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Sample records for iron uptake scope

  1. Moessbauer investigation of iron uptake in wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, K., E-mail: kkriszti@bolyai.elte.hu [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Kuzmann, E. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Chemical Research Center (Hungary); Fodor, F.; Cseh, E. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Department of Plant Physiology (Hungary); Homonnay, Z.; Vertes, A. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)

    2008-07-15

    Iron uptake and distribution in wheat roots were studied with {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. Plants were grown both in iron sufficient and in iron deficient nutrient solutions. Moessbauer spectra of the frozen iron sufficient roots exhibited three iron(III) components with the typical average Moessbauer parameters of {delta} = 0.50 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 0.43 mm s{sup -1}, {delta} = 0.50 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 0.75 mm s{sup -1} and {delta} = 0.50 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 1.20 mm s{sup -1} at 80 K. These doublets are very similar to those obtained earlier for cucumber [0], which allows us to suppose that iron is stored in a very similar way in different plants. No ferrous iron could be identified in any case, not even in the iron deficient roots, which confirms the mechanism proposed for iron uptake in the graminaceous plants.

  2. Monocyte transferrin-iron uptake in hereditary hemochromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizemore, D.J.; Bassett, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Transferrin-iron uptake by peripheral blood monocytes was studied in vitro to test the hypothesis that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hereditary hemochromatosis results from a defect in uptake of iron from transferrin. Monocytes from nine control subjects and 17 patients with hemochromatosis were cultured in the presence of 59Fe-labelled human transferrin. There was no difference in 59Fe uptake between monocytes from control subjects and monocytes from patients with hemochromatosis who had been treated by phlebotomy and who had normal body iron stores. However, 59Fe uptake by monocytes from iron-loaded patients with hemochromatosis was significantly reduced compared with either control subjects or treated hemochromatosis patients. It is likely that this was a secondary effect of iron loading since iron uptake by monocytes from treated hemochromatosis patients was normal. Assuming that monocytes in culture reflect mononuclear phagocyte iron metabolism in vivo, this study suggests that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hemochromatosis is not related to an abnormality in transferrin-iron uptake by these cells

  3. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe 3+ -DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe 3+ -RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe 3+ -EDTA and Fe 3+ -EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 μM CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 μM KCN) or 25 μM antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron ( 55 Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ([ 14 C] citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni 2+ and Co 2+ observed using Fe 3+ -DFOB and Fe 3+ -RA while iron uptake from Fe 3+ -citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe 3+ -DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism

  4. Placental iron uptake and its regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bierings (Marc)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIron transport in pregnancy is an active one-way process, from mother to fetus. Early in gestation fetal iron needs are low, and so is trans-placental transport, but as erythropoiesis develops, rising fetal iron needs are met by trans-placental iron transport. Apparently, the fetus

  5. Iron Availability in Tropical Soils and Iron Uptake by Plants

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    Guilherme Furlan Mielki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Given the increase in crop yields and the expansion of agriculture in low fertility soils, deficiency of micronutrients, such as iron, in plants grown in tropical soils has been observed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Fe availability and Fe uptake by corn (Zea mays L. plants in 13 different soils, at two depths. Iron was extracted by Mehlich-1, Mehlich-3, and CaCl2 (Fe-CC and was fractionated in forms related to low (Feo and high (Fed crystallinity pedogenic oxyhydroxides, and organic matter (Fep using ammonium oxalate, dithionite-citrate, and sodium pyrophosphate, respectively. In order to relate Fe availability to soil properties and plant growth, an experiment was carried out in a semi-hydroponic system in which part of the roots developed in a nutrient solution (without Fe and part in the soil (the only source of Fe. Forty-five days after seeding, we quantified shoot dry matter and leaf Fe concentration and content. Fed levels were high, from 5 to 132 g kg-1, and Feo and Fe-CC levels were low, indicating the predominance of Fe as crystalline oxyhydroxides and a low content of Fe readily available to plants. The extraction solutions showed significant correlations with various soil properties, many common to both, indicating that they act similarly. The correlation between the Mehlich-1 and Mehlich-3 extraction solutions was highly significant. However, these two extraction methods were inefficient in predicting Fe availability to plants. There was a positive correlation between dry matter and Fe levels in plant shoots, even within the ranges considered adequate in the soil and in the plant. Dry matter production and leaf Fe concentration and content were positively correlated with Fep concentration, indicating that the Fe fraction related to soil organic matter most contributes to Fe availability to plants.

  6. Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mechanistic Insights into Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires iron for normal growth but faces a limitation of the metal ion due to its low solubility at biological pH and the withholding of iron by the mammalian host. The pathogen expresses the Fe3+-specific siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin to chelate the metal ion from insoluble iron and the host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis, as knockout mutants, which were defective in siderophore synthesis or uptake, failed to survive in low-iron medium and inside macrophages. But as excess iron is toxic due to its catalytic role in the generation of free radicals, regulation of iron uptake is necessary to maintain optimal levels of intracellular iron. The focus of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of iron homeostasis in M. tuberculosis that is discussed in the context of mycobactin biosynthesis, transport of iron across the mycobacterial cell envelope, and storage of excess iron. The clinical significance of the serum iron status and the expression of the iron-regulated protein HupB in tuberculosis (TB) patients is presented here, highlighting the potential of HupB as a marker, notably in extrapulmonary TB cases. PMID:27402628

  7. Is there a strategy I iron uptake mechanism in maize?

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    Li, Suzhen; Zhou, Xiaojin; Chen, Jingtang; Chen, Rumei

    2018-04-03

    Iron is a metal micronutrient that is essential for plant growth and development. Graminaceous and nongraminaceous plants have evolved different mechanisms to mediate Fe uptake. Generally, strategy I is used by nongraminaceous plants like Arabidopsis, while graminaceous plants, such as rice, barley, and maize, are considered to use strategy II Fe uptake. Upon the functional characterization of OsIRT1 and OsIRT2 in rice, it was suggested that rice, as an exceptional graminaceous plant, utilizes both strategy I and strategy II Fe uptake systems. Similarly, ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 were identified as functional zinc and iron transporters in the maize genome, along with the determination of several genes encoding Zn and Fe transporters, raising the possibility that strategy I Fe uptake also occurs in maize. This mini-review integrates previous reports and recent evidence to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of Fe uptake in maize.

  8. Iron Requirement and Iron Uptake from Various Iron Compounds by Different Plant Species

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    Christ, Rudolf A.

    1974-01-01

    The Fe requirements of four monocotyledonous plant species (Avena sativa L., Triticum aestivum L., Oryza sativa L., Zea mays L.) and of three dicotyledonous species (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill., Cucumis sativus L., Glycine maxima (L.) Merr.) in hydroponic cultures were ascertained. Fe was given as NaFe-EDDHA chelate (Fe ethylenediamine di (O-hydroxyphenylacetate). I found that the monocotyledonous species required a substantially higher Fe concentration in the nutrient solution in order to attain optimum growth than did the dicotyledonous species. Analyses showed that the process of iron uptake was less efficient with the monocotyledonous species. When the results obtained by using chelated Fe were compared with those using ionic Fe, it was shown that the inefficient species were equally inefficient in utilizing Fe3+ ions. However, the differences between the efficient and the inefficient species disappeared when Fe2+ was used. This confirms the work of others who postulated that Fe3+ is reduced before uptake of chelated iron by the root. In addition, it was shown that reduction also takes place when Fe is used in ionic form. The efficiency of Fe uptake seems to depend on the efficiency of the root system of the particular plant species in reducing Fe3+. The removal of Fe from the chelate complex after reduction to Fe2+ seems to present no difficulties to the various plant species. PMID:16658933

  9. Prion Protein Promotes Kidney Iron Uptake via Its Ferrireductase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Swati; Tripathi, Ajai; Qian, Juan; Beserra, Amber; Suda, Srinivas; McElwee, Matthew; Turner, Jerrold; Hopfer, Ulrich; Singh, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron-dyshomeostasis is an important cause of neurotoxicity in prion disorders, a group of neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrPC) from its normal conformation to an aggregated, PrP-scrapie (PrPSc) isoform. Alteration of iron homeostasis is believed to result from impaired function of PrPC in neuronal iron uptake via its ferrireductase activity. However, unequivocal evidence supporting the ferrireductase activity of PrPC is lacking. Kidney provides a relevant model for this evaluation because PrPC is expressed in the kidney, and ∼370 μg of iron are reabsorbed daily from the glomerular filtrate by kidney proximal tubule cells (PT), requiring ferrireductase activity. Here, we report that PrPC promotes the uptake of transferrin (Tf) and non-Tf-bound iron (NTBI) by the kidney in vivo and mainly NTBI by PT cells in vitro. Thus, uptake of 59Fe administered by gastric gavage, intravenously, or intraperitoneally was significantly lower in PrP-knock-out (PrP−/−) mouse kidney relative to PrP+/+ controls. Selective in vivo radiolabeling of plasma NTBI with 59Fe revealed similar results. Expression of exogenous PrPC in immortalized PT cells showed localization on the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles and increased transepithelial transport of 59Fe-NTBI and to a smaller extent 59Fe-Tf from the apical to the basolateral domain. Notably, the ferrireductase-deficient mutant of PrP (PrPΔ51–89) lacked this activity. Furthermore, excess NTBI and hemin caused aggregation of PrPC to a detergent-insoluble form, limiting iron uptake. Together, these observations suggest that PrPC promotes retrieval of iron from the glomerular filtrate via its ferrireductase activity and modulates kidney iron metabolism. PMID:25572394

  10. Moessbauer study of iron uptake in cucumber root

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, K.; Kuzmann, E., E-mail: kuzmann@para.chem.elte.hu [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Nuclear Chemistry (Hungary); Fodor, F. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Department of Plant Physiology and Molecular Plant Biology (Hungary); Vertes, A. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Nuclear Chemistry (Hungary); Kamnev, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-15

    {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the uptake and distribution of iron in the root of cucumber plants grown in iron-deficient modified Hoagland nutrient solution and put into iron-containing solution with 10 {mu}M Fe citrate enriched with {sup 57}Fe (90%) only before harvesting. The Moessbauer spectra of the frozen roots exhibited two Fe{sup 3+} components with typical average Moessbauer parameters of {delta} = 0.5 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 0.46 mm s{sup -1} and {delta} = 0.5 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 1.2 mm s{sup -1} at 78 K and the presence of an Fe{sup 2+} doublet, assigned to the ferrous hexaaqua complex. This finding gives a direct evidence for the existence of Fe{sup 2+} ions produced via root-associated reduction according to the mechanism proposed for iron uptake for dicotyledonous plants. Monotonous changes in the relative content of the components were found with the time period of iron supply. The Moessbauer results are interpreted in terms of iron uptake and transport through the cell wall and membranes.

  11. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

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    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  12. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin

  13. Electron uptake by iron-oxidizing phototrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, A; Gardel, EJ; Vidoudez, C; Parra, EA; Girguis, PR

    2014-02-26

    Oxidation-reduction reactions underlie energy generation in nearly all life forms. Although most organisms use soluble oxidants and reductants, some microbes can access solid-phase materials as electron-acceptors or -donors via extracellular electron transfer. Many studies have focused on the reduction of solid-phase oxidants. Far less is known about electron uptake via microbial extracellular electron transfer, and almost nothing is known about the associated mechanisms. Here we show that the iron-oxidizing photoautotroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 accepts electrons from a poised electrode, with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source/electron acceptor. Both electron uptake and ruBisCo form I expression are stimulated by light. Electron uptake also occurs in the dark, uncoupled from photosynthesis. Notably, the pioABC operon, which encodes a protein system essential for photoautotrophic growth by ferrous iron oxidation, influences electron uptake. These data reveal a previously unknown metabolic versatility of photoferrotrophs to use extracellular electron transfer for electron uptake.

  14. Genomic insights into microbial iron oxidation and iron uptake strategies in extremely acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S

    2012-07-01

    This minireview presents recent advances in our understanding of iron oxidation and homeostasis in acidophilic Bacteria and Archaea. These processes influence the flux of metals and nutrients in pristine and man-made acidic environments such as acid mine drainage and industrial bioleaching operations. Acidophiles are also being studied to understand life in extreme conditions and their role in the generation of biomarkers used in the search for evidence of existing or past extra-terrestrial life. Iron oxidation in acidophiles is best understood in the model organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, recent functional genomic analysis of acidophiles is leading to a deeper appreciation of the diversity of acidophilic iron-oxidizing pathways. Although it is too early to paint a detailed picture of the role played by lateral gene transfer in the evolution of iron oxidation, emerging evidence tends to support the view that iron oxidation arose independently more than once in evolution. Acidic environments are generally rich in soluble iron and extreme acidophiles (e.g. the Leptospirillum genus) have considerably fewer iron uptake systems compared with neutrophiles. However, some acidophiles have been shown to grow as high as pH 6 and, in the case of the Acidithiobacillus genus, to have multiple iron uptake systems. This could be an adaption allowing them to respond to different iron concentrations via the use of a multiplicity of different siderophores. Both Leptospirillum spp. and Acidithiobacillus spp. are predicted to synthesize the acid stable citrate siderophore for Fe(III) uptake. In addition, both groups have predicted receptors for siderophores produced by other microorganisms, suggesting that competition for iron occurs influencing the ecophysiology of acidic environments. Little is known about the genetic regulation of iron oxidation and iron uptake in acidophiles, especially how the use of iron as an energy source is balanced with its need to take up

  15. Iron uptake mechanisms in the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum maritimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben; Toranzo, Alicia E; Romalde, Jesús L; Lemos, Manuel L; Magariños, Beatriz

    2005-11-01

    We present here the first evidence of the presence of iron uptake mechanisms in the bacterial fish pathogen Tenacibaculum maritimum. Representative strains of this species, with different serotypes and origins, were examined. All of them were able to grow in the presence of the chelating agent ethylenediamine-di-(o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid) (EDDHA) and also produced siderophores. Cross-feeding assays suggest that the siderophores produced are closely related. In addition, all T. maritimum strains utilized transferrin, hemin, hemoglobin, and ferric ammonic citrate as iron sources when added to iron-deficient media. Whole cells of all T. maritimum strains, grown under iron-supplemented or iron-restricted conditions, were able to bind hemin, indicating the existence of constitutive binding components located at the T. maritimum cell surface. This was confirmed by the observation that isolated total and outer membrane proteins from all of the strains, regardless of the iron levels of the media, were able to bind hemin, with the outer membranes showing the strongest binding. Proteinase K treatment of whole cells did not affect the hemin binding, indicating that, in addition to proteins, some protease-resistant components could also bind hemin. At least three outer membrane proteins were induced in iron-limiting conditions, and all strains, regardless of their serotype, showed a similar pattern of induced proteins. The results of the present study suggest that T. maritimum possesses at least two different systems of iron acquisition: one involving the synthesis of siderophores and another that allows the utilization of heme groups as iron sources by direct binding.

  16. Metallofullerenol Inhibits Cellular Iron Uptake by Inducing Transferrin Tetramerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxia; Xing, Xueqing; Sun, Baoyun; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Zhonghua

    2017-10-18

    Herein, A549 tumor cell proliferation was confirmed to be positively dependent on the concentration of Fe 3+ or transferrin (Tf). Gd@C 82 (OH) 22 or C 60 (OH) 22 effectively inhibited the iron uptake and the subsequent proliferation of A549 cells. The conformational changes of Tf mixed with FeCl 3 , GdCl 3 , C 60 (OH) 22 or Gd@C 82 (OH) 22 were obtained by SAXS. The results demonstrate that Tf homodimers can be decomposed into monomers in the presence of FeCl 3 , GdCl 3 or C 60 (OH) 22 , but associated into tetramers in the presence of Gd@C 82 (OH) 22 . The larger change of SAXS shapes between Tf+C 60 (OH) 22 and Tf+FeCl 3 implies that C 60 (OH) 22 is bound to Tf, blocking the iron-binding site. The larger deviation of the SAXS shape from a possible crystal structure of Tf tetramer implies that Gd@C 82 (OH) 22 is bound to the Tf tetramer, thus disturbing iron transport. This study well explains the inhibition mechanism of Gd@C 82 (OH) 22 and C 60 (OH) 22 on the iron uptake and the proliferation of A549 tumor cells and highlights the specific interactions of a nanomedicine with the target biomolecules in cancer therapy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Dietary Factors Modulate Iron Uptake in Caco-2 Cells from an Iron Ingot Used as a Home Fortificant to Prevent Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Rodriguez-Ramiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is a major public health concern and nutritional approaches are required to reduce its prevalence. The aim of this study was to examine the iron bioavailability of a novel home fortificant, the “Lucky Iron Fish™” (LIF (www.luckyironfish.com/shop, Guelph, Canada and the impact of dietary factors and a food matrix on iron uptake from LIF in Caco-2 cells. LIF released a substantial quantity of iron (about 1.2 mM at pH 2 but this iron was only slightly soluble at pH 7 and not taken up by cells. The addition of ascorbic acid (AA maintained the solubility of iron released from LIF (LIF-iron at pH 7 and facilitated iron uptake by the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In vitro digestion of LIF-iron in the presence of peas increased iron uptake 10-fold. However, the addition of tannic acid to the digestion reduced the cellular iron uptake 7.5-fold. Additionally, LIF-iron induced an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, similar to ferrous sulfate, but this effect was counteracted by the addition of AA. Overall, our data illustrate the major influence of dietary factors on iron solubility and bioavailability from LIF, and demonstrate that the addition of AA enhances iron uptake and reduces ROS in the intestinal lumen.

  18. Iron metabolism in BeWo chorion carcinoma cells. Transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, A.; du Maine, A.; Simmons, C. F.; Schwartz, A. L.; Strous, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    Growing human choriocarcinoma BeWo b24 cells contain 1.5 X 10(6) functional cell surface transferrin binding sites and 2.0 X 10(6) intracellular binding sites. These cells rapidly accumulate iron at a rate of 360,000 iron atoms/min/cell. During iron uptake the transferrin and its receptor recycle at

  19. Effect of different iron levels on 65Zn uptake and transport in maize seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, V.S.; Sharma, D.; Kandala, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Uptake and translocation of 65 Zn was studied in two week old maize seedlings at 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 ppm iron levels in half-strength Hoagland's solution. Four different zinc levels viz., 0.04, 0.4, 4 and 8 ppm were taken. Total 65 Zn uptake and translocation to shoots at 2, 4, 6 and 12 hours showed that increasing iron levels in the uptake medium reduced Zn-uptake in all combinations and at all uptake hours studied. This antagnnistic effect of iron on zinc uptake was more pronounced at the initial stages and could be partly inhibited by increasing zinc concentration in the uptake medium. Translocation of 65 Zn to shoots increased with increase in uptake time. Increasing iron levels in the medium decreased zinc dislocation to shoots at all zinc levels. (author)

  20. Carbonate-sensitive phytotransferrin controls high-affinity iron uptake in diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Jeffrey B.; Kustka, Adam B.; Oborník, Miroslav; Horák, Aleš; McCrow, John P.; Karas, Bogumil J.; Zheng, Hong; Kindeberg, Theodor; Andersson, Andreas J.; Barbeau, Katherine A.; Allen, Andrew E.

    2018-03-01

    In vast areas of the ocean, the scarcity of iron controls the growth and productivity of phytoplankton. Although most dissolved iron in the marine environment is complexed with organic molecules, picomolar amounts of labile inorganic iron species (labile iron) are maintained within the euphotic zone and serve as an important source of iron for eukaryotic phytoplankton and particularly for diatoms. Genome-enabled studies of labile iron utilization by diatoms have previously revealed novel iron-responsive transcripts, including the ferric iron-concentrating protein ISIP2A, but the mechanism behind the acquisition of picomolar labile iron remains unknown. Here we show that ISIP2A is a phytotransferrin that independently and convergently evolved carbonate ion-coordinated ferric iron binding. Deletion of ISIP2A disrupts high-affinity iron uptake in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and uptake is restored by complementation with human transferrin. ISIP2A is internalized by endocytosis, and manipulation of the seawater carbonic acid system reveals a second-order dependence on the concentrations of labile iron and carbonate ions. In P. tricornutum, the synergistic interaction of labile iron and carbonate ions occurs at environmentally relevant concentrations, revealing that carbonate availability co-limits iron uptake. Phytotransferrin sequences have a broad taxonomic distribution and are abundant in marine environmental genomic datasets, suggesting that acidification-driven declines in the concentration of seawater carbonate ions will have a negative effect on this globally important eukaryotic iron acquisition mechanism.

  1. A role for sex and a common HFE gene variant in brain iron uptake.

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    Duck, Kari A; Neely, Elizabeth B; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2018-03-01

    HFE (high iron) is an essential protein for regulating iron transport into cells. Mutations of the HFE gene result in loss of this regulation causing accumulation of iron within the cell. The mutated protein has been found increasingly in numerous neurodegenerative disorders in which increased levels of iron in the brain are reported. Additionally, evidence that these mutations are associated with elevated brain iron challenges the paradigm that the brain is protected by the blood-brain barrier. While much has been studied regarding the role of HFE in cellular iron uptake, it has remained unclear what role the protein plays in the transport of iron into the brain. We investigated regulation of iron transport into the brain using a mouse model with a mutation in the HFE gene. We demonstrated that the rate of radiolabeled iron ( 59 Fe) uptake was similar between the two genotypes despite higher brain iron concentrations in the mutant. However, there were significant differences in iron uptake between males and females regardless of genotype. These data indicate that brain iron status is consistently maintained and tightly regulated at the level of the blood-brain barrier.

  2. Lack of Plasma Protein Hemopexin Results in Increased Duodenal Iron Uptake.

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    Fiorito, Veronica; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Silengo, Lorenzo; Aime, Silvio; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    The body concentration of iron is regulated by a fine equilibrium between absorption and losses of iron. Iron can be absorbed from diet as inorganic iron or as heme. Hemopexin is an acute phase protein that limits iron access to microorganisms. Moreover, it is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for heme and thus it mediates heme-iron recycling. Considering its involvement in iron homeostasis, it was postulated that hemopexin may play a role in the physiological absorption of inorganic iron. Hemopexin-null mice showed elevated iron deposits in enterocytes, associated with higher duodenal H-Ferritin levels and a significant increase in duodenal expression and activity of heme oxygenase. The expression of heme-iron and inorganic iron transporters was normal. The rate of iron absorption was assessed by measuring the amount of (57)Fe retained in tissues from hemopexin-null and wild-type animals after administration of an oral dose of (57)FeSO4 or of (57)Fe-labelled heme. Higher iron retention in the duodenum of hemopexin-null mice was observed as compared with normal mice. Conversely, iron transfer from enterocytes to liver and bone marrow was unaffected in hemopexin-null mice. The increased iron level in hemopexin-null duodenum can be accounted for by an increased iron uptake by enterocytes and storage in ferritins. These data indicate that the lack of hemopexin under physiological conditions leads to an enhanced duodenal iron uptake thus providing new insights to our understanding of body iron homeostasis.

  3. Iron uptake and transport at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    The mechanism by which iron is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains controversial, and in this study we aimed to further clarify mechanisms by which iron is transported into the brain. We analyzed and compared the mRNA and protein expression of a variety of proteins involved...... in the transport of iron (transferrin receptor, divalent metal transporter I (DMT1), steap 2, steap 3, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and ferroportin) in both primary rat brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) and immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (RBE4) grown in co-culture with defined polarity....... The mRNA expression of the iron-related molecules was also investigated in isolated brain capillaries from iron deficiency, iron reversible and normal rats. We also performed iron transport studies to analyze the routes by which iron is transported through the brain capillary endothelial cells: i) We...

  4. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Adriana Hernández-Cuevas

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron, low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron, iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron, and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  5. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cuevas, Nora Adriana; Weber, Christian; Hon, Chung-Chau; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron), low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron), iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron), and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters) and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  6. UPTAKE OF HEAVY METALS IN BATCH SYSTEMS BY A RECYCLED IRON-BEARING MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    An iron-bearing material deriving from surface finishing operations in the manufacturing of cast-iron components demonstrates potential for removal of heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. Batch isotherm and rate experiments were conducted for uptake of cadmium, zinc, and lead...

  7. Characterisation of citrate and iron citrate uptake by cultured rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.M.; Morgan, E.H.; Baker, E.

    1998-01-01

    Background/Aims: the endogenous low molecular weight iron chelator, citrate, is considered to be an important contributor to iron transport and the liver the main site of uptake of iron citrate in subjects suffering from diseases of iron overload. Moreover, the citrate-metabolising enzyme, aconitase, is implicated in the regulation of cellular iron metabolism. This study was undertaken to determine the role of citrate and ferric citrate in the uptake of iron by rat hepatocytes. Methods: Cultured rat hepatocytes were incubated (37 deg. C, 15 min) with 100 μM [ 14 C]-citrate in the presence or absence of 1.0 μM 55 Fe. Membrane-bound and intracellular radiolabel were separated by incubation with the general protease, Pronase. Results: Our results suggest that ferric citrate uptake is mediated by a specific citrate binding site which exhibits a higher affinity for citrate in the presence of iron than in its absence. Citrate was internalised by hepatocytes, with at least 70% being oxidised to CO 2 within 15 min. Citrate uptake was pH-dependent, did not require the presence of sodium and increased with increasing iron concentration. Metabolic energy, anion channels, the Na + , K + -ATPase and vesicle acidification do not appear to play a role in uptake of ferric citrate, but functional sulphydryl groups may be involved. Conclusions: The data suggest either that ferric citrate complexes with higher molar ratios of iron to citrate relative to the incubation medium are bound preferentially to the membrane, or that once citrate has delivered its iron to the membrane, the complex dissociates and the components are internalised separately. (au)

  8. Mechanism of iron uptake by the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, A.

    1986-01-01

    C. albicans requires iron for growth and phenotypic development. When deprived of iron, mycelium and bud formation was suppressed. Survival of the organism was also reduced under iron-limiting conditions. The combination of elevated temperature and iron-deprivation further reduced phenotypic development and survival of the yeast. The combination of elevated temperature and iron starvation resulted in a decrease in both the growth rate and siderophore production. However, with time, the cells were able to show partial recovery in the growth rate which occurred concomitantly with an increase in siderophore production. In order for siderophores to be utilized, ferri-siderophore receptors must be produced. The receptor was shown to be located in the plasma membrane of the yeast. Scatchard analysis of the binding of ferri-siderophores to plasma membrane receptors showed an increase in receptor affinity and number of binding sites in iron-starved cells when compared to control cells. Autoradiograms of the 58 Fe-siderophore-protein complex following SDS-PAGE separation of candidal proteins revealed the presence of a ferri-siderophore receptor of approximately 10,000 daltons. C. albicans strains which lacked the ability to synthesize phenolate siderophore maintained a phenolate receptor and bound candidal phenolate siderophore better than non-candidal phenolate siderophores

  9. The prion-ZIP connection: From cousins to partners in iron uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neena; Asthana, Abhishek; Baksi, Shounak; Desai, Vilok; Haldar, Swati; Hari, Sahi; Tripathi, Ajai K

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Converging observations from disparate lines of inquiry are beginning to clarify the cause of brain iron dyshomeostasis in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a neurodegenerative condition associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrPC), a plasma membrane glycoprotein, from α-helical to a β-sheet rich PrP-scrapie (PrPSc) isoform. Biochemical evidence indicates that PrPC facilitates cellular iron uptake by functioning as a membrane-bound ferrireductase (FR), an activity necessary for the transport of iron across biological membranes through metal transporters. An entirely different experimental approach reveals an evolutionary link between PrPC and the Zrt, Irt-like protein (ZIP) family, a group of proteins involved in the transport of zinc, iron, and manganese across the plasma membrane. Close physical proximity of PrPC with certain members of the ZIP family on the plasma membrane and increased uptake of extracellular iron by cells that co-express PrPC and ZIP14 suggest that PrPC functions as a FR partner for certain members of this family. The connection between PrPC and ZIP proteins therefore extends beyond common ancestry to that of functional cooperation. Here, we summarize evidence supporting the facilitative role of PrPC in cellular iron uptake, and implications of this activity on iron metabolism in sCJD brains. PMID:26689487

  10. Effect of molybdenum and iron supply on molybdenum (99Mo) and iron (59Fe) uptake and activity of certain enzymes in tomato plants grown in sand culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, C.; Agarwala, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var. Marglobe) plants were raised under controlled sand culture to study the interaction of molybdenum and iron supply on the uptake of molybdenum and iron and activity of certain enzymes affected by iron and/or molybdenum supply. Iron deficiency caused a decrease in the molybdenum uptake and accentuated the effect of molybdenum deficiency in reducing the uptake and more so the translocation of molybdenum from roots to shoots, thus inducing more severe molybdenum deficiency. The deficiency of iron and molybdenum decreased the activity of catalase, succinate dehydrogenase and nitrate reductase, the most marked decrease being found in plants supplied with both iron and molybdenum at low levels. Changes in the activities of nitrate reductase and catalase can be attributed to the interaction of iron and molybdenum supply in their absorption and translocation. (auth.)

  11. Does a voltage-sensitive outer envelope transport mechanism contributes to the chloroplast iron uptake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solti, Ádám; Kovács, Krisztina; Müller, Brigitta; Vázquez, Saúl; Hamar, Éva; Pham, Hong Diep; Tóth, Brigitta; Abadía, Javier; Fodor, Ferenc

    2016-12-01

    Based on the effects of inorganic salts on chloroplast Fe uptake, the presence of a voltage-dependent step is proposed to play a role in Fe uptake through the outer envelope. Although iron (Fe) plays a crucial role in chloroplast physiology, only few pieces of information are available on the mechanisms of chloroplast Fe acquisition. Here, the effect of inorganic salts on the Fe uptake of intact chloroplasts was tested, assessing Fe and transition metal uptake using bathophenantroline-based spectrophotometric detection and plasma emission-coupled mass spectrometry, respectively. The microenvironment of Fe was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Transition metal cations (Cd 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Mn 2+ ) enhanced, whereas oxoanions (NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , and BO 3 3- ) reduced the chloroplast Fe uptake. The effect was insensitive to diuron (DCMU), an inhibitor of chloroplast inner envelope-associated Fe uptake. The inorganic salts affected neither Fe forms in the uptake assay buffer nor those incorporated into the chloroplasts. The significantly lower Zn and Mn uptake compared to that of Fe indicates that different mechanisms/transporters are involved in their acquisition. The enhancing effect of transition metals on chloroplast Fe uptake is likely related to outer envelope-associated processes, since divalent metal cations are known to inhibit Fe 2+ transport across the inner envelope. Thus, a voltage-dependent step is proposed to play a role in Fe uptake through the chloroplast outer envelope on the basis of the contrasting effects of transition metal cations and oxoaninons.

  12. Phytotoxicity and uptake of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) by two plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xingmao, E-mail: ma@engr.siu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Gurung, Arun [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Deng, Yang [Earth and Environmental Studies, Montclair State University, NJ 07403 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Use of nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) for the treatment of various environmental pollutants has been proven successful. However, large scale introduction of engineered nanomaterials such as nZVI into the environment has recently attracted serious concerns. There is an urgent need to investigate the environmental fate and impact of nZVI due to the scope of its application. The goal of this study was to evaluate the toxicity and accumulation of bare nZVI by two commonly encountered plant species: cattail (Typha latifolia) and hybrid poplars (Populous deltoids × Populous nigra). Plant seedlings were grown hydroponically in a greenhouse and dosed with different concentrations of nZVI (0–1000 mg/L) for four weeks. The nZVI exhibited strong toxic effect on Typha at higher concentrations (> 200 mg/L) but enhanced plant growth at lower concentrations. nZVI also significantly reduced the transpiration and growth of hybrid poplars at higher concentrations. Microscopic images indicated that large amount of nZVI coated on plant root surface as irregular aggregates and some nZVI penetrated into several layers of epidermal cells. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) confirmed the internalization of nZVI by poplar root cells but similar internalization was not observed for Typha root cells. The upward transport to shoots was minimal for both plant species. - Highlights: ► nZVI may exert phytotoxic effects on plants at concentrations (> 200 mg/L) often encountered in site remediation practices. ► nZVI deposits on plant root surface as aggregates and some could internalize in plant root cells. ► Plant uptake and accumulation of nZVI are plant species-dependent. ► Upward transport from roots to shoots was not observed.

  13. Nitrogen uptake and rate-limiting step in low-temperature nitriding of iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inia, DK; Vredenberg, AM; Habraken, FHPM; Boerma, DO

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a method to nitride iron in NH3 ambients at low temperature (225-350 degrees C) has been developed. In this method, the Fe is covered with a thin (similar to 40 nm) Ni layer, which acts as a catalyst for the nitriding process. From experiments, in which the amount of nitrogen uptake is

  14. Cellular uptake of folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Kyoungja; Moon, Jihyung; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Seong, Tae-Yeon; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2009-01-01

    We prepared five folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (F 5 -Liposuperparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles(SPIONs), 5.5 and 11 nm) and investigated their cellular uptake with KB cells, which is one of the representative folate-receptor over-expressing human epidermoid carcinoma cells, using MRI. The cellular uptake tests with the respective 5.5 and 11 nm F 5 -LipoSPIONs at a fixed particle concentration showed appreciable amount of receptor-mediated uptakes and the specificity was higher in 5.5 nm SPIONs, due to its higher folic acid (FA) density, without inhibition. However, the numbers of the particles taken up under FA inhibition were similar, irrespective of their sizes.

  15. Cellular uptake of folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Kyoungja [Nano-Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kjwoo@kist.re.kr; Moon, Jihyung [Nano-Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-Dong, Sungbook-Ku, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu-Sil [Division of Molecular Imaging, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Tae-Yeon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-Dong, Sungbook-Ku, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kwon-Ha [Institute for Radiological Imaging Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, 344-2, Shinyong, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    We prepared five folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (F{sub 5}-Liposuperparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles(SPIONs), 5.5 and 11 nm) and investigated their cellular uptake with KB cells, which is one of the representative folate-receptor over-expressing human epidermoid carcinoma cells, using MRI. The cellular uptake tests with the respective 5.5 and 11 nm F{sub 5}-LipoSPIONs at a fixed particle concentration showed appreciable amount of receptor-mediated uptakes and the specificity was higher in 5.5 nm SPIONs, due to its higher folic acid (FA) density, without inhibition. However, the numbers of the particles taken up under FA inhibition were similar, irrespective of their sizes.

  16. The effect of the administration of iron on Ga-67 uptake in animal tumor and biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Keiji

    1983-01-01

    In 1979 Larson reported that the uptake of Ga-67 in tumor cell was preceded by binding of the Ga-67 to transferrin. Since that time there have been many papers concerning changes in Ga-67 accumulation in experimental tumor by administration of iron before and after Ga-67 injection. This study was undertaken in the attempt to discern what changes are produced in Ga-67 images of tumor-bearing rabbits (VX-II) when iron was administered before and after Ga-67 injection. Additionally, the relationships between the change in the serum iron concentration in the tumor tissue in mice bearing Ehrlich's ascites tumor were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The tumor uptake and biodistribution of Ga-67 following administration of iron in the form of Fesin (saccharated ferric oxide) or ferric-citrate is obviously diminished. This iron administration leads to an elevated excretion of Ga-67 from tumor and other organs except from bone. From this results, it was found that Ga-67 binds somewhat less avidity than iron to various iron transport protein. Accordingly, Ga-67 biodistribution may be markedly influenced by iron-loading. 2) The Ga-67 activity in blood following administration of iron was noted to suddenly markedly decrease. However, 24-48 hours after iron injection the Ga-67 activity in blood gradually increased. This result suggests that the Ga-67 displaced into the extravascular space by iron-loading reentered the vascular space when the iron concentration of serum returned to normal. 3) The accumulation of Ga-67 in the tumor and soft tissues was slightly decreased compared with controls after iron administration. However, the tumor to blood ratio (T/B) of Ga-67 in mice by iron loading was several time greater than that of Ga-67 alone because the clearance of Ga-67 from the blood was more accelated than that of tumor. The large tumor to blood ratio (T/B) would be advantageous in obtaining a more distinct tumor scan. (author)

  17. Obligatory reduction of ferric chelates in iron uptake by soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, R L; Brown, J C; Tiffin, L O

    1972-08-01

    The contrasting Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) chelating properties of the synthetic chelators ethylenediaminedi (o-hydroxyphenylacetate) (EDDHA) and 4,7-di(4-phenylsulfonate)-1, 10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate) (BPDS) were used to determine the valence form of Fe absorbed by soybean roots supplied with Fe(3+)-chelates. EDDHA binds Fe(3+) strongly, but Fe(2+) weakly; BPDS binds Fe(2+) strongly but Fe(3+) weakly. Addition of an excess of BPDS to nutrient solutions containing Fe(3+)-chelates inhibited soybean Fe uptake-translocation by 99+%; [Fe(II) (BPDS)(3)](4-) accumulated in the nutrient solution. The addition of EDDHA caused little or no inhibition. These results were observed with topped and intact soybeans. Thus, separation and absorption of Fe from Fe(3+)-chelates appear to require reduction of Fe(3+)-chelate to Fe(2+)-chelate at the root, with Fe(2+) being the principal form of Fe absorbed by soybean.

  18. Analysis of the global ocean sampling (GOS) project for trends in iron uptake by surface ocean microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulza, Eve; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Blain, Stéphane; Piganeau, Gwenael

    2012-01-01

    Microbial metagenomes are DNA samples of the most abundant, and therefore most successful organisms at the sampling time and location for a given cell size range. The study of microbial communities via their DNA content has revolutionized our understanding of microbial ecology and evolution. Iron availability is a critical resource that limits microbial communities' growth in many oceanic areas. Here, we built a database of 2319 sequences, corresponding to 140 gene families of iron metabolism with a large phylogenetic spread, to explore the microbial strategies of iron acquisition in the ocean's bacterial community. We estimate iron metabolism strategies from metagenome gene content and investigate whether their prevalence varies with dissolved iron concentrations obtained from a biogeochemical model. We show significant quantitative and qualitative variations in iron metabolism pathways, with a higher proportion of iron metabolism genes in low iron environments. We found a striking difference between coastal and open ocean sites regarding Fe(2+) versus Fe(3+) uptake gene prevalence. We also show that non-specific siderophore uptake increases in low iron open ocean environments, suggesting bacteria may acquire iron from natural siderophore-like organic complexes. Despite the lack of knowledge of iron uptake mechanisms in most marine microorganisms, our approach provides insights into how the iron metabolic pathways of microbial communities may vary with seawater iron concentrations.

  19. The Porphyromonas gingivalis ferric uptake regulator orthologue does not regulate iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Butler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that has an absolute requirement for iron which it transports from the host as heme and/or Fe2+. Iron transport must be regulated to prevent toxic effects from excess metal in the cell. P. gingivalis has one ferric uptake regulator (Fur orthologue encoded in its genome called Har, which would be expected to regulate the transport and usage of iron within this bacterium. As a gene regulator, inactivation of Har should result in changes in gene expression of several genes compared to the wild-type. This dataset (GEO accession number GSE37099 provides information on expression levels of genes in P. gingivalis in the absence of Har. Surprisingly, these genes do not relate to iron homeostasis.

  20. Alkaline stress and iron deficiency regulate iron uptake and riboflavin synthesis gene expression differently in root and leaf tissue: implications for iron deficiency chlorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, En-Jung; Waters, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential mineral that has low solubility in alkaline soils, where its deficiency results in chlorosis. Whether low Fe supply and alkaline pH stress are equivalent is unclear, as they have not been treated as separate variables in molecular physiological studies. Additionally, molecular responses to these stresses have not been studied in leaf and root tissues simultaneously. We tested how plants with the Strategy I Fe uptake system respond to Fe deficiency at mildly acidic and alkaline pH by measuring root ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity and expression of selected Fe uptake genes and riboflavin synthesis genes. Alkaline pH increased cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) root FCR activity at full Fe supply, but alkaline stress abolished FCR response to low Fe supply. Alkaline pH or low Fe supply resulted in increased expression of Fe uptake genes, but riboflavin synthesis genes responded to Fe deficiency but not alkalinity. Iron deficiency increased expression of some common genes in roots and leaves, but alkaline stress blocked up-regulation of these genes in Fe-deficient leaves. In roots of the melon (Cucumis melo L.) fefe mutant, in which Fe uptake responses are blocked upstream of Fe uptake genes, alkaline stress or Fe deficiency up-regulation of certain Fe uptake and riboflavin synthesis genes was inhibited, indicating a central role for the FeFe protein. These results suggest a model implicating shoot-to-root signaling of Fe status to induce Fe uptake gene expression in roots. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Uptake and Translocation of Iron by Native Tree Species In A Constructed Wetland Treating Landfill Leachates

    OpenAIRE

    A. Snow; Abdel E. Ghaly; R. Cote; A. M. Snow

    2008-01-01

    A surface flow wetland was constructed in the Burnside Industrial Park, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, to treat stormwater runoff from the surrounding watersheds which are comprised primarily of commercial properties and two former landfills. The objectives of this study were: (a) to compare the uptake of iron by red maple, white birch and red spruce trees growing under flooded soil conditions in the constructed wetland and well drained soil conditions in a nearby reference site, (b) to evaluate the...

  2. Studies on the mechanism of pyrophosphate-mediated uptake of iron from transferrin by isolated rat-liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, K.; Romslo, I.; Bergen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    1. Respiring rat liver mitochondria accumulate iron released from transferrin by pyrophosphate. The amount of iron accumulated is 1-1.5 nmol mg protein -1 h -1 , or approximately 60% of the amount of iron mobilized from transferrin. 2. The uptake declines if respiration is inhibited, substrate is depleted, or the experiments are run under anaerobic conditions. Substrate, depletion and respiratory inhibitors are less inhibitory under anaerobic conditions. 3. More than 80% of the amount of iron accumulated by aerobic, actively respiring mitochondria can be chelated by bathophenanthroline sulphonate, and with deuteroporphyrin included, up to 30% of the amount of iron accumulated is recovered as deuteroheme. Iron accumulated by respiration-inhibited mitochondria under aerobic conditions is not available for heme synthesis. 4. With time the uptake of iron increases eightfold relative to the uptake of pyrophosphate. 5. The results are compatible with a model in which ferric iron is mobilized from transferrin by pyrophosphate, ferric iron pyrophosphate is bound to the mitochondria, iron is reduced, dissociates from pyrophosphate and is taken up by the mitochondria. Ferrous irons thus formed is available for heme synthesis. (orig.) [de

  3. Genomic insights into the iron uptake mechanisms of the biomining microorganism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatrini, Raquel; Jedlicki, Eugenia; Holmes, David S

    2005-12-01

    Commercial bioleaching of copper and the biooxidation of gold is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process for metal recovery. A partial genome sequence of the acidophilic, bioleaching bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is available from two public sources. This information has been used to build preliminary models that describe how this microorganism confronts unusually high iron loads in the extremely acidic conditions (pH 2) found in natural environments and in bioleaching operations. A. ferrooxidans contains candidate genes for iron uptake, sensing, storage, and regulation of iron homeostasis. Predicted proteins exhibit significant amino acid similarity with known proteins from neutrophilic organisms, including conservation of functional motifs, permitting their identification by bioinformatics tools and allowing the recognition of common themes in iron transport across distantly related species. However, significant differences in amino acid sequence were detected in pertinent domains that suggest ways in which the periplasmic and outer membrane proteins of A. ferrooxidans maintain structural integrity and relevant protein-protein contacts at low pH. Unexpectedly, the microorganism also contains candidate genes, organized in operon-like structures that potentially encode at least 11 siderophore systems for the uptake of Fe(III), although it does not exhibit genes that could encode the biosynthesis of the siderophores themselves. The presence of multiple Fe(III) uptake systems suggests that A. ferrooxidans can inhabit aerobic environments where iron is scarce and where siderophore producers are present. It may also help to explain why it cannot tolerate high Fe(III) concentrations in bioleaching operations where it is out-competed by Leptospirillum species.

  4. Absorption of iron in the aged; investigation of mucosal-uptake, mucosal-transfer and retention of a physiological dose of inorganic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, J.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Iron (II) and iron (III) uptake by the mucosal cells, the retention in the body, and the mucosal-transport fraction were studied in 40 healthy people over 65 years old, in 30 young adults and in 20 patients with iron-deficiency. The study was performed with 59 Fe as a tracer and 51 Cr as an inert indicator. The radioactivity was measured with a whole body scanner 24 hours and 24 days after ingestion

  5. Fob1 and Fob2 Proteins Are Virulence Determinants of Rhizopus oryzae via Facilitating Iron Uptake from Ferrioxamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfu Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis patients with chronic renal failure receiving deferoxamine for treating iron overload are uniquely predisposed for mucormycosis, which is most often caused by Rhizopus oryzae. Although the deferoxamine siderophore is not secreted by Mucorales, previous studies established that Rhizopus species utilize iron from ferrioxamine (iron-rich form of deferoxamine. Here we determined that the CBS domain proteins of Fob1 and Fob2 act as receptors on the cell surface of R. oryzae during iron uptake from ferrioxamine. Fob1 and Fob2 cell surface expression was induced in the presence of ferrioxamine and bound radiolabeled ferrioxamine. A R. oryzae strain with targeted reduced Fob1/Fob2 expression was impaired for iron uptake, germinating, and growing on medium with ferrioxamine as the sole source of iron. This strain also exhibited reduced virulence in a deferoxamine-treated, but not the diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA, mouse model of mucormycosis. The mechanism by which R. oryzae obtains iron from ferrioxamine involves the reductase/permease uptake system since the growth on ferrioxamine supplemented medium is associated with elevated reductase activity and the use of the ferrous chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate abrogates iron uptake and growth on medium supplemented with ferrioxamine as a sole source of iron. Finally, R. oryzae mutants with reduced copies of the high affinity iron permease (FTR1 or with decreased FTR1 expression had an impaired iron uptake from ferrioxamine in vitro and reduced virulence in the deferoxamine-treated mouse model of mucormycosis. These two receptors appear to be conserved in Mucorales, and can be the subject of future novel therapy to maintain the use of deferoxamine for treating iron-overload.

  6. Effect of iron deficiency on the biodistribution and tumor uptake of Ga-67 citrate in animals: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.P.; Alderson, P.O.; Weiss, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    To investigate the effect of iron deficiency on the biodistribution and tumor uptake of Ga-67 citrate, 20 weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained for 6 to 8 weeks on a low-iron diet. Eighteen littermates were maintained on a normal iron diet and served as controls. Animals received 10 μCi Ga-67 citrate, and urine and feces were collected for 48 h. The animals were then killed, tissue samples were obtained, and serum iron and unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) were measured. The accumulation of Ga-67 in the liver and spleen (% injected dose) was markedly increased in iron-deficient animals and urinary excretion was reduced. Tumor uptake was not significantly different in iron-deficient and control animals, but tumor-to-blood ratios were elevated (p < 0.001) in the iron-deficient animals because of low blood levels of Ga-67. The liver and spleen accumulation of Ga-67 correlated significantly (p < 0.001) with the UIBC. The results show that iron deficiency alters the distribution of Ga-67 citrate, and suggest that the variable liver-spleen uptake seen in clinical Ga-67 images may be explained, in part, by changes in serum iron and UIBC

  7. The role of iron uptake in pathogenicity and symbiosis in Photorhabdus luminescens TT01

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    Joyce Susan A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram negative bacteria that are pathogenic to insect larvae whilst also having a mutualistic interaction with nematodes from the family Heterorhabditis. Iron is an essential nutrient and bacteria have different mechanisms for obtaining both the ferrous (Fe2+ and ferric (Fe3+ forms of this metal from their environments. In this study we were interested in analyzing the role of Fe3+ and Fe2+ iron uptake systems in the ability of Photorhabdus to interact with its invertebrate hosts. Results We constructed targeted deletion mutants of exbD, feoABC and yfeABCD in P. luminescens TT01. The exbD mutant was predicted to be crippled in its ability to obtain Fe3+ and we show that this mutant does not grow well in iron-limited media. We also show that this mutant was avirulent to the insect but was unaffected in its symbiotic interaction with Heterorhabditis. Furthermore we show that a mutation in feoABC (encoding a predicted Fe2+ permease was unaffected in both virulence and symbiosis whilst the divalent cation transporter encoded by yfeABCD is required for virulence in the Tobacco Hornworm, Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera but not in the Greater Wax Moth, Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera. Moreover the Yfe transporter also appears to have a role during colonization of the IJ stage of the nematode. Conclusion In this study we show that iron uptake (via the TonB complex and the Yfe transporter is important for the virulence of P. luminescens to insect larvae. Moreover this study also reveals that the Yfe transporter appears to be involved in Mn2+-uptake during growth in the gut lumen of the IJ nematode. Therefore, the Yfe transporter in P. luminescens TT01 is important during colonization of both the insect and nematode and, moreover, the metal ion transported by this pathway is host-dependent.

  8. Inhibition of iron uptake is responsible for differential sensitivity to V-ATPase inhibitors in several cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Straud

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many cell lines derived from tumors as well as transformed cell lines are far more sensitive to V-ATPase inhibitors than normal counterparts. The molecular mechanisms underlying these differences in sensitivity are not known. Using global gene expression data, we show that the most sensitive responses to HeLa cells to low doses of V-ATPase inhibitors involve genes responsive to decreasing intracellular iron or decreasing cholesterol and that sensitivity to iron uptake is an important determinant of V-ATPase sensitivity in several cancer cell lines. One of the most sensitive cell lines, melanoma derived SK-Mel-5, over-expresses the iron efflux transporter ferroportin and has decreased expression of proteins involved in iron uptake, suggesting that it actively suppresses cytoplasmic iron. SK-Mel-5 cells have increased production of reactive oxygen species and may be seeking to limit additional production of ROS by iron.

  9. Ferric reductase genes involved in high-affinity iron uptake are differentially regulated in yeast and hyphae of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeves, Rose E; Mason, Robert P; Woodacre, Alexandra; Cashmore, Annette M

    2011-09-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans possesses a reductive iron uptake system which is active in iron-restricted conditions. The sequestration of iron by this mechanism initially requires the reduction of free iron to the soluble ferrous form, which is catalysed by ferric reductase proteins. Reduced iron is then taken up into the cell by a complex of a multicopper oxidase protein and an iron transport protein. Multicopper oxidase proteins require copper to function and so reductive iron and copper uptake are inextricably linked. It has previously been established that Fre10 is the major cell surface ferric reductase in C. albicans and that transcription of FRE10 is regulated in response to iron levels. We demonstrate here that Fre10 is also a cupric reductase and that Fre7 also makes a significant contribution to cell surface ferric and cupric reductase activity. It is also shown, for the first time, that transcription of FRE10 and FRE7 is lower in hyphae compared to yeast and that this leads to a corresponding decrease in cell surface ferric, but not cupric, reductase activity. This demonstrates that the regulation of two virulence determinants, the reductive iron uptake system and the morphological form of C. albicans, are linked. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  11. A cascade of iron-containing proteins governs the genetic iron starvation response to promote iron uptake and inhibit iron storage in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Encinar del Dedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor, but it is also toxic at high levels. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sensor glutaredoxin Grx4 guides the activity of the repressors Php4 and Fep1 to mediate a complex transcriptional response to iron deprivation: activation of Php4 and inactivation of Fep1 leads to inhibition of iron usage/storage, and to promotion of iron import, respectively. However, the molecular events ruling the activity of this double-branched pathway remained elusive. We show here that Grx4 incorporates a glutathione-containing iron-sulfur cluster, alone or forming a heterodimer with the BolA-like protein Fra2. Our genetic study demonstrates that Grx4-Fra2, but not Fep1 nor Php4, participates not only in iron starvation signaling but also in iron-related aerobic metabolism. Iron-containing Grx4 binds and inactivates the Php4 repressor; upon iron deprivation, the cluster in Grx4 is probably disassembled, the proteins dissociate, and Php4 accumulates at the nucleus and represses iron consumption genes. Fep1 is also an iron-containing protein, and the tightly bound iron is required for transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that the cluster-containing Grx4-Fra2 heterodimer constitutively binds to Fep1, and upon iron deprivation the disassembly of the iron cluster between Grx4 and Fra2 promotes reverse metal transfer from Fep1 to Grx4-Fra2, and de-repression of iron-import genes. Our genetic and biochemical study demonstrates that the glutaredoxin Grx4 independently governs the Php4 and Fep1 repressors through metal transfer. Whereas iron loss from Grx4 seems to be sufficient to release Php4 and allow its nuclear accumulation, total or partial disassembly of the Grx4-Fra2 cluster actively participates in iron-containing Fep1 activation by sequestering its iron and decreasing its interaction with promoters.

  12. The effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dafang; Ma, Wei; Song, Xiaojing; Bao, Yanyu

    2017-03-01

    Although the role of iron plaque on rice root surface has been investigated in recent years, its effect on antibiotic uptake remains uncertain. In the study, pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of iron plaque on uptake and translocation of norfloxacin (adding 10 and 50 mg·kg -1 treatments) in rice seedlings grown in paddy soil. Iron plaque was induced by adding different amounts of Fe(II) in soil. The results showed that the presence of norfloxacin can decrease the amount of iron plaque induced. After rice with iron plaque induced, norfloxacin was mainly accumulated in iron plaque on root surface, followed by inside root, but its translocation from root to other rice tissues is not observed. Iron plaque played the role of a barrier for norfloxacin uptake into rice roots under high norfloxacin concentration of 50 mg·kg -1 , however not that under low concentration of 10 mg·kg -1 . And the barrier function was the most strongest with adding Fe(II) of 30 mg·kg -1 as combined action of iron plaque and rhizosphere effect. Fluorescence microscope analysis showed that norfloxacin mainly distributed in the outside of root cell, which showed its translocation as apoplastic pathway in rice. Comparing with non-rhizosphere, more norfloxacin was accumulated in rhizosphere soil. Maybe, strong root oxidization (high Eh values) induced more iron oxide formation in rhizosphere and on root surface, which led to norfloxacin's mobility towards to rhizosphere through its strong adsorption of iron oxides and then promoted its uptake by rice on root surface.

  13. Magnetic separation of algae genetically modified for increased intracellular iron uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Amy [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Moore, Lee R. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lane, Christopher D.; Kumar, Anil; Stroff, Clayton; White, Nicolas [Phycal Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Xue, Wei; Chalmers, Jeffrey J. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Zborowski, Maciej, E-mail: zborowm@ccf.org [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Algae were investigated in the past as a potential source of biofuel and other useful chemical derivatives. Magnetic separation of algae by iron oxide nanoparticle binding to cells has been proposed by others for dewatering of cellular mass prior to lipid extraction. We have investigated feasibility of magnetic separation based on the presence of natural iron stores in the cell, such as the ferritin in Auxenochlorella protothecoides (A. protothecoides) strains. The A. protothecoides cell constructs were tested for inserted genes and for increased intracellular iron concentration by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption (ICP–AA). They were grown in Sueoka’s modified high salt media with added vitamin B1 and increasing concentration of soluble iron compound (FeCl{sub 3} EDTA, from 1× to 8× compared to baseline). The cell magnetic separation conditions were tested using a thin rectangular flow channel pressed against interpolar gaps of a permanent magnet forming a separation system of a well-defined fluid flow and magnetic fringing field geometry (up to 2.2 T and 1000 T/m) dubbed “magnetic deposition microscopy”, or MDM. The presence of magnetic cells in suspension was detected by formation of characteristic deposition bands at the edges of the magnet interpolar gaps, amenable to optical scanning and microscopic examination. The results demonstrated increasing cellular Fe uptake with increasing Fe concentration in the culture media in wild type strain and in selected genetically-modified constructs, leading to magnetic separation without magnetic particle binding. The throughput in this study is not sufficient for an economical scale harvest. - Highlights: • Auxenochlorella protothecoides algae were genetically modified for biofuel production. • Algal iron metabolism was sufficient for their label-less magnetic separation. • High magnetic field and low flow required make the separation scale-up uneconomical.

  14. Magnetic separation of algae genetically modified for increased intracellular iron uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Amy; Moore, Lee R.; Lane, Christopher D.; Kumar, Anil; Stroff, Clayton; White, Nicolas; Xue, Wei; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Algae were investigated in the past as a potential source of biofuel and other useful chemical derivatives. Magnetic separation of algae by iron oxide nanoparticle binding to cells has been proposed by others for dewatering of cellular mass prior to lipid extraction. We have investigated feasibility of magnetic separation based on the presence of natural iron stores in the cell, such as the ferritin in Auxenochlorella protothecoides (A. protothecoides) strains. The A. protothecoides cell constructs were tested for inserted genes and for increased intracellular iron concentration by inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption (ICP–AA). They were grown in Sueoka’s modified high salt media with added vitamin B1 and increasing concentration of soluble iron compound (FeCl 3 EDTA, from 1× to 8× compared to baseline). The cell magnetic separation conditions were tested using a thin rectangular flow channel pressed against interpolar gaps of a permanent magnet forming a separation system of a well-defined fluid flow and magnetic fringing field geometry (up to 2.2 T and 1000 T/m) dubbed “magnetic deposition microscopy”, or MDM. The presence of magnetic cells in suspension was detected by formation of characteristic deposition bands at the edges of the magnet interpolar gaps, amenable to optical scanning and microscopic examination. The results demonstrated increasing cellular Fe uptake with increasing Fe concentration in the culture media in wild type strain and in selected genetically-modified constructs, leading to magnetic separation without magnetic particle binding. The throughput in this study is not sufficient for an economical scale harvest. - Highlights: • Auxenochlorella protothecoides algae were genetically modified for biofuel production. • Algal iron metabolism was sufficient for their label-less magnetic separation. • High magnetic field and low flow required make the separation scale-up uneconomical

  15. Enhanced Iron and Selenium Uptake in Plants by Volatile Emissions of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BF06

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs released by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are involved in promoting growth and triggering systemic resistance (ISR in plants. Importantly, the release of VOCs by some PGPR strains confers improved plant uptake of nutrient elements from the soil. However, the underlying mechanisms of VOCs-regulated nutrient acquisition remain elusive. In this study, VOCs were extracted and identified from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (strain BF06 using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS. BF06 VOCs exposure significantly promoted the growth and photosynthesis of Arabidopsis plants. To explore how microbial VOCs stimulate growth in plants, gene expression profiles of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to BF06 VOCs were examined using transcriptomic analyses. In screening differentially expressed genes (DEGs, most upregulated DEGs were found to be related to amino acid transport, iron (Fe uptake and homeostasis, and sulfate transport. Furthermore, BF06 VOCs significantly enhanced Fe absorption in plants under Fe-limited conditions. However, when nitric oxide (NO synthesis was inhibited, BF06 VOCs exposure could not substantially augment Fe acquisition in plants under alkaline stress, indicating that VOCs-mediated plant uptake of Fe was required for induction of root NO accumulation. In addition, BF06 VOCs exposure led to a marked increase in some genes encoding for sulfate transporters, and further increased Se accumulation in plants. Intriguingly, BF06 VOCs exposure failed to increase Se uptake in sultr1;2 mutants, which may indicate that high-level transcription of these sulfate transporters induced by BF06 VOCs was essential for enhancing Se absorption by plants. Taken together, our results demonstrated the potential of VOCs released by this strain BF06 to increase Fe and Se uptake in plants.

  16. The effect of neutral-surface iron oxide nanoparticles on cellular uptake and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eunjoo Kim,1 Joon Mee Kim,2 Lucia Kim,2 Suk Jin Choi,2 In Suh Park,2 Jee Young Han,2 Young Chae Chu,2 Eun Sook Choi,1 Kun Na,3 Soon-Sun Hong4 1Division of Nano and Energy Convergence Research, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST, Daegu, 2Department of Pathology, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, 3Department of Biotechnology, Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, 4Department of Biomedical Sciences, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, South Korea Abstract: In recent years, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs have been applied widely to biomedical fields. However, the relationship between the physicochemical properties of IONPs and their biological behavior is not fully understood yet. We prepared 3-methacryloxypropyl­trimethoxysilane (MPS-coated IONPs, which have a neutral hydrophobic surface, and compared their biological behavior to that of Resovist (ferucarbotran, a commercialized IONP formulation modified with carboxymethyl dextran. The rate of MPS-IONP uptake by human aortic endothelial cells (HAoECs was higher than ferucarbotran uptake, indicating that the neutral hydrophobic nature of MPS-IONPs allowed them to be absorbed more readily through the plasma membrane. However, the signaling pathways activated by MPS-IONPs and ferucarbotran were comparable, suggesting that surface charge is not a key factor for inducing changes in HAoECs. In vivo fate analysis showed that MPS-IONPs accumulated for longer periods in tissues than hydrophilic ferucarbotran. These findings could enlarge our understanding of NP behavior for advanced applications in the biomedical field. Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticles, neutral hydrophobic surface, signaling pathway, uptake, accumulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS

  17. Augmented internalisation of ferroportin to late endosomes impairs iron uptake by enterocyte-like IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Phillip S; Thomas, Carla

    2005-08-01

    Absorption of iron occurs by duodenal enterocytes, involving uptake by the divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and release by ferroportin. Ferroportin responds to the hepatocyte-produced 25-amino-acid-peptide hepcidin-25 by undergoing internalisation to late endosomes that impair iron release. Ferroportin is also expressed on the apical membrane of polarised Caco-2 cells, rat intestinal cells and in IEC-6 cells (an intestinal epithelial cell line). A blocking antibody to ferroportin also impairs the uptake, but not the release, of iron. In this study IEC-6 cells were used to study the mechanism of impairment or recovery from impairment produced by the blocking antibody and the fate of DMT1 and ferroportin. Uptake of 1 muM Fe(II) was studied by adding the antibody from time 0 and after adding or removing the antibody once a steady state had been reached. Surface binding, maximum iron transport rate V(max) and transporter affinity (K(m)) were measured after impairment of iron uptake. Ferroportin and DMT1 distribution were assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Antibody-mediated impairment, or recovery from impairment, of Fe(II) uptake occurred within minutes. Impairment was lost when the antibody was combined with the immunizing peptide. DMT1 and ferroportin undergo internalisation to late endosomes and, in the presence of the antibody, augmented internalisation of DMT1 and ferroportin caused swelling of late endosomes. Surface binding of Fe(II) and iron transport V(max) were reduced by 50%, indicating that the antibody removed membrane-bound DMT1. The ferroportin antibody induced rapid turnover of membrane ferroportin and DMT1 and its internalisation to late endosomes, resulting in impaired Fe(II) uptake.

  18. Ligand-free, protein-bound technetium-99m iron-dextran enhancement of technetium pyrophosphate uptake in tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojer, P.M.; Jakovljevic, A.C.; Wise, K.N.

    1985-01-01

    The biodistribution of technetium-99m was studied in T-cell lymphoma and selected organs of iron-dextran treated and control mice given technetium-99m pyrophosphate. The results showed that high serum iron levels increased tumour uptake of technetium pyrophosphate. This supports the hypothesis that technetium, in common with other metal-based tumour seeking radiopharmaceuticals, is transported to tumours as a ligand-free protein-bound cation. (U.K.)

  19. The iron-regulated transporter 1 plays an essential role in uptake, translocation and grain-loading of manganese, but not iron, in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Lizhi; Persson, Daniel Olaf; Duan, Fengying

    2018-01-01

    Transporters involved in manganese (Mn) uptake and intracellular Mn homeostasis in Arabidopsis and rice are well characterized, while much less is known for barley, which is particularly prone to Mn deficiency. In this study we have investigated the role of the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1...

  20. Using Perls Staining to Trace the Iron Uptake Pathway in Leaves of a Prunus Rootstock Treated with Iron Foliar Fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Juan J; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to trace the Fe uptake pathway in leaves of Prunus rootstock (GF 677; Prunus dulcis × Prunus persica) plants treated with foliar Fe compounds using the Perls blue method, which detects labile Fe pools. Young expanded leaves of Fe-deficient plants grown in nutrient solution were treated with Fe-compounds using a brush. Iron compounds used were the ferrous salt FeSO4, the ferric salts Fe2(SO4)3 and FeCl3, and the chelate Fe(III)-EDTA, all of them at concentrations of 9 mM Fe. Leaf Fe concentration increases were measured at 30, 60, 90 min, and 24 h, and 70 μm-thick leaf transversal sections were obtained with a vibrating microtome and stained with Perls blue. In vitro results show that the Perls blue method is a good tool to trace the Fe uptake pathway in leaves when using Fe salts, but is not sensitive enough when using synthetic Fe(III)-chelates such as Fe(III)-EDTA and Fe(III)-IDHA. Foliar Fe fertilization increased leaf Fe concentrations with all Fe compounds used, with inorganic Fe salts causing larger leaf Fe concentration increases than Fe(III)-EDTA. Results show that Perls blue stain appeared within 30 min in the stomatal areas, indicating that Fe applied as inorganic salts was taken up rapidly via stomata. In the case of using FeSO4 a progression of the stain was seen with time toward vascular areas in the leaf blade and the central vein, whereas in the case of Fe(III) salts the stain mainly remained in the stomatal areas. Perls stain was never observed in the mesophyll areas, possibly due to the low concentration of labile Fe pools.

  1. Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI uptake by T lymphocytes: evidence for the selective acquisition of oligomeric ferric citrate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Arezes

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient in several biological processes such as oxygen transport, DNA replication and erythropoiesis. Plasma iron normally circulates bound to transferrin. In iron overload disorders, however, iron concentrations exceed transferrin binding capacity and iron appears complexed with low molecular weight molecules, known as non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI. NTBI is responsible for the toxicity associated with iron-overload pathologies but the mechanisms leading to NTBI uptake are not fully understood. Here we show for the first time that T lymphocytes are able to take up and accumulate NTBI in a manner that resembles that of hepatocytes. Moreover, we show that both hepatocytes and T lymphocytes take up the oligomeric Fe3Cit3 preferentially to other iron-citrate species, suggesting the existence of a selective NTBI carrier. These results provide a tool for the identification of the still elusive ferric-citrate cellular carrier and may also open a new pathway towards the design of more efficient iron chelators for the treatment of iron overload disorders.

  2. Facilitated monocyte-macrophage uptake and tissue distribution of superparmagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Beduneau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We posit that the same mononuclear phagocytes (MP that serve as target cells and vehicles for a host of microbial infections can be used to improve diagnostics and drug delivery. We also theorize that physical and biological processes such as particle shape, size, coating and opsonization that affect MP clearance of debris and microbes can be harnessed to facilitate uptake of nanoparticles (NP and tissue delivery. METHODS: Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM were used as vehicles of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO NP and immunoglobulin (IgG or albumin coated SPIO for studies of uptake and distribution. IgG coated SPIO was synthesized by covalent linkage and uptake into monocytes and MDM investigated related to size, time, temperature, concentration, and coatings. SPIO and IgG SPIO were infused intravenously into naïve mice. T(2 measures using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to monitor tissue distribution in animals. RESULTS: Oxidation of dextran on the SPIO surface generated reactive aldehyde groups and permitted covalent linkage to amino groups of murine and human IgG and F(ab'(2 fragments and for Alexa Fluor(R 488 hydroxylamine to form a Schiff base. This labile intermediate was immediately reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride in order to stabilize the NP conjugate. Optical density measurements of the oxidized IgG, F(ab'(2, and/or Alexa Fluor(R 488 SPIO demonstrated approximately 50% coupling yield. IgG-SPIO was found stable at 4 degrees C for a period of 1 month during which size and polydispersity index varied little from 175 nm and 200 nm, respectively. In vitro, NP accumulated readily within monocyte and MDM cytoplasm after IgG-SPIO exposure; whereas, the uptake of native SPIO in monocytes and MDM was 10-fold less. No changes in cell viability were noted for the SPIO-containing monocytes and MDM. Cell morphology was not changed as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Compared to unconjugated

  3. Effects of Exogenous Gibberellic Acid3 on Iron and Manganese Plaque Amounts and Iron and Manganese Uptake in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Zhu, Changhua; Gan, Lijun; Ng, Denny; Xia, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) regulate various components of plant development. Iron and Mn plaque result from oxiding and hydroxiding Fe and Mn, respectively, on the roots of aquatic plant species such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we found that exogenous gibberellic acid3 (GA3) spray decreased Fe plaque, but increased Mn plaque, with applications of Kimura B nutrient solution. Similar effects from GA3, leading to reduced Fe plaque and increased Mn plaque, were also found by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometric microanalysis. Reduced Fe plaque was observed after applying GA3 to the groups containing added Fe2+ (17 and 42 mg•L-1) and an increasing trend was detected in Mn plaques of the Mn2+ (34 and 84 mg•L-1) added treatments. In contrast, an inhibitor of GA3, uniconazole, reversed the effects of GA3. The uptake of Fe or Mn in rice plants was enhanced after GA3 application and Fe or Mn plaque production. Strong synergetic effects of GA3 application on Fe plaque production were detected. However, no synergetic effects on Mn plaque production were detected. PMID:25710173

  4. The quality of Metroxylon Sago sucker: morphology and uptake of manganese and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashriyah Mat; Abdul Khalik Wood; Ramli Ishak

    2001-01-01

    Metroxylon sago or sagopalm is an important source of carbohydrate for the South East Asian countries, apart from rice. In Malaysia, wild sagopalm grows in Sarawak in its natural habitats, the coastal peat swamp. The quality of sucker growing vegetatively on sagopalm was studied at Sungai Talau experimental station, Dalat plantation and Oya/Mukah plantation in Sarawak. The coefficients of variability (C) and Index of similiarity (I) were calculated based on sucker morphology and uptake of manganese and iron, The matrix of hypothetical exact interpoint distances (Indices of Similarity and Dissimilarity) shows that sucker on matured sagopalm at Sungai Talam experimental station was a high quality, sucker on 5 years old sagopalm at Mukah sago plantation was approximately one-third as good, whereas sucker on 1.5 years old sagopalm at Oya/dalat sago plantation was of inferior quality. (Author)

  5. Iron plaque formation on roots of different rice cultivars and the relation with lead uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Leng, Xuemei; Wang, Mingxin; Zhu, Zhongquan; Dai, Qinghua

    2011-07-01

    The relationships between lead (Pb) uptake and iron/manganese plaque formation on rice roots were investigated with three cultivars. The results showed that the rice cultivars with indica consanguinity were more sensitive to soil Pb stress than the cultivar with japonica consanguinity. Pb concentrations and distribution ratios in root tissues were in the order: Shanyou 63 > Yangdao 6 > Wuyunjing 7, but Pb and Fe concentrations and distribution ratios in the plaques showed a reverse order. Mn concentrations and distribution ratios in the plaques of Wuyunjing 7 were significantly higher (P rice root can provide a barrier to soil Pb stress. The plaque will increase sequestration of Pb on rice root surface and in the rhizosphere, providing a means of external exclusion of soil Pb to some extent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The iron uptake repressor Fep1 in the fission yeast binds Fe-S cluster through conserved cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kang-Lok; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye, E-mail: jhroe@snu.ac.kr

    2016-09-09

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated since iron is an essential but toxic element in the cell. The GATA-type transcription factor Fep1 and its orthologs contribute to iron homeostasis in many fungi by repressing genes for iron uptake when intracellular iron is high. Even though the function and interaction partners of Fep1 have been elucidated extensively In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the mechanism behind iron-sensing by Fep1 remains elusive. It has been reported that Fep1 interacts with Fe-S-containing monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and Grx4-Fra2 complex. In this study, we demonstrate that Fep1 also binds iron, in the form of Fe-S cluster. Spectroscopic and biochemical analyses of as isolated and reconstituted Fep1 suggest that the dimeric Fep1 binds Fe-S clusters. The mutation study revealed that the cluster-binding depended on the conserved cysteines located between the two zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. EPR analyses revealed [Fe-S]-specific peaks indicative of mixed presence of [2Fe-2S], [3Fe-4S], or [4Fe-4S]. The finding that Fep1 is an Fe-S protein fits nicely with the model that the Fe-S-trafficking Grx4 senses intracellular iron environment and modulates the activity of Fep1. - Highlights: • Fep1, a prototype fungal iron uptake regulator, was isolated stably from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. • Fep1 exhibits UV–visible absorption spectrum, characteristic of [Fe-S] proteins. • The iron and sulfide contents in purified or reconstituted Fep1 also support [Fe-S]. • The conserved cysteines are critical for [Fe-S]-binding. • EPR spectra at 5 K and 123 K suggest a mixed population of [Fe-S].

  7. Iron uptake and increased intracellular enzyme activity follow host lactoferrin binding by Trichomonas vaginalis receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, K.M.; Alderete, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Lactoferrin acquisition and iron uptake by pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis was examined. Saturation binding kinetics were obtained for trichomonads using increasing amounts of radioiodinated lactoferrin, while no significant binding by transferrin under similar conditions was achieved. Only unlabeled lactoferrin successfully and stoichiometrically competed with 125I-labeled lactoferrin binding. Time course studies showed maximal lactoferrin binding by 30 min at 37 degrees C. Data suggest no internalization of bound lactoferrin. The accumulation of radioactivity in supernatants after incubation of T. vaginalis with 125I-labeled lactoferrin and washing in PBS suggested the presence of low affinity sites for this host macromolecule. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of 90,000 receptors per trichomonad with an apparent Kd of 1.0 microM. Two trichomonad lactoferrin binding proteins were identified by affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation of receptor-ligand complexes. A 30-fold accumulation of iron was achieved using 59Fe-lactoferrin when compared to the steady state concentration of bound lactoferrin. The activity of pyruvate/ferrodoxin oxidoreductase, an enzyme involved in trichomonal energy metabolism, increased more than sixfold following exposure of the parasites to lactoferrin, demonstrating a biologic response to the receptor-mediated binding of lactoferrin. These data suggest that T. vaginalis possesses specific receptors for biologically relevant host proteins and that these receptors contribute to the metabolic processes of the parasites.

  8. Iron uptake and increased intracellular enzyme activity follow host lactoferrin binding by Trichomonas vaginalis receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.M.; Alderete, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Lactoferrin acquisition and iron uptake by pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis was examined. Saturation binding kinetics were obtained for trichomonads using increasing amounts of radioiodinated lactoferrin, while no significant binding by transferrin under similar conditions was achieved. Only unlabeled lactoferrin successfully and stoichiometrically competed with 125I-labeled lactoferrin binding. Time course studies showed maximal lactoferrin binding by 30 min at 37 degrees C. Data suggest no internalization of bound lactoferrin. The accumulation of radioactivity in supernatants after incubation of T. vaginalis with 125I-labeled lactoferrin and washing in PBS suggested the presence of low affinity sites for this host macromolecule. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of 90,000 receptors per trichomonad with an apparent Kd of 1.0 microM. Two trichomonad lactoferrin binding proteins were identified by affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation of receptor-ligand complexes. A 30-fold accumulation of iron was achieved using 59Fe-lactoferrin when compared to the steady state concentration of bound lactoferrin. The activity of pyruvate/ferrodoxin oxidoreductase, an enzyme involved in trichomonal energy metabolism, increased more than sixfold following exposure of the parasites to lactoferrin, demonstrating a biologic response to the receptor-mediated binding of lactoferrin. These data suggest that T. vaginalis possesses specific receptors for biologically relevant host proteins and that these receptors contribute to the metabolic processes of the parasites

  9. Can iron plaque affect Sb(III) and Sb(V) uptake by plants under hydroponic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Ying; Lenz, Markus; Lenz, Markus; Schulin, Rainer; Tandy, Susan

    2018-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) contamination of soils is of concern due to h uman activities such as recycling of Sb containing Pb acid batteries, shooting and mining. However Sb uptake by plants is poorly documented, especially when plants are growing on waterlogged soils and iron plaques form on their roots. The

  10. The use of pulsed magnetic fields to increase the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles by living cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uzhytchak, M.; Lynnyk, A.; Zablotskyy, V.; Dempsey, N.M.; Dias, A.L.; Bonfim, M.; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Kubinová, Šárka; Lunov, O.; Dejneka, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 24 (2017), s. 243703 ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : pulsed magnetic fields * increase the uptake * iron oxide * living cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  11. Iron plaque formation and heavy metal uptake in Spartina alterniflora at different tidal levels and waterlogging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Sun, Xiangli; Zhang, Qiqiong; Li, Xiuzhen; Yan, Zhongzheng

    2018-05-30

    Tidal flat elevation in the estuarine wetland determines the tidal flooding time and flooding frequency, which will inevitably affect the formation of iron plaque and accumulations of heavy metals (HMs) in wetland plants. The present study investigated the formation of iron plaque and HM's (copper, zinc, lead, and chromium) accumulation in S. alterniflora, a typical estuarine wetland species, at different tidal flat elevations (low, middle and high) in filed and at different time (3, 6, 9, 12 h per day) of waterlogging treatment in greenhouse conditions. Results showed that the accumulation of copper, zinc, lead, and chromium in S. alterniflora was proportional to the exchangeable fraction of these metals in the sediments, which generally increased with the increase of waterlogging time, whereas the formations of iron plaque in roots decreased with the increase of waterlogging time. Under field conditions, the uptake of copper and zinc in the different parts of the plants generally increased with the tidal levels despite the decrease in the metals' exchangeable fraction with increasing tidal levels. The formation of iron plaque was found to be highest in the middle tidal positions and significantly lower in low and high tidal positions. Longer waterlogging time increased the metals' accumulation but decreased the formation of iron plaque in S. alterniflora. The binding of metal ions on iron plaque helped impede the uptake and accumulation of copper and chromium in S. alterniflora. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phosphate dynamics in an acidic mountain stream: Interactions involving algal uptake, sorption by iron oxide, and photoreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Cathy M.; Broshears, Robert E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Acid mine drainage streams in the Rocky Mountains typically have few algal species and abundant iron oxide deposits which can sorb phosphate. An instream injection of radiolabeled phosphate (32P0,) into St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, was used to test the ability of a dominant algal species, Ulothrix sp., to rapidly assimilate phosphate. Approximately 90% of the injected phosphate was removed from the water column in the 175-m stream reach. When shaded stream reaches were exposed to full sunlight after the injection ended, photoreductive dissolution of iron oxide released sorbed 32P, which was then also removed downstream. The removal from the stream was modeled as a first-order process by using a reactive solute transport transient storage model. Concentrations of 32P mass-’ of algae were typically lo-fold greater than concentrations in hydrous iron oxides. During the injection, concentrations of 32P increased in the cellular P pool containing soluble, low-molecular-weight compounds and confirmed direct algal uptake of 32P0, from water. Mass balance calculations indicated that algal uptake and sorption on iron oxides were significant in removing phosphate. We conclude that in stream ecosystems, PO, sorbed by iron oxides can act as a dynamic nutrient reservoir regulated by photoreduction.

  13. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle–cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine–silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33–45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nanoparticles ranged from −50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle–cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions

  14. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline [University of Puerto Rico, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [University of Florida, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle-cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine-silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33-45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nanoparticles ranged from -50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle-cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions.

  15. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake ......The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron...

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma with marginal superparamagnetic iron oxide uptake on T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Kousei; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Nishie, Akihiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Kakihara, Daisuke; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Honda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the characteristics of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) with marginal superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) uptake on T2*-weighted MRI. Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 73 patients with 83 surgically resected HCCs. Preoperative SPIO-enhanced MRI studies were retrospectively reviewed. Marginal SPIO uptake was considered positive if a rim-like or band-like low intensity area was present on SPIO-enhanced T2*-weighted images. The prevalence of marginal SPIO uptake was evaluated. Pathological specimens with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining of CD68 were reviewed in HCCs with marginal SPIO uptake and 33 HCCs without marginal SPIO uptake (control group). Results: Ten of 83 (12%) HCCs showed marginal SPIO uptake. All HCCs were hypervascular, and only one nodule showed a nodule-in-nodule appearance on imaging findings. The pathology specimens suggested possible causes of marginal SPIO uptake, including marginal macrophage infiltration in moderately or poorly differentiated HCC (n = 4), residual normal hepatic tissue at the marginal area of confluent multinodular or single nodular with extranodular growth type HCC (n = 3), and a well-differentiated HCC component in nodule-in-nodule type HCC (n = 3). Marginal macrophage infiltration was not seen in the control group. Conclusion: SPIO-enhanced MRI may be able to demonstrate marginal macrophage infiltration in HCC.

  17. Siderophore-dependent iron uptake systems as gates for antibiotic Trojan horse strategies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen responsible for nosocomial infections. The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa strains is increasing, necessitating the urgent development of new strategies to improve the control of this pathogen. Its bacterial envelope constitutes of an outer and an inner membrane enclosing the periplasm. This structure plays a key role in the resistance of the pathogen, by decreasing the penetration and the biological impact of many antibiotics. However, this barrier may also be seen as the "Achilles heel" of the bacterium as some of its functions provide opportunities for breaching bacterial defenses. Siderophore-dependent iron uptake systems act as gates in the bacterial envelope and could be used in a "Trojan horse" strategy, in which the conjugation of an antibiotic to a siderophore could significantly increase the biological activity of the antibiotic, by enhancing its transport into the bacterium. In this review, we provide an overview of the various siderophore-antibiotic conjugates that have been developed for use against P. aeruginosa and show that an accurate knowledge of the structural and functional features of the proteins involved in this transmembrane transport is required for the design and synthesis of effective siderophore-antibiotic Trojan horse conjugates.

  18. Synthesis of bombesin-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and their specific uptake in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Amanda L.; Hickey, Jennifer L.; Ablack, Amber L.; Lewis, John D.; Luyt, Leonard G.; Gillies, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The imaging of molecular markers associated with disease offers the possibility for earlier detection and improved treatment monitoring. Receptors for gastrin-releasing peptide are overexpressed on prostate cancer cells offering a promising imaging target, and analogs of bombesin, an amphibian tetradecapeptide have been previously demonstrated to target these receptors. Therefore, the pan-bombesin analog [β-Ala11, Phe13, Nle14]bombesin-(7-14) was conjugated through a linker to dye-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for the development of a new potential magnetic resonance imaging probe. The peptide was conjugated via click chemistry, demonstrating a complementary alternative methodology to conventional peptide-nanoparticle conjugation strategies. The peptide-functionalized nanoparticles were then demonstrated to be selectively taken up by PC-3 prostate cancer cells relative to unfunctionalized nanoparticles and this uptake was inhibited by the presence of free peptide, confirming the specificity of the interaction. This study suggests that these nanoparticles have the potential to serve as magnetic resonance imaging probes for the detection of prostate cancer.

  19. Structural and sequence analysis of imelysin-like proteins implicated in bacterial iron uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingping Xu

    Full Text Available Imelysin-like proteins define a superfamily of bacterial proteins that are likely involved in iron uptake. Members of this superfamily were previously thought to be peptidases and were included in the MEROPS family M75. We determined the first crystal structures of two remotely related, imelysin-like proteins. The Psychrobacter arcticus structure was determined at 2.15 Å resolution and contains the canonical imelysin fold, while higher resolution structures from the gut bacteria Bacteroides ovatus, in two crystal forms (at 1.25 Å and 1.44 Å resolution, have a circularly permuted topology. Both structures are highly similar to each other despite low sequence similarity and circular permutation. The all-helical structure can be divided into two similar four-helix bundle domains. The overall structure and the GxHxxE motif region differ from known HxxE metallopeptidases, suggesting that imelysin-like proteins are not peptidases. A putative functional site is located at the domain interface. We have now organized the known homologous proteins into a superfamily, which can be separated into four families. These families share a similar functional site, but each has family-specific structural and sequence features. These results indicate that imelysin-like proteins have evolved from a common ancestor, and likely have a conserved function.

  20. Cloning and characterization of the iron uptake gene iutA from avian Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorismey Vieira Tokano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to isolate, clone and characterize the iron uptake gene iutA from avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC. The iutA gene was isolated from the strain APEC 9, serotype O2:H9, which was cloned in the expression vector pET101/D-TOPO. The gene of 2.2 Kb was sequenced (AY602767, which showed high similarity to the iutA gene from three plasmids, two from APEC, pAPEC-02-ColV (AY545598.4 and pTJ100 (AY553855.1, and one from a human invasive E. coli strain, the pColV K30. The recombinant protein IutA was over expressed in E. coli BL21(DE-3 and was solubilized with urea and purified by Ni-NTA column. This method produced a relatively high yield of r-IutA of approximately 74kDa, which was used to produce the antibody anti-IutA. This anti-IutA reacted with the protein r-IutA and native IutA of APEC 9, as demonstrated by Western blot, showing that the r-IutA conserved epitopes and its antigenicity was preserved. The anti-IutA IgY was able to inhibit the IutA biological activity, inhibiting the sensitivity to cloacin DF13 of APEC9. However, it did not inhibit the growth of APEC9 in M9 and did not protect the chickens inoculated with the APEC, suggesting that the APEC possessed another iron acquisition mechanism distinct of aerobactin.A proteína de membrane externa IutA (iron uptake transport é o receptor para aerobactina férrica, um fator de virulência encontrado mais frequentemente entre as amostras de E. coli pathogênicas para aves (APEC do que entre os isolados fecais de aves saudáveis. O gene iutA da amostra APEC 9, sorotipo O2:H9, foi amplificado e clonado no vetor pET101/D-TOPO. O gene iutA 2.2 Kb foi sequenciado (AY602767 e mostrou alta similaridade para gene iutA de três plasmidios, dois da APEC, pAPEC-02-ColV (AY545598.4 e pTJ100 (AY553855.1, e um da amostra E. coli invasiva humana, pColV K30. A proteína IutA recombinante (r-IutA foi produzida em Escherichia coli BL21(DE-3, solubilizada com uréia e purificada em coluna de n

  1. Mutually Exclusive Alterations in Secondary Metabolism Are Critical for the Uptake of Insoluble Iron Compounds by Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Celma, Jorge; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Guin-Mau; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The generally low bioavailability of iron in aerobic soil systems forced plants to evolve sophisticated genetic strategies to improve the acquisition of iron from sparingly soluble and immobile iron pools. To distinguish between conserved and species-dependent components of such strategies, we analyzed iron deficiency-induced changes in the transcriptome of two model species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Medicago truncatula. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing revealed a massive up-regulation of genes coding for enzymes involved in riboflavin biosynthesis in M. truncatula and phenylpropanoid synthesis in Arabidopsis upon iron deficiency. Coexpression and promoter analysis indicated that the synthesis of flavins and phenylpropanoids is tightly linked to and putatively coregulated with other genes encoding proteins involved in iron uptake. We further provide evidence that the production and secretion of phenolic compounds is critical for the uptake of iron from sources with low bioavailability but dispensable under conditions where iron is readily available. In Arabidopsis, homozygous mutations in the Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family gene F6′H1 and defects in the expression of PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE9, encoding a putative efflux transporter for products from the phenylpropanoid pathway, compromised iron uptake from an iron source of low bioavailability. Both mutants were partially rescued when grown alongside wild-type Arabidopsis or M. truncatula seedlings, presumably by secreted phenolics and flavins. We concluded that production and secretion of compounds that facilitate the uptake of iron is an essential but poorly understood aspect of the reduction-based iron acquisition strategy, which is likely to contribute substantially to the efficiency of iron uptake in natural conditions. PMID:23735511

  2. Application of Circuit Simulation Method for Differential Modeling of TIM-2 Iron Uptake and Metabolism in Mouse Kidney Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian eXie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Circuit simulation is a powerful methodology to generate differential mathematical models. Due to its highly accurate modelling capability, circuit simulation can be used to investigate interactions between the parts and processes of a cellular system. Circuit simulation has become a core technology for the field of electrical engineering, but its application in biology has not yet been fully realized. As a case study for evaluating the more advanced features of a circuit simulation tool called Advanced Design System (ADS, we collected and modeled laboratory data for iron metabolism in mouse kidney cells for a H ferritin (HFt receptor, T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-2 (TIM-2. The internal controlling parameters of TIM-2 associated iron metabolism were extracted and the ratios of iron movement among cellular compartments were quantified by ADS. The differential model processed by circuit simulation demonstrated a capability to identify variables and predict outcomes that could not be readily measured by in vitro experiments. For example, an initial rate of uptake of iron-loaded HFt was 2.17 pmol per million cells. TIM-2 binding probability with iron-loaded HFt was 16.6%. An average of 8.5 minutes was required for the complex of TIM-2 and iron-loaded HFt to form an endosome. The endosome containing HFt lasted roughly 2 hours. At the end of endocytosis, about 28% HFt remained intact and the rest was degraded. Iron released from degraded HFt was in the labile iron pool (LIP and stimulated the generation of endogenous HFt for new storage. Both experimental data and the model showed that TIM-2 was not involved in the process of iron export. The extracted internal controlling parameters successfully captured the complexity of TIM-2 pathway and the use of circuit simulation-based modeling across a wider range of cellular systems is the next step for validating the significance and utility of this method.

  3. Iron uptake by Caco-2 cells following in vitro digestion: effects of heat treatments of pork meat and pH of the digests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Anne D; Bukhave, Klaus

    2010-10-01

    The present in vitro studies report on iron uptake by Caco-2 cells from pepsin and pepsin+pancreatin-digested pork meat proteins at pH values between 4.6 and 7 mimicking conditions in the duodenum and the proximal jejunum, respectively. Heat treatment of the pork meat resulted in increased iron uptake from pepsin-digested samples to Caco-2 cells at pH 4.6. The major enhancing effects on iron uptake by Caco-2 cells were observed after pepsin digestion in the pH range 4.6-6.0, whereas the pepsin+pancreatin-digested samples resulted in negligible iron uptake in Caco-2 cells at pH 7. Thus, the results emphasize the importance of separating pepsin-digested and pepsin+pancreatin-digested proteins during in vitro studies on iron availability. Furthermore, the present results showed the pH dependency of iron uptake anticipated. The enhancing effect of ascorbic acid was verified by increased iron uptake from pepsin-digested pork meat samples at pH 4.6, while no effect of ascorbic acid was observed at pH 7 in pepsin+pancreatin-digested samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of pulsed magnetic fields to increase the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles by living cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uzhytchak, Mariia; Lynnyková, Anna; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Dempsey, N.M.; Dias, A.L.; Bonfim, M.; Lunova, Mariia; Jirsa, M.; Kubinová, Šárka; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 24 (2017), s. 1-5, č. článku 243703. ISSN 0003-6951 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : pulsed magnetic fields * increase the uptake * iron oxide * living cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  5. Physicochemical characterization of mineral (iron/zinc) bound caseinate and their mineral uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Kapila, Suman; Sharma, Vivek

    2018-08-15

    Milk proteins (especially caseins) are widely accepted as good vehicle for the delivery of various bioactive compounds including minerals. Succinylation is one of the most acceptable chemical modification techniques to enhance the mineral binding ability of caseins. Addition of minerals to succinylated proteins may alter their physicochemical and biochemical properties. Physicochemical characteristics of succinylated sodium caseinate (S.NaCN)-mineral (iron/zinc) complexes were elucidated. Chromatographic behaviour and fluorescence intensity confirmed the structural modification of S.NaCN upon binding with minerals. The bound mineral from protein complexes showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) in vitro bioavailability (mineral uptake) than mineral salts in Caco-2 cells. Also, iron bound S.NaCN showed higher cellular ferritin formation than iron in its free form. These mineral bound protein complexes with improved bioavailability could safely replace inorganic fortificants in various functional food formulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Effect of selenium on the uptake and translocation of manganese, iron, phosphorus and selenium in rice (Oryza sativa L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying; Huang, Yi-Zong; Huang, Yan-Chao; Liu, Yun-Xia; Liang, Jian-Hong

    2013-10-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to clarify the effect of selenium on the uptake and translocation of manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) , phosphorus (P) and selenium (Se) in rice ( Oryza sativa L.). The results showed that addition of Se led to the significant increase of Se concentration in iron plaque on the root surface, root, shoot, husk and brown rice, and significant decrease of Mn concentration in shoot, husk and brown rice. At the Se concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0 mg.kg-1 in soil, Mn concentrations in rice shoot decreased by 32. 2% and 35.0% respectively, in husk 22.0% and 42.6% , in brown rice 27.5% and 28.5% , compared with the Se-free treatment. There was no significant effect of Se on the P and Fe concentrations in every parts of rice, except for Fe concentrations in husk. The translocation of P and Fe from iron plaque, root, shoot and husk to brown rice was not significantly affected by Se addition, but Mn translocation from iron plaque and root to brown rice was significantly inhibited by Se addition. Addition of 1.0 mg.kg-1. Se resulted in the decrease of translocation factor from iron plaque and root to brown rice by 38.9% and 37.9%, respectively, compared with the control treatment. The distribution ratios of Mn, Fe, P and Se in iron plaque, root, shoot, husk and brown rice were also affected by Se addition. The results indicated that Mn uptake, accumulation and translocation in rice could be decreased by the addition of Se in soil, therefore, Se addition could reduce the Mn harm to human health through food chain.

  7. Homogenization, lyophilization or acid-extraction of meat products improves iron uptake from cereal-meat product combinations in an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachón, Helena; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Glahn, Raymond P

    2009-03-01

    The effect of processing (homogenization, lyophilization, acid-extraction) meat products on iron uptake from meat combined with uncooked iron-fortified cereal was evaluated using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Beef was cooked, blended to create smaller meat particles, and combined with electrolytic iron-fortified infant rice cereal. Chicken liver was cooked and blended, lyophilized, or acid-extracted, and combined with FeSO4-fortified wheat flour. In the beef-cereal combination, Caco-2 cell iron uptake, assessed by measuring the ferritin formed by cells, was greater when the beef was blended for the greatest amount of time (360 s) compared with 30 s (P meat products on iron absorption in iron-fortified cereals.

  8. Iron bioavailability in two commercial cultivars of wheat: comparison between wholegrain and white flour and the effects of nicotianamine and 2'-deoxymugineic acid on iron uptake into Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagling, Tristan; Wawer, Anna A; Shewry, Peter R; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-10-22

    Iron bioavailability in unleavened white and wholegrain bread made from two commercial wheat varieties was assessed by measuring ferritin production in Caco-2 cells. The breads were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion and the digests applied to the Caco-2 cells. Although Riband grain contained a lower iron concentration than Rialto, iron bioavailability was higher. No iron was taken up by the cells from white bread made from Rialto flour or from wholegrain bread from either variety, but Riband white bread produced a small ferritin response. The results probably relate to differences in phytate content of the breads, although iron in soluble monoferric phytate was demonstrated to be bioavailable in the cell model. Nicotianamine, an iron chelator in plants involved in iron transport, was a more potent enhancer of iron uptake into Caco-2 cells than ascorbic acid or 2'-deoxymugineic acid, another metal chelator present in plants.

  9. Effect of surface charge and agglomerate degree of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on KB cellular uptake in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuqing; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Jingguang; Ma, Ming; He, Shiying; Nie, Fang; Gu, Ning

    2009-10-15

    We synthesized three types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs), which were meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated MNPs (DMSA@MNPs, 17.3+/-4.8 nm, negative charge), chitosan (CS) coated MNPs (CS@MNPs, 16.5+/-6.1 nm, positive charge) and magnetic nanoparticles agglomerates, formed by electronic aggregation between DMSA@MNPs and CS (CS-DMSA@MNPs, 85.7+/-72.9 nm, positive charge) respectively. The interactions of these MNPs with Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cell KB were investigated. The results showed that cellular uptakes of MNPs were on the dependence of incubation time, nanoparticles concentration and nanoparticles properties such as surface charge, size, etc. The cellular uptake was enhanced with the increase of incubation time and nanoparticles concentration. Although all MNPs could enter to cells, we observed apparent differences in the magnitude of nanoparticles uptaken. The cellular uptake of CS-DMSA@MNPs by KB cells was the highest and that of DMSA@MNPs was the lowest among the three types of MNPs. The same conclusions were drawn via the reduction of water proton relaxation times T(2)(*), resulting from the different iron load of labeled cells using a 1.5T clinical MR imager. The finding of this study will have implications in the chemical design of nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

  10. Ebselen inhibits iron-induced tau phosphorylation by attenuating DMT1 up-regulation and cellular iron uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ling; Zheng, Wei; Xin, Na; Xie, Jing-Wei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhan-You

    2012-08-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis is involved in the pathological process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have recently reported that divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is upregulated in an AD transgenic mouse brain, and that silencing of DMT1, which reduces cellular iron influx, results in inhibition of amyloidogenesis in vitro, suggesting a potential target of DMT1 for AD therapy. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of DMT1 with ebselen, a DMT1 transport inhibitor, could affect tau phosphorylation. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were pre-treated with ebselen and then treated with ferrous sulfate (dissolved in ascorbic acid), and the effects of ebselen on tau phosphorylation and the relative signaling pathways were examined. Our results showed that ebselen decreased iron influx, reduced iron-induced ROS production, inhibited the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and ultimately attenuated the levels of tau phosphorylation at the sites of Thr205, Ser396 and Thr231. The present study indicates that the neuroprotective effect of ebselen on AD is not only related to its antioxidant activity as reported previously, but is also associated with a reduction in tau phosphorylation by inhibition of DMT1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SUPEROXIDE-DEPENDENT IRON UPTAKE: A NEW ROLE FOR ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cells import iron across the plasma membrane as ferrous (Fe2+) ion by incompletely understood mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells import non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) using superoxide-dependent ferri-reductase activity involvi...

  12. Increased cerebral iron uptake in Wilson's disease : A (52)Fe-citrate PET study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruehlmeier, M; Leenders, KL; Vontobel, P; Calonder, C; Antonini, A; Weindl, A

    Toxicity of abundant copper is the main cause of brain and liver tissue damage in patients with Wilson's disease (WD). However, there is also evidence of a disturbed iron metabolism in this genetically determined disorder. This PET study was undertaken to assess cerebral iron metabolism in WD

  13. Involvement of two uptake mechanisms of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles in a co-exposure scenario using mouse macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Vanhecke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the simultaneous uptake of different engineered nanoparticle types, as it can be expected in our daily life. In order to test such co-exposure effects, murine macrophages (J774A.1 cell line were incubated with gold (AuNPs and iron oxide nanoparticles (FeOxNPs either alone or combined. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed that single NPs of both types bound within minutes on the cell surface but with a distinctive difference between FeOxNPs and AuNPs. Uptake analysis studies based on laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed intracellular appearance of both NP types in all exposure scenarios and a time-dependent increase. This increase was higher for both AuNPs and FeOxNPs during co-exposure. Cells treated with endocytotic inhibitors recovered after co-exposure, which additionally hinted that two uptake mechanisms are involved. Cross-talk between uptake pathways is relevant for toxicological studies: Co-exposure acts as an uptake accelerant. If the goal is to maximize the cellular uptake, e.g., for the delivery of pharmaceutical agents, this can be beneficial. However, co-exposure should also be taken into account in the case of risk assessment of occupational settings. The demonstration of co-exposure-invoked pathway interactions reveals that synergetic nanoparticle effects, either positive or negative, must be considered for nanotechnology and nanomedicine in particular to develop to its full potential.

  14. Effects of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticle Surface Chemistry on Uptake Kinetics and Cytotoxicity in CHO-K1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille C. Hanot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs show great promise for multiple applications in biomedicine. While a number of studies have examined their safety profile, the toxicity of these particles on reproductive organs remains uncertain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of starch-coated, aminated, and PEGylated SPIONs on a cell line derived from Chinese Hamster ovaries (CHO-K1 cells. We evaluated the effect of particle diameter (50 and 100 nm and polyethylene glycol (PEG chain length (2k, 5k and 20k Da on the cytotoxicity of SPIONs by investigating cell viability using the tetrazolium dye 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and sulforhodamine B (SRB assays. The kinetics and extent of SPION uptake by CHO-K1 cells was also studied, as well as the resulting generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. Cell toxicity profiles of SPIONs correlated strongly with their cellular uptake kinetics, which was strongly dependent on surface properties of the particles. PEGylation caused a decrease in both uptake and cytotoxicity compared to aminated SPIONs. Interestingly, 2k Da PEG-modifed SPIONs displayed the lowest cellular uptake and cytotoxicity among all studied particles. These results emphasize the importance of surface coatings when engineering nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

  15. Influence of iron plaque on uptake and accumulation of Cd by rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings grown in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Houjun; Zhang, Junling; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Fusuo

    2008-05-15

    Iron plaque is ubiquitously formed on the root surfaces of rice. However, little is known about the role of iron plaque in Cd movement from soil to the plant aboveground parts. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of iron plaque in Cd uptake and accumulation by rice seedlings in soil. Rice seedlings were pre-cultivated in solution culture for 16 days. Two seedlings were transplanted in a nylon bag containing no substrate but surrounded by soil amended with Fe and Cd combined at rates of 0, 1, or 2 g Fe kg(-1) and 0, 2.0, or 10 mg Cd kg(-1) soil. Fe was added to induce different amounts of iron plaque, and Cd to simulate Cd-polluted soils. Plants were grown for a further 43 days and then harvested. The length of the longest leaf and SPAD values of the newly mature leaves were measured during plant growth. Fe and Cd concentrations were determined in dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) soil extracts and in plant roots and shoots. Shoot and root dry weights were significantly affected by Fe supply level but not by added Cd. Root dry weight declined with increasing Fe supply but shoot dry weight decreased at 2 g Fe kg(-1) and increased at 1 g Fe kg(-1) (except at 2 mg Cd kg(-1)). The length of the longest leaf and SPAD values of the newly mature leaves were significantly affected by plant growth stage and added Fe and Cd. Fe tended to diminish the negative effect of Cd on these two parameters. Cd concentrations in DCB extracts increased with increasing Cd and Fe supply. In contrast, external Fe supply markedly reduced shoot and root Cd concentrations and there was generally no significant difference between the two Fe supply levels. Shoot and root Cd concentrations increased with increasing Cd addition. Root Cd concentrations were negatively correlated with root Fe concentrations. The proportion of Cd in DCB extracts was significantly lower than in roots or shoots. The results indicate that enhanced Fe uptake by plants can diminish the negative

  16. Impact of Silver and Iron Nanoparticle Exposure on Cholesterol Uptake by Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Shannahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are central to the development of atherosclerosis by absorbing lipids, promoting inflammation, and increasing plaque deposition. Nanoparticles (NPs are becoming increasingly common in biomedical applications thereby increasing exposure to the immune and vascular systems. This project investigated the influence of NPs on macrophage function and specifically cholesterol uptake. Macrophages were exposed to 20 nm silver NPs (AgNPs, 110 nm AgNPs, or 20 nm Fe3O4 NPs for 2 h and NP uptake, cytotoxicity, and subsequent uptake of fluorescently labeled cholesterol were assessed. Macrophage uptake of NPs did not induce cytotoxicity at concentrations utilized (25 μg/mL; however, macrophage exposure to 20 nm AgNPs reduced subsequent uptake of cholesterol. Further, we assessed the impact of a cholesterol-rich environment on macrophage function following NP exposure. In these sets of experiments, macrophages internalized NPs, exhibited no cytotoxicity, and altered cholesterol uptake. Alterations in the expression of scavenger receptor-B1 following NP exposure, which likely influences cholesterol uptake, were observed. Overall, NPs alter cholesterol uptake, which may have implications in the progression of vascular or immune mediated diseases. Therefore, for the safe development of NPs for biomedical applications, it is necessary to understand their impact on cellular function and biological interactions in underlying disease environments.

  17. Modulatory Role of Surface Coating of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoworms in Complement Opsonization and Leukocyte Uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inturi, Swetha; Wang, Guankui; Chen, Fangfang

    2015-01-01

    demonstrated that neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes and eosinophils took up SPIO NWs, and the uptake was prevented by EDTA (a general complement inhibitor) and by antiproperdin antibody (an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of the complement system). Cross-linking and hydrogelation of SPIO NWs surface...... by epichlorohydrin decreased C3 opsonization in mouse serum, and consequently reduced the uptake by mouse leukocytes by more than 70% in vivo. Remarkably, the cross-linked particles did not show a decrease in C3 opsonization in human serum, but showed a significant decrease (over 60%) of the uptake by human...... leukocytes. The residual uptake of cross-linked nanoparticles was completely blocked by EDTA. These findings demonstrate species differences in complement-mediated nanoparticle recognition and uptake by leukocytes, and further show that human hemocompatibility could be improved by inhibitors of complement...

  18. Ferric reductase activity of low molecular weight human milk fraction is associated with enhanced iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, Madhavan Krishnapillai; Kasula, Sunanda; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Thippande, Tippeswamy Gowda

    2008-09-19

    It is known that the fractional absorption of extrinsic iron from human milk is higher in infants and adults. A low molecular weight milk fraction has been proposed to increase the bioavailability of iron from human milk. Nevertheless, the mechanisms remained elusive. Here in we demonstrate ferric reductase activity (Km7.73x10(-6)M) in low molecular weight human milk fraction (10kF, filtrate derived from ultra filtration of milk whey through 10kDa cutoff membrane), which increased ferric iron solubility and iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. The 10kF fraction was as effective as ascorbic acid (1:20 iron to ascorbic acid) in increasing the ferric iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Further, gel filtration chromatography on peptide column led to co-elution of ferric reductase and iron solubilization activities at an apparent molecular mass of iron in Caco-2 cells. Thus, it is concluded that human milk possesses ferric reductase activity and is associated with ferric iron solubilization and enhanced absorption.

  19. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  20. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  1. Is the effect of silicon on rice uptake of arsenate (AsV) related to internal silicon concentrations, iron plaque and phosphate nutrition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, W.; Zhu, Y.-G.; Liu, W.-J.; Liang, Y.-C.; Geng, C.-N.; Wang, S.-G.

    2007-01-01

    Solution culture experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of silicon (Si) on arsenate (As V ) uptake by rice. The addition of Si to the pretreatment or uptake solution significantly decreased shoot and root As concentrations (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05). The presence of Si in the pretreatment or uptake solution also significantly decreased shoot P concentrations (P < 0.001). The data demonstrated that both internal and external Si inhibited the uptake of As and P. Results of As uptake kinetics showed that the mechanism of the effect of Si on arsenate uptake is not caused by direct competition for active sites of transporters with As. The effect of Si on As uptake was not entirely mediated through the effect of Si on P uptake. Although the addition of Si to pretreatment solutions still significantly decreased shoot and root As concentrations, the extent of reduction became smaller when rice roots were coated with iron plaque. - Arsenate uptake by rice seedlings is affected by both Si (internal and external) and iron plaque on root surface

  2. Exploring cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles associated with rhodium citrate in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Natalia L; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Böttner, Julia; Lopes, Cláudio Ap; Guido, Bruna C; de Sousa, Aparecido R; Báo, Sônia N

    2017-01-01

    Nanocarriers have the potential to improve the therapeutic index of currently available drugs by improving their efficacy and achieving therapeutic steady-state levels over an extended period. The association of maghemite-rhodium citrate (MRC) nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to increase specificity of the cytotoxic action. However, the interaction of these NPs with cells, their uptake mechanism, and subcellular localization need to be elucidated. This work evaluates the uptake mechanism of MRC NPs in metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer-cell models, comparing them to a nontumor cell line. MRC NPs uptake in breast cancer cells was more effective than in normal cells, with regard to both the amount of internalized material and the achievement of more strategic intracellular distribution. Moreover, this process occurred through a clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway with different basal expression levels of this protein in the cell lines tested.

  3. Towards a Mechanistic Understanding of Anaerobic Nitrate Dependent Iron Oxidation: Balancing Electron Uptake and Detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Karl Carlson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II by subsurface microorganisms is an important part of biogeochemical cycling in the environment, but the biochemical mechanisms used to couple iron oxidation to nitrate respiration are not well understood. Based on our own work and the evidence available in the literature, we propose a mechanistic model for anaerobic nitrate dependent iron oxidation. We suggest that anaerobic iron oxidizing microorganisms likely exist along a continuum including: 1 bacteria that inadvertently oxidize Fe(II by abiotic or biotic reactions with enzymes or chemical intermediates in their metabolic pathways (e.g. denitrification and suffer from toxicity or energetic penalty, 2 Fe(II tolerant bacteria that gain little or no growth benefit from iron oxidation but can manage the toxic reactions, and 3 bacteria that efficiently accept electrons from Fe(II to gain a growth advantage while preventing or mitigating the toxic reactions. Predictions of the proposed model are highlighted and experimental approaches are discussed.

  4. Roles for root iron plaque in sequestration and uptake of heavy metals and metalloids in aquatic and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Rudra D; Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Aradhana; Chauhan, Puneet S; Norton, Gareth J; Nautiyal, Chandra S

    2014-10-01

    Toxic metal(loid) contamination of soil and sediment poses long term risk to soil and human health through plant-human or plant-animal-human food chain pathways. Iron plaque (IP) formation is frequent in aquatic and wetland plant species and is responsible for the sequestration of various metal(loids). The presence of IP may act as a buffer or barrier and may thus enhance or reduce the uptake of potentially phytotoxic metals and metalloids by plants. If IP acts as a barrier, then low IP producing macrophytes/aquatic plants may be better accumulators of toxic metals and may find use in constructed wetlands for remediation of pollutants, while high IP forming edible plant species could be safer for human consumption. Conversely, if IP acts as a buffer for mineral nutrients and toxic elements then those cultivars may be rich in nutrients, but may also cause toxicity. However, an ecotoxicological risk is also inevitable if IP rich macrophyte roots containing heavy metals are consumed by herbivores. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of IP in metal and metalloid sequestration, uptake, and transport. Furthermore, we will address the role of root IP in Oryza sativa for arsenic (As) sequestration leading to lower grain As translocation, reducing the risk of human exposure.

  5. Bacterial Iron Uptake Pathways: Gates for the Import of Bactericide Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A

    2017-06-08

    Bacterial resistance to most antibiotics in clinical use has reached alarming proportions. A challenge for modern medicine will be to discover new antibiotics or strategies to combat multidrug resistant bacteria, especially Gram-negative bacteria for which the situation is particularly critical. Vectorization of bactericide compounds by siderophores (iron chelators produced by bacteria) is a promising strategy able to considerably increase the efficacy of drugs. Such a Trojan horse strategy can also extend activity of specific Gram-positive antibiotics to Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Influence of Rapeseed Cake on Iron Plaque Formation and Cd Uptake by Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Seedlings Exposed to Excess Cd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Hang; Gu, Jiao-Feng; Zeng, Qing-Ru; Liao, Bo-Han

    2017-11-01

    A soil spiking experiment at two Cd levels (0.72 and 5.20 mg kg -1 ) was conducted to investigate the effects of rapeseed cake (RSC) at application rates of 0%, 0.75%, 1.5%, and 3.0% (w/w) on iron plaque formation and Cd uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings. The use of RSC did result in a sharp decrease in soil bioavailability of Cd and a significant increase in rice growth, soil pH and organic matter. Application of RSC increased the amount of iron plaque formation and this effectively inhibited the uptake and translocation of Cd into the rice seedlings. RSC was an effective organic additive for increasing rice growth and reducing Cd uptake by rice plant, simultaneously. These results could be used as a reference for the safety use of Cd polluted paddy soil.

  7. Building a Conceptual Framework to Study the Effect of HIV Stigma-Reduction Intervention Strategies on HIV Test Uptake: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Subash; Hannes, Karin; Cargo, Margaret; Buve, Anne; Aro, Arja R; Mathei, Catharina

    A scoping review of grey and peer-reviewed literature was conducted to develop a conceptual framework to illustrate mechanisms involved in reducing HIV stigma and increasing HIV test uptake. We followed a three-step approach to exploring the literature: developing concepts, organizing and categorizing concepts, and synthesizing concepts into a framework. The framework contains four types of intervention strategies: awareness creation, influencing normative behavior, providing support, and developing regulatory laws. The awareness creation strategy generally improves knowledge and the influencing normative behavior strategy changes stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors, and subsequently, increases HIV test uptake. Providing support and development of regulatory law strategies changes actual stigmatizing behaviors of the people, and subsequently, increases HIV test uptake. The framework further outlines that the mechanisms described are influenced by the interaction of various social-contextual and individual factors. The framework sheds new light on the effects of HIV stigma-reduction intervention strategies and HIV test uptake. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Blood to brain iron uptake in one Rhesus monkey using [Fe-52]-citrate and positron emission tomography (PET): influence of haloperidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenders, K L [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); [Neurology Dept., Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland); Antonini, A; Schwarzbach, R; Smith-Jones, P; Reist, H [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Youdim, M [Pharmacology Dept., Technion, Haifa (Israel); Henn, V [Neurology Dept., Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Iron is highly concentrated in the basal ganglia of the brain. The involvement of cerebral iron and its handling systems in neurodegenerative brain diseases like Parkinson`s disease and tardive dyskinesia is currently under close investigation. There is evidence from animal studies that neuroleptics can increase iron uptake into brain. This effect appeared to be due to alteration of blood-brain barrier transport by the neuroleptics, particularly chlorpromazine and haloperidol, but not clozapine. We have investigated one Rhesus monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and [Fe-52]-citrate before and during haloperidol administration. After drug withdrawal during a period of 1.5 year the investigation procedure was repeated. The results show that in the investigated monkey haloperidol induces a reversible marked increase of iron transport across the blood brain barrier concomitant with a large increase in elimination rate of the tracer from the blood. (author).

  9. Blood to brain iron uptake in one Rhesus monkey using [Fe-52]-citrate and positron emission tomography (PET): influence of haloperidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.; Antonini, A.; Schwarzbach, R.; Smith-Jones, P.; Reist, H.; Youdim, M.; Henn, V.

    1994-01-01

    Iron is highly concentrated in the basal ganglia of the brain. The involvement of cerebral iron and its handling systems in neurodegenerative brain diseases like Parkinson's disease and tardive dyskinesia is currently under close investigation. There is evidence from animal studies that neuroleptics can increase iron uptake into brain. This effect appeared to be due to alteration of blood-brain barrier transport by the neuroleptics, particularly chlorpromazine and haloperidol, but not clozapine. We have investigated one Rhesus monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and [Fe-52]-citrate before and during haloperidol administration. After drug withdrawal during a period of 1.5 year the investigation procedure was repeated. The results show that in the investigated monkey haloperidol induces a reversible marked increase of iron transport across the blood brain barrier concomitant with a large increase in elimination rate of the tracer from the blood. (author)

  10. Macrophage Uptake of Ultra-Small Iron Oxide Particles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Acute Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penno, E.; Johnsson, C.; Johansson, L.; Ahlstroem, H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To discriminate between acutely rejecting and non-rejecting transplanted hearts using a blood pool contrast agent and T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a clinical 1.5T scanner. Material and Methods: Allogeneic and syngeneic heterotopic heart transplantations were performed in rats. One allogeneic and one syngeneic group each received either the ultra-small iron oxide particle (USPIO), at two different doses, or no contrast agent at all. MRI was performed on postoperative day 6. Immediately after the MR scanning, contrast agent was injected and a further MRI was done 24 h later. Change in T2 was calculated. Results: No significant difference in change in T2 could be seen between rejecting and non-rejecting grafts in either of the doses, or in the control groups. There was a difference between the allogeneic group that received the higher contrast agent dose and the allogeneic group that did not receive any contrast agent at all. Conclusion: In our rat model, measurements of T2 after myocardial macrophage uptake of AMI-227 in a clinical 1.5T scanner were not useful for the diagnosis of acute rejection

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticles surface coating and cell uptake affect biocompatibility and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells and macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, Antonina [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Health Sciences (Italy); Colombo, Miriam; Prosperi, Davide [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences (Italy); Gregori, Maria; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Masserini, Massimo; Cazzaniga, Emanuela, E-mail: emanuela.cazzaniga@unimib.it [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Health Sciences (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Engineered iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) offer the possibility of a wide range of medical uses, from clinical imaging to magnetically based hyperthermia for tumor treatment. These applications require their systemic administration in vivo. An important property of nanoparticles is their stability in biological media. For this purpose, a multicomponent nanoconstruct combining high colloidal stability and improved physical properties was synthesized and characterized. IONP were coated with an amphiphilic polymer (PMA), which confers colloidal stability, and were pegylated in order to obtain the nanoconstruct PEG-IONP-PMA. The aim of this study was to utilize cultured human endothelial cells (HUVEC) and murine macrophages, taken as model of cells exposed to NP after systemic administration, to assess the biocompatibility of PEG-IONP-PMA (23.1 ± 1.4 nm) or IONP-PMA (15.6 ± 3.4 nm). PEG-IONP-PMA, tested at different concentrations as high as 20 μg mL{sup −1}, exhibited no cytotoxicity or inflammatory responses. By contrast, IONP-PMA showed a concentration-dependent increase of cytotoxicity and of TNF-α production by macrophages and NO production by HUVECs. Cell uptake analysis suggested that after PEGylation, IONP were less internalized either by macrophages or by HUVEC. These results suggest that the choice of the polymer and the chemistry of surface functionalization are a crucial feature to confer to IONP biocompatibility.

  12. Almond milk fermented with different potentially probiotic bacteria improves iron uptake by intestinal epithelial (Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Bernat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available New fermented almond milks were developed, using different potentially probiotic bacteria, in order to meet the current demand for healthy, versatile non-dairy products. An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model was used to evaluate the effect of both non-fermented and fermented almond milks on the mitochondrial enzymatic activities of enterocytes. Moreover, macrophages were challenged with the in-vitro digested samples and the production of pro-inflammatory biomarkers TNF-a and IL-6 was quantified. Enzymatic activities of cell cultures seemed to be stimulated by the exposure to both fermented and non-fermented almond milks. Both biomarkers decreased (p< 0.05 in fermented almond milks with either B. bifidum or B. longum. Results showed that fermented almond products favored the energetic metabolism of enterocytes and had a lower inflammatory response than non-fermented almond milk, suggesting its benefits for the management of allergies/intolerances. Moreover, the fermentation process enhanced the uptake of iron by Caco-2 cells, especially when using L. rhamnosus and either B. bifidum or B. longum as starters, thus improving the product bioactivity. Therefore, new non-dairy fermented products with functional properties were developed, which might be positioned as alternatives to cow-milk products for sensitized groups of population (allergic and/or intolerant to cow milk or anemic population, among others.

  13. Cadmium uptake by and translocation within rice (oryza sativa l.) seedlings as affected by iron plaque and Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.; Xu, B.O.; Mou, S.

    2012-01-01

    A hydroponics culture experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of iron plaque and/or Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ on Cadmium (Cd) uptake by and translocation within rice seedlings. Uniform rice seedlings grown in nutrient solution for two weeks were selected and transferred to nutrient solution containing ferrous iron (Fe/sup 2+/) (30 mg/L) for 24 h to induce the formation of iron plaque on the root surface. Then rice seedlings were exposed to different level of Cd (1.0 mg/L and 0.1 mg/L), and simultaneously Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was added into hydroponic system for three days. At harvest Cd content in dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) extracts, roots and shoots were determined. The results of this study showed that iron plaque could sequester more Cd on root surfaces of rice seedlings, however, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reduced Cd adsorbed on root surfaces. Both of iron plaque and/or Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ did not block Cd uptake by and translocation within rice seedlings. Although iron plaque could alleviate Cd toxicity to rice seedlings under low concentration of Cd (0.1 mg/L), the root tissue played more important role in reducing Cd translocation into shoot. And the long period experiment of hydroponic and soil culture was still needed to verify the potential effect of iron plaque and/or Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ on alleviating Cd toxicity to rice seedlings. (author)

  14. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  15. Fob1 and Fob2 proteins are virulence determinants of Rhizopus oryzae via facilitating iron uptake from ferrioxamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialysis patients with chronic renal failure receiving deferoxamine for treating iron overload are uniquely predisposed for mucormycosis. Although not secreted by Mucorales, previous studies established that Rhizopus species utilize iron from ferrioxamine (iron-rich form of deferoxamine). Here we de...

  16. The importance of the stem cell marker prominin-1/CD133 in the uptake of transferrin and in iron metabolism in human colon cancer Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Bourseau-Guilmain

    Full Text Available As the pentaspan stem cell marker CD133 was shown to bind cholesterol and to localize in plasma membrane protrusions, we investigated a possible function for CD133 in endocytosis. Using the CD133 siRNA knockdown strategy and non-differentiated human colon cancer Caco-2 cells that constitutively over-expressed CD133, we provide for the first time direct evidence for a role of CD133 in the intracellular accumulation of fluorescently labeled extracellular compounds. Assessed using AC133 monoclonal antibody, CD133 knockdown was shown to improve Alexa488-transferrin (Tf uptake in Caco-2 cells but had no impact on FITC-dextran or FITC-cholera-toxin. Absence of effect of the CD133 knockdown on Tf recycling established a role for CD133 in inhibiting Tf endocytosis rather than in stimulating Tf exocytosis. Use of previously identified inhibitors of known endocytic pathways and the positive impact of CD133 knockdown on cellular uptake of clathrin-endocytosed synthetic lipid nanocapsules supported that CD133 impact on endocytosis was primarily ascribed to the clathrin pathway. Also, cholesterol extraction with methyl-β-cyclodextrine up regulated Tf uptake at greater intensity in the CD133(high situation than in the CD133(low situation, thus suggesting a role for cholesterol in the inhibitory effect of CD133 on endocytosis. Interestingly, cell treatment with the AC133 antibody down regulated Tf uptake, thus demonstrating that direct extracellular binding to CD133 could affect endocytosis. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy established that down regulation of CD133 improved the accessibility to the TfR from the extracellular space, providing a mechanism by which CD133 inhibited Tf uptake. As Tf is involved in supplying iron to the cell, effects of iron supplementation and deprivation on CD133/AC133 expression were investigated. Both demonstrated a dose-dependent down regulation here discussed to the light of transcriptional and post

  17. Andrographolide Suppresses MV4-11 Cell Proliferation through the Inhibition of FLT3 Signaling, Fatty Acid Synthesis and Cellular Iron Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Andrographolide (ADR, the main active component of Andrographis paniculata, displays anticancer activity in various cancer cell lines, among which leukemia cell lines exhibit the highest sensitivity to ADR. In particular, ADR was also reported to have reduced drug resistance in multidrug resistant cell lines. However, the mechanism of action (MOA of ADR’s anticancer and anti-drug-resistance activities remain elusive. Methods: In this study, we used the MV4-11 cell line, a FLT3 positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML cell line that displays multidrug resistance, as our experimental system. We first evaluated the effect of ADR on MV4-11 cell proliferation. Then, a quantitative proteomics approach was applied to identify differentially expressed proteins in ADR-treated MV4-11 cells. Finally, cellular processes and signal pathways affected by ADR in MV4-11 cell were predicted with proteomic analysis and validated with in vitro assays. Results: ADR inhibits MV4-11 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. With a proteomic approach, we discovered that ADR inhibited fatty acid synthesis, cellular iron uptake and FLT3 signaling pathway in MV4-11 cells. Conclusions: ADR inhibits MV4-11 cell proliferation through inhibition of fatty acid synthesis, iron uptake and protein synthesis. Furthermore, ADR reduces drug resistance by blocking FLT3 signaling.

  18. Methodology description for detection of cellular uptake of PVA coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in synovial cells of sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoepf, Bernhard; Neuberger, Tobias; Schulze, Katja; Petri, Alke; Chastellain, Matthieu; Hofmann, Margarete; Hofmann, Heinrich; Rechenberg, Brigitte von

    2005-01-01

    The detection of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in synoviocytes is reported. Synoviocytes were incubated for 2, 12, 24 and 48 h with 1.5 mg/ml of PVA coated SPION under the influence of magnets (12 h). Particles were well tolerated by the synoviocytes, were easily detected using the Turnbulls and Prussian blue reactions between 12 and 24 h

  19. Methodology description for detection of cellular uptake of PVA coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in synovial cells of sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, Bernhard [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Neuberger, Tobias [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Schulze, Katja [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Petri, Alke [Powder Technology Laboratory, Institute of Materials, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, EPFL, MX-D Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Chastellain, Matthieu [Powder Technology Laboratory, Institute of Materials, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, EPFL, MX-D Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hofmann, Margarete [MatSearch, Ch. Jean Pavillard 14, 1009 Pully (Switzerland); Hofmann, Heinrich [Powder Technology Laboratory, Institute of Materials, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, EPFL, MX-D Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rechenberg, Brigitte von [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: bvonrechenberg@vetclinics.unizh.ch

    2005-05-15

    The detection of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in synoviocytes is reported. Synoviocytes were incubated for 2, 12, 24 and 48 h with 1.5 mg/ml of PVA coated SPION under the influence of magnets (12 h). Particles were well tolerated by the synoviocytes, were easily detected using the Turnbulls and Prussian blue reactions between 12 and 24 h.

  20. Uptake, translocation and physiological effects of magnetic iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles in corn (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junli; Hu, Jing; Ma, Chuanxin; Wang, Yunqiang; Wu, Chan; Huang, Jin; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-09-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3 NPs) have emerged as an innovative and promising method of iron application in agricultural systems. However, the possible toxicity of γ-Fe2O3 NPs and its uptake and translocation require further study prior to large-scale field application. In this study, we investigated uptake and distribution of γ-Fe2O3 NPs in corn (Zea mays L.) and its impacts on seed germination, antioxidant enzyme activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and chlorophyll content were determined. 20 mg/L of γ-Fe2O3 NPs significantly promoted root elongation by 11.5%, and increased germination index and vigor index by 27.2% and 39.6%, respectively. However, 50 and 100 mg/L γ-Fe2O3 NPs remarkably decreased root length by 13.5% and 12.5%, respectively. Additionally, evidence for γ-Fe2O3 NPs induced oxidative stress was exclusively found in the root. Exposures of different concentrations of NPs induced notably high levels of MDA in corn roots, and the MDA levels of corn roots treated by γ-Fe2O3 NPs (20-100 mg/L) were 5-7-fold higher than that observed in the control plants. Meanwhile, the chlorophyll contents were decreased by 11.6%, 39.9% and 19.6%, respectively, upon NPs treatment relative to the control group. Images from fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that γ-Fe2O3 NPs could enter plant roots and migrate apoplastically from the epidermis to the endodermis and accumulate the vacuole. Furthermore, we found that NPs mostly existed around the epidermis of root and no translocation of NPs from roots to shoots was observed. Our results will be highly meaningful on understanding the fate and physiological effects of γ-Fe2O3 NPs in plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As{sup III}) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, Y., E-mail: yiannisgeorgiou@hotmail.com [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Mouzourakis, E., E-mail: emouzou@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bourlinos, A.B., E-mail: bourlino@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Zboril, R., E-mail: radek.zboril@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Karakassides, M.A., E-mail: mkarakas@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Douvalis, A.P., E-mail: adouval@uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bakas, Th., E-mail: tbakas@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Deligiannakis, Y., E-mail: ideligia@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Novel hybrid based on carbon nitride and iron nanoparticles (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe). • gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe superior As{sup III} sorbent(76.5 mg g{sup −1}). • Surface complexation modeling of As{sup III} adsorption. • Dual mode EPR,monitoring of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} evolution. - Abstract: A novel hybrid material (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10 nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20–100 nm). {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O{sub 2}. The as-prepared gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears Fe{sup 2+} and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O{sub 2}, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As{sup III} uptake capacity of 76.5 mg g{sup −1}, i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe is a superior As{sup III} sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11–36 mg g{sup −1}). The present results demonstrate that the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity.

  2. Heavy Metal Uptake by Nepenthes sp. in Ex-Iron and Tin Mine Soil, Pelepah Kanan, Kota Tinggi, Johor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahibin Abd. Rahim; Tukimat Lihan; Zulfahmi Ali Rahman; Wan Mohd Razi Idris; Muhd Barzani Gasim; Azman Hashim; Sharilnizam Mohd. Yusof; Liow Hai Yin; Baba Musta; Adon Laming

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metals which are Pb, Co, Ni, Zn and Cd content in four Nephentes sp. plant component (roots, stem, leaf and pots) and in soil substrates from former iron and tin mining land at Pelepah Kanan, Kota Tinggi, Johor were determined. The composition of heavy metals in soil were extracted using a mixture of concentrated nitric acid and perchloric acid. Meanwhile, heavy metals in plants samples were extracted using wet digestion method. Heavy metals content in solution extract of soil and plant were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (FAAS - model Perkin Elmer 3300). BAC (Biological Absorption Coefficient) which is a ratio of heavy metal content in plant to that of heavy metal in soil was obtained by calculation. The result of analyses showed that the former mining area has low organic matter contents and low values of soil electrical conductivity, whereas the soil pH showed an acidic value. Concentration of heavy metal in soil substrates in decreasing sequence start with Zn at 698.5 mg/ kg followed by Co (182.9 mg/ kg), Pb (58.2 mg/ kg), Ni (12.2 mg/ kg) and Cd (2.09 mg/ kg). Heavy metal concentration in plant in decreasing sequence was Ni>Co>Cd>Pb>Zn. Concentration in different part of the plant did not show any significant difference for all of the metals. Nepenthes sp. was found to accumulate high concentration of Ni as indicated by its high BAC value. This plant may be useful as bio-indicator for high concentration of Ni in soil. (author)

  3. Zinc, iron, manganese and copper uptake requirement in response to nitrogen supply and the increased grain yield of summer maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Xue

    Full Text Available The relationships between grain yields and whole-plant accumulation of micronutrients such as zinc (Zn, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn and copper (Cu in maize (Zea mays L. were investigated by studying their reciprocal internal efficiencies (RIEs, g of micronutrient requirement in plant dry matter per Mg of grain. Field experiments were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in North China to evaluate RIEs and shoot micronutrient accumulation dynamics during different growth stages under different yield and nitrogen (N levels. Fe, Mn and Cu RIEs (average 64.4, 18.1 and 5.3 g, respectively were less affected by the yield and N levels. ZnRIE increased by 15% with an increased N supply but decreased from 36.3 to 18.0 g with increasing yield. The effect of cultivars on ZnRIE was similar to that of yield ranges. The substantial decrease in ZnRIE may be attributed to an increased Zn harvest index (from 41% to 60% and decreased Zn concentrations in straw (a 56% decrease and grain (decreased from 16.9 to 12.2 mg kg-1 rather than greater shoot Zn accumulation. Shoot Fe, Mn and Cu accumulation at maturity tended to increase but the proportions of pre-silking shoot Fe, Cu and Zn accumulation consistently decreased (from 95% to 59%, 90% to 71% and 91% to 66%, respectively. The decrease indicated the high reproductive-stage demands for Fe, Zn and Cu with the increasing yields. Optimized N supply achieved the highest yield and tended to increase grain concentrations of micronutrients compared to no or lower N supply. Excessive N supply did not result in any increases in yield or micronutrient nutrition for shoot or grain. These results indicate that optimized N management may be an economical method of improving micronutrient concentrations in maize grain with higher grain yield.

  4. Iron availability, nitrate uptake, and exportable new production in the subarctic Pacific. [phytoplankton population growth support and atmospheric CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banse, Karl

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a critique of experimental data and papers by Martin et al. (1989, 1990), who suggested that the phytoplankton growth is iron-limited and that, small additions of iron to large subarctic ocean areas might be a way of removing significant amounts of atmospheric CO2 by increasing phytoplancton growth. Data are presented to show that, in the summer of 1987, the phytoplankton assemblage as a whole was not iron limited, as measured by the bulk removal of nitrate or by the increase of chlorophyll. It is suggested that grazing normally prevents the phytoplankton from reaching concentrations that reduce the iron (and nitrate) to levels that depress division rates drastically.

  5. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  6. The endocytic receptor megalin binds the iron transporting neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin with high affinity and mediates its cellular uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Jacobsen, Christian; Strong, Roland K

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a prominent protein of specific granules of human neutrophils also synthesized by epithelial cells during inflammation. NGAL binds bacterial siderophores preventing bacteria from retrieving iron from this source. Also, NGAL may be important in ...... by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Furthermore, a rat yolk sac cell line known to express high levels of megalin, endocytosed NGAL by a mechanism completely blocked by an antibody against megalin.......Neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a prominent protein of specific granules of human neutrophils also synthesized by epithelial cells during inflammation. NGAL binds bacterial siderophores preventing bacteria from retrieving iron from this source. Also, NGAL may be important...

  7. Mitochondrial Iron Transport and Homeostasis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshika eJain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for plants and although the mechanisms controlling iron uptake from the soil are relatively well understood, comparatively little is known about subcellular trafficking of iron in plant cells. Mitochondria represent a significant iron sink within cells, as iron is required for the proper functioning of respiratory chain protein complexes. Mitochondria are a site of Fe-S cluster synthesis, and possibly heme synthesis as well. Here we review recent insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling mitochondrial iron transport and homeostasis. We focus on the recent identification of a mitochondrial iron uptake transporter in rice and a possible role for metalloreductases in iron uptake by mitochondria. In addition, we highlight recent advances in mitochondrial iron homeostasis with an emphasis on the roles of frataxin and ferritin in iron trafficking and storage within mitochondria.

  8. Effect of Bacillus subtilis on phosphorus uptake by cucumber as affected by iron oxides and the solubility of the phosphorus source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Garcia-Lopez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we examined the effects of Bacillus subtilis strain QST713 by assessing plant P uptake from variably P compound .The experiment performed involved three factors: (i P source [KH2PO4 at 100 mg kg–1, and phosphate rock (PR at 100 or 200 mg kg–1]; (ii plant inoculation with QST713 (inoculated and non-inoculated; and (iii Fe oxide (ferrihydrite in the growth medium (0 or 300 mg kg–1 concentration of citrate–ascorbate-extractable Fe. Ferrihydrite decreased dry matter yield in plants by more than 50 %. Inoculation with QST713 increased plant growth, and total accumulation of P and P uptake in plants. Overall, QST713 increased P uptake by 40 %, the effect being independent of the presence of ferrihydrite and P source. The increased P uptake observed can be ascribed to increased solubilization of P and to increased root growth.. Therefore, QST713 improves P nutrition in plants grown on media with a high P adsorption capacity irrespective of the solubility of the P compound.

  9. Airborne signals by Trichoderma fungi stimulate iron uptake responses in roots resulting in priming of jasmonic acid-dependent defences in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanum lycopersicum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Van Wees, Saskia C M; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2017-01-01

    Root colonization by Trichoderma fungi can trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR). In Arabidopsis, Trichoderma-ISR relies on the transcription factor MYB72, which plays a dual role in the onset of ISR and the activation of Fe uptake responses. Volatile compounds (VCs) from rhizobacteria are

  10. Nondiffuse fatty infiltration of the liver: Does the uptake of iron-oxide increase or decrease at SPIO-enhanced MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, Hideko; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Shimizu, Ayame; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify whether the uptake of SPIO increases or decreases in areas of fatty change compared with surrounding areas of nonfatty change at SPIO-enhanced MR imaging. Materials and methods: Approval for this retrospective study was obtained from our institutional review board. This study included 14 patients with nondiffuse fatty infiltration of the liver who underwent SPIO-enhanced MR imaging. Additionally, 30 patients without nondiffuse fatty infiltration of the liver were also evaluated. Results: Among 14 patients, areas of fatty change showed relatively high signal intensity in 7 patents, indicating decreased uptake of SPIO in areas of fatty change. In these 7 patients, 4 had mild cirrhosis and 3 did not have cirrhosis. The mean percentage of signal intensity loss (42%) of fatty areas was significantly lower (p < 0.007) than that of adjacent areas of nonfatty change (52%). In the remaining 7 of 14 patients, areas of fatty change showed relatively low signal intensity, indicating increased uptake of SPIO in areas of fatty change. Among these 7 patients, 6 had advanced cirrhosis. The mean percentage of signal intensity loss (47%) of fatty areas was significantly higher (p < 0.008) than that of adjacent areas of nonfatty change (31%). Conclusion: The uptake of SPIO generally decreased in areas of fatty change compared with normal liver parenchyma at SPIO-enhanced MR imaging. However, in patients with advanced cirrhosis, areas of fatty change shows relatively low signal intensity because the uptake of SPIO in surrounding areas of nonfatty change severely decreased probably due to liver fibrosis.

  11. Airborne signals from Trichoderma fungi stimulate iron uptake responses in roots resulting in priming of jasmonic acid-dependent defences in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanum lycopersicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Van Wees, Saskia C M; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2017-11-01

    Root colonization by Trichoderma fungi can trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR). In Arabidopsis, Trichoderma-ISR relies on the transcription factor MYB72, which plays a dual role in the onset of ISR and the activation of Fe uptake responses. Volatile compounds (VCs) from rhizobacteria are important elicitors of MYB72 in Arabidopsis roots. Here, we investigated the mode of action of VCs from Trichoderma fungi in the onset of ISR and Fe uptake responses. VCs from Trichoderma asperellum and Trichoderma harzianum were applied in an in vitro split-plate system with Arabidopsis or tomato seedlings. Locally, Trichoderma-VCs triggered MYB72 expression and molecular, physiological and morphological Fe uptake mechanisms in Arabidopsis roots. In leaves, Trichoderma-VCs primed jasmonic acid-dependent defences, leading to an enhanced resistance against Botrytis cinerea. By using Arabidopsis micrografts of VCs-exposed rootstocks and non-exposed scions, we demonstrated that perception of Trichoderma-VCs by the roots leads to a systemic signal that primes shoots for enhanced defences. Trichoderma-VCs also elicited Fe deficiency responses and shoot immunity in tomato, suggesting that this phenomenon is expressed in different plant species. Our results indicate that Trichoderma-VCs trigger locally a readjustment of Fe homeostasis in roots, which links to systemic elicitation of ISR by priming of jasmonic acid-dependent defences. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Dietary uptake of Cu sorbed to hydrous iron oxide is linked to cellular toxicity and feeding inhibition in a benthic grazer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Fuller, Christopher C.; Ringwood, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas feeding inhibition caused by exposure to contaminants has been extensively documented, the underlying mechanism(s) are less well understood. For this study, the behavior of several key feeding processes, including ingestion rate and assimilation efficiency, that affect the dietary uptake of Cu were evaluated in the benthic grazer Lymnaea stagnalis following 4–5 h exposures to Cu adsorbed to synthetic hydrous ferric oxide (Cu–HFO). The particles were mixed with a cultured alga to create algal mats with Cu exposures spanning nearly 3 orders of magnitude at variable or constant Fe concentrations, thereby allowing first order and interactive effects of Cu and Fe to be evaluated. Results showed that Cu influx rates and ingestion rates decreased as Cu exposures of the algal mat mixture exceeded 104 nmol/g. Ingestion rate appeared to exert primary control on the Cu influx rate. Lysosomal destabilization rates increased directly with Cu influx rates. At the highest Cu exposure where the incidence of lysosomal membrane damage was greatest (51%), the ingestion rate was suppressed 80%. The findings suggested that feeding inhibition was a stress response emanating from excessive uptake of dietary Cu and cellular toxicity.

  13. The iron uptake mechanisms of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli Mecanismos de captação de ferro de Escherichia coli enteroinvasora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agda Andrade

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli strains (EIEC of different serotypes isolated from patients with acute diarrhea were examined for the ability to produce siderophores and iron-regulated outer membrane proteins (IROMP. For iron starvation cultures were grown at 37°C in LB supplied with 200 muM of a-alpha’dypirydil. All strains produced enterobactin and twelve (40% produced aerobactin. The strains showed IROMP varying from 67-82 kDa. Proteins were either induced or stimulated by the iron starvation. Differences were observed in the electrophoretic profile among the serotypes, originating 5 electrophoretic profiles. All serotypes expressed proteins of 82 kDa (FepA and 76 kDa (IutA (except serotype O28ac:H- that did not produce the 76 kDa protein. Several strains (O29:H-, O144:H-, O152:H-, and O167:H- expressed IutA in the outer membrane, in the absence of aerobactin production. Additionally to well characterized proteins (FepA and IutA, we found two IROMP of unknown function in some serotypes: a 71 kDa protein was detected in three profiles and a 67 kDa protein was present in serotype O152:H-. Moreover, two bands (39 and 43 kDa which were not iron-regulated bound specifically to human lactoferrin.Cepas de Escherichia coli enteroinvasora de diferentes sorotipos isoladas de pacientes com diarréia aguda foram examinadas quanto a capacidade de produzir sideróforos e proteínas de membrana externa reguladas pelo ferro (IROMP. O crescimento bacteriano em meio com deficiência em Fe foi obtido em caldo Lúria acrescido de 200 mM de alfa-a’dipiridil. Todas as cepas produziram enterobactina e 40% produziram aerobactina. As cepas produziram IROMPs com MM variando de 82-67 kDa. As proteínas foram induzidas ou estimuladas pela deficiência de ferro. Diferenças foram observadas no perfil eletroforético entre os sorotipos, originando 5 perfis eletroforéticos. Todos os sorotipos, com exceção do sorotipo O28ac:H- (onde a proteína de 76 kDa não foi

  14. Scope Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Laurent, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    The scope definition is the second phase of an LCA. It determines what product systems are to be assessed and how this assessment should take place. This chapter teaches how to perform a scope definition. First, important terminology and key concepts of LCA are introduced. Then, the nine items...... making up a scope definition are elaborately explained: (1) Deliverables. (2) Object of assessment, (3) LCI modelling framework and handling of multifunctional processes, (4) System boundaries and completeness requirements, (5) Representativeness of LCI data, (6) Preparing the basis for the impact...... assessment, (7) Special requirements for system comparisons, (8) Critical review needs and (9) Planning reporting of results. The instructions relate both to the performance and reporting of a scope definition and are largely based on ILCD....

  15. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  16. Overexpression of FurA in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 reveals new targets for this regulator involved in photosynthesis, iron uptake and cellular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Andrés; Bes, M Teresa; Barja, François; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2010-11-01

    Previous genomic analyses of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 have identified three ferric uptake regulator (Fur) homologs with low sequence identities and probably different functions in the cell. FurA is a constitutive protein that shares the highest homology with Fur from heterotrophic bacteria and appears to be essential for in vitro growth. In this study, we have analysed the effects of FurA overexpression on the Anabaena sp. phenotype and investigated which of the observed alterations were directly operated by FurA. Overexpression of the regulator led to changes in cellular morphology, resulting in shorter filaments with rounded cells of different sizes. The furA-overexpressing strain showed a slower photoautotrophic growth and a marked decrease in the oxygen evolution rate. Overexpression of the regulator also decreased both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, but did not lead to an increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. By combining phenotypic studies, reverse transcription-PCR analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified three novel direct targets of FurA, including genes encoding a siderophore outer membrane transporter (schT), bacterial actins (mreBCD) and the PSII reaction center protein D1 (psbA). The affinity of FurA for these novel targets was markedly affected by the absence of divalent metal ions, confirming previous evidence of a critical role for the metal co-repressor in the function of the regulator in vivo. The results unravel new cellular processes modulated by FurA, supporting its role as a global transcriptional regulator in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  17. Shigella Iron Acquisition Systems and their Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yahan; Murphy, Erin R

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Shigella within the host is strictly dependent on the ability of the pathogen to acquire essential nutrients, such as iron. As an innate immune defense against invading pathogens, the level of bio-available iron within the human host is maintained at exceeding low levels, by sequestration of the element within heme and other host iron-binding compounds. In response to sequestration mediated iron limitation, Shigella produce multiple iron-uptake systems that each function to facilitate the utilization of a specific host-associated source of nutrient iron. As a mechanism to balance the essential need for iron and the toxicity of the element when in excess, the production of bacterial iron acquisition systems is tightly regulated by a variety of molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the iron-uptake systems produced by Shigella species, their distribution within the genus, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their production.

  18. Selective Iron(III ion uptake using CuO-TiO2 nanostructure by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Mohammed M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CuO-TiO2 nanosheets (NSs, a kind of nanomaterials is one of the most attracting class of transition doped semiconductor materials due to its interesting and important optical, electrical, and structural properties and has many technical applications, such as in metal ions detection, photocatalysis, Chemi-sensors, bio-sensors, solar cells and so on. In this paper the synthesis of CuO-TiO2 nanosheets by the wet-chemically technique is reported. Methods CuO-TiO2 NSs were prepared by a wet-chemical process using reducing agents in alkaline medium and characterized by UV/vis., FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM etc. Results The structural and optical evaluation of synthesized NSs were measured by XRD pattern, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and UV–vis spectroscopy, respectively which confirmed that the obtained NSs are well-crystalline CuO-TiO2 and possessing good optical properties. The morphological analysis of CuO-TiO2 NSs was executed by FE-SEM, which confirmed that the doped products were sheet-shaped and growth in large quantity. Here, the analytical efficiency of the NSs was applied for a selective adsorption of iron(III ion prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The selectivity of NSs towards various metal ions, including Au(III, Cd(II, Co(II, Cr(III, Fe(III, Pd(II, and Zn(II was analyzed. Conclusions Based on the selectivity study, it was confirmed that the selectivity of doped NSs phase was the most towards Fe(III ion. The static adsorption capacity for Fe(III was calculated to be 110.06 mgg−1. Results from adsorption isotherm also verified that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer-adsorption onto a surface containing a finite number of CuO-TiO2 NSs adsorption sites.

  19. Hepatic uptake of technetium-99m diphosphonate in thalassemia major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, H.M.; Smith, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of thalassemia major are presented in which bone scintigraphy demonstrated diffuse hepatic uptake of Tc-99m diphosphonate. Although abnormal splenic and renal uptake of Tc-99m phosphates has been reported in patients with thalassemia major, hepatic uptake has not been reported previously. This scintigraphic finding is presumably due to increased iron deposition in the liver, resulting from increased iron turnover and retention in these patients and from multiple previous blood transfusions

  20. Influence of Water Deficit on Iron and Zinc Uptake by Matricaria chamomilla L. Influencia del Deficit Hídrico en la Absorción de Hierro y Zinc por Matricaria chamomilla L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Pirzad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron and zinc deficiency are a yield-limiting factor with major implications for field crop production in many agricultural regions of the world; this production is essential source of Fe and Zn in human and animal diets. Two experiments were conducted under greenhouse conditions to evaluate Fe and Zn uptake by German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. grown under several drought conditions. Treatments were arranged in four irrigation regimes (95%, 80%, 65%, and 50% field capacity and six irrigation disruptions (stem formation, flower onset, full bloom, first harvest, second harvest, and control without disruption based on a randomized complete block design with five and four replicates in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. In Experiment 1, the irrigation regimes had no significant effect on Fe and Zn uptake by German chamomile, which reached total means of Fe (39.68 mg kg4 and Zn (29.15 mg kg4. In Experiment 2, the highest amount of Fe (39.0 mg kg4 was obtained from irrigation disruption at first harvest; this is similar to the results of irrigation disruption at flower onset and full bloom. However, irrigation disruption in stem formation (21.3 mg kg4, second harvest (12.95 mg kg4, and the control (7.79 mg kg4 had a decreasing trend of Fe uptake. The maximum value of Zn (40.0 mg kg4 occurred at irrigation disruption at the full bloom stage, which was also similar to irrigation disruption at flower onset and stem formation. However, later irrigation disruptions at the first and second harvest stages caused lower amounts of Zn uptake by chamomile. Therefore, the lowest Zn values were obtained from irrigation disruption at second harvest (5.0 mg kg4 and the control (5.5 mg kg4. Regressions between both Fe or Zn uptake and irrigation showed a binomial function.La deficiencia de hierro y zinc es un factor limitante de la producción con grandes implicaciones para producción de cultivo en terreno en muchas regiones agrícolas del mundo como

  1. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. 75 FR 79339 - Notice of Scope Rulings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington... calendar quarter. Scope Rulings Completed Between April 1, 2010, and June 30, 2010: People's Republic of China A-570-502: Iron Construction Castings From the People's Republic of China Requestor: National...

  3. Effects of an iron-silicon material, a synthetic zeolite and an alkaline clay on vegetable uptake of As and Cd from a polluted agricultural soil and proposed remediation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Aijun; Wang, Yani; Ling, Xiaodan; Chen, Zhe; Tang, Yetao; Qiu, Hao; Ying, Rongrong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2017-04-01

    Economic and highly effective methods of in situ remediation of Cd and As polluted farmland in mining areas are urgently needed. Pot experiments with Brassica chinensis L. were carried out to determine the effects of three soil amendments [a novel iron-silicon material (ISM), a synthetic zeolite (SZ) and an alkaline clay (AC)] on vegetable uptake of As and Cd. SEM-EDS and XRD analyses were used to investigate the remediation mechanisms involved. Amendment with ISM significantly reduced the concentrations of As and Cd in edible parts of B. chinensis (by 84-94 % and 38-87 %, respectively), to levels that met food safety regulations and was much lower than those achieved by SZ and AC. ISM also significantly increased fresh biomass by 169-1412 % and 436-731 % in two consecutive growing seasons, while SZ and AC did not significantly affect vegetable growth. Correlation analysis suggested that it was the mitigating effects of ISM on soil acidity and on As and Cd toxicity, rather than nutrient amelioration, that contributed to the improvement in plant growth. SEM-EDS analysis showed that ISM contained far more Ca, Fe and Mn than did SZ or AC, and XRD analysis showed that in the ISM these elements were primarily in the form of silicates, oxides and phosphates that had high capacities for chemisorption of metal(loid)s. After incubation with solutions containing 800 mg L -1 AsO 4 2- or Cd 2+ , ISM bound distinctly higher levels of As (6.18 % in relative mass percent by EDS analysis) and Cd (7.21 % in relative mass percent by EDS analysis) compared to SZ and AC. XRD analysis also showed that ISM facilitated the precipitation of Cd 2+ as silicates, phosphates and hydroxides, and that arsenate combined with Fe, Al, Ca and Mg to form insoluble arsenate compounds. These precipitation mechanisms were much more active in ISM than in SZ or AC. Due to the greater pH elevation caused by the abundant calcium silicate, chemisorption and precipitation mechanisms in ISM treatments

  4. Market scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Nova Scotia's Energy Strategy is aimed at opening the electricity market to wholesale competition, allowing eligible wholesale customers (such as municipal distribution utilities) to buy their electricity from competitive sources. The Nova Scotia Electricity Marketplace Governance Committee (EMGC) is concerned that this will not promote long-term competition because these eligible customers form only a very small fraction (1.6 per cent) of the total electricity demand in the province. This report examines the possible extensions of competition beyond the minimum specified in the Energy Strategy. It also identifies approaches that the EMGC may consider, including other potential levels of competition and their associated issues. The report discussed the issue of implementing wholesale competition as it relates to unbundling of the transmission tariff from the cost of energy supply and from the cost of distribution in retail marketing. The stages of expanding the market scope were also described with reference to large industrial customers, medium industrial and large commercial customers, and small commercial and residential customers. The report states that it is unlikely that the transition to an open access transmission market will need to be reversed, as it is likely to be an essential component of any further development. The EMGC feels it could minimize future transition costs and promote future evolution of competition by recommending for an institutional and market structure that is compatible with a broader competitive market

  5. Superparamagnetic iron oxides for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissleder, R.; Reimer, P.

    1993-01-01

    Pharmaceutical iron oxide preparations have been used as MRI contrast agents for a variety of purposes. These agents predominantly decrease T2 relaxation times and therefore cause a decrease in signal intensity of tissues that contain the agent. After intravenous administration, dextran-coated iron oxides typically accumulate in phagocytic cells in liver and spleen. Clinical trials have shown that iron oxide increases lesion/liver and lesion/spleen contrast, that more lesions can be depicted than on plain MRI or CT, and that the size threshold for lesion detection decreases. Decreased uptake of iron oxides in liver has been observed in hepatitis and cirrhosis, potentially allowing the assessment of organ function. More recently a variety of novel, target-specific monocrystalline iron oxides compounds have been used for receptor and immunospecific images. Future development of targeted MRI contrast agents is critical for organ- or tissue-specific quantitative and functional MRI. (orig.)

  6. Superparamagnetic iron oxides for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissleder, R [MGH-NMR Center, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Reimer, P [MGH-NMR Center, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Zentrale Roentgendiagnostik, Westfaelische-Wilhelms-Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    1993-06-01

    Pharmaceutical iron oxide preparations have been used as MRI contrast agents for a variety of purposes. These agents predominantly decrease T2 relaxation times and therefore cause a decrease in signal intensity of tissues that contain the agent. After intravenous administration, dextran-coated iron oxides typically accumulate in phagocytic cells in liver and spleen. Clinical trials have shown that iron oxide increases lesion/liver and lesion/spleen contrast, that more lesions can be depicted than on plain MRI or CT, and that the size threshold for lesion detection decreases. Decreased uptake of iron oxides in liver has been observed in hepatitis and cirrhosis, potentially allowing the assessment of organ function. More recently a variety of novel, target-specific monocrystalline iron oxides compounds have been used for receptor and immunospecific images. Future development of targeted MRI contrast agents is critical for organ- or tissue-specific quantitative and functional MRI. (orig.)

  7. Response of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii to iron stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, G.I.; Morel, F.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The coastal diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii responds to iron limitation with decreasing growth rate, decreasing quotas of cellular iron, and increasing rates of maximum short term uptake. Growth response to steady iron limitation can be modeled according to the equations of Droop and Monod. The cellular iron quota varies from about 2 to 25 x 10 -1 mol iron per liter-cell with increasing iron; the half-saturation constant for growth, Kμ, is 1.1 x 10 -21 M (free ferric ion). In contrast, the half-saturation constant for 59 I iron uptake, K/sub rho/ is about 3 x 10 -19 M; the maximum iron uptake rate (rho/sub max/) is increased several-fold under iron limitation, resulting in a potential short term uptake rate that is a few hundred times the steady state rate. At a fixed concentration of free manganese ion, the cellular manganese quota is increased several-fold in iron-limited cultures compared to iron-sufficient cultures

  8. Modelling Systemic Iron Regulation during Dietary Iron Overload and Acute Inflammation: Role of Hepcidin-Independent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enculescu, Mihaela; Metzendorf, Christoph; Sparla, Richard; Hahnel, Maximilian; Bode, Johannes; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Legewie, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic iron levels must be maintained in physiological concentrations to prevent diseases associated with iron deficiency or iron overload. A key role in this process plays ferroportin, the only known mammalian transmembrane iron exporter, which releases iron from duodenal enterocytes, hepatocytes, or iron-recycling macrophages into the blood stream. Ferroportin expression is tightly controlled by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms in response to hypoxia, iron deficiency, heme iron and inflammatory cues by cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms. At the systemic level, the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin is released from the liver in response to these cues, binds to ferroportin and triggers its degradation. The relative importance of individual ferroportin control mechanisms and their interplay at the systemic level is incompletely understood. Here, we built a mathematical model of systemic iron regulation. It incorporates the dynamics of organ iron pools as well as regulation by the hepcidin/ferroportin system. We calibrated and validated the model with time-resolved measurements of iron responses in mice challenged with dietary iron overload and/or inflammation. The model demonstrates that inflammation mainly reduces the amount of iron in the blood stream by reducing intracellular ferroportin transcription, and not by hepcidin-dependent ferroportin protein destabilization. In contrast, ferroportin regulation by hepcidin is the predominant mechanism of iron homeostasis in response to changing iron diets for a big range of dietary iron contents. The model further reveals that additional homeostasis mechanisms must be taken into account at very high dietary iron levels, including the saturation of intestinal uptake of nutritional iron and the uptake of circulating, non-transferrin-bound iron, into liver. Taken together, our model quantitatively describes systemic iron metabolism and generated experimentally testable predictions for additional

  9. Regulatory mechanisms for iron transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Kari A; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2017-12-09

    Many critical metabolic functions in the brain require adequate and timely delivery of iron. However, most studies when considering brain iron uptake have ignored the iron requirements of the endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, current models of BBB iron transport do not address regional regulation of brain iron uptake or how neurons, when adapting to metabolic demands, can acquire more iron. In this study, we demonstrate that both iron-poor transferrin (apo-Tf) and the iron chelator, deferoxamine, stimulate release of iron from iron-loaded endothelial cells in an in vitro BBB model. The role of the endosomal divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in BBB iron acquisition and transport has been questioned. Here, we show that inhibition of DMT1 alters the transport of iron and Tf across the endothelial cells. These data support an endosome-mediated model of Tf-bound iron uptake into the brain and identifies mechanisms for local regional regulation of brain iron uptake. Moreover, our data provide an explanation for the disparity in the ratio of Tf to iron transport into the brain that has confounded the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III)-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshiko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Takashi; Namba, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) and the uptake of iron(II) by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III). Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III)-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III)-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III) complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems to diverse

  11. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Murata

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III to iron(II and the uptake of iron(II by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III. Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems

  12. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  13. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  15. Subcellular Iron Localization Mechanisms in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Aksoy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic micro-nutrient element iron (Fe is present as a cofactor in the active sites of many metalloproteins with important roles in the plant. On the other hand, since it is excessively reactive, excess accumulation in the cell triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, leading to cell death. Therefore, iron homeostasis in the cell is very important for plant growth. Once uptake into the roots, iron is distributed to the subcellular compartments. Subcellular iron transport and hence cellular iron homeostasis is carried out through synchronous control of different membrane protein families. It has been discovered that expression levels of these membrane proteins increase under iron deficiency. Examination of the tasks and regulations of these carriers is very important in terms of understanding the iron intake and distribution mechanisms in plants. Therefore, in this review, the transporters responsible for the uptake of iron into the cell and its subcellular distribution between organelles will be discussed with an emphasis on the current developments about these transporters.

  16. Pumping Iron and Silica Bodybuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnair, H.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Krause, J. W.; Parker, C.; Brown, M.; Coale, T.; Bruland, K. W.

    2016-02-01

    The availability of dissolved iron influences the stoichiometry of nutrient uptake by diatoms. Under nutrient replete conditions diatoms consume silicic acid and nitrate in a 1:1 ratio, this ratio increases under iron stress. Using the tracers 32Si and PDMPO, the total community and group-specific silica production rates were measured along a gradient of dissolved iron in an upwelling plume off the California coast. At each station, a control (ambient silicic acid) and +20 µM silicic acid treatment were conducted with each tracer to determine whether silicic acid limitation controlled the rate of silica production. Dissolved iron was 1.3 nmol kg-1 nearshore and decreased to 0.15 nmol kg-1 offshore. Silicic acid decreased more rapidly than nitrate, it was nearly 9 µM higher in the nearshore and 7 µM lower than nitrate in the middle of the transect where the iron concentration had decreased. The rate of diatom silica production decreased in tandem with silicic acid concentration, and silica production limitation by low silicic acid was most pronounced when iron concentrations were >0.4 nmol kg-1. The composition of the diatom assemblage shifted from Chaetoceros spp. dominated nearshore to a more sparse pennate-dominated assemblage offshore. Changes in taxa-specific silica production rates will be reported based on examination of PDMPO labeled cells using confocal microscopy.

  17. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  18. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  19. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a thyroid scan is 30 minutes or less. Thyroid Uptake You will be given radioactive iodine ( ... for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will I experience during ...

  20. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uptake measurements are obtained at different times. For example, you may have uptake measurements at four to ... medicine procedures can be time consuming. It can take several hours to days for the radiotracer to ...

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special ... is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of ... potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. ... eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. Jewelry and other metallic accessories should be left ...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uptake? A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) ... of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that ...

  5. Plant mechanisms of siderophore-iron utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanisms of siderophore iron-utilization by plants were examined to determine whether plants have direct mechanisms for acquiring iron from microbially-produced hydroxamate siderophores or simply take up inorganic iron in equilibrium with the chelate (shuttle mechanism). Experiments were designed to determine whether the monocot plant species, oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Victory) could acquire iron from ferrichrome under hydroponic conditions in which iron uptake was most likely to occur by direct use of the chelating agent. Ten-day-old iron-deficient seedlings, grown in aerated Hoagland's nutrient solution (minus iron) buffered at pH 7.4 with CaCO 3 , were placed in fresh nutrient solution containing 10/sup -7.4/M radioactive 55 FeCl 3 (23.7 mCi/mg) with the synthetic chelate, EDDHA (10π 5 M), ferrichrome (10 -5 M), or with no chelate. After 6 days, shoot content of 55 Fe in shoots of plants provided with ferrichrome was 100-fold greater than that in shoots of plants provided with EDDHA. Therefore iron uptake by oat under these conditions not only indicates direct use of ferrichrome, but also suggest that oat may be better able to acquire iron from siderophores than from synthetic chelates. One possible mechanism for direct use of chelating agents, may involve siderophore binding sites on the plasmalemma of root cortical cells where iron is split from the chelate by enzymatic reduction of ferric to ferrous iron. To demonstrate hypothesized siderophore binding sites on oat roots, experiments examined possible competition for presumed siderophore binding sites by an inert analog of ferrichrome constructed by irreversible chelation with chromium

  6. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Derenskaya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to define the essence of project scope management process, its components, as well as to develop an algorithm of project scope management in terms of pharmaceutical production. Methodology. To carry out the study, available information sources on standards of project management in whole and elements of project scope management in particular are analysed. Methods of system and structural analysis, logical generalization are used to study the totality of subprocesses of project scope management, input and output documents, and to provide each of them. Methods of network planning are used to construct a precedence diagram of project scope management process. Results of the research showed that components of the project scope management are managing the scope of the project product and managing the content of project work. It is the second component is investigated in the presented work as a subject of research. Accordingly, it is defined that project scope management process is to substantiate and bring to the realization the necessary amount of work that ensures the successful implementation of the project (achievement of its goal and objectives of individual project participants. It is also determined that the process of managing the project scope takes into account the planning, definition of the project scope, creation of the structure of project work, confirmation of the scope and management of the project scope. Participants of these subprocesses are: customer, investor, and other project participants – external organizations (contractors of the project; project review committee; project manager and project team. It is revealed that the key element of planning the project scope is the formation of the structure of design work, the justification of the number of works, and the sequence of their implementation. It is recommended to use the following sequence of stages for creating the structure of project work

  7. Uranium uptake of Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Viet Hung; Maslov, O.D.; Trinh Thi Thu My; Phung Khac Nam Ho; Dang Duc Nhan

    2010-01-01

    Uranium uptake of vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash) from Eutric Fluvisols (AK), Albic Acrisols (BG), Dystric Fluvisols (HP) and Ferralic Acrisols (TC) in northern Vietnam is assessed. The soils were mixed with aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate to make soils contaminated with uranium at 0, 50, 100, 250 mg/kg before planting the grass. The efficiency of uranium uptake by the grass was assessed based on the soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF U , kg·kg -1 ). It was found that the TF U values are dependent upon the soils properties. CEC facilitates the uptake and the increased soil pH could reduce the uptake and translocation of uranium in the plant. Organic matter content, as well as iron and potassium, inhibits the uranium uptake of the grass. It was revealed that the lower fertile soil, the higher uranium uptake. The translocation of uranium in root for all the soil types studied is almost higher than that in its shoot. It seems that vetiver grass could potentially be used for the purpose of phytoremediation of soils contaminated with uranium

  8. Hunger for iron: the alternative siderophore iron scavenging systems in highly virulent Yersinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRakin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight siderophores are used by many living organisms to scavenge scarcely available ferric iron. Presence of at least a single siderophore-based iron acquisition system is usually acknowledged as a virulence-associated trait and a prerequisite to become an efficient and successful pathogen. Currently it is assumed that yersiniabactin (Ybt is the solely functional endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in highly virulent Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B. Genes responsible for biosynthesis, transport and regulation of the yersiniabactin (ybt production are clustered on a mobile genetic element, the High Pathogenicity Island (HPI that is responsible for broad dissemination of the ybt genes in Enterobacteriaceae. However, the ybt gene cluster is absent from nearly half of Y. pseudotuberculosis O3 isolates and epidemic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 isolates responsible for the Far East Scarlet-like Fever. Several potential siderophore-mediated iron uptake gene clusters are documented in Yersinia genomes, however neither of them have been proven to be functional. It has been suggested that at least two siderophores alternative to Ybt may operate in the highly virulent Yersinia pestis / Y. pseudotuberculosis group, and are referred to as pseudochelin (Pch and yersiniachelin (Ych. Furthermore, most sporadic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 strains possess gene clusters encoding all three iron scavenging systems. Thus, the Ybt system appears not to be the sole endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in the highly virulent yersiniae and may be efficiently substituted and / or supplemented by alternative iron scavenging systems.

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a thyroid scan is 30 minutes or less. Thyroid Uptake You will be given radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) in liquid or capsule form to swallow. The thyroid uptake will begin several hours to 24 hours later. Often, two separate uptake ...

  10. Proteomic analysis of iron acquisition, metabolic and regulatory responses of Yersinia pestis to iron starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the bubonic plague. Efficient iron acquisition systems are critical to the ability of Y. pestis to infect, spread and grow in mammalian hosts, because iron is sequestered and is considered part of the innate host immune defence against invading pathogens. We used a proteomic approach to determine expression changes of iron uptake systems and intracellular consequences of iron deficiency in the Y. pestis strain KIM6+ at two physiologically relevant temperatures (26°C and 37°C. Results Differential protein display was performed for three Y. pestis subcellular fractions. Five characterized Y. pestis iron/siderophore acquisition systems (Ybt, Yfe, Yfu, Yiu and Hmu and a putative iron/chelate outer membrane receptor (Y0850 were increased in abundance in iron-starved cells. The iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster assembly system Suf, adapted to oxidative stress and iron starvation in E. coli, was also more abundant, suggesting functional activity of Suf in Y. pestis under iron-limiting conditions. Metabolic and reactive oxygen-deactivating enzymes dependent on Fe-S clusters or other iron cofactors were decreased in abundance in iron-depleted cells. This data was consistent with lower activities of aconitase and catalase in iron-starved vs. iron-rich cells. In contrast, pyruvate oxidase B which metabolizes pyruvate via electron transfer to ubiquinone-8 for direct utilization in the respiratory chain was strongly increased in abundance and activity in iron-depleted cells. Conclusions Many protein abundance differences were indicative of the important regulatory role of the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Iron deficiency seems to result in a coordinated shift from iron-utilizing to iron-independent biochemical pathways in the cytoplasm of Y. pestis. With growth temperature as an additional variable in proteomic comparisons of the Y. pestis fractions (26°C and 37°C, there was

  11. Iron transport and storage in the coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Andrej; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for all living organisms due to its ubiquitous role in redox and other enzymes, especially in the context of respiration and photosynthesis. The iron uptake and storage systems of terrestrial/higher plants are now reasonably well understood with two basic strategies for iron uptake being distinguished: strategy I plants use a mechanism involving soil acidification and induction of Fe(III)-chelate reductase (ferrireductase) and Fe(II) transporter proteins while strategy II plants have evolved sophisticated systems based on high-affinity, iron specific, binding compounds called phytosiderophores. In contrast, there is little knowledge about the corresponding systems in marine plant-like lineages. Herein we report a study of the iron uptake and storage mechanisms in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Short term radio-iron uptake studies indicate that iron is taken up by Emiliania in a time and concentration dependent manner consistent with an active transport process. Based on inhibitor studies it appears that iron is taken up directly as Fe(iii). However if a reductive step is involved the Fe(II) must not be accessible to the external environment. Upon long term exposure to (57)Fe we have been able, using a combination of Mössbauer and XAS spectroscopies, to identify a single metabolite which displays spectral features similar to the phosphorus-rich mineral core of bacterial and plant ferritins.

  12. The role of p97 in iron metabolism in human brain glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Chunlin; Chen Guiwen; Qian Zhongming

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of p97 (melanotransferrin) in iron uptake in human brain glioma cells . Methods: Human brain glioma cell lines, GBM and BT325 were incubated in the medium containing 59 Fe-Citrate. The cells were treated with phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and pronase. The iron uptake of the cells was expressed as relative iron uptake level according to the cpm measured by the gamma scintillation counter. Results: 59 Fe uptake of the cells was significantly declined with the certain concentration of PI-PCL. 59 Fe uptake of the cells treated with pronase tended to coincide with that of the cells treated without pronase in the increasing concentration of PI-PLC. Conclusion: p97 expresses a high level and plays an important role in iron uptake in human brain glioma cells

  13. Deciphering the iron isotope message of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczyk, Thomas; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2005-04-01

    Mass-dependent variations in isotopic composition are known since decades for the light elements such as hydrogen, carbon or oxygen. Multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and double-spike thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) permit us now to resolve small variations in isotopic composition even for the heavier elements such as iron. Recent studies on the iron isotopic composition of human blood and dietary iron sources have shown that lighter iron isotopes are enriched along the food chain and that each individual bears a certain iron isotopic signature in blood. To make use of this finding in biomedical research, underlying mechanisms of isotope fractionation by the human body need to be understood. In this paper available iron isotope data for biological samples are discussed within the context of isotope fractionation concepts and fundamental aspects of human iron metabolism. This includes evaluation of new data for body tissues which show that blood and muscle tissue have a similar iron isotopic composition while heavier iron isotopes are concentrated in the liver. This new observation is in agreement with our earlier hypothesis of a preferential absorption of lighter iron isotopes by the human body. Possible mechanisms for inducing an iron isotope effect at the cellular and molecular level during iron uptake are presented and the potential of iron isotope effects in human blood as a long-term measure of dietary iron absorption is discussed.

  14. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apollo Stacy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community.

  15. Iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattermann, Norbert

    2018-01-01

    Iron overload (IOL) starts to develop in MDS patients before they become transfusion-dependent because ineffective erythropoiesis suppresses hepcidin production in the liver and thus leads to unrestrained intestinal iron uptake. However, the most important cause of iron overload in MDS is chronic transfusion therapy. While transfusion dependency by itself is a negative prognostic factor reflecting poor bone marrow function, the ensuing transfusional iron overload has an additional dose-dependent negative impact on the survival of patients with lower risk MDS. Cardiac dysfunction appears to be important in this context, as a consequence of chronic anemia, age-related cardiac comorbidity, and iron overload. Another potential problem is iron-related endothelial dysfunction. There is some evidence that with increasing age, high circulating iron levels worsen the atherosclerotic phenotype. Transfusional IOL also appears to aggravate bone marrow failure in MDS, through unfavorable effects on mesenchymal stromal cells as well a hematopoietic cells, particularly erythroid precursors. Patient series and clinical trials have shown that the iron chelators deferoxamine and deferasirox can improve hematopoiesis in a minority of transfusion-dependent patients. Analyses of registry data suggest that iron chelation provides a survival benefit for patients with MDS, but data from a prospective randomized clinical trial are still lacking.

  16. The role of natural zeolite and of zeolite modified with ammnonium ions to reduce the uptake of lead, zinc, copper and iron ions in Hieracium aurantium and Rumex acetosella grown on tailing ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca PETER

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to determine if zeolite modified with ammonium ions has a higher capacity than natural zeolite to protect Hieracium aurantium and Rumex acetosella growing on tailing ponds, by reducing the quantity of metal ions these plants would accumulate in their roots and leaves. The influence of the amount of zeolite in the substrate (5% and 10% mass percentage was also studied. The experiments were carried out in laboratory and the concentration of the ions of heavy metal in roots and leaves, after 38 days of growth was established by Flame Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy. The pH, conductivity and redox potential for each of the substrate considered were measured. The results were statistically processed using the one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA. FTIR analyses were performed to establish the structural differences between the natural and modified zeolite. Hieracium aurantium and Rumex acetosella accumulate a smaller quantity of metal ions in roots and leaves in the presence of zeolite modified with ammonium ions than in the presence of natural zeolite. Laboratory tests showed that Hieracium aurantium is more tolerant to ions of heavy metals than Rumex acetosella, as demonstrated by their translocation factors.In terms of reducing the uptake of ions of heavy metals, only the zeolite modified with ammonium has a significant protective effecton Hieracium aurantium, while both natural zeolite and zeolite modified demonstrate a significant role for Rumex acetosella, asrevealed by statistical tests.

  17. Overexpression of Arabidopsis VIT1 increases accumulation of iron in cassava roots and stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is extremely abundant in the soil, but its uptake in plants is limited due to low solubility in neutral or alkaline soils. Plants can rely on rhizosphere acidification to increase iron solubility. AtVIT1 was previously found to be involved in mediating vacuolar sequestration of iron, which indi...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  20. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  8. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  11. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  13. Thyroid uptake test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The uptake of radioiodine by the thyroid gland is altered by the iodine content of diet or drugs. American diet has a high iodine content because each slice of the white bread contains nearly 150μg of iodine due to the bleaching process employed in the production of the bread. This carrier content of iodine reduces the uptake so much, that the normal American uptakes are usually three to four times lower than the uptakes in the developing countries. The other drawback of the thyroid uptake test is that it is affected by the iodine containing drugs. Anti-diarrhoea medications are quire common in the developing countries and many of them contain iodine moiety. Without a reliable drug history, a low thyroid uptake value may lead to a misleading conclusion

  14. Enterobactin-mediated iron transport in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, K; Young, L; Neshat, S

    1990-01-01

    A pyoverdine-deficient strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was unable to grow in an iron-deficient minimal medium in the presence of the nonmetabolizable iron chelator ethylene diamine-di(omega-hydroxyphenol acetic acid) (EDDHA), although addition of enterobactin to EDDHA-containing minimal media did restore growth of the pyoverdine-deficient P. aeruginosa. Consistent with the apparent ability of enterobactin to provide iron to P. aeruginosa, enterobactin-dependent 55Fe3+ uptake was observed in cells of P. aeruginosa previously grown in an iron-deficient medium containing enterobactin (or enterobactin-containing Escherichia coli culture supernatant). This uptake was energy dependent, was observable at low concentrations (60 nM) of FeCl3, and was absent in cells cultured without enterobactin. A novel protein with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000 was identified in the outer membranes of cells grown in iron-deficient minimal medium containing enterobactin, concomitant with the induction of enterobactin-dependent iron uptake. A Tn501 insertion mutant lacking this protein was isolated and shown to be deficient in enterobactin-mediated iron transport at 60 nM FeCl3, although it still exhibited enterobactin-dependent growth in iron-deficient medium containing EDDHA. It was subsequently observed that the mutant was, however, capable of enterobactin-mediated iron transport at much higher concentrations (600 nM) of FeCl3. Indeed, enterobactin-dependent iron uptake at this concentration of iron was observed in both the mutant and parent strains irrespective of whether they had been cultured in the presence of enterobactin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2174865

  15. The role of mitochondria in cellular iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Roland; Hoffmann, Bastian; Molik, Sabine; Pierik, Antonio J; Rietzschel, Nicole; Stehling, Oliver; Uzarska, Marta A; Webert, Holger; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in iron metabolism in that they synthesize heme, assemble iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, and participate in cellular iron regulation. Here, we review the latter two topics and their intimate connection. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery consists of 17 proteins that operate in three major steps of the maturation process. First, the cysteine desulfurase complex Nfs1-Isd11 as the sulfur donor cooperates with ferredoxin-ferredoxin reductase acting as an electron transfer chain, and frataxin to synthesize an [2Fe-2S] cluster on the scaffold protein Isu1. Second, the cluster is released from Isu1 and transferred toward apoproteins with the help of a dedicated Hsp70 chaperone system and the glutaredoxin Grx5. Finally, various specialized ISC components assist in the generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters and cluster insertion into specific target apoproteins. Functional defects of the core ISC assembly machinery are signaled to cytosolic or nuclear iron regulatory systems resulting in increased cellular iron acquisition and mitochondrial iron accumulation. In fungi, regulation is achieved by iron-responsive transcription factors controlling the expression of genes involved in iron uptake and intracellular distribution. They are assisted by cytosolic multidomain glutaredoxins which use a bound Fe/S cluster as iron sensor and additionally perform an essential role in intracellular iron delivery to target metalloproteins. In mammalian cells, the iron regulatory proteins IRP1, an Fe/S protein, and IRP2 act in a post-transcriptional fashion to adjust the cellular needs for iron. Thus, Fe/S protein biogenesis and cellular iron metabolism are tightly linked to coordinate iron supply and utilization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. ScienceScope: Aerospace

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this edition of ScienceScope, innovations in and around aerodynamics research and development is explored. The publication explores activities in environmentally friendly aerospace technologies to enhance the aviation industry....

  18. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  19. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  20. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum Ferrous Iron Transporter FeoAB Is Required for Ferric Iron Utilization in Free Living Aerobic Cells and for Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankari, Siva; O'Brian, Mark R

    2016-07-22

    The bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 does not synthesize siderophores for iron utilization in aerobic environments, and the mechanism of iron uptake within symbiotic soybean root nodules is unknown. An mbfA bfr double mutant defective in iron export and storage activities cannot grow aerobically in very high iron medium. Here, we found that this phenotype was suppressed by loss of function mutations in the feoAB operon encoding ferrous (Fe(2+)) iron uptake proteins. Expression of the feoAB operon genes was elevated under iron limitation, but mutants defective in either gene were unable to grow aerobically over a wide external ferric (Fe(3+)) iron (FeCl3) concentration range. Thus, FeoAB accommodates iron acquisition under iron limited and iron replete conditions. Incorporation of radiolabel from either (55)Fe(2+) or (59)Fe(3+) into cells was severely defective in the feoA and feoB strains, suggesting Fe(3+) reduction to Fe(2+) prior to traversal across the cytoplasmic membrane by FeoAB. The feoA or feoB deletion strains elicited small, ineffective nodules on soybean roots, containing few bacteria and lacking nitrogen fixation activity. A feoA(E40K) mutant contained partial iron uptake activity in culture that supported normal growth and established an effective symbiosis. The feoA(E40K) strain had partial iron uptake activity in situ within nodules and in isolated cells, indicating that FeoAB is the iron transporter in symbiosis. We conclude that FeoAB supports iron acquisition under limited conditions of soil and in the iron-rich environment of a symbiotic nodule. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Comparative evaluation of nephrotoxicity and management by macrophages of intravenous pharmaceutical iron formulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Connor

    Full Text Available There is a significant clinical need for effective treatment of iron deficiency. A number of compounds that can be administered intravenously have been developed. This study examines how the compounds are handled by macrophages and their relative potential to provoke oxidative stress.Human kidney (HK-2 cells, rat peritoneal macrophages and renal cortical homogenates were exposed to pharmaceutical iron preparations. Analyses were performed for indices of oxidative stress and cell integrity. In addition, in macrophages, iron uptake and release and cytokine secretion was monitored.HK-2 cell viability was decreased by iron isomaltoside and ferumoxytol and all compounds induced lipid peroxidation. In the renal cortical homogenates, lipid peroxidation occurred at lowest concentrations with ferric carboxymaltose, iron dextran, iron sucrose and sodium ferric gluconate. In the macrophages, iron sucrose caused loss of cell viability. Iron uptake was highest for ferumoxytol and iron isomaltoside and lowest for iron sucrose and sodium ferric gluconate. Iron was released as secretion of ferritin or as ferrous iron via ferroportin. The latter was blocked by hepcidin. Exposure to ferric carboxymaltose and iron dextran resulted in release of tumor necrosis factor α.Exposure to iron compounds increased cell stress but was tissue and dose dependent. There was a clear difference in the handling of iron from the different compounds by macrophages that suggests in vivo responses may differ.

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. ...

  3. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake Thyroid scan and uptake uses ...

  4. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  5. Full-scope training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugedo, E.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics to be covered in this report are: Reasons justifying the use of full-scope simulators for operator qualification. Full-scope simulator description: the control room, the physical models, the computer complex, the instructor's console. Main features of full-scope simulators. Merits of simulator training. The role of full-scope simulators in the training programs. The process of ordering and acquiring a full-scope simulator. Maintaining and updating simulator capabilities. (orig./GL)

  6. Performance of Iron Plaque of Wetland Plants for Regulating Iron, Manganese, and Phosphorus from Agricultural Drainage Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural drainage water continues to impact watersheds and their receiving water bodies. One approach to mitigate this problem is to use surrounding natural wetlands. Our objectives were to determine the effect of iron (Fe-rich groundwater on phosphorus (P removal and nutrient absorption by the utilization of the iron plaque on the root surface of Glyceria spiculosa (Fr. Schmidt. Rosh. The experiment was comprised of two main factors with three regimes: Fe2+ (0, 1, 20, 100, 500 mg·L−1 and P (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 mg·L−1. The deposition and structure of iron plaque was examined through a scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. Iron could, however, also impose toxic effects on the biota. We therefore provide the scanning electron microscopy (SEM on iron plaques, showing the essential elements were iron (Fe, oxygen (O, aluminum (Al, manganese (Mn, P, and sulphur (S. Results showed that (1 Iron plaque increased with increasing Fe2+ supply, and P-deficiency promoted its formation; (2 Depending on the amount of iron plaque on roots, nutrient uptake was enhanced at low levels, but at higher levels, it inhibited element accumulation and translocation; (3 The absorption of manganese was particularly affected by iron plague, which also enhanced phosphorus uptake until the external iron concentration exceeded 100 mg·L−1. Therefore, the presence of iron plaque on the root surface would increase the uptake of P, which depends on the concentration of iron-rich groundwater.

  7. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  8. Ironing out the Details: Exploring the Role of Iron and Heme in Blood-Sucking Arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Shavonn R.; Eggleston, Heather; Adelman, Zach N.

    2018-01-01

    Heme and iron are essential molecules for many physiological processes and yet have the ability to cause oxidative damage such as lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, and ultimately cell death if not controlled. Blood-sucking arthropods have evolved diverse methods to protect themselves against iron/heme-related damage, as the act of bloodfeeding itself is high risk, high reward process. Protective mechanisms in medically important arthropods include the midgut peritrophic matrix in mosquitoes, heme aggregation into the crystalline structure hemozoin in kissing bugs and hemosomes in ticks. Once heme and iron pass these protective mechanisms they are presumed to enter the midgut epithelial cells via membrane-bound transporters, though relatively few iron or heme transporters have been identified in bloodsucking arthropods. Upon iron entry into midgut epithelial cells, ferritin serves as the universal storage protein and transport for dietary iron in many organisms including arthropods. In addition to its role as a nutrient, heme is also an important signaling molecule in the midgut epithelial cells for many physiological processes including vitellogenesis. This review article will summarize recent advancements in heme/iron uptake, detoxification and exportation in bloodfeeding arthropods. While initial strides have been made at ironing out the role of dietary iron and heme in arthropods, much still remains to be discovered as these molecules may serve as novel targets for the control of many arthropod pests. PMID:29387018

  9. Iron plaque formation and morphoanatomy of roots from species of restinga subjected to excess iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; Azevedo, Aristéa Alves; Oliva, Marco Antonio

    2012-04-01

    The restingas, a sandy coastal plain ecosystem of Brazil, have received an additional amount of iron due to the activity of mining industries. The present study aims to characterize morphoanatomically and histochemically the iron plaque formation on roots of Ipomoea pes-caprae L. and Canavalia rosea DC, cultivated in hydroponic solution with and without excess iron. The iron plaque formation as well as changes in the external morphology of the lateral roots of both species were observed after the subjection to excess iron. Changes in the nutrient uptake, and in the organization and form of the pericycle and cortex cells were observed for both species. Scanning electron microscopy showed evident iron plaques on the whole surface of the root. The iron was histolocalized in all root tissues of both species. The species of restinga studied here formed iron plaque in their roots when exposed to excess of this element, which may compromise their development in environments polluted by particulated iron. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Co-regulation of Iron Metabolism and Virulence Associated Functions by Iron and XibR, a Novel Iron Binding Transcription Factor, in the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sheo Shankar; Patnana, Pradeep Kumar; Lomada, Santosh Kumar; Tomar, Archana; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2016-01-01

    Abilities of bacterial pathogens to adapt to the iron limitation present in hosts is critical to their virulence. Bacterial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to coordinately regulate iron metabolism and virulence associated functions to maintain iron homeostasis in response to changing iron availability in the environment. In many bacteria the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) functions as transcription factor that utilize ferrous form of iron as cofactor to regulate transcription of iron metabolism and many cellular functions. However, mechanisms of fine-tuning and coordinated regulation of virulence associated function beyond iron and Fur-Fe2+ remain undefined. In this study, we show that a novel transcriptional regulator XibR (named X anthomonas iron binding regulator) of the NtrC family, is required for fine-tuning and co-coordinately regulating the expression of several iron regulated genes and virulence associated functions in phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Genome wide expression analysis of iron-starvation stimulon and XibR regulon, GUS assays, genetic and functional studies of xibR mutant revealed that XibR positively regulates functions involved in iron storage and uptake, chemotaxis, motility and negatively regulates siderophore production, in response to iron. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that iron promoted binding of the XibR to the upstream regulatory sequence of operon’s involved in chemotaxis and motility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that purified XibR bound ferric form of iron. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that iron positively affected the binding of XibR to the upstream regulatory sequences of the target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by ferric iron chelator deferoxamine. Taken together, these data revealed that how XibR coordinately regulates virulence associated and iron metabolism functions in Xanthomonads in

  11. Co-regulation of Iron Metabolism and Virulence Associated Functions by Iron and XibR, a Novel Iron Binding Transcription Factor, in the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheo Shankar Pandey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abilities of bacterial pathogens to adapt to the iron limitation present in hosts is critical to their virulence. Bacterial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to coordinately regulate iron metabolism and virulence associated functions to maintain iron homeostasis in response to changing iron availability in the environment. In many bacteria the ferric uptake regulator (Fur functions as transcription factor that utilize ferrous form of iron as cofactor to regulate transcription of iron metabolism and many cellular functions. However, mechanisms of fine-tuning and coordinated regulation of virulence associated function beyond iron and Fur-Fe2+ remain undefined. In this study, we show that a novel transcriptional regulator XibR (named Xanthomonas iron binding regulator of the NtrC family, is required for fine-tuning and co-coordinately regulating the expression of several iron regulated genes and virulence associated functions in phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc. Genome wide expression analysis of iron-starvation stimulon and XibR regulon, GUS assays, genetic and functional studies of xibR mutant revealed that XibR positively regulates functions involved in iron storage and uptake, chemotaxis, motility and negatively regulates siderophore production, in response to iron. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that iron promoted binding of the XibR to the upstream regulatory sequence of operon's involved in chemotaxis and motility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that purified XibR bound ferric form of iron. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that iron positively affected the binding of XibR to the upstream regulatory sequences of the target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by ferric iron chelator deferoxamine. Taken together, these data revealed that how XibR coordinately regulates virulence associated and iron metabolism functions in

  12. Quantification of nanowire uptake by live cells

    KAUST Repository

    Margineanu, Michael B.

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructures fabricated by different methods have become increasingly important for various applications at the cellular level. In order to understand how these nanostructures “behave” and for studying their internalization kinetics, several attempts have been made at tagging and investigating their interaction with living cells. In this study, magnetic iron nanowires with an iron oxide layer are coated with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), and subsequently labeled with a fluorogenic pH-dependent dye pHrodo™ Red, covalently bound to the aminosilane surface. Time-lapse live imaging of human colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells interacting with the labeled iron nanowires is performed for 24 hours. As the pHrodo™ Red conjugated nanowires are non-fluorescent outside the cells but fluoresce brightly inside, internalized nanowires are distinguished from non-internalized ones and their behavior inside the cells can be tracked for the respective time length. A machine learning-based computational framework dedicated to automatic analysis of live cell imaging data, Cell Cognition, is adapted and used to classify cells with internalized and non-internalized nanowires and subsequently determine the uptake percentage by cells at different time points. An uptake of 85 % by HCT 116 cells is observed after 24 hours incubation at NW-to-cell ratios of 200. While the approach of using pHrodo™ Red for internalization studies is not novel in the literature, this study reports for the first time the utilization of a machine-learning based time-resolved automatic analysis pipeline for quantification of nanowire uptake by cells. This pipeline has also been used for comparison studies with nickel nanowires coated with APTES and labeled with pHrodo™ Red, and another cell line derived from the cervix carcinoma, HeLa. It has thus the potential to be used for studying the interaction of different types of nanostructures with potentially any live cell types.

  13. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased ∼2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, 54 Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. 54 Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected 54 Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration

  14. Oxidizer Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the acceptable knowledge (AK) review of oxidizers present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the oxidizers, and report the results of the scoping study testing. This report will determine the fastest burning oxidizer to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-002, Sorbent Scoping Studies, contains similar information for sorbents identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  15. LogScope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Smith, Margaret H.; Barringer, Howard; Groce, Alex

    2012-01-01

    LogScope is a software package for analyzing log files. The intended use is for offline post-processing of such logs, after the execution of the system under test. LogScope can, however, in principle, also be used to monitor systems online during their execution. Logs are checked against requirements formulated as monitors expressed in a rule-based specification language. This language has similarities to a state machine language, but is more expressive, for example, in its handling of data parameters. The specification language is user friendly, simple, and yet expressive enough for many practical scenarios. The LogScope software was initially developed to specifically assist in testing JPL s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) flight software, but it is very generic in nature and can be applied to any application that produces some form of logging information (which almost any software does).

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  19. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Environment Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dvorakova, Marcela [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC{sub 50} value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC{sub 50} = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: > The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. > Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. > Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. > The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  20. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka; Benesova, Dagmar; Dvorakova, Marcela; Vanek, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC 50 value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC 50 = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: → The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. → Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. → Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. → The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  1. Ferrokinetic studies in normal and iron deficiency anemic calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellerberg, L.; Ekman, L.; Jacobsson, S.-O.

    1975-01-01

    inetic studies were performed on control calves and on calves with experimentallally induced iron deficiency anemia, all 15 weeks old. The plasma iron clearance half time was about 4 times shorter in the experimental than in the control group. The low plasma iron concentration in the anemic calves was partially compensated by a more rapid plasma iron disappearance. Therefore the difference in the plasma iron turnover rate was reduced. The mean value of plasma iron renewal rate was about 3 times higher in the experimental than in the control group. The maximum uptake of injected 59 Fe into blood cells was reached 14 to 16 days after injection. The uptake of 59 Fe was about 10 % higher in the control than in the experimental group. Using the values from the ferrokinetietic study, the iron need for calves could be estimated. The requirement of iron to maintain a normal and constant Hb in a calf weighing 100 kg at a growth rate of 1 kg/daily was estimated as being 17.5 mg/day. Based on information in the literature and assuming a retention of dietary Fe of 25 %, the total daily iron need for such a calf gaining 1 kg/day would be 160-180 mg. (author)

  2. Prion Protein Regulates Iron Transport by Functioning as a Ferrireductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay; Haldar, Swati; Horback, Katharine; Tom, Cynthia; Zhou, Lan; Meyerson, Howard; Singh, Neena

    2017-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is implicated in the pathogenesis of prion disorders, but its normal function is unclear. We demonstrate that PrPC is a ferrireductase (FR), and its absence causes systemic iron deficiency in PrP knock-out mice (PrP−/−). When exposed to non-transferrin-bound (NTB) radioactive-iron (59FeCl3) by gastric-gavage, PrP−/− mice absorb significantly more 59Fe from the intestinal lumen relative to controls, indicating appropriate systemic response to the iron deficiency. Chronic exposure to excess dietary iron corrects this deficiency, but unlike wild-type (PrP+/+) controls that remain iron over-loaded, PrP−/− mice revert back to the iron deficient phenotype after 5 months of chase on normal diet. Bone marrow (BM) preparations of PrP−/− mice on normal diet show relatively less stainable iron, and this phenotype is only partially corrected by intraperitoneal administration of excess iron-dextran. Cultured PrP−/− BM-macrophages incorporate significantly less NTB-59Fe in the absence or presence of excess extracellular iron, indicating reduced uptake and/or storage of available iron in the absence of PrPC. When expressed in neuroblastoma cells, PrPC exhibits NAD(P)H-dependent cell-surface and intracellular FR activity that requires the copper-binding octa-peptide-repeat region and linkage to the plasma membrane for optimal function. Incorporation of NTB-59Fe by neuroblastoma cells correlates with FR activity of PrPC, implicating PrPC in cellular iron uptake and metabolism. These observations explain the correlation between PrPC expression and cellular iron levels, and the cause of iron imbalance in sporadic-Creutzfeldt-Jakob-disease brains where PrPC accumulates as insoluble aggregates. PMID:23478311

  3. Quality and Safety Assurance of Iron Casts and Manufacturing Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kukla S.

    2016-01-01

    The scope of this work focuses on the aspects of quality and safety assurance of the iron cast manufacturing processes. Special attention was given to the processes of quality control and after-machining of iron casts manufactured on automatic foundry lines. Due to low level of automation and huge work intensity at this stage of the process, a model area was established which underwent reorganization in accordance with the assumptions of the World Class Manufacturing (WCM). An analysis of wor...

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about your thyroid’s size, shape, position and function that is often unattainable using other imaging procedures. ... thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which are encased in metal and plastic and most often shaped like a box, attached to a ... will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake procedures are painless. ...

  6. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... often unattainable using other imaging procedures. For many diseases, nuclear medicine scans yield the most useful information ...

  7. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  8. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential ... or imaging device that produces pictures and provides molecular information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Actual scanning time for each thyroid uptake is five minutes or less. top of page What will ... diagnostic procedures have been used for more than five decades, and there are no known long-term ...

  10. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top ... Scan and Uptake Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  11. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When radiotracer is taken by mouth, in either liquid or capsule form, it is typically swallowed up ... radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) in liquid or capsule form to swallow. The thyroid uptake ...

  12. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... RAIU) is also known as a thyroid uptake. It is a measurement of thyroid function, but does ... they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate ...

  13. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. Jewelry ... small hand-held device resembling a microphone that can detect and measure the amount of the radiotracer ...

  14. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Most thyroid scan and thyroid uptake ... you otherwise, you may resume your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan. If any special instructions ...

  15. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is ... computer, create pictures offering details on both the structure and function of organs and tissues in your ...

  16. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eat for several hours before your exam because eating can affect the accuracy of the uptake measurement. ... its radioactivity over time. It may also pass out of your body through your urine or stool ...

  17. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedures within the last two months that used iodine-based contrast material. Your doctor will instruct you ... a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a ...

  18. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead...... involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ... and lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... delivery or giving birth to a baby with low birth weight In people with chronic conditions, iron- ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  8. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amount of iron, and medical conditions that make it hard for your body to absorb iron from ... hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy ... sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  16. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark ... choose nonmeat sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  20. Effects of Chemical Applications to Metal Polluted Soils on Cadmium Uptake by Rice Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo J. H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pot experiment using metal polluted soils was conducted to investigate the effects of lime, iron and sulfur on changes in Cd availability and uptake by rice plant. Drainage and irrigation of water were performed to develop redox changes like field cultivation. Iron chloride and sodium sulfate solutions were applied to the pots in the middle of growth period of rice plant. Reactive metal pool in heavily polluted soils was slightly decreased after treatments with lime, iron chloride, sodium sulfate and combination of these chemicals. However, cadmium uptake by rice plant was significantly different across the treatments and the extent of Cd pollution. For highly polluted soils, more Cd reduction was observed in iron chloride treatments. Cd content in polished rice for iron chloride and (iron chloride+organic matter treatments was only 16-23% and 25-37% compared to control and liming, respectively. Treatment of (iron chloride+sulfate rather increased Cd content in rice. For moderately polluted soils, Cd reduction rate was the order of (OM+iron chloride > iron chloride > lime. Other treatments including sulfate rather increased Cd content in rice maximum 3 times than control. It was proposed to determine the optimum application rate of iron for minimizing hazardous effect on rice plant.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  2. Vibrio Iron Transport: Evolutionary Adaptation to Life in Multiple Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, Alexandra R.; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is an essential element for Vibrio spp., but the acquisition of iron is complicated by its tendency to form insoluble ferric complexes in nature and its association with high-affinity iron-binding proteins in the host. Vibrios occupy a variety of different niches, and each of these niches presents particular challenges for acquiring sufficient iron. Vibrio species have evolved a wide array of iron transport systems that allow the bacteria to compete for this essential element in each of its habitats. These systems include the secretion and uptake of high-affinity iron-binding compounds (siderophores) as well as transport systems for iron bound to host complexes. Transporters for ferric and ferrous iron not complexed to siderophores are also common to Vibrio species. Some of the genes encoding these systems show evidence of horizontal transmission, and the ability to acquire and incorporate additional iron transport systems may have allowed Vibrio species to more rapidly adapt to new environmental niches. While too little iron prevents growth of the bacteria, too much can be lethal. The appropriate balance is maintained in vibrios through complex regulatory networks involving transcriptional repressors and activators and small RNAs (sRNAs) that act posttranscriptionally. Examination of the number and variety of iron transport systems found in Vibrio spp. offers insights into how this group of bacteria has adapted to such a wide range of habitats. PMID:26658001

  3. FedScope Employment Cubes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — This raw data set provides Federal civilian employee population data. The scope of this raw data set includes all data elements used in the creation of the FedScope...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  5. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  6. Ceruloplasmin-ferroportin system of iron traffic in vertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni; Musci; Fabio; Polticelli; Maria; Carmela; Bonaccorsi; di; Patti

    2014-01-01

    Safe trafficking of iron across the cell membrane is a delicate process that requires specific protein carriers. While many proteins involved in iron uptake by cells are known, only one cellular iron export protein has been identified in mammals: ferroportin(SLC40A1). Ceruloplasmin is a multicopper enzyme endowed with ferroxidase activity that is found as a soluble isoform in plasma or as a membrane-associated isoform in specific cell types. According to the currently accepted view, ferrous iron transported out of the cell by ferroportin would be safely oxidized by ceruloplasmin to facilitate loading on transferrin. Therefore, the ceruloplasminferroportin system represents the main pathway for cellular iron egress and it is responsible for physiological regulation of cellular iron levels. The most recent findings regarding the structural and functional features of ceruloplasmin and ferroportin and their relationship will be described in this review.

  7. Iron pnictide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co x Fe 1-x )PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr 2 Si 2 -type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba 0.6 K 0.4 Fe 2 As 2 , is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba 1-x K x )Fe 2 As 2 is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe 2 As 2 and EuFe 2 As 2 are characterised and the superconductors Sr 1-x K x Fe 2 As 2 and Ca 1-x Na x Fe 2 As 2 are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se 1-x Te x ) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr 3 Sc 2 O 5 Fe 2 As 2 are presented and Ba 2 ScO 3 FeAs and Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr 2 CrO 3 FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is given. Finally, the superconductor Sr 2 VO 3 FeAs is scrutinised and necessary prerequisites for superconductivity in this compound are suggested. (orig.)

  8. Isolation and characterization of iron chelators from turmeric (Curcuma longa): selective metal binding by curcuminoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Donald J; Surrago, Christine; Fiordalisi, Celia; Chung, Wing Yin; Kowdley, Kris V

    2017-10-01

    Iron overload disorders may be treated by chelation therapy. This study describes a novel method for isolating iron chelators from complex mixtures including plant extracts. We demonstrate the one-step isolation of curcuminoids from turmeric, the medicinal food spice derived from Curcuma longa. The method uses iron-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-agarose, to which curcumin binds rapidly, specifically, and reversibly. Curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin each bound iron-NTA-agarose with comparable affinities and a stoichiometry near 1. Analyses of binding efficiencies and purity demonstrated that curcuminoids comprise the primary iron binding compounds recovered from a crude turmeric extract. Competition of curcuminoid binding to the iron resin was used to characterize the metal binding site on curcumin and to detect iron binding by added chelators. Curcumin-Iron-NTA-agarose binding was inhibited by other metals with relative potency: (>90% inhibition) Cu 2+  ~ Al 3+  > Zn 2+  ≥ Ca 2+  ~ Mg 2+  ~ Mn 2+ (80% by addition of iron to the media; uptake was completely restored by desferoxamine. Ranking of metals by relative potencies for blocking curcumin uptake agreed with their relative potencies in blocking curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose. We conclude that curcumin can selectively bind toxic metals including iron in a physiological setting, and propose inhibition of curcumin binding to iron-NTA-agarose for iron chelator screening.

  9. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius J. R. Lane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB; may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism.

  10. Sweden [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnedal, P.-O.

    1967-01-01

    The research which is going on now is concentrated on a study of uptake of cobalt, zinc and iron in the food chains in brackish water. We are following different lines in this work and they can be listed as follows: A. A study of accumulation and biological half-life of cobalt (later zinc and iron) in organisms in brackish water by means of radioactive isotopes. B. Analyses of stable elements (Co, Zn and Fe) in water, algae, evertebrates and fish from different localities in the Baltic and on the Swedish West Coast

  11. Diurnal variations in iron concentrations and expression of genes involved in iron absorption and metabolism in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiming; Wan, Dan; Zhou, Xihong; Long, Ciming; Wu, Xin; Li, Lan; He, Liuqin; Huang, Pan; Chen, Shuai; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2017-09-02

    Diurnal variations in serum iron levels have been well documented in clinical studies, and serum iron is an important diagnostic index for iron-deficiency anemia. However, the underlying mechanism of dynamic iron regulation in response to the circadian rhythm is still unclear. In this study, we investigated daily variations in iron status in the plasma and liver of pigs. The transcripts encoding key factors involved in iron uptake and homeostasis were evaluated. The results showed that iron levels in the plasma and liver exhibited diurnal rhythms. Diurnal variations were also observed in transcript levels of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), membrane-associated ferric reductase 1 (DCYTB), and transferrin receptor (TfR) in the duodenum and jejunum, as well as hepcidin (HAMP) and TfR in the liver. Moreover, the results showed a network in which diurnal variations in systemic iron levels were tightly regulated by hepcidin and Tf/TfR via DCYTB and DMT1. These findings provide new insights into circadian iron homeostasis regulation. The diurnal variations in serum iron levels may also have pathophysiological implications for clinical diagnostics related to iron deficiency anemia in pigs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron – a key nexus in the virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus eHaas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential but in excess toxic nutrient. Therefore, fungi evolved fine-tuned mechanisms for uptake and storage of iron, such as the production of siderophores (low-molecular mass iron-specific chelators. In Aspergillus fumigatus, iron starvation causes extensive transcriptional remodeling involving two central transcription factors, which are interconnected in a negative transcriptional feed-back loop: the GATA-factor SreA and the bZip-factor HapX. During iron sufficiency SreA represses iron uptake, including reductive iron assimilation and siderophore-mediated iron uptake, to avoid toxic effects. During iron starvation HapX represses iron-consuming pathways, including heme biosynthesis and respiration, to spare iron and activates synthesis of ribotoxin AspF1 and siderophores, the latter partly by ensuring supply of the precursor ornithine. In agreement with the expression pattern and mode of action, detrimental effects of inactivation of SreA and HapX are confined to growth during iron sufficiency and iron starvation, respectively. Deficiency in HapX, but not SreA, attenuates virulence of A. fumigatus in a murine model of aspergillosis, which underlines the crucial role of adaptation to iron limitation in virulence. Consistently, production of both extra- and intracellular siderophores is crucial for virulence of A. fumigatus. Recently, the sterol-regulatory element-binding protein SrbA was found to be essential for adaptation to iron starvation, thereby linking regulation of iron metabolism, ergosterol biosynthesis, azole drug resistance and hypoxia adaptation.

  13. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  14. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  15. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...

  16. Competitive advantage of diferric transferrin in delivering iron to reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebers, H A; Csiba, E; Huebers, E; Finch, C A

    1983-01-01

    Radioiron- and radioiodine-labeled forms of human diferric and monoferric transferrin and apotransferrin, isolated by preparative isoelectric focusing, were used to define transferrin-iron uptake by human reticulocytes. In mixtures of human diferric and monoferric transferrin, the diferric molecule had a constant 7-fold advantage in delivering iron to reticulocytes, as compared with the 2-fold advantage when single solutions of mono- and diferric transferrins were compared. This was shown to be due to competitive interaction in iron delivery, probably at a common membrane-receptor binding site for transferrin. Apotransferrin did not interfere with the iron-donating process and its limited cellular uptake was inhibited in noncompetitive fashion by diferric transferrin. PMID:6572005

  17. Characterization and fluoride uptake studies of nano-scale iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 8 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Characterization and fluoride uptake studies of nano-scale iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption data followed second order kinetic model. The isothermic data fitted to both Langmuir and Freundlich models and maximum loading capacity as estimated by Langmuir model was 62.89 mg/g for the studied concentration range of 10-30 mg/L. The high loading capacity points towards the potential of this ...

  19. Scope and closures

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    No matter how much experience you have with JavaScript, odds are you don’t fully understand the language. This concise yet in-depth guide takes you inside scope and closures, two core concepts you need to know to become a more efficient and effective JavaScript programmer. You’ll learn how and why they work, and how an understanding of closures can be a powerful part of your development skillset.

  20. Sorbent Scoping Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chancellor, Christopher John

    2016-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) office was tasked by the DOE CBFO, Office of the Manager to perform a review of the acceptable knowledge (AK) to identify the oxidizers and sorbents in transuranic (TRU) waste streams, to conduct scoping studies on the oxidizers and sorbents identified in AK review to inform the Quality Level 1 (QL1) testing, and to conduct a series of QL1 tests to provide the scientific data to support a basis of knowledge document for determining the criteria for (1) accepting waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without treatment, (2) determining waste that will require treatment, and (3) if treatment is required, how the treatment must be performed. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the AK review of sorbents present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the sorbent list, report the results of the scoping studies for the fastest-burning organic sorbent, and provide the list of organic and inorganic sorbents to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-001, Oxidizer Scoping Studies, has similar information for oxidizers identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  1. Sorbent Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Carlsbad, NM (United States). Difficult Waste Team

    2016-11-14

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory–Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) office was tasked by the DOE CBFO, Office of the Manager to perform a review of the acceptable knowledge (AK) to identify the oxidizers and sorbents in transuranic (TRU) waste streams, to conduct scoping studies on the oxidizers and sorbents identified in AK review to inform the Quality Level 1 (QL1) testing, and to conduct a series of QL1 tests to provide the scientific data to support a basis of knowledge document for determining the criteria for (1) accepting waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without treatment, (2) determining waste that will require treatment, and (3) if treatment is required, how the treatment must be performed. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the AK review of sorbents present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the sorbent list, report the results of the scoping studies for the fastest-burning organic sorbent, and provide the list of organic and inorganic sorbents to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-001, Oxidizer Scoping Studies, has similar information for oxidizers identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  4. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  5. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ... iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  8. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  9. Thyroid uptake software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Dolores; Arista, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    The DETEC-PC software was developed as a complement to a measurement system (hardware) able to perform Iodine Thyroid Uptake studies. The software was designed according to the principles of Object oriented programming using C++ language. The software automatically fixes spectrometric measurement parameters and besides patient measurement also performs statistical analysis of a batch of samples. It possesses a PARADOX database with all information of measured patients and a help system with the system options and medical concepts related to the thyroid uptake study

  10. Phosphate Recovery From Sewage Sludge Containing Iron Phosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilfert, P.K.

    2018-01-01

    The scope of this thesis was to lay the basis for a phosphate recovery technology that can be applied on sewage sludge containing iron phosphate. Such a technology should come with minimal changes to the existing sludge treatment configuration while keeping the use of chemicals or energy as small as

  11. Jasmonate signaling is activated in the very early stages of iron deficiency responses in rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Senoura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Takaya; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Minoru; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-07-01

    Under low iron availability, plants induce the expression of various genes involved in iron uptake and translocation at the transcriptional level. This iron deficiency response is affected by various plant hormones, but the roles of jasmonates in this response are not well-known. We investigated the involvement of jasmonates in rice iron deficiency responses. High rates of jasmonate-inducible genes were induced during the very early stages of iron deficiency treatment in rice roots. Many jasmonate-inducible genes were also negatively regulated by the ubiquitin ligases OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and positively regulated by the transcription factor IDEF1. Ten out of 35 genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were rapidly induced at 3 h of iron deficiency treatment, and this induction preceded that of known iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation. Twelve genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were also upregulated in HRZ-knockdown roots. Endogenous concentrations of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl isoleucine tended to be rapidly increased in roots in response to iron deficiency treatment, whereas these concentrations were higher in HRZ-knockdown roots under iron-sufficient conditions. Analysis of the jasmonate-deficient cpm2 mutant revealed that jasmonates repress the expression of many iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation under iron sufficiency, but this repression is partly canceled under an early stage of iron deficiency. These results indicate that jasmonate signaling is activated during the very early stages of iron deficiency, which is partly regulated by IDEF1 and OsHRZs.

  12. The Battle for Iron between Humans and Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Peggy L

    2018-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for bacteria, fungi, and humans; as such, each has evolved specialized iron uptake systems to acquire iron from the extracellular environment. To describe complex 'tug of war' for iron that has evolved between human hosts and pathogenic microorganisms in the battle for this vital nutrient. A review of current literature was performed, to assess current approaches and controversies in iron therapy and chelation in humans. In humans, sequestration (hiding) of iron from invading pathogens is often successful; however, many pathogens have evolved mechanisms to circumvent this approach. Clinically, controversy continues whether iron overload or administration of iron results in an increased risk of infection. The administration of iron chelating agents and siderophore- conjugate drugs to infected hosts seems a biologically plausible approach as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of infections caused by pathogens dependent on host iron supply (e.g. tuberculosis, malaria, and many bacterial and fungal pathogens); however, thus far, studies in humans have proved unsuccessful. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Extraosseous radiotracer uptake on bone scan in beta-thalassemia: report of one case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezguez, M.; Nouira, M.; Sfar, R.; Chatti, K.; Ben Fradj, M.; Ben Ali, K.; Ajmi, S.; Essabbah, H.; Zrour, S.

    2009-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion, main therapeutic modality of beta-thalassemia, leads to iron overload which may perturb several metabolic ways. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the uptake abnormalities observed on bone scan of thalassaemic patients and to discuss mechanisms of extraosseous accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical in this pathology. We report a 16-year-old child suffering from beta-thalassemia major undergoing transfusion therapy. A bone scan was indicated to look for osseous infection. This study revealed a little skeletal uptake and abnormal liver, splenic and renal accumulation. A repeat bone scan, performed three weeks later showed a better skeletal uptake which enabled the discovery of focal abnormalities and made the diagnostic easier. The effect of iron overload on radiopharmaceuticals uptake in bone scan is known since 1975. Dissociation of 99m Tc from the carrier ligand due to the presence of iron excess seems the most plausible hypothesis. Free 99m Tc can be bound to other tissular substrates which can explain extraosseous uptake. The normally available pool for bone is reduced and then the skeletal uptake decreased. This report limits considerably the sensitivity of the bone scan. A well-led iron chelation and eventually the use of diuretic drug may guarantee a better quality of bone scan images. (authors)

  14. Genomic Organization and Expression of Iron Metabolism Genes in the Emerging Pathogenic Mold Scedosporium apiospermum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohann Le Govic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous mold Scedosporium apiospermum is increasingly recognized as an emerging pathogen, especially among patients with underlying disorders such as immunodeficiency or cystic fibrosis (CF. Indeed, it ranks the second among the filamentous fungi colonizing the respiratory tract of CF patients. However, our knowledge about virulence factors of this fungus is still limited. The role of iron-uptake systems may be critical for establishment of Scedosporium infections, notably in the iron-rich environment of the CF lung. Two main strategies are employed by fungi to efficiently acquire iron from their host or from their ecological niche: siderophore production and reductive iron assimilation (RIA systems. The aim of this study was to assess the existence of orthologous genes involved in iron metabolism in the recently sequenced genome of S. apiospermum. At first, a tBLASTn analysis using A. fumigatus iron-related proteins as query revealed orthologs of almost all relevant loci in the S. apiospermum genome. Whereas the genes putatively involved in RIA were randomly distributed, siderophore biosynthesis and transport genes were organized in two clusters, each containing a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS whose orthologs in A. fumigatus have been described to catalyze hydroxamate siderophore synthesis. Nevertheless, comparative genomic analysis of siderophore-related clusters showed greater similarity between S. apiospermum and phylogenetically close molds than with Aspergillus species. The expression level of these genes was then evaluated by exposing conidia to iron starvation and iron excess. The expression of several orthologs of A. fumigatus genes involved in siderophore-based iron uptake or RIA was significantly induced during iron starvation, and conversely repressed in iron excess conditions. Altogether, these results indicate that S. apiospermum possesses the genetic information required for efficient and competitive iron uptake

  15. Accumulation of radioactive iron in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateda, Yuzuru

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation and excretion of radioactive iron in some marine organisms was investigated by radio-tracer experiments. The concentration factor, biological half-life, distribution in body, and combining form in some organs, are compared and discussed between mollusks and fishes. The results obtained are: 1) The concentration factor of seaweed was higher than those of worm and fish in uptake from seawater. Abalone showed a higher concentration factor than fish. 2) The first component of excretion curve was small in case of a longer period of uptake from seawater. 3) Abalone and octopus showed a higher radioactivity retention than flounder and black-fish. 4) The fish fed labelled seaweed showed a lower radioactivity retention than fish fed labelled worm. 5) The fish fed radioisotopes with prey showed a higher radioactivity retention than fish fed labelled prey. 6) Biological half-lives were longer in abalone and octopus than in fishes. The biological half-lives of radioactive iron in fishes varied according to the uptake modes. 7) The distribution ratio of radioactive iron in organisms were large in the liver and degestive tract. 8) The GFC profile of 59 Fe in some organs of organisms showed combining form of same molecular weight of proteinous matter. (author)

  16. HFE mRNA expression is responsive to intracellular and extracellular iron loading: short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kosha J; Farnaud, Sebastien; Patel, Vinood B

    2017-10-01

    In liver hepatocytes, the HFE gene regulates cellular and systemic iron homeostasis by modulating cellular iron-uptake and producing the iron-hormone hepcidin in response to systemic iron elevation. However, the mechanism of iron-sensing in hepatocytes remain enigmatic. Therefore, to study the effect of iron on HFE and hepcidin (HAMP) expressions under distinct extracellular and intracellular iron-loading, we examined the effect of holotransferrin treatment (1, 2, 5 and 8 g/L for 6 h) on intracellular iron levels, and mRNA expressions of HFE and HAMP in wild-type HepG2 and previously characterized iron-loaded recombinant-TfR1 HepG2 cells. Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR and intracellular iron was measured by ferrozine assay. Data showed that in the wild-type cells, where intracellular iron content remained unchanged, HFE expression remained unaltered at low holotransferrin treatments but was upregulated upon 5 g/L (p HFE and HAMP expressions were elevated only at low 1 g/L treatment (p HFE (p HFE mRNA was independently elevated by extracellular and intracellular iron-excess. Thus, it may be involved in sensing both, extracellular and intracellular iron. Repression of HAMP expression under simultaneous intracellular and extracellular iron-loading resembles non-hereditary iron-excess pathologies.

  17. Effect of sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on the absorption of various trace elements in anemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Kaori; Sasaki, Ayako; Yoda, Yoko; Inage, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yukiko; Kimura, Shuichi; Yanagiya, Takahiro; Hirunuma, Rieko; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2001-01-01

    Iron deficiency in developing countries is attributed to the bioavailability of iron derived from staple food such as grains, vegetables and legumes. Sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA), a strong metal chelator, is one of the food additives for iron fortification and it has been for improvement of iron deficiency in the world. However, the effect of NaFeEDTA on the absorption of trace elements other than Fe has been poorly understood. In the present study, to investigate the effect of NaFeEDTA on the absorption of trace elements, we determined the uptake rate of various metals using a multitracer technique. The uptake rates of Zn, Co, and Na in rats fed with NaFeEDTA diet were significantly lower than those in rats fed with ferrous sulfate (FS) diet, suggesting that iron fortification by NaFeEDTA lowers the bioavailability of various elements compared with FS. On the other hand, iron fortification using the FS diet in the presence of tannic acid decreased the bioavailability of Zn and Rb. However, no effect of tannic acid on the uptake rate of metal was observed in NaFeEDTA diet, suggesting that iron fortification using NaFeEDTA is less affected by tannic acid than that using the FS diet. These results indicate that iron fortification using NaFeEDTA is an effective method for improving iron deficiency. (author)

  18. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Mende, Daniel R.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Saito, Mak A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-12-01

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1-2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle.

  19. Transcriptional regulation by Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxell, Bryan; Hassan, Hosni M

    2013-01-01

    In the ancient anaerobic environment, ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was one of the first metal cofactors. Oxygenation of the ancient world challenged bacteria to acquire the insoluble ferric iron (Fe(3+)) and later to defend against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the Fenton chemistry. To acquire Fe(3+), bacteria produce low-molecular weight compounds, known as siderophores, which have extremely high affinity for Fe(3+). However, during infection the host restricts iron from pathogens by producing iron- and siderophore-chelating proteins, by exporting iron from intracellular pathogen-containing compartments, and by limiting absorption of dietary iron. Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) is a transcription factor which utilizes Fe(2+) as a corepressor and represses siderophore synthesis in pathogens. Fur, directly or indirectly, controls expression of enzymes that protect against ROS damage. Thus, the challenges of iron homeostasis and defense against ROS are addressed via Fur. Although the role of Fur as a repressor is well-documented, emerging evidence demonstrates that Fur can function as an activator. Fur activation can occur through three distinct mechanisms (1) indirectly via small RNAs, (2) binding at cis regulatory elements that enhance recruitment of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and (3) functioning as an antirepressor by removing or blocking DNA binding of a repressor of transcription. In addition, Fur homologs control defense against peroxide stress (PerR) and control uptake of other metals such as zinc (Zur) and manganese (Mur) in pathogenic bacteria. Fur family members are important for virulence within bacterial pathogens since mutants of fur, perR, or zur exhibit reduced virulence within numerous animal and plant models of infection. This review focuses on the breadth of Fur regulation in pathogenic bacteria.

  20. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  1. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Thyroid Scan and Uptake ...

  2. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information. The thyroid scan and thyroid uptake provide information about the structure and function of the thyroid. The thyroid is a gland in the neck that controls metabolism , a chemical process that regulates the rate at which the body ...

  3. Radioactive uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, O

    1986-01-01

    The fundamentals of radionuclide uptake by plants, both by leaves and roots are presented. Iodine, cesium, strontium and ruthenium are considered and a table of the measured concentrations in several agricultural plants shortly after the Chernobyl accident is presented. Another table gives the Cs and Sr transfer factors soil plants for some plants. By using them estimates of future burden can be obtained.

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... of a typical probe counter used for thyroid uptake exams. The patient sits with the camera directed at the neck for five minutes, and then the leg for ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... of a typical probe counter used for thyroid uptake exams. The patient sits with the camera directed at the neck for five minutes, and then the leg for ...

  6. Comparative Evaluation of U.S. Brand and Generic Intravenous Sodium Ferric Gluconate Complex in Sucrose Injection: In Vitro Cellular Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia is a common clinical consequence for people who suffer from chronic kidney disease, especially those requiring dialysis. Intravenous (IV iron therapy is a widely accepted safe and efficacious treatment for iron deficiency anemia. Numerous IV iron drugs have been approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA, including a single generic product, sodium ferric gluconate complex in sucrose. In this study, we compared the cellular iron uptake profiles of the brand (Ferrlecit® and generic sodium ferric gluconate (SFG products. We used a colorimetric assay to examine the amount of iron uptake by three human macrophage cell lines. This is the first published study to provide a parallel evaluation of the cellular uptake of a brand and a generic IV iron drug in a mononuclear phagocyte system. The results showed no difference in iron uptake across all cell lines, tested doses, and time points. The matching iron uptake profiles of Ferrlecit® and its generic product support the FDA’s present position detailed in the draft guidance on development of SFG complex products that bioequivalence can be based on qualitative (Q1 and quantitative (Q2 formulation sameness, similar physiochemical characterization, and pharmacokinetic bioequivalence studies.

  7. The SCOPE Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, M.; Tsuda, Y.; Saito, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Takashima, T.; Matsuoka, A.; Kojima, H.; Kasaba, Y.

    2009-01-01

    In order to reach the new horizon of the space physics research, the Plasma Universe, via in-situ measurements in the Earth's magnetosphere, SCOPE will perform formation flying observations combined with high-time resolution electron measurements. The simultaneous multi-scale observations by SCOPE of various plasma dynamical phenomena will enable data-based study of the key space plasma processes from the cross-scale coupling point of view. Key physical processes to be studied are magnetic reconnection under various boundary conditions, shocks in space plasma, collisionless plasma mixing at the boundaries, and physics of current sheets embedded in complex magnetic geometries. The SCOPE formation is made up of 5 spacecraft and is put into the equatorial orbit with the apogee at 30 Re (Re: earth radius). One of the spacecraft is a large mother ship which is equipped with a full suite of particle detectors including ultra-high time resolution electron detector. Among other 4 small spacecraft, one remains near (∼10 km) the mother ship and the spacecraft-pair will focus on the electron-scale physics. Others at the distance of 100∼3000 km(electron∼ion spatial scales) from the mother ship will monitor plasma dynamics surrounding the mother-daughter pair. There is lively on-going discussion on Japan-Europe international collaboration (ESA's Cross-Scale), which would certainly make better the coverage over the scales of interest and thus make the success of the mission, i.e., clarifying the multi-scale nature of the Plasma Universe, to be attained at an even higher level.

  8. SCOPE: a scorecard for osteoporosis in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanis, J A; Borgström, F; Compston, J; Dreinhöfer, K; Nolte, E; Jonsson, L; Lems, W F; McCloskey, E V; Rizzoli, R; Stenmark, J

    2013-01-01

    The scorecard summarises key indicators of the burden of osteoporosis and its management in each of the member states of the European Union. The resulting scorecard elements were then assembled on a single sheet to provide a unique overview of osteoporosis in Europe. The scorecard for osteoporosis in Europe (SCOPE) is an independent project that seeks to raise awareness of osteoporosis care in Europe. The aim of this project was to develop a scorecard and background documents to draw attention to gaps and inequalities in the provision of primary and secondary prevention of fractures due to osteoporosis. The SCOPE panel reviewed the information available on osteoporosis and the resulting fractures for each of the 27 countries of the European Union (EU27). The information researched covered four domains: background information (e.g. the burden of osteoporosis and fractures), policy framework, service provision and service uptake e.g. the proportion of men and women at high risk that do not receive treatment (the treatment gap). There was a marked difference in fracture risk among the EU27. Of concern was the marked heterogeneity in the policy framework, service provision and service uptake for osteoporotic fracture that bore little relation to the fracture burden. For example, despite the wide availability of treatments to prevent fractures, in the majority of the EU27, only a minority of patients at high risk receive treatment for osteoporosis even after their first fracture. The elements of each domain in each country were scored and coded using a traffic light system (red, orange, green) and used to synthesise a scorecard. The resulting scorecard elements were then assembled on a single sheet to provide a unique overview of osteoporosis in Europe. The scorecard will enable healthcare professionals and policy makers to assess their country's general approach to the disease and provide indicators to inform future provision of healthcare.

  9. Scope selection and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guglielmi, F.

    2011-01-01

    OPG is preparing for a 4-unit refurbishment program at Darlington later in this decade. Key efforts underway include the selection of the right refurbishment scope that will allow Darlington to achieve top-decile performance post-refurbishment. For this to be possible, it is imperative that (1) plant/equipment condition be well understood, (2) post-refurbishment performance objectives be clearly defined, and (3) regulatory and other risks be carefully assessed and mitigated. Significant engineering, operations and maintenance support is required to complete this phase of the project cycle.

  10. Altered biodistribution of gallium-67 in a patient with multiple factors influencing iron-transport protein saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeon Young; Kim, Sang Eun; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [College of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    We present a case of a young female patient with fulminant hepatitis who showed an altered biodistribution of Ga-67, after being scanned twice at 10 month intervals. On initial scan, uptake of Ga-67 was increased in the liver, kidneys, and skeletons. Increased hepatic Ga-67 uptake may be explained by increased transferrin unbound Ga-67 that was taken up by the inflamed liver. The saturation of iron-binding proteins due to multiple transfusions may lead to increased renal and skeletal Ga-67 uptake. On follow-up scan hepatic Ga-67 uptake was markedly increased. Also increased Ga-67 uptake in the axial skeleton and normalized renal uptake were shown. The findings were consistent with iron deficiency anemia. This case demonstrates altered Ga-67 biodistribution associated with multiple transfusions, fulminant hepatitis, and iron deficiency anemia.

  11. Iron metabolism in mynah birds (Gracula religiosa) resembles human hereditary haemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mete, A; Hendriks, HG; Klaren, PHM; Dorrestein, GM; van Dijk, JE; Marx, JJM

    2003-01-01

    Iron overload is a very frequent finding in several animal species and a genetic predisposition is suggested. In one of the most commonly reported species with susceptibility for iron overload ( mynah bird), it was recently shown that the cause of this pathophysiology is high uptake and retention of

  12. Riboflavin Biosynthesis Is Associated with Assimilatory Ferric Reduction and Iron Acquisition by Campylobacter Jejuni.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaskin, D.J.H.; Holmes, K.; Mulholland, F.; Wells, J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the pathways involved in the acquisition of the essential metal iron by bacteria involves the reduction of insoluble Fe3+ to soluble Fe2+, followed by transport of Fe2+ to the cytoplasm. Flavins have been implicated as electron donors in this poorly understood process. Ferrous iron uptake is

  13. Mechanism and developmental changes in iron transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Evan H; Moos, Torben

    2002-01-01

    Transferrin and iron uptake by the brain were measured using [(59)Fe-(125)I]transferrin injected intravenously in rats aged from 15 days to 22 weeks. The values for both decreased with age. In rats aged 18 and 70 days the uptake was measured at short time intervals after the injection. When expressed as the volume of distribution (Vd), which represents the volume of plasma from which the transferrin and iron were derived, the results for iron were greater than those of transferrin as early as 7 min after injection and the difference increased rapidly with time, especially in the younger animals. A very similar time course was found for uptake by bone marrow (femurs) where iron uptake involves receptor-mediated endocytosis of Fe-transferrin, release of iron in the cell and recycling of apo-transferrin to the blood. It is concluded that, during transport of transferrin-bound plasma iron into the brain, a similar process occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and that transcytosis of transferrin into the brain interstitium is only a minor pathway. Also, the high rate of iron transport into the brain in young animals, when iron requirements are high due to rapid growth of the brain, is a consequence of the level of expression and rate of recycling of transferrin receptors on BCECs. As the animal and brain mature both decrease. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Root excretions in tobacco plants and possible implications on the Iron nutrition of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, A

    1969-01-01

    Several pieces of evidence indicate that riboflavin produced in roots and perhaps other compounds produced either in roots or in microorganisms can facilitate either or both the absorption and translocation of iron in higher plants. Riboflavin production and increased iron transport are characteristic of iron-deficient plants, both are decreased by nitrogen deficiency, both evidently can be regulated by a microorganism. When large amounts of iron was transported in the xylem exudate of tobacco, riboflavin was also. An excess of the chelating agent, EDTA, without iron seems to increase the iron uptake from an iron chelate, EDDHA. All these effects are probably related and knowledge of them may help solve iron deficiency problems in horticultural crops.

  15. Scoping Study: Networked Microgrids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinklei, Eddy; Parker, Gordon; Weaver, Wayne; Robinett, Rush; Babe Gauchia, Lucia; Ten, Chee-Wooi; Bower, Ward; Glover, Steven F.; Bukowski, Steve

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a scoping study for networked microgrids which are defined as "Interoperable groups of multiple Advanced Microgrids that become an integral part of the electricity grid while providing enhanced resiliency through self-healing, aggregated ancillary services, and real-time communication." They result in optimal electrical system configurations and controls whether grid-connected or in islanded modes and enable high penetrations of distributed and renewable energy resources. The vision for the purpose of this document is: "Networked microgrids seamlessly integrate with the electricity grid or other Electric Power Sources (EPS) providing cost effective, high quality, reliable, resilient, self-healing power delivery systems." Scoping Study: Networked Microgrids September 4, 2014 Eddy Trinklein, Michigan Technological University Gordon Parker, Michigan Technological University Wayne Weaver, Michigan Technological University Rush Robinett, Michigan Technological University Lucia Gauchia Babe, Michigan Technological University Chee-Wooi Ten, Michigan Technological University Ward Bower, Ward Bower Innovations LLC Steve Glover, Sandia National Laboratories Steve Bukowski, Sandia National Laboratories Prepared by Michigan Technological University Houghton, Michigan 49931 Michigan Technological University

  16. Paving a Path to Understanding Metabolic Responses to Iron Bioavailability: Global Proteomic Analysis of Crocosphaera watsonii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauglitz, J.; McIlvin, M. R.; Moran, D. M.; Waterbury, J. B.; Saito, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Marine diazotrophic cyanobacteria provide a key source of new nitrogen into the oceans and are important contributors to primary production. The geographic distribution of these cyanobacteria is impacted by available iron and phosphorus as well as environmental conditions such as temperature, however available iron concentrations are thought to be particularly critical due to the high demand for iron in cellular processes. Iron bioavailability and microorganismal adaptations to low iron environments may thus play a key role in dictating community structure, however the mechanisms by which cyanobacteria acquire iron and regulate its uptake are not well defined. In this study, the unicellular diazotroph, Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501, was acclimated to a range of bioavailable iron concentrations (from 0.001nM to 8.13nM Fe') using trace metal clean culturing techniques and the proteomes were analyzed by LC/MS-MS. Physiological and proteomic data indicate three distinct phenotypic ranges: iron-replete, iron-limited, and iron-starved. Trends in photosynthetic, carbon fixation and iron storage proteins across the iron gradient indicate that the C. watsonii proteome responds directly to iron availability. Further analysis of relative protein expression, which describes the physiological state of the cell, will lead to insights into how C. watsonii is able to adapt to iron-limited conditions and the resulting biogeochemical implications will be discussed.

  17. Roles of iron in the survival, growth, and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, F.D.

    1985-01-01

    The essentially of iron for living cells has long been recognized, and the availability of host-iron has been proposed as a contributing factor to virulence in bacterial, fungal, and protozoan infections. The mechanism by which legionella pneumophila causes disease is unknown. Growth of fresh clinical or environmental isolates in pure culture requires 20 times more iron than is needed for most other bacteria. Thus, increased plasma iron levels may be needed for multiplication within human hosts. It was observed that: (1) this organism can be more readily deprived of iron by iron binding agents than all other bacteria studied, and this inhibition can be reversed by the addition of iron; (2) normal human blood serum kills L. pneumophila and the bactericidal action is decreased when complement is inactivated or enough iron to saturate serum transferrin is added to the system; (3) in assays with a radioactive isotope of iron ( 55 Fe), no specific iron sequestering system was detected; (4) in analysis of outer membrane proteins with 55 Fe, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and autoradiography, no specific outer membrane proteins responsible for iron acquisition were observed; and (5) in assays for protease, iron does not stimulate production of extracellular proteases. These observations indicate that L. pneumophila has no specific iron uptake mechanism, but instead relies on passive diffusion and/or non-specific mechanisms to obtain its iron

  18. Potential of Phytase-Mediated Iron Release from Cereal-Based Foods: A Quantitative View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anne V. F.; Tetens, Inge; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    The major part of iron present in plant foods such as cereals is largely unavailable for direct absorption in humans due to complexation with the negatively charged phosphate groups of phytate (myo-inositol (1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate). Human biology has not evolved an efficient mechanism to naturally release iron from iron phytate complexes. This narrative review will evaluate the quantitative significance of phytase-catalysed iron release from cereal foods. In vivo studies have shown how addition of microbially derived phytases to cereal-based foods has produced increased iron absorption via enzyme-catalysed dephosphorylation of phytate, indicating the potential of this strategy for preventing and treating iron deficiency anaemia. Despite the immense promise of this strategy and the prevalence of iron deficiency worldwide, the number of human studies elucidating the significance of phytase-mediated improvements in iron absorption and ultimately in iron status in particularly vulnerable groups is still low. A more detailed understanding of (1) the uptake mechanism for iron released from partially dephosphorylated phytate chelates, (2) the affinity of microbially derived phytases towards insoluble iron phytate complexes, and (3) the extent of phytate dephosphorylation required for iron release from inositol phosphates is warranted. Phytase-mediated iron release can improve iron absorption from plant foods. There is a need for development of innovative strategies to obtain better effects. PMID:23917170

  19. Prion protein modulates glucose homeostasis by altering intracellular iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Ajay; Singh, Neena

    2018-04-26

    The prion protein (PrP C ), a mainly neuronal protein, is known to modulate glucose homeostasis in mouse models. We explored the underlying mechanism in mouse models and the human pancreatic β-cell line 1.1B4. We report expression of PrP C on mouse pancreatic β-cells, where it promoted uptake of iron through divalent-metal-transporters. Accordingly, pancreatic iron stores in PrP knockout mice (PrP -/- ) were significantly lower than wild type (PrP +/+ ) controls. Silencing of PrP C in 1.1B4 cells resulted in significant depletion of intracellular (IC) iron, and remarkably, upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT2 and insulin. Iron overloading, on the other hand, resulted in downregulation of GLUT2 and insulin in a PrP C -dependent manner. Similar observations were noted in the brain, liver, and neuroretina of iron overloaded PrP +/+ but not PrP -/- mice, indicating PrP C -mediated modulation of insulin and glucose homeostasis through iron. Peripheral challenge with glucose and insulin revealed blunting of the response in iron-overloaded PrP +/+ relative to PrP -/- mice, suggesting that PrP C -mediated modulation of IC iron influences both secretion and sensitivity of peripheral organs to insulin. These observations have implications for Alzheimer's disease and diabetic retinopathy, known complications of type-2-diabetes associated with brain and ocular iron-dyshomeostasis.

  20. Uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells for cell tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Christiane; Hodenius, Michael; Blendinger, Gitta; Sechi, Antonio; Hieronymus, Thomas; Mueller-Schulte, Detlef; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Zenke, Martin

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for future applications in nanotechnology is the functional integration of nano-sized materials into cellular structures. Here we investigated superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a lipid bilayer for uptake into cells and for targeting subcellular compartments. It was found that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are effectively taken up into cells and make cells acquire magnetic activity. Biotin-conjugated MNPs were further functionalized by binding of the fluorescent tag streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and, following uptake into cells, shown to confer magnetic activity and fluorescence labeling. Such FITC-MNPs were localized in the lysosomal compartment of cells which suggests a receptor-mediated uptake mechanism

  1. LABILE IRON IN CELLS AND BODY FLUIDS . Physiology, Pathology and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Ioav Cabantchik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In living systems iron appears predominantly associated with proteins, but can also be detected in forms referred as labile iron, which denotes the combined redox properties of iron and its amenability to exchange between ligands, including chelators. The labile cell iron (LCI composition varies with metal concentration and substances with chelating groups but also with pH and the redox potential. Although physiologically in the lower µM range, LCI plays a key role in cell iron economy as cross-roads of metabolic pathways. LCI levels are continually regulated by an iron-responsive machinery that balances iron uptake versus deposition into ferritin. However, LCI rises aberrantly in some cell types due to faulty cell utilization pathways or infiltration by pathological iron forms that are found in hemosiderotic plasma. As LCI attains pathological levels, it can catalyze reactive O species (ROS formation that, at particular threshold, can surpass cellular anti-oxidant capacities and seriously damage its constituents. While in normal plasma and interstitial fluids, virtually all iron is securely carried by circulating transferrin (that renders iron essentially non-labile, in systemic iron overload (IO, the total plasma iron binding capacity is often surpassed by a massive iron influx from hyperabsorptive gut or from erythrocyte overburdened spleen and/or liver. As plasma transferrin approaches iron saturation, labile plasma iron (LPI emerges in forms that can infiltrate cells by unregulated routes and raise LCI to toxic levels. Despite the limited knowledge available on LPI speciation in different types and degrees of iron overload, LPI measurements can be and are in fact used for identifying systemic IO and for initiating/adjusting chelation regimens to attain full-day LPI protection. A recent application of labile iron assay is the detection of labile components in iv iron formulations per se as well as in plasma (LPI following parenteral iron

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend changes to help you meet the recommended daily amount of iron. If you ... stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron levels, your doctor may ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... less Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... lose blood, you lose iron. Certain conditions or medicines can cause blood loss and lead to iron- ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments ... improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. ... red blood cells on hand, their bodies can store iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  18. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  19. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron ...

  7. Scope of strategic marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Frank

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing is a philosophy that leads to the process by which organizations, groups and individuals obtain what they need and want by identifying value, providing it, communicating it and delivering it to others. The core concepts of marketing are customers needs, wants and values; products, exchange, communications and relationships. Marketing is strategically concerned with the direction and scope of the long-term activities performed by the organization to obtain a competitive advantage. The organization applies its resources within a changing environment to satisfy customer needs while meeting stakeholder expectations. Implied in this view of strategic marketing is the requirement to develop a strategy to cope with competitors, identify market opportunities, develop and commercialize new products and services, allocate resources among marketing activities and design an appropriate organizational structure to ensure the perform once desired is achieved.

  8. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound is

  9. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound

  10. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  11. Uptake, translocation and transformation of antimony in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Fei; Ren, Jinghua; Tao, Shu; Wang, Xilong

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb), as a toxic metalloid, has been gaining increasing research concerns due mainly to its severe pollution in many places. Rice has been identified to be the dominant intake route of Sb by residents close to the Sb mining areas. A hydroponic experiment was conducted to investigate the difference in uptake, translocation and transformation of Sb in rice seedlings of four cultivars exposed to 0.2 or 1.0 mg/L of Sb(V). The results showed that mass concentration of iron plaque (mg/kg FW) formed at the root surfaces of cultivar N was the highest among all tested cultivars at both low and high exposure levels of Sb(V). The accumulated Sb concentration in iron plaque significantly increased with an increase in mass concentration of iron plaque formed at the rice root. The total amount of iron plaque (mg/pot) at rice root generally increased with increasing exposed Sb(V) concentration, which was closely associated with the increasing lipid peroxidation in roots. Concentration percentage of Sb in rice root significantly reduced as the corresponding value in the iron plaque increased, suggesting that iron plaque formation strongly suppressed uptake of Sb by rice root. Sb concentration in rice tissues followed an order: root > stem, leaf. The japonica rice (cultivars N and Z) exhibited a stronger translocation tendency of Sb from root to stem than indica hybrid rice (cultivars F and G). Translocation of Sb from root of cultivar F to its stem and leaf was sharply enhanced with increasing Sb exposure concentration. Sb(V) could be reduced to Sb(III) in rice tissues, especially in stems (10–26% of the total Sb). For the sake of food safety, the difference in uptake, translocation and transformation of Sb in rice species planted in Sb-contaminated soils should be taken into consideration. - Highlights: • Sb(V) caused lipid peroxidation and increased iron plaque formation at root surface. • The iron plaque may suppress uptake of Sb by rice. • Cultivars

  12. Actinide uptake by transferrin and ferritin metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Auwer, C.; Llorens, I.; Moisy, Ph.; Vidaud, C.; Goudard, F.; Barbot, C.; Solari, P.L.; Funke, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms of actinide uptake by specific biomolecules, it is essential to explore the intramolecular interactions between the cation and the protein binding site. Although this has long been done for widely investigated transition metals, very few studies have been devoted to complexation mechanisms of actinides by active chelation sites of metalloproteins. In this field, X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been extensively used as a structural and electronic metal cation probe. The two examples that are presented here are related to two metalloproteins in charge of iron transport and storage in eukaryote cells: transferrin and ferritin. U(VI)O 2 2+ , Np(IV) and Pu(IV) have been selected because of their possible role as contaminant from the geosphere. (orig.)

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  20. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  1. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  2. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bleeding or other abnormalities, such as growths or cancer of the lining of the colon. For this test, a ... that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  5. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  14. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency isn't corrected, it can lead to iron-deficiency anemia (a decrease in the number of red blood ... Parents Kids Teens Anemia Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegetarianism Menstrual Problems Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ... cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  17. Impairment of Interrelated Iron- and Copper Homeostatic Mechanisms in Brain Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin, all highly involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake, and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells that express various transporters. PMID:23055972

  18. Increased iron sequestration in alveolar macrophages in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Philippot

    Full Text Available Free iron in lung can cause the generation of reactive oxygen species, an important factor in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD pathogenesis. Iron accumulation has been implicated in oxidative stress in other diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, but little is known about iron accumulation in COPD. We sought to determine if iron content and the expression of iron transport and/or storage genes in lung differ between controls and COPD subjects, and whether changes in these correlate with airway obstruction. Explanted lung tissue was obtained from transplant donors, GOLD 2-3 COPD subjects, and GOLD 4 lung transplant recipients, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells were obtained from non-smokers, healthy smokers, and GOLD 1-3 COPD subjects. Iron-positive cells were quantified histologically, and the expression of iron uptake (transferrin and transferrin receptor, storage (ferritin and export (ferroportin genes was examined by real-time RT-PCR assay. Percentage of iron-positive cells and expression levels of iron metabolism genes were examined for correlations with airflow limitation indices (forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 and the ratio between FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC. The alveolar macrophage was identified as the predominant iron-positive cell type in lung tissues. Furthermore, the quantity of iron deposit and the percentage of iron positive macrophages were increased with COPD and emphysema severity. The mRNA expression of iron uptake and storage genes transferrin and ferritin were significantly increased in GOLD 4 COPD lungs compared to donors (6.9 and 3.22 fold increase, respectively. In BAL cells, the mRNA expression of transferrin, transferrin receptor and ferritin correlated with airway obstruction. These results support activation of an iron sequestration mechanism by alveolar macrophages in COPD, which we postulate is a protective mechanism against iron induced oxidative

  19. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  20. PfsR is a key regulator of iron homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cheng

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor in numerous cellular processes. The iron deficiency in the oceans affects the primary productivity of phytoplankton including cyanobacteria. In this study, we examined the function of PfsR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator, in iron homeostasis of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Compared with the wild type, the pfsR deletion mutant displayed stronger tolerance to iron limitation and accumulated significantly more chlorophyll a, carotenoid, and phycocyanin under iron-limiting conditions. The mutant also maintained more photosystem I and photosystem II complexes than the wild type after iron deprivation. In addition, the activities of photosystem I and photosystem II were much higher in pfsR deletion mutant than in wild-type cells under iron-limiting conditions. The transcripts of pfsR were enhanced by iron limitation and inactivation of the gene affected pronouncedly expression of fut genes (encoding a ferric iron transporter, feoB (encoding a ferrous iron transporter, bfr genes (encoding bacterioferritins, ho genes (encoding heme oxygenases, isiA (encoding a chlorophyll-binding protein, and furA (encoding a ferric uptake regulator. The iron quota in pfsR deletion mutant cells was higher than in wild-type cells both before and after exposure to iron limitation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that PfsR bound to its own promoter and thereby auto-regulated its own expression. These data suggest that PfsR is a critical regulator of iron homeostasis.

  1. Exosomes: Mechanisms of Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. McKelvey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 30–100 nm microvesicles which contain complex cellular signals of RNA, protein and lipids. Because of this, exosomes are implicated as having limitless therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer, pregnancy complications, infections, and autoimmune diseases. To date we know a considerable amount about exosome biogenesis and secretion, but there is a paucity of data regarding the uptake of exosomes by immune and non-immune cell types (e.g., cancer cells and the internal signalling pathways by which these exosomes elicit a cellular response. Answering these questions is of paramount importance.

  2. Exosomes: Mechanisms of Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J. McKelvey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 30–100 nm microvesicles which contain complex cellular signals of RNA, protein and lipids. Because of this, exosomes are implicated as having limitless therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer, pregnancy complications, infections, and autoimmune diseases. To date we know a considerable amount about exosome biogenesis and secretion, but there is a paucity of data regarding the uptake of exosomes by immune and non- immune cell types (e.g., cancer cells and the internal signalling pathways by which these exosomes elicit a cellular response. Answering these questions is of para‐ mount importance.

  3. Phototrophs in high-iron-concentration microbial mats: physiological ecology of phototrophs in an iron-depositing hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, B. K.; Parenteau, M. N.; Griffin, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of photosynthetic activity on the oxygen content and the pH in the mat and sediment microenvironments. Photosynthesis increased the oxygen concentration to 200% of air saturation levels in the top millimeter of the mats. The oxygen concentration decreased with depth and in the dark. Light-dependent increases in pH were observed. The penetration of light in the mats and in the sediments was determined. Visible radiation was rapidly attenuated in the top 2 mm of the iron-rich mats. Near-infrared radiation penetrated deeper. Iron was totally oxidized in the top few millimeters, but reduced iron was detected at greater depths. By increasing the pH and the oxygen concentration in the surface sediments, the cyanobacteria could potentially increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ. This high-iron-content hot spring provides a suitable model for studying the interactions of microbial photosynthesis and iron deposition and the role of photosynthesis in microbial iron cycling. This model may help clarify the potential role of photosynthesis in the deposition of Precambrian banded iron formations.

  4. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D.; Costa, Max

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  5. Microbial iron management mechanisms in extremely acidic environments: comparative genomics evidence for diversity and versatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an essential nutrient but can be toxic at high intracellular concentrations and organisms have evolved tightly regulated mechanisms for iron uptake and homeostasis. Information on iron management mechanisms is available for organisms living at circumneutral pH. However, very little is known about how acidophilic bacteria, especially those used for industrial copper bioleaching, cope with environmental iron loads that can be 1018 times the concentration found in pH neutral environments. This study was motivated by the need to fill this lacuna in knowledge. An understanding of how microorganisms thrive in acidic ecosystems with high iron loads requires a comprehensive investigation of the strategies to acquire iron and to coordinate this acquisition with utilization, storage and oxidation of iron through metal responsive regulation. In silico prediction of iron management genes and Fur regulation was carried out for three Acidithiobacilli: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (iron and sulfur oxidizer A. thiooxidans and A. caldus (sulfur oxidizers that can live between pH 1 and pH 5 and for three strict iron oxidizers of the Leptospirillum genus that live at pH 1 or below. Results Acidithiobacilli have predicted FeoB-like Fe(II and Nramp-like Fe(II-Mn(II transporters. They also have 14 different TonB dependent ferri-siderophore transporters of diverse siderophore affinity, although they do not produce classical siderophores. Instead they have predicted novel mechanisms for dicitrate synthesis and possibly also for phosphate-chelation mediated iron uptake. It is hypothesized that the unexpectedly large number and diversity of Fe(III-uptake systems confers versatility to this group of acidophiles, especially in higher pH environments (pH 4–5 where soluble iron may not be abundant. In contrast, Leptospirilla have only a FtrI-Fet3P-like permease and three TonB dependent ferri-dicitrate siderophore systems. This paucity of iron

  6. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  7. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem, E-mail: aesmaeili@sci.ui.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-15

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  8. Siderophore production by pathogenic mucorales and uptake of deferoxamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, Gérald; Dias, Marylène; Razafimandimby, Bienvenue; Bomal, Danielle; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Clinical reports have established that mucormycosis, mainly caused by Rhizopus spp., frequently occurs in patients treated with deferoxamine B (DFO, Desferal(®)) which is misappropriated by these fungi. Siderophore production by twenty mucoralean isolates was therefore investigated using a commercial iron-depleted culture medium. Siderophore production was detected for most of the isolates. Our experiments confirmed that feroxamine B (iron chelate of DFO) promoted in vitro growth of Rhizopus arrhizus. Electrophoretic analysis of somatic extracts revealed iron-regulated proteins of 60 and 32 kDa which were lacking in iron-depleted culture conditions. Using a fluorescent derivative of deferoxamine B, we showed by fluorescence microscopy the entry of the siderophore within the fungal cells, thus suggesting a shuttle mechanism encompassing the uptake of the entire siderophore-ion complex into the cell. This useful tool renders possible a better understanding of iron metabolism in Mucorales which could lead to the development of new diagnostic method or new antifungal therapy using siderophores as imaging contrast agents or active drug vectors.

  9. Thyroid Uptake Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Duc Tuan; Nguyen Thi Bao My; Nguyen Van Sy

    2007-01-01

    The NED-UP.M7 is a complete thyroid uptake and analysis system specifically designed for nuclear medicine. Capable of performing a full range of studies this system provides fast, accurate results for Uptake Studies. The heart of the NED-UP.M7 is a microprocessor-controlled 2048 channel Compact Multi-Channel Analyzer, coupled to a 2 inch x 2 inch NaI(Tl) detector with a USB personal computer interface. The system offers simple, straight-forward operation using pre-programmed isotopes, and menudriven prompts to guide the user step by step through each procedure. The pre-programmed radionuclides include I-123, I-125, I-131, Tc-99m and Cs-137. The user-defined radionuclides also allow for isotope identification while the printer provides hard copy printouts for patient and department record keeping. The included software program running on PC (Windows XP-based) is a user friendly program with menudriven and graphic interface for easy controlling the system and managing measurement results of patient on Excel standard form. (author)

  10. SCOPE, Shipping Cask Optimization and Parametric Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    number (1-25) of 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 7-, or 10-year-old PWR spent fuel assemblies. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The key physical features of those casks considered by the SCOPE code include: an inner steel shell, a gamma-ray shield, an outer steel shell, a neutron shield, and an outside barrel. Depending on the amount of decay heat that must be dissipated, the cask(s) may or may not have circumferential fins. Inside the cask(s), the spent fuel assemblies (or canisters) may be separated by means of an aluminium or copper insert. It is assumed that the spent fuel is to be shipped dry (i.e., casks with forced circulation cooling systems are not considered). Lead, iron, or uranium metal may be specified as the gamma-ray shielding material, while the neutron shield is always assumed to be a common mixture of water and ethylene glycol containing approximately 1 wt% boron

  11. Recycled iron fuels new production in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Patrick A; Sigman, Daniel M; Mackey, Katherine R M

    2017-10-24

    Nitrate persists in eastern equatorial Pacific surface waters because phytoplankton growth fueled by nitrate (new production) is limited by iron. Nitrate isotope measurements provide a new constraint on the controls of surface nitrate concentration in this region and allow us to quantify the degree and temporal variability of nitrate consumption. Here we show that nitrate consumption in these waters cannot be fueled solely by the external supply of iron to these waters, which occurs by upwelling and dust deposition. Rather, a substantial fraction of nitrate consumption must be supported by the recycling of iron within surface waters. Given plausible iron recycling rates, seasonal variability in nitrate concentration on and off the equator can be explained by upwelling rate, with slower upwelling allowing for more cycles of iron regeneration and uptake. The efficiency of iron recycling in the equatorial Pacific implies the evolution of ecosystem-level mechanisms for retaining iron in surface ocean settings where it limits productivity.

  12. Iron-dependent gene expression in Actinomyces oris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Mulé

    2015-12-01

    Results: When A. oris was grown under iron-limiting conditions, the genes encoding iron/siderophore transporters fetA and sidD showed increased expression. One of these genes (sidD was mutated, and the sidD::Km strain exhibited a 50% reduction in growth in late log and stationary phase cells in media that contained iron. This growth defect was restored when the sidD gene was provided in a complemented strain. We were able to isolate the AmdR-encoding gene in seven clinical isolates of Actinomyces. When these protein sequences were aligned to the laboratory strain, there was a high degree of sequence similarity. Conclusions: The growth of the sidD::Km mutant in iron-replete medium mirrored the growth of the wild-type strain grown in iron-limiting medium, suggesting that the sidD::Km mutant was compromised in iron uptake. The known iron regulator AmdR is well conserved in clinical isolates of A. oris. This work provides additional insight into iron metabolism in this important oral microbe.

  13. Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in the brain: implications for a role in iron transport at the blood-brain barrier, and neuronal and glial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Burkhart, Annette; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Iron is required in a variety of essential processes in the body. In this review, we focus on iron transport in the brain and the role of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) vital for iron uptake in most cells. DMT1 locates to cellular membranes and endosomal membranes, where it is a key player in non-transferrin bound iron uptake and transferrin-bound iron uptake, respectively. Four isoforms of DMT1 exist, and their respective characteristics involve a complex cell-specific regulatory machinery all controlling iron transport across these membranes. This complexity reflects the fine balance required in iron homeostasis, as this metal is indispensable in many cell functions but highly toxic when appearing in excess. DMT1 expression in the brain is prominent in neurons. Of serious dispute is the expression of DMT1 in non-neuronal cells. Recent studies imply that DMT1 does exist in endosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells denoting the blood-brain barrier. This supports existing evidence that iron uptake at the BBB occurs by means of transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis followed by detachment of iron from transferrin inside the acidic compartment of the endosome and DMT1-mediated pumping iron into the cytosol. The subsequent iron transport across the abluminal membrane into the brain likely occurs by ferroportin. The virtual absent expression of transferrin receptors and DMT1 in glial cells, i.e., astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes, suggest that the steady state uptake of iron in glia is much lower than in neurons and/or other mechanisms for iron uptake in these cell types prevail.

  14. Networked Microgrids Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dobriansky, Larisa [General MicroGrids, San Diego, CA (United States); Glover, Steve [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, Chen-Ching [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Looney, Patrick [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mashayekh, Salman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pratt, Annabelle [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schneider, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stadler, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Starke, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Jianhui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yue, Meng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-05

    Much like individual microgrids, the range of opportunities and potential architectures of networked microgrids is very diverse. The goals of this scoping study are to provide an early assessment of research and development needs by examining the benefits of, risks created by, and risks to networked microgrids. At this time there are very few, if any, examples of deployed microgrid networks. In addition, there are very few tools to simulate or otherwise analyze the behavior of networked microgrids. In this setting, it is very difficult to evaluate networked microgrids systematically or quantitatively. At this early stage, this study is relying on inputs, estimations, and literature reviews by subject matter experts who are engaged in individual microgrid research and development projects, i.e., the authors of this study The initial step of the study gathered input about the potential opportunities provided by networked microgrids from these subject matter experts. These opportunities were divided between the subject matter experts for further review. Part 2 of this study is comprised of these reviews. Part 1 of this study is a summary of the benefits and risks identified in the reviews in Part 2 and synthesis of the research needs required to enable networked microgrids.

  15. Aerodynamic Drag Scoping Work.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voskuilen, Tyler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erickson, Lindsay Crowl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knaus, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    This memo summarizes the aerodynamic drag scoping work done for Goodyear in early FY18. The work is to evaluate the feasibility of using Sierra/Low-Mach (Fuego) for drag predictions of rolling tires, particularly focused on the effects of tire features such as lettering, sidewall geometry, rim geometry, and interaction with the vehicle body. The work is broken into two parts. Part 1 consisted of investigation of a canonical validation problem (turbulent flow over a cylinder) using existing tools with different meshes and turbulence models. Part 2 involved calculating drag differences over plate geometries with simple features (ridges and grooves) defined by Goodyear of approximately the size of interest for a tire. The results of part 1 show the level of noise to be expected in a drag calculation and highlight the sensitivity of absolute predictions to model parameters such as mesh size and turbulence model. There is 20-30% noise in the experimental measurements on the canonical cylinder problem, and a similar level of variation between different meshes and turbulence models. Part 2 shows that there is a notable difference in the predicted drag on the sample plate geometries, however, the computational cost of extending the LES model to a full tire would be significant. This cost could be reduced by implementation of more sophisticated wall and turbulence models (e.g. detached eddy simulations - DES) and by focusing the mesh refinement on feature subsets with the goal of comparing configurations rather than absolute predictivity for the whole tire.

  16. The fuel cycle scoping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, G.D.; Malone, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Scoping System (FCSS) was created to fill the need for a scoping tool which provides the utilities with the ability to quickly evaluate alternative fuel management strategies, tails assay choices, fuel fabrication quotes, fuel financing alternatives, fuel cycle schedules, and other fuel cycle perturbations. The FCSS was specifically designed for PC's that support dBASE-III(TM), a relational data base software system by Ashton-Tate. However, knowledge of dBASE-III is not necessary in order to utilize the FCSS. The FCSS is menu driven and can be utilized as a teaching tool as well as a scoping tool

  17. Cell tagging with clinically approved iron oxides: feasibility and effect of lipofection, particle size, and surface coating on labeling efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewski, Lars; Persigehl, Thorsten; Wall, Alexander; Schwindt, Wolfram; Tombach, Bernd; Fobker, Manfred; Poremba, Christopher; Ebert, Wolfgang; Heindel, Walter; Bremer, Christoph

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of lipofection, particle size, and surface coating on labeling efficiency of mammalian cells with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs). Institutional Review Board approval was not required. Different human cell lines (lung and breast cancer, fibrosarcoma, leukocytes) were tagged by using carboxydextran-coated SPIOs of various hydrodynamic diameters (17-65 nm) and a dextran-coated iron oxide (150 nm). Cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of iron (0.01-1.00 mg of iron [Fe] per milliliter), including or excluding a transfection medium (TM). Cellular iron uptake was analyzed qualitatively at light and electron microscopy and was quantified at atomic emission spectroscopy. Cell visibility was assessed with gradient- and spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Effects of iron concentration in the medium and of lipofection on cellular SPIO uptake were analyzed with analysis of variance and two-tailed Student t test, respectively. Iron oxide uptake increased in a dose-dependent manner with higher iron concentrations in the medium. The TM significantly increased the iron load of cells (up to 2.6-fold, P .05). As few as 10 000 cells could be detected with clinically available MR techniques by using this approach. Lipofection-based cell tagging is a simple method for efficient cell labeling with clinically approved iron oxide-based contrast agents. Large particle size and carboxydextran coating are preferable for cell tagging with endocytosis- and lipofection-based methods. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  18. FedScope Accessions Cubes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — This raw data set provides the actual number of personnel actions ("Transfer-Ins" and "New Hires") that have taken place within a Fiscal Year. The scope of this raw...

  19. Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope is the collection of weather radar imagery for the period prior to the beginning of the Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) system...

  20. Iron Acquisition in Bacillus cereus: The Roles of IlsA and Bacillibactin in Exogenous Ferritin Iron Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Christophe; Daou, Nadine; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Arosio, Paolo; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Nielsen Le Roux, Christina

    2014-01-01

    In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A) binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24550730

  1. Iron acquisition in Bacillus cereus: the roles of IlsA and bacillibactin in exogenous ferritin iron mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Segond

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis.

  2. Overexpression of Arabidopsis VIT1 increases accumulation of iron in cassava roots and stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Narayanan; Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Gaitán-Solis, Eliana; Grusak, Michael A; Taylor, Nigel; Anderson, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Iron is extremely abundant in the soil, but its uptake in plants is limited due to low solubility in neutral or alkaline soils. Plants can rely on rhizosphere acidification to increase iron solubility. AtVIT1 was previously found to be involved in mediating vacuolar sequestration of iron, which indicates a potential application for iron biofortification in crop plants. Here, we have overexpressed AtVIT1 in the starchy root crop cassava using a patatin promoter. Under greenhouse conditions, iron levels in mature cassava storage roots showed 3-4 times higher values when compared with wild-type plants. Significantly, the expression of AtVIT1 showed a positive correlation with the increase in iron concentration of storage roots. Conversely, young leaves of AtVIT1 transgenic plants exhibit characteristics of iron deficiency such as interveinal chlorosis of leaves (yellowing) and lower iron concentration when compared with the wild type plants. Interestingly, the AtVIT1 transgenic plants showed 4 and 16 times higher values of iron concentration in the young stem and stem base tissues, respectively. AtVIT1 transgenic plants also showed 2-4 times higher values of iron content when compared with wild-type plants, with altered partitioning of iron between source and sink tissues. These results demonstrate vacuolar iron sequestration as a viable transgenic strategy to biofortify crops and to help eliminate micronutrient malnutrition in at-risk human populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Silicate reduces cadmium uptake into cells of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greger, Maria; Kabir, Ahmad H.; Landberg, Tommy; Maity, Pooja J.; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a health threat all over the world and high Cd content in wheat causes high Cd intake. Silicon (Si) decreases cadmium content in wheat grains and shoot. This work investigates whether and how silicate (Si) influences cadmium (Cd) uptake at the cellular level in wheat. Wheat seedlings were grown in the presence or absence of Si with or without Cd. Cadmium, Si, and iron (Fe) accumulation in roots and shoots was analysed. Leaf protoplasts from plants grown without Cd were investigated for Cd uptake in the presence or absence of Si using the fluorescent dye, Leadmium Green AM. Roots and shoots of plants subjected to all four treatments were investigated regarding the expression of genes involved in the Cd uptake across the plasma membrane (i.e. LCT1) and efflux of Cd into apoplasm or vacuole from the cytosol (i.e. HMA2). In addition, phytochelatin (PC) content and PC gene (PCS1) expression were analysed. Expression of iron and metal transporter genes (IRT1 and NRAMP1) were also analysed. Results indicated that Si reduced Cd accumulation in plants, especially in shoot. Si reduced Cd transport into the cytoplasm when Si was added both directly during the uptake measurements and to the growth medium. Silicate downregulated LCT1 and HMA2 and upregulated PCS1. In addition, Si enhanced PC formation when Cd was present. The IRT1 gene, which was downregulated by Cd was upregulated by Si in root and shoot facilitating Fe transport in wheat. NRAMP1 was similarly expressed, though the effect was limited to roots. This work is the first to show how Si influences Cd uptake on the cellular level. - Highlights: • Si decreases accumulation and translocation of Cd in plants at tissue level. • This work is the first to show how Si influences Cd uptake. • Si decreases Cd uptake into cell and downregulates heavy metal transporter LCT1. • Si downregulates HMA2 transporter, which regulates Cd transport from root to shoot. • Si increases phytochelatin formation

  4. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  6. Milk peptides increase iron solubility in water but do not affect DMT-1 expression in Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro digestion of milk produces peptide fractions that enhance iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our objectives were to investigate whether these fractions a) exert their effect by increasing relative gene expression of DMT-1 in Caco-2 cells b) enhance iron dialyzability when added in meals. Peptid...

  7. Comparative biogeochemical behaviors of iron-55 and stable iron in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimer, W.C.; Langford, J.C.; Jenkins, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric aerosols have demonstrated that much of the 55 Fe associated with the aerosol input to the oceans is present as either an amorphous or hydrous iron oxide or as very small particulate species attached to the surfaces of the large aerosol particles. By comparison, nearly all of the stable iron is bound in the mineral phase of aerosol particles. This difference in the chemical and physical forms of the radioactive and stable iron isotopes results in the 55 Fe being more biologically available than is the stable iron. This difference in availability is responsible for the transfer of a much higher specific activity 55 Fe to certain ocean organisms and man relative to the specific activity of the total aerosol or of sea water. This differential biological uptake of the radioactive element and its stable element counterpart points out that natural levels of stable elements in the marine environment may not effectively dilute radioelements or other stable elements of anthropogenic sources. The effectiveness of dilution by natural sources depends on the chemical and physical forms of the materials in both the source terms and the receiving environments. The large difference in specific activities of 55 Fe in aerosols and sea water relative to ocean organisms reflects the independent behaviors of 55 Fe and stable iron

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  9. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–. Langalata iron ore ...... sure to sea water. Uranium in these samples varies ..... Ce oxidation and removal (Elderfield and Greaves. 1982; De Baar et ...

  10. Increased bone marrow uptake of gallium-67 in patients with fever of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, L.G.; Jinnouchi, S.; Nagamachi, S.; Ohnishi, T.; Futami, S.; Watanabe, K.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose of the study: we studied the relationships of clinical diagnosis, the effect of blood chemistry and the clinical implication of increased gallium-67 in the bone marrow of patients presenting signs and symptoms of FUO. Materials and Methods: Based on intensity of gallium-67 uptake in bone marrow, patients were classified as follows: Type 1 when there is no evidence or very faint bone marrow uptake in vertebrae, Type 2 when mild to moderate, Type 3 when uptake is severe. The relationships of white blood cell count (WBC), hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit count, serum iron and unsaturated iron biding capacity (UIBC) with the occurrence of increased bone marrow uptake in the different groups were noted. Analysis of variance with Fishers Protected Least Significant Difference was used. A.p. value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The results showed significant differences between Types 1 and 2 and between Type 1 and 3 for WBC counts, serum hemoglobin and serum hematocrit level. Serum iron concentration and UIBC however, did not show any significant differences. Conclusion: Significant changes in WBC count, Hb concentration and Hct count in FUO patients were accompanied by varying intensity of gallium-67 uptake in the bone marrow. (author)

  11. Interactions between iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex and commonly used medications / laboratory studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Felix; Canclini, Camillo; Geisser, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Simple iron salts, such as iron sulphate, often interact with food and other medications reducing bioavailability and tolerability. Iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex (IPC, Maltofer) provides a soluble form of non-ionic iron, making it an ideal form of oral iron supplementation. The physicochemical properties of IPC predict a low potential for interactions. The effects of co-administration with aluminium hydroxide (CAS 21645-51-2), acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2), bromazepam (CAS 1812-30-2), calcium acetate (CAS 62-54-4), calcium carbonate (CAS 471-34-1), auranofin (CAS 34031-32-8), magnesium-L-aspartate hydrochloride (CAS 28184-71-6), methyldopa sesquihydrate (CAS 41372-08-1), paracetamol (CAS 103-90-2), penicillamine (CAS 52-67-5), sulfasalazine (CAS 599-79-1), tetracycline hydrochloride (CAS 64-75-5), calcium phosphate (CAS 7757-93-9) in combination with vitamin D3 (CAS 67-97-0), and a multi-vitamin preparation were tested in rats fed an iron-deficient diet. Uptake of iron from radiolabelled IPC with and without concomitant medications was compared. None of the medicines tested had a significant effect on iron uptake. Iron-59 retrieval from blood and major storage organs was 64-76% for IPC alone compared with 59-85% following co-administration with other medications. It is concluded that, under normal clinical conditions, IPC does not interact with these medications.

  12. Radioiodine uptake measurements in thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadireshn, A.; Kapur, S.C.; Samuel, J.R.; Mahajan, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluation of thyroid function can be carried out by measuring the uptake of orally administered radioactive iodine. The results of the thyroid uptake measurements for the period 1982-1987 in Christian Medical College, Ludhiana are presented here. About 3000 patients were screened during the analysis period. (author)

  13. Aquaporins and root water uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water is one of the most critical resources limiting plant growth and crop productivity, and root water uptake is an important aspect of plant physiology governing plant water use and stress tolerance. Pathways of root water uptake are complex and are affected by root structure and physiological res...

  14. Uptake of nuclides by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greger, Maria

    2004-04-01

    This review on plant uptake of elements has been prepared to demonstrate how plants take up different elements. The work discusses the nutrient elements, as well as the general uptake and translocation in plants, both via roots and by foliar absorption. Knowledge of the uptake by the various elements within the periodic system is then reviewed. The work also discusses transfer factors (TF) as well as difficulties using TF to understand the uptake by plants. The review also focuses on species differences. Knowledge necessary to understand and calculate plant influence on radionuclide recirculation in the environment is discussed, in which the plant uptake of a specific nuclide and the fate of that nuclide in the plant must be understood. Plants themselves determine the uptake, the soil/sediment determines the availability of the nuclides and the nuclides themselves can interact with each other, which also influences the uptake. Consequently, it is not possible to predict the nuclide uptake in plants by only analysing the nuclide concentration of the soil/substrate

  15. Uptake of nuclides by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greger, Maria [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Botany

    2004-04-01

    This review on plant uptake of elements has been prepared to demonstrate how plants take up different elements. The work discusses the nutrient elements, as well as the general uptake and translocation in plants, both via roots and by foliar absorption. Knowledge of the uptake by the various elements within the periodic system is then reviewed. The work also discusses transfer factors (TF) as well as difficulties using TF to understand the uptake by plants. The review also focuses on species differences. Knowledge necessary to understand and calculate plant influence on radionuclide recirculation in the environment is discussed, in which the plant uptake of a specific nuclide and the fate of that nuclide in the plant must be understood. Plants themselves determine the uptake, the soil/sediment determines the availability of the nuclides and the nuclides themselves can interact with each other, which also influences the uptake. Consequently, it is not possible to predict the nuclide uptake in plants by only analysing the nuclide concentration of the soil/substrate.

  16. Genome-Wide Search for Genes Required for Bifidobacterial Growth under Iron-Limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Noreen; Bottacini, Francesca; Casey, Pat G.; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria evolved over millennia in the presence of the vital micronutrient iron. Iron is involved in numerous processes within the cell and is essential for nearly all living organisms. The importance of iron to the survival of bacteria is obvious from the large variety of mechanisms by which iron may be acquired from the environment. Random mutagenesis and global gene expression profiling led to the identification of a number of genes, which are essential for Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 survival under iron-restrictive conditions. These genes encode, among others, Fe-S cluster-associated proteins, a possible ferric iron reductase, a number of cell wall-associated proteins, and various DNA replication and repair proteins. In addition, our study identified several presumed iron uptake systems which were shown to be essential for B. breve UCC2003 growth under conditions of either ferric and/or ferrous iron chelation. Of these, two gene clusters encoding putative iron-uptake systems, bfeUO and sifABCDE, were further characterised, indicating that sifABCDE is involved in ferrous iron transport, while the bfeUO-encoded transport system imports both ferrous and ferric iron. Transcription studies showed that bfeUO and sifABCDE constitute two separate transcriptional units that are induced upon dipyridyl-mediated iron limitation. In the anaerobic gastrointestinal environment ferrous iron is presumed to be of most relevance, though a mutation in the sifABCDE cluster does not affect B. breve UCC2003's ability to colonise the gut of a murine model. PMID:28620359

  17. Genome-Wide Search for Genes Required for Bifidobacterial Growth under Iron-Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreen Lanigan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria evolved over millennia in the presence of the vital micronutrient iron. Iron is involved in numerous processes within the cell and is essential for nearly all living organisms. The importance of iron to the survival of bacteria is obvious from the large variety of mechanisms by which iron may be acquired from the environment. Random mutagenesis and global gene expression profiling led to the identification of a number of genes, which are essential for Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 survival under iron-restrictive conditions. These genes encode, among others, Fe-S cluster-associated proteins, a possible ferric iron reductase, a number of cell wall-associated proteins, and various DNA replication and repair proteins. In addition, our study identified several presumed iron uptake systems which were shown to be essential for B. breve UCC2003 growth under conditions of either ferric and/or ferrous iron chelation. Of these, two gene clusters encoding putative iron-uptake systems, bfeUO and sifABCDE, were further characterised, indicating that sifABCDE is involved in ferrous iron transport, while the bfeUO-encoded transport system imports both ferrous and ferric iron. Transcription studies showed that bfeUO and sifABCDE constitute two separate transcriptional units that are induced upon dipyridyl-mediated iron limitation. In the anaerobic gastrointestinal environment ferrous iron is presumed to be of most relevance, though a mutation in the sifABCDE cluster does not affect B. breve UCC2003's ability to colonise the gut of a murine model.

  18. Subject categories and scope descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is one in a series of publications known as the ETDE/INIS Joint Reference Series. It defines the subject categories and provides the scope descriptions to be used for categorization of the nuclear literature for the preparation of INIS and ETDE input by national and regional centres. Together with the other volumes of the INIS Reference Series it defines the rules, standards and practices and provides the authorities to be used in the International Nuclear Information System and ETDE. A complete list of the volumes published in the INIS Reference Series may be found on the inside front cover of this publication. This INIS/ETDE Reference Series document is intended to serve two purposes: to define the subject scope of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and to define the subject classification scheme of INIS and ETDE. It is thus the guide to the inputting centres in determining which items of literature should be reported, and in determining where the full bibliographic entry and abstract of each item should be included in INIS or ETDE database. Each category is identified by a category code consisting of three alphanumeric characters. A scope description is given for each subject category. The scope of INIS is the sum of the scopes of all the categories. With most categories cross references are provided to other categories where appropriate. Cross references should be of assistance in finding the appropriate category; in fact, by indicating topics that are excluded from the category in question, the cross references help to clarify and define the scope of the category to which they are appended. A Subject Index is included as an aid to subject classifiers, but it is only an aid and not a means for subject classification. It facilitates the use of this document, but is no substitute for the description of the scope of the subject categories

  19. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, T

    2018-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy with a hypochromic microcytic anaemia, refractory to oral iron treatment. After exclusion of dietary and gastrointestinal causes of iron deficiency, a genetic cause for iron deficiency was confirmed by finding two mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, consistent with a diagnosis of iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA).

  20. The iron-responsive microsomal proteome of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Nicola M; Owens, Rebecca A; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Dolan, Stephen K; Mulvihill, Eoin; Clynes, Martin; Doyle, Sean

    2016-03-16

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen. Siderophore biosynthesis and iron acquisition are essential for virulence. Yet, limited data exist with respect to the adaptive nature of the fungal microsomal proteome under iron-limiting growth conditions, as encountered during host infection. Here, we demonstrate that under siderophore biosynthetic conditions--significantly elevated fusarinine C (FSC) and triacetylfusarinine C (TAFC) production (pproteome remodelling occurs. Specifically, a four-fold enrichment of transmembrane-containing proteins was observed with respect to whole cell lysates following ultracentrifugation-based microsomal extraction. Comparative label-free proteomic analysis of microsomal extracts, isolated following iron-replete and -deplete growth, identified 710 unique proteins. Scatterplot analysis (MaxQuant) demonstrated high correlation amongst biological replicates from each growth condition (Pearson correlation >0.96 within groups; biological replicates (n=4)). Quantitative and qualitative comparison revealed 231 proteins with a significant change in abundance between the iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions (pAspergillus fumigatus must acquire iron to facilitate growth and pathogenicity. Iron-chelating non-ribosomal peptides, termed siderophores, mediate iron uptake via membrane-localised transporter proteins. Here we demonstrate for the first time that growth of A. fumigatus under iron-deplete conditions, concomitant with siderophore biosynthesis, leads to an extensive remodelling of the microsomal proteome which includes significantly altered levels of 231 constituent proteins (96 increased and 135 decreased in abundance), many of which have not previously been localised to the microsome. We also demonstrate the first synthesis of a fluorescent version of fusarinine C, an extracellular A. fumigatus siderophore, and its uptake and localization under iron-restricted conditions. This infers the use of an A. fumigatus

  1. Two-Component Signaling System VgrRS Directly Senses Extracytoplasmic and Intracellular Iron to Control Bacterial Adaptation under Iron Depleted Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both iron starvation and excess are detrimental to cellular life, especially for animal and plant pathogens since they always live in iron-limited environments produced by host immune responses. However, how organisms sense and respond to iron is incompletely understood. Herein, we reveal that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, VgrS (also named ColS is a membrane-bound receptor histidine kinase that senses extracytoplasmic iron limitation in the periplasm, while its cognate response regulator, VgrR (ColR, detects intracellular iron excess. Under iron-depleted conditions, dissociation of Fe3+ from the periplasmic sensor region of VgrS activates the VgrS autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphotransfer to VgrR, an OmpR-family transcription factor that regulates bacterial responses to take up iron. VgrR-VgrS regulon and the consensus DNA binding motif of the transcription factor VgrR were dissected by comparative proteomic and ChIP-seq analyses, which revealed that in reacting to iron-depleted environments, VgrR directly or indirectly controls the expressions of hundreds of genes that are involved in various physiological cascades, especially those associated with iron-uptake. Among them, we demonstrated that the phosphorylated VgrR tightly represses the transcription of a special TonB-dependent receptor gene, tdvA. This regulation is a critical prerequisite for efficient iron uptake and bacterial virulence since activation of tdvA transcription is detrimental to these processes. When the intracellular iron accumulates, the VgrR-Fe2+ interaction dissociates not only the binding between VgrR and the tdvA promoter, but also the interaction between VgrR and VgrS. This relieves the repression in tdvA transcription to impede continuous iron uptake and avoids possible toxic effects of excessive iron accumulation. Our results revealed a signaling system that directly senses both extracytoplasmic and intracellular

  2. Sodium nitroprusside may modulate Escherichia coli antioxidant enzyme expression by interacting with the ferric uptake regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, R; Danielson, D; Gong, V; Olynik, B; Eze, M O

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to explore possible relationships between nitric oxide (NO) and antioxidant enzymes in an Escherichia coli model have uncovered a possible interaction between sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a potent, NO-donating drug, and the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an iron(II)--dependent regulator of antioxidant and iron acquisition proteins present in Gram-negative bacteria. The enzymatic profiles of superoxide dismutase and hydroperoxidase during logarithmic phase of growth were studied via non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and activity staining specific to each enzyme. Though NO is known to induce transcription of the manganese-bearing isozyme of SOD (MnSOD), treatment with SNP paradoxically suppressed MnSOD expression and greatly enhanced the activity of the iron-containing equivalent (FeSOD). Fur, one of six global regulators of MnSOD transcription, is uniquely capable of suppressing MnSOD while enhancing FeSOD expression through distinct mechanisms. We thus hypothesize that Fur is complacent in causing this behaviour and that the iron(II) component of SNP is activating Fur. E. coli was also treated with the SNP structural analogues, potassium ferricyanide (PFi) and potassium ferrocyanide (PFo). Remarkably, the ferrous PFo was capable of mimicking the SNP-related pattern, whereas the ferric PFi was not. As Fur depends upon ferrous iron for activation, we submit this observation of redox-specificity as preliminary supporting evidence for the hypothesized Fur-SNP interaction. Iron is an essential metal that the human innate immune system sequesters to prevent its use by invading pathogens. As NO is known to inhibit iron-bound Fur, and as activated Fur regulates iron uptake through feedback inhibition, we speculate that the administration of this drug may disrupt this strategic management of iron in favour of residing Gram-negative species by providing a source of iron in an otherwise iron-scarce environment capable of encouraging its own uptake

  3. Regulation of iron metabolism during Neisseria meningitidis infection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letendre, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of vertebrates triggers a marked reduction in the levels of iron associated with the plasma transferrin (Tf) pool. This hypoferremic response has been regarded as a host attempt to withhold essential iron from the invading pathogen. The exact nature of the mechanisms involved remains obscure. The kinetics of iron processing by the RE system were studied by labeling the RE compartments with /sup 59/Fe-labeled denatured red blood cells. Uptake and redistribution of the label indicated the RE-processed iron was not returned to the plasma Tf pool during the hypoferremia. Fractionation of hepatic cellular compartments showed that this impaired release of iron resulted from a preferential incorporation of home-derived iron into the intracellular ferritin pool and this produces the hypoferremia. The role of ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase I,EC.1.16.3.1) (Cp) in iron metabolism during meningococcal infection was investigated. Plasma Cp ferroxidase activity was found to increase greatly in mice during the convalescence phase.

  4. Cadmium uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghiri, F.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption of /sup 115m/Cd by soybean (Gylcine max l.) plants via foliar and root systems and translocation into the seed was determined. The uptake of /sup 115m/Cd by soybeans via the root system was more efficient than that of the foliar placement. Growth and Cd concentrations of soybean and wheat (Triticum aestivum l.) tops were influenced by soil-applied Cd. In both crops, the Cd concentration of plant tops increased while yield decreased with increasing levels of applied Cd. Cadmium toxicitiy began to occur in both crops at the lowest level of soil applied Cd (2.5 ppM). With soybean plants, Cd toxicity symptoms resembled fe chlorosis. For wheat plants there were no visual symptoms other than the studied growth. The relative concentration of Cd found in several vegetable crops varied depending on the plant species. The relative Cd concentration in descending order for various vegetables was lettuce (Lactuca sativa l.) > radish top (Raphanus sativus l.) > celery stalk (Apium graveolens l.) > celery leaves greater than or equal to green pepper (Capsicum frutescens l.) > radish roots.

  5. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  6. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your ... very young red blood cells. Peripheral smear to see if your red blood ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is the most common treatment ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect ... in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored Cardiovascular Health Study ...

  17. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those ... environments Children who have lead in ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  6. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  12. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... age, sex, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  17. In Vitro Iron Bioavailability of Brazilian Food-Based by-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocchetti, Gabriela M; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A; Wawer, Anna A; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Christides, Tatiana

    2018-05-16

    Background : Iron deficiency is a public health problem in many low- and middle-income countries. Introduction of agro-industrial food by-products, as additional source of nutrients, could help alleviate this micronutrient deficiency, provide alternative sources of nutrients and calories in developed countries, and be a partial solution for disposal of agro-industry by-products. Methods : The aim of this study was to determine iron bioavailability of 5 by-products from Brazilian agro-industry (peels from cucumber, pumpkin, and jackfruit, cupuaçu seed peel, and rice bran), using the in vitro digestion/ Caco-2 cell model; with Caco-2 cell ferritin formation as a surrogate marker of iron bioavailability. Total and dialyzable Fe, macronutrients, the concentrations of iron-uptake inhibitors (phytic acid, tannins, fiber) and their correlation with iron bioavailability were also evaluated. Results : The iron content of all by-products was high, but the concentration of iron and predicted bioavailability were not related. Rice bran and cupuaçu seed peel had the highest amount of phytic acid and tannins, and lowest iron bioavailability. Cucumber peels alone, and with added extrinsic Fe, and pumpkin peels with extrinsic added iron, had the highest iron bioavailability. Conclusion : The results suggest that cucumber and pumpkin peel could be valuable alternative sources of bioavailable Fe to reduce iron deficiency in at-risk populations.

  18. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  19. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  20. New Insights on Iron Study in Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha M. El Husseiny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hepcidin plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. It is predominantly produced by hepatocytes and inhibits iron release from macrophages and iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. Competitive ELISA is the current method of choice for the quantification of serum hepcidin because of its lower detection limit, low costs, and high throughput. This study aims to discuss the role of hepcidin in the pathogenesis of iron overload in recently diagnosed myelodysplasia (MDS cases. METHODS: The study included 21 recently diagnosed MDS patients and 13 healthy controls. Ferritin, hepcidin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTFR were measured in all subjects. RESULTS: There were 7 cases of hypocellular MDS, 8 cases of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, and 6 cases of refractory anemia with excess blasts. No difference was observed among the 3 MDS subtypes in terms of hepcidin, sTFR, and ferritin levels (p>0.05. Mean hepcidin levels in the MDS and control groups were 55.8±21.5 ng/mL and 19.9±2.6 ng/ mL, respectively. Mean sTFR was 45.7±8.8 nmol/L in MDS patients and 31.1±5.6 nmol/L in the controls. Mean ferritin levels were significantly higher in MDS patients than in controls (539.14±83.5 ng/mL vs. 104.6±42.9 ng/mL, p0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin may not be the main cause of iron overload in MDS. Further studies are required to test failure of production or peripheral unresponsiveness to hepcidin in MDS cases.

  1. Role of glutaredoxin 3 in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential mineral nutrient that is tightly regulated through mechanisms involving iron regulatory genes, intracellular storage, and iron recycling. Dysregulation of these mechanisms often results in either excess tissue iron accumulation (overload) or iron deficiency (anemia). Many bioche...

  2. Secreted glyceraldehye-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a multifunctional autocrine transferrin receptor for cellular iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheokand, Navdeep; Kumar, Santosh; Malhotra, Himanshu; Tillu, Vikas; Raje, Chaaya Iyengar; Raje, Manoj

    2013-06-01

    The long held view is that mammalian cells obtain transferrin (Tf) bound iron utilizing specialized membrane anchored receptors. Here we report that, during increased iron demand, cells secrete the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) which enhances cellular uptake of Tf and iron. These observations could be mimicked by utilizing purified GAPDH injected into mice as well as when supplemented in culture medium of model cell lines and primary cell types that play a key role in iron metabolism. Transferrin and iron delivery was evaluated by biochemical, biophysical and imaging based assays. This mode of iron uptake is a saturable, energy dependent pathway, utilizing raft as well as non-raft domains of the cell membrane and also involves the membrane protein CD87 (uPAR). Tf internalized by this mode is also catabolized. Our research demonstrates that, even in cell types that express the known surface receptor based mechanism for transferrin uptake, more transferrin is delivered by this route which represents a hidden dimension of iron homeostasis. Iron is an essential trace metal for practically all living organisms however its acquisition presents major challenges. The current paradigm is that living organisms have developed well orchestrated and evolved mechanisms involving iron carrier molecules and their specific receptors to regulate its absorption, transport, storage and mobilization. Our research uncovers a hidden and primitive pathway of bulk iron trafficking involving a secreted receptor that is a multifunctional glycolytic enzyme that has implications in pathological conditions such as infectious diseases and cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Liver Iron Contents in Rats after Administration of Certain Iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of certain iron compounds on liver iron deposition was ... extra iron probably depends on the type of food prepared, .... main groups. Each main group consisted of 4 subgroups. (8 rats per subgroup) which received the same basic diet but differing amounts of iron of a specific type. Each animal was ...

  4. Technetium uptake by Sinapis Alba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Ter Meer-Bekk, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Transfer factors for pertechnetate uptake was determined for Sinapis Alba cultured hydroponically. For the freshly harvested, undried plants transfer factors were found between 13 and 40 depending on the growth period. (author)

  5. Intraarticular application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and their uptake by synovial membrane-an experimental study in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Katja [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Koch, Annette [Department of Chemistry and Applied BioSciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich), Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Schoepf, Bernhard [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Petri, Alke [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Steitz, Benedikt [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Chastellain, Mathieu [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hofmann, Margarethe [MatSearch, Chemin Jean Pavillard 14, 1009 Pully (Switzerland); Hofmann, Heinrich [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Rechenberg, Brigitte von [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: bvonrechenberg@vetclinics.unizh.ch

    2005-05-15

    A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle, coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA-SPION) and its fluorescently functionalized analogue (amino-PVA-Cy3.5-SPION) were compared in vivo as proof of principle for future use in magnetic drug targeting in inflammatory joint diseases. They were injected either intraarticularly or periarticularly and their uptake by cells of the synovial membrane was evaluated. Uptake was completed in 48 h and was enforced by an extracorporally applied magnet.

  6. Intraarticular application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and their uptake by synovial membrane-an experimental study in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, Katja; Koch, Annette; Schoepf, Bernhard; Petri, Alke; Steitz, Benedikt; Chastellain, Mathieu; Hofmann, Margarethe; Hofmann, Heinrich; Rechenberg, Brigitte von

    2005-01-01

    A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle, coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA-SPION) and its fluorescently functionalized analogue (amino-PVA-Cy3.5-SPION) were compared in vivo as proof of principle for future use in magnetic drug targeting in inflammatory joint diseases. They were injected either intraarticularly or periarticularly and their uptake by cells of the synovial membrane was evaluated. Uptake was completed in 48 h and was enforced by an extracorporally applied magnet

  7. Novel insights into iron metabolism by integrating deletome and transcriptome analysis in an iron deficiency model of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkin Adam P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-deficiency anemia is the most prevalent form of anemia world-wide. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model of cellular iron deficiency, in part because many of its cellular pathways are conserved. To better understand how cells respond to changes in iron availability, we profiled the yeast genome with a parallel analysis of homozygous deletion mutants to identify essential components and cellular processes required for optimal growth under iron-limited conditions. To complement this analysis, we compared those genes identified as important for fitness to those that were differentially-expressed in the same conditions. The resulting analysis provides a global perspective on the cellular processes involved in iron metabolism. Results Using functional profiling, we identified several genes known to be involved in high affinity iron uptake, in addition to novel genes that may play a role in iron metabolism. Our results provide support for the primary involvement in iron homeostasis of vacuolar and endosomal compartments, as well as vesicular transport to and from these compartments. We also observed an unexpected importance of the peroxisome for growth in iron-limited media. Although these components were essential for growth in low-iron conditions, most of them were not differentially-expressed. Genes with altered expression in iron deficiency were mainly associated with iron uptake and transport mechanisms, with little overlap with those that were functionally required. To better understand this relationship, we used expression-profiling of selected mutants that exhibited slow growth in iron-deficient conditions, and as a result, obtained additional insight into the roles of CTI6, DAP1, MRS4 and YHR045W in iron metabolism. Conclusion Comparison between functional and gene expression data in iron deficiency highlighted the complementary utility of these two approaches to identify important functional

  8. Assessment of iron bioavailability from different bread making processes using an in vitro intestinal cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ramiro, I; Brearley, C A; Bruggraber, S F A; Perfecto, A; Shewry, P; Fairweather-Tait, S

    2017-08-01

    Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6), is the main iron chelator in cereals and bread. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three commercial baking processes (sourdough, conventional yeast and Chorleywood Bread Making Process (CBP)) on the IP6 content of wholemeal bread, its impact on iron uptake in Caco-2 cells and the predicted bioavailability of iron from these breads with added iron, simulating a mixed-meal. The sourdough process fully degraded IP6 whilst the CBP and conventional processes reduced it by 75% compared with wholemeal flour. The iron released in solution after a simulated digestion was 8-fold higher in sourdough bread than with others but no difference in cellular iron uptake was observed. Additionally, when iron was added to the different breads digestions only sourdough bread elicited a significant ferritin response in Caco-2 cells (4.8-fold compared to the other breads) suggesting that sourdough bread could contribute towards improved iron nutrition. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Attitudes of pregnant women and male partners towards non-invasive prenatal testing and widening the scope of prenatal screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schendel, Rachèl V.; Kleinveld, Johanna H.; Dondorp, Wybo J.; Pajkrt, Eva; Timmermans, Danielle R. M.; Holtkamp, Kim C. A.; Karsten, Margreet; Vlietstra, Anne L.; Lachmeijer, Augusta M. A.; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and its potential to test for multiple disorders has received much attention. This study explores attitudes of women and men towards NIPT, and their views on widening the scope of prenatal testing in a country with a low uptake of prenatal screening (The

  10. Diselenolane-mediated cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuard, Nicolas; Poblador-Bahamonde, Amalia I; Zong, Lili; Bartolami, Eline; Hildebrandt, Jana; Weigand, Wolfgang; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2018-02-21

    The emerging power of thiol-mediated uptake with strained disulfides called for a move from sulfur to selenium. We report that according to results with fluorescent model substrates, cellular uptake with 1,2-diselenolanes exceeds uptake with 1,2-dithiolanes and epidithiodiketopiperazines with regard to efficiency as well as intracellular localization. The diselenide analog of lipoic acid performs best. This 1,2-diselenolane delivers fluorophores efficiently to the cytosol of HeLa Kyoto cells, without detectable endosomal capture as with 1,2-dithiolanes or dominant escape into the nucleus as with epidithiodiketopiperazines. Diselenolane-mediated cytosolic delivery is non-toxic (MTT assay), sensitive to temperature but insensitive to inhibitors of endocytosis (chlorpromazine, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, wortmannin, cytochalasin B) and conventional thiol-mediated uptake (Ellman's reagent), and to serum. Selenophilicity, the extreme CSeSeC dihedral angle of 0° and the high but different acidity of primary and secondary selenols might all contribute to uptake. Thiol-exchange affinity chromatography is introduced as operational mimic of thiol-mediated uptake that provides, in combination with rate enhancement of DTT oxidation, direct experimental evidence for existence and nature of the involved selenosulfides.

  11. Multidominance, ellipsis, and quantifier scope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmerman, Tanja Maria Hugo

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provides a novel perspective on the interaction between quantifier scope and ellipsis. It presents a detailed investigation of the scopal interaction between English negative indefinites, modals, and quantified phrases in ellipsis. One of the crucial observations is that a negative

  12. Commercial Art: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a commercial art vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  13. Influence of sodium humate on the growth of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Turp. Brèb. and Gonium pectorale in the case of different calciumand iron doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Juraja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sodium humate on calcium and iron uptake by two species of algae was studied. It was found that sodium humate influence differentially the growth of these algae in various culture conditions by regulating the iron uptake. The action of sodium humate is especially favourable in non optimal pH of the medium and its effectiveness increases with time.

  14. 32 CFR 651.48 - Scoping process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... significantly affecting the environment will go through scoping unless extenuating circumstances make it... associated environmental controversy. (4) Importance of the affected environmental parameters. (5... the affected Army organization or installation. Such integration is encouraged. (f) Scoping procedures...

  15. Integrated Care Planning for Cancer Patients: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Irfan Khan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been a growing emphasis on the use of integrated care plans to deliver cancer care. However little is known about how integrated care plans for cancer patients are developed including featured core activities, facilitators for uptake and indicators for assessing impact. Methods: Given limited consensus around what constitutes an integrated care plan for cancer patients, a scoping review was conducted to explore the components of integrated care plans and contextual factors that influence design and uptake. Results: Five types of integrated care plans based on the stage of cancer care: surgical, systemic, survivorship, palliative and comprehensive (involving a transition between stages are described in current literature. Breast, esophageal and colorectal cancers were common disease sites. Multi-disciplinary teams, patient needs assessment and transitional planning emerged as key features. Provider buy-in and training alongside informational technology support served as important facilitators for plan uptake. Provider-level measurement was considerably less robust compared to patient and system-level indicators. Conclusions: Similarities in design features, components and facilitators across the various types of integrated care plans indicates opportunities to leverage shared features and enable a management lens that spans the trajectory of a patient’s journey rather than a phase-specific silo approach to care.

  16. Key Roles of Size and Crystallinity of Nanosized Iron Hydr(oxides) Stabilized by Humic Substances in Iron Bioavailability to Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia A; Polyakov, Alexander Yu; Lebedev, Vasily A; Abroskin, Dmitry P; Volkov, Dmitry S; Pankratov, Denis A; Klein, Olga I; Senik, Svetlana V; Sorkina, Tatiana A; Garshev, Alexey V; Veligzhanin, Alexey A; Garcia Mina, Jose M; Perminova, Irina V

    2017-12-27

    Availability of Fe in soil to plants is closely related to the presence of humic substances (HS). Still, the systematic data on applicability of iron-based nanomaterials stabilized with HS as a source for plant nutrition are missing. The goal of our study was to establish a connection between properties of iron-based materials stabilized by HS and their bioavailability to plants. We have prepared two samples of leonardite HS-stabilized iron-based materials with substantially different properties using the reported protocols and studied their physical chemical state in relation to iron uptake and other biological effects. We used Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, SAXS, and TEM to conclude on iron speciation, size, and crystallinity. One material (Fe-HA) consisted of polynuclear iron(III) (hydr)oxide complexes, so-called ferric polymers, distributed in HS matrix. These complexes are composed of predominantly amorphous small-size components (Bioavailability studies were conducted on wheat plants under conditions of iron deficiency. The uptake studies have shown that small and amorphous ferric polymers were readily translocated into the leaves on the level of Fe-EDTA, whereas relatively large and crystalline feroxyhyte NPs were mostly sorbed on the roots. The obtained data are consistent with the size exclusion limits of cell wall pores (5-20 nm). Both samples demonstrated distinct beneficial effects with respect to photosynthetic activity and lipid biosynthesis. The obtained results might be of use for production of iron-based nanomaterials stabilized by HS with the tailored iron availability to plants. They can be applied as the only source for iron nutrition as well as in combination with the other elements, for example, for industrial production of "nanofortified" macrofertilizers (NPK).

  17. Iron forms in some egyptian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Kholi, A.F.; Massoud, M.A.; EL-Naggar, H.A.; Gadallah, A.

    1990-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to find out the available forms of iron (Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ ) in five egyptian soils samples, representing alluvial, calcareous and sandy soils. Concerning the iron content of soil either Fe 2+ or Fe 3+ , the tested soil types were relatively arranged in the order alluvial> calcareous> sandy soil. In spite of the considerable variations in the soil content of iron cations, the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ ratio was almost kept constant around 0.83. The uniformity of the ferrous : ferric ratio in the different tested soil types indicates their similarity in their redox-potential, pH and their environmental conditions, particularly, the aeration and partial O 2 - pressure degree. Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ being less than unity suggests that the Fe 2+ Fe 3+ reaction tends towards the forward direction, i.e., to the Fe 3+ formation. As a result of the pot experiment, significant correlations have been found between the laboratory determined soil Fe 2+ and both of the plant Fe-uptake and the plant dry matter weight

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help ... but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR ...