they are usually related in fold and function; they have similar but not necessarily identical conformations. However, individual chelate loops, for example Zn(-C-X-X'-C-), in which both cysteines are coordinated to Zn through S, and X and X' are any amino acids, are repeated frequently in many different and unrelated proteins. Not all chelate loops with the same composition have the same conformation, but for smaller loops there are usually one or two strongly preferred and well defined

  13. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an α helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S γ -C β -H β )Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven instrumental in affording new

  14. A SELDI mass spectrometry study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: sample preparation, reproducibility, and differential protein expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Sausan; Broadwater, Laurie; Li, Shuo; Freeman, Ernest J; McDonough, Jennifer; Gregory, Roger B

    2013-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that is widely used as a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mitochondrial dysfunction appears to play a role in the development of neuropathology in MS and may also play a role in disease pathology in EAE. Here, surface enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (SELDI-MS) has been employed to obtain protein expression profiles from mitochondrially enriched fractions derived from EAE and control mouse brain. To gain insight into experimental variation, the reproducibility of sub-cellular fractionation, anion exchange fractionation as well as spot-to-spot and chip-to-chip variation using pooled samples from brain tissue was examined. Variability of SELDI mass spectral peak intensities indicates a coefficient of variation (CV) of 15.6% and 17.6% between spots on a given chip and between different chips, respectively. Thinly slicing tissue prior to homogenization with a rotor homogenizer showed better reproducibility (CV = 17.0%) than homogenization of blocks of brain tissue with a Teflon® pestle (CV = 27.0%). Fractionation of proteins with anion exchange beads prior to SELDI-MS analysis gave overall CV values from 16.1% to 18.6%. SELDI mass spectra of mitochondrial fractions obtained from brain tissue from EAE mice and controls displayed 39 differentially expressed proteins (p≤ 0.05) out of a total of 241 protein peaks observed in anion exchange fractions. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that protein fractions from EAE animals with severe disability clearly segregated from controls. Several components of electron transport chain complexes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6b1, subunit 6C, and subunit 4; NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein 3, alpha subcomplex subunit 2, Fe-S protein 4, and Fe-S protein 6; and ATP synthase subunit e) were identified as possible differentially expressed proteins. Myelin Basic Protein isoform 8 (MBP8) (14.2 k

  15. The E5 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    DiMaio, Daniel; Petti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The E5 proteins are short transmembrane proteins encoded by many animal and human papillomaviruses. These proteins display transforming activity in cultured cells and animals, and they presumably also play a role in the productive virus life cycle. The E5 proteins are thought to act by modulating the activity of cellular proteins. Here, we describe the biological activities of the best-studied E5 proteins and discuss the evidence implicating specific protein targets and pathways in mediating ...

  16. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  17. Impact of mutations on the midpoint potential of the [4Fe-4S]+1,+2 cluster and on catalytic activity in electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J; Fielding, Alistair J; Frerman, Frank E; Watmough, Nicholas J; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-01-08

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the Q-pool. ETF-QO contains a single [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. Mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in the vicinity of the iron-sulfur cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO. Y501 and T525 are equivalent to Y533 and T558 in the porcine ETF-QO. In the porcine protein, these residues are within hydrogen-bonding distance of the Sgamma of the cysteine ligands to the iron-sulfur cluster. Y501F, T525A, and Y501F/T525A substitutions were made to determine the effects on midpoint potential, activity, and EPR spectral properties of the cluster. The integrity of the mutated proteins was confirmed by optical spectra, EPR g-values, and spin-lattice relaxation rates, and the cluster to flavin point-dipole distance was determined by relaxation enhancement. Potentiometric titrations were monitored by changes in the CW EPR signals of the cluster and semiquinone. Single mutations decreased the midpoint potentials of the iron-sulfur cluster from +37 mV for wild type to -60 mV for Y501F and T525A and to -128 mV for Y501F/T525A. Lowering the midpoint potential resulted in a decrease in steady-state ubiquinone reductase activity and in ETF semiquinone disproportionation. The decrease in activity demonstrates that reduction of the iron-sulfur cluster is required for activity. There was no detectable effect of the mutations on the flavin midpoint potentials.

  18. Impact of Mutations on the Midpoint Potential of the [4Fe-4S]+1,+2 Cluster and on Catalytic Activity in Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Fielding, Alistair J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Watmough, Nicholas J.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein - ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the Q-pool. ETF-QO contains a single [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. Mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in the vicinity of the iron-sulfur cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO. Y501 and T525 are equivalent to Y533 and T558 in the porcine ETF-QO. In the porcine protein, these residues are within hydrogen bonding distance of the Sγ of the cysteine ligands to the iron-sulfur cluster. Y501F, T525A, and Y501F/T525A substitutions were made to determine the effects on midpoint potential, activity, and EPR spectral properties of the cluster. The integrity of the mutated proteins was confirmed by optical spectra, EPR g-values, and spin-lattice relaxation rates, and the cluster to flavin point-dipole distance was determined by relaxation enhancement. Potentiometric titrations were monitored by changes in the CW EPR signals of the cluster and semiquinone. Single mutations decreased the mid-point potentials of the iron-sulfur cluster from +37 mV for wild type to −60 mV for Y501F and T525A and to −128 mV for Y501F/T525A. Lowering the midpoint potential resulted in a decrease in steady-state ubiquinone reductase activity and in ETF semiquinone disproportionation. The decrease in activity demonstrates that reduction of the iron-sulfur cluster is required for activity. There was no detectable effect of the mutations on the flavin midpoint potentials. PMID:18069858

  19. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm, is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. Conclusion We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  20. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-10

    Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm), is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  1. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  2. Introduction to protein blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Protein blotting is a powerful and important procedure for the immunodetection of proteins following electrophoresis, particularly proteins that are of low abundance. Since the inception of the protocol for protein transfer from an electrophoresed gel to a membrane in 1979, protein blotting has evolved greatly. The scientific community is now confronted with a variety of ways and means to carry out this transfer.

  3. Our interests in protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein interactions. Evolution of P-P partnerships. Evolution of P-P structures. Evolutionary dynamics of P-P interactions. Dynamics of P-P interaction network. Host-pathogen interactions. CryoEM mapping of gigantic protein assemblies.

  4. Evolution of protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evolution of protein-protein interactions · Our interests in protein-protein interactions · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20.

  5. Protein in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - protein ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a ... to eat animal products to get all the protein you need in your diet. Amino acids are ...

  6. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  7. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  8. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  9. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Paramagnetic Macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Since A. Kowalsky's first report of the spectrum of cytochrome c in 1965, interest in the detection, assignment and interpretation of paramagnetic molecules has surged, especially in the last decade. Two classes of systems have played a key role in the development of the field: heme proteins and iron-sulfur proteins. These two systems are unique in many respects, one of which is that they contain well-defined chromophores, each of which can be studied in detail outside the protein matrix. They are the most successfully studied macromolecules, and the first eight and last six of the seventeen contributions to this book deal with heme and/or iron-sulfur proteins. The middle three chapters survey the progress on, and significant promise of, more difficult systems which do not possess a chromophore, but which have nevertheless yielded remarkable insights into their structure.

  10. The unique fold and lability of the [2Fe-2S] clusters of NEET proteins mediate their key functions in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmi, Ola; Marjault, Henri-Baptiste; Pesce, Luca; Carloni, Paolo; Onuchic, Jose' N; Jennings, Patricia A; Mittler, Ron; Nechushtai, Rachel

    2018-02-12

    NEET proteins comprise a new class of [2Fe-2S] cluster proteins. In human, three genes encode for NEET proteins: cisd1 encodes mitoNEET (mNT), cisd2 encodes the Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1) and cisd3 encodes MiNT (Miner2). These recently discovered proteins play key roles in many processes related to normal metabolism and disease. Indeed, NEET proteins are involved in iron, Fe-S, and reactive oxygen homeostasis in cells and play an important role in regulating apoptosis and autophagy. mNT and NAF-1 are homodimeric and reside on the outer mitochondrial membrane. NAF-1 also resides in the membranes of the ER associated mitochondrial membranes (MAM) and the ER. MiNT is a monomer with distinct asymmetry in the molecular surfaces surrounding the clusters. Unlike its paralogs mNT and NAF-1, it resides within the mitochondria. NAF-1 and mNT share similar backbone folds to the plant homodimeric NEET protein (At-NEET), while MiNT's backbone fold resembles a bacterial MiNT protein. Despite the variation of amino acid composition among these proteins, all NEET proteins retained their unique CDGSH domain harboring their unique 3Cys:1His [2Fe-2S] cluster coordination through evolution. The coordinating exposed His was shown to convey the lability to the NEET proteins' [2Fe-2S] clusters. In this minireview, we discuss the NEET fold and its structural elements. Special attention is given to the unique lability of the NEETs' [2Fe-2S] cluster and the implication of the latter to the NEET proteins' cellular and systemic function in health and disease.

  11. Proteomic analysis of iron acquisition, metabolic and regulatory responses of Yersinia pestis to iron starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the bubonic plague. Efficient iron acquisition systems are critical to the ability of Y. pestis to infect, spread and grow in mammalian hosts, because iron is sequestered and is considered part of the innate host immune defence against invading pathogens. We used a proteomic approach to determine expression changes of iron uptake systems and intracellular consequences of iron deficiency in the Y. pestis strain KIM6+ at two physiologically relevant temperatures (26°C and 37°C. Results Differential protein display was performed for three Y. pestis subcellular fractions. Five characterized Y. pestis iron/siderophore acquisition systems (Ybt, Yfe, Yfu, Yiu and Hmu and a putative iron/chelate outer membrane receptor (Y0850 were increased in abundance in iron-starved cells. The iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster assembly system Suf, adapted to oxidative stress and iron starvation in E. coli, was also more abundant, suggesting functional activity of Suf in Y. pestis under iron-limiting conditions. Metabolic and reactive oxygen-deactivating enzymes dependent on Fe-S clusters or other iron cofactors were decreased in abundance in iron-depleted cells. This data was consistent with lower activities of aconitase and catalase in iron-starved vs. iron-rich cells. In contrast, pyruvate oxidase B which metabolizes pyruvate via electron transfer to ubiquinone-8 for direct utilization in the respiratory chain was strongly increased in abundance and activity in iron-depleted cells. Conclusions Many protein abundance differences were indicative of the important regulatory role of the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Iron deficiency seems to result in a coordinated shift from iron-utilizing to iron-independent biochemical pathways in the cytoplasm of Y. pestis. With growth temperature as an additional variable in proteomic comparisons of the Y. pestis fractions (26°C and 37°C, there was

  12. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  13. Protein Structure Prediction by Protein Threading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhijie; Cai, Liming; Xu, Dong

    The seminal work of Bowie, Lüthy, and Eisenberg (Bowie et al., 1991) on "the inverse protein folding problem" laid the foundation of protein structure prediction by protein threading. By using simple measures for fitness of different amino acid types to local structural environments defined in terms of solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure, the authors derived a simple and yet profoundly novel approach to assessing if a protein sequence fits well with a given protein structural fold. Their follow-up work (Elofsson et al., 1996; Fischer and Eisenberg, 1996; Fischer et al., 1996a,b) and the work by Jones, Taylor, and Thornton (Jones et al., 1992) on protein fold recognition led to the development of a new brand of powerful tools for protein structure prediction, which we now term "protein threading." These computational tools have played a key role in extending the utility of all the experimentally solved structures by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), providing structural models and functional predictions for many of the proteins encoded in the hundreds of genomes that have been sequenced up to now.

  14. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  15. Amino acids and proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    A balanced, safe diet with proteins is important to meet nutritional requirements. Proteins occur in animal as well as vegetable products in important quantities. In some countries, many people obtain much of their protein from animal products. In other regions, the major portion of dietary protein ...

  16. The Protein Model Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, J?rgen; Battey, James N. D.; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D.; Berman, Helen M.; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploratio...

  17. Formation of nitrosyl non-heme iron-sulphur complexes of a mitrochondria electron-transport chain in a liver and kidneys under prolonged permanent action of radiation contamination in the Chernobyl region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorik, E.P.; Burlaka, A.P.; Druzhina, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    No-complexes with iron-sulfur protein of the N-type (EPR signal g=2.03 at 77 K) have been revealed in a mitochondria electron transport chain in a liver and kidneys of animals which were hold for 1.5 years in the Chernobyl area under action of low intensity ionizing radiation as a result of incorporated radionuclides. These alterations in protein give evidence of changes in oxidation and phosphorylation in tissues

  18. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  19. Comparing side chain packing in soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J C; Acebes, S; Virrueta, A; Butler, M; Regan, L; O'Hern, C S

    2018-05-01

    We compare side chain prediction and packing of core and non-core regions of soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins. We first identified or created comparable databases of high-resolution crystal structures of these 3 protein classes. We show that the solvent-inaccessible cores of the 3 classes of proteins are equally densely packed. As a result, the side chains of core residues at protein-protein interfaces and in the membrane-exposed regions of transmembrane proteins can be predicted by the hard-sphere plus stereochemical constraint model with the same high prediction accuracies (>90%) as core residues in soluble proteins. We also find that for all 3 classes of proteins, as one moves away from the solvent-inaccessible core, the packing fraction decreases as the solvent accessibility increases. However, the side chain predictability remains high (80% within 30°) up to a relative solvent accessibility, rSASA≲0.3, for all 3 protein classes. Our results show that ≈40% of the interface regions in protein complexes are "core", that is, densely packed with side chain conformations that can be accurately predicted using the hard-sphere model. We propose packing fraction as a metric that can be used to distinguish real protein-protein interactions from designed, non-binding, decoys. Our results also show that cores of membrane proteins are the same as cores of soluble proteins. Thus, the computational methods we are developing for the analysis of the effect of hydrophobic core mutations in soluble proteins will be equally applicable to analyses of mutations in membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The transcriptional repressor protein NsrR senses nitric oxide directly via a [2Fe-2S] cluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Tucker

    Full Text Available The regulatory protein NsrR, a member of the Rrf2 family of transcription repressors, is specifically dedicated to sensing nitric oxide (NO in a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. It has been proposed that NO directly modulates NsrR activity by interacting with a predicted [Fe-S] cluster in the NsrR protein, but no experimental evidence has been published to support this hypothesis. Here we report the purification of NsrR from the obligate aerobe Streptomyces coelicolor. We demonstrate using UV-visible, near UV CD and EPR spectroscopy that the protein contains an NO-sensitive [2Fe-2S] cluster when purified from E. coli. Upon exposure of NsrR to NO, the cluster is nitrosylated, which results in the loss of DNA binding activity as detected by bandshift assays. Removal of the [2Fe-2S] cluster to generate apo-NsrR also resulted in loss of DNA binding activity. This is the first demonstration that NsrR contains an NO-sensitive [2Fe-2S] cluster that is required for DNA binding activity.

  1. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...... facilitates homophilic cell adhesion. Moreover, IGSF9 family proteins have been implicated in the outgrowth and branching of neurites, axon guidance, synapse maturation, self-avoidance, and tiling. However, despite the few published studies on IGSF9 family proteins, reports on the functions of both Turtle...

  2. Personalizing Protein Nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS, DAVID C.; SANCTUARY, MEGAN R.; QU, YUNYAO; KHAJAVI, SHABNAM HAGHIGHAT; VAN ZANDT, ALEXANDRIA E.; DYANDRA, MELISSA; FRESE, STEVEN A.; BARILE, DANIELA; GERMAN, J. BRUCE

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are not equally digestible—their proteolytic susceptibility varies by their source and processing method. Incomplete digestion increases colonic microbial protein fermentation (putrefaction), which produces toxic metabolites that can induce inflammation in vitro and have been associated with inflammation in vivo. Individual humans differ in protein digestive capacity based on phenotypes, particularly disease states. To avoid putrefaction-induced intestinal inflammation, protein sources and processing methods must be tailored to the consumer’s digestive capacity. This review explores how food processing techniques alter protein digestibility and examines how physiological conditions alter digestive capacity. Possible solutions to improving digestive function or matching low digestive capacity with more digestible protein sources are explored. Beyond the ileal digestibility measurements of protein digestibility, less invasive, quicker and cheaper techniques for monitoring the extent of protein digestion and fermentation are needed to personalize protein nourishment. Biomarkers of protein digestive capacity and efficiency can be identified with the toolsets of peptidomics, metabolomics, microbial sequencing and multiplexed protein analysis of fecal and urine samples. By monitoring individual protein digestive function, the protein component of diets can be tailored via protein source and processing selection to match individual needs to minimize colonic putrefaction and, thus, optimize gut health. PMID:26713355

  3. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Related to Protein Complexes Based on Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting protein-protein interactions based on detected protein complexes is proposed to repair deficient interactions derived from high-throughput biological experiments. Protein complexes are pruned and decomposed into small parts based on the adaptive k-cores method to predict protein-protein interactions associated with the complexes. The proposed method is adaptive to protein complexes with different structure, number, and size of nodes in a protein-protein interaction network. Based on different complex sets detected by various algorithms, we can obtain different prediction sets of protein-protein interactions. The reliability of the predicted interaction sets is proved by using estimations with statistical tests and direct confirmation of the biological data. In comparison with the approaches which predict the interactions based on the cliques, the overlap of the predictions is small. Similarly, the overlaps among the predicted sets of interactions derived from various complex sets are also small. Thus, every predicted set of interactions may complement and improve the quality of the original network data. Meanwhile, the predictions from the proposed method replenish protein-protein interactions associated with protein complexes using only the network topology.

  4. Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein energy malnutrition. MH Etukudo, EO Agbedana, OO Akinyinka, BOA Osifo. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 5(1) 2006: 7-11. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  5. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  6. Protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Luc J C; Kies, Arie K; Saris, Wim H M

    2007-08-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the role of nutrition in increasing exercise performance, it has become clear over the last 2 decades that amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates can play an important role. Most of the attention has been focused on their effects at a muscular level. As these nutrients are ingested, however, it also means that gastrointestinal digestibility and absorption can modulate their efficacy significantly. Therefore, discussing the role of amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition entails holding a discussion on all levels of the metabolic route. On May 28-29, 2007, a small group of researchers active in the field of exercise science and protein metabolism presented an overview of the different aspects of the application of protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition. In addition, they were asked to share their opinions on the future progress in their fields of research. In this overview, an introduction to the workshop and a short summary of its outcome is provided.

  7. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  8. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Learning About Proteins KidsHealth / For Kids / Learning About Proteins What's in ...

  9. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  10. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full

  11. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  12. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interactions with other proteins, or binding of small molecules. Covalent .... vealed through structural elucidation of the protein in free and oxygen-bound forms .... stance, molecular dynamic simulation of glutamine binding pro- tein shows that ...

  13. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... covering all the systems, so far discovered.5,7,8,12. With the increasing ... Structural investigations on proteins by NMR are, currently ... rapid analysis of unfolded proteins. ...... and hence help in design of drugs against them.

  14. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  15. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  16. Role of cytochrome B in the processing of the subunits of complex III in the yeast mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The work described in this dissertation deals with the effect of cytochrome b on the biogenesis and assembly of the subunits of complex III in the mitochondrial membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cytochrome b-mutants (Box mutants of S. cerevisiae form an excellent system to study such a role of cytochome B. The amounts of cytochrome c 1 in the mitochrondria, as determined both spectroscopically and immunologically, were not affected by the absence of cytochrome b. Pulse labelling of the cells with ( 35 S) methionine in the presence of CCCP showed the accumulation of the precursors to the core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in similar amounts in the mutant Box 6-2 and the wild type cells. Synthesis of the iron sulfur protein and the cytochrome c 1 by in vitro translation of mRNA isolated from wild type and mutant Box 6-2 in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, also confirmed that the synthesis of the nuclear encoded subunits was not affected in the mutants. Pulse labeling of the cells in the absence of CCCP and subsequent chase with cold methionine, however, showed much less of the mature subunits of core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in the mitochrondria of the mutant cells relative to the wild type. These results indicate that cytochrome b is necessary for the proper processing of certain subunits of complex III

  17. Iron-induced changes in the proteome of Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neritza Campo Beltrán

    Full Text Available Iron plays a crucial role in metabolism as a key component of catalytic and redox cofactors, such as heme or iron-sulfur clusters in enzymes and electron-transporting or regulatory proteins. Limitation of iron availability by the host is also one of the mechanisms involved in immunity. Pathogens must regulate their protein expression according to the iron concentration in their environment and optimize their metabolic pathways in cases of limitation through the availability of respective cofactors. Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted pathogen of humans, requires high iron levels for optimal growth. It is an anaerobe that possesses hydrogenosomes, mitochondrion-related organelles that harbor pathways of energy metabolism and iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We analyzed the proteomes of hydrogenosomes obtained from cells cultivated under iron-rich and iron-deficient conditions employing two-dimensional peptide separation combining IEF and nano-HPLC with quantitative MALDI-MS/MS. We identified 179 proteins, of which 58 were differentially expressed. Iron deficiency led to the upregulation of proteins involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and the downregulation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Interestingly, iron affected the expression of only some of multiple protein paralogues, whereas the expression of others was iron independent. This finding indicates a stringent regulation of differentially expressed multiple gene copies in response to changes in the availability of exogenous iron.

  18. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  19. Protein - Which is Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  20. Peptide segments in protein-protein interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-09-06

    Sep 6, 2006 ... contact surface from the rest of the protein surface have been used to identify ..... interfaces the contribution of the charged residues, such as. Lys, Asp and ..... Lawrence M C and Colman P M 1993 Shape complementarity at.

  1. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  2. Intracellular protein breakdown. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohley, P.; Kirschke, H.; Langner, J.; Wiederanders, B.; Ansorge, S.

    1976-01-01

    Double-labelled proteins from rat liver cytosol ( 14 C in long-lived, 3 H in short-lived proteins after in-vivo-labelling) are used as substrates for unlabelled proteinases in vitro. Differences in the degradation rates of short-lived and long-lived proteins in vitro by different proteinases and after addition of different effectors allow conclusions concerning their importance for the in-vivo-turnover of substrate proteins. The main activity (>90%) of soluble lysosomal proteinases at pH 6.1 and pH 6.9 is caused by thiolproteinases, which degrade preferentially short-lived cytosol proteins. These proteinases are inhibited by leupeptin. Autolysis of double-labelled cell fractions shows a remarkably faster breakdown of short-lived substrate proteins only in the soluble part of lysosomes. Microsomal fractions degrade in vitro preferentially long-lived substrate proteins. (author)

  3. Protein carbonylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Havelund, Jesper; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current knowledge on protein carbonylation in plants and its role in plant physiology. It starts with a brief outline of the turnover and production sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants and the causes of protein carbonylation. This is followed...... by a description of the methods used to study protein carbonylation in plants, which is also very brief as the methods are similar to those used in studies on animals. The chapter also focuses on protein carbonylation in plants in general and in mitochondria and in seeds in particular, as case stories where...... specific carbonylated proteins have been identified. Protein carbonylation appears to accumulate at all stages of seed development and germination investigated to date. In some cases, such as seed aging, it is probably simply an accumulation of oxidative damage. However, in other cases protein...

  4. Racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-01-01

    Although natural proteins are chiral and are all of one "handedness," their mirror image forms can be prepared by chemical synthesis. This opens up new opportunities for protein crystallography. A racemic mixture of the enantiomeric forms of a protein molecule can crystallize in ways that natural proteins cannot. Recent experimental data support a theoretical prediction that this should make racemic protein mixtures highly amenable to crystallization. Crystals obtained from racemic mixtures also offer advantages in structure determination strategies. The relevance of these potential advantages is heightened by advances in synthetic methods, which are extending the size limit for proteins that can be prepared by chemical synthesis. Recent ideas and results in the area of racemic protein crystallography are reviewed.

  5. Texturized dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwulata, Charles I; Phillips, John G; Tunick, Michael H; Qi, Phoebi X; Cooke, Peter H

    2010-03-01

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear, and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey protein concentrate (WPC), and whey protein isolate (WPI) were modified using a twin-screw extruder at melt temperatures of 50, 75, and 100 degrees C, and moistures ranging from 20 to 70 wt%. Viscoelasticity and solubility measurements showed that extrusion temperature was a more significant (P extruded dairy protein ranged from rigid (2500 N) to soft (2.7 N). Extruding at or above 75 degrees C resulted in increased peak force for WPC (138 to 2500 N) and WPI (2.7 to 147.1 N). NDM was marginally texturized; the presence of lactose interfered with its texturization. WPI products extruded at 50 degrees C were not texturized; their solubility values ranged from 71.8% to 92.6%. A wide possibility exists for creating new foods with texturized dairy proteins due to the extensive range of states achievable. Dairy proteins can be used to boost the protein content in puffed snacks made from corn meal, but unmodified, they bind water and form doughy pastes with starch. To minimize the water binding property of dairy proteins, WPI, or WPC, or NDM were modified by extrusion processing. Extrusion temperature conditions were adjusted to 50, 75, or 100 degrees C, sufficient to change the structure of the dairy proteins, but not destroy them. Extrusion modified the structures of these dairy proteins for ease of use in starchy foods to boost nutrient levels. Dairy proteins can be used to boost the protein content in puffed snacks made from corn meal, but unmodified, they bind water and form doughy pastes with starch. To minimize the water binding property of dairy proteins, whey protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, or nonfat dried milk were modified by extrusion processing. Extrusion

  6. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  7. PROTEIN - WHICH IS BEST?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Falvo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids, whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function are also reviewed

  8. Exogenous short-term silicon application regulates macro-nutrients, endogenous phytohormones, and protein expression in Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Soo-Won; Kim, Yoonha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Na, Chae-In; Lee, In-Jung

    2018-01-04

    Silicon (Si) has been known to regulate plant growth; however, the underlying mechanisms of short-term exogenous Si application on the regulation of calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N), endogenous phytohormones, and expression of essential proteins have been little understood. Exogenous Si application significantly increased Si content as compared to the control. Among Si treatments, 1.0 mM Si application showed increased phosphorus content as compared to other Si treatments (0.5, 2.0, and 4.0 mM). However, Ca accumulation was significantly reduced (1.8- to 2.0-fold) at the third-leaf stage in the control, whereas all Si treatments exhibited a dose-dependent increase in Ca as determined by radioisotope 45 Ca analysis. Similarly, the radioisotope 15 N for nitrogen localization and uptake showed a varying but reduced response (ranging from 1.03-10.8%) to different Si concentrations as compared to 15 N application alone. Physiologically active endogenous gibberellin (GA 1 ) was also significantly higher with exogenous Si (1.0 mM) as compared to GA 20 and the control plants. A similar response was noted for endogenous jasmonic and salicylic acid synthesis in rice plants with Si application. Proteomic analysis revealed the activation of several essential proteins, such as Fe-S precursor protein, putative thioredoxin, Ser/Thr phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6P), and importin alpha-1b (Imp3), with Si application. Among the most-expressed proteins, confirmatory gene expression analysis for G6P and Imp3 showed a similar response to those of the Si treatments. In conclusion, the current results suggest that short-term exogenous Si can significantly regulate rice plant physiology by influencing Ca, N, endogenous phytohormones, and proteins, and that 1.0 mM Si application is more beneficial to plants than higher concentrations.

  9. Specificity and affinity quantification of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Guo, Liyong; Hu, Liang; Wang, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Most biological processes are mediated by the protein-protein interactions. Determination of the protein-protein structures and insight into their interactions are vital to understand the mechanisms of protein functions. Currently, compared with the isolated protein structures, only a small fraction of protein-protein structures are experimentally solved. Therefore, the computational docking methods play an increasing role in predicting the structures and interactions of protein-protein complexes. The scoring function of protein-protein interactions is the key responsible for the accuracy of the computational docking. Previous scoring functions were mostly developed by optimizing the binding affinity which determines the stability of the protein-protein complex, but they are often lack of the consideration of specificity which determines the discrimination of native protein-protein complex against competitive ones. We developed a scoring function (named as SPA-PP, specificity and affinity of the protein-protein interactions) by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions show that SPA-PP performs remarkably on both predictions of binding pose and binding affinity. Thus, SPA-PP is a promising quantification of protein-protein interactions, which can be implemented into the protein docking tools and applied for the predictions of protein-protein structure and affinity. The algorithm is implemented in C language, and the code can be downloaded from http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1865642/Optimization.cpp.

  10. General protein-protein cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria-Schaffer, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a general protein-to-protein cross-linking procedure using the water-soluble amine-reactive homobifunctional BS(3) (bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate); however, the protocol can be easily adapted using other cross-linkers of similar properties. BS(3) is composed of two sulfo-NHS ester groups and an 11.4 Å linker. Sulfo-NHS ester groups react with primary amines in slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7.2-8.5) and yield stable amide bonds. The reaction releases N-hydroxysuccinimide (see an application of NHS esters on Labeling a protein with fluorophores using NHS ester derivitization). © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scoring functions for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moal, Iain H; Moretti, Rocco; Baker, David; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The computational evaluation of protein-protein interactions will play an important role in organising the wealth of data being generated by high-throughput initiatives. Here we discuss future applications, report recent developments and identify areas requiring further investigation. Many functions have been developed to quantify the structural and energetic properties of interacting proteins, finding use in interrelated challenges revolving around the relationship between sequence, structure and binding free energy. These include loop modelling, side-chain refinement, docking, multimer assembly, affinity prediction, affinity change upon mutation, hotspots location and interface design. Information derived from models optimised for one of these challenges can be used to benefit the others, and can be unified within the theoretical frameworks of multi-task learning and Pareto-optimal multi-objective learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part...

  13. Blue Emission in Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Sohini; Sengupta, Abhigyan; Hazra, Partha; Mandal, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Recent literatures reported blue-green emission from amyloid fibril as exclusive signature of fibril formation. This unusual visible luminescence is regularly used to monitor fibril growth. Blue-green emission has also been observed in crystalline protein and in solution. However, the origin of this emission is not known exactly. Our spectroscopic study of serum proteins reveals that the blue-green emission is a property of protein monomer. Evidences suggest that semiconductor-like band struc...

  14. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  15. The Alternative complex III: properties and possible mechanisms for electron transfer and energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refojo, Patrícia N; Teixeira, Miguel; Pereira, Manuela M

    2012-10-01

    Alternative complexes III (ACIII) are recently identified membrane-bound enzymes that replace functionally the cytochrome bc(1/)b(6)f complexes. In general, ACIII are composed of four transmembrane proteins and three peripheral subunits that contain iron-sulfur centers and C-type hemes. ACIII are built by a combination of modules present in different enzyme families, namely the complex iron-sulfur molybdenum containing enzymes. In this article a historical perspective on the investigation of ACIII is presented, followed by an overview of the present knowledge on these enzymes. Electron transfer pathways within the protein are discussed taking into account possible different locations (cytoplasmatic or periplasmatic) of the iron-sulfur containing protein and their contribution to energy conservation. In this way several hypotheses for energy conservation modes are raised including linear and bifurcating electron transfer pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Yeast ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, E.; Kobata, K.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic 80s ribosomal proteins from the cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed by SDS two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventyfour proteins were identified and consecutively numbered from 1 to 74. Upon oxidation of the 80s proteins with performic acid, ten proteins (no. 15, 20, 35, 40, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54 and 55) were dislocated on the gel without change of the total number of protein spots. Five proteins (no. 8, 14, 16, 36 and 74) were phosphorylated in vivo as seen in 32 P-labelling experiments. The large and small subunits separated in low magnesium medium were analyzed by the above gel electrophoresis. At least forty-five and twenty-eight proteins were assumed to be in the large and small subunits, respectively. All proteins found in the 80s ribosomes, except for no. 3, were detected in either subunit without appearance of new spots. The acidic protein no. 3 seems to be lost during subunit dissociation. (orig.) [de

  17. Physics of protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, A. V.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2004-04-01

    Protein physics is grounded on three fundamental experimental facts: protein, this long heteropolymer, has a well defined compact three-dimensional structure; this structure can spontaneously arise from the unfolded protein chain in appropriate environment; and this structure is separated from the unfolded state of the chain by the “all-or-none” phase transition, which ensures robustness of protein structure and therefore of its action. The aim of this review is to consider modern understanding of physical principles of self-organization of protein structures and to overview such important features of this process, as finding out the unique protein structure among zillions alternatives, nucleation of the folding process and metastable folding intermediates. Towards this end we will consider the main experimental facts and simple, mostly phenomenological theoretical models. We will concentrate on relatively small (single-domain) water-soluble globular proteins (whose structure and especially folding are much better studied and understood than those of large or membrane and fibrous proteins) and consider kinetic and structural aspects of transition of initially unfolded protein chains into their final solid (“native”) 3D structures.

  18. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  19. Isolation and characterization of the small subunit of the uptake hydrogenase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleiras, Patrícia; Kellers, Petra; Lindblad, Peter; Styring, Stenbjörn; Magnuson, Ann

    2013-06-21

    In nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, hydrogen evolution is associated with hydrogenases and nitrogenase, making these enzymes interesting targets for genetic engineering aimed at increased hydrogen production. Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that expresses the uptake hydrogenase HupSL in heterocysts under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Little is known about the structural and biophysical properties of HupSL. The small subunit, HupS, has been postulated to contain three iron-sulfur clusters, but the details regarding their nature have been unclear due to unusual cluster binding motifs in the amino acid sequence. We now report the cloning and heterologous expression of Nostoc punctiforme HupS as a fusion protein, f-HupS. We have characterized the anaerobically purified protein by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopies. Our results show that f-HupS contains three iron-sulfur clusters. UV-visible absorption of f-HupS has bands ∼340 and 420 nm, typical for iron-sulfur clusters. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized f-HupS shows a narrow g = 2.023 resonance, characteristic of a low-spin (S = ½) [3Fe-4S] cluster. The reduced f-HupS presents complex EPR spectra with overlapping resonances centered on g = 1.94, g = 1.91, and g = 1.88, typical of low-spin (S = ½) [4Fe-4S] clusters. Analysis of the spectroscopic data allowed us to distinguish between two species attributable to two distinct [4Fe-4S] clusters, in addition to the [3Fe-4S] cluster. This indicates that f-HupS binds [4Fe-4S] clusters despite the presence of unusual coordinating amino acids. Furthermore, our expression and purification of what seems to be an intact HupS protein allows future studies on the significance of ligand nature on redox properties of the iron-sulfur clusters of HupS.

  20. Interaction of the iron–sulfur cluster assembly protein IscU with the Hsc66/Hsc20 molecular chaperone system of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin G.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Vickery, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    The iscU gene in bacteria is located in a gene cluster encoding proteins implicated in iron–sulfur cluster assembly and an hsc70-type (heat shock cognate) molecular chaperone system, iscSUA-hscBA. To investigate possible interactions between these systems, we have overproduced and purified the IscU protein from Escherichia coli and have studied its interactions with the hscA and hscB gene products Hsc66 and Hsc20. IscU and its iron–sulfur complex (IscU–Fe/S) stimulated the basal steady-state ATPase activity of Hsc66 weakly in the absence of Hsc20 but, in the presence of Hsc20, increased the ATPase activity up to 480-fold. Hsc20 also decreased the apparent Km for IscU stimulation of Hsc66 ATPase activity, and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that Hsc20 enhances binding of IscU to Hsc66. Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry further showed that IscU and Hsc20 form a complex, and Hsc20 may thereby aid in the targeting of IscU to Hsc66. These results establish a direct and specific role for the Hsc66/Hsc20 chaperone system in functioning with isc gene components for the assembly of iron–sulfur cluster proteins. PMID:10869428

  1. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different

  2. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented.

  3. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  4. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery.

  5. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  6. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  7. Protein restriction and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Huang, Xingguo; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2018-03-26

    Protein restriction without malnutrition is currently an effective nutritional intervention known to prevent diseases and promote health span from yeast to human. Recently, low protein diets are reported to be associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality risk of cancers in human. In murine models, protein restriction inhibits tumor growth via mTOR signaling pathway. IGF-1, amino acid metabolic programing, FGF21, and autophagy may also serve as potential mechanisms of protein restriction mediated cancer prevention. Together, dietary intervention aimed at reducing protein intake can be beneficial and has the potential to be widely adopted and effective in preventing and treating cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  9. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  10. The Protein Model Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, Jürgen; Battey, James N D; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D; Berman, Helen M; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploration of the protein structure space. One of the challenges in using model information effectively has been to access all models available for a specific protein in heterogeneous formats at different sites using various incompatible accession code systems. Often, structure models for hundreds of proteins can be derived from a given experimentally determined structure, using a variety of established methods. This has been done by all of the PSI centers, and by various independent modeling groups. The goal of the Protein Model Portal (PMP) is to provide a single portal which gives access to the various models that can be leveraged from PSI targets and other experimental protein structures. A single interface allows all existing pre-computed models across these various sites to be queried simultaneously, and provides links to interactive services for template selection, target-template alignment, model building, and quality assessment. The current release of the portal consists of 7.6 million model structures provided by different partner resources (CSMP, JCSG, MCSG, NESG, NYSGXRC, JCMM, ModBase, SWISS-MODEL Repository). The PMP is available at http://www.proteinmodelportal.org and from the PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase.

  11. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are

  12. Protein-Protein Docking in Drug Design and Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Bartuzi, Damian; Stępniewski, Tomasz Maciej; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are responsible for a number of key physiological processes in the living cells and underlie the pathomechanism of many diseases. Nowadays, along with the concept of so-called "hot spots" in protein-protein interactions, which are well-defined interface regions responsible for most of the binding energy, these interfaces can be targeted with modulators. In order to apply structure-based design techniques to design PPIs modulators, a three-dimensional structure of protein complex has to be available. In this context in silico approaches, in particular protein-protein docking, are a valuable complement to experimental methods for elucidating 3D structure of protein complexes. Protein-protein docking is easy to use and does not require significant computer resources and time (in contrast to molecular dynamics) and it results in 3D structure of a protein complex (in contrast to sequence-based methods of predicting binding interfaces). However, protein-protein docking cannot address all the aspects of protein dynamics, in particular the global conformational changes during protein complex formation. In spite of this fact, protein-protein docking is widely used to model complexes of water-soluble proteins and less commonly to predict structures of transmembrane protein assemblies, including dimers and oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this chapter we review the principles of protein-protein docking, available algorithms and software and discuss the recent examples, benefits, and drawbacks of protein-protein docking application to water-soluble proteins, membrane anchoring and transmembrane proteins, including GPCRs.

  13. Involvement of Arabidopsis glutaredoxin S14 in the maintenance of chlorophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Pascal; Becuwe, Noëlle; Tourrette, Sébastien; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    Plant class-II glutaredoxins (GRXs) are oxidoreductases carrying a CGFS active site signature and are able to bind iron-sulfur clusters in vitro. In order to explore the physiological functions of the 2 plastidial class-II isoforms, GRXS14 and GRXS16, we generated knockdown and overexpression Arabidopsis thaliana lines and characterized their phenotypes using physiological and biochemical approaches. Plants deficient in one GRX did not display any growth defect, whereas the growth of plants lacking both was slowed. Plants overexpressing GRXS14 exhibited reduced chlorophyll content in control, high-light, and high-salt conditions. However, when exposed to prolonged darkness, plants lacking GRXS14 showed accelerated chlorophyll loss compared to wild-type and overexpression lines. We observed that the GRXS14 abundance and the proportion of reduced form were modified in wild type upon darkness and high salt. The dark treatment also resulted in decreased abundance of proteins involved in the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins. We propose that the phenotype of GRXS14-modified lines results from its participation in the control of chlorophyll content in relation with light and osmotic conditions, possibly through a dual action in regulating the redox status of biosynthetic enzymes and contributing to the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters, which are essential cofactors in chlorophyll metabolism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  15. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  16. Endometrial proteins: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, M; Julkunen, M; Riittinen, L; Koistinen, R

    1992-06-01

    Uterine factors influence reproduction at the macro-anatomy level, and the effects of hormonal steroids on endometrial morphology are well recognized in the histopathological diagnosis of dysfunctional bleeding and infertility. During the past decade, attention has been paid to endometrial protein synthesis and secretion with respect to endocrine stimuli and implantation, and to the paracrine/autocrine effects of endometrial peptide growth factors, their binding proteins and other factors. The emphasis of this presentation is on protein secretion of the secretory endometrium, in which progesterone plays a pivotal role. Insulin-like growth factors have receptors on the endometrium, and IGF-binding proteins, stimulated by progesterone, modulate the effects of IGFs locally. Also other protein products of the secretory endometrium have been reviewed in this communication, with special emphasis on studies of a progesterone-associated endometrial protein which has many names in the literature, such as PEP, PP14, alpha 2-PEG and AUP. Extensive studies are ongoing in many laboratories to elucidate the regulation, function, interplay at tissue and cellular levels, and clinical significance of these proteins.

  17. Protein trapping of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Joo C.; Lin, Jack M.; Yaron, Peter N.; White, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We have observed the formation of protein-nanoparticle complexes at the air-water interfaces from three different methods of presenting the nanoparticles to proteins. The structures formed resemble the 'protein-nanoparticle corona' proposed by Lynch et al. [1-3) in relation to a possible route for nanoparticle entry into living cells. To do this, the methods of x-ray and neutron reflectivity (with isotopic contrast variation between the protein and nanoparticles) have been used to study the structures formed at the air-water interface of l 3 - casein presented to silica nanoparticle dispersions. Whilst the silica dispersions showed no observable reflectivity, strong signals appear in the reflectivity when protein is present. Drop-wise spreading of a small amount of protein at the air-silica sol interface and presentation of the silica sol to an isolated monomolecular protein film (made by the 'flow-trough' method [4]) gave an immediate signal. Mixing the components in solution only produces a slow response but in all cases a similar structure is formed. The different responses are interpreted in structural and stoichiometric ways.

  18. Intercellular protein-protein interactions at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofei; Hou, Dongmei; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions through which neurons send nerve impulses to communicate with other neurons or excitable cells. The appropriate formation of synapses, both spatially and temporally, is essential for brain function and depends on the intercellular protein-protein interactions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) at synaptic clefts. The CAM proteins link pre- and post-synaptic sites, and play essential roles in promoting synapse formation and maturation, maintaining synapse number and type, accumulating neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, controlling neuronal differentiation, and even regulating synaptic plasticity directly. Alteration of the interactions of CAMs leads to structural and functional impairments, which results in many neurological disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the functions of CAMs during development and in the mature neural system, as well as in the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. Here, we review the function of the major classes of CAMs, and how dysfunction of CAMs relates to several neurological disorders.

  19. Functional aspects of protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2009-01-01

    this into an intuitive perception of protein function is challenging. Flexibility is of overwhelming importance for protein function, and the changes in protein structure during interactions with binding partners can be dramatic. The present review addresses protein flexibility, focusing on protein-ligand interactions...

  20. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  1. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Fiser, Andras; Roderick, Steven L.; Takiff, Howard E.; Blanchard, John S.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S,T,A,V][D,N][L,F]-[S,T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Myc...

  2. Pierced Lasso Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Patricia

    Entanglement and knots are naturally occurring, where, in the microscopic world, knots in DNA and homopolymers are well characterized. The most complex knots are observed in proteins which are harder to investigate, as proteins are heteropolymers composed of a combination of 20 different amino acids with different individual biophysical properties. As new-knotted topologies and new proteins containing knots continue to be discovered and characterized, the investigation of knots in proteins has gained intense interest. Thus far, the principle focus has been on the evolutionary origin of tying a knot, with questions of how a protein chain `self-ties' into a knot, what the mechanism(s) are that contribute to threading, and the biological relevance and functional implication of a knotted topology in vivo gaining the most insight. Efforts to study the fully untied and unfolded chain indicate that the knot is highly stable, remaining intact in the unfolded state orders of magnitude longer than first anticipated. The persistence of ``stable'' knots in the unfolded state, together with the challenge of defining an unfolded and untied chain from an unfolded and knotted chain, complicates the study of fully untied protein in vitro. Our discovery of a new class of knotted proteins, the Pierced Lassos (PL) loop topology, simplifies the knotting approach. While PLs are not easily recognizable by the naked eye, they have now been identified in many proteins in the PDB through the use of computation tools. PL topologies are diverse proteins found in all kingdoms of life, performing a large variety of biological responses such as cell signaling, immune responses, transporters and inhibitors (http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/). Many of these PL topologies are secreted proteins, extracellular proteins, as well as, redox sensors, enzymes and metal and co-factor binding proteins; all of which provide a favorable environment for the formation of the disulphide bridge. In the PL

  3. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a balance between synthesis and hydrolysis. Aside from .... be used to follow the synthesis of this protein fraction. (Clarke, 1977a) .... form of digestive enzymes, urea and ammonia (Egan, ..... decreasing urine-nitrogen excretion (Thornton, Bird,.

  4. Dietary Proteins and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  5. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  6. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...... modulated by EDTA. This is ascribed to metal ion-protein interactions affecting the sites of initial oxidation. Hypochlorous acid gave low concentrations of released carbonyls, but high yields of protein-bound material. The peroxyl radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride...

  7. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  8. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils......, is a general hallmark. They also include the α1-antitrypsin deficiency, where disease-causing mutations in the serine protease inhibitor, α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), leads to accumulation of the aberrant protein in the liver of these patients. The native metastable structure of α1AT constitutes a molecular trap...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding...

  9. Protein turnover in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable advances have been made in the knowledge of the mechanisms and control of synthesis and degradation of proteins in animal tissues during the last decade. Most of the work on the measurement of synthetic and degradative rates of the mixed protein fraction from tissues has been conducted in the rat. There have, unfortunately, been few publications describing results of protein turnover studies with ruminants. Consideration is given here to the techniques used to measure protein turnover, and some of the results obtained, particularly with sheep, are summarized. No attempt has been made to discuss directly the situation in parasitized animals; rather the aim is to provide background information which complements other work dealing with the effects of parasites on the nitrogen metabolism of ruminants. (author)

  10. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...... characteristics of a miP. In this opinion article, we clearly state the characteristics of a miP as evidenced by known proteins that fit the definition; we explain why modulatory proteins misrepresented as miPs do not qualify as true miPs. We also discuss the evolutionary history of miPs, and how the miP concept...

  11. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  12. Interactive protein manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures

  13. The protein protocols handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, John M

    2002-01-01

    .... The new chapters cover with many rapidly developing areas, particularly the application of mass spectrometry in protein characterization, as well as the now well-established 2-D PAGE technique in proteomics...

  14. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  15. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  16. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  17. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals.

  18. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, Dalibor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 31-32 ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : pokeweed antiviral protein * flavodoxin-like protein * PSII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. The tubby family proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Jackson, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    The tubby mouse shows a tripartite syndrome characterized by maturity-onset obesity, blindness and deafness. The causative gene Tub is the founding member of a family of related proteins present throughout the animal and plant kingdoms, each characterized by a signature carboxy-terminal tubby domain. This domain consists of a β barrel enclosing a central α helix and binds selectively to specific membrane phosphoinositides. The vertebrate family of tubby-like proteins (TULPs) includes the foun...

  20. The caveolin proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Terence M; Lisanti, Michael P

    2004-01-01

    The caveolin gene family has three members in vertebrates: caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3. So far, most caveolin-related research has been conducted in mammals, but the proteins have also been found in other animals, including Xenopus laevis, Fugu rubripes, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Caveolins can serve as protein markers of caveolae ('little caves'), invaginations in the plasma membrane 50-100 nanometers in diameter. Caveolins are found predominantly at the plasma membrane but also ...

  1. More protein in cereals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  2. Electrophoretic transfer protein zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Hill, Adam P; Kashou, Anthony; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2011-04-15

    Zymography detects and characterizes proteolytic enzymes by electrophoresis of protease-containing samples into a nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel containing a copolymerized protein substrate. The usefulness of zymography for molecular weight determination and proteomic analysis is hampered by the fact that some proteases exhibit slower migration through a gel that contains substrate protein. This article introduces electrophoretic transfer protein zymography as one solution to this problem. In this technique, samples containing proteolytic enzymes are first resolved in nonreducing SDS-PAGE on a gel without protein substrate. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel previously prepared with a copolymerized protein substrate. The receiving gel is then developed as a zymogram to visualize clear or lightly stained bands in a dark background. Band intensities are linearly related to the amount of protease, extending the usefulness of the technique so long as conditions for transfer and development of the zymogram are kept constant. Conditions of transfer, such as the pore sizes of resolving and receiving gels and the transfer time relative to the molecular weight of the protease, are explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. More protein in cereals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-01

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  4. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  5. Competitive protein binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Toshio; Oka, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of cyclic GMP (cGMP) by competitive protein binding assay was described and discussed. The principle of binding assay was represented briefly. Procedures of our method by binding protein consisted of preparation of cGMP binding protein, selection of 3 H-cyclic GMP on market, and measurement procedures. In our method, binding protein was isolated from the chrysalis of silk worm. This method was discussed from the points of incubation medium, specificity of binding protein, the separation of bound cGMP from free cGMP, and treatment of tissue from which cGMP was extracted. cGMP existing in the tissue was only one tenth or one scores of cGMP, and in addition, cGMP competed with cGMP in binding with binding protein. Therefore, Murad's technique was applied to the isolation of cGMP. This method provided the measurement with sufficient accuracy; the contamination by cAMP was within several per cent. (Kanao, N.)

  6. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  7. Unique Features of Halophilic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Proteins from moderate and extreme halophiles have unique characteristics. They are highly acidic and hydrophilic, similar to intrinsically disordered proteins. These characteristics make the halophilic proteins soluble in water and fold reversibly. In addition to reversible folding, the rate of refolding of halophilic proteins from denatured structure is generally slow, often taking several days, for example, for extremely halophilic proteins. This slow folding rate makes the halophilic proteins a novel model system for folding mechanism analysis. High solubility and reversible folding also make the halophilic proteins excellent fusion partners for soluble expression of recombinant proteins.

  8. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  9. Bioinformatics and moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eHernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyse and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are: a remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, b detection of functional motifs and domains, c analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs, d match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE, e mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs have the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations –it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/, previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses.

  10. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 654346314 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Mastigocoleus testarum MLEQIELKPNWERNQVAFLDFIVNGTSLHDQFDHPQVRDLCTVFTSDQYEFDGKSSAAIHASWFLGYGETPFPDDRIPVYICSSGDFDCGTVTAYLTVNDGTIKWSEFRIERLTEELQDQPIELTSVKQCVFERNAYEKLFQPFLRKVID

  12. Protein Correlation Profiles Identify Lipid Droplet Proteins with High Confidence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahmer, Natalie; Hilger, Maximiliane; Kory, Nora; Wilfling, Florian; Stoehr, Gabriele; Mann, Matthias; Farese, Robert V.; Walther, Tobias C.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are important organelles in energy metabolism and lipid storage. Their cores are composed of neutral lipids that form a hydrophobic phase and are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer that harbors specific proteins. Most well-established LD proteins perform important functions, particularly in cellular lipid metabolism. Morphological studies show LDs in close proximity to and interacting with membrane-bound cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endosomes. Because of these close associations, it is difficult to purify LDs to homogeneity. Consequently, the confident identification of bona fide LD proteins via proteomics has been challenging. Here, we report a methodology for LD protein identification based on mass spectrometry and protein correlation profiles. Using LD purification and quantitative, high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified LD proteins by correlating their purification profiles to those of known LD proteins. Application of the protein correlation profile strategy to LDs isolated from Drosophila S2 cells led to the identification of 111 LD proteins in a cellular LD fraction in which 1481 proteins were detected. LD localization was confirmed in a subset of identified proteins via microscopy of the expressed proteins, thereby validating the approach. Among the identified LD proteins were both well-characterized LD proteins and proteins not previously known to be localized to LDs. Our method provides a high-confidence LD proteome of Drosophila cells and a novel approach that can be applied to identify LD proteins of other cell types and tissues. PMID:23319140

  13. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact...

  14. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  15. Changes in protein composition and protein phosphorylation during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in protein profiles and protein phosphorylation were studied in various stages of germinating somatic and zygotic embryos. Many proteins, which were expressed in cotyledonary stage somatic embryos, were also present in the zygotic embryos obtained from mature dry seed. The intensity of 22 kDa protein was ...

  16. A Stevedore's protein knot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bölinger

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein knots, mostly regarded as intriguing oddities, are gradually being recognized as significant structural motifs. Seven distinctly knotted folds have already been identified. It is by and large unclear how these exceptional structures actually fold, and only recently, experiments and simulations have begun to shed some light on this issue. In checking the new protein structures submitted to the Protein Data Bank, we encountered the most complex and the smallest knots to date: A recently uncovered alpha-haloacid dehalogenase structure contains a knot with six crossings, a so-called Stevedore knot, in a projection onto a plane. The smallest protein knot is present in an as yet unclassified protein fragment that consists of only 92 amino acids. The topological complexity of the Stevedore knot presents a puzzle as to how it could possibly fold. To unravel this enigma, we performed folding simulations with a structure-based coarse-grained model and uncovered a possible mechanism by which the knot forms in a single loop flip.

  17. Protein Annotation from Protein Interaction Networks and Gene Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Cao D.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.; Cios, Krzysztof J.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for annotating protein function that combines Naïve Bayes and association rules, and takes advantage of the underlying topology in protein interaction networks and the structure of graphs in the Gene Ontology. We apply our method to proteins from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and show that, in comparison with other approaches, it predicts protein functions with significantly higher recall with no loss of precision. Specifically, it achieves 51% precis...

  18. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...... example of soundfile was obtained from using Steered Molecular Dynamics for stretching the neck region of the scallop myosin molecule (in rigor, PDB-id: 1SR6), in such a way as to cause a rotation of the myosin head. Myosin is the molecule responsible for producing the force during muscle contraction...

  20. Can infrared spectroscopy provide information on protein-protein interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, Parvez I

    2010-08-01

    For most biophysical techniques, characterization of protein-protein interactions is challenging; this is especially true with methods that rely on a physical phenomenon that is common to both of the interacting proteins. Thus, for example, in IR spectroscopy, the carbonyl vibration (1600-1700 cm(-1)) associated with the amide bonds from both of the interacting proteins will overlap extensively, making the interpretation of spectral changes very complicated. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy, where one of the interacting proteins is uniformly labelled with (13)C or (13)C,(15)N has been introduced as a solution to this problem, enabling the study of protein-protein interactions using IR spectroscopy. The large shift of the amide I band (approx. 45 cm(-1) towards lower frequency) upon (13)C labelling of one of the proteins reveals the amide I band of the unlabelled protein, enabling it to be used as a probe for monitoring conformational changes. With site-specific isotopic labelling, structural resolution at the level of individual amino acid residues can be achieved. Furthermore, the ability to record IR spectra of proteins in diverse environments means that isotope-edited IR spectroscopy can be used to structurally characterize difficult systems such as protein-protein complexes bound to membranes or large insoluble peptide/protein aggregates. In the present article, examples of application of isotope-edited IR spectroscopy for studying protein-protein interactions are provided.

  1. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  2. Protein: FBA7 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA7 claudin-zona occluden Tjp1 Zo1 Tight junction protein ZO-1 Tight junction protein 1, Zona occludens pr...otein 1, Zonula occludens protein 1 10090 Mus musculus 21872 P39447 2RRM P39447 21431884 ...

  3. Protein: FEA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA3 AREB pathway: Signaling proteins At4g11890/T26M18_100 At4g11890, Protein kinase family pr...otein, Putative uncharacterized protein At4g11890/T26M18_100 3702 Arabidopsis thaliana 826796 Q8GY82 22225700 ...

  4. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author) [de

  6. Urinary Protein Biomarker Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    silica emitter via a Valco stainless steel union. Four μL of individual peptide fractions (total volume 20 μL) following PRISM were injected for LC...secreted cement gland protein XAG-2 homolog, AGR2 belongs to the protein disulfide 5 isomerase (PDI) family. The strongest AGR2 expression has...µm C18 column (75 µm i.d. × 10 cm), which was connected to a chemically etched 20 µm i.d. fused-silica emitter via a Valco stainless steel union

  7. Protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Zubin; Ee, Looi C

    2009-10-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common problem worldwide and occurs in both developing and industrialized nations. In the developing world, it is frequently a result of socioeconomic, political, or environmental factors. In contrast, protein energy malnutrition in the developed world usually occurs in the context of chronic disease. There remains much variation in the criteria used to define malnutrition, with each method having its own limitations. Early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM.

  8. Heme Sensor Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Hazel M.; Munro, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group best known for roles in oxygen transport, oxidative catalysis, and respiratory electron transport. Recent years have seen the roles of heme extended to sensors of gases such as O2 and NO and cell redox state, and as mediators of cellular responses to changes in intracellular levels of these gases. The importance of heme is further evident from identification of proteins that bind heme reversibly, using it as a signal, e.g. to regulate gene expression in circadian rhythm pathways and control heme synthesis itself. In this minireview, we explore the current knowledge of the diverse roles of heme sensor proteins. PMID:23539616

  9. Protein-protein interactions: an application of Tus-Ter mediated protein microarray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaraman, Kalavathy; Chatterjee, Deb K

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a novel, cost-effective microarray strategy that utilizes expression-ready plasmid DNAs to generate protein arrays on-demand and its use to validate protein-protein interactions. These expression plasmids were constructed in such a way so as to serve a dual purpose of synthesizing the protein of interest as well as capturing the synthesized protein. The microarray system is based on the high affinity binding of Escherichia coli "Tus" protein to "Ter," a 20 bp DNA sequence involved in the regulation of DNA replication. The protein expression is carried out in a cell-free protein synthesis system, with rabbit reticulocyte lysates, and the target proteins are detected either by labeled incorporated tag specific or by gene-specific antibodies. This microarray system has been successfully used for the detection of protein-protein interaction because both the target protein and the query protein can be transcribed and translated simultaneously in the microarray slides. The utility of this system for detecting protein-protein interaction is demonstrated by a few well-known examples: Jun/Fos, FRB/FKBP12, p53/MDM2, and CDK4/p16. In all these cases, the presence of protein complexes resulted in the localization of fluorophores at the specific sites of the immobilized target plasmids. Interestingly, during our interactions studies we also detected a previously unknown interaction between CDK2 and p16. Thus, this Tus-Ter based system of protein microarray can be used for the validation of known protein interactions as well as for identifying new protein-protein interactions. In addition, it can be used to examine and identify targets of nucleic acid-protein, ligand-receptor, enzyme-substrate, and drug-protein interactions.

  10. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; Duinkerken, Van Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more

  11. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  12. HIV protein sequence hotspots for crosstalk with host hub proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sarmady

    Full Text Available HIV proteins target host hub proteins for transient binding interactions. The presence of viral proteins in the infected cell results in out-competition of host proteins in their interaction with hub proteins, drastically affecting cell physiology. Functional genomics and interactome datasets can be used to quantify the sequence hotspots on the HIV proteome mediating interactions with host hub proteins. In this study, we used the HIV and human interactome databases to identify HIV targeted host hub proteins and their host binding partners (H2. We developed a high throughput computational procedure utilizing motif discovery algorithms on sets of protein sequences, including sequences of HIV and H2 proteins. We identified as HIV sequence hotspots those linear motifs that are highly conserved on HIV sequences and at the same time have a statistically enriched presence on the sequences of H2 proteins. The HIV protein motifs discovered in this study are expressed by subsets of H2 host proteins potentially outcompeted by HIV proteins. A large subset of these motifs is involved in cleavage, nuclear localization, phosphorylation, and transcription factor binding events. Many such motifs are clustered on an HIV sequence in the form of hotspots. The sequential positions of these hotspots are consistent with the curated literature on phenotype altering residue mutations, as well as with existing binding site data. The hotspot map produced in this study is the first global portrayal of HIV motifs involved in altering the host protein network at highly connected hub nodes.

  13. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  14. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider may be able to order a test that is done on just one urine sample (protein-to-creatinine ratio). Normal Results The normal ... Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test ... Abnormal results may be due to: A group ...

  15. Disorder in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarage, James Braun, II

    1990-01-01

    Methods have been developed for analyzing the diffuse x-ray scattering in the halos about a crystal's Bragg reflections as a means of determining correlations in atomic displacements in protein crystals. The diffuse intensity distribution for rhombohedral insulin, tetragonal lysozyme, and triclinic lysozyme crystals was best simulated in terms of exponential displacement correlation functions. About 90% of the disorder can be accounted for by internal movements correlated with a decay distance of about 6A; the remaining 10% corresponds to intermolecular movements that decay in a distance the order of size of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that protein crystals fit into neither the Einstein nor the Debye paradigms for thermally fluctuating crystalline solids. Unlike the Einstein model, there are correlations in the atomic displacements, but these correlations decay more steeply with distance than predicted by the Debye-Waller model for an elastic solid. The observed displacement correlations are liquid -like in the sense that they decay exponentially with the distance between atoms, just as positional correlations in a liquid. This liquid-like disorder is similar to the disorder observed in 2-D crystals of polystyrene latex spheres, and similar systems where repulsive interactions dominate; hence, these colloidal crystals appear to provide a better analogy for the dynamics of protein crystals than perfectly elastic lattices.

  16. Optimization of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, D.S.; Goedhart, J.; Hink, M.A.; van Weeren, L.; Joosen, L.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Engelborghs, Y.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fluorescent protein (FP) variants have been engineered to fluoresce in all different colors; to display photoswitchable, or photochromic, behavior; or to show yet other beneficial properties that enable or enhance a still growing set of new fluorescence spectroscopy and microcopy

  17. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Tuber storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R

    2003-06-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose-binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers.

  19. Mobility of photosynthetic proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaňa, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, 2-3 (2013), s. 465-479 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/12/0304; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Photosynthesis * Protein mobility * FRAP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor : 3.185, year: 2013

  20. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2003), s. 30-31 ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : antiviral proteins Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  1. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030 ...

  2. Radioimmunoassay of protein hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talas, M.; Fingerova, H.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the history of RIA methods for FSH, LH, HCG, HPL and prolactin determinations with special regard to the double antibody method in a kinetic system. Problems are shown in 125 I-labelling protein hormones in preparing own antisera. (L.O.)

  3. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 1. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins: A Historical Perspective on the Development of Concepts and Techniques. General Article Volume 22 Issue 1 January 2017 pp 37-50 ...

  4. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  5. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  6. Phosphorylation of human link proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oester, D.A.; Caterson, B.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    Three link proteins of 48, 44 and 40 kDa were purified from human articular cartilage and identified with monoclonal anti-link protein antibody 8-A-4. Two sets of lower molecular weight proteins of 30-31 kDa and 24-26 kDa also contained link protein epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibody and were most likely degradative products of the intact link proteins. The link proteins of 48 and 40 kDa were identified as phosphoproteins while the 44 kDa link protein did not contain 32 P. The phosphorylated 48 and 40 kDa link proteins contained approximately 2 moles PO 4 /mole link protein

  7. Coevolution study of mitochondria respiratory chain proteins: toward the understanding of protein--protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Ge, Yan; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Yu, Jun

    2011-05-20

    Coevolution can be seen as the interdependency between evolutionary histories. In the context of protein evolution, functional correlation proteins are ever-present coordinated evolutionary characters without disruption of organismal integrity. As to complex system, there are two forms of protein--protein interactions in vivo, which refer to inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction. In this paper, we studied the difference of coevolution characters between inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction using "Mirror tree" method on the respiratory chain (RC) proteins. We divided the correlation coefficients of every pairwise RC proteins into two groups corresponding to the binary protein--protein interaction in intra-complex and the binary protein--protein interaction in inter-complex, respectively. A dramatical discrepancy is detected between the coevolution characters of the two sets of protein interactions (Wilcoxon test, p-value = 4.4 × 10(-6)). Our finding reveals some critical information on coevolutionary study and assists the mechanical investigation of protein--protein interaction. Furthermore, the results also provide some unique clue for supramolecular organization of protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. More detailed binding sites map and genome information of nuclear encoded RC proteins will be extraordinary valuable for the further mitochondria dynamics study. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Rational synthesis of high nuclearity Mo/Fe/S clusters: the reductive coupling approach in the convenient synthesis of (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(6)S(8)(PR(3))(6) [R = Et, (n)Pr, (n)Bu] and the new [(Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(2)S(3)O(PEt(3))(3)Cl]-1/2(Fe(PEt(3))(2)(MeCN)(4)) and (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(3)S(5)(PEt(3))(5) clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Koutmos, M; Ahmad, S A; Coucouvanis, D

    2001-11-05

    A general method for the synthesis of high nuclearity Mo/Fe/S clusters is presented and involves the reductive coupling of the (Et(4)N)(2)[(Cl(4)-cat)MoOFeS(2)Cl(2)] (I) and (Et(4)N)(2)[Fe(2)S(2)Cl(4)] (II) clusters. The reaction of I and II with Fe(PR(3))(2)Cl(2) or sodium salts of noncoordinating anions such as NaPF(6) or NaBPh(4) in the presence of PR(3) (R = Et, (n)Pr, or (n)Bu) affords (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(6)S(8)(PR(3))(6) [R = Et (IIIa), (n)Pr (IIIb), (n)Bu (IIIc)], Fe(6)S(6)(PEt(3))(4)Cl(2) (IV) and (PF(6))[Fe(6)S(8)(P(n)Pr(3))(6)] (V) as byproducts. The isolation of (Et(4)N)[Fe(PEt(3))Cl(3)] (VI), NaCl, and SPEt(3) supports a reductive coupling mechanism. Cluster IV and V also have been synthesized by the reductive self-coupling of compound II. The reductive coupling reaction between I and II by PEt(3) and NaPF(6) in a 1:1 ratio produces the (Et(4)N)(2)[(Cl(4)-cat)Mo(L)Fe(3)S(4)Cl(3)] clusters [L = MeCN (VIIa), THF (VIIb)]. The hitherto unknown [(Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(2)S(3)O(PEt(3))(3)Cl](+) cluster (VIII) has been isolated as the 2:1 salt of the (Fe(PEt(3))(2)(MeCN)(4))(2+) cation after the reductive self-coupling reaction of I in the presence of Fe(PEt(3))(2)Cl(2). Cluster VIII crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 11.098(3) A, b = 22.827(6) A, c = 25.855(6) A, beta = 91.680(4) degrees, and Z = 4. The formal oxidation states of metal atoms in VIII have been assigned as Mo(III), Mo(IV), Fe(II), and Fe(III) on the basis of zero-field Mössbauer spectra. The Fe(PEt(3))(2)(MeCN)(4) cation of VIII is also synthesized independently, isolated as the BPh(4)(-) salt (IX), and has been structurally characterized. The reductive coupling of compound I also affords in low yield the new (Cl(4)-cat)(2)Mo(2)Fe(3)S(5)(PEt(3))(5) cluster (X) as a byproduct. Cluster X crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n with a = 14.811(3) A, b = 22.188(4) A, c = 21.864(4) A, beta = 100.124(3) degrees, and Z = 4 and the structure shows very short Mo

  9. Fluorogen-activating proteins: beyond classical fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Xu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique for the real-time noninvasive monitoring of protein dynamics. Recently, fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs/fluorogen probes for protein imaging were developed. Unlike the traditional fluorescent proteins (FPs, FAPs do not fluoresce unless bound to their specific small-molecule fluorogens. When using FAPs/fluorogen probes, a washing step is not required for the removal of free probes from the cells, thus allowing rapid and specific detection of proteins in living cells with high signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, with different fluorogens, living cell multi-color proteins labeling system was developed. In this review, we describe about the discovery of FAPs, the design strategy of FAP fluorogens, the application of the FAP technology and the advances of FAP technology in protein labeling systems. KEY WORDS: Fluorogen activating proteins, Fluorogens, Genetically encoded sensors, Fluorescence imaging, Molecular imaging

  10. Utilization of soya protein as an alternative protein source in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-05

    Jan 5, 2009 ... For carcass trait, ash, crude fat, and energy varied significantly with soya protein ... high-protein content, relatively well-balanced amino acid profile ..... and organoleptic quality of flesh of brook char (Salvelinus fontinalis).

  11. Analysis of protein folds using protein contact networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a well-recognized classification system of proteins, which is based on manual in- ... can easily correspond to the information in the 2D matrix. ..... [7] U K Muppirala and Zhijun Li, Protein Engineering, Design & Selection 19, 265 (2006).

  12. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  13. A Mesoscopic Model for Protein-Protein Interactions in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mikael; Jönsson, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Protein self-association may be detrimental in biological systems, but can be utilized in a controlled fashion for protein crystallization. It is hence of considerable interest to understand how factors like solution conditions prevent or promote aggregation. Here we present a computational model describing interactions between protein molecules in solution. The calculations are based on a molecular description capturing the detailed structure of the protein molecule using x-ray or nuclear ma...

  14. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  15. Immunostimulatory mouse granuloma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontan, E; Fauve, R M; Hevin, B; Jusforgues, H

    1983-10-01

    Earlier studies have shown that from subcutaneous talc-induced granuloma in mice, a fraction could be extracted that fully protected mice against Listeria monocytogenes. Using standard biochemical procedures--i.e., ammonium sulfate fractionation, preparative electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis--we have now purified an active factor to homogeneity. A single band was obtained in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel with an apparent Mr of 55,000. It migrated with alpha 1-globulins and the isoelectric point was 5 +/- 0.1. The biological activity was destroyed with Pronase but not with trypsin and a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum was obtained. The intravenous injection of 5 micrograms of this "mouse granuloma protein" fully protects mice against a lethal inoculum of L. monocytogenes. Moreover, after their incubation with 10 nM mouse granuloma protein, mouse peritoneal cells became cytostatic against Lewis carcinoma cells.

  16. Stability of Hyperthermophilic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel

    stability by randomly generate mutants and lengthy screening processes to identify the best new mutants. However, with the increase in available genomic sequences of thermophilic or hyperthermophilic organisms a world of enzymes with intrinsic high stability are now available. As these organisms are adapted...... to life at high temperatures so are their enzymes, as a result the high stability is accompanied by low activity at moderate temperatures. Thus, much effort had been put into decoding the mechanisms behind the high stability of the thermophilic enzymes. The hope is to enable scientist to design enzymes...... in the high stability of hyperthermophilic enzymes. The thesis starts with an introduction to the field of protein and enzyme stability with special focus on the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes and proteins. After the introduction three original research manuscripts present the experimental data...

  17. Structures composing protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrycht, Jaroslav; Sigler, Karel; Souček, Pavel; Hudeček, Jiří

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes available data concerning intradomain structures (IS) such as functionally important amino acid residues, short linear motifs, conserved or disordered regions, peptide repeats, broadly occurring secondary structures or folds, etc. IS form structural features (units or elements) necessary for interactions with proteins or non-peptidic ligands, enzyme reactions and some structural properties of proteins. These features have often been related to a single structural level (e.g. primary structure) mostly requiring certain structural context of other levels (e.g. secondary structures or supersecondary folds) as follows also from some examples reported or demonstrated here. In addition, we deal with some functionally important dynamic properties of IS (e.g. flexibility and different forms of accessibility), and more special dynamic changes of IS during enzyme reactions and allosteric regulation. Selected notes concern also some experimental methods, still more necessary tools of bioinformatic processing and clinically interesting relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of protein-protein interactions by ribosome display and protein in situ immobilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Liu, Hong; Turner, Martin; Taussig, Michael J

    2009-12-31

    We describe a method for identification of protein-protein interactions by combining two cell-free protein technologies, namely ribosome display and protein in situ immobilisation. The method requires only PCR fragments as the starting material, the target proteins being made through cell-free protein synthesis, either associated with their encoding mRNA as ribosome complexes or immobilised on a solid surface. The use of ribosome complexes allows identification of interacting protein partners from their attached coding mRNA. To demonstrate the procedures, we have employed the lymphocyte signalling proteins Vav1 and Grb2 and confirmed the interaction between Grb2 and the N-terminal SH3 domain of Vav1. The method has promise for library screening of pairwise protein interactions, down to the analytical level of individual domain or motif mapping.

  19. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions with Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarson, Margret B; Pugacheva, Elena N; Orlinick, Jason R

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONGlutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins have had a wide range of applications since their introduction as tools for synthesis of recombinant proteins in bacteria. GST was originally selected as a fusion moiety because of several desirable properties. First and foremost, when expressed in bacteria alone, or as a fusion, GST is not sequestered in inclusion bodies (in contrast to previous fusion protein systems). Second, GST can be affinity-purified without denaturation because it binds to immobilized glutathione, which provides the basis for simple purification. Consequently, GST fusion proteins are routinely used for antibody generation and purification, protein-protein interaction studies, and biochemical analysis. This article describes the use of GST fusion proteins as probes for the identification of protein-protein interactions.

  20. Why fibrous proteins are romantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C

    1998-01-01

    Here I give a personal account of the great history of fibrous protein structure. I describe how Astbury first recognized the essential simplicity of fibrous proteins and their paradigmatic role in protein structure. The poor diffraction patterns yielded by these proteins were then deciphered by Pauling, Crick, Ramachandran and others (in part by model building) to reveal alpha-helical coiled coils, beta-sheets, and the collagen triple helical coiled coil-all characterized by different local sequence periodicities. Longer-range sequence periodicities (or "magic numbers") present in diverse fibrous proteins, such as collagen, tropomyosin, paramyosin, myosin, and were then shown to account for the characteristic axial repeats observed in filaments of these proteins. More recently, analysis of fibrous protein structure has been extended in many cases to atomic resolution, and some systems, such as "leucine zippers," are providing a deeper understanding of protein design than similar studies of globular proteins. In the last sections, I provide some dramatic examples of fibrous protein dynamics. One example is the so-called "spring-loaded" mechanism for viral fusion by the hemagglutinin protein of influenza. Another is the possible conformational changes in prion proteins, implicated in "mad cow disease," which may be related to similar transitions in a variety of globular and fibrous proteins. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  1. Tuber Storage Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    SHEWRY, PETER R.

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits act...

  2. Prion Protein and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eGasperini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrPC has been widely investigated ever since its conformational isoform, the prion (or PrPSc, was identified as the etiological agent of prion disorders. The high homology shared by the PrPC-encoding gene among mammals, its high turnover rate and expression in every tissue strongly suggest that PrPC may possess key physiological functions. Therefore, defining PrPC roles, properties and fate in the physiology of mammalian cells would be fundamental to understand its pathological involvement in prion diseases. Since the incidence of these neurodegenerative disorders is enhanced in aging, understanding PrPC functions in this life phase may be of crucial importance. Indeed, a large body of evidence suggests that PrPC plays a neuroprotective and antioxidant role. Moreover, it has been suggested that PrPC is involved in Alzheimer disease, another neurodegenerative pathology that develops predominantly in the aging population. In prion diseases, PrPC function is likely lost upon protein aggregation occurring in the course of the disease. Additionally, the aging process may alter PrPC biochemical properties, thus influencing its propensity to convert into PrPSc. Both phenomena may contribute to the disease development and progression. In Alzheimer disease, PrPC has a controversial role because its presence seems to mediate β-amyloid toxicity, while its down-regulation correlates with neuronal death. The role of PrPC in aging has been investigated from different perspectives, often leading to contrasting results. The putative protein functions in aging have been studied in relation to memory, behavior and myelin maintenance. In aging mice, PrPC changes in subcellular localization and post-translational modifications have been explored in an attempt to relate them to different protein roles and propensity to convert into PrPSc. Here we provide an overview of the most relevant studies attempting to delineate PrPC functions and

  3. The mitochondrial uncoupling proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ledesma, Amalia; de Lacoba, Mario García; Rial, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    The uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are transporters, present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, that mediate a regulated discharge of the proton gradient that is generated by the respiratory chain. This energy-dissipatory mechanism can serve functions such as thermogenesis, maintenance of the redox balance, or reduction in the production of reactive oxygen species. Some UCP homologs may not act as true uncouplers, however, and their activity has yet to be defined. The UCPs are integral membrane...

  4. Protein engineering techniques gateways to synthetic protein universe

    CERN Document Server

    Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This brief provides a broad overview of protein-engineering research, offering a glimpse of the most common experimental methods. It also presents various computational programs with applications that are widely used in directed evolution, computational and de novo protein design. Further, it sheds light on the advantages and pitfalls of existing methodologies and future perspectives of protein engineering techniques.

  5. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  6. Molecular simulations of lipid-mediated protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meyer, F.J.M.; Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental results revealed that lipid-mediated interactions due to hydrophobic forces may be important in determining the protein topology after insertion in the membrane, in regulating the protein activity, in protein aggregation and in signal transduction. To gain insight into the

  7. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    membrane targeting and association with ERES. We determine the localization of Sec16B by transient expression in HeLa cells, and find that the protein is evenly distributed throughout the cell except the nucleus at 37°C, as is also observed with mSec16A. When the temperature is lowered to 15°C, mSec16B...... proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms...... that regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...

  8. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-01-01

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition

  9. Neutron protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    X-ray diffraction of single crystal has enriched the knowledge of various biological molecules such as proteins, DNA, t-RNA, viruses, etc. It is difficult to make structural analysis of hydrogen atoms in a protein using X-ray crystallography, whereas neutron diffraction seems usable to directly determine the location of those hydrogen atoms. Here, neutron diffraction method was applied to structural analysis of hen egg-white lysozyme. Since the crystal size of a protein to analyze is generally small (5 mm{sup 3} at most), the neutron beam at the sample position in monochromator system was set to less than 5 x 5 mm{sup 2} and beam divergence to 0.4 degree or less. Neutron imaging plate with {sup 6}Li or Gd mixed with photostimulated luminescence material was used and about 2500 Bragg reflections were recorded in one crystal setting. A total of 38278 reflections for 2.0 A resolution were collected in less than 10 days. Thus, stereo views of Trp-111 omit map around the indol ring of Trp-111 was presented and the three-dimensional arrangement of 696H and 264D atoms in the lysozyme molecules was determined using the omit map. (M.N.)

  10. Promoter polymorphisms in two overlapping 6p25 genes implicate mitochondrial proteins in cognitive deficit in schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jablensky, A

    2011-10-04

    In a previous study, we detected a 6p25-p24 region linked to schizophrenia in families with high composite cognitive deficit (CD) scores, a quantitative trait integrating multiple cognitive measures. Association mapping of a 10 Mb interval identified a 260 kb region with a cluster of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with CD scores and memory performance. The region contains two colocalising genes, LYRM4 and FARS2, both encoding mitochondrial proteins. The two tagging SNPs with strongest evidence of association were located around the overlapping putative promoters, with rs2224391 predicted to alter a transcription factor binding site (TFBS). Sequencing the promoter region identified 22 SNPs, many predicted to affect TFBSs, in a tight linkage disequilibrium block. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed promoter activity in the predicted promoter region, and demonstrated marked downregulation of expression in the LYRM4 direction under the haplotype comprising the minor alleles of promoter SNPs, which however is not driven by rs2224391. Experimental evidence from LYRM4 expression in lymphoblasts, gel-shift assays and modelling of DNA breathing dynamics pointed to two adjacent promoter SNPs, rs7752203-rs4141761, as the functional variants affecting expression. Their C-G alleles were associated with higher transcriptional activity and preferential binding of nuclear proteins, whereas the G-A combination had opposite effects and was associated with poor memory and high CD scores. LYRM4 is a eukaryote-specific component of the mitochondrial biogenesis of Fe-S clusters, essential cofactors in multiple processes, including oxidative phosphorylation. LYRM4 downregulation may be one of the mechanisms involved in inefficient oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress, increasingly recognised as contributors to schizophrenia pathogenesis.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 4 October 2011; doi:10.1038\\/mp.2011.129.

  11. Noncovalent synthesis of protein dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempens, E.H.M.; Baal, van I.; Dongen, van J.L.J.; Hackeng, T.M.; Merkx, M.; Meijer, E.W.

    2009-01-01

    The covalent synthesis of complex biomolecular systems such as multivalent protein dendrimers often proceeds with low efficiency, thereby making alternative strategies based on noncovalent chemistry of high interest. Here, the synthesis of protein dendrimers using a strong but noncovalent

  12. Protein folding and wring resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The polypeptide chain of a protein is shown to obey topological contraints which enable long range excitations in the form of wring modes of the protein backbone. Wring modes of proteins of specific lengths can therefore resonate with molecular modes present in the cell. It is suggested that prot......The polypeptide chain of a protein is shown to obey topological contraints which enable long range excitations in the form of wring modes of the protein backbone. Wring modes of proteins of specific lengths can therefore resonate with molecular modes present in the cell. It is suggested...... that protein folding takes place when the amplitude of a wring excitation becomes so large that it is energetically favorable to bend the protein backbone. The condition under which such structural transformations can occur is found, and it is shown that both cold and hot denaturation (the unfolding...

  13. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a ... in mice suggests that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type ...

  14. Pathways of Unconventional Protein Secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouille, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Secretory proteins are conventionally transported through the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and then to the plasma membrane where they are released into the extracellular space. However, numerous substrates also reach these destinations using unconventional pathways. Unconventional protein

  15. Pathways of Unconventional Protein Secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouille, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Secretory proteins are conventionally transported through the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and then to the plasma membrane where they are released into the extracellular space. However, numerous substrates also reach these destinations using unconventional pathways. Unconventional protein

  16. Designing proteins for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Greg A; Marshall, Shannon A; Plecs, Joseph J; Mayo, Stephen L; Desjarlais, John R

    2003-08-01

    Protein design is becoming an increasingly useful tool for optimizing protein drugs and creating novel biotherapeutics. Recent progress includes the engineering of monoclonal antibodies, cytokines, enzymes and viral fusion inhibitors.

  17. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  19. Protein annotation from protein interaction networks and Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cao D; Gardiner, Katheleen J; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2011-10-01

    We introduce a novel method for annotating protein function that combines Naïve Bayes and association rules, and takes advantage of the underlying topology in protein interaction networks and the structure of graphs in the Gene Ontology. We apply our method to proteins from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and show that, in comparison with other approaches, it predicts protein functions with significantly higher recall with no loss of precision. Specifically, it achieves 51% precision and 60% recall versus 45% and 26% for Majority and 24% and 61% for χ²-statistics, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  1. A Novel Approach for Protein-Named Entity Recognition and Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers focus on developing protein-named entity recognition (Protein-NER or PPI extraction systems. However, the studies about these two topics cannot be merged well; then existing PPI extraction systems’ Protein-NER still needs to improve. In this paper, we developed the protein-protein interaction extraction system named PPIMiner based on Support Vector Machine (SVM and parsing tree. PPIMiner consists of three main models: natural language processing (NLP model, Protein-NER model, and PPI discovery model. The Protein-NER model, which is named ProNER, identifies the protein names based on two methods: dictionary-based method and machine learning-based method. ProNER is capable of identifying more proteins than dictionary-based Protein-NER model in other existing systems. The final discovered PPIs extracted via PPI discovery model are represented in detail because we showed the protein interaction types and the occurrence frequency through two different methods. In the experiments, the result shows that the performances achieved by our ProNER and PPI discovery model are better than other existing tools. PPIMiner applied this protein-named entity recognition approach and parsing tree based PPI extraction method to improve the performance of PPI extraction. We also provide an easy-to-use interface to access PPIs database and an online system for PPIs extraction and Protein-NER.

  2. Proteins: Chemistry, Characterization, and Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sforza, S.; Tedeschi, T.; Wierenga, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are one of the major macronutrients in food, and several traditional food commodities are good sources of proteins (meat, egg, milk and dairy products, fish, and soya). Proteins are polymers made by 20 different amino acids. They might undergo desired or undesired chemical or enzymatic

  3. Protein: FBA8 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA8 LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain-assembly complex) RNF31 ZIBRA RNF31 RING finger pr...otein 31 HOIL-1-interacting protein, Zinc in-between-RING-finger ubiquitin-associated domain protein 9606 Homo sapiens Q96EP0 55072 2CT7 55072 Q96EP0 ...

  4. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules MAVS IPS1, KIAA1271, VISA VISA_(gene) Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling pr...otein CARD adapter inducing interferon beta, Interferon beta promoter stimulator protein... 1, Putative NF-kappa-B-activating protein 031N, Virus-induced-signaling adapter 9606 Homo sapiens Q7Z434 57506 2VGQ 57506 ...

  5. Protein: FBA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA3 Ubiquitination CBLB RNF56 CBLB E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase CBL-B Casitas B-lineage lymphoma pr...oto-oncogene b, RING finger protein 56, SH3-binding protein CBL-B, Signal transduction prote

  6. Protein: MPB2 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPB2 Ubiquitin ligases WWP1 WWP1 NEDD4-like E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase WWP1 Atrophin-1-interacting pr...otein 5, WW domain-containing protein 1 9606 Homo sapiens Q9H0M0 11059 2OP7, 1ND7 11059 ...

  7. Hydrophobic patches on protein surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijnzaad, P.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a prime determinant of the structure and function of proteins. It is the driving force behind the folding of soluble proteins, and when exposed on the surface, it is frequently involved in recognition and binding of ligands and other proteins. The energetic cost of

  8. Modeling complexes of modeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A

    2017-03-01

    Structural characterization of proteins is essential for understanding life processes at the molecular level. However, only a fraction of known proteins have experimentally determined structures. This fraction is even smaller for protein-protein complexes. Thus, structural modeling of protein-protein interactions (docking) primarily has to rely on modeled structures of the individual proteins, which typically are less accurate than the experimentally determined ones. Such "double" modeling is the Grand Challenge of structural reconstruction of the interactome. Yet it remains so far largely untested in a systematic way. We present a comprehensive validation of template-based and free docking on a set of 165 complexes, where each protein model has six levels of structural accuracy, from 1 to 6 Å C α RMSD. Many template-based docking predictions fall into acceptable quality category, according to the CAPRI criteria, even for highly inaccurate proteins (5-6 Å RMSD), although the number of such models (and, consequently, the docking success rate) drops significantly for models with RMSD > 4 Å. The results show that the existing docking methodologies can be successfully applied to protein models with a broad range of structural accuracy, and the template-based docking is much less sensitive to inaccuracies of protein models than the free docking. Proteins 2017; 85:470-478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Protein-protein interactions and cancer: targeting the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Amanda L; Janda, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    Between 40,000 and 200,000 protein-protein interactions have been predicted to exist within the human interactome. As these interactions are of a critical nature in many important cellular functions and their dysregulation is causal of disease, the modulation of these binding events has emerged as a leading, yet difficult therapeutic arena. In particular, the targeting of protein-protein interactions relevant to cancer is of fundamental importance as the tumor-promoting function of several aberrantly expressed proteins in the cancerous state is directly resultant of its ability to interact with a protein-binding partner. Of significance, these protein complexes play a crucial role in each of the steps of the central dogma of molecular biology, the fundamental processes of genetic transmission. With the many important discoveries being made regarding the mechanisms of these genetic process, the identification of new chemical probes are needed to better understand and validate the druggability of protein-protein interactions related to the central dogma. In this review, we provide an overview of current small molecule-based protein-protein interaction inhibitors for each stage of the central dogma: transcription, mRNA splicing and translation. Importantly, through our analysis we have uncovered a lack of necessary probes targeting mRNA splicing and translation, thus, opening up the possibility for expansion of these fields.

  10. Biophysics of protein evolution and evolutionary protein biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikosek, Tobias; Chan, Hue Sun

    2014-01-01

    The study of molecular evolution at the level of protein-coding genes often entails comparing large datasets of sequences to infer their evolutionary relationships. Despite the importance of a protein's structure and conformational dynamics to its function and thus its fitness, common phylogenetic methods embody minimal biophysical knowledge of proteins. To underscore the biophysical constraints on natural selection, we survey effects of protein mutations, highlighting the physical basis for marginal stability of natural globular proteins and how requirement for kinetic stability and avoidance of misfolding and misinteractions might have affected protein evolution. The biophysical underpinnings of these effects have been addressed by models with an explicit coarse-grained spatial representation of the polypeptide chain. Sequence–structure mappings based on such models are powerful conceptual tools that rationalize mutational robustness, evolvability, epistasis, promiscuous function performed by ‘hidden’ conformational states, resolution of adaptive conflicts and conformational switches in the evolution from one protein fold to another. Recently, protein biophysics has been applied to derive more accurate evolutionary accounts of sequence data. Methods have also been developed to exploit sequence-based evolutionary information to predict biophysical behaviours of proteins. The success of these approaches demonstrates a deep synergy between the fields of protein biophysics and protein evolution. PMID:25165599

  11. The Proteins API: accessing key integrated protein and genome information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Andrew; Antunes, Ricardo; Alpi, Emanuele; Bursteinas, Borisas; Gonzales, Leonardo; Liu, Wudong; Luo, Jie; Qi, Guoying; Turner, Edd; Martin, Maria

    2017-07-03

    The Proteins API provides searching and programmatic access to protein and associated genomics data such as curated protein sequence positional annotations from UniProtKB, as well as mapped variation and proteomics data from large scale data sources (LSS). Using the coordinates service, researchers are able to retrieve the genomic sequence coordinates for proteins in UniProtKB. This, the LSS genomics and proteomics data for UniProt proteins is programmatically only available through this service. A Swagger UI has been implemented to provide documentation, an interface for users, with little or no programming experience, to 'talk' to the services to quickly and easily formulate queries with the services and obtain dynamically generated source code for popular programming languages, such as Java, Perl, Python and Ruby. Search results are returned as standard JSON, XML or GFF data objects. The Proteins API is a scalable, reliable, fast, easy to use RESTful services that provides a broad protein information resource for users to ask questions based upon their field of expertise and allowing them to gain an integrated overview of protein annotations available to aid their knowledge gain on proteins in biological processes. The Proteins API is available at (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/proteins/api/doc). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  13. Diffusion of Integral Membrane Proteins in Protein-Rich Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    of being protein-poor, native cell membranes are extremely crowded with proteins. On the basis of extensive molecular simulations, we here demonstrate that protein crowding of the membrane at physiological levels leads to deviations from the SD relation and to the emergence of a stronger Stokes......-like dependence D ∝ 1/R. We propose that this 1/R law mainly arises due to geometrical factors: smaller proteins are able to avoid confinement effects much better than their larger counterparts. The results highlight that the lateral dynamics in the crowded setting found in native membranes is radically different......The lateral diffusion of embedded proteins along lipid membranes in protein-poor conditions has been successfully described in terms of the Saffman-Delbrück (SD) model, which predicts that the protein diffusion coefficient D is weakly dependent on its radius R as D ∝ ln(1/R). However, instead...

  14. Protein enriched pasta: structure and digestibility of its protein network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laleg, Karima; Barron, Cécile; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Walrand, Stéphane; Micard, Valérie

    2016-02-01

    Wheat (W) pasta was enriched in 6% gluten (G), 35% faba (F) or 5% egg (E) to increase its protein content (13% to 17%). The impact of the enrichment on the multiscale structure of the pasta and on in vitro protein digestibility was studied. Increasing the protein content (W- vs. G-pasta) strengthened pasta structure at molecular and macroscopic scales but reduced its protein digestibility by 3% by forming a higher covalently linked protein network. Greater changes in the macroscopic and molecular structure of the pasta were obtained by varying the nature of protein used for enrichment. Proteins in G- and E-pasta were highly covalently linked (28-32%) resulting in a strong pasta structure. Conversely, F-protein (98% SDS-soluble) altered the pasta structure by diluting gluten and formed a weak protein network (18% covalent link). As a result, protein digestibility in F-pasta was significantly higher (46%) than in E- (44%) and G-pasta (39%). The effect of low (55 °C, LT) vs. very high temperature (90 °C, VHT) drying on the protein network structure and digestibility was shown to cause greater molecular changes than pasta formulation. Whatever the pasta, a general strengthening of its structure, a 33% to 47% increase in covalently linked proteins and a higher β-sheet structure were observed. However, these structural differences were evened out after the pasta was cooked, resulting in identical protein digestibility in LT and VHT pasta. Even after VHT drying, F-pasta had the best amino acid profile with the highest protein digestibility, proof of its nutritional interest.

  15. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  16. Protein Sorting Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    and drawbacks of each of these approaches is described through many examples of methods that predict secretion, integration into membranes, or subcellular locations in general. The aim of this chapter is to provide a user-level introduction to the field with a minimum of computational theory.......Many computational methods are available for predicting protein sorting in bacteria. When comparing them, it is important to know that they can be grouped into three fundamentally different approaches: signal-based, global-property-based and homology-based prediction. In this chapter, the strengths...

  17. Proteins in the experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1985-08-01

    The backbone of ferredoxin and hemoproteins are described by SAWs in two and three dimensions. But the spin-lattice relaxation process of Fsub(e) 3+ ions cannot be described by pure fractal model. The spectral dimensions observed in experiment is defined through dsub(s)=dsub(f)/a, a is given by the scaling form of the low frequency mode ω(bL)=bsup(a)ω(L) of the whole system consisting of proteins and the solvent upon a change of the length scale. (author)

  18. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Detection of protein complex from protein-protein interaction network using Markov clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochieng, P J; Kusuma, W A; Haryanto, T

    2017-01-01

    Detection of complexes, or groups of functionally related proteins, is an important challenge while analysing biological networks. However, existing algorithms to identify protein complexes are insufficient when applied to dense networks of experimentally derived interaction data. Therefore, we introduced a graph clustering method based on Markov clustering algorithm to identify protein complex within highly interconnected protein-protein interaction networks. Protein-protein interaction network was first constructed to develop geometrical network, the network was then partitioned using Markov clustering to detect protein complexes. The interest of the proposed method was illustrated by its application to Human Proteins associated to type II diabetes mellitus. Flow simulation of MCL algorithm was initially performed and topological properties of the resultant network were analysed for detection of the protein complex. The results indicated the proposed method successfully detect an overall of 34 complexes with 11 complexes consisting of overlapping modules and 20 non-overlapping modules. The major complex consisted of 102 proteins and 521 interactions with cluster modularity and density of 0.745 and 0.101 respectively. The comparison analysis revealed MCL out perform AP, MCODE and SCPS algorithms with high clustering coefficient (0.751) network density and modularity index (0.630). This demonstrated MCL was the most reliable and efficient graph clustering algorithm for detection of protein complexes from PPI networks. (paper)

  20. Human cancer protein-protein interaction network: a structural perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Kar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network. The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%. We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub