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Sample records for iron reduction related

  1. Relative contribution of iron reduction to sediments organic matter mineralization in contrasting habitats of a shallow eutrophic freshwater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-06-01

    Iron reduction is one of the important organic matter (OM) mineralization pathway in sediments. Here we investigated the rates and the relative contribution of iron reduction to OM mineralization in Zhushan bay (ZSB, cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB)-dominated habitats) and East Taihu Lake (ETL, submerged macrophypes (SM)-dominated habitats) of Lake Taihu, China. Anaerobic microcosm incubation revealed that the rate of iron reduction at ZSB (4.42 μmol cm(-3) d(-1)) in summer was almost 1.5 times higher than at ETL (3.13 μmol cm(-3) d(-1)). Iron reduction accounted for 66.5% (ZSB) and 31.8% (ETL) of total anaerobic carbon mineralization, respectively. No detectable methanogenesis was found at ZSB, while methanogenesis was responsible for 16.7% of total anaerobic respiration in sediments of ETL. Geochemical analysis of solid phase constituents indicated that ZSB surface sediments experienced highly oxidizing conditions with much higher amorphous Fe(III) (71 mmol m(-2)) than ETL (11 mmol m(-2)). Conversely, AVS inventories at ETL (38 mmol m(-2)) were up to 30 times higher than at ZSB (1.27 mmol m(-2)), indicating significant sulfate reduction in sediments of ETL. Overall results suggested that varying carbon sources and distinct geochemical characterizations of the sediments in contrasting habitats significantly influenced the rate of iron reduction and the pathway of C mineralization in a large freshwater lake.

  2. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  3. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins at the Neurovascular Unit Supports Reduction and Reoxidation of Iron for Transport Through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhart, Annette; Skjørringe, Tina; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix;

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms for iron transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain a controversy. We analyzed for expression of mRNA and proteins involved in oxidation and transport of iron in isolated brain capillaries from dietary normal, iron-deficient, and iron-reverted rats. The expression...... was also investigated in isolated rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) and in immortalized rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells grown as monoculture or in hanging culture inserts with defined BBB properties. Transferrin receptor 1, ferrireductases Steap 2 and 3, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1...... cells provide the machinery for receptor-mediated uptake of ferric iron-containing transferrin. Ferric iron can then undergo reduction to ferrous iron by ferrireductases inside endosomes followed by DMT1-mediated pumping into the cytosol and subsequently cellular export by ferroportin. The expression...

  4. Microbial iron reduction related to metal speciation in mine waste at the former uranium mine in Ranstad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, F.T. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology

    1998-02-01

    Mining activities in Ranstad uranium mine started in 1965 and ended in 1969. In 1988 the final restoration was discussed, and it was proposed to water-fill the open pit and cover the waste disposal area using the `dry method`. Today the open pit has become a lake. Also some alum shale was placed on the land surface where it has been weathered by oxygen and water during 30 years. In 1994 it was observed that the color of the lake turned over to brown-red. Further studies showed increasing iron concentration in the lake and around the tailings area. For estimation of microbial iron reduction in the lake, three iron reducing bacteria were isolated from the water-filled open pit. For the enrichment process, water samples were inoculated in an anoxic enrichment medium. The isolates were able to reduce Fe(III) oxyhydroxide by oxidation of lactate as energy source. Growth of these strains was determined by production of a black precipitation of iron sulfide and was confirmed by estimation of total number of cells. Fe(III) reduction was monitored by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) over time. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains Tran-l, Tran-2, and Tran-3 with the EMBL data base showed 98.6% identity with Shewanella putrefaciens, 98.7% identity with Shewanella alga and 98.2% identity with Aeromonas salmonicida, respectively. S. putrefaciens strains have been isolated from many different environments, many of which are suboxic or anoxic. In addition to growing aerobically, S. putrefaciens can use Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. To distinguish if the Fe(III) and/or organic compounds presence in weathered alum shale can be utilized by iron reducing bacteria isolated from the lake, reduction of Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds in sterile and non-sterile weathered alum shale was studied. The reduction of Fe(III) coupled to growth of bacteria on sterile and non-sterile shale was observed. Furthermore

  5. Confounding Impacts of Iron Reduction on Arsenic Retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufano, K.J.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-05-26

    A transition from oxidizing to reducing conditions has long been implicated to increase aqueous As concentrations, for which reductive dissolution of iron (hydr)oxides is commonly implicated as the primary culprit. Confounding our understanding of processes controlling As retention, however, is that reductive transformation of ferrihydrite has recently been shown to promote As retention rather than release. To resolve the role iron phases have in regulating arsenic concentrations, here we examine As desorption from ferrihydrite-coated sands presorbed with As(lll); experiments were performed at circumneutral pH under Fe-reducing conditions with the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 over extended time periods. We reveal that with the initial phase of iron reduction, ferrihydrite undergoes transformation to secondary phases and increases As(lll) retention (relative to abiotic controls). However, with increased reaction time, cessation of the phase transitions and ensuing reductive dissolution result in prolonged release of As(III) to the aqueous phase. Our results suggest that As(lll) retention during iron reduction is temporally dependent on secondary precipitation of iron phases; during transformation to secondary phases, particularly magnetite, As(lll) retention is enhanced even relative to oxidized systems. However, conditions that retard secondary transformation (more stable iron oxides or limited iron reducing bacterial activity), or prolonged anaerobiosis, will lead to both the dissolution of ferric (hydr)oxides and release of As(lll) to the aqueous phase.

  6. Microbial inhibition by pharmaceutical antibiotics in different soils--dose-response relations determined with the iron(III) reduction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele-Bruhn, Sören

    2005-04-01

    Soil contamination from pharmaceuticals is an emerging problem, though quantitative data on their microbial effects are lacking. Thus, nine pharmaceutical antibiotics were tested for their effects on the microbial iron(III) reduction in six different topsoils. Complete dose-response curves were obtained and best-fit by sigmoidal Logit, Weibull, Box-Cox Logit, and Box-Cox Weibull equations (r2 0.73-1.00). The derived effective doses (ED [micromol/kg soil]) for the different antibiotics increased in the order (average ED50 in parentheses) chlortetracycline (53) fenbendazole at doses up to 5,800 and 3,300 micromol/kg, respectively. Due to a strong soil adsorption, especially of the tetracyclines, the corresponding effective concentrations in the soil solution (EC50), derived from sorption experiments, were considerably smaller and ranged from 0.004 micromol/L (chlortetracycline) to 120 micromol/L (sulfapyridine). The effects of the antibiotics were governed by soil sorptive properties, especially the concentration of soil organic matter. The microbial inhibition was influenced indirectly by the soil pH, which affects the ionization status of the amphoteric antibiotics.

  7. Thermodynamic constraints on microbial iron oxide reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, S.; Behrends, T.; Haese, R.; van Cappellen, P.

    2003-04-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit large surface areas which bind trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules. Under suboxic conditions, iron oxides can reductively dissolve via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. The aim of our study was to determine the thermodynamic energy yields of dissimilatory iron reduction for different Fe(III) substrates. We used the facultative anaerobic gram-positive bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens as model iron reducing bacterium, with ferrihydrite, hematite, goethite or Fe(III)-salicylate as electron acceptor, and lactate as electron donor. Experiments were conducted in an anaerobic pH-stat batch reactor, equipped with a polarographic electrode to monitor in situ the dissolved ferrous iron activity. The stoichiometry of total Fe(II) production and acid consumption during the experiments indicated that lactate was oxidized to acetate. From the Fe(II) activity and redox potential measurements, free energy yields were calculated for Fe(III) reduction coupled to lactate oxidation. The results showed that the redox potential of the overall reaction was poised by equilibrium between the Fe(III)-substrate and aqueous Fe(II). Hence, the energy yields decreased in the order ferrihydrite > Fe(III)-salicylate > hematite > goethite. Accumulation of Fe(II) in solution only caused small decreases in the energy yields over the course of the experiments. Cessation of iron reduction, which was observed in all experiments, was therefore not due to thermodynamic limitation, but more likely reflected the decline in cell level of activity.

  8. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  9. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  10. Reductive denitrification using zero-valent iron and bimetallic iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Hak; Shinb, Won Sik; Choi, Sang June; Kim, Young-Hun

    2009-08-01

    A study of reductive denitrification of nitrate was conducted. Microscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) and palladium-coated iron (Pd/Fe) were used in the reduction of nitrate with variable pH. The solution pH was controlled by an auto controlling system instead of chemical buffers. Higher reduction rates were achieved with lower pH and lower pH gave the pseudo-first-order kinetics while it was close to the zero-order reaction when the pH of the solution was becoming high and nitrate concentration was higher. As it took several hours to convert intermediates to ammonia completely, the assumption, under which mass loss calculated from the measured ammonia concentration right after the reaction was the mass of nitrogen evolved, could lead to overestimation of the nitrogen selectivity. The current study confirmed that the palladium coating on the iron could increase the nitrogen selectivity, and the Pd/Fe system could also achieve the advantages of coupling of electron source and catalyst with regard to the engineering aspects.

  11. Reductive denitrification of nitrate by scrap iron filings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Zhi-wei; XU Xin-hua; WANG Da-hui

    2005-01-01

    Reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron is a highly exergonic reaction that has long been known to occur. Use of scrap iron filings (SIF) as the PRB (Permeable Reactive Barrier) material can be used to recycle certain by-products, and identify cheaper replacements for expensive conventional PRB materials, especially pure metallic iron. The feasibility of reductive denitrification of nitrate by SIF was studied by batch experiments. Operational parameters such as pH value, SIF dosage and initial concentration of nitrate were investigated. The removal efficiency of nitrate reached 80% under the conditions of pH of 2.5, nitrate initial concentration of 45 mg/L and SIF dosage of 100 g/L within 4 h. Results indicated that nitrate removal is inversely related to pH. Low pH value condition favors for the nitrate transformation. Different from the results of others who studied nitrate reduction using iron powder, we found that there was a lag time before nitrate reduction occurs, even at low pH. Finally, the possible mechanism of nitrate reduction by Fe0 is discussed.

  12. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or Reductive Iron Assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies...

  13. Chemical state mapping of heterogeneous reduction of iron ore sinter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, M.; Takeichi, Y.; Murao, R.; Obayashi, I.; Hiraoka, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Iron ore sinter constitutes the major component of the iron-bearing burden in blast furnaces, and its reduction mechanism is one of the keys to improving the productivity of ironmaking. Iron ore sinter is composed of multiple iron oxide phases and calcium ferrites (CFs), and their heterogeneous reduction was investigated in terms of changes in iron chemical state: FeIII, FeII, and Fe0 were examined macroscopically by 2D X-ray absorption and microscopically by 3D transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). It was shown that the reduction starts at iron oxide grains rather than at calcium ferrite (CF) grains, especially those located near micropores. The heterogeneous reduction causes crack formation and deteriorates the mechanical strength of the sinter. These results help us to understand the fundamental aspects of heterogeneous reduction schemes in iron ore sinter.

  14. Reductive Dechlorination of p-Chlorophenol by Nanoscale Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To investigate reductive dechlorination of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) by nanoscale Fe0 under different conditions.Methods Nanoscale Fe0 was synthesized by using reductive method. 4-CP and its intermediate products were analyzed by HPLC. Chlorine ion was quantified with DX-100 ion chromatograph. Nano-iron particles were observed under a FEI Quanta 200 FEG environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM).Results The size of the particles was in the range of 10-100 nm. The nano-iron particles could reduce 4-CP effectively. The initial concentration of 4-CP increased with the decrease of the relative degradation rate,whereas the reduced amount of 4-CP increased. Temperature could influence both the dechlorination rate and the reaction pathway. Moreover,the stability and durability of nanoscale Fe0 was evaluated through batch studies over extended periods of time.Conclusion The nanoscale Fe0 can be used for sustainable treatment of contaminants in groundwater.

  15. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of chlorinated solvents by reduction at the surface of zero-valent metals and bimetallic systems has emerged as an important approach to the in-situ remediation of ground water. Reduction by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long term performance in field applications.

  16. Recovery of Iron from Copper Tailings by Direct Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jing; Xia, De-Hong; Gu, Jing; Liu, Kai-Qi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shou-Zeng; Qi, Zhao-Dong; Ao, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Direct reduction of copper tailings were performed to recover iron efficiently by carbon-containing pellets, and the metallization rate was gained by chemical analysis method. The results showed that the metallization rate of copper tailings was up to 85.32% and the best reduction parameters are also found. Content of precious metals, such as, gold, silver in copper tailings can be enriched by 1.8~1.9 times through removing iron. The apparent activation energy of direct reduction of iron oxide in copper tailings is calculated to be 125.4 kJ/mol and the restrictive factor of reduction process is solid diffusion.

  17. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial dissimilatory iron oxide reduction in simulated Archaean seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percak-Dennett, E M; Beard, B L; Xu, H; Konishi, H; Johnson, C M; Roden, E E

    2011-05-01

    The largest Fe isotope excursion yet measured in marine sedimentary rocks occurs in shales, carbonates, and banded iron formations of Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic age. The results of field and laboratory studies suggest a potential role for microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in producing this excursion. However, most experimental studies of Fe isotope fractionation during DIR have been conducted in simple geochemical systems, using pure Fe(III) oxide substrates that are not direct analogues to phases likely to have been present in Precambrian marine environments. In this study, Fe isotope fractionation was investigated during microbial reduction of an amorphous Fe(III) oxide-silica coprecipitate in anoxic, high-silica, low-sulphate artificial Archaean seawater at 30 °C to determine if such conditions alter the extent of reduction or isotopic fractionations relative to those observed in simple systems. The Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate was highly reducible (c. 80% reduction) in the presence of excess acetate. The coprecipitate did not undergo phase conversion (e.g. to green rust, magnetite or siderite) during reduction. Iron isotope fractionations suggest that rapid and near-complete isotope exchange took place among all Fe(II) and Fe(III) components, in contrast to previous work on goethite and hematite, where exchange was limited to the outer few atom layers of the substrate. Large quantities of low-δ(56)Fe Fe(II) (aqueous and solid phase) were produced during reduction of the Fe(III)-Si coprecipitate. These findings shed new light on DIR as a mechanism for producing Fe isotope variations observed in Neoarchaean and Paleoproterozoic marine sedimentary rocks.

  18. Iron Corrosion Observations: Pu(VI)-Fe Reduction Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean-Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-11

    Iron and Pu Reduction: (1) Very different appearances in iron reaction products were noted depending on pH, brine and initial iron phase; (2) Plutonium was associated with the Fe phases; (3) Green rust was often noted at the higher pH; (4) XANES established the green rust to be an Fe2/3 phase with a bromide center; and (5) This green rust phase was linked to Pu as Pu(IV).

  19. Formation and characterization of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction of oolitic iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Han, Yue-xin; Li, Yan-feng; Li, Yan-jun

    2017-02-01

    To reveal the formation and characteristics of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction, oolitic iron ore was isothermally reduced in various reduction times at various reduction temperatures. The microstructure and size of the metallic iron phase were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a Bgrimm process mineralogy analyzer. In the results, the reduced Fe separates from the ore and forms metallic iron protuberances, and then the subsequent reduced Fe diffuses to the protuberances and grows into metallic iron grains. Most of the metallic iron grains exist in the quasi-spherical shape and inlaid in the slag matrix. The cumulative frequency of metallic iron grain size is markedly influenced by both reduction time and temperature. With increasing reduction temperature and time, the grain size of metallic iron obviously increases. According to the classical grain growth equation, the growth kinetic parameters, i.e., time exponent, growth activation energy, and pre-exponential constant, are estimated to be 1.3759 ± 0.0374, 103.18 kJ·mol-1, and 922.05, respectively. Using these calculated parameters, a growth model is established to describe the growth behavior of metallic iron grains.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility as a proxy for investigating microbially mediated iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewafy, Farag M.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Werkema, D. Dale, Jr.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Revil, André; Skold, Magnus; Delin, Geoffrey N.

    2011-11-01

    We investigated magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. Our objective was to determine if MS can be used as an intrinsic bioremediation indicator due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria. A contaminated and an uncontaminated core were retrieved from a site contaminated with crude oil near Bemidji, Minnesota and subsampled for MS measurements. The contaminated core revealed enriched MS zones within the hydrocarbon smear zone, which is related to iron-reduction coupled to oxidation of hydrocarbon compounds and the vadose zone, which is coincident with a zone of methane depletion suggesting aerobic or anaerobic oxidation of methane is coupled to iron-reduction. The latter has significant implications for methane cycling. We conclude that MS can serve as a proxy for intrinsic bioremediation due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria iron-reducing bacteria and for the application of geophysics to iron cycling studies.

  1. Sorption of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate to soil components and effects on microbial iron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Inge Broberg; de Jonge, Hubert; Nørnberg, Per; Mather-Christensen, Ole; Elsgaard, Lars

    2003-06-01

    When sewage sludge is applied to arable land, linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is released into the environment. In soils, LAS has been shown to impede microbial processes, such as bacterial iron reduction. The aim of the present study was to quantify LAS adsorption and desorption to agricultural soils and iron oxides and relate this to the inhibition of microbial iron reduction. Two agricultural soils were used, namely, Askov (coarse sandy loam soil) and Lundgaard (coarse sandy soil). In both soils, LAS inhibited microbial iron reduction even at low LAS concentrations with 10% effect concentrations of 6 to 7 and 26 to 32 mg LAS/kg dry-weight soil for Lundgaard and Askov soil, respectively. The sorption isotherms showed that sorption of LAS to iron oxides was 10 to 100 times stronger than sorption to the agricultural soils. Also, it appeared that at low LAS concentrations (< 10 mg/kg dry-wt soil), Lundgaard soil adsorbed approximately 10 times more LAS than Askov soil. Thus, the inhibitory effect of LAS on microbial iron reduction was highest in the Lundgaard soil, which exhibited both the strongest sorption and the lowest desorption of the two soils. A possible hypothesis to explain this correlation was that LAS toxicity toward bacterial iron reduction was, at least partly, caused by LAS adsorbed to iron oxides, which could interfere with transfer of electrons between the bacteria and their respiratory electron acceptor.

  2. Vibrio cholerae VciB Mediates Iron Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Eric D; Payne, Shelley M

    2017-06-15

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the severe diarrheal disease cholera. V. cholerae thrives within the human host, where it replicates to high numbers, but it also persists within the aquatic environments of ocean and brackish water. To survive within these nutritionally diverse environments, V. cholerae must encode the necessary tools to acquire the essential nutrient iron in all forms it may encounter. A prior study of systems involved in iron transport in V. cholerae revealed the existence of vciB, which, while unable to directly transport iron, stimulates the transport of iron through ferrous (Fe(2+)) iron transport systems. We demonstrate here a role for VciB in V. cholerae in which VciB stimulates the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), which can be subsequently transported into the cell with the ferrous iron transporter Feo. Iron reduction is independent of functional iron transport but is associated with the electron transport chain. Comparative analysis of VciB orthologs suggests a similar role for other proteins in the VciB family. Our data indicate that VciB is a dimer located in the inner membrane with three transmembrane segments and a large periplasmic loop. Directed mutagenesis of the protein reveals two highly conserved histidine residues required for function. Taken together, our results support a model whereby VciB reduces ferric iron using energy from the electron transport chain.IMPORTANCEVibrio cholerae is a prolific human pathogen and environmental organism. The acquisition of essential nutrients such as iron is critical for replication, and V. cholerae encodes a number of mechanisms to use iron from diverse environments. Here, we describe the V. cholerae protein VciB that increases the reduction of oxidized ferric iron (Fe(3+)) to the ferrous form (Fe(2+)), thus promoting iron acquisition through ferrous iron transporters. Analysis of VciB orthologs in Burkholderia and Aeromonas spp. suggest that they have a similar activity, allowing a

  3. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes by iron metal and iron sulfide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Reduced forms of iron and sulfur, such as Fe(II), iron(II) sulfide and hydrogen sulfide, are abundant natural reductants in anaerobic soils and sediments. Redox reactions between these reductants and organic pollutants are often greatly accelerated in natural systems because of microbial mediation or because the electron transfer is mediated by the cycling of Fe(II)/Fe(III). For example, recent studies have shown that surface-bound, reduced iron species play the important role of electron transfer mediator in reductions promoted by iron-reducing bacteria. It has been postulated that the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons by iron metal may occur by a reaction of surface-bound Fe(II) at the iron metal-water interface. The surface-bound Fe(II) species at the passive oxide-water interface may serve as mediator for the transfer of electrons from Fe{sup 0} to adsorbed chlorinated hydrocarbon. Fast reduction rates for chlorinated hydrocarbons observed in this system may be attributed to the facile regeneration of reducing surface Fe(II) species due to the close proximity of the bulk reductant (Fe{sup 0}) to the electron carrier, surface-bound Fe(II). Evidence in support of this proposed mechanism is presented.

  4. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  5. Direct iron ore reduction by methane in a fluidized bed. Final report, November 1989-December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Vaart, D.R.; Conger, W.L.

    1993-08-01

    Novel process chemistry of methane in a fluidized bed was investigated to identify a more direct route to producing the reducing gas needed in the Direct Reduction of iron ore. A rather surprising result, however, of the study was the discovery of an inexpensive and attrition-resistant catalytic material for methane oxidative coupling. The iron oxide impregnated, non-porous silica oxide was found to be relatively active, and quite selective when steam was added to the methane/air feed.

  6. Kinetics of hexavalent chromium reduction by iron metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijing QIAN; Yanjun WU; Yong LIU; Xinhua XU

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction to Cr(Ⅲ) by metallic iron (Fe0) was studied in batch reactors for a range of reactant concentrations, pH and temperatures. Nearly 86.8% removal efficiency for Cr(Ⅵ) was achieved when Fe0 concentration was 6 g/L (using commercial iron powder (200 mesh) I n 120 min). The reduction ofhexavalent chro-mium took place on the surface of the iron particles following pseudo-first order kinetics. The rate of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction increased with increasing Fe0 addition and temperature but inversely with initial pH. The pseudo-first-order rate coeffi-cients (kobs) were determined as 0.0024, 0.010, 0.0268 and 0.062 8 min-1 when iron powder dosages were 2, 6, 10 and 14 g/L at 25℃ and pH 5.5, respectively. According to the Arrehenius equation, the apparent activation energy of 26.5 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factor of 3 330 min-1 were obtained at the temperature range of 288-308 K. Different Fe0 types were compared in this study. The reactivity was in the order starch-stabilized Fe0 nanoparticlesFe0 nano-particlesFe0 powderFe0 filings. Electrochemical analysis of the reaction process showed that Cr(Ⅲ) and Fe(Ⅲ) hydroxides should be the dominant final products.

  7. A bioinspired iron catalyst for nitrate and perchlorate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Courtney L; Park, Yun Ji; Matson, Ellen M; Gordon, Zachary; Fout, Alison R

    2016-11-11

    Nitrate and perchlorate have considerable use in technology, synthetic materials, and agriculture; as a result, they have become pervasive water pollutants. Industrial strategies to chemically reduce these oxyanions often require the use of harsh conditions, but microorganisms can efficiently reduce them enzymatically. We developed an iron catalyst inspired by the active sites of nitrate reductase and (per)chlorate reductase enzymes. The catalyst features a secondary coordination sphere that aids in oxyanion deoxygenation. Upon reduction of the oxyanions, an iron(III)-oxo is formed, which in the presence of protons and electrons regenerates the catalyst and releases water.

  8. Effect of phosphorus addition on the reductive transformation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and iron reduction with microorganism involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongkui; Liu, Xianli; Huang, Jiexun; Xiao, Wensheng; Zhang, Jiaquan; Yin, Chunqin

    2017-04-25

    The transformation of phosphorus added to the soil environment has been proven to be influenced by the Fe biochemical process, which thereby may affect the transformation of organic chlorinated contaminants. However, the amount of related literatures regarding this topic is limited. This study aimed to determine the effects of phosphorus addition on pentachlorophenol (PCP) anaerobic transformation, iron reduction, and paddy soil microbial community structure. Results showed that the transformation of phosphorus, iron, and PCP were closely related to the microorganisms. Moreover, phosphorus addition significantly influenced PCP transformation and iron reduction, which promoted and inhibited these processes at low and high concentrations, respectively. Both the maximum reaction rate of PCP transformation and the maximum Fe(II) amount produced were obtained at 1 mmol/L phosphorus concentration. Among the various phosphorus species, dissolved P and NaOH-P considerably changed, whereas only slight changes were observed for the remaining phosphorus species. Microbial community structure analysis demonstrated that adding low concentration of phosphorus promoted the growth of Clostridium bowmanii, Clostridium hungatei, and Clostridium intestinale and Pseudomonas veronii. By contrast, high-concentration phosphorus inhibited growth of these microorganisms, similar to the curves of PCP transformation and iron reduction. These observations indicated that Clostridium and P. veronii, especially Clostridium, played a vital role in the transformation of related substances in the system. All these findings may serve as a reference for the complicated reactions among the multiple components of soils.

  9. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes by iron metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P. [GE Corp. Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Reduction of chlorinated ethenes in aqueous solution by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems under anaerobic and mildly aerobic conditions. The goal of this work was to gain a fundamental mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long-term performance in groundwater treatment. Pseudo-first-order TCE, DCE and VC dechlorination rates and product mass balances (chloride ion and C2-C6 hydrocarbons) were measured for greater than twenty-five commercial iron metals. All experimental evidence was found to support a direct reduction mechanism in which electron transfer from Fe{sup o} to the adsorbed chloroethene occurs at the metal/water interface. XPS depth profile analysis was used to correlate Fe{sup o} surface concentration with observed dechlorination rates. A linear dependence of dechlorination rate on iron specific surface area was determined. Other factors that influence dechlorination rates will be discussed, including proton- and anion-promoted dissolution processes that remove surface iron oxides and yield new Fe{sup o} surfaces.

  10. Water Soluble Iron aminoclay for Catalytic Reduction of Nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ANBU ANJUGAM VANDARKUZHALI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble iron decorated phyllosilicate is synthesized through one pot sol-gel synthesis by a wet chemical method using NaBH4 as reducing agent. The as-synthesized nanocomposite is characterized by powder-XRD and TGA techniques. The morphology of the composite is obtained using HRSEM and HRTEM. The prepared nanocomposite is an efficient catalyst for the reduction of nitrophenol.

  11. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system. Part 2: Effect of scrap iron shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2010-10-15

    Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron has the advantage that two wastes are treated simultaneously. The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using as reducing agent the following scrap iron shapes and sizes: (1) spiral fibers, (2) shavings, and (3) powder. The shape and size of scrap iron were found to have a significant influence on chromium and iron species concentration in column effluent, on column effluent pH and on Cr(VI) reduction mechanism. While for large scrap iron particles (spiral fibers) homogeneous reduction is the dominant Cr(VI) reduction process, for small scrap iron particles (powder) heterogeneous reduction appears to be the dominant reaction contributing to Cr(VI) reduction. All three shapes and sizes investigated in this work have both advantages and disadvantages. If found in sufficient quantities, scrap iron powder seem to be the optimum shape and size for the continuous reduction of Cr(VI), due to the following advantages: (1) the greatest reduction capacity, (2) the most important pH increase in column effluent (up to 6.3), (3) no chromium was detected in the column effluent during the first 60 h of the experiment, and (4) the lowest steady-state Cr(VI) concentration observed in column effluent (3.7 mg/L). But, despite of a lower reduction capacity in comparison with powder particles, spiral fibers and shavings have the advantage to result in large quantities from the mechanic processing of steel.

  12. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  13. Reduction of lateritic iron ore briquette using coal bed reductant by isothermal - temperature gradient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulhan, Zulfiadi; Himawan, David Mangatur; Dimyati, Arbi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, isothermal-temperature gradient method was used to separate iron and alumina in lateritic iron ore as an alternative technique. The lateritic iron ore was ground to obtain grain size of less than 200 mesh and agglomerated in the form of cylindrical briquette using a press machine. The iron oxide in the briquette was reduced by addition of coal so that all surface of the briquette was covered by the coal. The temperature profile for the reduction process of the briquette was divided into three stages: the first stage was isothermal at 1000°C, the second stage was temperature gradient at varies heating rate of 5, 6.67 and 8.33°C/minutes from 1000 to 1400°C, and the final stage was isothermal at 1400°C. The effect of dehydroxylation of lateritic iron ore was studied as well. Aluminum distribution inside and outside the briquette was analyzed by scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The analysis results showed that the aluminum content increased from 8.01% at the outside of the briquette to 13.12% in the inside of the briquette. On contrary, iron content is higher at the outside of the briquette compared to that in the inside. These phenomena indicated that aluminum tends to migrate into the center of the briquette while iron moves outward to the surface of briquette. Furthermore, iron metallization of 91.03% could be achieved in the case of without dehydroxylation treatment. With the dehydroxylation treatment, iron metallization degree was increased up to 95.27%.

  14. Volatile fatty acids as substrates for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, N.; Vandieken, V.; Jorgensen, B. B.

    2006-12-01

    Anaerobic degradation of complex organic material in aquatic systems is a multi-step process. The metabolic products of fermentative bacteria serve as electron donors for the terminal oxidizing bacteria. In marine sediments, iron reduction and sulfate reduction are generally the most important terminal oxidation processes in the upper anoxic zone [1]. Microorganisms that reduce iron and sulfate may use a broad range of electron donors, yet the list of potential substrates provides little information about the substrates used in situ by these organisms. Investigations on the electron donors for sulfate reducers in marine sediments have shown that volatile fatty acids (VFA), and in particular acetate, together with hydrogen are the major substrates (e.g. [2-4]). Similar investigations for iron reduction or simultaneous iron and sulfate reduction are lacking for marine sediments. Furthermore, most of these studies were made in temperate sediments and little is known about the substrates for sulfate reducers in permanently cold sediments, which account for >90% of the ocean floor [5]. We investigated the relative contributions of iron reduction and sulfate reduction to the terminal oxidation of organic carbon and the importance of acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in permanently cold, Arctic sediments from Svalbard. In the surface layer (0-2 cm) sulfate reduction accounted for 2/3 of the organic carbon oxidation (determined as DIC production), the remaining 1/3 were attributed to iron reduction. In the 5-9 cm layer sulfate reduction was the sole important terminal oxidation step. The contribution of acetate to terminal oxidation was determined by radiotracer incubation as well as from the accumulation after the inhibition of sulfate reduction by selenate. The rates determined with the two methods varied by less than 20%. Acetate turnover, determined with the tracer incubations, accounted for 10 and 40% of

  15. Isolation of microorganisms involved in reduction of crystalline iron(III oxides in natural environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki eHori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of crystalline Fe(III oxides is one of the most important electron sinks for organic compound oxidation in natural environments. Yet a limited number of isolates makes it difficult to understand physiology and ecological impact of the microorganisms involved. Here, two-staged cultivation was implemented to selectively enrich and isolate crystalline iron(III reducers in soils and sediments. Firstly, iron reducers were enriched and other untargeted eutrophs were depleted by two-year successive culture on a crystalline ferric iron oxide (i.e., goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, or magnetite as electron acceptor. Fifty-eight out of 136 incubation conditions allowed the continued existence of microorganisms as confirmed by PCR amplification. High-throughput Illumina sequencing based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that the enrichment cultures on each of the ferric iron oxides contained bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria (mainly Geobacteraceae, followed by Firmicutes and Chloroflexi, which also comprised most of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs identified. The Venn diagrams indicated that the core OTUs enriched with all of the iron oxides were dominant in the Geobacteraceae. Secondly, 38 enrichment cultures including novel microorganisms were transferred to soluble-iron(III media in order to stimulate proliferation of the enriched iron reducers. Through extinction dilution-culture and single colony isolation, six strains within the Deltaproteobacteria were finally obtained; five strains belonged to the genus Geobacter and one strain to Pelobacter. These isolates had 94.8–98.1% sequence similarities of 16S rRNA genes to cultured relatives. All the isolates were able to grow on acetate and ferric iron but their physiological characteristics differed considerably in terms of growth rate. The results demonstrate the successful enrichment and isolation of novel iron(III reducers that were able to thrive by reducing highly

  16. Study on Metallized Reduction and Magnetic Separation of Iron from Fine Particles of High Iron Bauxite Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Gen; Chu, Man-Sheng; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jue

    2017-01-01

    High iron bauxite ore is a typical unmanageable polyparagenetic resource and owns high comprehensive utilization value. Separation of iron from fine particles of high iron bauxite ore by the process of metallized reduction and magnetic dressing was researched systemically. The effect of magnetic field intensity, reduction temperature, reduction time, mole ratio of fixed carbon to reducible oxygen (FC/O) and ore particles size on separation indexes was researched. The results show that, with the conditions of reduction temperature of 1,400 °C, reduction time of 180 min, FC/O of 2.0, ore particle size of -2.0 mm and magnetic field intensity of 40 KA/m, about 89.24 % of the iron could be removed from high iron bauxite ore as metallic iron. Meanwhile, 86.09 % of the aluminum is stayed in non-magnetic fraction as alumina. However, the formation of hercynite (FeAl2O4) limits the reduction rate of iron oxides to metallic iron. The lower reduction conditions and higher recovery ratio of iron could be achieved with adopting ore-coal composite agglomerates or adding catalyst.

  17. Direct reduction of iron ore by biomass char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hai-bin; Hu, Zheng-wen; Zhang, Jian-liang; Li, Jing; Liu, Zheng-jian

    2013-06-01

    By using thermogravimetric analysis the process and mechanism of iron ore reduced by biomass char were investigated and compared with those reduced by coal and coke. It is found that biomass char has a higher reactivity. The increase of carbon-to-oxygen mole ratio (C/O) can lead to the enhancement of reaction rate and reduction fraction, but cannot change the temperature and trend of each reaction. The reaction temperature of hematite reduced by biomass char is at least 100 K lower than that reduced by coal and coke, the maximum reaction rate is 1.57 times as high as that of coal, and the final reaction fraction is much higher. Model calculation indicates that the use of burden composed of biomass char and iron ore for blast furnaces can probably decrease the temperature of the thermal reserve zone and reduce the CO equilibrium concentration.

  18. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  19. Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene by Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles: Reactivity Enhancement through Sulfidation Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanlai; Yan, Weile

    2016-12-06

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) synthesized in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds have been shown to degrade trichloroethene (TCE) at significantly higher rates. However, the applicability of sulfidation as a general means to enhance nZVI reactivity under different particle preparation conditions and the underlying cause for this enhancement effect are not well understood. In this study, the effects of sulfidation reagent, time point of sulfidation, and sulfur loading on the resultant particles were assessed through TCE degradation experiments. Up to 60-fold increase in TCE reaction rates was observed upon sulfidation treatment, with products being fully dechlorinated hydrocarbons. While the reactivity of these sulfur-treated nZVI (S-nZVI) was relatively unaffected by the sulfidation reagent (viz., sodium sulfide, dithionite, or thiosulfate) or the sequence of sulfidation relative to iron reduction, TCE reaction rates were found to depend strongly on sulfur to iron ratio. At a low sulfur loading, TCE degradation was accelerated with increasing sulfur dose. The rate constant reached a limiting value, however, as the sulfur to iron mole ratio was greater than 0.025. Different from previous propositions that iron sulfidation leads to more efficient TCE or tetrachloroethene (PCE) degradation by enabling depassivation of iron surface, affording catalytic pathways, or facilitating electron transfer, we show that the role of sulfur in nZVI lies essentially in its ability to poison hydrogen recombination, which drives surface reactions to favor reduction by atomic hydrogen. This implies that the reactivity of S-nZVI is contaminant-specific and is selective against the background reaction of water reduction. As the effect of sulfur manifests through surface processes, sulfidation represents a broadly applicable surface modification approach to modulate or increase the reactivity of nZVI for treating TCE and other related contaminants.

  20. Effect of microbial mediated iron plaque reduction on arsenic mobility in paddy soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinjun; CHEN Xueping; YANG Jing; WANG Zhaosu; SUN Guoxin

    2009-01-01

    The potential of microbial mediated iron plaque reduction,and associated arsenic (As) mobility were examined by iron reducing bacteria enriched from As contaminated paddy soil.To our knowledge,this is the first time to report the impact of microbial iron plaque reduction on As mobility.Iron reduction occurred during the inoculation of iron reducing enrichment culture in the treatments with iron plaque and ferrihydrite as the electron acceptors,respectively.The Fe(Ⅱ) concentration with the treatment of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS) and iron reducing bacteria increased much faster than the control.Arsenic released from iron plaque with the iron reduction,and a significant correlation between Fe(Ⅱ) and total As in culture was observed.However,compared with control,the increasing rate of As was inhibited by iron reducing bacteria especially in the presence of AQDS.In addition,the concentrations of As(Ⅲ) and As(V) in abiotic treatments were higher than those in the biotic treatments at day 30.These results indicated that both microbial and chemical reductions of iron plaque caused As release from iron plaque to aqueous phase,however,microbial iron reduction induced the formation of more crystalline iron minerals,leading to As sequestration.In addition,the presence of AQDS in solution can accelerate the iron reduction,the As release from iron plaque and subsequently the As retention in the crystalline iron mineral.Thus,our results suggested that it is possible to remediate As contaminated soils by utilizing iron reducing bacteria and AQDS.

  1. Integration of coal pyrolysis process with iron ore reduction:Reduction behaviors of iron ore with benzene-containing coal pyrolysis gas as a reducing agent☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Li; Helong Hui; Songgeng Li; Lu He; Lijie Cui

    2016-01-01

    An integrated coal pyrolysis process with iron ore reduction is proposed in this article. As the first step, iron oxide reduction is studied in a fixed bed reactor using simulated coal pyrolysis gas with benzene as a model tar com-pound. Variables such as reduction temperature, reduction time and benzene concentration are studied. The car-bon deposition of benzene results in the retarded iron reduction at low temperatures. At high temperatures over 800 °C, the presence of benzene in the gas can promote iron reduction. The metallization can reach up to 99%in 20 min at 900 °C in the presence of benzene. Significant increases of hydrogen and CO/CO2 ratio are observed in the gas. It is indicated that iron reduction is accompanied by the reforming and decomposition of benzene. The degree of metal ization and reduction increases with the increasing benzene concentration. Iron oxide can nearly completely be converted into cementite with benzene present in the gas under the experimental conditions. No sintering is found in the reduced sample with benzene in the gas.

  2. Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Roden, E.E.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Woodward, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to enzymatically reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated. Five species of Desulfovibrio as well as Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobulbus propionicus reduced Fe(III) chelated with nitrilotriacetic acid as well as insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Fe(III) oxide reduction resulted in the accumulation of magnetite and siderite. Desulfobacter postgatei reduced the chelated Fe(III) but not Fe(III) oxide. Desulfobacter curvatus, Desulfomonile tiedjei, and Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans did not reduce Fe(III). Only Desulfovibrio species reduced U(VI). U(VI) reduction resulted in the precipitation of uraninite. None of the SRB that reduced Fe(III) or U(VI) appeared to conserve enough energy to support growth from this reaction. However, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans metabolized H2 down to lower concentrations with Fe(III) or U(VI) as the electron acceptor than with sulfate, suggesting that these metals may be preferred electron acceptors at the low H2 concentrations present in most marine sediments. Molybdate did not inhibit Fe(III) reduction by D. desulfuricans. This indicates that the inability of molybdate to inhibit Fe(III) reduction in marine sediments does not rule out the possibility that SRB are important catalysts for Fe(III) reduction. The results demonstrate that although SRB were previously considered to reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) indirectly through the production of sulfide, they may also directly reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) through enzymatic mechanisms. These findings, as well as our recent discovery that the So-reducing microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans can reduce Fe(III), demonstrate that there are close links between the microbial sulfur, iron, and uranium cycles in anaerobic marine sediments. ?? 1993.

  3. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  4. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  5. Uranium(VI) reduction by iron(II) monosulfide mackinawite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Sung Pil; Davis, James A; Sun, Kai; Hayes, Kim F

    2012-03-20

    Reaction of aqueous uranium(VI) with iron(II) monosulfide mackinawite in an O(2) and CO(2) free model system was studied by batch uptake measurements, equilibrium modeling, and L(III) edge U X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Batch uptake measurements showed that U(VI) removal was almost complete over the wide pH range between 5 and 11 at the initial U(VI) concentration of 5 × 10(-5) M. Extraction by a carbonate/bicarbonate solution indicated that most of the U(VI) removed from solution was reduced to nonextractable U(IV). Equilibrium modeling using Visual MINTEQ suggested that U was in equilibrium with uraninite under the experimental conditions. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy showed that the U(IV) phase associated with mackinawite was uraninite. Oxidation experiments with dissolved O(2) were performed by injecting air into the sealed reaction bottles containing mackinawite samples reacted with U(VI). Dissolved U measurement and XAS confirmed that the uraninite formed from the U(VI) reduction by mackinawite did not oxidize or dissolve under the experimental conditions. This study shows that redox reactions between U(VI) and mackinawite may occur to a significant extent, implying an important role of the ferrous sulfide mineral in the redox cycling of U under sulfate reducing conditions. This study also shows that the presence of mackinawite protects uraninite from oxidation by dissolved O(2). The findings of this study suggest that uraninite formation by abiotic reduction by the iron sulfide mineral under low temperature conditions is an important process in the redistribution and sequestration of U in the subsurface environments at U contaminated sites.

  6. Bacterial Oxidation and Reduction of Iron in the Processes of Creation and Treatment of Acid Mining Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kupka

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainages (AMDs arise at the weathering of sulphidic minerals. The occurrence of acidic streams is commonly associated with the human mining activities. Due to the disruption and excavation of sulphide deposits, the oxidation processes have initiated. Acidic products of sulphide oxidation accelerate the degradation of accompanying minerals. AMDs typically contain high concentrations of sulfuric acid and soluble metals and cause serious ecological problems due to the water pollution and the devastation of adjacent country. Microbial life in these extremely acidic environments may be considerably diverse. AMDs are abundant in bacteria capable to oxidize and/or to reduce iron. The rate of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron released from pyrite surfaces is up to one million times faster than the chemical oxidation rate at low pH. Bacterial regeneration of ferric iron maintains the continuity of pyrite oxidation and the production of AMDs. Another group of microorganisms living in these environments are acidophilic ferric iron reducing bacteria. This group of microorganisms has been discovered only relatively recently. Acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria reduce ferric iron in either soluble or solid forms to ferrous iron. The reductive dissolution of ferric iron minerals brings about a mobilization of iron as well as associated heavy metals. The Bacterial oxidation and reduction of iron play an important role in the transformation of either crystalline or amorphous iron-containing minerals, including sulphides, oxides, hydroxysulfates, carbonates and silicates. This work discusses the role of acidophilic bacteria in the natural iron cycling and the genesis of acidic effluents. The possibilities of application of iron bacteria in the remediation of AMDs are also considered.

  7. Geochemical and microbiological controls on dissimilatory iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2006-06-01

    Recent experimental studies permit development of conceptual and quantitative models of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction at circumneutral pH that can be compared to and contrasted with established models of abiotic mineral dissolution. The findings collectively support a model for controls on enzymatic reduction that differs fundamentally from those applied to abiotic reductive dissolution as a result of two basic phenomena: (1) the relatively minor influence of oxide mineralogical and thermodynamic properties on rates of enzymatic reduction compared to abiotic reductive dissolution, and (2) the major limitation which sorption and/or surface precipitation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide and Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell surfaces poses to enzymatic electron transfer in the presence of excess electron donor. Parallel studies with two well-characterized Fe(III)-reducing organisms ( Shewanella putrefaciens and Geobacter sulfurreducens) lead to common conclusions regarding the importance of these phenomena in regulating the rate and long-term extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction. Models in which rates of enzymatic reduction are limited by Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell density together with the abundance of 'available' oxide surface sites (as controlled by oxide surface area and the accumulation of surface-bound biogenic Fe(II)) provide an adequate macroscopic description of controls on the initial rate and long-term extent of oxide reduction. To cite this article: E.E. Roden, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  8. Evidence for Microbial Iron Reduction in a Landfill Leachate-Polluted Aquifer (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    as an increase in the concentration of dissolved Fe(II). Iron reduction did not occur when the medium was inoculated with inactive sediment and when the organisms in the inoculated medium were killed by formaldehyde, by chloroform, or by pasteurization, whereas the level of iron reduction was significant when...... and groundwater. Synthetic amorphous Fe(III) oxides, as well as naturally occurring sediment-bound Fe(III) oxides, could be reduced by the cultures. Together, our results provide evidence that iron-reducing bacteria are present and microbial iron reduction occurs in the polluted aquifer sediments which we studied....

  9. Effects of Cerium on Reduction of Non-Chromium Iron Based CO Shift Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏运来; 胡捷; 马卓娜; 杜宝石; 郭益群

    2001-01-01

    The effects of Ce on reduction of non-chromium iron based CO shift catalyst were studied by XRD, TPR, SEM and XPS. The results show that Ce refines Fe2O3 grains and riches on the surface of catalyst in the process of reduction, which leads to decrease of the initial reductive temperature and increase of the final reductive temperature.

  10. Reduction Kinetics of Wüstite Scale on Pure Iron and Steel Sheets in Ar and H2 Gas Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weichen; Sloof, Willem G.

    2017-07-01

    A dense and closed Wüstite scale is formed on pure iron and Mn alloyed steel after oxidation in Ar + 33 vol pct CO2 + 17 vol pct CO gas mixture. Reducing the Wüstite scale in Ar + H2 gas mixture forms a dense and uniform iron layer on top of the remaining Wüstite scale, which separates the unreduced scale from the gas mixture. The reduction of Wüstite is controlled by the bulk diffusion of dissolved oxygen in the formed iron layer and follows parabolic growth rate law. The reduction kinetics of Wüstite formed on pure iron and on Mn alloyed steel are the same. The parabolic rate constant of Wüstite reduction obeys an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy of 104 kJ/mol if the formed iron layer is in the ferrite phase. However, at 1223 K (950 °C) the parabolic rate constant of Wüstite reduction drops due to the phase transformation of the iron layer from ferrite to austenite. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on the parabolic rate constant of Wüstite reduction is negligible when reducing in a gas mixture with a dew point below 283 K (10 °C). During oxidation of the Mn alloyed steel, Mn is dissolved in the Wüstite scale. Subsequently, during reduction of the Wüstite layer, Mn diffuses into the unreduced Wüstite. Ultimately, an oxide-free iron layer is obtained at the surface of the Mn alloyed steel, which is beneficial for coating application.

  11. Interactions between microbial iron reduction and metal geochemistry: effect of redox cycling on transition metal speciation in iron bearing sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D Craig; Picardal, Flynn F; Coby, Aaron J

    2006-03-15

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respectto Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a -3x increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by approximately 12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These

  12. Smelting reduction and kinetics analysis of magnetic iron in copper slag using waste cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xubin; Wang, Hua; Wei, Yonggang; Hu, Jianhang

    2017-05-25

    To improve the recovery of copper, the viscosity of copper molten slag is decreased by the reduction of magnetic iron, which, in turn, accelerates the settling and separation of copper droplets from the slag. A new technology is proposed in which waste cooking oil is used as a reductant to reduce magnetic iron in the copper smelting slag and consequently reduce carbon emissions in the copper smelting process. A kinetic model of the reduction of magnetic iron in copper slag by waste cooking oil was built using experimental data, and the accuracy of the model was verified. The results indicated that the magnetic iron content in the copper slag decreased with increasing reduction time and an increase in temperature more efficiently reduced magnetic iron in the copper slag. The magnetic iron in the copper slag gradually transformed to fayalite, and the viscosity of the copper molten slag decreased as the magnetic iron content decreased during the reduction process. The reduction of magnetic iron in the copper molten slag using waste cooking oil was a first-order reaction, and the rate-limiting step was the mass transfer of Fe3O4 through the liquid boundary layer.

  13. Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-05-15

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system.

  14. Labile iron potentiates ascorbate-dependent reduction and mobilization of ferritin iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badu-Boateng, Charles; Pardalaki, Sofia; Wolf, Claude; Lajnef, Sonia; Peyrot, Fabienne; Naftalin, Richard J

    2017-03-21

    Ascorbate mobilizes iron from equine spleen ferritin by two separate processes. Ascorbate alone mobilizes ferritin iron with an apparent Km (ascorbate) ≈1.5mM. Labile iron >2μM, complexed with citrate (10mM), synergises ascorbate-dependent iron mobilization by decreasing the apparent Km (ascorbate) to ≈270μM and raising maximal mobilization rate by ≈5-fold. Catalase reduces the apparent Km(ascorbate) for both ascorbate and ascorbate+iron dependent mobilization by ≈80%. Iron mobilization by ascorbate alone has a higher activation energy (Ea=45.0±5.5kJ/mole) than when mediated by ascorbate with labile iron (10μM) (Ea=13.7±2.2kJ/mole); also mobilization by iron-ascorbate has a three-fold higher pH sensitivity (pH range 6.0-8.0) than with ascorbate alone. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits ascorbate's iron mobilizing action. EPR and autochemiluminescence studies show that ascorbate and labile iron within ferritin enhances radical formation, whereas ascorbate alone produces negligible radicals. These findings suggest that iron catalysed single electron transfer reactions from ascorbate, involving ascorbate or superoxide and possibly ferroxidase tyrosine radicals, accelerate iron mobilization from the ferroxidase centre more than EPR silent, bi-dentate two-electron transfers. These differing modes of electron transference from ascorbate mirror the known mono and bidentate oxidation reactions of dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide with di-ferrous iron at the ferroxidase centre. This study implies that labile iron, at physiological pH, complexed with citrate, synergises iron mobilization from ferritin by ascorbate (50-4000μM). This autocatalytic process can exacerbate oxidative stress in ferritin-containing inflamed tissue.

  15. Smelting in cupola furnace for re carburization of direct reduction iron (DRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, J. L.; Tremps, E.; Ruiz-Bustinza, I.; Moron, C.; GarciaGarcia, A.; Robla, J. I.; Gonzalez-Gasca, C.

    2015-07-01

    Herein the synthesis of iron-carbon saturated alloys (foundries) melting in cupola furnaces from direct reduction iron is described. The fundamentals are reviewed and combinations undertaken are discussed along with their results, including conclusions and recommendations for follow up. (Author)

  16. Microbial reduction of iron and porewater biogeochemistry in acidic peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Küsel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Temporal drying of upper soil layers of acidic methanogenic peatlands might divert the flow of reductants from CH4 formation to other electron-accepting processes due to a renewal of alternative electron acceptors. In this study, we evaluated the in situ relevance of Fe(III-reducing microbial activities in peatlands of a forested catchment that differed in their hydrology. Intermittent seeps reduced sequentially nitrate, Fe(III, and sulfate during periods of water saturation. Due to the acidic soil conditions, released Fe(II was transported with the groundwater flow and accumulated as Fe(III in upper soil layers of a lowland fen apparently due to oxidation. Microbial Fe(III reduction in the upper soil layer accounted for 26.7 and 71.6% of the anaerobic organic carbon mineralization in the intermittent seep and the lowland fen, respectively. In an upland fen not receiving exogenous Fe, Fe(III reduction contributed only to 6.7%. Fe(II and acetate accumulated in deeper porewater of the lowland fen with maximum concentrations of 7 and 3 mM, respectively. Both supplemental glucose and acetate stimulated the reduction of Fe(III indicating that fermentative, incomplete, and complete oxidizers were involved in Fe(II formation in the acidic fen. Amplification of DNA yielded PCR products specific for Acidiphilium-, Geobacter-, and Geothrix-, but not for Shewanella- or Anaeroromyxobacter-related sequences. Porewater biogeochemistry observed during a 3-year-period suggests that increased drought periods and subsequent intensive rainfalls due to global climate change will further favor Fe(III and sulfate as alternative electron acceptors due to the storage of their reduced compounds in the soil.

  17. Microbial reduction of iron and porewater biogeochemistry in acidic peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Küsel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal drying of upper soil layers of acidic methanogenic peatlands might divert the flow of reductants from CH4 formation to other electron-accepting processes due to a renewal of alternative electron acceptors. In this study, we evaluated the in situ relevance of Fe(III-reducing microbial activities in peatlands of a forested catchment that differed in their hydrology. Intermittent seeps reduced sequentially nitrate, Fe(III, and sulfate during periods of water saturation. Due to the acidic soil conditions, released Fe(II was transported with the groundwater flow and accumulated as Fe(III in upper soil layers of a lowland fen apparently due to oxidation. Microbial Fe(III reduction in the upper soil layer accounted for 26.7 and 71.6% of the anaerobic organic carbon mineralization in the intermittent seep and the lowland fen, respectively. In an upland fen not receiving exogenous Fe, Fe(III reduction contributed only to 6.7%. Fe(II and acetate accumulated in deeper porewater of the lowland fen with maximum concentrations of 7 and 3 mM, respectively. Both supplemental glucose and acetate stimulated the reduction of Fe(III indicating that fermentative, incomplete, and complete oxidizers were involved in Fe(II formation in the acidic fen. Amplification of DNA yielded PCR products specific for Acidiphilium-, Geobacter-, and Geothrix-, but not for Shewanella- or Anaeroromyxobacter-related sequences. Porewater biogeochemistry observed during a 3-year-period suggests that increased drought periods and subsequent intensive rainfalls due to global climate change will further favor Fe(III and sulfate as alternative electron acceptors due to the storage and enhanced re-oxidation of their reduced compounds in the soil.

  18. Abiotic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fubo; Xie, Li; Li, Jun; Zhou, Qi

    2013-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides (goethite, hematite and magnetite) and humic acid. The reduction rate of nitrobenzene decreased in the order of Fe(II) associated with magnetite>Fe(II) associated with goethite>Fe(II) associated with hematite. We proposed a four-step model (adsorption, electron transfer to conduction band, electron transfer to nitrobenzene and electron transfer to crystal lattice) for nitrobenzene reduction by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides. Fe(II)-humic acid complexes did not present reduction capability of nitrobenzene. Furthermore, Humic acid significantly inhibited nitrobenzene reduction by Fe(II) associated with iron oxides. The inhibitory effect of humic acid toward the reduction of nitrobenzene decreased in the order of magnetite>goethite>hematite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Heterogeneous reductive dehalogenation of PCB contaminated transformer oil and brominated diphenyl ethers with zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habekost, A; Aristov, N

    2012-09-01

    Reductive dechlorination and debromination of halogenated biphenyls (PCBs) and diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) occurs efficiently at moderately elevated temperatures (350-600 °C) with zero valent iron (iron powder) in a nitrogen atmosphere. The proton donors tested were waste transformer oil, iso-octane, and n-decane. Observation of production of biphenyl and diphenyl ether and their condensation products indicates that the reaction is not simple pyrolysis, but a reduction. No halogenated organic products are observed.

  20. Natural clinoptilolite exchanged with iron: characterization and catalytic activity in nitrogen monoxide reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Tito-Ferro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the natural clinoptilolite from Tasajeras deposit, Cuba, modified by hydrothermal ion-exchange with solutions of iron (II sulfate and iron (III nitrate in acid medium. Besides this, its catalytic activity to reduce nitrogen monoxide with carbon monoxide/propene in the presence of oxygen was evaluated. The characterization was performed by Mössbauer and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopies and adsorption measurements. The obtained results lead to conclude that in exchanged samples, incorporated divalent and trivalent irons are found in octahedral coordination. Both irons should be mainly in cationic extra-framework positions inside clinoptilolite channels as charge compensating cations, and also as iron oxy-hydroxides resulting from limited hydrolysis of these cations. The iron (III exchanged samples has a larger amount of iron oxy-hydroxides agglomerates. The iron (II exchanged samples have additionally iron (II sulfate adsorbed. The catalytic activity in the nitrogen monoxide reduction is higher in the exchanged zeolites than starting. Among all samples, those exchanged of iron (II has the higher catalytic activity. This lead to outline that, main catalytically active centers are associated with divalent iron.

  1. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  2. Reduction of Nitroaromatic Compounds on the Surface of Metallic Iron: Quantum Chemical Study

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    Jerzy Leszczynski

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The initial reduction steps of nitroaromatic compounds on the surface of metallic iron have been studied theoretically using nitrobenzene (NB as a representative of nitroaromatic compounds. The quantum chemical cluster approximation within the semiempirical Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap for Metal Compounds method was applied to model the Fe(110 crystallographic surface, taken as a representative reactive surface for granular iron. This surface was modeled as a 39-atom two-layer metal cluster with rigid geometry. The associative and dissociative adsorption of nitrobenzene was considered. Based on our quantum chemical analysis, we suggest that the direct electron donation from the metal surface into the π* orbital of NB is a decisive factor responsible for subsequent transformation of the nitro group. Molecularly adsorbed NB interacts with metal iron exclusively through nitro moiety oxygens which occupy tri-coordinated positions on surface The charge transfer from metal to NB of approximately 2 atomic units destablizes the nitro group. As a result, the first dissociation of the N-O bond goes through a relatively low activation barrier. The adsorbed nitrosobenzene is predicted to be a stable surface species, though still quiet labile.

  3. Upgrading and dephosphorization of Western Australian iron ore using reduction roasting by adding sodium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, De-qing; Chun, Tie-jun; Pan, Jian; Lu, Li-ming; He, Zhen

    2013-06-01

    The technology of direct reduction by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and magnetic separation was developed to treat Western Australian high phosphorus iron ore. The iron ore and reduced product were investigated by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that phosphorus exists within limonite in the form of solid solution, which cannot be removed through traditional ways. During reduction roasting, Na2CO3 reacts with gangue minerals (SiO2 and Al2O3), forming aluminum silicate-containing phosphorus and damaging the ore structure, which promotes the separation between iron and phosphorus during magnetic separation. Meanwhile, Na2CO3 also improves the growth of iron grains, increasing the iron grade and iron recovery. The iron concentrate, assaying 94.12wt% Fe and 0.07wt% P at the iron recovery of 96.83% and the dephosphorization rate of 74.08%, is obtained under the optimum conditions. The final product (metal iron powder) after briquetting can be used as the burden for steelmaking by an electric arc furnace to replace scrap steel.

  4. Recovery of iron from copper slag by deep reduction and magnetic beneficiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke-qing; Ping, Shuo; Wang, Hong-yu; Ni, Wen

    2013-11-01

    Aiming at recovering iron from high-iron-content copper slag, this article introduced a combination technology of deep reduction and magnetic beneficiation, investigated the iron recovery efficiency and optimized the technical conditions. When coke powder with 86wt% fixed carbon was used as a reductant, iron was successfully extracted from the copper slag. Under the optimized condition of the coke powder content of 14wt%, the calcium-to-silicon mass ratio (Ca/Si) of 0.2, the roasting temperature of 1300°C, the roasting time of 3 h, the grinding time of 20 min, and the magnetic field intensity of 61 kA·m-1, the iron recovery rate of the copper slag can reach 91.82%, and the extracted iron powder has an iron grade of 96.21%. With the characteristics of high iron grade and low impurity content, the extracted iron powder can be used as high-quality raw materials of weathering steel.

  5. Iron homeostasis related genes in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross Jeferson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for plants. However, excess iron is toxic, leading to oxidative stress and decreased productivity. Therefore, plants must use finely tuned mechanisms to keep iron homeostasis in each of their organs, tissues, cells and organelles. A few of the genes involved in iron homeostasis in plants have been identified recently, and we used some of their protein sequences as queries to look for corresponding genes in the rice (Oryza sativa genome. We have assigned possible functions to thirty-nine new rice genes. Together with four previously reported sequences, we analyzed a total of forty-three genes belonging to five known protein families: eighteen YS (Yellow Stripe, two FRO (Fe3+-chelate reductase oxidase, thirteen ZIP (Zinc regulated transporter / Iron regulated transporter Protein, eight NRAMP (Natural Resistance - Associated Macrophage Protein, and two Ferritin proteins. The possible cellular localization and number of potential transmembrane domains were evaluated, and phylogenetic analysis performed for each gene family. Annotation of genomic sequences was performed. The presence and number of homologues in each gene family in rice and Arabidopsis is discussed in light of the established iron acquisition strategies used by each one of these two plants.

  6. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in iron-related genes and iron status in multiethnic populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E McLaren

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. We previously performed a genome-wide association study of iron-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using DNA from white men aged ≥ 25 y and women ≥ 50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study with serum ferritin (SF ≤ 12 µg/L (cases and controls (SF >100 µg/L in men, SF >50 µg/L in women. We report a follow-up study of white, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian HEIRS participants, analyzed for association between SNPs and eight iron-related outcomes. Three chromosomal regions showed association across multiple populations, including SNPs in the TF and TMPRSS6 genes, and on chromosome 18q21. A novel SNP rs1421312 in TMPRSS6 was associated with serum iron in whites (p = 3.7 × 10(-6 and replicated in African Americans (p = 0.0012.Twenty SNPs in the TF gene region were associated with total iron-binding capacity in whites (p<4.4 × 10(-5; six SNPs replicated in other ethnicities (p<0.01. SNP rs10904850 in the CUBN gene on 10p13 was associated with serum iron in African Americans (P = 1.0 × 10(-5. These results confirm known associations with iron measures and give unique evidence of their role in different ethnicities, suggesting origins in a common founder.

  7. Reduction of iron-bearing lunar minerals for the production of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massieon, Charles; Cutler, Andrew; Shadman, Farhang

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of simulants of the iron-bearing lunar minerals olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4), pyroxene ((Fe,Mg,Ca)SiO3), and ilmenite (FeTiO3) are investigated, extending previous work with ilmenite. Fayalite is reduced by H2 at 1070 K to 1480 K. A layer of mixed silica glass and iron forms around an unreacted core. Reaction kinetics are influenced by permeation of hydrogen through this layer and a reaction step involving dissociated hydrogen. Reaction mechanisms are independent of Mg content. Augite, hypersthene, and hedenbergite are reduced in H2 at the same temperatures. The products are iron metal and lower iron silicates mixed throughout the mineral. Activation energy rises with calcium content. Ilmenite and fayalite are reduced with carbon deposited on partially reduced minerals via the CO disproportionation reaction. Reduction with carbon is rapid, showing the carbothermal reduction of lunar minerals is possible.

  8. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  9. Copper increases reductive dehalogenation of haloacetamides by zero-valent iron in drinking water: Reduction efficiency and integrated toxicity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Bond, Tom; Gao, Naiyun; Bin, Xu; Wang, Qiongfang; Ding, Shunke

    2016-12-15

    The haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogen-containing disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), are highly cytotoxic and genotoxic, and typically occur in treated drinking waters at low μg/L concentrations. Since many drinking distribution and storage systems contain unlined cast iron and copper pipes, reactions of HAcAms with zero-valent iron (ZVI) and metallic copper (Cu) may play a role in determining their fate. Moreover, ZVI and/or Cu are potentially effective HAcAm treatment technologies in drinking water supply and storage systems. This study reports that ZVI alone reduces trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) to sequentially form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) and then monochloroacetamide (MCAcAm), whereas Cu alone does not impact HAcAm concentrations. The addition of Cu to ZVI significantly improved the removal of HAcAms, relative to ZVI alone. TCAcAm and their reduction products (DCAcAm and MCAcAm) were all decreased to below detection limits at a molar ratio of ZVI/Cu of 1:1 after 24 h reaction (ZVI/TCAcAm = 0.18 M/5.30 μM). TCAcAm reduction increased with the decreasing pH from 8.0 to 5.0, but values from an integrated toxic risk assessment were minimised at pH 7.0, due to limited removal MCAcAm under weak acid conditions (pH = 5.0 and 6.0). Higher temperatures (40 °C) promoted the reductive dehalogenation of HAcAms. Bromine was preferentially removed over chlorine, thus brominated HAcAms were more easily reduced than chlorinated HAcAms by ZVI/Cu. Although tribromoacetamide was more easily reduced than TCAcAm during ZVI/Cu reduction, treatment of tribromoacetamide resulted in a higher integrated toxicity risk than TCAcAm, due to the formation of monobromoacetamide (MBAcAm). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduction Behaviors of Carbon Composite Iron Oxide Briquette Under Oxidation Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki-Woo; Kim, Kang-Min; Kwon, Jae-Hong; Han, Jeong-Whan [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Sang-Han [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The carbon composite iron oxide briquette (CCB) is considered a potential solution to the upcoming use of low grade iron resources in the ironmaking process. CCB is able to reduce raw material cost by enabling the use of low grade powdered iron ores and coal. Additionally, the fast reduction of iron oxides by direct contact with coal can be utilized. In this study, the reduction behaviors of CCB were investigated in the temperature range of 200-1200 ℃ under oxidizing atmosphere. Briquettes were prepared by mixing iron ore and coal in a weight ratio of 8:2. Then reduction experiments were carried out in a mixed gas atmosphere of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. Compressive strength tests and quantitative analysis were performed by taking samples at each target temperature. In addition, the reduction degree depending on the reaction time was evaluated by off-gas analysis during the reduction test. It was found that the compressive strength and the metallization degree of the reduced briquettes increased with increases in the reaction temperature and holding time. However, it tended to decrease when the re-oxidation phenomenon was caused by injected oxygen. The degree of reduction reached a maximum value in 26 minutes. Therefore, the re-oxidation phenomenon becomes dominant after 26 minutes.

  11. ARSENIC ADSORPTION AND REDUCTION IN IRON-RICH SOILS NEARBY LANDFILLS IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqin Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Florida, soils are mainly composed of Myakka, an acid soil characterized by a subsurface accumulation of humus and Al(III and Fe(III oxides. Downgradient of the landfills in Northwest Florida, elevated levels of iron and arsenic observations had been made in the groundwater from monitoring wells, which was attributed to the geomicrobial iron and arsenic reduction. There is thus an immediate research need for a better understanding of the reduction reactions that are responsible for the mobilization of iron and arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills. Owing to the high Fe(III oxide content, As(V adsorption reactions with Fe(III oxide surfaces are particularly important, which may control As(V reduction. This research focused on the investigation of the biogeochemical processes of the subsurface soil nearby landfills of Northwest Florida. Arsenic and iron reduction was studied in batch reactors and quantified based on Monod-type microbial kinetic growth simulations. As(V adsorption in iron-rich Northwest Floridian soils was further investigated to explain the reduction observations. It was demonstrated in this research that solubilization of arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills in Northwest Florida would likely occur under conditions favoring Fe(III dissimilatory reduction.

  12. Application Of Bacterial Iron Reduction For The Removal Of Iron Impurities From Industrial Silica Sand And Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A.; Yahaya, S.; Fialips, C. I.; White, M.; Manning, D. A.; Gray, N.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical evidence exists to support the potential importance of crystalline or amorphous Fe minerals as electron acceptor for Fe reducing bacteria in soils and subsurface sediments. This microbial metabolic activity can be exploited as alternative method in different industrial applications. For instance, the removal of ferric iron impurities from minerals for the glass and paper industries currently rely on physical and chemical treatments having substantial economical and environmental disadvantages. The ability to remove iron by other means, such as bacterial iron reduction, may reduce costs, allow lower grade material to be mined, and improve the efficiency of mineral processing. Kaolin clay and silica sand are used in a wide range of industrial applications, particularly in paper, ceramics and glass manufacturing. Depending on the geological conditions of deposition, they are often associated with iron (hydr)oxides that are either adsorbed to the mineral surfaces or admixed as separate iron bearing minerals. In this study, we have examined the Fe(III) removal efficiency from kaolin and silica sand by a series of iron- reducing bacteria from the Shewanella species (S. alga BrY, S. oneidensis MR-1, S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. putrefaciens ATCC 8071) in the presence of anthraquinone 2,6 disulfonate (AQDS). We have also investigated the effectiveness of a natural organic matter, extracted with the silica sand, as a substitute to AQDS for enhancing Fe(III) reduction kinetics. The microbial reduction of Fe(III) was achieved using batch cultures under non-growth conditions. The rate and the extent of Fe(III) reduction was monitored as a function of the initial Fe(III) content, Shewanella species and temperature. The bacterially- treated minerals were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to observe any textural and mineralogical transformation. The whiteness and ISO brightness of the kaolin was also measured by

  13. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akam, Eman A.; Chang, Tsuhen M.; Astashkin, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  14. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment.

  15. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Von L. [Advanced Technology Inst., Virginia Beach, VA (United States)

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  16. Electrochemical reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by single sheet iron oxide coated electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-Zhi, E-mail: lizhi@plen.ku.dk [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK–1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Hansen, Hans Christian B. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK–1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Bjerrum, Morten Jannik [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK–2100 København Ø (Denmark)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Composite layers of single sheet iron oxides were coated on indium tin oxide electrodes. • Single sheet iron oxide is an electro-catalyst for reduction of nitroaromatic compounds in aqueous solution. • The reduction is well explained by a diffusion layer model. • The charge properties of the nitrophenols have an important influence on reduction. • Low-cost iron oxide based materials are promising electro-catalyst for water treatment. - Abstract: Nitroaromatic compounds are substantial hazard to the environment and to the supply of clean drinking water. We report here the successful reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by use of iron oxide coated electrodes, and demonstrate that single sheet iron oxides formed from layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides have unusual electrocatalytic reactivity. Electrodes were produced by coating of single sheet iron oxides on indium tin oxide electrodes. A reduction current density of 10 to 30 μA cm{sup −2} was observed in stirred aqueous solution at pH 7 with concentrations of 25 to 400 μM of the nitroaromatic compound at a potential of −0.7 V vs. SHE. Fast mass transfer favors the initial reduction of the nitroaromatic compound which is well explained by a diffusion layer model. Reduction was found to comprise two consecutive reactions: a fast four-electron first-order reduction of the nitro-group to the hydroxylamine-intermediate (rate constant = 0.28 h{sup −1}) followed by a slower two-electron zero-order reduction resulting in the final amino product (rate constant = 6.9 μM h{sup −1}). The zero-order of the latter reduction was attributed to saturation of the electrode surface with hydroxylamine-intermediates which have a more negative half-wave potential than the parent compound. For reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, the SSI electrode is found superior to metal electrodes due to low cost and high stability, and superior to carbon-based electrodes in terms of high coulombic efficiency and

  17. Structural Changes Occuring During the Direct Reduction of Attepe Iron Ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesibe Ort

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, most of the World's iron (over 95 % is produced in blast furnaces where it is essential to use high grade coking coal which is in great demand, scarce and very expensive. In addition, the building of blast furnaces requires huge capital investments and because of their large sizes they are not flexible for limited operations. These led, since 1950s to the development of direct reduction processes which have reached a worldwide production of 60 million tons per annum. The iron produced by direct reduction can be used directly as raw material in electric arc furnaces as a replacement of scrap, thus increasing the steel quality. The fact that Turkey imports around 15 million tons of scrap per year for steel production, indicates alone the importance of investigation of suitability of domestic iron ores to the direct reduction. Since the direct reduction processes involve typical gas-solid reactions, the structure of iron ore and structural changes taking place during reaction within the solid phase, have great impact on process kinetics. This study therefore, deals with the changes observed before (i.e. during preheating and during reduction in the surface area and porosity of Attepe iron ore.

  18. Reduction of molybdenum oxide from steelmaking slags by pure liquid iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction temperature, slag basicity and FeO concentration on the reduction of molybdenum oxide from steelmaking slags by pure liquid iron were investigated experimently. The reduction kinetics of molybdenum oxide by liquid iron was analysed. The reaction models were developed based on the condition that diffusion of [Mo] in liquid iron and CaMoO4 in slag is the control steps, respectively. These reaction models were tested using data from a series of experiments. The results indicate that under the present experimental conditions, the temperature and the FeO content, other than slag basicity, have some effects on the reduction of molybdenum oxide from steelmaking slags by pure liquid iron. Both the molybdenum oxide reduction rate and final reduction ratio increase with an increase of temperature and a decrease of FeO content. The diffusion of CaMoO4 in slag which dominated overall reduction process is the only one ratecontrolling step with its apparent activation energy 294 kJ/mol. The reduction of molybdenum oxide used directly as alloy additive can be further enhanced by strong stirring in the converter practice.

  19. Complete reduction of TNT and other (poly)nitroaromatic compounds under iron-reducing subsurface conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, T.B.; Haderlein, S.B.; Schwarzenbach, R.P. [Swiss Federal Inst. for Environmental Science and Technology, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Heijman, C.G.; Holliger, C. [Swiss Federal Inst. for Tech., Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    1999-05-01

    Contamination of soils and aquifers with (poly)nitroaromatic compounds ((P)NACs) is a widespread problem. This work demonstrates that (P)NACs such as the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) can be completely reduced to the corresponding aromatic polyamines by Fe(II) present at the surface of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides or, less efficiently, by hydroquinone moieties of (natural) organic matter in the presence of H{sub 2}S. The reduction kinetics of (P)NACs were investigated in sterile batch systems as well as in columns containing either FeOOH-coated sand and a pure culture of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter metallireducens or ferrogenic consortia in aquifer sediments. The relative reactivities as well as the competition behavior of (P)NACs in batch and column systems, respectively, correlated well with their one-electron reduction potentials, E{sub h}{sup 1}{prime}, which the authors determined for TNT and its aminonitrotoluene transformation products. A similar reactivity pattern of (P)NACs was found irrespective of the processes that (re)generated the surface-bound Fe(II), i.e., adsorption of Fe(II) from aqueous solution or microbial reduction of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The apparent stability of the toxic arylamine products under ferrogenic conditions may compromise intrinsic attenuation as an acceptable remediation option for (P)NAC contaminated anoxic aquifers. Iron-reducing conditions would, however, be favorable as a first step in a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic treatment of PNAC contaminated sediments since aromatic polyamines are biodegradable and/or bind irreversibly to the solid matrix under oxic conditions.

  20. Ligand-based reduction of CO2 and release of CO on iron(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammavongsy, Zachary; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Kaminsky, Werner; Gilbertson, John D

    2012-09-01

    A synthetic cycle for the CO(2)-to-CO conversion (with subsequent release of CO) based on iron(II), a redox-active pydridinediimine ligand (PDI), and an O-atom acceptor is reported. This conversion is a passive-type ligand-based reduction, where the electrons for the CO(2) conversion are supplied by the reduced PDI ligand and the ferrous state of the iron is conserved.

  1. Significance of iron reduction for the therapy of chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nožić Darko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It has been established that many patients with chronic hepatitis C have elevated serum iron, feritin levels and iron deposits in the liver. Therefore, the liver damage due to hepatitis C virus may be aggravated with iron overload. In many studies higher levels of iron in the blood and the liver were connected with the decreased response to interferon-alfa therapy for chronic viral hepatitis C. Recent introduction of pegylated interferons plus ribavirin has improved the therapeutic response, so it is now possible to cure more than 50% of the patients. Case report. Three patients with chronic hepatitis C and iron overload were presented. Iron reduction therapy using phlebotomy or eritrocytapheresis with plasmapheresis was done at different times in regard to specific antiviral therapy or as a sole therapy. Conclusion. It has been shown that iron reduction, sole or combined with antiviral therapy, led to the deacreased aminotransferase serum activity and might have slow down the evolution of chronic hepatitis C viral infection.

  2. In situ redox manipulation of subsurface sediments from Fort Lewis, Washington: Iron reduction and TCE dechlorination mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JE Szecsody; JS Fruchter; DS Sklarew; JC Evans

    2000-03-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a bench-scale study to determine how effective chemically treated Ft. Lewis sediments can degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The objectives of this experimental study were to quantify: (1) sediment reduction and oxidation reactions, (2) TCE degradation reactions, and (3) other significant geochemical changes that occurred. Sediment reduction and oxidation were investigated to determine the mass of reducible iron in the Ft. Lewis sediments and the rate of this reduction and subsequent oxidation at different temperatures. The temperature dependence was needed to be able to predict field-scale reduction in the relatively cold ({approximately}11 C) Ft. Lewis aquifer. Results of these experiments were used in conjunction with other geochemical and hydraulic characterization to design the field-scale injection experiment and predict barrier longevity. For example, the sediment reduction rate controls the amount of time required for the dithionite solution to fully react with sediments. Sediment oxidation experiments were additionally conducted to determine the oxidation rate and provide a separate measure of the mass of reduced iron. Laboratory experiments that were used to meet these objectives included: (1) sediment reduction in batch (static) systems, (2) sediment reduction in 1-D columns, and (3) sediment oxidation in 1-D columns. Multiple reaction modeling was conducted to quantify the reactant masses and reaction rates.

  3. Effects of phlebotomy-induced reduction of body iron stores on metabolic syndrome: results from a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houschyar Khosrow S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (METS is an increasingly prevalent but poorly understood clinical condition characterized by insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity. Increased oxidative stress catalyzed by accumulation of iron in excess of physiologic requirements has been implicated in the pathogenesis of METS, but the relationships between cause and effect remain uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that phlebotomy-induced reduction of body iron stores would alter the clinical presentation of METS, using a randomized trial. Methods In a randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial, 64 patients with METS were randomly assigned to iron reduction by phlebotomy (n = 33 or to a control group (n = 31, which was offered phlebotomy at the end of the study (waiting-list design. The iron-reduction patients had 300 ml of blood removed at entry and between 250 and 500 ml removed after 4 weeks, depending on ferritin levels at study entry. Primary outcomes were change in systolic blood pressure (SBP and insulin sensitivity as measured by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA index after 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included HbA1c, plasma glucose, blood lipids, and heart rate (HR. Results SBP decreased from 148.5 ± 12.3 mmHg to 130.5 ± 11.8 mmHg in the phlebotomy group, and from 144.7 ± 14.4 mmHg to 143.8 ± 11.9 mmHg in the control group (difference -16.6 mmHg; 95% CI -20.7 to -12.5; P Conclusions In patients with METS, phlebotomy, with consecutive reduction of body iron stores, lowered BP and resulted in improvements in markers of cardiovascular risk and glycemic control. Blood donation may have beneficial effects for blood donors with METS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01328210 Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/53

  4. Preparation of Metallic Iron Powder from Pyrite Cinder by Carbothermic Reduction and Magnetic Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Long

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The reduction and magnetic separation procedure of pyrite cinder in the presence of a borax additive was performed for the preparation of reduced powder. The effects of borax dosage, reduction temperature, reduction time and grinding fineness were investigated. The results show that when pyrite cinder briquettes with 5% borax were pre-oxidized at 1050 °C for 10 min, and reduced at 1050 °C for 80 min, with the grinding fineness (<0.44 mm passing 81%, the iron recovery was 91.71% and the iron grade of the magnetic concentrate was 92.98%. In addition, the microstructures of the products were analyzed by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and mineralography, and the products were also studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique (XRD to investigate the mechanism; the results show that the borax additive was approved as a good additive to improve the separation of iron and gangue.

  5. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles via chemical reduction with palladium ion seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-01-30

    We report on the synthesis of highly monodisperse iron nanoparticles, using a chemical reduction method. Iron nanoparticles with an average diameter of 6 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.3 were synthesized at a pH of 9.50 from ferric chloride precursor with sodium borohydride as the reducing agent, polyacrylic acid as the dispersing agent, and palladium ions as seeds for iron nanoparticle nucleation. The resulting nanoparticles were ferromagnetic at 5 K and superparamagnetic at 350 K. The dispersing agent polyacrylic acid (PAA) was shown to prevent iron nanoparticles and possibly palladium clusters from aggregating; in the absence of PAA, only aggregated iron nanoparticles were obtained. The addition of palladium ions decreased the diameter of iron nanoparticles presumably by providing sites for heterogeneous nucleation onto palladium clusters. In the absence of palladium ions, the mean diameter of iron nanoparticles was approximately 110 nm and the standard deviation increased to 2.0. The pH of the solution also was found to have a significant effect on the particle diameter, likely by affecting PAA ionization and altering the conformation of the polymer chains. At lower pH (8.75), the PAA is less ionized and its ability to disperse palladium clusters is reduced, so the number of palladium seeds decreases. Therefore, the resulting iron nanoparticles were larger, 59 nm in diameter, versus 6 nm for nanoparticles formed at a pH of 9.50.

  6. Iron isotope fractionation during microbial reduction of iron: The importance of adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icopini, G. A.; Anbar, A. D.; Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Brantley, S. L.

    2004-03-01

    In experiments investigating the causes of Fe isotope fractionation, the δ56/54Fe value of Fe(II) remaining in solution (Fe(II)(aq)) after reduction of Fe(III) (goethite) by Shewanella putrefaciens is ˜-1.2‰ relative to the goethite, in agreement with previous research. The addition of an electron shuttle did not affect fractionation, suggesting that Fe isotope fractionation may not be related to the kinetics of the electron transfer. Furthermore, in abiotic, anaerobic FeCl2(aq) experiments in which approximately one-third of Fe(II)(aq) is lost from solution due to adsorption of Fe(II) onto goethite, the δ56/54Fe value of Fe(II)(aq) remaining in solution is shifted by -0.8‰ relative to FeCl2. This finding demonstrates that anaerobic nonbiological interaction between Fe(II) and goethite can generate significant Fe isotope fractionation. Acid extraction of sorbed Fe(II) from goethite in experiments reveals that heavy Fe preferentially sorbs to goethite. Simple mass-balance modeling indicates that the isotopic composition of the sorbed Fe(II) pool is ˜+1.5‰ to +2.5‰ heavier than Fe in the goethite [˜2.7‰ 3.7‰ heavier than aqueous Fe(II)]. Mass balance is also consistent with a pool of heavy Fe that is not released to solution during acid extraction.

  7. Biotic and abiotic oxidation and reduction of iron at circumneutral pH are inseparable processes under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionescu, Danny; Heim, Christine; Polerecky, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370827929; Thiel, Volker; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation and reduction of iron can occur through abiotic (chemical) and biotic (microbial) processes. Abiotic iron oxidation is a function of pH and O2 concentration. Biotic iron oxidation is carried out by a diverse group of bacteria, using O2 or NO3 as terminal electron acceptors. At circumneutra

  8. Biotic and abiotic oxidation and reduction of iron at circumneutral pH are inseparable processes under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionescu, Danny; Heim, Christine; Polerecky, L.; Thiel, Volker; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation and reduction of iron can occur through abiotic (chemical) and biotic (microbial) processes. Abiotic iron oxidation is a function of pH and O2 concentration. Biotic iron oxidation is carried out by a diverse group of bacteria, using O2 or NO3 as terminal electron acceptors. At circumneutra

  9. Treating thalassemia major-related iron overload: the role of deferiprone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdoukas, Vasilios; Farmaki, Kallistheni; Carson, Susan; Wood, John; Coates, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, management for thalassemia major has improved to the point where we predict that patients' life expectancy will approach that of the normal population. These outcomes result from safer blood transfusions, the availability of three iron chelators, new imaging techniques that allow specific organ assessment of the degree of iron overload, and improvement in the treatment of hepatitis. In October 2011, the Food and Drug Administration licensed deferiprone, further increasing the available choices for iron chelation in the US. The ability to prescribe any of the three chelators as well as their combinations has led to more effective reduction of total body iron. The ability to determine the amount of iron in the liver and heart by magnetic resonance imaging allows the prescription of the most appropriate chelation regime for patients and to reconsider what our aims with respect to total body iron should be. Recent evidence from Europe has shown that by normalizing iron stores not only are new morbidities prevented but also reversal of many complications such as cardiac failure, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes can occur, improving survival and patients' quality of life. The most effective way to achieve normal iron stores seems to be with the combination of deferoxamine and deferiprone. Furthermore, outcomes should continue to improve in the future. Starting relative intensive chelation in younger children may prevent short stature and abnormal pubertal maturation as well as other iron-related morbidities. Also, further information should become available on the use of other combinations in chelation treatment, some of which have been used only in a very limited fashion to date. All these advances in management require absolute cooperation and understanding of parents, children, and, subsequently, the patients themselves. Only with such cooperation can normal long-term survival be achieved, as

  10. H{sub 2} from biosyngas via iron reduction and oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straus, J.; Terry, P. [H Power Corp., Belleville, NJ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The production of hydrogen from the steam-oxidation of iron is a long-known phenomenon. The rise in interest in the production and storage of hydrogen justifies the examination of this process (and of the reverse process, the reduction of iron oxide) for commercial use. Under NREL subcontract ZAR-4-13294-02, a process simulation program was developed and used as a design tool to analyze various configurations of the iron-hydrogen purification/storage scheme. Specifically, analyses were performed to determine the effectiveness of this scheme in conjunction with biomass-derived gasified fuel streams (biosyngas). The results of the computer simulations led to a selection of a two-stage iron oxide reduction process incorporating interstage water and CO{sub 2} removal. Thermal analysis shows that the iron-hydrogen process would yield essentially the same quantity of clean hydrogen per unit of biomass as the conventional route. The iron-hydrogen process benefits from the excellent match potentially achievable between the otherwise-unusable energy fraction in the off-gas of the reduction reactor and the parasitic thermal, mechanical and electrical energy needs of some typical gasifier systems. The program simulations and economic analysis suggest that clean hydrogen from biomass feedstock could cost about 20% less via the iron-hydrogen method than by conventional methods of purification (using the same feedstock). Cost analyses show that lower capital costs would be incurred in generating clean hydrogen by utilizing this approach, especially in response to the fluctuating demand profile of a utility.

  11. Screening the performance of lubricants for ironing of stainless steel with a strip reduction test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bay, Niels; Andersen, Mette Merete;

    1997-01-01

    A laboratory strip reduction test simulating the tribological conditions of an ironing process is proposed. The test is capable of simulating varying process conditions such as reduction, drawing speed, tool temperature and sliding length. The test makes it possible to quantify the onset of break...... of breakdown of the lubricant film and subsequent galling. Experimental investigations of stainless steel show the influence of varying process conditions and the performance of different lubricants....

  12. REDUCTION OF AZO DYES WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reduction of azo dyes by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) at pH 7.0 in 10 mM HEPES buffer was studied in aqueous, anaerobic batch systems. Orange II was reduced by cleavage of the azo linkage, as evidenced by the production of sulfanilic acid (a substituted ani...

  13. Controlled electropolymerisation of a carbazole-functionalised iron porphyrin electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xinming; Salmi, Zakaria; Lillethorup, Mie;

    2016-01-01

    Using a one-step electropolymerisation procedure, CO2 absorbing microporous carbazole-functionalised films of iron porphyrins are prepared in a controlled manner. The electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 for these films is investigated to elucidate their efficiency and the origin of their ultimate...

  14. Simulation of reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sabuj

    The primary motivation of this work is to evaluate a new alternative ironmaking process which involves the combination of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) with an iron bath smelter. This work is concerned primarily, with the productivity of the RHF. It is known that the reduction in the RHF is controlled by chemical kinetics of the carbon oxidation and wustite reduction reactions as well as by heat transfer to the pellet surface and within the pellet. It is heat transfer to the pellet which limits the number of layers of pellets in the pellet bed in the RHF and thus, the overall productivity. Different types of carbon like graphite, coal-char and wood charcoal were examined. Part of the research was to investigate the chemical kinetics by de-coupling it from the influence of heat and mass transfer. This was accomplished by carrying out reduction experiments using small iron-oxide-carbon powder composite mixtures. The reaction rate constants were determined by fitting the experimental mass loss with a mixed reaction model. This model accounts for the carbon oxidation by CO2 and wustite reduction by CO, which are the primary rate controlling surface-chemical reactions in the composite system. The reaction rate constants have been obtained using wustite-coal-char powder mixtures and wustite-wood-charcoal mixtures. The wustite for these mixtures was obtained from two iron-oxide sources: artificial porous analytical hematite (PAH) and hematite ore tailings. In the next phase of this study, larger scale experiments were conducted in a RHF simulator using spherical composite pellets. Measurement of the reaction rates was accomplished using off-gas analysis. Different combinations of raw materials for the pellets were investigated. These included artificial ferric oxide as well as naturally existing hematite and taconite ores. Graphite, coal-char and wood-charcoal were the reductants. Experiments were conducted using a single layer, a double layer and a triple layer of

  15. The anaerobic degradation of organic matter in Danish coastal sediments: iron reduction, manganese reduction, and sulfate reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Thamdrup, B; Hansen, Jens Würgler

    1993-01-01

    important than sulfate reduction. Most of the Mn reduction in these sediments may have been coupled to the oxidation of acid volatile sulfides (AVS), rather than to dissimilatory reduction. High rates of metal oxide reduction at all sites were driven by active recycling of both Fe and Mn, encouraged......We used a combination of porewater and solid phase analysis, as well as a series of sediment incubations, to quantify organic carbon oxidation by dissimilatory Fe reduction, Mn reduction, and sulfate reduction, in sediments from the Skagerrak (located off the northeast coast of Jutland, Denmark......). In the deep portion of the basin, surface Mn enrichments reached 3.5 wt%, and Mn reduction was the only important anaerobic carbon oxidation process in the upper 10 cm of the sediment. In the less Mn-rich sediments from intermediate depths in the basin, Fe reduction ranged from somewhat less, to far more...

  16. Fe(II)-mediated reduction and repartitioning of structurally incorporated Cu, Co, and Mn in iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frierdich, Andrew J; Catalano, Jeffrey G

    2012-10-16

    The reduction of trace elements and contaminants by Fe(II) at Fe(III) oxide surfaces is well documented. However, the effect of aqueous Fe(II) on the fate of redox-active trace elements structurally incorporated into iron oxides is unknown. Here, we investigate the fate of redox-active elements during Fe(II)-activated recrystallization of Cu-, Co-, and Mn-substituted goethite and hematite. Enhanced release of Cu, Co, and Mn to solution occurs upon exposure of all materials to aqueous Fe(II) relative to reactions in Fe(II)-free fluids. The quantity of trace element release increases with pH when Fe(II) is present but decreases with increasing pH in the absence of Fe(II). Co and Mn release from goethite is predicted well using a second-order kinetic model, consistent with the release of redox-inactive elements such as Ni and Zn. However, Cu release and Co and Mn release from hematite require the sum of two rates to adequately model the kinetic data. Greater uptake of Fe(II) by Cu-, Co-, and Mn-substituted iron oxides relative to analogues containing only redox-inactive elements suggests that net Fe(II) oxidation occurs. Reduction of Cu, Co, and Mn in all materials following reaction with Fe(II) at pHs 7.0-7.5 is confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. This work shows that redox-sensitive elements structurally incorporated within iron oxides are reduced and repartitioned into fluids during Fe(II)-mediated recrystallization. Such abiotic reactions likely operate in tandem with partial microbial and abiotic iron reduction or during the migration of Fe(II)-containing fluids, mobilizing structurally bound contaminants and micronutrients in aquatic systems.

  17. The Role of Dimethyl Sulfoxide in the Reductive Dissolution of Iron in Marine Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, J. M.; Johansen, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    Very little is known about the effects of atmospheric iron (Fe) deposition from aeolian dusts into the remote oceans and the role it plays as a key nutrient for photosynthesis in marine phytoplankton in high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters. Several in situ iron fertilization studies in HNLC regions have reported increases in chlorophyll a concentrations, nutrient and carbon uptake, and the release of various biogenic gases which have the potential to directly and indirectly impact global climate. Of particular interest in the present study is the indirect effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as part of a positive feedback cycle that may exist between such biogenically derived reduced sulfur compounds and crustal derived iron in the atmosphere over remote oceanic regions. To determine whether DMSO can lead to larger atmospheric concentrations of bioavailable iron in the form of Fe(II), photochemical simulation experiments were carried out using synthetic ferrihydrite (Fe5HO8ṡ4H2O) in the presence of DMSO. During these experiments DMSO oxidation products, such as methane sulfonic acid (MSA), methane sulfinic acid (MSIA), and sulfate (SO42-), were quantified by means of ion chromatography (IC), while Fe(II) was determined spectrophotometrically by complexation with ferrozine. Preliminary results suggest that current ambient DMSO levels are too low to play a significant role in the reductive dissolution of iron hydroxide in aerosol particles. However, increased DMSO levels may enhance bioavailability of iron, thus potentially closing the gap in the positive feedback cycle.

  18. Catalysis of Dissolved and Adsorbed Iron in Soil Suspension for Chromium(Ⅵ) Reduction by Sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Ye-Qing; YANG Jun-Xiang; B. DENG

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction by sulfide in soil suspensions with various pHs, soil compositions, and Fe(Ⅱ) concentrations was examined using batch anaerobic experimental systems at constant temperature. The results showed that the reaction rate of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction was in the order of red soil < yellow-brown soil < chernozem and was proportional to the concentration of HCl-extractable iron in the soils. Dissolved and adsorbed iron in soil suspensions played an important role in accelerating Cr(Ⅵ) reduction. The reaction involved in the Cr(Ⅵ) reduction by Fe(Ⅱ) to produce Fe(Ⅲ), which was reduced to Fe(Ⅱ) again by sulfide, could represent the catalytic pathway until about 70% of the initially present Cr(Ⅵ)was reduced. The catalysis occurred because the one-step reduction of Cr(Ⅵ) by sulfide was slower than the two-step process consisting of rapid Cr(Ⅵ) reduction by Fe(Ⅱ) followed by Fe(Ⅲ) reduction by sulfide. In essence, Fe(Ⅱ)/Fe(Ⅲ)species shuttle electrons from sulfide to Cr(Ⅵ), facilitating the reaction. The effect of iron, however, could be completely blocked by adding a strong Fe(Ⅱ)-complexing ligand, 1,10-phenanthroline, to the soil suspensions. In all the experiments,initial sulfide concentration was much higher than initial Cr(Ⅵ) concentration. The plots of ln c[Cr(Ⅵ)] versus reaction time were linear up to approximately 70% of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction, suggesting a first-order reaction kinetics with respect to Cr(Ⅵ). Elemental sulfur, the product of sulfide oxidation, was found to accelerate Cr(Ⅵ) reduction at a later stage of the reaction, resulting in deviation from linearity for the ln c[Cr(Ⅵ)] versus time plots.

  19. Unification of catalytic water oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions: amorphous beat crystalline cobalt iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Arindam; Menezes, Prashanth W; Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Bergmann, Arno; Das, Chittaranjan; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; Strasser, Peter; Driess, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    Catalytic water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is considered as one of the convenient routes for the sustainable energy conversion. Bifunctional catalysts for the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are pivotal for the energy conversion and storage, and alternatively, the photochemical water oxidation in biomimetic fashion is also considered as the most useful way to convert solar energy into chemical energy. Here we present a facile solvothermal route to control the synthesis of amorphous and crystalline cobalt iron oxides by controlling the crystallinity of the materials with changing solvent and reaction time and further utilize these materials as multifunctional catalysts for the unification of photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation as well as for the oxygen reduction reaction. Notably, the amorphous cobalt iron oxide produces superior catalytic activity over the crystalline one under photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation and oxygen reduction conditions.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Arsenic Mobility during Reductive Iron-Mineral Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Joey; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Carr, Jackson; Berg, Michael; Davis, James A; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed to hazardous concentrations of arsenic from contaminated drinking water. Despite massive efforts toward understanding the extent and underlying geochemical processes of the problem, numerical modeling and reliable predictions of future arsenic behavior remain a significant challenge. One of the key knowledge gaps concerns a refined understanding of the mechanisms that underlie arsenic mobilization, particularly under the onset of anaerobic conditions, and the quantification of the factors that affect this process. In this study, we focus on the development and testing of appropriate conceptual and numerical model approaches to represent and quantify the reductive dissolution of iron oxides, the concomitant release of sorbed arsenic, and the role of iron-mineral transformations. The initial model development in this study was guided by data and hypothesized processes from a previously reported,1 well-controlled column experiment in which arsenic desorption from ferrihydrite coated sands by variable loads of organic carbon was investigated. Using the measured data as constraints, we provide a quantitative interpretation of the processes controlling arsenic mobility during the microbial reductive transformation of iron oxides. Our analysis suggests that the observed arsenic behavior is primarily controlled by a combination of reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite, arsenic incorporation into or co-precipitation with freshly transformed iron minerals, and partial arsenic redox transformations.

  1. Bifunctional (cyclopentadienone)iron-tricarbonyl complexes: synthesis, computational studies and application in reductive amination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Solenne; Dentel, Hélène; Pagnoux-Ozherelyeva, Anastassiya; Gaillard, Sylvain; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Lohier, Jean-François; Renaud, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-23

    Reductive amination under hydrogen pressure is a valuable process in organic chemistry to access amine derivatives from aldehydes or ketones. Knölker's complex has been shown to be an efficient iron catalyst in this reaction. To determine the influence of the substituents on the cyclopentadienone ancillary ligand, a series of modified Knölker's complexes was synthesised and fully characterised. These complexes were also transformed into their analogous acetonitrile iron-dicarbonyl complexes. Catalytic activities of these complexes were evaluated and compared in a model reaction. The scope of this reaction is also reported. For mechanistic insights, deuterium-labelling experiments and DFT calculations were undertaken and are also presented.

  2. Smelting in cupola furnace for recarburization of direct reduction iron (DRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enríquez, José L.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein the synthesis of iron-carbon saturated alloys (foundries melting in cupola furnaces from direct reduction iron is described. The fundamentals are reviewed and combinations undertaken are discussed along with their results, including conclusions and recommendations for follow up.Se describe la síntesis de aleaciones saturadas hierro-carbono (fundiciones en hornos de cubilote a partir de hierro de reducción directa. Se revisan sus fundamentos, operaciones realizadas, resultados y conclusiones. Finalmente se ofrecen recomendaciones para su implantación industrial.

  3. Fundamentals of fast reduction of ultrafine iron ore at low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Zhao; Peimin Guo

    2008-01-01

    Fundamentals on the fast reduction of ultrafine iron ore at low temperature, including characterization of ultrafine ore, de- oxidation thermodynamics of stored-energy ultrafine ore, kinetics of iron ore deoxidation, and deoxidation mechanism, etc., and a new ironmaking process are presented in this article. Ultrafine ore concentrate with a high amount of stored energy can be produced by mechanical milling, and can be dcoxidated fast below 700℃ by either the coal-based or gas-based process. This novel process has some advantages over others: high productivity, low energy consumption, and environmental friendliness.

  4. Ammonia from iron(II) reduction of nitrite and the Strecker synthesis: do iron(II) and cyanide interfere with each other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, D. P.; Lerner, N.

    1998-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, effect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The reduction of nitrite and the Strecker can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, to yield glycine from a mixture of nitrite, Fe+2, formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  5. Kinetics and corrosion products of aqueous nitrate reduction by iron powder without reaction conditions control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiaomeng; GUAN Xiaohong; MA Jun; AI Hengyu

    2009-01-01

    Although considerable research has been conducted on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron powder (Fe0), these studies were mostly operated under anaerobic and invariable pH conditions that was unsuitable for practical application.Without reaction conditions (dissolved oxygen or reaction pH) control, this study aimed at subjecting the kinetics of denitrification by microscale Fe0 (160-200 mesh) to analysis the factors affecting the denitrification of nitrate and the composition of iron reductive products coating upon the iron surface.Results of the kinetics study have indicated that a higher initial concentration of nitrate would yield a greater reaction rate constant.Additional test results showed that the reduction rate of nitrate increased with increasing Fe0 dosage.The reaction can be described as a pseudo-first order reaction with respect to nitrate concentration or Fe0 dosage.Experimental results also suggested that nitrate reduction by microscale Fe0 without reaction condition control primarily was an acid-driven surface-mediated process, and the reaction order was 0.65 with respect to hydrogen ion concentration.X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a black coating, consisted of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and FeO(OH), was formed on the surface of iron grains as an iron corrosion product when the system initial pH was lower than 5.The proportion of FeO(OH) increased as reaction time went on, whereas the proportion of Fe3O4 decreased.

  6. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain ( 100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe66Co34) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  7. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  8. Solubility and dissimilatory reduction kinetics of iron(III) oxyhydroxides: A linear free energy relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve; Behrends, Thilo; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Rates of reduction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides by the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were measured as a function of the bacterial density and the Fe(III) substrate concentration. The results show that an earlier reported positive correlation between the solubility products ( ∗K so) and the maximum cell-specific reduction rates ( vmax) of predominantly poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides also applies to insoluble and crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. The mineral solubilities were measured by a dialysis bag technique under acidic conditions (pH 1 up to 2.5) at 25 °C. Initial iron reduction rates by S. putrefaciens were determined in the presence of excess lactate as electron donor. In all cases, the microbial reduction rate exhibited saturation behavior with respect to the Fe(III) oxyhydroxide concentration. On a double logarithmic scale, the maximum rates vmax and the solubility products defined a single linear free energy relationship (LFER) for all the Fe(III) oxyhydroxides considered. The solubility provided a better predictor of vmax than the specific surface area of the mineral phase. A rate limitation by the electron transfer between an iron reductase and a Fe(III) center, or by the subsequent desorption of Fe 2+ from the iron oxide mineral surface, are both consistent with the observed LFER.

  9. Controls on Arsenic Retention in Surface and Subsurface Environments: Resolving the Impact of Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufano, K.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    A transition from oxidizing to reducing conditions has long been implicated in increasing aqueous As concentrations. Confounding processes controlling the release of As, reductive transformation of ferrihydrite, a common Fe(III) (hydr)oxide, has recently been shown to promote As retention rather than release. Elucidating the processes controlling As desorption and subsequent migration in surface and subsurface environments and how environmental factors (for example, availability of labile carbon and duration/extent of flooding) affect these processes will allow predictions to be made regarding long-term stability of As in soil and sediment. In turn, this can aid in evaluating the likelihood of having measurable As in groundwater. To better resolve these processes, here we examine As desorption from ferrihydrite-coated sands pre-sorbed with As(III) at circumneutral pH under Fe-reducing conditions with the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium (DIRB) Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN- 32. We reveal that upon iron reduction, transformation of As-bearing ferrihydrite results in As(III) retention. However, over time there is a shift from reductive transformation to reductive dissolution of the As-bearing Fe phase(s) coupled with prolonged release of As to the aqueous phase. Our results suggest that arsenic retention may increase or decrease depending on the type of iron oxide, secondary iron transformations, and duration of reducing conditions. Immediately following a transition to anaerobic conditions there is potential for As retention on newly formed ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxide phases; however prolonged reduction will result in both the dissolution of ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxides and release of aqueous arsenic.

  10. Treating thalassemia major-related iron overload: the role of deferiprone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdoukas V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Vasilios Berdoukas,1 Kallistheni Farmaki,2 Susan Carson,1 John Wood,3 Thomas Coates11Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Thalassemia Unit, General Hospital of Corinth, Corinth, Greece; 3Division of Cardiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Over the last 20 years, management for thalassemia major has improved to the point where we predict that patients' life expectancy will approach that of the normal population. These outcomes result from safer blood transfusions, the availability of three iron chelators, new imaging techniques that allow specific organ assessment of the degree of iron overload, and improvement in the treatment of hepatitis. In October 2011, the Food and Drug Administration licensed deferiprone, further increasing the available choices for iron chelation in the US. The ability to prescribe any of the three chelators as well as their combinations has led to more effective reduction of total body iron. The ability to determine the amount of iron in the liver and heart by magnetic resonance imaging allows the prescription of the most appropriate chelation regime for patients and to reconsider what our aims with respect to total body iron should be. Recent evidence from Europe has shown that by normalizing iron stores not only are new morbidities prevented but also reversal of many complications such as cardiac failure, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes can occur, improving survival and patients' quality of life. The most effective way to achieve normal iron stores seems to be with the combination of deferoxamine and deferiprone. Furthermore, outcomes should continue to improve in the future. Starting relative intensive chelation in younger children may prevent short stature and abnormal pubertal maturation as well as other iron-related morbidities. Also, further information should become available on the

  11. Effects of Coating Materials and Mineral Additives on Nitrate Reduction by Zerovalent Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. H.; Jeong, H. Y.; Lee, S.; Kang, N.; Choi, H. J.; Park, M.

    2015-12-01

    In efforts to facilitate nitrate removal, a variety of coating materials and mineral additives were assessed for their effects on the nitrate reduction by zerovalent iron (ZVI). Coated ZVIs were prepared by reacting Fe particles with Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and S(-II) solutions under anoxic conditions, with the resultant materials named Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, Ni/Fe, Cu/Fe, and FeS/Fe, respectively. The mineral additives used, synthesized or purchased, included goethite, magnetite, and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Kinetic experiments were performed using air-tight serum vials containing 1.0 g Fe (uncoated or coated forms) in 15 mL of 100 mg NO3×N/L solutions with pH buffered at 7.0. To monitor the reaction progress, the solution phase was analyzed for NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ on an ion chromatography, while the headspace was analyzed for H2, N2, and O2 on a gas chromatography. By uncoated Fe, ca. 60% of nitrate was reductively transformed for 3.6 h, with NH4+ being the predominant product. Compared with uncoated one, Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, and Cu/Fe showed faster removal rates of nitrate. The observed reactivity enhancement was thought to result from additional reduction of nitrate by H atoms adsorbed on the surface of Cr, Co, or Cu metal. In contrast, both Ni/Fe and FeS/Fe showed slower removal of nitrate than uncoated Fe. In both cases, the coating, which highly disfavors the adsorption of nitrate, would form on the Fe surface. When goethite, HFO, and magnetite were amended, the nitrate reduction by Fe was significantly increased, with the effect being most evident with HFO. Although not capable of reducing nitrate, the mineral additives would serve as crystal nuclei for the corrosion products of Fe, thus making the development of passivation layers on the Fe surface less. In the future, we will perform a kinetic modeling of the experimental data to assess the relative contribution of multiple reaction paths in the nitrate reduction by Fe.

  12. Iron uptake and homeostasis related genes in potato cultivated in vitro under iron deficiency and overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legay, Sylvain; Guignard, Cédric; Ziebel, Johanna; Evers, Danièle

    2012-11-01

    Potato is one of the most important staple food in the world because it is a good source of vitamin C, vitamin B6 but also an interesting source of minerals including mainly potassium, but also magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, zinc and iron to a lesser extent. The lack of iron constitutes the main form of micronutrient deficiency in the world, namely iron deficiency anemia, which strongly affects pregnant women and children from developing countries. Iron biofortification of major staple food such as potato is thus a crucial issue for populations from these countries. To better understand mechanisms leading to iron accumulation in potato, we followed in an in vitro culture experiment, by qPCR, in the cultivar Désirée, the influence of media iron content on the expression of genes related to iron uptake, transport and homeostasis. As expected, plantlets grown in a low iron medium (1 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA) displayed a decreased iron content, a strong induction of iron deficiency-related genes and a decreased expression of ferritins. Inversely, plantlets grown in a high iron medium (120 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA) strongly accumulated iron in roots; however, no significant change in the expression of our set of genes was observed compared to control (40 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA).

  13. Geochemistry of iron,sulfur and related heavy metals in metal-polluted Taihu Lake sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong-Bin; FAN Cheng-Xin; DING Shi-Ming; ZHANG Lu; ZHONG Ji-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    To understand the geochemical characteristics of iron and sulfur and the extent of iron-sulfide minerals influencing heavy metal behaviour in metal-polluted sediments of Talhu Lake,two sites,in Meiliang Bay (ML) and Wuli Lake (WL),were selected to study the fractionation of iron,sulfur and related heavy metals.There were relatively high concentrations of Fe2+ and low concentrations of total S2- in porewaters,indicating that conditions in these sediments favored iron reduction.The concentrations of acid volatile sulfides in sediments were 1.9-9.6μmol g-1 at ML and 1.0-11.7 μmol g-1 at WL,both in the range of values detected in unpolluted lakes.Pyrite-S was 10.2-49.4 μmol g-1 at ML and 10.333.0 μmol g-1 at WL,accounting for more than 69% of the reduced inorganic sulfur at both sites.The low degree of sulphidization (<14%) and pyritization (<10%) indicate that sulfate may be the limiting factor for pyrite formation.The extractability of Mn,Cu,Pb,Zn,Ni,and Cr in sediments all suggest that sulfides are not the major binding phase for these metals during early diagenesis.Sulfur may play a modest role in the geochemistry of iron and traced metals in the sediments.

  14. Molecular Catalysis of O2 Reduction by Iron Porphyrins in Water: Heterogeneous versus Homogeneous Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Dridi, Hachem; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-28

    Despite decades of active attention, important problems remain pending in the catalysis of dioxygen reduction by iron porphyrins in water in terms of selectivity and mechanisms. This is what happens, for example, for the distinction between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis for soluble porphyrins, for the estimation of H2O2/H2O product selectivity, and for the determination of the reaction mechanism in the two situations. With water-soluble iron tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin as an example, procedures are described that allow one to operate this distinction and determine the H2O2/H2O product ratio in each case separately. It is noteworthy that, despite the weak adsorption of the iron(II) porphyrin on the glassy carbon electrode, the contribution of the adsorbed complex to catalysis rivals that of its solution counterpart. Depending on the electrode potential, two successive catalytic pathways have been identified and characterized in terms of current-potential responses and H2O2/H2O selectivity. These observations are interpreted in the framework of the commonly accepted mechanism for catalytic reduction of dioxygen by iron porphyrins, after checking its compatibility with a change of oxygen concentration and pH. The difference in intrinsic catalytic reactivity between the catalyst in the adsorbed state and in solution is also discussed. The role of heterogeneous catalysis with iron tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin has been overlooked in previous studies because of its water solubility. The main objective of the present contribution is therefore to call attention, by means of this emblematic example, to such possibilities to reach a correct identification of the catalyst, its performances, and reaction mechanism. This is a question of general interest, so that reduction of dioxygen remains a topic of high importance in the context of contemporary energy challenges.

  15. One-pot green synthesis of silver/iron oxide composite nanoparticles for 4-nitrophenol reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Jau-Rung; Lai, Bo-Hung; Hsu, Kai-Chih; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2013-03-15

    Silver/iron oxide composite nanoparticles have been synthesized successfully via a facile one-pot green route by the use of l-arginine, which created an aqueous solution of about pH 10 and acted as a reducing agent for the successive formation of iron oxide and Ag nanoparticles. The product was characterized to be silver-coated iron oxide and iron oxide hydroxide composite nanoparticles with a mean diameter of about 13.8 ± 3.0 nm and 8.53% of Ag in weight. It exhibited good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol with sodium borohydride. The reduction reaction followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics. The corresponding rate constants increased with the increases of temperature and catalyst amount but decreased with the increase of initial 4-NP concentration, revealing an activation energy of 28.2 kJ/mol and a diffusion controlled mechanism. In addition, this product had quite good stability. No significant activity loss was observed after reuse for 5 cycles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Role of Microbial Iron Reduction in the Formation of Proterozoic Molar Tooth Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgskiss, M. S. W.; Kunzmann, M.; Halverson, G. P.; Poirier, A.

    2016-12-01

    Molar tooth structures are poorly understood early diagenetic, microspar-filled voids in clay-rich carbonate sediments. They are a common structure in sedimentary successions dating from 2600-720 Ma, but do not occur in rocks older or younger. Despite being volumetrically significant in carbonate rocks of this age, their formation and disappearance are poorly understood. Here, we present iron isotope data, supported by carbon and oxygen isotopes, major and minor element concentrations, and total organic carbon and pyrite contents for samples from ten regions spanning 1870-635 Ma. The iron isotopic composition of molar tooth structures is almost always lighter (modal depletion of 2‰) than the carbonate or siliciclastic components in the host sediment, whereas carbon isotopes are indistinguishable. We interpret the isotopically light iron in molar tooth structures to have been produced by microbial iron reduction utilising Fe-oxyhydroxides and smectites. The microbial conversion of smectite to illite results in a volume reduction of clay minerals ( 30%), while locally increasing pore water alkalinity. Therefore, this biogeochemical process is a viable mechanism to produce voids and subsequently precipitate carbonate minerals. The disappearance of molar tooth structures is likely linked to a combination of a decrease in smectite abundance, a decline in the marine DIC reservoir, and increase in the concentration of O2 in shallow seawater in the mid-Neoproterozoic.

  17. Mössbauer study of carbon coated iron magnetic nanoparticles produced by simultaneous reduction/pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Fernanda G.; Ardisson, José D.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Lago, Rochel M.; Tristão, Juliana C.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic iron nanoparticles immersed in a carbon matrix were produced by a combined process of controlled dispersion of Fe3 + ions in sucrose, thermal decomposition with simultaneous reduction of iron cores and the formation of the porous carbonaceous matrix. The materials were prepared with iron contents of 1, 4 and 8 in %wt in sucrose and heated at 400, 600 and 800°. The samples were analyzed by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, TG, SEM and TEM. The materials prepared at 400° are composed essentially of Fe3O4 particles and carbon, while treatments at higher temperatures, e.g. 600 and 800° produced as main phases Fe0 and Fe3C. The Mössbauer spectra of samples heated at 400° showed two sextets characteristic of a magnetite phase and other contributions compatible with Fe3 + and Fe2 + phases in a carbonaceous matrix. Samples treated at temperatures above 600° showed the presence of metallic iron with concentrations between 16-43%. The samples heated at 800° produced higher amounts of Fe3C (between 20% and 58%). SEM showed for the iron 8% sample treated at 600-800°C particle sizes smaller than 50 nm. Due to the presence of Fe0 particles in the carbonaceous porous matrix the materials have great potential for application as magnetic adsorbents.

  18. Kinetics for Reduction of Iron Ore Based on the Phase Space Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Feng Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of smelting reduction experiments has been carried out with high-phosphorus iron ore of the different bases and heating rates by thermogravimetric analyzer. The derivative thermo gravimetric (DTG data have been obtained from the experiments. After analyzing its phase space reconstruction, it is found that DTG phase portrait contains with a clear double “∞” attractor characteristic by one-order delay. The statistical properties of the attractor inside and outside the double “∞” structures are characterized with interface chemical reaction control and diffusion control stage in dynamic smelting process, respectively; the results are deserved to be a reference value on understanding of the mechanism and optimization and control of the process in smelting reduction of high-phosphorus iron ore.

  19. Hematite Reduction Buffers Acid Generation and Enhances Nutrient Uptake by a Fermentative Iron Reducing Bacterium, Orenia metallireducens Strain Z6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yiran; Sanford, Robert A; Chang, Yun-Juan; McInerney, Michael J; Fouke, Bruce W

    2017-01-03

    Fermentative iron-reducing organisms have been identified in a variety of environments. Instead of coupling iron reduction to respiration, they have been consistently observed to use ferric iron minerals as an electron sink for fermentation. In the present study, a fermentative iron reducer, Orenia metallireducens strain Z6, was shown to use iron reduction to enhance fermentation not only by consuming electron equivalents, but also by generating alkalinity that effectively buffers the pH. Fermentation of glucose by this organism in the presence of a ferric oxide mineral, hematite (Fe2O3), resulted in enhanced glucose decomposition compared with fermentation in the absence of an iron source. Parallel evidence (i.e., genomic reconstruction, metabolomics, thermodynamic analyses, and calculation of electron transfer) suggested hematite reduction as a proton-consuming reaction effectively consumed acid produced by fermentation. The buffering effect of hematite was further supported by a greater extent of glucose utilization by strain Z6 in media with increasing buffer capacity. Such maintenance of a stable pH through hematite reduction for enhanced glucose fermentation complements the thermodynamic interpretation of interactions between microbial iron reduction and other biogeochemical processes. This newly discovered feature of iron reducer metabolism also has significant implications for groundwater management and contaminant remediation by providing microbially mediated buffering systems for the associated microbial and/or chemical reactions.

  20. Relationship Between Iron Whisker Growth and Doping Amount of Oxide During Fe2O3 Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xuzhong; Zhao, Zhilong; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Ben; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron whisker growth during Fe2O3 doped with oxide reduced by CO was investigated by using in situ observation and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the minimum doping amount (MDA) of various oxides, hindering the iron whisker growth, was different. The MDA of Al2O3, Li2O, Na2O, and K2O was 0.5, 0.4, 4, and 12 pct, respectively. From the reduction rate, it was found that Li2O, MgO, and Al2O3 had some suppressive effects on the Fe2O3 reduction process, thus, confining the growth of iron whisker. However, other oxides had some catalytic effects on the Fe2O3 reduction process (Fe2O3-Fe3O4-FeO-Fe), such as CaO, SrO, BaO, Na2O, and K2O. As long as their doping amount was enough, these oxides could inhibit the diffusion of the Fe atom. When the metal ionic radius in doped oxide was bigger than that of Fe3+, such as Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Na+, and K+, there were lots of spaces left in Fe2O3 doped with oxide after reduction, improving Fe atom diffusion. Consequently, their MDA was more than that of small radius to restrain the growth of iron whisker. Finally, the relationship between corresponding metal ionic radius, electron layer number, valence electron number, and MDA of oxide was expressed by using data fitting as follows: N_{{{{A}}y {{O}}x }} = 1.3 × 10^{ - 5} × {r_{{{{A}}^{x + } }}2 × √{n_{{{{A}}^{x + } }} } }/{f_{q }}

  1. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-02-06

    This project represented a joint effort between Florida State University (FSU), Rutgers University (RU), and the University of Illinois (U of I). FSU served as the lead institution and Dr. J.E. Kostka was responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliverables. This project was designed to elucidate the microbial ecology and geochemistry of metal reduction in subsurface environments at the U.S. DOE-NABIR Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORFRC). Our objectives were to: 1) characterize the dominant iron minerals and related geochemical parameters likely to limit U(VI) speciation, 2) directly quantify reaction rates and pathways of microbial respiration (terminal-electron-accepting) processes which control subsurface sediment chemistry, and 3) identify and enumerate the organisms mediating U(VI) transformation. A total of 31 publications and 47 seminars or meeting presentations were completed under this project. One M.S. thesis (by Nadia North) and a Ph.D. dissertation (by Lainie Petrie-Edwards) were completed at FSU during fall of 2003 and spring of 2005, respectively. Ph.D. students, Denise Akob and Thomas Gihring have continued the student involvement in this research since fall of 2004. All of the above FSU graduate students were heavily involved in the research, as evidenced by their regular attendance at PI meetings and ORFRC workshops.

  2. Kinetics of Reduction of MnO in Molten Slag with Carbon Undersaturated Liquid Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of MnO in molten slag with carbon undersaturated iron was studied. It was found that the process is affected by the carbon content of molten metal and the temperature. The higher the carbon content and the temperature, the faster both the reduction and the emerging of the hump on curve of ωFeO, the larger the difference betwe en ωFeO, max and ωFeO, e. The phenomena were explained with three-step reaction model.

  3. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohao Wu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase, and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances.

  4. Investigation of a role for reduction in ferric iron uptake by mouse duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, K B; Simpson, R J; Peters, T J

    1992-06-10

    59Fe uptake rates by mouse duodenal fragments incubated in vitro were markedly reduced by non-permeable reagents, ferricyanide (oxidising agent) and ferrozine (Fe2+ chelator), in the medium; ferrocyanide had no effect. Reduction of Fe3+, as reflected by an increase in ferrozine-(Fe2+)-chelatable iron, was observed in the presence of the tissue fragments. The generation of Fe2+ occurred linearly with time, was independent of the medium ferrozine concentration, and was not due to release of reducing factors from the duodenal fragments. Fe(3+)-reducing activity was mainly present on the mucosal surface and was localised primarily to the proximal region of the small intestine. Changes in Fe3+ reduction rates closely parallelled the changes in duodenal 59Fe uptake, when metabolic inhibitors or modulators of membrane potential were included in the medium. The enhancement in duodenal mucosal 59Fe uptake in chronic hypoxic and iron-deficient mice parallelled the changes in the tissue reduction of medium Fe3+. Moreover, the rates of reduction were quantitatively similar to rates of uptake. These observations indicate that a sequential reduction and uptake process operates for Fe3+ uptake in mouse duodenum.

  5. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, III, William R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-12-03

    India’s 2010 annual crude steel production was 68 Mt which accounted for nearly five percent of the world’s annual steel production in the same year. In 2007, roughly 1600 PJ were consumed by India’s iron and steel industry to produce 53 Mt of steel. We identified and analyzed 25 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the Indian iron and steel industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model and compared to an electricity price forecast the cumulative plant-level cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Indian iron and steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 66 TWh, and the cumulative plant-level technical electricity saving potential is only slightly greater than 66 TWh for the same period. The primary energy related CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 65 Mt CO2. Compared to a fuel price forecast, an estimated cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 768 PJ with associated CO2 emission reduction of 67 Mt CO2 during 2010-2030 is possible. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Indian iron and steel industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  6. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J; Oh, Seok-Young

    2011-08-30

    US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21 wastewater was rapidly decreased to an undetectable level in 2 days. This result demonstrated that iron treatment not only removed energetic compounds but also eliminated the toxic constituents that inhibited the subsequent microbial process.

  7. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  8. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  9. Roles of UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 in iron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Chen, Jingrong; Qiu, Dongru; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-11-25

    The completion of genome sequencing in a number of Shewanella species, which are most renowned for their metal reduction capacity, offers a basis for comparative studies. Previous work in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has indicated that some genes within a cluster (mtrBAC-omcA-mtrFED) were involved in iron reduction. To explore new features of iron reduction pathways, we experimentally analyzed Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 since its gene cluster is considerably different from that of MR-1 in that the gene cluster encodes only four ORFs. Among the gene cluster, two genes (mtrC and undA) were shown to encode c-type cytochromes. The ΔmtrC deletion mutant revealed significant deficiencies in reducing metals of Fe2O3, α-FeO(OH), β-FeO(OH), ferric citrate, Mn(IV) and Co(III), but not organic compounds. In contrast, no deficiency of metal reduction was observed in the ΔundA deletion mutant. Nonetheless, undA deletion resulted in progressively slower iron reduction in the absence of mtrC and fitness loss under the iron-using condition, which was indicative of a functional role of UndA in iron reduction. These results provide physiological and biochemical evidences that UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 are involved in iron reduction.

  10. Utilization of waste polyethylene terephthalate as a reducing agent in the reduction of iron ore composite pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Gökhan; Birol, Burak; Sarıdede, Muhlis Nezihi

    2014-08-01

    The increasing consumption of plastics inevitably results in increasing amounts of waste plastics. Because of their long degradation periods, these wastes negatively affect the natural environment. Numerous studies have been conducted to recycle and eliminate waste plastics. The potential for recycling waste plastics in the iron and steel industry has been underestimated; the high C and H contents of plastics may make them suitable as alternative reductants in the reduction process of iron ore. This study aims to substitute plastic wastes for coal in reduction melting process and to investigate their performance during reduction at high temperature. We used a common type of waste plastic, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), because of its high carbon and hydrogen contents. Composite pellets containing PET wastes, coke, and magnetite iron ore were reduced at selected temperatures of 1400 and 1450°C for reduction time from 2 to 10 min to investigate the reduction melting behavior of these pellets. The results showed that an increased temperature and reduction time increased the reduction ratio of the pellets. The optimum experimental conditions for obtaining metallic iron (iron nuggets) were reduction at 1450°C for 10 min using composite pellets containing 60% PET and 40% coke.

  11. Utilization of waste polyethylene terephthalate as a reducing agent in the reduction of iron ore composite pellets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gökhan Polat; Burak Birol; Muhlis Nezihi Sarıdede

    2014-01-01

    The increasing consumption of plastics inevitably results in increasing amounts of waste plastics. Because of their long degrada-tion periods, these wastes negatively affect the natural environment. Numerous studies have been conducted to recycle and eliminate waste plastics. The potential for recycling waste plastics in the iron and steel industry has been underestimated;the high C and H contents of plas-tics may make them suitable as alternative reductants in the reduction process of iron ore. This study aims to substitute plastic wastes for coal in reduction melting process and to investigate their performance during reduction at high temperature. We used a common type of waste plastic, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), because of its high carbon and hydrogen contents. Composite pellets containing PET wastes, coke, and magnetite iron ore were reduced at selected temperatures of 1400 and 1450°C for reduction time from 2 to 10 min to investigate the re-duction melting behavior of these pellets. The results showed that an increased temperature and reduction time increased the reduction ratio of the pellets. The optimum experimental conditions for obtaining metallic iron (iron nuggets) were reduction at 1450°C for 10 min using composite pellets containing 60%PET and 40%coke.

  12. Heterogeneous electron transfer and oxygen reduction reaction at nanostructured iron(II) phthalocyanine and its MWCNTs nanocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mamuru, SA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer and oxygen reduction dynamics at nanostructured iron(II) phthalocyanine/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite supported on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPPGE-MWCNT-nanoFePc) platform have been reported. All...

  13. Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts Based on Coupled Iron Nitride Nanoparticles with Nitrogen-Doped Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at developing a highly active and stable non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR, a novel FexNy/NC nanocomposite—that is composed of highly dispersed iron nitride nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon (NC—was prepared by pyrolyzing carbon black with an iron-containing precursor in an NH3 atmosphere. The influence of the various synthetic parameters such as the Fe precursor, Fe content, pyrolysis temperature and pyrolysis time on ORR performance of the prepared iron nitride nanoparticles was investigated. The formed phases were determined by experimental and simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD of numerous iron nitride species. We found that Fe3N phase creates superactive non-metallic catalytic sites for ORR that are more active than those of the constituents. The optimized Fe3N/NC nanocomposite exhibited excellent ORR activity and a direct four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. Furthermore, the hybrid material showed outstanding catalytic durability in alkaline electrolyte, even after 4,000 potential cycles.

  14. In situ reduction of as-prepared γ-Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbus, Pelle Gorm; Ahlburg, Jakob; Christensen, Mogens

    .L., et al., Size and Size Distribution Control of γ-Fe2O3 Nanocrystallites: An in Situ Study. Crystal Growth & Design, 2014. 14(3): p. 1307-1313.3.Bondesgaard, M., et al., Guide to by-products formed in organic solvents under solvothermal conditions. The Journal of Supercritical Fluids, 2016. 113: p. 166...... behind the structural development [1, 2] adds to the fundamental understanding of materials’ formation and can lead to new synthesis pathways. In this study, iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) particles were heated to 400°C under a flow of H2/Ar mixture, while the process was followed by in situ synchrotron powder X......-iron oxide Fe2O3. The reduction of maghemite to body centered cubic (BCC) iron does not go through a detectable intermediate state.1.Jensen, K.M., et al., Mechanisms for iron oxide formation under hydrothermal conditions: an in situ total scattering study. ACS nano, 2014. 8(10): p. 10704-10714.2.Andersen, H...

  15. Bacterial assimilation reduction of iron in the treatment of non-metallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Malachovský

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural non-metallics, including granitoide and quartz sands, often contain iron which decreases the whiteness of these raw materials. Insoluble Fe3+ in these samples could be reduced to soluble Fe2+ by bacteria of Bacillus spp. and Saccharomyces spp. The leaching effect, observed by the measurement of Fe2+concentration in a solution, showed higher activities of a bacterial kind isolated from the Bajkal lake and also by using of yeast Saccharomyces sp. during bioleaching of quartz sands. However, allkinds of Bacillus spp. isolated from the Slovak deposit and from Bajkal lake were very active in the iron reduction during bioleaching of the feldspar raw material. This metal was efficiently removed from quartz sands as documented by the Fe2O3 decrease (from 0,317 % to 0,126 % and from feldpars raw materials by the Fe2O3 decrease (from 0,288 % to 0,115 % after bioleaching. The whiteness of these non-metallics was increased during a visual comparison of samples before and after bioleaching but samples contain selected magnetic particles. A removal of iron as well as a release of iron minerals from silicate matrix should increase the effect of the magnetic separation and should give a product which is suitable for industrial applications.

  16. Iron deficiency and overload in relation to nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg MQI; Jansen EHJM; LEO

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional iron intake in the Netherlands has been reviewed with respect to both iron deficiency and iron overload. In general, iron intake and iron status in the Netherlands are adequate and therefore no change in nutrition policy is required. The following aspects and developments, however, need

  17. Promotion of iron oxide reduction and extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis by DMSO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Cheng

    Full Text Available The dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, known for its capacity of reducing iron and manganese oxides, has great environmental impacts. The iron oxides reducing process is affected by the coexistence of alternative electron acceptors in the environment, while investigation into it is limited so far. In this work, the impact of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, a ubiquitous chemical in marine environment, on the reduction of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO by S. oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Results show that DMSO promoted HFO reduction by both wild type and ΔdmsE, but had no effect on the HFO reduction by ΔdmsB, indicating that such a promotion was dependent on the DMSO respiration. With the DMSO dosing, the levels of extracellular flavins and omcA expression were significantly increased in WT and further increased in ΔdmsE. Bioelectrochemical analysis show that DMSO also promoted the extracellular electron transfer of WT and ΔdmsE. These results demonstrate that DMSO could stimulate the HFO reduction through metabolic and genetic regulation in S. oneidensis MR-1, rather than compete for electrons with HFO. This may provide a potential respiratory pathway to enhance the microbial electron flows for environmental and engineering applications.

  18. Iron Isotope Fractionation Reveals Structural Change upon Microbial and Chemical Reduction of Nontronite NAu-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Wu, L.; Shi, B.; Smeaton, C. M.; Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.; Roden, E. E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) isotope fractionations were determined during reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1 biologically by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and chemically by dithionite. ~10% reduction was achieved in biological reactors, with similar reduction extents obtained by dithionite. We hypothesize that two stages occurred in our reactors. Firstly, reduction started from edge sites of clays and the produced Fe(II) partially remained in situ and partially was released into solution. Next aqueous Fe(II) adsorbed onto basal planes. The basal sorbed Fe(II) then undergoes electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) with octahedral Fe(III) in clays, with the most negative fractionation factor Δ56Febasal Fe(II)-structural Fe(III)of -1.7‰ when basal sorption reached a threshold value. Secondly, when the most reactive Fe(III) was exhausted, bioreduction significantly slowed down and chemical reduction was able to achieve 24% due to diffusion of small size dithionite. Importantly, no ETAE occurred between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) due to blockage of pathways by collapsed clay layers. This two-stage process in our reduction experiments is distinctive from abiotic exchange experiments by mixing aqueous Fe(II) and NAu-1, where no structural change of clay would block ETAE between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III). The separation of reduction sites (clay edges) and sorption sites (basal planes) is unique to clay minerals with layered structure. In contrast, reduction and sorption occur on the same sites on the surfaces of Fe oxyhydroxides, where reduction does not induce structure change. Thus, the Fe isotope fractionations are the same for reduction and abiotic exchange experiments for Fe oxides. Our study reveals important changes in electron transfer and atom exchange pathways upon reduction of clay minerals by dissimilatory Fe reducing bacteria, which is prevalent in anoxic soils and sediments.

  19. NO x Reduction in the Iron Ore Sintering Process with Flue Gas Recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Fan, Xiaohui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xuling; Lv, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Flue gas recirculation (FGR) has been implemented for exhaust gas emissions reduction in iron ore sintering. However, the mechanism of NO x reduction through FGR is still unclear. In this paper, the laboratory pot-grate sintering test showed a 30% reduction in gas flow and 15.51% reduction in NO x emissions achieved with a 30% FGR ratio, and the sinter indexes almost matched those of the conventional process. In the sinter zone, NO-CO catalytic reduction occurs in the range of 500-900°C. When the sinter temperature is 700°C, the highest nitrogen reduction ratio (NRR) achieved is 8%; however, the NO x reduction is inhibited as the post-combustion of CO starts when the temperature increases beyond 700°C. NO x in the flue gas is mainly a product of the fuel combustion in the combustion zone, as the nitrogen conversion rate reaches 50-60%, because the N-containing intermediates exist during the fuel combustion. The existence of NO in the FGR gas inhibits the NO x generation from the fuel combustion, and the NO elimination—through the NO-carbon reaction—is significant in the combustion zone. The NRR in the combustion zone reaches a range of 18-20%.

  20. NO x Reduction in the Iron Ore Sintering Process with Flue Gas Recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Fan, Xiaohui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xuling; Lv, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Flue gas recirculation (FGR) has been implemented for exhaust gas emissions reduction in iron ore sintering. However, the mechanism of NO x reduction through FGR is still unclear. In this paper, the laboratory pot-grate sintering test showed a 30% reduction in gas flow and 15.51% reduction in NO x emissions achieved with a 30% FGR ratio, and the sinter indexes almost matched those of the conventional process. In the sinter zone, NO-CO catalytic reduction occurs in the range of 500-900°C. When the sinter temperature is 700°C, the highest nitrogen reduction ratio (NRR) achieved is 8%; however, the NO x reduction is inhibited as the post-combustion of CO starts when the temperature increases beyond 700°C. NO x in the flue gas is mainly a product of the fuel combustion in the combustion zone, as the nitrogen conversion rate reaches 50-60%, because the N-containing intermediates exist during the fuel combustion. The existence of NO in the FGR gas inhibits the NO x generation from the fuel combustion, and the NO elimination—through the NO-carbon reaction—is significant in the combustion zone. The NRR in the combustion zone reaches a range of 18-20%.

  1. Study of nonisothermal reduction of iron ore-coal/char composite pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S. K.; Ghosh, A.

    1994-01-01

    Cold-bonded composite pellets, consisting of iron ore fines and fines of noncoking coal or char, were prepared by steam curing at high pressure in an autoclave employing inorganic binders. Dry compressive strength ranged from 200 to 1000 N for different pellets. The pellets were heated from room temperature to 1273 K under flowing argon at two heating rates. Rates of evolution of product gases were determined from gas Chromatographie analysis, and the temperature of the sample was monitored by thermocouple as a function of time during heating. Degree of reduction, volume change, and compressive strength of the pellets upon reduction were measured subsequently. Degree of reduction ranged from 46 to 99 pct. Nonisothermal devolatilization of coal by this procedure also was carried out for comparison. It has been shown that a significant quantity (10 to 20 pct of the pellet weight) of extraneous H2O and CO2 was retained by dried pellets. This accounted for the generation of additional quantities of H2 and CO during heating. Carbon was the major reductant, but reduction by H2 also was significant. Ore-coal and ore-char composites exhibited a comparable degree of reduction. However, the former showed superior postreduction strength due to a smaller amount of swelling upon reduction.

  2. Inhibition of sulfate reduction by iron, cadmium and sulfide in granular sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Silva, Blanca M. [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a. Seccion, 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Briones-Gallardo, Roberto [Facultad de Ingenieria-Instituto de Metalurgia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Sierra Leona 550, Lomas 2a. Seccion, 78210, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Razo-Flores, Elias [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a. Seccion, 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B., E-mail: celis@ipicyt.edu.mx [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a. Seccion, 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2009-12-15

    This study investigated the inhibition effect of iron, cadmium and sulfide on the substrate utilization rate of sulfate reducing granular sludge. A series of batch experiments in a UASB reactor were conducted with different concentrations of iron (Fe{sup 2+}, 4.0-8.5 mM), cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}, 0.53-3.0 mM) and sulfide (4.2-10.6 mM), the reactor was fed with ethanol at 1 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L and sulfate to yield a COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (g/g) ratio of 0.5. The addition of iron, up to a concentration of 8.1 mM, had a positive effect on the substrate utilization rate which increased 40% compared to the rate obtained without metal addition (0.25 g COD/g VSS-d). Nonetheless, iron concentration of 8.5 mM inhibited the specific substrate utilization rate by 57% compared to the substrate utilization rate obtained in the batch amended with 4.0 mM Fe{sup 2+} (0.44 g COD/g VSS-d). Cadmium had a negative effect on the specific substrate utilization rate at the concentrations tested; at 3.0 mM Cd{sup 2+} the substrate utilization rate was inhibited by 44% compared with the substrate utilization rate without metal addition. Cadmium precipitation with sulfide did not decrease the inhibition of cadmium on sulfate reduction. These results could have important practical implications mainly when considering the application of the sulfate reducing process to treat effluents with high concentrations of sulfate and dissolved metals such as iron and cadmium.

  3. Moessbauer study of carbon coated iron magnetic nanoparticles produced by simultaneous reduction/pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Fernanda G. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica - ICEx (Brazil); Ardisson, Jose D. [CDTN, Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (Brazil); Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Lago, Rochel M.; Tristao, Juliana C., E-mail: juliana@ufv.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica - ICEx (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic iron nanoparticles immersed in a carbon matrix were produced by a combined process of controlled dispersion of Fe{sup 3 + } ions in sucrose, thermal decomposition with simultaneous reduction of iron cores and the formation of the porous carbonaceous matrix. The materials were prepared with iron contents of 1, 4 and 8 in %wt in sucrose and heated at 400, 600 and 800 Degree-Sign . The samples were analyzed by XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, TG, SEM and TEM. The materials prepared at 400 Degree-Sign are composed essentially of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles and carbon, while treatments at higher temperatures, e.g. 600 and 800 Degree-Sign produced as main phases Fe{sup 0} and Fe{sub 3}C. The Moessbauer spectra of samples heated at 400 Degree-Sign showed two sextets characteristic of a magnetite phase and other contributions compatible with Fe{sup 3 + } and Fe{sup 2 + } phases in a carbonaceous matrix. Samples treated at temperatures above 600 Degree-Sign showed the presence of metallic iron with concentrations between 16-43%. The samples heated at 800 Degree-Sign produced higher amounts of Fe{sub 3}C (between 20% and 58%). SEM showed for the iron 8% sample treated at 600-800 Degree-Sign C particle sizes smaller than 50 nm. Due to the presence of Fe{sup 0} particles in the carbonaceous porous matrix the materials have great potential for application as magnetic adsorbents.

  4. Reduction of Iron Oxides: A Comparison Between Biotic and Abiotic Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyodo, Y. J.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Bonville, P.; Lagroix, F.

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of fine particles of magnetite in soils and sediments may, under favorable climatic and environmental conditions, be the result of iron reduction in pre-existing magnetic phases. Nonetheless, the conditions and pathways leading to magnetite formation, and the connection between the amount and type of magnetite particles (size distribution, shape, etc…) and past climatic conditions remains to be elucidated. One way to address this fundamental question is to perform controlled experiments using synthetic iron bearing minerals subjected to specific physical and bio-chemical conditions. At the meeting, we will present experiments performed on synthetic maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) samples. In a first series of experiments, iron- reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens were used to produce magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, the starting iron oxides being used as electron acceptor. In a second set of experiments, the starting iron oxides were converted to magnetite by slow heating in CO/CO2 atmosphere. Subsequently, the resulting samples were subjected to slow heating in air, in order to induce aging and oxidation of the material. In our presentation, we will show key results of our experiments, including both magnetic (low-temperature, low-field and high-field magnetic measurements, Mossbaüer spectroscopy, etc.) and non-magnetic (XRD, HRTEM, etc.) characterizations. The different series of experiments conducted on these samples shall allow us to better constrain pathways of magnetite formation and alteration in the environment, including solid-state conversion, partial or total dissolution/precipitation, and particles aggregation.

  5. Evaluation of iron metabolism indices and their relation with physical work capacity in athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Karamizrak, S O; Işlegen, C; Varol, S R; Taşkiran, Y; Yaman, C; Mutaf, I; Akgün, N

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the relation between iron status and physical working capacity, and to assess the effect of oral iron treatment on these variables, in athletes with borderline iron status. METHODS--Blood haemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), red blood cell count (RBC), serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and ferritin determinations were compared in 71 male and 18 female athletes participating in various sports and in matched male (n = 11) and female (n = 8) controls. ...

  6. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures.

  7. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kim, Byung J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, IL 61826-9005 (United States); Oh, Seok-Young, E-mail: quartzoh@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. {yields} DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. {yields} Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21

  8. Effects of Redox Cycling of Iron in Nontronite on Reduction of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Junjie; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Dong, Hailiang; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Zhang, Jing; Kim, Jinwook

    2012-01-06

    In situ technetium-99 (99Tc) immobilization by Fe(II) associated with clay minerals has been studied and is a potential cost-effective method for Tc remediation at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Fe redox cycling are common in sedimentary environments, however their effect on Tc reduction and immobilization has not yet been investigated. The objective of this project was therefore to study how multiple cycles of reduction-reoxidation of Fe-rich clay mineral, nontronite, affected its reactivity toward Tc (VII) reduction. Iron-rich nontronite NAu-2 was used as a model clay mineral. NAu-2 suspension was first bioreduced by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, which consequently was re-oxidized by air. Three cycles of reduction-oxidation were conducted and bioreduced NAu-2 samples from all three cycles were collected and used for Tc(VII) reduction experiments. Each redox cycle resulted in a small fraction of dissolution of small size and/or poorly crystalline NAu-2. The released Fe(II) from the dissolution was likely adsorbed onto NAu-2 surface/edge sites with a high reactivity. Upon exposure to O2, this reactive Fe(II) fraction was oxidized more rapidly than structural Fe(II) and may have accounted for a two-step reoxidation kinetics of NAu-2 associated Fe(II): rapid oxidation over first few hours followed by slow oxidation. Progressive increase of this reactive fraction of Fe(II), from increased dissolution, accounted for the successively higher rate of bioreduction and reoxidation with increased redox cycles. The same Fe redistribution accounted for two-step Tc(VII) reduction kinetics as well. Rapid Tc(VII) reduction in the first few hours may be attributed to a small fraction of highly reactive Fe(II) at the NAu-2 surface/edge sites, and more steady Tc(VII) reduction over longer time may be carried out by structural Fe(II). Similar to the increased rates of Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation, the Tc(VII) reduction rate also increased with redox

  9. Reduction phases of thin iron-oxide nanowires upon thermal treatment and Li exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelucci, Marco, E-mail: marco.angelucci@gmail.com; Frau, Eleonora; Grazia Betti, Maria [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Hassoun, Jusef; Hong, Inchul; Panero, Stefania [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Scrosati, Bruno [IIT, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genova (Italy); Mariani, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.mariani@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, CNISM, CNIS, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2014-04-28

    Iron oxide nanostructures, a promising alternative to carbon-based anode in lithium-ion batteries, can be produced using a hard template route. This procedure guarantees the formation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires with comparable diameter and size (average diameter 8 nm) with a dominant cubic γ-phase at the surface. Lithium exposure of the iron oxide nanowires in ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions induces reduction of the Fe ion, leading to a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and then to a Fe{sup 2+} phase, as determined by means of core-level photoemission spectroscopy. Mild annealing of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in UHV determines an oxygen content reduction for the nanowires at lower temperature with respect to the bulk phase. The morphology and the evolution of the electronic properties upon reduction have been compared to those of micro-sized bulk-like grains, to unravel the role of the reduced size and surface-volume ratio.

  10. Relation between Serum Ferritin and Iron Parameters with Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Taheripanah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Preeclampsia is one of the most important complications of pregnancy that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between serum iron status and ferritin with pre-eclampsia. Materials and Methods: This case control study evaluated 33 preeclamptic patients and 33 normal pregnant women before parturition in Imam Hossein hospital, from March 2003 till March 2004. Anemia, diabetes and multiple pregnancies were excluded from the study. Blood samples were taken before delivery and patients with HELLP syndrome were considered separately.  Data were analyzed using the SPSS software and P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. T-test, chi-square and Fisher exact test were used.  Results: The mean of serum iron level in case and control group was 79.9±32.4µg/dl and 88.6±40.8 µg/dl, respectively (NS. TIBC was 443.4±55.0 µmol/l and 383.7±63.6 µmol/l in normal patients and preeclamptics respectively (P = 0.002. Mean serum ferritin was 32.1±16.2 ng/dl in control group and 123.8±46.1 ng/dl in preeclamptics (P<0.001. No meaningful relation was observed between hematocrit, ferritin and iron. Conclusions: Ferritin increases and TIBC decreases in preeclampsia regardless of hepatic function. It seems that elevated serum ferritin (as an oxidative stress can accelerate vascular damage. So, routine iron supplementation in preeclamptic women is questationable.

  11. Moessbauer study of iron(II) and iron(III) complexes of some nitrogen-, oxygen- and sulphur donor ligands, reduction of iron(III) by the mercaptide group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawhney, G.L.; Baijal, J.S. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics); Chandra, S. (Zakir Hussain College, Ajmeri Gate, Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry); Pandeya, K.B. (Delhi Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-01-01

    Complex formation reactions of iron(II) and iron(III) with semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones of pyruvic acid and phenyl pyruvic acid have been studied by magnetic measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With iron(II), all the ligands form hexa-coordinated octahedral complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H/sub 2/). With iron(III) semicarbazones, complexes of the composition (Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/)(OH) are formed. Thiosemicarbazones first reduce iron(III) to iron(II) and then form iron(II) complexes of the type Fe(ligand-H)/sub 2/.

  12. Electrical Signatures Associated with Abiotic and In Vitro Dissimilatory Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regberg, A. B.; Brantley, S. L.; Singha, K.; Tien, M.

    2007-05-01

    Several researchers have described anomalous electrical signatures associated with bacterial activity in anoxic zones in aquifers containing organic contaminants. It is thought that these signals can be attributed to (bio)geochemical changes caused by the oxidation of organic contaminants and the reduction of associated species like iron oxides. We report laboratory observations of changes in electrical conductivity (EC) that can be attributed to specific (bio)geochemical reactions involving reductive dissolution of iron oxides enzymatically and nonenzymatically. Abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite by ascorbic acid in batch experiments causes a cumulative 20- 40% increase in measured conductivity, (EC increases by ~300 μ S/cm). This change can be attributed to a decrease in conductivity (Δ EC) from increasing proton activity (Δ pH = 3.25 --> 5.07, Δ EC = -200 μ S/cm) and an increase in dissolved Fe(II) (Δ [Fe] = 2.2 - 3.3 mM, Δ EC = 400 -700 μ S/cm). Conductivity is presumably unaffected by Fe(II) sorbed to the ferrihydrite. Rates calculated from this method are comparable to literature rates for similar experiments. In a similar in vitro system, total membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used to reduce ferrihydrite in the presence of formate and HEPES buffer. A 10 - 15% increase in conductivity was observed in the batch experiment (Δ EC = ~280 μ S/cm). This Δ EC is attributed to an increase in the concentration of de-protonated HEPES as well as carbonate ion as formate is oxidized. Fe(II) released in this system is quickly sorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface and is not thought to change conductivity. Despite the sorption of iron in these in vitro experiments, conductivity changes measurably and documents the rate of the reaction. Accessory changes like buffer de- protonation play an important role in interpreting the electrical signals caused by dissimilatory iron reduction. In order to accurately interpret field data it is necessary

  13. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    of uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR......). As a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  14. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woongchul; Yang, Gang; Kim, Suk Lae; Liu, Peng; Sue, Hung-Jue; Yu, Choongho

    2016-05-01

    Prohibitively expensive precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been one of the major hurdles in a wide use of electrochemical cells. Recent significant efforts to develop precious metal free catalysts have resulted in excellent catalytic activities. However, complicated and time-consuming synthesis processes have negated the cost benefit. Moreover, detailed analysis about catalytically active sites and the role of each element in these high-performance catalysts containing nanomaterials for large surface areas are often lacking. Here we report a facile one-step synthesis method of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts without precious metals. Our catalysts show excellent long-term stability and onset ORR potential comparable to those of other precious metal free catalysts, and the maximum limiting current density from our catalysts is larger than that of the Pt-based catalysts. We carry out a series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without iron and nitrogen in CNT, and identify that the coordination of nitrogen and iron in CNT plays a key role in achieving the excellent catalytic performances. We anticipate our one-step process could be used for mass production of precious metal free electrocatalysts for a wide range of electrochemical cells including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  15. Recent advances in iron metabolism and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara; Strati, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Iron is essential for life, because it is indispensable for several biological reactions such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, but is toxic if present in excess since it causes cellular damage through free radical formation. Either cellular or systemic iron regulation can be disrupted in disorders of iron metabolism. In the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has dramatically changed. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged and the role of iron has started to be recognized as a cofactor of other disorders. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory-iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited for a more effective treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders.

  16. Recovery of iron from copper tailings via low-temperature direct reduction and magnetic separation: process optimization and mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Rui-min; Xing, Peng; Wang, Cheng-yan; Ma, Bao-zhong; Chen, Yong-Qiang

    2017-09-01

    Currently, the majority of copper tailings are not effectively developed. Worldwide, large amounts of copper tailings generated from copper production are continuously dumped, posing a potential environmental threat. Herein, the recovery of iron from copper tailings via low-temperature direct reduction and magnetic separation was conducted; process optimization was carried out, and the corresponding mineralogy was investigated. The reduction time, reduction temperature, reducing agent (coal), calcium chloride additive, grinding time, and magnetic field intensity were examined for process optimization. Mineralogical analyses of the sample, reduced pellets, and magnetic concentrate under various conditions were performed by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry to elucidate the iron reduction and growth mechanisms. The results indicated that the optimum parameters of iron recovery include a reduction temperature of 1150°C, a reduction time of 120 min, a coal dosage of 25%, a calcium chloride dosage of 2.5%, a magnetic field intensity of 100 mT, and a grinding time of 1 min. Under these conditions, the iron grade in the magnetic concentrate was greater than 90%, with an iron recovery ratio greater than 95%.

  17. Acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finke, Niko; Vandieken, Verona; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of volatile fatty acids (VFA) as e--donors for anaerobic terminal oxidation of organic carbon through iron and sulfate reduction was studied in Arctic fjord sediment. Dissolved inorganic carbon, Fe2+, VFA concentrations, and sulfate reduction were monitored in slurries from...

  18. Recovery of alumina and ferric oxide from Bayer red mud rich in iron by reduction sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; XIAO Wei; LIU Wei; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; QI Tian-gui

    2009-01-01

    A great amount of red mud generated from alumina production by Bayer process not only threatens the environment but also causes waste of secondary resources. High-iron-content red mud from Bayer process was employed to recover alumina and ferric oxide by the process of reduction-sintering, leaching and then magnetic beneficiation. Results of thermodynamic analyses show that ferric oxide should be reduced to Fe if reduction of ferric oxide and formation of sodium aluminate and calcium silicate happen simultaneously. Experimental results indicate that alumina recovery of Bayer red mud can reach 89.71%, and Fe recovery rate and the grade of magnetite concentrate are 60.67% and 61.78%, respectively, under the optimized sintering conditions.

  19. Effect of dolomite on reduction swelling property of iron ore pellets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许斌; 侯通; 陈许玲; 李骞; 姜涛; 李鹏

    2013-01-01

    The effect of various dosages of dolomites on the reduction swelling property of iron ore pellets was studied. Experimental results show that the reduction swelling index(RSI) decreases from 13.35% to 4.0%, while the porosity of roasted pellets increases from 35% to 40% with increasing the dolomite dosage from 0 to 10.5%. Meanwhile, the content of magnesium ferrite with high melting temperature, as well as the stability of magnetite(Fe3 O4) in the roasted pellets, increases with increasing the magnesium oxide(MgO) content from dolomite. The reasons for the decrease of RSI rely on the absence of crystal transformation from Fe2 O3 to Fe3 O4, the increased porosity of roasted pellet, and the suppression of phase transition of 2CaO·SiO2 resulted from the incorporation of magnesium into calcium silicate.

  20. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Nonprecious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction are the ultimate materials and the foremost subject for low‐temperature fuel cells. A novel type of catalysts prepared by high‐pressure pyrolysis is reported. The catalyst is featured by hollow spherical morphologies consisting...... of uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR......). As a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  1. Bifunctional (cyclopentadienone)iron-tricarbonyl complexes: Synthesis, computational studies and application in reductive amination

    KAUST Repository

    Moulin, Solenne

    2013-11-15

    Reductive amination under hydrogen pressure is a valuable process in organic chemistry to access amine derivatives from aldehydes or ketones. Knölker\\'s complex has been shown to be an efficient iron catalyst in this reaction. To determine the influence of the substituents on the cyclopentadienone ancillary ligand, a series of modified Knölker\\'s complexes was synthesised and fully characterised. These complexes were also transformed into their analogous acetonitrile iron-dicarbonyl complexes. Catalytic activities of these complexes were evaluated and compared in a model reaction. The scope of this reaction is also reported. For mechanistic insights, deuterium-labelling experiments and DFT calculations were undertaken and are also presented. Festival of amination: Two series of modified Knölker\\'s complexes were synthesised and applied in the reductive amination of various carbonyl derivatives with primary or secondary amines (see scheme, TIPS = triisopropylsilyl). For a mechanistic insight, deuterium-labelling experiments and DFT calculations were undertaken and are also presented. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Effect of gas composition on the kinetics of iron oxide reduction in a hydrogen production process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowski, Krzysztof; Lorethova, Hana; Stonawski, Lubor; Wiltowski, Tomasz [Coal Research Center, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL (United States); Mondal, Kanchan; Szymanski, Tomasz [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes, Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a suitable oxygen transfer agent for converting CO present in syngas to CO{sub 2} for its eventual separation from H{sub 2}. However, H{sub 2} also reacts with iron oxide to form H{sub 2}O. In order to evaluate the reactions for hydrogen enrichment, investigations into Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to FeO reduction kinetics in the presence of syngas constituents were conducted. The reaction kinetic parameters were estimated based on the thermogravimetric data. Hancock and Sharp method of comparing the kinetics of isothermal solid-state reactions, based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Erofe'ev equation describing nucleation and growth processes, was applied. The experimental results indicate that the reduction is initially a surface-controlled process, but once a thin layer of lower iron oxides (magnetite, wusite) is formed on the surface, the mechanism shifts to diffusion control. It was concluded that this initial stage of the reaction process could be interpreted as a both phase-boundary-controlled reaction and the two-dimensional nucleation and growth (transformation of the crystallographic lattices of higher oxide to lattices of lower oxide) at the gas/iron oxide interface. Comparison of the reaction courses for both the reducing agents (H{sub 2}, CO) independently and for their mixture was performed. It was found, that the reaction rate increases with, both, temperature and the hydrogen content in inlet gas. The activation energy values were estimated and compared. (author)

  3. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, 'model' organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria.

  4. Synchronous Upgrading Iron and Phosphorus Removal from High Phosphorus Oolitic Hematite Ore by High Temperature Flash Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deqing Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an effective method was developed to remove phosphorus and upgrade iron from high phosphorus oolitic hematite ore by high temperature flash reduction—a wet magnetic separation process. A thermodynamic analysis of iron and phosphorus mineral reactions and experiments with Fe-P separation process were performed, and the mechanism of phosphorus removal and beneficiation of iron is discussed as well. The results show that under the proper conditions, a final metallic iron powder assaying over 91% Fe and 0.25% P was obtained with iron recovery of 90% and phosphorus removal rate of 91.79% using the new process, indicating that the high temperature flash reduction process is a feasible and efficient way to process this kind of complex and refractory iron ore. Moreover, sodium sulfate is found to be capable of improving the removal of phosphorus and the upgrading of iron, as well as enhancing the growth of metallic iron grains significantly for higher recovery of iron.

  5. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  6. Rhizobacterial volatiles and photosynthesis-related signals coordinate MYB72 expression in Arabidopsis roots during onset of induced systemic resistance and iron-deficiency responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamioudis, Christos; Korteland, Jolanda; Van Pelt, Johan A; van Hamersveld, Muriël; Dombrowski, Nina; Bai, Yang; Hanson, Johannes; Van Verk, Marcel C; Ling, Hong-Qing; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2015-10-01

    In Arabidopsis roots, the transcription factor MYB72 plays a dual role in the onset of rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance (ISR) and plant survival under conditions of limited iron availability. Previously, it was shown that MYB72 coordinates the expression of a gene module that promotes synthesis and excretion of iron-mobilizing phenolic compounds in the rhizosphere, a process that is involved in both iron acquisition and ISR signaling. Here, we show that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from ISR-inducing Pseudomonas bacteria are important elicitors of MYB72. In response to VOC treatment, MYB72 is co-expressed with the iron uptake-related genes FERRIC REDUCTION OXIDASE 2 (FRO2) and IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) in a manner that is dependent on FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT), indicating that MYB72 is an intrinsic part of the plant's iron-acquisition response that is typically activated upon iron starvation. However, VOC-induced MYB72 expression is activated independently of iron availability in the root vicinity. Moreover, rhizobacterial VOC-mediated induction of MYB72 requires photosynthesis-related signals, while iron deficiency in the rhizosphere activates MYB72 in the absence of shoot-derived signals. Together, these results show that the ISR- and iron acquisition-related transcription factor MYB72 in Arabidopsis roots is activated by rhizobacterial volatiles and photosynthesis-related signals, and enhances the iron-acquisition capacity of roots independently of the iron availability in the rhizosphere. This work highlights the role of MYB72 in plant processes by which root microbiota simultaneously stimulate systemic immunity and activate the iron-uptake machinery in their host plants.

  7. Understanding the role of multiheme cytochromes in iron(III) reduction and arsenic mobilization by Shewanella sp. ANA-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, C.; Duenas, R.; Saltikov, C.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) and of arsenate (As (V)) to arsenite (As (III)) by Fe (III) reducing and As (V) respiring prokaryotes such as the bacterium Shewanella sp. ANA-3 may contribute to arsenic mobilization in aquifers contaminated with arsenic, specifically in places such as Bangladesh. Under oxic conditions As (V) predominates and is often adsorbed onto mineral surfaces such as amorphous ferrihydrite. However, under anoxic conditions As (III) predominates, sorbs to fewer minerals, and has a greater hydrologic mobility compared to As (V). The genetic mechanism underlying arsenic release from subsurface material most likely involves a combination of respiratory gene clusters (e.g. mtr/omc and arr). In this study, we are investigating the genetic pathways underlying arsenic mobilization. We have generated various mutations in the mtr/omc gene cluster, which encodes several outermembrane decaheme c-type cytochromes. Deletions in one mtr/omc gene did not eliminate iron reduction. However, strains carrying multiple gene deletions were greatly impaired in iron reduction abilities. Work is currently underway to generate combinations of iron reduction and arsenate reduction single and double mutants that will be used to investigate microbial mobilization of arsenic in flow-through columns containing As (V)-HFO coated sand. This work will address the importance of arsenate reduction and iron reduction in the mobilization of arsenic.

  8. Decreased serum hepcidin concentration correlates with brain iron deposition in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. METHODS: Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional

  9. Reduction of Sulphur-containing Aromatic Nitro Compounds with Hydrazine Hydrate over Iron(Ⅲ) Oxide-MgO Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sulphur-containing aromatic amines were prepared efficiently in good to excellent yields by reduction of the corresponding sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds with hydrazine hydrate in the presence of iron(Ⅲ) oxide-MgO catalyst. The catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the reduction of sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds. The yields of sulphur-containing aromatic amines were up to 91-99 % at 355 K after reduction for 1-4 h over this catalyst.

  10. The importance of reductive mechanisms for intestinal uptake of iron from ferric maltol and ferric nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrand, M A; Hider, R C; Callingham, B A

    1990-04-01

    Intestinal iron absorption is thought to proceed with iron mainly in the ferrous form, yet the novel iron complex, ferric maltol is an effective oral preparation. Although possessing a high oil: water partition coefficient, ferric maltol does not diffuse across the intestine but donates its iron to the endogenous uptake system. Reduction of the ferric iron in the gut lumen appears to precede iron uptake both from ferric maltol and from ferric nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) which is a non-penetrating iron ligand. Uptake of radiolabelled iron (59Fe) into isolated fragments of rat small intestine was inhibited by the ferrous chelator, bathophenanthroline sulphonate (BPS) and enhanced at low concentrations by the reducing agent ascorbic acid. Spectrophotometric evidence was obtained that ferrous ions are generated from these ferric complexes in the presence of ascorbic acid and other reducing agents. The rate of ferrous ion formation was independent of ferric maltol concentration at low ascorbic acid levels and decreased with increasing ferric maltol concentration at higher levels of ascorbate. Maltol has a high affinity for ferric ions and may delay reduction at higher concentrations. By contrast, a higher rate of ferrous ion generation was seen with ferric NTA and this increased with iron ligand concentration. Washings from the intestinal lumen also brought about ferrous ion formation from these ferric ligands. Gel filtration revealed these reducing factors to be of low molecular weight. The washings, however, interfered with 59Fe uptake into the isolated fragments, but when reducing fractions only from the filtered washings were used, enhanced iron uptake was seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Reduction of dinitrotoluene sulfonates in TNT red water using nanoscale zerovalent iron particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shi-Ni; Liu, Guo-Hua; Ye, Zhengfang; Zhao, Quanlin; Xu, Ying

    2012-07-01

    This research was designed to investigate the feasibility of converting the dinitrotoluene sulfonates (DNTS) in TNT red water into the corresponding aromatic amino compounds using nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI). NZVI particles were simultaneously synthesized and stabilized by sodium borohydride reduction in a nondeoxygenated system. The morphology, elemental content, specific surface area, and crystal properties of the NZVI were characterized before and after the reaction by environmental scanning electron microscope; energy dispersive X-ray; Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller; and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The reduction process was conducted at pH = 6.3 at ambient temperature. The efficiency of the NZVI-mediated DNTS reduction process was monitored by HPLC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The properties of the NZVI particles prepared were found to be similar to those obtained through oxygen-free preparation and inert stabilization processes. Both 2,4-DNT-3-sulfonate (2,220 mg L(-1)) and 2,4-DNT-5-sulfonate (3,270 mg L(-1)) in TNT red water underwent a pseudo-first-order transformation when mixed with NZVI at room temperature and near-neutral pH. Their observed rate constants were 0.11 and 0.30 min(-1), respectively. Within 1 h of processing, more than 99% of DNTS was converted by NZVI-mediated reduction into the corresponding diaminotoluene sulfonates. NZVI can be simultaneously prepared and stabilized in a nondeoxygenated system. NZVI reduction is a highly efficient method for the conversion of DNTS into the corresponding diaminotoluene sulfonates under near-neutral pH conditions. Therefore, NZVI reduction may be useful in the treatment of TNT red water and subsequent recovery of diaminotoluene from explosive wastewater.

  12. Biological reduction of iron to the elemental state from ochre deposits of Skelton Beck in Northeast England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattanathu K S M Rahman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ochre, consequence of acid mine drainage, is iron oxides-rich soil pigments that can be found in the water drainage from historic base metal and coal mines. The anaerobic strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella denitrificans were used for the microbial reduction of iron from samples of ochre collected from Skelton Beck (Saltburn Orange River, NZ 66738 21588 in Northeast England. The aim of the research was to determine the ability of the two anaerobic bacteria to reduce the iron present in ochre and to determine the rate of the reduction process. The physico-chemical changes in the ochre sample after the microbial reduction process were observed by the production of zero-valent iron which was later confirmed by the detection of elemental Fe in XRD spectrum. The XRF results revealed that 69.16% and 84.82% of iron oxide can be reduced using G. sulfurreducens and S. denitrificans respectively after 8 days of incubation. These results could provide the basis for the development of a biohydrometallurgical process for the production of elemental iron from ochre sediments.

  13. Characterising microbial reduction of arsenate sorbed to ferrihydrite and its concurrence with iron reduction and the consequent impact on arsenic mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-How

    2014-05-01

    Mobilisation of solid phase arsenic under reducing conditions involves a combination of microbial arsenate and iron reduction and is affected by secondary reactions of released products. A series of model anoxic incubations were performed to understand the concurrence between arsenate and ferrihydrite reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 at different concentrations of arsenate, ferrihydrite and lactate, and with given ΔGrxn for arsenate and ferrihydrite reduction in non-growth conditions at pH 7. The reduction kinetics of arsenate sorbed to ferrihydrite is predominately controlled by the availability of dissolved arsenate, which is measured by the integral of dissolved arsenate concentrations against incubation time and shown to correlate with the first order rate constants. Thus, the mobilisation of adsorbed As(V) can be regarded as the rate determining step of microbial reduction of As(V) sorbed to ferrihydrite. High lactate concentrations slightly slowed down the rate of arsenate reduction due to the competition with arsenate for microbial contact. Under all experimental conditions, simultaneous arsenate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred following addition of S. putrefaciens inoculums and suggested no apparent competition between these two enzymatic reductions. Ferrous ions released from iron reduction might retard microbial arsenate reduction at high arsenate and ferrihydrite concentrations due to formation of ferrous arsenate. At high arsenate to ferrihydrite ratios, reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite shifted arsenate from sorption to dissolution and hence accelerated arsenate reduction. Reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite may cause additional releases of adsorbed As(V) into solution, which is especially effective at high As(V) to ferrihydrite ratios. In comparison, formation of Fe(II) secondary minerals during microbial Fe(III) reduction were responsible for trapping solution As(V) in the systems with high ferrihydrite but low As

  14. Bacterial reduction of ferric iron and co-respiration of O2 and Fe3+ at various oxygen concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kupka

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Acidiphilium SJH, was cultivated in laboratory bioreactor under aerobic, micro-aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The bacterium oxidized organic substratum D-galactose to carbon dioxide using oxygen and ferric iron as terminal electron acceptor. The reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron was observed in either fully aerobic or anoxic conditions. Bacterial growth measured as turbidity and the substrate oxidation measured as CO2 production showed an exponential pattern. The maximum specific growth rate μ = 0,12 h-1 (generation time of 5.8 h was observed under aerobic conditions. The molar ratio of CO2 produced to O2 consumed CO2/O2 of approx. 1.16 in fully aerobic conditions indicate bacterial preference of oxygen as electron acceptor though weak reduction of ferric iron by the bacterial culture was apparent. Under conditions with the oxygen limitation, the molar CO2/O2 ratio increased to above 4 with a marked prevalence of Fe3+ as the electron acceptor. The co-respiration of both oxygen and ferric iron regardless of the concentration of soluble oxygen suggests a constitutive synthesis of the “iron-reductase” enzyme system in this bacterium. On the other hand, the bacterial growth was inhibited in cultures sparged with a pure nitrogen gas. The organic substrate oxidation and ferric iron reduction by apparently non-growing bacteria was linear and extremely slow for a few days. The recovery and acceleration of bacterial growth and ferric iron reduction was observed after changing the inconvenient incubation in pure N2 atmosphere into incubation allowing the CO2 accumulation within the medium in a closed reactor. Reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron in micro-aerobic conditions proceeded most rapidly and completely. The change in the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio caused decrease of the oxidation-reduction potential of the medium (Eh from approx. 800 mV to approx.350 mV with respect to the Nernst’s equation.

  15. 26 CFR 1.272-1 - Expenditures relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... domestic iron ore. 1.272-1 Section 1.272-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore. (a) Introduction. Section 272 provides special treatment... sometimes referred to as a “coal royalty contract” or “iron ore royalty contract”) for the disposal of coal...

  16. Speciation-Dependent Microbial Reduction of Uranium Within Iron-Coated Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiss, J.; Stewart, B.D.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-06-03

    Transport of uranium within surface and subsurface environments is predicated largely on its redox state. Uranyl reduction may transpire through either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic pathways; in either case, reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) results in the formation of sparingly soluble UO{sub 2} precipitates. Biological reduction of U(VI), while demonstrated as prolific under both laboratory and field conditions, is influenced by competing electron acceptors (such as nitrate, manganese oxides, or iron oxides) and uranyl speciation. Formation of Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} ternary complexes, often the predominate uranyl species in carbonate-bearing soils and sediments, decreases the rate of dissimilatory U(VI) reduction. The combined influence of uranyl speciation within a mineralogical matrix comparable to natural environments and under hydrodynamic conditions, however, remains unresolved. We therefore examined uranyl reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens within packed mineral columns of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand under conditions conducive or nonconducive to Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} species formation. The results are dramatic. In the absence of Ca, where uranyl carbonato complexes dominate, U(VI) reduction transpires and consumes all of the U(VI) within the influent solution (0.166 mM) over the first 2.5 cm of the flow field for the entirety of the 54 d experiment. Over 2 g of U is deposited during this reaction period, and despite ferrihydrite being a competitive electron acceptor, uranium reduction appears unabated for the duration of our experiments. By contrast, in columns with 4 mM Ca in the influent solution (0.166 mM uranyl), reduction (enzymatic or surface-bound Fe(ll) mediated) appears absent and breakthrough occurs within 18 d (at a flow rate of 3 pore volumes per day). Uranyl speciation, and in particular the formation of ternary Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes, has a profound impact on U(VI) reduction and thus transport within anaerobic systems.

  17. Mother's iron status, breastmilk iron and lactoferrin--are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashiraj; Faridi, M M A; Singh, O; Rusia, U

    2006-07-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended till 6 months age. Factors regulating the breastmilk iron and lactoferrin levels are incompletely known. Considering high prevalence of nutritional anemia in lactating mothers, we studied the iron status of lactating mothers, their breastmilk iron and lactoferrin levels to determine any relationship between them. Prospective study with 6 months follow-up. Tertiary care referral hospital. Hundred nonanemic and 100 anemic mothers with their babies recruited at birth. Fifty-two nonanemic and 50 anemic mothers and their babies completed the 6-month follow-up. Hemoglobin (Hb), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), percent transferrin saturation (%TS), serum iron (SI) and serum ferritin measured on day 1 and 6 months postpartum. Breastmilk iron and lactoferrin measured on day 1, 14 weeks and 6 months after delivery. Breastmilk iron decreased progressively from day 1 to 14 weeks and at 6 months in both groups, but no significant difference was noted between nonanemic and anemic mothers (P>0.05). Significant decline in breastmilk lactoferrin concentration from day 1 to 14 weeks in nonanemic and anemic mothers (P<0.001) noted. Hemoglobin, TIBC, %TS, SI and serum ferritin of both groups had no correlation with breastmilk iron and lactoferrin concentration on day 1, 14 weeks and 6 months after delivery. Breastmilk iron and lactoferrin concentration had no relationship with the mother's Hb and iron status.

  18. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  19. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2013-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world's population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes) has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains) and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA) metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings (NTS). Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of yellow stripe like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II) complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  20. Distribution behavior of phosphorus in the coal-based reduction of high-phosphorus-content oolitic iron ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-sheng Sun; Yue-xin Han; Peng Gao; Duo-zhen Ren

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the reduction of phosphorus from high-phosphorus-content oolitic iron ore via coal-based reduction. The distribution behavior of phosphorus (i.e., the phosphorus content and the phosphorus distribution ratio in the metal, slag, and gas phases) during reduction was investigated in detail. Experimental results showed that the distribution behavior of phosphorus was strongly influenced by the reduction temperature, the reduction time, and the C/O molar ratio. A higher temperature and a longer reaction time were more favor-able for phosphorus reduction and enrichment in the metal phase. An increase in the C/O ratio improved phosphorus reduction but also hin-dered the mass transfer of the reduced phosphorus when the C/O ratio exceeded 2.0. According to scanning electron microscopy analysis, the iron ore was transformed from an integral structure to metal and slag fractions during the reduction process. Apatite in the ore was reduced to P, and the reduced P was mainly enriched in the metal phase. These results suggest that the proposed method may enable utilization of high-phosphorus-content oolitic iron ore resources.

  1. Reduction and Immobilization of Potassium Permanganate on Iron Oxide Catalyst by Fluidized-Bed Crystallization Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Xia Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A manganese immobilization technology in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR was developed by using a waste iron oxide (i.e., BT-3 as catalyst which is a by-product from the fluidized-bed Fenton reaction (FBR-Fenton. It was found that BT-3 could easily reduce potassium permanganate (KMnO4 to MnO2. Furthermore, MnO2 could accumulate on the surface of BT-3 catalyst to form a new Fe-Mn oxide. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the KMnO4-reduction mechanism, including the effect of KMnO4 concentration, BT-3 dosage, and operational solution pH. The results showed that the pH solution was a significant factor in the reduction of KMnO4. At the optimum level, pHf 6, KMnO4 was virtually reduced in 10 min. A pseudo-first order reaction was employed to describe the reduction rate of KMnO4.

  2. Interaction mechanism between refractory and melts in iron bath smelting reduction process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu G.B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of three sorts of refractories based on alumina-graphite were studied by immersion tests. The melts included smelting reduction molten slag and corresponding carbon saturated molten iron. The influence of test temperature, FeO content in slag and specimen rotative velocity on the corrosion rate of refractories was examined. By means of SEM and EDS, the microstructure change of the refractories after immersion test in kinds of melts was studied. The morphology of the deteriorated layer showed the corrosion extent of refractories. With the addition of zirconia and titania into the refractories, the corrosion rate changed to some extent. The corrosion rate of three sorts of refractories increased dramatically with the increasing FeO content in smelting reduction slag. Compared with alumina-graphite refractory and alumina-graphite-zirconia refractory, alumina-graphite-titania refractory had stronger corrosion resistance in the smelting reduction conditions. By the results of SEM and EDS, the corrosion mechanism of refractories was developed.

  3. Treatment of wastewater phosphate by reductive dissolution of iron: use of ferric oxyhydroxide media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, W D; Lombardo, P S

    2011-01-01

    In smaller wastewater treatment systems such as septic systems, there is an interest in the development of passive phosphorus (P) removal methods. This study tested fixed-bed filters containing ferric oxyhydroxide media for wastewater P removal in a laboratory column test and in a full-scale domestic septic system. In the column test, during 30 mo of dosing with domestic wastewater, reductive iron dissolution reactions delivered consistent moderate concentrations of Fe into solution (2.9 ± 1.6 mg L), and influent PO-P of 3.7 ± 1.0 mg L was attenuated to 0.09 + 0.04 mg L in the column effluent (98% removal). Phosphorus breakthrough at successive locations along the column indicated that in addition to sorption, mineral precipitation reactions probably also played an important role in the observed P attenuation. This was supported by electron microprobe analyses, which showed the presence of thick (20 μm) secondary Fe-rich coatings containing P on the primary ferric media grains. Assays of NaHCO-leachable and acid-extractable P on the column solids showed accumulation of up to 5.4 mg g acid-extractable P near the column inlet, but iron filters could be attractive options for P removal in smaller wastewater systems because of their passive nature.

  4. Selenate and Selenite Reduction by Nanometer-Scale Zerovalent Iron Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olegario, J. T.; Yee, N. Y.; Manning, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    Selenium oxyanions can be present in agricultural drainage waters, coal mining effluent, and as fission products in radioactive wastes. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of both nanometer scale zerovalent iron (nano-Fe) and 100 mesh Fe filings for reduction and immobilization of aqueous selenate Se(VI) and selenite Se(IV). The uptake of Se(VI) and Se(IV) using batch equilibrium, kinetics, and X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) techniques was investigated. In addition, a thorough investigation of the solid phase corrosion products by X-ray diffraction was conducted. The crystalline corrosion product was similar to magnetite, though some distinct differences in the XRD results were noted between Se(IV)- and Se(VI)-treated samples. Application of quantitative X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that both Se(VI) and Se(IV) were reduced to a mixture of elemental Se(0) plus iron(II) selenide (Se(-II)). The Se local atomic structure in Se(VI)- and Se(IV)-treated nano-Fe was determined using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and a Se-Se interatomic distance of 2.44 angstroms was revealed. This work suggests that nano-Fe is an efficient material for removing dissolved Se(VI) and Se(IV) from waste waters by formation of an insoluble, reduced FeSe product.

  5. Smelting reduction process with a thick layer of slag for producing ferroalloys and iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, H. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-06-01

    Smelting reduction process with a thick layer of slag is one of the potential technologies of a flexible manufacturing system desired for the production iron and steel. Its feature is that an oxygen jet is separated from the molten metal by a thick layer of slag, and it is realized by the coexistence of carbonaceous material for controlling slag foaming and allows high post combustion operation without disturbing the reducing reaction. Experimental furnaces of 100kg, 600kg, 3t and 100t were built for the production Cr-Fe-C, Mn-Fe-C and Fe-C and the experimental production was performed successfully. The procedure of the experiments is reviewed and slag foaming and its control, the properties of the slag layer, the reducing reaction, direct supply of fine ore, the mechanism of heat transfer, post combustion and coal consumption are discussed. Though there are some problems in the decrease of post combustion in the use of coal with high volatile content, this process has no problem in enlargement of the scale, and it is promising for the flexible production of iron. It also can be applied for scrap melting. 67 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Z-Selective Olefin Synthesis via Iron-Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Alkyl Halides with Terminal Arylalkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Zhurkin, Fedor E; Hu, Xile

    2015-04-22

    Selective catalytic synthesis of Z-olefins has been challenging. Here we describe a method to produce 1,2-disubstituted olefins in high Z selectivity via reductive cross-coupling of alkyl halides with terminal arylalkynes. The method employs inexpensive and nontoxic catalyst (iron(II) bromide) and reductant (zinc). The substrate scope encompasses primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl halides, and the reaction tolerates a large number of functional groups. The utility of the method is demonstrated in the synthesis of several pharmaceutically relevant molecules. Mechanistic study suggests that the reaction proceeds through an iron-catalyzed anti-selective carbozincation pathway.

  7. Amine synthesis via iron-catalysed reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2016-08-01

    (Hetero)Aryl amines, an important class of organic molecules in medicinal chemistry, are most commonly synthesized from anilines, which are in turn synthesized by hydrogenation of nitroarenes. Amine synthesis directly from nitroarenes is attractive due to improved step economy and functional group compatibility. Despite these potential advantages, there is yet no general method for the synthesis of (hetero)aryl amines by carbon-nitrogen cross-coupling of nitroarenes. Here we report the reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides to yield (hetero)aryl amines. A simple iron catalyst enables the coupling with numerous primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl halides. Broad scope and high functional group tolerance are demonstrated. Mechanistic study suggests that nitrosoarenes and alkyl radicals are involved as intermediates. This new C-N coupling method provides general and step-economical access to aryl amines.

  8. Rhizosphere iron (III) deposition and reduction in a Juncus effusus L.-dominated wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.V.; Emerson, D.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (III) plaque forms on the roots of wetland plants from the reaction of Fe(II) with O2 released by roots. Recent laboratory studies have shown that Fe plaque is more rapidly reduced than non-rhizosphere Fe(III) oxides. The goals of the current study were to determine in situ rates of: (i) Fe(III) reduction of root plaque and soil Fe(III) oxides, (ii) root Fe(III) deposition, and (iii) root and soil organic matter decomposition. Iron (III) reduction was investigated using a novel buried-bag technique in which roots and soil were buried in heat-sealed membrane bags (Versapor 200 membrane, pore size = 0.2 ??m) in late fall following plant senescence. Bags were retrieved at monthly intervals for 1 yr to assess changes in total C and Fe mass, Fe mineralogy, Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio, and the abundances of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB). The soil C and Fe pools did not change significantly throughout the year, but root C and total root Fe mass decreased by 40 and 70%, respectively. When total Fe losses were adjusted for changes in the ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III), over 95% of the Fe(III) in the plaque was reduced during the 12-mo study, at a peak rate of 0.6 mg Fe(III) g dry weight-1 d-1 (gdw-1 d-1). These estimates exceed the crude estimate of Fe(III) accumulation [0.3 mg Fe(III) g dry weight-1 d-1] on bare-root plants that were transplanted into the wetland for a growing season. We concluded that root plaque has the potential to be reduced as rapidly as it is deposited under field conditions. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan-Humic Acid-Zerovalent Iron Nanocomposite for Nitrate Reduction in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Avosuahi Akinremi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new zerovalent iron chitosan-humic acid nanocomposite was prepared and tested for nitrate ion reduction in water. Humic acid was used for intramolecular cross-linking of the chitosan linear chains to increase the active sites on the chitosan biopolymer and then further used as a stabilizer to synthesize zerovalent iron nanoparticles by the reduction of iron (II chloride with sodium borohydride. Characterization of the products was carried out using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffractometer. Batch experiments were conducted for the reduction of nitrate in water using different concentrations of the products in different concentrations of nitrate ion and at different contact time. The adsorption equilibrium data for the nitrate solution gave a favorable adsorption according to the Langmuir equation. Varying the nanocomposite-to-nitrate ion ratio generally led to faster nitrate reduction, with the pseudofirst-order rate constant for the adsorption increasing with increase in nanocomposite-to-nitrate ion ratio. Nitrate removal efficiency of zerovalent iron chitosan-humic acid nanocomposite was further confirmed using real water samples obtained from drainage waste and river with an initial nitrate concentration of 18.00±0.01 and 12.00±0.12 ppm, respectively. The reduction of nitrate in water using the nanocomposite was concluded to be highly effective.

  10. Multiple sclerosis deep grey matter: the relation between demyelination, neurodegeneration, inflammation and iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Simeonidou, Constantina; Steinberger, Günther; Hametner, Simon; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Deretzi, Georgia; Kovacs, Gabor G; Kutzelnigg, Alexandra; Lassmann, Hans; Frischer, Josa M

    2014-12-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), diffuse degenerative processes in the deep grey matter have been associated with clinical disabilities. We performed a systematic study in MS deep grey matter with a focus on the incidence and topographical distribution of lesions in relation to white matter and cortex in a total sample of 75 MS autopsy patients and 12 controls. In addition, detailed analyses of inflammation, acute axonal injury, iron deposition and oxidative stress were performed. MS deep grey matter was affected by two different processes: the formation of focal demyelinating lesions and diffuse neurodegeneration. Deep grey matter demyelination was most prominent in the caudate nucleus and hypothalamus and could already be seen in early MS stages. Lesions developed on the background of inflammation. Deep grey matter inflammation was intermediate between low inflammatory cortical lesions and active white matter lesions. Demyelination and neurodegeneration were associated with oxidative injury. Iron was stored primarily within oligodendrocytes and myelin fibres and released upon demyelination. In addition to focal demyelinated plaques, the MS deep grey matter also showed diffuse and global neurodegeneration. This was reflected by a global reduction of neuronal density, the presence of acutely injured axons, and the accumulation of oxidised phospholipids and DNA in neurons, oligodendrocytes and axons. Neurodegeneration was associated with T cell infiltration, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in microglia and profound accumulation of iron. Thus, both focal lesions as well as diffuse neurodegeneration in the deep grey matter appeared to contribute to the neurological disabilities of MS patients.

  11. Generation process of FeS and its inhibition mechanism on iron mineral reduction in selective direct reduction of laterite nickel ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Liu; Ti-chang Sun; Xiao-ping Wang; En-xia Gao

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that Na2SO4 can significantly inhibit the reduction of iron oxide in the selective reduction process of laterite nickel ore. FeS generated in the process plays an important role in selective reduction, but the generation process of FeS and its inhibition mechanism on iron reduction are not clear. To figure this out, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses were conducted to study the roasted ore. The results show that when Na2SO4 is added in the roasting, the FeO content in the roasted ore in-creases accompanied by the emergence of FeS phase. Further analysis indicates that Na2S formed by the reaction of Na2SO4 with CO reacts with SiO2 at the FeO surface to generate FeS and Na2Si2O5. As a result, a thin film forms on the surface of FeO, hindering the contact be-tween reducing gas and FeO. Therefore, the reduction of iron is depressed, and the FeO content in the roasted ore increases.

  12. Superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of chloroplastic ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Brian; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Abdel-Ghany, Salah; Pilon, Marinus; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A; Sagi, Moshe; Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2016-09-01

    Selenium assimilation in plants is facilitated by several enzymes that participate in the transport and assimilation of sulfate. Manipulation of genes that function in sulfur metabolism dramatically affects selenium toxicity and accumulation. However, it has been proposed that selenite is not reduced by sulfite reductase. Instead, selenite can be non-enzymatically reduced by glutathione, generating selenodiglutathione and superoxide. The damaging effects of superoxide on iron-sulfur clusters in cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins are well known. However, it is unknown if superoxide damages chloroplastic iron-sulfur proteins. The goals of this study were twofold: to determine whether decreased activity of sulfite reductase impacts selenium tolerance in Arabidopsis, and to determine if superoxide generated from the glutathione-mediated reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin. Our data demonstrate that knockdown of sulfite reductase in Arabidopsis does not affect selenite tolerance or selenium accumulation. Additionally, we provide in vitro evidence that the non-enzymatic reduction of selenite damages the iron-sulfur cluster of ferredoxin, a plastidial protein that is an essential component of the photosynthetic light reactions. Damage to ferredoxin's iron-sulfur cluster was associated with formation of apo-ferredoxin and impaired activity. We conclude that if superoxide damages iron-sulfur clusters of ferredoxin in planta, then it might contribute to photosynthetic impairment often associated with abiotic stress, including toxic levels of selenium.

  13. Fuzzy Relational Databases: Representational Issues and Reduction Using Similarity Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Henri; Testemale, Claudette

    1987-01-01

    Compares and expands upon two approaches to dealing with fuzzy relational databases. The proposed similarity measure is based on a fuzzy Hausdorff distance and estimates the mismatch between two possibility distributions using a reduction process. The consequences of the reduction process on query evaluation are studied. (Author/EM)

  14. Rates of microbial sulfate reduction control the sizes of biogenic iron sulfide aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q.

    2005-12-01

    Sulfide minerals occur widely in freshwater and marine sediments as byproducts of microbial sulfate reduction and as end products of heavy metal bioremediation. They form when metals in the environments combine with sulfide produced from the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria. We used chemostat bioreactors to study sizes and crystal structures of iron sulfide (FeS) minerals produced by Desulfovibrio vulgaris, D. desulfuricans strain G20, and subspecies desulfuricans. FeS nanoparticles and their aggregates are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). FeS nanoparticles produced by sulfate reducing bacteria are extremely small, usually less than around 10 nm in diameter. Nanoparticles do not occur as individual nanoparticles, but as aggregates. The sizes of FeS aggregates are affected by sulfate reduction rates, Fe(II) concentration, pH, ionic strength, organic matter concentration, bacterial species, etc. Aggregate size ranges from about 500 nm at very large sulfate reduction rates to about 1,500 nm at very small rates. Variations in Fe(II) concentration also lead to a difference up to 500 nm in FeS aggregate size. Different bacterial species produce nanoparticle aggregates of different sizes under similar growth conditions. For example, D. vulgaris produces FeS aggregates with sizes 500 nm smaller than those by strain G20. The inverse relationship between FeS aggregate sizes and sulfate reduction rates is important in evaluating metal bioremediation strategies. Previous approaches have focused on stimulating microbial activities in natural environments. However, our experimental results suggest that increasing metabolic rates may decrease the aggregate size, increasing the mobility of colloidal aggregates. Therefore, the balance between microbial activities and sizes of biogenic aggregates may be an important consideration in the design and

  15. Inhibition of iron (III) minerals and acidification on the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Laiby; Smolders, Erik

    2014-09-01

    Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes is inhibited by acidification and by the presence of Fe (III) as a competitive electron acceptor. Synergism between both factors on dechlorination is predicted as reductive dissolution of Fe (III) minerals is facilitated by acidification. This study was set-up to assess this synergism for two common aquifer Fe (III) minerals, goethite and ferrihydrite. Anaerobic microbial dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by KB-1 culture and formate as electron donor was investigated in anaerobic batch containers at different solution pH values (6.2-7.2) in sand coated with these Fe minerals and a sand only as control. In the absence of Fe, lowering substrate pH from 7.2 to 6.2 increased the time for 90% TCE degradation from 14±1d to 42±4d. At pH 7.2, goethite did not affect TCE degradation time while ferrihydrite increased the degradation time to 19±1d compared to the no Fe control. At pH 6.2, 90% degradation was at 78±1 (ferrihydrite) or 131±1d (goethite). Ferrous iron production in ferrihydrite treatment increased between pH 7.2 and 6.5 but decreased by further lowering pH to 6.2, likely due to reduced microbial activity. This study confirms that TCE is increasingly inhibited by the combined effect of acidification and bioavailable Fe (III), however no evidence was found for synergistic inhibition since Fe reduction did not increase as pH decreases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where effect of pH and Fe (III) reduction on TCE was simultaneously tested. Acid Fe-rich aquifers need sufficient buffering and alkalinity to ensure swift degradation of chlorinated ethenes.

  16. Chromium(VI) reduction kinetics by zero-valent iron in moderately hard water with humic acid: iron dissolution and humic acid adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzhou; Tsang, Daniel C W; Lo, Irene M C

    2008-03-15

    In zerovalent iron treatment systems, the presence of multiple solution components may impose combined effects that differ from corresponding individual effects. The copresence of humic acid and hardness (Ca2+/Mg2+) was found to influence Cr(VI) reduction by Feo and iron dissolution in a way different from their respective presence in batch kinetics experiments with synthetic groundwater at initial pH 6 and 9.5. Cr(VI) reduction rate constants (k(obs)) were slightly inhibited by humic acid adsorption on iron filings (decreases of 7-9% and 10-12% in the presence of humic acid alone and together with hardness, respectively). The total amount of dissolved Fe steadily increased to 25 mg L(-1) in the presence of humic acid alone because the formation of soluble Fe-humate complexes appeared to suppress iron precipitation. Substantial amounts of soluble and colloidal Fe-humate complexes in groundwater may arouse aesthetic and safety concerns in groundwater use. In contrast, the coexistence of humic acid and Ca2+/Mg2+ significantly promoted aggregation of humic acid and metal hydrolyzed species, as indicated by XPS and TEM analyses, which remained nondissolved (>0.45 microm) in solution. These metal-humate aggregates may impose long-term impacts on PRBs in subsurface settings.

  17. A hydrogen-bond facilitated cycle for oxygen reduction by an acid- and base-compatible iron platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Han Sen; Komor, Alexis C; Iavarone, Anthony T; Chang, Christopher J

    2009-11-02

    We report a hydrogen-bond functionalized N4Py ligand platform (N,N-bis(2-R-6-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine; R = neopentyl-NH, N4Py(2NpNH), 9; R = phenyl-NH, N4Py(2PhNH), 10) and the ability of its iron(II)-triflate [N4Py(2R)Fe(II)(OTf)][OTf] complexes (R = NpNH, 11; R = PhNH, 12) to activate and reduce dioxygen in a synthetic cycle by coupled proton and electron transfer. A pair of iron(III)-hydroxide [N4Py(2R)Fe(III)(OH)][OTf](2) complexes (R = NpNH, 13; R = PhNH, 14) are isolated and structurally and spectroscopically characterized after exposure of the iron(II)-triflate precursors to 1 atm of O(2) at ambient temperature. The stability of this system to acids and bases allows regeneration of the labile iron(II)-triflate starting materials by sequential electron and proton transfer with cobaltocene and triflic acid, respectively, or through direct proton-coupled reduction with ascorbic acid. In the stepwise process, reduction of the iron(III)-hydroxide complexes with cobaltocene gives structurally homologous iron(II)-hydroxide [N4Py(2R)Fe(II)(OH)][OTf] congeners (R = NpNH, 15; R = PhNH, 16) that can be prepared independently from 11 and 12 with 20% aq. NaOH. Additions of triflic acid to complexes 15 and 16 furnish the starting compounds 11 and 12, respectively, to complete the synthetic cycle. The combined data establish a synthetic cycle for O(2) reduction by an iron platform that manages proton and electron transfer through its first and second coordination spheres.

  18. Comparative study of reactions between µ-nitrido- or µ-oxo-bridged iron tetrasulfophthalocyanines and sulfur-containing reductants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dereven’kov Ilia A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of reactivity of μ-nitrido- and μ-oxo-dimers of iron tetrasulfophthalocyanine has been performed in aqueous solutions of various acidity. The substantially higher stability of nitrido-bridged structure under both strongly acidic and strongly alkaline environments was demonstrated. Reactions of the complexes with sulfur-containing reductants (sodium dithionite, thiourea dioxide, sodium hydroxymethanesulfinate, L-cysteine has been studied. Differences in reduction processes were explained.

  19. Kinetic studies on the reduction of iron ore nuggets by devolatilization of lean-grade coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Chanchal; Gupta, Prithviraj; De, Arnab; Chaudhuri, Mahua Ghosh; Dey, Rajib

    2016-12-01

    An isothermal kinetic study of a novel technique for reducing agglomerated iron ore by volatiles released by pyrolysis of lean-grade non-coking coal was carried out at temperature from 1050 to 1200°C for 10-120 min. The reduced samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. A good degree of metallization and reduction was achieved. Gas diffusion through the solid was identified as the reaction-rate-controlling resistance; however, during the initial period, particularly at lower temperatures, resistance to interfacial chemical reaction was also significant, though not dominant. The apparent rate constant was observed to increase marginally with decreasing size of the particles constituting the nuggets. The apparent activation energy of reduction was estimated to be in the range from 49.640 to 51.220 kJ/mol and was not observed to be affected by the particle size. The sulfur and carbon contents in the reduced samples were also determined.

  20. Kinetic studies on the reduction of iron ore nuggets by devolatilization of lean-grade coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chanchal Biswas; PrithviraJGupta; Arnab De; Mahua Ghosh Chaudhuri; and Rajib Dey

    2016-01-01

    An isothermal kinetic study of a novel technique for reducing agglomerated iron ore by volatiles released by pyrolysis of lean-grade non-coking coal was carried out at temperature from 1050 to 1200°C for 10–120 min. The reduced samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. A good degree of metallization and reduction was achieved. Gas diffusion through the solid was identified as the reaction-rate-controlling resistance; however, during the initial period, particularly at lower temperatures, resistance to interfacial chemical reaction was also significant, though not dominant. The apparent rate constant was observed to increase marginally with decreasing size of the particles constituting the nuggets. The apparent activation energy of reduction was estimated to be in the range from 49.640 to 51.220 kJ/mol and was not observed to be affected by the particle size. The sulfur and carbon contents in the reduced samples were also determined.

  1. Reduction of Sn-Bearing Iron Concentrate with Mixed H2/CO Gas for Preparation of Sn-Enriched Direct Reduced Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhixiong; Li, Guanghui; Wen, Peidan; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yuanbo; Jiang, Tao

    2017-06-01

    The development of manufacturing technology of Sn-bearing stainless steel inspires a novel concept for using Sn-bearing complex iron ore via reduction with mixed H2/CO gas to prepare Sn-enriched direct reduced iron (DRI). The thermodynamic analysis of the reduction process confirms the easy reduction of stannic oxide to metallic tin and the rigorous conditions for volatilizing SnO. Although the removal of tin is feasible by reduction of the pellet at 1223 K (950 °C) with mixed gas of 5 vol pct H2, 28.5 vol pct CO, and 66.5 vol pct CO2 (CO/(CO + CO2) = 30 pct), it is necessary that the pellet be further reduced for preparing DRI. In contrast, maintaining Sn in the metallic pellet is demonstrated to be a promising way to effectively use the ore. It is indicated that only 5.5 pct of Sn is volatilized when the pellet is reduced at 1223 K (950 °C) for 30 minutes with the mixed gas of 50 vol pct H2, 50 vol pct CO (CO/(CO + CO2) = 100 pct). A metallic pellet (Sn-bearing DRI) with Sn content of 0.293 pct, Fe metallization of 93.5 pct, and total iron content of 88.2 pct is prepared as a raw material for producing Sn-bearing stainless steel. The reduced tin in the Sn-bearing DRI either combines with metallic iron to form Sn-Fe alloy or it remains intact.

  2. Reduction of Sn-Bearing Iron Concentrate with Mixed H2/CO Gas for Preparation of Sn-Enriched Direct Reduced Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhixiong; Li, Guanghui; Wen, Peidan; Peng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yuanbo; Jiang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The development of manufacturing technology of Sn-bearing stainless steel inspires a novel concept for using Sn-bearing complex iron ore via reduction with mixed H2/CO gas to prepare Sn-enriched direct reduced iron (DRI). The thermodynamic analysis of the reduction process confirms the easy reduction of stannic oxide to metallic tin and the rigorous conditions for volatilizing SnO. Although the removal of tin is feasible by reduction of the pellet at 1223 K (950 °C) with mixed gas of 5 vol pct H2, 28.5 vol pct CO, and 66.5 vol pct CO2 (CO/(CO + CO2) = 30 pct), it is necessary that the pellet be further reduced for preparing DRI. In contrast, maintaining Sn in the metallic pellet is demonstrated to be a promising way to effectively use the ore. It is indicated that only 5.5 pct of Sn is volatilized when the pellet is reduced at 1223 K (950 °C) for 30 minutes with the mixed gas of 50 vol pct H2, 50 vol pct CO (CO/(CO + CO2) = 100 pct). A metallic pellet (Sn-bearing DRI) with Sn content of 0.293 pct, Fe metallization of 93.5 pct, and total iron content of 88.2 pct is prepared as a raw material for producing Sn-bearing stainless steel. The reduced tin in the Sn-bearing DRI either combines with metallic iron to form Sn-Fe alloy or it remains intact.

  3. Multistep Reduction Kinetics of Fine Iron Ore with Carbon Monoxide in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Zhong; Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Wenzhou; Yue, Junrong

    2017-04-01

    The reduction kinetics of Brazilian hematite by CO is investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer (MFBRA) using an analyzing method based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) model at temperatures of 973 K (700 °C), 1023 K (750 °C), 1073 K (800 °C), and 1123 K (850 °C). The solid products at different reduction stages are evaluated by SEM/EDS and XRD technologies. Results indicate that the reduction process is better to be discussed in terms of a parallel reaction model that consists of the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron, rather than a stepwise route. Meanwhile, the controlling mechanism of the reduction process is found to vary with temperature and the degree of conversion. The overall process is controlled by the gas-solid reaction occurring at the iron/wüstite interface in the initial stages, and then is limited by the nucleation of wüstite, and finally shifts to diffusion control. Moreover, the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron take place simultaneously but with different time dependences, and the apparent activation energies of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron are determined as 83.61 and 80.40 KJ/mol, respectively.

  4. Multistep Reduction Kinetics of Fine Iron Ore with Carbon Monoxide in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Zhong; Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Wenzhou; Yue, Junrong

    2017-01-01

    The reduction kinetics of Brazilian hematite by CO is investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer (MFBRA) using an analyzing method based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) model at temperatures of 973 K (700 °C), 1023 K (750 °C), 1073 K (800 °C), and 1123 K (850 °C). The solid products at different reduction stages are evaluated by SEM/EDS and XRD technologies. Results indicate that the reduction process is better to be discussed in terms of a parallel reaction model that consists of the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron, rather than a stepwise route. Meanwhile, the controlling mechanism of the reduction process is found to vary with temperature and the degree of conversion. The overall process is controlled by the gas-solid reaction occurring at the iron/wüstite interface in the initial stages, and then is limited by the nucleation of wüstite, and finally shifts to diffusion control. Moreover, the reactions of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron take place simultaneously but with different time dependences, and the apparent activation energies of hematite to wüstite and wüstite to iron are determined as 83.61 and 80.40 KJ/mol, respectively.

  5. Recovery of iron and calcium aluminate slag from high-ferrous bauxite by high-temperature reduction and smelting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-yi Zhang; Wei L; Yuan-hong Qi; Zong-shu Zou

    2016-01-01

    A high-temperature reduction and smelting process was used to recover iron and calcium aluminate slag from high-ferrous bauxite. The effects of w(CaO)/w(SiO2) ratio, anthracite ratio, and reduction temperature and time on the recovery and size of iron nuggets and on the Al2O3 grade of the calcium aluminate slag were investigated through thermodynamic calculations and experiments. The optimized process conditions were the bauxite/anthracite/slaked lime weight ratio of 100:16.17:59.37, reduction temperature of 1450°C and reduction time of 20 min. Under these conditions, high-quality iron nuggets and calcium aluminate slag were obtained. The largest size and the highest recov-ery rate of iron nuggets were 11.42 mm and 92.79wt%, respectively. The calcium aluminate slag mainly comprised Ca2SiO4 and Ca12Al14O33, with small amounts of FeAl2O4, CaAl2O4, and Ca2Al2SiO7.

  6. Sharply higher rates of iron deficiency in obese Mexican women and children are predicted by obesity-related inflammation rather than by differences in dietary iron intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cepeda-Lopez, A.C.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Boonstra, A.; Aeberli, I.; Gonzalez-Salazar, F.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Villalpando, S.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Obese individuals may be at increased risk of iron deficiency (ID), but it is unclear whether this is due to poor dietary iron intakes or to adiposity-related inflammation. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relations between body mass index (BMI), dietary iron, and diet

  7. Evidence of relative iron deficiency in platelet- and plasma-pheresis donors correlates with donation frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihui; Condon, Frances; Kessler, Debra; Nandi, Vijay; Rebosa, Mark; Westerman, Mark; Shaz, Beth H; Ginzburg, Yelena

    2016-12-01

    The loss of iron stores and resulting iron deficiency is well documented in whole blood or red blood cell donors. We hypothesized that relative iron deficiency also occurs as a result of more frequent platelet- and plasma-pheresis (apheresis) donation. To test this hypothesis, we proposed a pilot cross-sectional study to analyze erythropoiesis- and iron-related parameters in white male apheresis donors: (1) relative to controls, (2) in correlation with apheresis donation frequency, and (3) in correlation with pre-donation platelet count. Fifty eligible apheresis donors and eight controls were enrolled in the study. Apheresis donors were found to have a lower serum ferritin and serum hepcidin and exhibited evidence of iron restricted erythropoiesis relative to controls. Furthermore, among donors, lower MCV, CH(r) , hepcidin concentration, and serum ferritin were observed in more frequent apheresis donors. Correlations between donation frequency and hepcidin and ferritin were noted in apheresis donors. This pilot study demonstrates that apheresis donors are relatively iron deficient compared to controls and supports the premise that frequent apheresis donation correlates with relatively iron restricted erythropoiesis. An analysis of iron- and erythropoiesis-related parameters in a broader population of frequent apheresis donors (i.e., female and non-white donors) may demonstrate larger deficits and an even greater potential benefit of iron replacement. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:551-558, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. In Situ Synchrotron Powder Diffraction Studies of Reduction-Oxidation (Redox) Behavior of Iron Ores and Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushechkin, Alexander Y.; Kochanek, Mark; Tang, Liangguang; Lim, Seng

    2017-04-01

    Phase transformations of two types of iron-based oxides (iron ore and industrial-grade ilmenite) were studied using synchrotron powder diffraction of the samples processed in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at 1173 K (900 °C) and 1223 K (950 °C), respectively. In iron ore oxidation, the disappearance of the wustite and fayalite phases was followed by hematite growth and a decrease of the magnetite phase. The magnetite phase was partially recovered by treatment in a reducing atmosphere. Ilmenite oxidation initiated decomposition of the ilmenite phase with rapid growth of hematite and gradual growth of the pseudobrookite phase. In a reducing atmosphere, ilmenite was gradually recovered from pseudobrookite with a relatively fast initial decrease in rutile and hematite content. Under reducing conditions, there was interaction of iron ore with magnesio-ferrites in iron ore-ash mixture and interaction of ilmenite with silica by the formation of fayalite.

  9. In Situ Synchrotron Powder Diffraction Studies of Reduction-Oxidation (Redox) Behavior of Iron Ores and Ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushechkin, Alexander Y.; Kochanek, Mark; Tang, Liangguang; Lim, Seng

    2017-01-01

    Phase transformations of two types of iron-based oxides (iron ore and industrial-grade ilmenite) were studied using synchrotron powder diffraction of the samples processed in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at 1173 K (900 °C) and 1223 K (950 °C), respectively. In iron ore oxidation, the disappearance of the wustite and fayalite phases was followed by hematite growth and a decrease of the magnetite phase. The magnetite phase was partially recovered by treatment in a reducing atmosphere. Ilmenite oxidation initiated decomposition of the ilmenite phase with rapid growth of hematite and gradual growth of the pseudobrookite phase. In a reducing atmosphere, ilmenite was gradually recovered from pseudobrookite with a relatively fast initial decrease in rutile and hematite content. Under reducing conditions, there was interaction of iron ore with magnesio-ferrites in iron ore-ash mixture and interaction of ilmenite with silica by the formation of fayalite.

  10. EFFECTS OF NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER, ANTHROPOGENIC SURFACTANTS, AND MODEL QUINONES ON THE REDUCTION OF CONTAMINANTS BY ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies of contaminant reduction by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) have highlighted the role of iron oxides at the metal–water interface and the effect that sorption has at the oxide–water interface on contaminant reduction kinetics. The results s...

  11. Effect of phosphate, iron and sulfate reduction on arsenic dynamics and bioaccumulation in constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Moon, H. S.; Myneni, S.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Constructed wetlands are economically viable and highly efficient in the treatment of high As waters discharged from smelting process in the mining industry. However, arsenic (As) dynamics and bioaccumulation in constructed wetlands coupled to nutrients loading and associated biogeochemical changes are confounding and not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of phosphate, iron and sulfate reduction on As dynamics in the wetland rhizosphere and its bioaccumulation in plants using greenhouse mesocosms. Results show that high Fe (50µM ferrihydrite/g soil) and SO42- (5mM) treatments are most favorable for As sequestration in soils in the presence of wetland plants (Scirpus actus), probably because the biodegradable plant exudates released into the rhizosphere facilitates the microbial reduction of Fe(III), SO42- and As(V) to sequester As by precipitation/coprecipitation. Whereas, from the transition of oxidizing to reducing conditions, the loading of high phosphate (100µM) enhances the As release into groundwater and its accumulation in the plants, due to the competitive sorption between phosphate and arsenate as well as the reductive dissolution of Fe and As. As retention in soils and accumulation in plants were mainly controlled by SO42- rather than Fe levels. Compared with low SO42- (0.1mM) treatment, high SO42- resulted in 2 times more As in soils, 30 times more As in roots, and 49% less As in leaves. The As levels in soils are negatively correlated with the As levels in plant roots. An As speciation analysis in pore water indicated that 19% more dissolved As was reduced under high SO42- than low SO42- levels, and 30% more As(III) was detected under high PO43- than low PO43- levels, which is consistent with the fact that more dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria were found under high SO42- and high PO43- levels.

  12. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., FeII release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  13. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  14. Nitrogen-doped graphene-wrapped iron nanofragments for high-performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Na Young; Shin, Dong Yun; Park, Hee-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Joon Kwon, S.; Lim, Dong-Hee; Bong, Ki Wan; Son, Jeong Gon; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-03-01

    Transition metals, such as iron (Fe)- or cobalt (Co)-based nanomaterials, are promising electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells due to their high theoretical activity and low cost. However, a major challenge to using these metals in place of precious metal catalysts for ORR is their low efficiency and poor stability, thus new concepts and strategies should be needed to address this issue. Here, we report a hybrid aciniform nanostructures of Fe nanofragments embedded in thin nitrogen (N)-doped graphene (Fe@N-G) layers via a heat treatment of graphene oxide-wrapped iron oxide (Fe2O3) microparticles with melamine. The heat treatment leads to transformation of Fe2O3 microparticles to nanosized zero-valent Fe fragments and formation of core-shell structures of Fe nanofragments and N-doped graphene layers. Thin N-doped graphene layers massively promote electron transfer from the encapsulated metals to the graphene surface, which efficiently optimizes the electronic structure of the graphene surface and thereby triggers ORR activity at the graphene surface. With the synergistic effect arising from the N-doped graphene and Fe nanoparticles with porous aciniform nanostructures, the Fe@N-G hybrid catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity, which was evidenced by high E1/2 of 0.82 V, onset potential of 0.93 V, and limiting current density of 4.8 mA cm-2 indicating 4-electron ORR, and even exceeds the catalytic stability of the commercial Pt catalyst.

  15. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eCoursolle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA, an integral outer membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB and an outer membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC. Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC / mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA / MtrE / OmcA is able to reduce iron(III citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications towards the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production.

  16. Decreasing ammonium generation using hydrogenotrophic bacteria in the process of nitrate reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Yi; Li, Tielong [College of Environmental Science and Engineering/Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control/Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Processed and Environmental Criteria, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Jin, Zhaohui, E-mail: jinzh@nankai.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering/Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control/Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Processed and Environmental Criteria, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Dong, Meiying; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Shuaima [College of Environmental Science and Engineering/Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control/Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Processed and Environmental Criteria, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2009-10-15

    An integrated nitrate treatment using nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) and Alcaligenes eutrophus, which is a kind of hydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria, was conducted to remove nitrate and decrease ammonium generation. Within 8 days, nitrate was removed completely in the reactors containing NZVI particles plus bacteria while the proportion of ammonium generated was only 33%. That is a lower reduction rate but a smaller proportion of ammonium relative to that in abiotic reactors. It was also found that ammonium generation experienced a biphasic process, involving an increasing period and a stable period. After domestication of the bacteria, the combined NZVI-cell system could remove all nitrate without ammonium released when the refreshed nitrate was introduced. Nitrate reduction and the final product distribution were also studied in batch reactors amended with different initial NZVI contents and biomass concentrations, respectively. Both the nitrate removal rate and the ammonium yield decreased when the initial content of NZVI reduced and the initial biomass concentration increased. However, about 27% of the nitrate was converted to ammonium when excess bacteria (OD{sub 422} = 0.026) were used, which was higher than that with appropriate amount of bacteria.

  17. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system Part 1: effect of feed solution pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Iovi, A; Balcu, I

    2008-05-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using long-term column experiments, for aqueous Cr(VI) solutions having low buffering capacities, over the pH range of 2.00-7.30. The results showed that the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution significantly affects the reduction capacity of scrap iron. The highest reduction capacity was determined to be 19.2 mg Cr(VI)/g scrap iron, at pH 2.50, and decreased with increasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. A considerable decrease in scrap iron reduction capacity (25%) was also observed at pH 2.00, as compared to pH 2.50, due to the increased contribution of H(+) ions to the corrosion of scrap iron, which leads to a rapid decrease in time of the scrap iron volume. Over the pH range of 2.50-7.30, hexavalent chromium concentration increases slowly in time after its breakthrough in column effluent, until a steady-state concentration was observed; similarly, over the same pH range, the amount of solubilized Cr(III) in treated column effluent decreases in time, until a steady-state concentration was observed. The steady-state concentration in column effluent decreased for Cr(VI) and increased for Cr(III) with decreasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. No steady-state Cr(VI) or Cr(III) concentrations in column effluent were observed at pH 2.00. Over the entire studied pH range, the amount of Fe(total) in treated solution increases as the initial pH of column influent is decreased; the results show also a continuously decrease in time of Fe(total) concentration, for a constant initial pH, due to a decrease in time of iron corrosion rate. Cr(III) concentration in column effluent also continuously decreased in time, for a constant initial pH, over the pH range of 2.50-7.30. This represents an advantage, because the amount of precipitant agent used to remove Fe(total) and Cr(III) from the column effluent will also decrease in time. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) reduction with scrap iron in

  18. Sustaining reactivity of Fe(0) for nitrate reduction via electron transfer between dissolved Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Luchao; yang, Li; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Xuexiang; Chen, Zhan; Hu, Chun

    2016-05-05

    The mechanism of the effects of Fe(2+)(aq) on the reduction of NO3(-) by Fe(0) was investigated. The effects of initial pH on the rate of NO3(-) reduction and the Fe(0) surface characteristics revealed Fe(2+)(aq) and the characteristics of minerals on the surface of Fe(0) played an important role in NO3(-) reduction. Both NO3(-) reduction and the decrease of Fe(2+)(aq) exhibited similar kinetics and were promoted by each other. This promotion was associated with the types of the surface iron oxides of Fe(0). Additionally, further reduction of NO3(-) produced more surface iron oxides, supplying more active sites for Fe(2+)(aq), resulting in more electron transfer between Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides and a higher reaction rate. Using the isotope specificity of (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, it was verified that the Fe(2+)(aq) was continuously converted into Fe(3+) oxides on the surface of Fe(0) and then converted into Fe3O4 via electron transfer between Fe(2+) and the pre-existing surface Fe(3+) oxides. Electrochemistry measurements confirmed that the spontaneous electron transfer between the Fe(2+) and structural Fe(3+) species accelerated the interfacial electron transfer between the Fe species and NO3(-). This study provides a new insight into the interaction between Fe species and contaminants and interface electron transfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Aging-related changes in the iron status of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRuisseau, Keith C; Park, Young-Min; DeRuisseau, Lara R; Cowley, Patrick M; Fazen, Christopher H; Doyle, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    The rise in non-heme iron (NHI) concentration observed in skeletal muscle of aging rodents is thought to contribute to the development of sarcopenia. The source of the NHI has not been identified, nor have the physiological ramifications of elevated iron status in aged muscle been directly examined. Therefore, we assessed plantaris NHI and heme iron (HI) levels in addition to expression of proteins involved in iron uptake (transferrin receptor-1; TfR1), storage (ferritin), export (ferroportin; FPN), and regulation (iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) and -2 (IRP2)) of male F344xBN F1 rats (n=10/group) of various ages (8, 18, 28, 32, and 36 months) to further understand iron regulation in aging muscle. In a separate experiment, iron chelator (pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone; PIH) or vehicle was administered to male F344xBN F1 rats (n=8/group) beginning at 30 months of age to assess the impact on plantaris muscle mass and function at ~36 months of age. Principle findings revealed the increased NHI concentration in old age was consistent with concentrating effects of muscle atrophy and reduction in HI levels, with no change in the total iron content of the muscle. The greatest increase in muscle iron content occurred during the period of animal growth and was associated with downregulation of TfR1 and IRP2 expression. Ferritin upregulation did not occur until senescence and the protein remained undetectable during the period of muscle iron content elevation. Lastly, administration of PIH did not significantly (p>0.05) impact NHI or measures of muscle atrophy or contractile function. In summary, this study confirms that the elevated NHI concentration in old age is largely due to the loss in muscle mass. The increased muscle iron content during aging does not appear to associate with cytosolic ferritin storage, but the functional consequences of elevated iron status in old age remains to be determined.

  20. Relations between two-dimensional models from dimensional reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Natividade, C.P. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1998-12-31

    In this work we explore the consequences of dimensional reduction of the 3D Maxwell-Chern-Simons and some related models. A connection between topological mass generation in 3D and mass generation according to the Schwinger mechanism in 2D is obtained. Besides, a series of relationships are established by resorting to dimensional reduction and duality interpolating transformations. Nonabelian generalizations are also pointed out. (author) 10 refs.

  1. Electrical conductivity as an indicator of iron reduction rates in abiotic and biotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regberg, Aaron; Singha, Kamini; Tien, Ming; Picardal, Flynn; Zheng, Quanxing; Schieber, Jurgen; Roden, Eric; Brantley, Susan L.

    2011-04-01

    Although changes in bulk electrical conductivity (σb) in aquifers have been attributed to microbial activity, σb has never been used to infer biogeochemical reaction rates quantitatively. To explore the use of electrical conductivity to measure reaction rates, we conducted iron oxide reduction experiments of increasing biological complexity. To quantify reaction rates, we propose composite reactions that incorporate the stoichiometry of five different types of reactions: redox, acid-base, sorption, dissolution/precipitation, and biosynthesis. In batch experiments and the early stages of a column experiment, such reaction stoichiometries inferred from a few chemical measurements allowed quantification of the Fe oxide reduction rate based on changes in electrical conductivity. The relationship between electrical conductivity and fluid chemistry did not hold during the latter stages of the column experiment when σb increased while fluid chemistry remained constant. Growth of an electrically conductive biofilm could possibly explain this late stage σb increase. The measured σb increase is consistent with a model proposed by analogy from percolation theory that attributes the increased conductivity to growth of biofilms with conductivity of ˜5.5 S m-1 in at least 3% of the column pore space. This work demonstrates that measurements of σb and flow rate, combined with a few direct chemical measurements, can be used to quantify biogeochemical reaction rates in controlled laboratory situations and may be able to detect the presence of biofilms. This approach may help in designing future field experiments to interpret biogeochemical reactivity from conductivity measurements.

  2. Reduction and immobilization of chromate in chromite ore processing residue with nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jingjing; Lu, Jinsuo; Wu, Qiong; Jing, Chuanyong

    2012-05-15

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR) poses a great environmental and health risk with persistent Cr(VI) leaching. To reduce Cr(VI) and subsequently immobilize in the solid matrix, COPR was incubated with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and the Cr(VI) speciation and leachability were studied. Multiple complementary analysis methods including leaching tests, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to investigate the immobilization mechanism. Geochemical PHREEQC model calculation agreed well with our acid neutralizing capacity experimental results and confirmed that when pH was lowered from 11.7 to 7.0, leachate Cr(VI) concentrations were in the range 358-445mgL(-1) which contributed over 90% of dissolved Cr from COPR. Results of alkaline digestion, XANES, and XPS demonstrated that incubation COPR with nZVI under water content higher than 27% could result in a nearly complete Cr(VI) reduction in solids and less than 0.1mgL(-1) Cr(VI) in the TCLP leachate. The results indicated that remediation approaches using nZVI to reduce Cr(VI) in COPR should be successful with sufficient water content to facilitate electron transfer from nZVI to COPR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparative DFT study of oxygen reduction reaction on mononuclear and binuclear cobalt and iron phthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Li, Mengke; Yu, Zongxue; Ke, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by mononuclear and planar binuclear cobalt (CoPc) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) catalysts is investigated in detail by density functional theory (DFT) methods. The calculation results indicate that the ORR activity of Fe-based Pcs is much higher than that of Co-based Pcs, which is due to the fact that the former could catalyze 4e- ORRs, while the latter could catalyze only 2e- ORRs from O2 to H2O2. The original high activities of Fe-based Pcs could be attributed to their high energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), which could lead to the stronger adsorption energy between catalysts and ORR species. Nevertheless, the HOMO of Co-based Pcs is the ring orbital, not the 3 d Co orbital, thereby inhibiting the electron transfer from metal to adsorbates. Furthermore, compared with mononuclear FePc, the planar binuclear FePc has more stable structure in acidic medium and more suitable adsorption energy of ORR species, making it a promising non-precious electrocatalyst for ORR.

  4. Simple-Cubic Carbon Frameworks with Atomically Dispersed Iron Dopants toward High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biwei; Wang, Xinxia; Zou, Jinxiang; Yan, Yancui; Xie, Songhai; Hu, Guangzhi; Li, Yanguang; Dong, Angang

    2017-03-08

    Iron and nitrogen codoped carbons (Fe-N-C) have attracted increasingly greater attention as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although challenging, the synthesis of Fe-N-C catalysts with highly dispersed and fully exposed active sites is of critical importance for improving the ORR activity. Here, we report a new type of graphitic Fe-N-C catalysts featuring numerous Fe single atoms anchored on a three-dimensional simple-cubic carbon framework. The Fe-N-C catalyst, derived from self-assembled Fe3O4 nanocube superlattices, was prepared by in situ ligand carbonization followed by acid etching and ammonia activation. Benefiting from its homogeneously dispersed and fully accessible active sites, highly graphitic nature, and enhanced mass transport, our Fe-N-C catalyst outperformed Pt/C and many previously reported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR. Furthermore, when used for constructing the cathode for zinc-air batteries, our Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited current and power densities comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst.

  5. Age-related accumulation of non-heme ferric and ferrous iron in mouse ovarian stroma visualized by sensitive non-heme iron histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yoshiya

    2012-03-01

    Sensitive non-heme iron histochemistry--namely, the perfusion-Perls method and perfusion-Turnbull method--was applied to study the distribution and age-related accumulation of non-heme ferric iron and ferrous iron in mouse ovary. Light and electron microscopic studies revealed that non-heme ferric iron is distributed predominantly in stromal tissue, especially in macrophages. By contrast, the distribution of non-heme ferrous iron was restricted to a few ovoid macrophages. Aged ovaries exhibited remarkable non-heme iron accumulation in all stromal cells. In particular, non-heme ferrous iron level was increased in stromal tissue, suggestive of increased levels of redox-active iron, which can promote oxidative stress. Moreover, intense localization of both non-heme ferric and ferrous iron was observed in aggregated large stromal cells that were then characterized as ceroid-laden enlarged macrophages with frothy cytoplasm. Intraperitoneal iron overload in adult mice resulted in non-heme iron deposition in the entire stroma and generation of enlarged macrophages, suggesting that excessive iron accumulation induced macrophage morphological changes. The data indicated that non-heme iron accumulation in ovarian stromal tissue may be related to aging of the ovary due to increasing oxidative stress.

  6. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

  7. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part II. Rates of Reduction of Composite Pellets in a Rotary Hearth Furnace Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO2 generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O3-to-Fe3O4 transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O4. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

  8. Deferasirox improves hematologic and hepatic function with effective reduction of serum ferritin and liver iron concentration in transfusional iron overload patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Lee, Jae Hoon; Park, Hee-Sook; Kim, Ho Young; Shim, Hyeok; Seong, Chu-Myung; Kim, Chul Soo; Chung, Jooseop; Hyun, Myung Soo; Jo, Deog-Yeon; Jung, Chul Won; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Yoon, Hwi-Joong; Kim, Byung Soo; Joo, Young-Don; Park, Chi-Young; Min, Yoo Hong

    2014-06-01

    Transfusional iron overload and its consequences are challenges in chronically transfused patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) or aplastic anemia (AA). This was a prospective, multicenter, open-label study to investigate the efficacy of deferasirox (DFX) by serial measurement of serum ferritin (S-ferritin) level, liver iron concentration (LIC) level using relaxation rates magnetic resonance imaging, and other laboratory variables in patients with MDS or AA. A total of 96 patients showing S-ferritin level of at least 1000 ng/mL received daily DFX for up to 1 year. At the end of the study, S-ferritin level was significantly decreased in MDS (p=0.02366) and AA (p=0.0009). LIC level was also significantly reduced by more than 6.7 mg Fe/g dry weight from baseline. Hemoglobin level and platelet counts were significantly increased from baseline (p=0.002 and p=0.025, respectively) for patients showing significant anemia or thrombocytopenia. Elevated alanine aminotransferase was also significantly decreased from baseline. This study shows that DFX is effective in reducing S-ferritin and LIC level in transfusional iron overload patients with MDS or AA and is well tolerated. In addition, positive effects in hematologic and hepatic function can be expected with DFX. Iron chelation treatment should be considered in transfused patients with MDS and AA when transfusion-related iron overload is documented. © 2013 AABB.

  9. Recovery of Iron from Pyrite Cinder Containing Non-ferrous Metals Using High-Temperature Chloridizing-Reduction-Magnetic Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Guo, Hongwei; Xu, Jifang; Lv, Yanan; Xu, Zemin; Huo, Haijiang

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a new technique that uses high-temperature chloridizing -reduction-magnetic separation to recover iron from pyrite cinder containing non-ferrous metals. The effects of the reduction temperature, reduction time, and chlorinating agent dosage were investigated. The optimized process parameters were proposed as the following: CaCl2 dosage of 2 pct, chloridizing at 1398 K (1125 °C) for 10 minutes, reducing at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 80 minutes, grinding to a particle size of 78.8 pct less than 45 μm, and magnetic field intensity of 73 mT. Under the optimized conditions, the Cu, Pb, and Zn removal rates were 45.2, 99.2, and 89.1 pct, respectively. The iron content of the magnetic concentrate was 90.6 pct, and the iron recovery rate was 94.8 pct. Furthermore, the reduction behavior and separation mechanism were determined based on microstructure and phase change analyses using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and optical microscopy.

  10. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia.

  11. Recovery of Work-Related Stress: Complaint Reduction and Work-Resumption are Relatively Independent Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vente, W. de; Kamphuis, J.H.; Blonk, R.W.; Emmelkamp, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The process of recovery from work-related stress, consisting of complaint reduction and work-resumption, is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of complaint reduction and work-resumption, as well as testing complaint reduction as a mediator in the as

  12. Recovery of work-related stress: Complaint reduction and work-resumption are relatively independent processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vente, W.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Blonk, R.W.B.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The process of recovery from work-related stress, consisting of complaint reduction and work-resumption, is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of complaint reduction and work-resumption, as well as testing complaint reduction as a mediator in the a

  13. Enhancement of the reductive transformation of pentachlorophenol by polycarboxylic acids at the iron oxide-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangbai; Wang, Xugang; Li, Yongtao; Liu, Chengshuai; Zeng, Fang; Zhang, Lijia; Hao, Mingde; Ruan, Huada

    2008-05-15

    The enhancement effect of polycarboxylic acids on reductive dechlorination transformation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) reacting with iron oxides was studied in anoxic suspension. Batch experiments were performed with three species of iron oxides (goethite, lepidocrocite and hematite) and four species of polycarboxylic acids (oxalate, citrate, succinate, and tartrate) through anoxic abiotic reactors. The chemical analyses and morphological observation from scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that different combinations between polycarboxylic acids and iron oxides produced distinct contents of Fe(II)-polycarboxylic ligand complexes, which significantly enhanced PCP transformation. Generation of the surface-bound Fe(II) depended on concentration of polycarboxylic acids. The optimal concentration for the enhancement was 2.0 mM oxalic acid. The dechlorination mechanism was further demonstrated by generation of chloride ions. The results suggest that surface-bound Fe(II) formed on the iron oxides surface appears to be a key factor in enhancing PCP transformation, and the mole ratio of oxalate to surface-bound Fe(II) (oxalate/Fe(II)) acted as an indicator of the enhancement effect. The enhancement mechanism attributes to strong nucleophilic ability and low reductive potential of the equivalent Fe(II)-polycarboxylate complexes. Therefore, the enhancement effects might be helpful for understanding the natural attenuation of reducible organic pollutants at the interface of contaminated soil in anoxic condition.

  14. Reduction-melting behaviors of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets with addition of CaO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-song Wang

    2015-01-01

    Although the total amount of boron resources in China is high, the grades of these resources are low. The authors have already proposed a new comprehensive utilization process of boron-bearing iron concentrate based on the iron nugget process. The present work de-scribes a further optimization of the conditions used in the previous study. The effects of CaO on the reduction–melting behavior and proper-ties of the boron-rich slag are presented. CaO improved the reduction of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets when its content was less than 1wt%. Melting separation of the composite pellets became difficult with the CaO content increased. The sulfur content of the iron nugget gradually decreased from 0.16wt%to 0.046wt%as the CaO content of the pellets increased from 1wt%to 5wt%. CaO negatively affected the iron yield and boron extraction efficiency of the boron-rich slag. The mineral phase evolution of the boron-rich slag during the reduction–melting separation of the composite pellets with added CaO was also deduced.

  15. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  16. Iron and iron/manganese ratio in forage from Icelandic sheep farms: relation to scrapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jóhannesson T

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was undertaken in order to examine whether any connection existed between the amounts of iron in forage and the sporadic occurrence of scrapie observed in certain parts of Iceland. As iron and manganese are considered antagonistic in plants, calculation of the Fe/Mn ratios was also included by using results from Mn determination earlier performed in the same samples. Forage samples (n = 170 from the summer harvests of 2001–2003, were collected from 47 farms for iron and manganese analysis. The farms were divided into four categories: 1. Scrapie-free farms in scrapie-free areas (n = 9; 2. Scrapie-free farms in scrapie-afflicted areas (n = 17; 3. Scrapie-prone farms (earlier scrapie-afflicted, restocked farms (n = 12; 4. Scrapie-afflicted farms (n = 9. Farms in categories 1 and 2 are collectively referred to as scrapie-free farms. The mean iron concentration in forage samples from scrapie-afflicted farms was significantly higher than in forage samples from farms in the other scrapie categories (P = 0.001. The mean Fe/Mn ratio in forage from scrapie-afflicted farms was significantly higher than in forage from scrapie-free and scrapie-prone farms (P

  17. Reduction in trunk fat predicts cardiovascular exercise training-related reductions in C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, V J; Hu, L; Valentine, R J; McAuley, E; Evans, E M; Baynard, T; Woods, J A

    2009-05-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine (1) if 10 months of cardiovascular exercise training (Cardio) reduces CRP in a group of older adults, (2) if such a reduction is related to improvements in trunk fat, fitness, and/or psychosocial variables, and (3) if the effect of Cardio on CRP differs between men and women. Community-dwelling residents (n=127; 60-83 yrs) were randomized to a Flex group (n=61) where they participated in 2-75 min supervised sessions per wk during which they performed non-cardiovascular flexibility and balance exercises or a Cardio group (n=66) where they participated in three supervised sessions per wk during which they performed cardiovascular exercises for approximately 45-60 min at 60-70% maximal oxygen uptake. The main outcome measures were serum CRP, cardiovascular fitness, total and central adiposity, and self-reported psychosocial function. Cardio experienced a reduction in CRP (-0.5mg/L), as well as improvements in fitness (+7%) and total (-1.5%) and central (i.e., trunk) (-2.5%) adiposity. These relationships were not modified by sex. Regression analyses indicated that only the reduction in trunk fat was significantly related to the reduction in CRP. Ten months of cardiovascular exercise training reduced CRP in previously sedentary older adults and this effect was partially mediated by a reduction in trunk fat.

  18. Iron chelators can protect against oxidative stress through ferryl heme reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Brandon J; Hider, Robert C; Wilson, Michael T

    2008-02-01

    Iron chelators such as desferrioxamine have been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo. The mechanism of this therapeutic action under non-iron-overload conditions is, however, complex, as desferrioxamine has properties that can impact on oxidative damage independent of its capacity to act as an iron chelator. Desferrioxamine can act as a reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl myoglobin and hemoglobin and has recently been shown to prevent the formation of a highly cytotoxic heme-to-protein cross-linked derivative of myoglobin. In this study we have examined the effects of a wide range of iron chelators, including the clinically used hydroxypyridinone CP20 (deferriprone), on the stability of ferryl myoglobin and on the formation of heme-to-protein cross-linking. We show that all hydroxypyridinones, as well as many other iron chelators, are efficient reducing agents of ferryl myoglobin. These compounds are also effective at preventing the formation of cytotoxic derivatives of myoglobin such as heme-to-protein cross-linking. These results show that the use of iron chelators in vivo may ameliorate oxidative damage under conditions of non-iron overload by at least two mechanisms. The antioxidant effects of chelators in vivo cannot, therefore, be attributed solely to iron chelation.

  19. Reduction enhances yields of nitric oxide trapping by iron-diethyldithiocarbamate complex in biological systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanin, A.F.; Bevers, L.M.; Mikoyan, V.D.; Poltorakov, A.P.; Kubrina, L.N.; Faassen, E. van

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of NO trapping by iron-diethylthiocarbamate complexes was investigated in cultured cells and animal and plant tissues. Contrary to common belief, the NO radicals are trapped by iron-diethylthiocarbamates not only in ferrous but in ferric state also in the biosystems. When DETC was exce

  20. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems.

  1. Manganese extraction from high-iron-content manganese oxide ores by selective reduction roasting-acid leaching process using black charcoal as reductant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张元波; 赵熠; 游志雄; 段道显; 李光辉; 姜涛

    2015-01-01

    Reduction roasting-acid leaching process was utilized to process high-iron-content manganese oxide ore using black charcoal as reductant. The results indicate that, compared with the traditional reductant of anthracite, higher manganese extraction efficiency is achieved at lower roasting temperature and shorter residence time. The effects of roasting parameters on the leaching efficiency of Mn and Fe were studied, and the optimal parameters are determined as follows: roasting temperature is 650 °C, residence time is 40 min, and black charcoal dosage is 10% (mass fraction). Under these conditions, the leaching efficiency of Mn reaches 82.37% while that of Fe is controlled below 7%. XRD results show that a majority of MnO2 and Fe2O3in the raw ore are reduced to MnO and Fe3O4, respectively.

  2. [Reduction of nitrobenzene by iron oxides bound Fe(II) system at different pH values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fu-Bo; Xie, Li; Li, Jun; Zhou, Qi

    2009-07-15

    Batch tests were conducted to investigate the reductive transformation of nitrobenzene by goethite, hematite, magnetite and steel converter slag bound Fe(II) system. And the reduction mechanism was explored at different pH values. Experimental results showed that hematite, magnetite and steel converter slag could adsorb Fe(II) on surfaces and form iron oxides bound Fe(II) system at pH from 6.5 to 7.0. The systems had strong reductive capacity and could reduce nitrobenzene to aniline. The reduction efficiency of nitrobenzene in surface bound Fe(II) system followed the sequence of magnetite, hematite and steel converter slag from high to low. The reduction efficiency of hematite and magnetite system increased with pH increasing. While it was almost pH independent in steel converter slag system. Although goethite adsorbed most of Fe(II) in solution, the adsorbed Fe(II) had no reductive activity for nitrobenzene. At pH 6.0, small amount of Fe(II) was adsorbed on magnetite and hematite and the systems did not show reductive activity for nitrobenzene. However, steel converter slag could adsorb Fe(II) at pH 6.0 and reduction efficiency almost equaled to the value at pH 7.0. When pH was above 7.5, dissolved Fe(II) could be converted to Fe(OH)2 and the newly formed Fe(OH)2 became the main redactor in the system. Under alkali condition, the presence of iron oxides inhibited the reduction capacity of system.

  3. Transferrin iron uptake is stimulated by ascorbate via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Chikhani, Sherin; Richardson, Vera; Richardson, Des R

    2013-06-01

    Although ascorbate has long been known to stimulate dietary iron (Fe) absorption and non-transferrin Fe uptake, the role of ascorbate in transferrin Fe uptake is unknown. Transferrin is a serum Fe transport protein supplying almost all cellular Fe under physiological conditions. We sought to examine ascorbate's role in this process, particularly as cultured cells are typically ascorbate-deficient. At typical plasma concentrations, ascorbate significantly increased (59)Fe uptake from transferrin by 1.5-2-fold in a range of cells. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced ferritin expression and increased (59)Fe accumulation in ferritin. The lack of effect of cycloheximide or the cytosolic aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on ascorbate-mediated (59)Fe uptake from transferrin indicate increased ferritin synthesis or cytosolic aconitase activity was not responsible for ascorbate's activity. Experiments with membrane-permeant and -impermeant ascorbate-oxidizing reagents indicate that while extracellular ascorbate is required for stimulation of (59)Fe uptake from (59)Fe-citrate, only intracellular ascorbate is needed for transferrin (59)Fe uptake. Additionally, experiments with l-ascorbate analogs indicate ascorbate's reducing ene-diol moiety is necessary for its stimulatory activity. Importantly, neither N-acetylcysteine nor buthionine sulfoximine, which increase or decrease intracellular glutathione, respectively, affected transferrin-dependent (59)Fe uptake. Thus, ascorbate's stimulatory effect is not due to a general increase in cellular reducing capacity. Ascorbate also did not affect expression of transferrin receptor 1 or (125)I-transferrin cellular flux. However, transferrin receptors, endocytosis, vacuolar-type ATPase activity and endosomal acidification were required for ascorbate's stimulatory activity. Therefore, ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin Fe uptake pathway, acting via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

  4. Reduction of Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater by FeS-coated iron magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanyan; Gai, Longshuang; Tang, Jingchun; Fu, Jie; Wang, Qilin; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2017-10-01

    FeS-coated iron (Fe/FeS) magnetic nanoparticles were easily prepared, characterized, and applied for Cr(VI) removal in simulated groundwater. TEM, XRD, and BET characterization tests showed that FeS coating on the surface of Fe(0) inhibited the aggregation of Fe(0) and that Fe/FeS at a S/Fe molar ratio of 0.207 possessed a large surface area of 62.1m(2)/g. Increasing the S/Fe molar ratio from 0 to 0.138 decreased Cr(VI) removal by 42.8%, and a further increase to 0.207 enhanced Cr(VI) removal by 63% within 72h. Moreover, Fe/FeS inhibited the leaching of Fe, reducing the toxicity of the particles. Mechanistic analysis indicated that Fe(0), Fe(2+), and S(2-) were synergistically involved in the reduction of Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III), which further precipitated as (CrxFe1-x)(OH)3 and Cr(III)-Fe-S. The process of Cr(VI) sorption by Fe/FeS (S/Fe=0.207) was fitted well with a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the isotherm data were simulated by Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum sorption capacity of 69.7mg/g compared to 48.9mg/g for Fe(0). Low pH and initial Cr(VI) concentration favored Cr(VI) removal. Continuous fixed bed column studies showed that simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) with Fe/FeS was considerably effective for in situ removal of Cr(VI) from groundwater. This study demonstrated the high potential of Fe/FeS for Cr(VI) immobilization in water, groundwater, and soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  6. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  7. Formation of Fe(0-Nanoparticles via Reduction of Fe(II Compounds by Amino Acids and Their Subsequent Oxidation to Iron Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Klačanová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron nanoparticles were prepared by the reduction of central Fe(II ion in the coordination compounds with amino acid ligands. The anion of the amino acid used as a ligand acted as the reducing agent. Conditions for the reduction were very mild; the temperature did not exceed 52°C, and the optimum pH was between 9.5 and 9.7. The metal iron precipitated as a mirror on the flask or as a colloid in water. Identification of the product was carried out by measuring UV/VIS spectra of the iron nanoparticles in water. The iron nanoparticles were oxidized by oxygen yielding a mixture of iron oxides. Oxidation of Fe(0 to Fe(II took several seconds under air. The size and properties of iron oxide nanoparticles were studied by UV/VIS, TEM investigation, RTG diffractometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetometry, thermogravimetry, and GC/MS.

  8. Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur coupled to chemical reduction of iron or manganese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Finster, Kai; Hansen, Jens Würgler

    1993-01-01

    the formed sulfide and the added FeOOH led to the observed precipitation of iron sulfides. Sulfate and iron sulfides were also produced when FeOOH was replaced by FeCO(3). Further enrichment with manganese oxide, MnO(2), instead of FeOOH yielded stable cultures which formed sulfate during concomitant...... significantly in the presence of sulfide-scavenging agents such as iron and manganese compounds. The population density of bacteria capable of S disproportionation in the presence of FeOOH or MnO(2) was high, > 10 cm in coastal sediments. The metabolism offers an explanation for recent observations of anaerobic...

  9. Recovery of Work-Related Stress: Complaint Reduction and Work-Resumption are Relatively Independent Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vente, Wieke; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Blonk, Roland W B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2015-09-01

    The process of recovery from work-related stress, consisting of complaint reduction and work-resumption, is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate predictors of complaint reduction and work-resumption, as well as testing complaint reduction as a mediator in the association between predictors and work-resumption. Seventy-one patients on sickness-leave because of work-related stress complaints were followed over a period of 13 months. Predictors comprised personal (demographics, coping, cognitions), work-related (job-characteristics, social support), and illness-related (complaint duration, absence duration) variables. Dependent variables were distress complaints, burnout complaints, and work-resumption. Complaints reduced considerably over time to borderline clinical levels and work-resumption increased to 68% at 13 months. Predictors of stronger reduction of distress complaints were male gender, less working hours, less decision authority, more co-worker support, and shorter absence duration. Predictors of stronger reduction of burnout complaints were male gender, lower age, high education, less avoidant coping, less decision authority, more job security, and more co-worker support. Predictors of work-resumption were lower age and stronger reduction of burnout complaints. No indication for a mediating role of burnout complaints between the predictor age and work-resumption was found. Complaint reduction and work-resumption are relatively independent processes. Symptom reduction is influenced by individual and work-related characteristics, which holds promise for a multidisciplinary treatment approach for work-related stress.

  10. Oxygen reduction reaction at MWCNT-modified nanoscale iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine: remarkable performance over platinum and tolerance toward methanol in alkaline medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fashedemi, OO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A nanoscale iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine (nanoFeTSPc) catalyst obtained by co-ordinating with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and subsequently anchored onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been...

  11. Hepatic reduction of carbamoyl-PROXYL in ferric nitrilotriacetate induced iron overloaded mice: an in vivo ESR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Noppawan Phumala; Yamaguchi, Yumiko; Murakami, Kimiyo; Kosem, Nuttavut; Utsumi, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of a nitroxyl radical, carbamoyl-PROXYL in association of free radical production and hepatic glutathione (GSH) was investigated in iron overloaded mice using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. Significant increases in hepatic iron, lipid peroxidation and decrease in hepatic GSH were observed in mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) administrated with ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe(III)-NTA, a total 45 µmol/mouse over a period of 3 weeks). Free radical production in iron overloaded mice was evidenced by significantly enhanced rate constant of ESR signal decay of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which was slightly reduced by treatment with iron chelator, deferoxamine. Moreover, the rate constant of ESR signal decay was negatively correlated with hepatic GSH level (r=-0.586, p80%) in mice through daily i.p. injection and drinking water supplementation of L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) significantly retarded ESR signal decay, while there were no changes in serum aspartate aminotransferase and liver thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels. In conclusion, GSH plays two distinguish roles on ESR signal decay of carbamoyl-PROXYL, as an antioxidant and as a reducing agent, dependently on its concentration. Therefore, it should be taken into account in the interpretation of free radical production in each specific experimental setting.

  12. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles with poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) and its application to nitrate reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Nara; Choi, Kyunghoon; Uthuppu, Basil

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to synthesize dispersed and reactive nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) with poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVP/VA), nontoxic and biodegradable stabilizer. The nZVI used for the experiments was prepared by reduction of ferric solution in the presence of PVP/VA with spe......This study aimed to synthesize dispersed and reactive nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) with poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVP/VA), nontoxic and biodegradable stabilizer. The nZVI used for the experiments was prepared by reduction of ferric solution in the presence of PVP...... with increasing amount of PVP/VA (the ratios of 2). For the most stable nZVI coated by PVP/VA, its reactivity was examined by nitrate reduction in a closed batch system. The pseudo-first-order kinetic rate constants for the nitrate reduction by the nanoparticles with PVP/VA ratios of 0 and 2 were 0.1633 and 0...

  13. Removal of chromium from Cr(VI) polluted wastewaters by reduction with scrap iron and subsequent precipitation of resulted cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2011-11-30

    This work presents investigations on the total removal of chromium from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by reduction with scrap iron and subsequent precipitation of the resulted cations with NaOH. The process was detrimentally affected by a compactly passivation film occurred at scrap iron surface, mainly composed of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Maximum removal efficiency of the Cr(total) and Fe(total) achieved in the clarifier under circumneutral and alkaline (pH 9.1) conditions was 98.5% and 100%, respectively. The optimum precipitation pH range which resulted from this study is 7.6-8.0. Fe(total) and Cr(total) were almost entirely removed in the clarifier as Fe(III) and Cr(III) species; however, after Cr(VI) breakthrough in column effluent, chromium was partially removed in the clarifier also as Cr(VI), by coprecipitation with cationic species. As long the column effluent was free of Cr(VI), the average Cr(total) removal efficiency of the packed column and clarifier was 10.8% and 78.8%, respectively. Our results clearly indicated that Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater can be successfully treated by combining reduction with scrap iron and chemical precipitation with NaOH.

  14. Effect of hepatic iron concentration reduction on hepatic fibrosis and damage in rats with cholestatic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gil Peretz; Gabriela Link; Orit Pappo; Rafael Bruck; Zvi Ackerman

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of iron reduction after phlebotomy in rats with "normal" hepatic iron concentration (HIC) on the progression of hepatic fibrosis, as a result of bile duct ligation (BDL).METHODS: Rats underwent phlebotomy before or after sham operation or BDL. Animals undergone only BDL or sham operation served as controls. Two weeks after surgery, indices of hepatic damage and fibrosis were evaluated.RESULTS: Phlebotomy lowered HIC. Phlebotomy after BDL was associated with body weight increase, lower hepatic weight, less portal hypertension, less periportal necrosis, less portal inflammation, lower hepatic activity index score and higher albumin levels. On the other hand, phlebotomy before BDL was associated with body weight decrease and hepatic activity index score increase. Phlebotomy after sham operation was not associated with any hepatic or systemic adverse effects.CONCLUSION: Reduction of HIC after induction of liver damage may have beneficial effects in BDL rats.However, iron deficiency could induce impairment of liver function and may make the liver more susceptible to insults like BDL.

  15. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Serum Iron; Serum Fe Formal name: Iron, serum Related tests: Ferritin ; TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Reticulocyte Count ; Zinc Protoporphyrin ; Iron Tests ; Soluble Transferrin Receptor ... I should know? How is it used? Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) , and/or ...

  16. Regulation of iron transport related genes by boron in the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Hobusch, Ashtian R; Schroeder, Kristine J; Amin, Shady A; Hartnett, Andrej D; Barker, Ryan A; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-08-01

    While there has been extensive interest in the use of boron isotope ratios as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the high (0.4 mM) concentration and the depth-independent (conservative or non-nutrient-like) concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the modern ocean. Here we report that boron affects the expression of a number of protein and genes in the "algal-associated" Gram-negative marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Most intriguingly, a number of these proteins and genes are related to iron uptake. In a recent separate publication we have shown that boron regulates one such iron transport related protein, i.e. the periplasmic iron binding protein FbpA via a direct interaction of the metalloid with this protein. Here we show that a number of other iron uptake related genes are also affected by boron but in the opposite way i.e. they are up-regulated. We propose that the differential effect of boron on FbpA expression relative to other iron transport related genes is a result of an interaction between boron and the global iron regulatory protein Fur.

  17. Reductive dehalogenation by layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides and related iron(II) containing solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao

    In the present PhD project, novel synthesis and modifications of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) were investigated with focus on improved dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride by using modified green rusts and/or altered reaction conditions. The Ph.D. project has comprised: 1...

  18. Synthesis of nanoscale zero-valent iron/ordered mesoporous carbon for adsorption and synergistic reduction of nitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiaofeng; Li, Jiansheng; Zhu, Wen; Zhu, Yaoyao; Sun, Xiuyun; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2012-05-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) supported on ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) was synthesized through liquid phase reduction route. The NZVI/OMC composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, N(2) adsorption/desorption and transmission electron microscopy. Results reveal that the composite possesses ordered mesostructure with NZVI distributing homogeneously on the surface of OMC support. The removal effects of nitrobenzene (NB) in water with OMC, NZVI/OMC and non-supported NZVI were evaluated. Results indicate that NZVI/OMC shows enhanced removal efficiency, which is attributed to its adsorption and synergistic reduction for NB. The transformation process of NB was further investigated by HPLC. Nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine were detected as intermediate products and aniline was the final reductive product.

  19. Age-related changes in laboratory values used in the diagnosis of anemia and iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, R; Johnson, C; Dallman, P R

    1984-03-01

    Laboratory results from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) were used to define age-related changes in laboratory values that are related to the diagnosis of anemia and iron deficiency. Analyses included Hb, hematocrit, red blood cell count, red cell indices, iron, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation, and erythrocyte protoporphyrin. Computation of median values and 95% ranges by age and sex for each laboratory test were performed on 15,093 subjects between 1 and 74 yr of age who had complete laboratory data on venous blood, after excluding those subjects with an abnormality in one or more of three other laboratory tests. Age-related changes in laboratory measurements, such as those described herein, must be taken into consideration in order to optimize the identification of individuals with anemia and iron deficiency.

  20. [Microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE with nano iron serving as electron donor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Zong-Ming; Li, Tie-Long; Jin, Zhao-Hui; Alvarez, Pedro J

    2009-06-15

    A trichloroethylene (TCE) dechlorinating enrichment (Dehalococcoides spp.), which was isolated from soil of chlorinated ethene contaminated site, was used to investigate whether nano-scale zero valent iron (NZVI) could serve as electron donor for this consortium via cathodic H2 production during anaerobic corrosion. The results show that in the presence of methanol serving as electron donor, dechlorinating culture of 25 fold dilution [(2.0 +/- 0.44) x 10(5) cell/mL] degraded 20 mg/L TCE completely in 96 h, which was accompanied by the production of 2.706 micromol ethene in 190 h. Methanol-free control caused partial degradation of TCE to primarily cis-DCE in 96 h, with only 0.159 micromol ethene produced in 190 h. This indicates bacteria cannot reduce TCE to ethene without electron donor. But when 4 g/L NZVI was added as sole electron donor, this dechlorinating culture degraded 20 mg/L TCE into ethene and vinyl chloride (VC) in 131 h at a speed higher than that by NZVI alone. Compared to 2.706 micromol ethene produced by Dehalococcoides spp. with methanol added as the electron donor, there was only 1.187 micromol ethene produced by bacteria with NZVI serving as the electron donor, which means NZVI has a potential toxicity on Dehalococcoides spp.. At the meantime, 0.109 micromol acetylene was produced in 190 h, which was relatively lower than 0.161 micromol produced by NZVI alone, indicating bacteria competed with NZVI under electron deficient condition. In conclusion, NZVI could serve as electron donor and support dechlorination activity for Dehalococcoides spp. which could enhance the application of NZVI and usage of dechlorinating culture as a polishing strategy in future ground water remediation.

  1. Synthesis of spherical mesoporous titania modified iron-niobate nanoclusters for photocatalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay K. Ghorai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spherical mesoporous titania modified iron-niobate nanoclusters FNT1 [FexNbxTi1−2xO2−x/2 (x = 0.01], with relatively small particle size 10 ± 2 nm and SBET 145 m2 g−1 were prepared using a sol–gel method, from the reaction of titanium and niobium tartrate with triethanol amine and ferric nitrate solution. HRTEM of FNT1 shows coexistence of porous mesostructure and high symmetric order of crystallinity in the nanoparticles. The mesopore size is in the range of 4–5 nm and the lattice fringes of 0.37 nm is observed in the mesopore walls which correspond to the d-spacing between adjacent (101 crystallographic planes of FNT1 phase. This is supported by XRD studies. In the presence of UV light, FNT1 (0.1 g/50 mL reduces the 4-nitrophenol (4-NP (0.0139 g L−1 to 4-aminophenol by using NaBH4 (0.054 g L−1 in contrast to pure TiO2 and other composites of FexNbxTi1−2xO2−x/2 photocatalysts. The 4-NP is reduced to 4-aminophenol within 10 min in the presence of FNT1 and UV light, but in the absence of the catalysts, it takes approximately 82 min. The catalytic activity of FNT1 is enhanced significantly in the presence of UV light compared to the absence of UV light. We observed that the catalytic activity of the prepared catalyst also depends on crystal size, particle morphology and particle porosity, and dopant concentrations.

  2. Effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper in synthesized Fe(III) minerals and Fe-rich soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaohua; Zhang, Youchi; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Wensui

    2014-04-01

    The effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper were investigated in a high concentration of sulfate with synthesized Fe(III) minerals and red earth soils rich in amorphous Fe (hydr)oxides. Batch microcosm experiments showed that red earth soil inoculated with subsurface sediments had a faster Fe(III) bioreduction rate than pure amorphous Fe(III) minerals and resulted in quicker immobilization of Cu in the aqueous fraction. Coinciding with the decrease of aqueous Cu, SO4(2-) in the inoculated red earth soil decreased acutely after incubation. The shift in the microbial community composite in the inoculated soil was analyzed through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Results revealed the potential cooperative effect of microbial Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction on copper immobilization. After exposure to air for 144 h, more than 50% of the immobilized Cu was remobilized from the anaerobic matrices; aqueous sulfate increased significantly. Sequential extraction analysis demonstrated that the organic matter/sulfide-bound Cu increased by 52% after anaerobic incubation relative to the abiotic treatment but decreased by 32% after oxidation, indicating the generation and oxidation of Cu-sulfide coprecipitates in the inoculated red earth soil. These findings suggest that the immobilization of copper could be enhanced by mediating microbial Fe(III) reduction with sulfate reduction under anaerobic conditions. The findings have an important implication for bioremediation in Cucontaminated and Fe-rich soils, especially in acid-mine-drainage-affected sites.

  3. Application of a water cooling treatment and its effect on coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-tao; Zhou, Mi; Jiang, Tao; Guan, Shan-fei; Zhang, Wei-jun; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2016-12-01

    A water cooling treatment was applied in the coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium (V-Ti-Cr) iron ore from the Hongge region of Panzhihua, China. Its effects on the metallization ratio ( η), S removal ratio ( R S), and P removal ratio ( R P) were studied and analyzed on the basis of chemical composition determined via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The metallic iron particle size and the element distribution of Fe, V, Cr, and Ti in a reduced briquette after water cooling treatment at 1350°C were determined and observed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the water cooling treatment improved the η, R S, and R P in the coal-based reduction of V-Ti-Cr iron ore compared to those obtained with a furnace cooling treatment. Meanwhile, the particle size of metallic iron obtained via the water cooling treatment was smaller than that of metallic iron obtained via the furnace cooling treatment; however, the particle size reached 70 μm at 1350°C, which is substantially larger than the minimum particle size required (20 μm) for magnetic separation. Therefore, the water cooling treatment described in this work is a good method for improving the quality of metallic iron in coal-based reduction and it could be applied in the coal-based reduction of V-Ti-Cr iron ore followed by magnetic separation.

  4. Application of a water cooling treatment and its effect on coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium iron ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song-tao Yang; Mi Zhou; Tao Jiang; Shan-fei Guan; Wei-jun Zhang; and Xiang-xin Xue

    2016-01-01

    A water cooling treatment was applied in the coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium (V–Ti–Cr) iron ore from the Hongge region of Panzhihua, China. Its effects on the metallization ratio (η), S removal ratio (RS), and P removal ratio (RP) were studied and analyzed on the basis of chemical composition determined via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The metallic iron particle size and the element distribution of Fe, V, Cr, and Ti in a reduced briquette after water cooling treatment at 1350°C were determined and observed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the water cooling treatment improved theη,RS, and RP in the coal-based reduction of V–Ti–Cr iron ore compared to those obtained with a furnace cooling treatment. Meanwhile, the particle size of metallic iron obtained via the water cooling treatment was smaller than that of metallic iron obtained via the furnace cooling treatment; however, the particle size reached 70μm at 1350°C, which is substantially larger than the minimum particle size required (20μm) for mag-netic separation. Therefore, the water cooling treatment described in this work is a good method for improving the quality of metallic iron in coal-based reduction and it could be applied in the coal-based reduction of V–Ti–Cr iron ore followed by magnetic separation.

  5. An interesting biochar effect that suppressed dechlorination of pentachlorophenol while promoted iron/sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in flooded soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Zhu, Min

    2017-04-01

    Biochar has received increasing attention for its many environmental impacts in recent years, but there is still a lack of comprehensive understanding of its effects on the fate of reducible organic pollutants and soil biogeochemical processes under anaerobic environments. In this study, anaerobic batch experiments were conducted to explore the effect of biochar on reductive transformation of PCP and other soil redox processes in anaerobic incubation environment. Results showed that biochar had little impact on the system Eh and pH, both of which decreased gradually to a stable value during the incubation. Dissimilatory iron reduction and sulfate reduction were significantly enhanced following biochar addition, with the promoting effect more prominent in the treatment with 1% (w/w) than that with 5% biochar added. In addition, biochar accelerated the formation of carbon dioxide and methane, but there was no difference in the final content of these two greenhouse gases at the end of incubation between biochar amended and control treatments. Unexpectedly, compared to biochar-free controls, the reductively dechlorinated degradation of PCP was inhibited following biochar addition, with the inhibition extent increased with the increase of biochar amount. These revealed an interesting biochar effect that suppressed the dechlorination of PCP, but promoted the iron/sulfate reduction and accelerated the methanogenesis. It might be simultaneously mediated by the functional microbial groups that responded sensitively to the addition of biochar and/or PCP, including the potential dechlorinators, the potential iron/sulfate reducers, and the typical methanogenic archaea. Specific function of biochar as electron shuttle was also likely involved in underpinning this interesting effect, since biochar would be capable of splitting the limited electrons from the inferior electron acceptors (in our case, the PCP) to the dominant more competitive ones (in our case, Fe(III) and SO42

  6. Investigation of iron(III) reduction and trace metal interferences in the determination of dissolved iron in seawater using flow injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ussher, Simon J. [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Milne, Angela [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Landing, William M. [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Attiq-ur-Rehman, Kakar [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Seguret, Marie J.M.; Holland, Toby [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Achterberg, Eric P. [National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Nabi, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Worsfold, Paul J., E-mail: pworsfold@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-12

    A detailed investigation into the performance of two flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) manifolds (with and without a preconcentration column) for the determination of sub-nanomolar dissolved iron (Fe(II) + Fe(III)), following the reduction of Fe(III) by sulphite, in seawater is described. Kinetic experiments were conducted to examine the efficiency of reduction of inorganic Fe(III) with sulphite under different conditions and a rigorous study of the potential interference caused by other transition metals present in seawater was conducted. Using 100 {mu}M concentrations of sulphite a reduction time of 4 h was sufficient to quantitatively reduce Fe(III) in seawater. Under optimal conditions, cobalt(II) and vanadium(IV)/(III) were the major positive interferences and strategies for their removal are reported. Specifically, cobalt(II) was masked by the addition of dimethylglyoxime to the luminol solution and vanadium(IV) was removed by passing the sample through an 8-hydroxyquinoline column in a low pH carrier stream. Manganese(II) also interfered by suppression of the CL response but this was not significant at typical open ocean concentrations.

  7. Diastereomer-dependent substrate reduction properties of a dinitrogenase containing 1-fluorohomocitrate in the iron-molybdenum cofactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Madden, M S; Kindon, N D; Ludden, P W; Shah, V K

    1990-01-01

    In vitro synthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) of dinitrogenase using homocitrate and its analogs allows the formation of modified forms of FeMo-co that show altered substrate specificities (N2, acetylene, cyanide, or proton reduction) of nitrogenase [reduced ferredoxin:dinitrogen oxidoreductase (ATP-hydrolyzing), EC 1.18.6.1]. The (1R,2S)-threo- and (1S,2S)-erythro-fluorinated diastereomers of homocitrate have been incorporated in vitro into dinitrogenase in place of homocitrat...

  8. Performance of a scaled-up Microbial Fuel Cell with iron reduction as the cathode reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijne, ter A.; Liu, F.; Rijnsoever, van L.S.; Saakes, M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Scale-up studies of Microbial Fuel Cells are required before practical application comes into sight. We studied an MFC with a surface area of 0.5 m2 and a volume of 5 L. Ferric iron (Fe3+) was used as the electron acceptor to improve cathode performance. MFC performance increased in time as a combin

  9. Magnetic Susceptibility as a Proxy for Investigating Microbial Mediated Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. Our objective was to determine if MS can be used as an intrinsic bioremediation indicator due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria. A contaminated and an uncontaminated core were r...

  10. Iron encapsulated within pod-like carbon nanotubes for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dehui; Yu, Liang; Chen, Xiaoqi; Wang, Guoxiong; Jin, Li; Pan, Xiulian; Deng, Jiao; Sun, Gongquan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-01-01

    Chainmail for catalysts: a catalyst with iron nanoparticles confined inside pea-pod-like carbon nanotubes exhibits a high activity and remarkable stability as a cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), even in presence of SO(2). The approach offers a new route to electro- and heterogeneous catalysts for harsh conditions.

  11. Toxicity of xenobiotics during sulfate, iron, and nitrate reduction in primary sewage sludge suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The effect and persistence of six organic xenobiotics was tested under sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions in primary sewage sludge suspensions. The xenobiotics tested were acenaphthene, phenanthrene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), linear alkylbenzene sulfonate...

  12. Decomposition analysis of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the iron and steel industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqiang SUN; Jiuju CAI, Hai YU, Lei DAI

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to identify the main factors influencing the energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the iron and steel industry in China during the period of 1995-2007. The logarithmic mean divisia index (LMDI) technique was applied with period-wise analysis and time-series analysis. Changes in energy- related CO2 emissions were decomposed into four factors: emission factor effect, energy structure effect, energy consumption effect, and the steel production effect. The results show that steel production is the major factor responsible for the rise in CO2 emissions during the sampling period; on the other hand the energy consump- tion is the largest contributor to the decrease in C02 emissions. To a lesser extent, the emission factor and energy structure effects have both negative and positive contributions to C02 emissions, respectively. Policy implications are provided regarding the reduction of C02 emissions from the iron and steel industry in China, such as controlling the overgrowth of steel production, improving energy-saving technologies, and introducing low-carbon energy sources into the iron and steel industry.

  13. Hexavalent chromium reduction in contaminated soil: A comparison between ferrous sulphate and nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, L; Gueye, M T; Petrucci, E

    2015-01-01

    Iron sulphate (FeSO4) and colloidal nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reducing agents were compared, with the aim of assessing their effectiveness in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal from a contaminated industrial soil. Experiments were performed on soil samples collected from an industrial site where a nickel contamination, caused by a long-term productive activity, was also verified. The influence of reducing agents amount with respect to chromium content and the effectiveness of deoxygenation of the slurry were discussed. The soil was fully characterized before and after each test, and sequential extractions were performed to assess chemico-physical modifications and evaluate metals mobility induced by washing. Results show that both the reducing agents successfully lowered the amount of Cr(VI) in the soil below the threshold allowed by Italian Environmental Regulation for industrial reuse. Cr(VI) reduction by colloidal nZVI proved to be faster and more effective: the civil reuse of soil [Cr(VI)hydroxide fraction, thus confirming a mechanism of chromium-iron hydroxides precipitation. In addition, a decrease of nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) content in soil was also observed when acidic conditions were established.

  14. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins Differentiate Non-Cancerous and Cancerous Breast Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzamiglio, Sara; De Bortoli, Maida; Taverna, Elena; Signore, Michele; Veneroni, Silvia; Cho, William Chi-Shing; Orlandi, Rosaria; Verderio, Paolo; Bongarzone, Italia

    2017-02-14

    We have previously reported hepcidin and ferritin increases in the plasma of breast cancer patients, but not in patients with benign breast disease. We hypothesized that these differences in systemic iron homeostasis may reflect alterations in different iron-related proteins also play a key biochemical and regulatory role in breast cancer. Thus, here we explored the expression of a bundle of molecules involved in both iron homeostasis and tumorigenesis in tissue samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or reverse-phase protein array (RPPA), were used to measure the expression of 20 proteins linked to iron processes in 24 non-cancerous, and 56 cancerous, breast tumors. We found that cancerous tissues had higher level of hepcidin than benign lesions (p = 0.012). The univariate analysis of RPPA data highlighted the following seven proteins differentially expressed between non-cancerous and cancerous breast tissue: signal transducer and transcriptional activator 5 (STAT5), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), cluster of differentiation 74 (CD74), transferrin receptor (TFRC), inhibin alpha (INHA), and STAT5_pY694. These findings were confirmed for STAT5, STAT3, BMP6, CD74 and INHA when adjusting for age. The multivariate statistical analysis indicated an iron-related 10-protein panel effective in separating non-cancerous from cancerous lesions including STAT5, STAT5_pY694, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88), CD74, iron exporter ferroportin (FPN), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), STAT3_pS727, TFRC, ferritin heavy chain (FTH), and ferritin light chain (FTL). Our results showed an association between some iron-related proteins and the type of tumor tissue, which may provide insight in strategies for using iron chelators to treat breast cancer.

  15. Genetic contribution to iron status: SNPs related to iron deficiency anaemia and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 calcium channel subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; Remacha, Angel; Vaquero, M Pilar; López-Parra, Ana M

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies associate genetic markers with iron- and erythrocyte-related parameters, but few relate them to iron-clinical phenotypes. Novel SNP rs1375515, located in a subunit of the calcium channel gene CACNA2D3, is associated with a higher risk of anaemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of this SNP with iron-related parameters and iron-clinical phenotypes, and to explore the potential role of calcium channel subunit region in iron regulation. Furthermore, we aim to replicate the association of other SNPs reported previously in our population. We tested 45 SNPs selected via systematic review and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 region, with haematological and biochemical traits in 358 women of reproductive age. Multivariate analyses include back-step logistic regression and decision trees. The results replicate the association of SNPs with iron-related traits, and also confirm the protective effect of both A allele of rs1800562 (HFE) and G allele of rs4895441 (HBS1L-MYB). The risk of developing anaemia is increased in reproductive age women carriers of A allele of rs1868505 (CACNA2D3) and/or T allele of rs13194491 (HIST1H2BJ). Association of SNPs from fine mapping with ferritin and serum iron suggests that calcium channels could be a potential pathway for iron uptake in physiological conditions.

  16. Electron transfer between iron minerals and quinones: estimating the reduction potential of the Fe(II)-goethite surface from AQDS speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsetti, Silvia; Laskov, Christine; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2013-12-17

    Redox reactions at iron mineral surfaces play an important role in controlling biogeochemical processes of natural porous media such as sediments, soils and aquifers, especially in the presence of recurrent variations in redox conditions. Ferrous iron associated with iron mineral phases forms highly reactive species and is regarded as a key factor in determining pathways, rates, and extent of chemically and microbially driven electron transfer processes across the iron mineral-water interface. Due to their transient nature and heterogeneity a detailed characterization of such surface bound Fe(II) species in terms of redox potential is still missing. To this end, we used the nonsorbing anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as a redox probe and studied the thermodynamics of its redox reactions in heterogeneous iron systems, namely goethite-Fe(II). Our results provide a thermodynamic basis for and are consistent with earlier observations on the ability of AQDS to "shuttle" electrons between microbes and iron oxide minerals. On the basis of equilibrium AQDS speciation we reported for the first time robust reduction potential measurements of reactive iron species present at goethite in aqueous systems (EH,Fe-GT ≈ -170 mV). Due to the high redox buffer intensity of heterogeneous mixed valent iron systems, this value might be characteristic for many iron-reducing environments in the subsurface at circumneutral pH. Our results corroborate the picture of a dynamic remodelling of Fe(II)/Fe(III) surface sites at goethite in response to oxidation/reduction events. As quinones play an essential role in the electron transport systems of microbes, the proposed method can be considered as a biomimetic approach to determine "effective" biogeochemical reduction potentials in heterogeneous iron systems.

  17. DOC-dynamics in a small headwater catchment as driven by redox fluctuations and hydrological flow paths - are DOC exports mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, K.-H.

    2013-02-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports from many catchments in Europe and North-America are steadily increasing. Several studies have sought to explain this observation. As possible causes, a decrease in acid rain or sulfate deposition, concomitant reductions in ionic strength and increasing temperatures were identified. DOC often originates from riparian wetlands; but here, despite higher DOC concentrations, ionic strength in pore waters usually exceeds that in surface waters. In the catchment under study, DOC concentrations were synchronous with dissolved iron concentrations in pore and stream water. This study aims at testing the hypothesis that DOC exports are mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles. Following the observed hydrographs, δ18O of water and DOC fluorescence, the wetlands were identified as the main source of DOC. Antecedent biogeochemical conditions, i.e., water table levels in the wetlands, influenced the discharge patterns of nitrate, iron and DOC during an event. The correlation of DOC with pH was positive in pore waters, but negative in surface waters; it was negative for DOC with sulfate in pore waters, but only weak in surface waters. Though, the positive correlation of DOC with iron was universal for pore and surface water. The decline of DOC and iron concentrations in transition from anoxic wetland pore water to oxic stream water suggests a flocculation of DOC with oxidising iron, leading to a drop in pH in the stream during high DOC fluxes. The pore water did not per se differ in pH. There is, thus, a need to consider processes more thoroughly of DOC mobilisation in wetlands when interpreting DOC exports from catchments. The coupling of DOC with iron fluxes suggested that increased DOC exports could at least, in part, be caused by increasing activities in iron reduction, possibly due to increases in temperature, increasing wetness of riparian wetlands, or by a shift from sulfate dominated to iron reduction dominated biogeochemical

  18. DOC-dynamics in a small headwater catchment as driven by redox fluctuations and hydrological flow paths – are DOC exports mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Knorr

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC exports from many catchments in Europe and North-America are steadily increasing. Several studies have sought to explain this observation. As possible causes, a decrease in acid rain or sulfate deposition, concomitant reductions in ionic strength and increasing temperatures were identified. DOC often originates from riparian wetlands; but here, despite higher DOC concentrations, ionic strength in pore waters usually exceeds that in surface waters. In the catchment under study, DOC concentrations were synchronous with dissolved iron concentrations in pore and stream water. This study aims at testing the hypothesis that DOC exports are mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles. Following the observed hydrographs, δ18O of water and DOC fluorescence, the wetlands were identified as the main source of DOC. Antecedent biogeochemical conditions, i.e., water table levels in the wetlands, influenced the discharge patterns of nitrate, iron and DOC during an event. The correlation of DOC with pH was positive in pore waters, but negative in surface waters; it was negative for DOC with sulfate in pore waters, but only weak in surface waters. Though, the positive correlation of DOC with iron was universal for pore and surface water. The decline of DOC and iron concentrations in transition from anoxic wetland pore water to oxic stream water suggests a flocculation of DOC with oxidising iron, leading to a drop in pH in the stream during high DOC fluxes. The pore water did not per se differ in pH. There is, thus, a need to consider processes more thoroughly of DOC mobilisation in wetlands when interpreting DOC exports from catchments. The coupling of DOC with iron fluxes suggested that increased DOC exports could at least, in part, be caused by increasing activities in iron reduction, possibly due to increases in temperature, increasing wetness of riparian wetlands, or by a shift from sulfate dominated to iron

  19. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil by in-vessel anaerobic composting with zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yu-Yang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Yao; Tao, Xiao-Qing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Anaerobic dechlorination is an effective degradation pathway for higher chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The enhanced reductive dechlorination of PCB-contaminated soil by anaerobic composting with zero-valent iron (ZVI) was studied, and preliminary reasons for the enhanced reductive dechlorination with ZVI were investigated. The results show that the addition of nanoscale ZVI can enhance dechlorination during in-vessel anaerobic composting. After 140 days, the average number of removed Cl per biphenyl with 10 mg g(-1) of added nanoscale ZVI was 0.63, enhancing the dechlorination by 34 % and improving the initial dechlorination speed. The ZVI enhances dechlorination by providing a suitable acid base environment, reducing volatile fatty acid inhibition and stimulating the microorganisms. The C/N ratios for treatments with the highest rate of ZVI addition were smaller than for the control, indicating that ZVI addition can promote compost maturity.

  20. Association of hair iron levels with creativity and psychological variables related to creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos M.; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-01-01

    Creativity generally involves the conception of original and valuable ideas. Previous studies have suggested an association between creativity and the dopaminergic system, and that physical activity facilitates creativity. Iron plays a key role in the dopaminergic system and physical activity. Here, we newly investigated the associations between hair iron levels and creativity, dopamine-related traits and states [novelty seeking, extraversion, and vigor (motivational state)], as well as the physical activity level. In the present study, we addressed this issue by performing a hair mineral analysis to determine iron levels and a behavioral creativity test of divergent thinking and related psychological measures among young adults (254 men, 88 women; mean age 20.79 ± 2.03 years). Iron levels did not show any significant association with creativity but displayed significant positive associations with novelty seeking, extraversion, and physical activity level. These results may be partly congruent with the notion that iron plays a key role in the dopaminergic system and imply that iron is important for traits and physical activity, which facilitate creativity. Future interventional or longitudinal studies are warranted to identify any causal effects. PMID:24385960

  1. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  2. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2017-02-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  3. Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of AQS Transformation and Microbial Goethite Reduction:Insight into "Redox mediator-Microbe-Iron oxide" Interaction Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Tinglin; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into "redox mediator-iron oxide" interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the "strain S12- goethite" and the "strain S12-AQS" were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of the redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for "Quinone-Iron" interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among "quinone-DIRB- goethite" under biotic/abiotic driven.

  4. Experimental study and modelling of iron ore reduction by hydrogen; Etude experimentale et modelisation de la reduction du minerai de fer par l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, D

    2008-01-15

    In an effort to find new ways to drastically reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions from the steel industry (ULCOS project), the reduction of iron ore by pure hydrogen in a shaft furnace was investigated. The work consisted of literature, experimental, and modelling studies. The chemical reaction and its kinetics were analysed on the basis of thermogravimetric experiments and physicochemical characterizations of partially reduced samples. A specific kinetic model was designed, which simulates the successive reactions, the different steps of mass transport, and possible iron sintering, at the particle scale. Finally, a 2-dimensional numerical model of a shaft furnace was developed. It depicts the variation of the solid and gas temperatures and compositions throughout the reactor. One original feature of the model is using the law of additive characteristic times for calculating the reaction rates. This allowed us to handle both the particle and the reactor scale, while keeping reasonable calculation time. From the simulation results, the influence of the process parameters was assessed. Optimal operating conditions were concluded, which reveal the efficiency of the hydrogen process. (author)

  5. Effect of reduction roasting by using bio-char derived from empty fruit bunch on the magnetic properties of Malaysian iron ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurul A. Yunus; Mohd H. Ani; Hamzah M. Salleh; Rusila Z. A. Rashid; Tomohiro Akiyama; Hadi Purwanto; Nur E. F. Othman

    2014-01-01

    Beneficiation of Malaysian iron ore is becoming necessary as iron resources are depleting. However, the upgrading process is challenging because of the weak magnetic properties of Malaysian iron ore. In this study, bio-char derived from oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) was utilized as an energy source for reduction roasting. Mixtures of Malaysian iron ore and the bio-char were pressed into briquettes and subjected to reduction roasting processes at 873-1173 K. The extent of reduction was estimated on the basis of mass loss, and the mag-netization of samples was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). When reduced at 873 K, the original goethite-rich ore was converted into hematite. An increase in temperature to 1073 K caused a significant conversion of hematite into magnetite and enhanced the magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization of samples. The magnetic properties diminished at 1173 K as the iron ore was par-tially reduced to wustite. This reduction roasting by using the bio-char can assist in upgrading the iron ore by improving its magnetic proper-ties.

  6. Effect of reduction roasting by using bio-char derived from empty fruit bunch on the magnetic properties of Malaysian iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Nurul A.; Ani, Mohd H.; Salleh, Hamzah M.; Rashid, Rusila Z. A.; Akiyama, Tomohiro; Purwanto, Hadi; Othman, Nur E. F.

    2014-04-01

    Beneficiation of Malaysian iron ore is becoming necessary as iron resources are depleting. However, the upgrading process is challenging because of the weak magnetic properties of Malaysian iron ore. In this study, bio-char derived from oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) was utilized as an energy source for reduction roasting. Mixtures of Malaysian iron ore and the bio-char were pressed into briquettes and subjected to reduction roasting processes at 873-1173 K. The extent of reduction was estimated on the basis of mass loss, and the magnetization of samples was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). When reduced at 873 K, the original goethite-rich ore was converted into hematite. An increase in temperature to 1073 K caused a significant conversion of hematite into magnetite and enhanced the magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization of samples. The magnetic properties diminished at 1173 K as the iron ore was partially reduced to wustite. This reduction roasting by using the bio-char can assist in upgrading the iron ore by improving its magnetic properties.

  7. Lactate Oxidation Coupled to Iron or Electrode Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.

    2011-10-14

    Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA completely oxidized lactate and reduced iron or an electrode, producing pyruvate and acetate intermediates. Compared to the current produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, G. sulfurreducens PCA produced 10-times-higher current levels in lactate-fed microbial electrolysis cells. The kinetic and comparative analyses reported here suggest a prominent role of G. sulfurreducens strains in metaland electrode-reducing communities supplied with lactate. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, T. J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-05-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37°C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18°C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37°C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  9. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-09-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37 C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18 C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37 C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  10. Graphitic Layer Encapsulated Iron Based Non‐precious Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Lijie

    -containing nanoparticles, is essentially maintained during the pyrolysis of varied durations and temperatures. The metal-containing nanoparticles showed changes in the iron phases and their contents, as characterized by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The iron containing components include reduced metals (α-Fe and γ......-Fe), oxide (γ-Fe2O3), carbide (Fe3C) as well as a minor paramagnetic component due to Fe3+ (high spin) and/or possibly Fe2+ (low spin), likely coordinated with nitrogen (FeNx/C) as well identified for the Fe/N/C type catalysts in the literatures. Quantitative determination of these metal containing...... components by low temperature 57Mössbauer spectra shows that the content of the reduced metal component is steadily increasing with the pyrolytic time and temperature while the content of iron oxide is nearly constant. The most interesting finding is that the Fe3C content shows a peak in both the temperature...

  11. [Enhanced reductive decoloration of methylene blue by polyacrylic acid modified zero-valent iron nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Pei; Liu, Kun-Qian

    2015-03-01

    Nano zerovalent iron ( NZVI) technology has attracted tremendous amount of interests for degrading a number of environmental contaminants found both in surface water and underground water. However, these nanoscale particles are prone to aggregate, which may result in the decrease of its reactivity in liquid phase. Iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) modified with polyacrylic acid (PAA) has enhanced the dispersion of NZVI and reduced its agglomeration. For the first time, PAA modified NPs (PAA-Fe NPs) were used for degradation of methylene blue in water phase. The PAA-Fe NPs prepared were characterized in terms of TEM, SEM, XRD and specific surface area. The results indicated that, the surface area of PAA-Fe NPs was increased, compared with unmodified pristine zero-valent iron NPs, and PAA-Fe NPs were smoother with smaller particle size. With addition of 0.1 g x L(-1) of PAA, the decolorization efficiency of methylene blue by PAA-Fe NPs was 98.84% in 60 min, which was 27.32% higher than that of pristine Fe NPs. Decolorization efficiencies were also affected by initial pH value, initial concentration of methylene blue, dosage of PAA-Fe NPs, and degradation temperature. Kinetic analyses based on the experimental data illustrated that the decolorization reaction of methylene blue fitted well to the pseudo first-order kinetics model.

  12. Changes and relations of photosynthesis and iron cycling in anoxic paddy soil amended with high concentrations of sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qin; Jia, Rong; Qu, Dong; Li, Ming

    2017-04-01

    Sulfate contamination is an increasingly serious environmental problem related to microbial reduction processes in anoxic paddy soil. This study revealed the changes and interrelations of ferric iron [Fe(III)] reduction, ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation, and oxygenic photosynthesis in an anoxic paddy soil (Fe-accumuli-Stagnic Anthrosols) amended with a range of high sulfate concentrations. Soil slurries mixed with 0 (control), 50, 100, 200, and 400 mmol kg(-1) Na2SO4 were incubated anaerobically under dark and light conditions. The changes in chlorophyll a (Chl a), Fe(II), pH levels, and the chlorophyll absorption spectrum were determined over a 42-day period. Fe(II) concentrations increased with the addition of sulfate under dark conditions, while Fe(III) reduction potential was enhanced by increasing sulfate addition. The effect of light on Fe(II) concentration was observed after 16 days of incubation, when Fe(II) started to decrease markedly in the control. The decrease in Fe(II) slowed with increasing sulfate addition. The concentrations of Chl a increased in all treatments after 16 days of incubation under light conditions. There was a reduction in Chl a accumulation with increasing sulfate at the same incubation time. The absorption peaks of chlorophyll remained shorter than the 700-nm wavelength throughout the incubation period. The pH of all treatments decreased in the first week and then increased thereafter. The pH increased with sulfate addition and light conditions. In conclusion, contamination with high concentrations of sulfate could accelerate Fe(III) reduction while inhibiting oxygenic photosynthesis, which correspondingly slows chemical Fe(II) oxidation in an anoxic paddy soil.

  13. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part III. The simulation of volatile reduction in a multi-layer rotary hearth furnace process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    For reduction of iron oxides by volatiles from coal, the major reductant was found to be H2, and it can affect the overall reduction of iron oxides. In this study, the reduction by actual volatiles of composite pellets at 1000 °C was studied. The volatile reduction of the hand-packed Fe2O3/coal composite pellet as it is devolatilizing out of the pellet was found to be negligible. However, the reduction of iron oxide pellets at the top layer by volatiles from the bottom layers of a three-layer pellet geometry was observed to be about 15 pct. From the morphological observations of partially reduced pellets and the computed rates of bulk mass transfer, volatile reduction appears to be controlled by a mixed-controlled mechanism of bulk gas mass transfer and the limited-mixed control reduction kinetics. Using the reduction rate obtained from the single pellet experiments with pure hydrogen and extrapolating this rate to an H2 partial pressure corresponding to the H2 from the volatiles, an empirical relationship was obtained to approximately predict the amount of volatile reduction up to 20 pct.

  14. Modeling and Recovery of Iron (Fe) from Red Mud by Coal Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiancong; Li, Hongxu; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Lifeng

    Recovery of Fe from red mud has been studied using statistically designed experiments. The effects of three factors, namely: reduction temperature, reduction time and proportion of additive on recovery of Fe have been investigated. Experiments have been carried out using orthogonal central composite design and factorial design methods. A model has been obtained through variance analysis at 92.5% confidence level.

  15. Role of Siderophores in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Arctic Soils : Effect of Direct Amendment of Siderophores to Arctic Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, A. J.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR), where ferric iron (Fe3+) is reduced to ferrous iron (Fe2+) anaerobically, is an important respiratory pathway used by soil bacteria. DIR contributes to carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the wet sedge tundra biome in the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) in Alaska, and could competitively inhibit the production of methane, a stronger greenhouse gas than CO2, from arctic soils. The occurrence of DIR as a dominant anaerobic process depends on the availability of substantial levels of Fe3+ in soils. Siderophores are metabolites made by microbes to dissolve Fe3+ from soil minerals in iron deficient systems, making Fe3+ soluble for micronutrient uptake. However, as the ACP is not iron deficient, siderophores in arctic soils may play a vital role in anaerobic respiration by dissolving Fe3+ for DIR. We studied the effects of direct siderophore addition to arctic soils through a field study conducted in Barrow, Alaska, and a laboratory incubation study conducted at San Diego State University. In the field experiment, 50μM deferroxamine mesylate (a siderophore), 50μM trisodium nitrilotriacetate (an organic chelator) or an equal volume of water was added to isolated experimental plots, replicated in clusters across the landscape. Fe2+ concentrations were measured in soil pore water samples collected periodically to measure DIR over time in each. In the laboratory experiment, frozen soil samples obtained from drained thaw lake basins in the ACP, were cut into cores and treated with the above-mentioned compounds to the same final concentrations. Along with measuring Fe2+ concentrations, CO2 output was also measured to monitor DIR over time in each core. Experimental addition of siderophores to soils in both the field and laboratory resulted in increased concentrations of soluble Fe3+ and a sustained increase in Fe2+concentrations over time, along with increased respiration rates in siderophore-amended cores. These results show increased DIR in

  16. Effect of mass transfer limitations on catalyst performance during reduction and carburization of iron based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akbar; Zamaniyan; Yadollah; Mortazavi; Abbas; Ali; Khodadadi; Ali; Nakhaei; Pour

    2013-01-01

    Existence of intraparticle mass transfer limitations under typical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has been reported previously,but there is no suitable study on the existence of intraparticle diffusion limitations under pretreatment steps (reduction and activation) and their effect on catalytic performance for iron based catalysts.In this study,Fe-Cu-La-SiO2 catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method.To investigate the intraparticle mass transfer limitation under reduction,activation and reaction steps,and its effect on catalytic performance,catalyst pellets with different sizes of 6,3,1 and 0.5 mm have been prepared.All catalysts were calcined,pretreated and tested under similar conditions.The catalysts were activated in hydrogen (5%H2in N2) at 450℃ for 3 h and exposed to syngas (H2/CO=1) at 270℃ and atmospheric pressure for 40 h.Afterwards,FTS reaction tests were performed for approximately 120 h to reach steady state conditions at 290℃,17 bar and a feed flow (syngas H2/CO=1) rate of 3 L/h (STP).Using small pellets resulted in higher CO conversion,FT reaction rate and C5+ productivity as compared with larger pellets.The small pellets reached steady state conditions just 20 h after starting the reaction.Whereas for larger pellets,CO conversion,FT reaction rate and C5+ productivity increased gradually,and reached steady state and maximum values after 120 h of operation.The results illustrate that mass transfer limitations exist not only for FTS reaction but also for the reduction and carburization steps which lead to various phase formation through catalyst activation.Also the results indicate that some effects of mass transfer limitations in activation step,can be compensated in the reaction step.The results can be used for better design of iron based catalyst to improve the process economy.

  17. Mechanism and optimization of titanium carbide-reinforced iron composite formation through carbothermal reduction of hematite and anatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasniyati, Md Razi; Zuhailawati, Hussain, E-mail: zuhaila@eng.usm.my; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Reduction mechanism of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} mixture in formation Fe–TiC composite was discovered. • Factorial design is used to define interaction between calcination temperature and FeCl{sub 3} content. • Increasing FeCl{sub 3} content and calcination temperature increased the formation of Fe and TiC phases. • Microhardness and density of the sintered composite improved noticeably. -- Abstract: This study investigated an optimization of titanium carbide-reinforced iron composite fabricated using a combination of powder metallurgy and carbothermal reduction of hematite-anatase mixture using 2{sup k} factorial design. The composite formation mechanism is described as well. Powders of hematite, anatase and graphite with mole ratio of 1:1:6 were mixed for 1 h together with 0 wt%, 1 wt% and 5 wt% FeCl{sub 3}. The mixture was pressed at 5 MPa, calcined for 1 h at 1000 °C, 1100 °C or 1200 °C and sintered at 1200 °C. X-ray diffraction of the calcined powder showed that with increasing temperature TiO{sub 2} was reduced to TiC through formation of various suboxides (Ti{sub 3}O{sub 5} and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Scanning electron microscope observation of the sintered composite indicated that addition of FeCl{sub 3} enhanced the formation of TiC in iron matrix. Consequently, microhardness and density of the sintered composite improved noticeably. Based on microhardness, green density and sintered density measurements, design of experiment analysis suggested that an increase in both FeCl{sub 3} content and calcination temperature increased the percentage of hematite and anatase reduction.

  18. Reduction of highly concentrated phosphate from aqueous solution using pectin-nanoscale zerovalent iron (PNZVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyu; Zou, Zhuocheng; Xiao, Xuelian; Chen, Dan; Yang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Pectin-nanoscale zerovalent iron (PNZVI) has been studied as an effective phosphate adsorption material to remove highly concentrated phosphate from aqueous solution. Batch phosphate removal and equilibrium experiments were conducted in order to evaluate the effects of environmental factors such as pH, coexisting anions and ionic strengths on phosphate removal by PNZVI. The scanning electron microscope images of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) and PNZVI demonstrated that PNZVI exhibited larger specific surface areas than NZVI so that PNZVI had higher phosphate removal efficiency than NZVI. Equilibrium experiments showed that phosphate adsorption by PNZVI was well fitted with the Freundlich and Langmuir models. In addition, the maximum adsorption capacity reached 277.38 mgP/gPNZVI. The ionic strengths and common anions showed no significant effects on the process of phosphate adsorption by PNZVI. The phosphate removal efficiency increased to a peak value with pH increased from 2.0 to 5.0, then decreased with pH further increased from 5.0 to 10.0. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of PNZVI and P-loaded PNZVI indicated that adsorption, rather than redox reaction, was the dominant mechanism for the removal of phosphate by PNZVI.

  19. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    weeks. Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation–reduction reaction.

  20. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Böhlke, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    . Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation-reduction reaction.

  1. Importance of Tetrahedral Iron during Microbial Reduction of Clay Mineral NAu-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, B.; Wu, L.; Liu, K.; Smeaton, C. M.; Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.; Roden, E. E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Transformations between Fe(II) and Fe(III) in ferruginous clay minerals significantly impact the physicochemical properties of soils and sediments, such as the ion exchange capacity and redox potential. An increasing number of studies have focused on clay minerals that undergo redox changes, however, none have so far addressed Fe isotope fractionation during these processes. In this study, Fe isotope fractionations were determined during microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2 with different concentrations of lactate. No secondary Fe-bearing minerals, including Fe oxides, were detected by SEM in over 100 days of incubation, suggesting that the measured fractionations only reflected the net isotope effect associated with the clay minerals. The initial reduction likely started from edge sites, and the reductive dissolution released aqueous Fe(II). Basal plane sorbed Fe(II) was detectable after the extent of Fe reduction exceeded 5% and extensive electron transfer and isotope exchange had occurred between basal plane sorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III). With lower concentrations of the lactate(40 mM), the maximum Fe isotope fractionation was larger (∆56Febasal Fe(II)-structure Fe(III)= -4.37‰), consistent with greater adsorption than in systems with more lactate. After the Fe in reactive sites was all reduced, isotope exchange between Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) was inhibited due to blockage of electron transfer pathways by the collapse of the clay layers. The results agree with another study in our group on microbial reduction of NAu-1, despite both the smaller extent of reduction (~10% vs. 22% max bioreduction for NAu-1 and NAu-2, respectively) and smaller isotope fractionation factor than for NAu-2. We speculate that tetrahedral Fe in NAu-2 may have accelerated the electron transfer between Fe atoms, thus inducing a higher extent of reduction and a larger Fe isotope fractionation compared to NAu-1.

  2. Reductive Leaching of Iron from Sulfate Slag%硫酸烧渣还原浸取铁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金程; 李登新

    2012-01-01

    采用硫化物作助剂还原浸出硫酸烧渣中的三价铁.采用L9(43)四因素三水平正交试验,考察助剂用量、硫酸用量、温度、时间对浸出效果的影响,并确定最佳配比.结果表明:影响的显著顺序为助剂用量>时间>硫酸用量>温度.在下述最佳条件下铁浸取率可以达到87.8%:起始液固比2∶1、搅拌转速1 300 r/min、助剂用量17.2g、硫酸23 mL、85℃反应3h.%The ferric iron was reductive leached from sulfate slag with sulfide. The effects of leaching agent dosage, sulfuric acid consumption, reaction temperature and time on leaching rate of iron were investigated with L9(43) orthogonal test. The results show that the sequence of effecting is leaching agent dosage, reaction time, sulfuric acid consumption and reaction temperature. The iron leaching rate reaches 87. 8% on the following optimum conditions: ratio of liquid to solid of 2 : 1, stirring rate of 1 300 r/min, leaching a-gent dosage of 17. 2 g, sulfuric acid consumption of 23 mL, leaching temperature of 85 °C and leaching time of 3 h.

  3. Potential of modified iron-rich foundry waste for environmental applications: Fenton reaction and Cr(VI) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Patrícia E F; Oliveira, Leandro D; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2011-10-30

    A magnetic fraction (15%) from a waste of foundry sand (WFS), composed of sand, carbon, bentonite clay and iron (10%) was modified by thermal treatment at 400, 600 and 800°C under inert atmosphere. Mössbauer analyses showed that the thermal treatment increased the amount of Fe(3)O(4) from 25 to 55% by reduction of Fe(2)O(3) and highly dispersed Fe(3+) by the carbon present in the waste. The Fe(3)O(4) caused a significant increase on the activity of two important reactions with application in environmental remediation: the Fenton oxidation of indigo carmine dye with H(2)O(2) and the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The magnetic fraction of WFS was also mixed with hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) and thermally treated at 400, 600 and 800°C. This treatment produced large amounts of surface Fe(3)O(4) and increased substantially the rate of Fenton reaction as well as Cr(VI) reduction. This reactivity combined with the presence of carbon (an adsorbent for organic contaminants), bentonite clay (an adsorbent for metallic contaminants) and the granulometry/packing/hydrodynamic features make WFS a promising material for use in reactive permeable barriers.

  4. The role of clay minerals in the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Chon, Chul-Min; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Kim, Yongje; Khan, Moonis Ali; Song, Hocheol

    2010-10-01

    Bench-scale batch experiments were performed to investigate the feasibility of using different types of clay minerals (bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite) with zero-valent iron for their potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction and ammonium control. Kinetics experiments performed with deionized water (DW) and groundwater (GW) revealed nitrate reduction by Fe(0) proceeded at significantly faster rate in GW than in DW, and such a difference was attributed to the formation of green rust in GW. The amendment of the minerals at the dose of 25 g L(-1) in Fe(0) reaction in GW resulted in approximately 41%, 43%, and 33% more removal of nitrate in 64 h reaction for bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite, respectively, compared to Fe(0) alone reaction. The presumed role of the minerals in the rate enhancement was to provide sites for the formation of surface bound green rust. Bentonite and fuller's earth also effectively removed ammonium produced from nitrate reduction by adsorption, with the removal efficiencies significantly increased with the increase in mineral dose above 5:1 Fe(0) to mineral mass ratio. Such a removal of ammonium was not observed for biotite, presumably due to its lack of swelling property. Equilibrium adsorption experiments indicated bentonite and fuller's earth had maximum ammonium adsorption capacity of 5.6 and 2.1 mg g(-1), respectively.

  5. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  6. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp (2) carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  7. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.. China Energy Group; Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.. China Energy Group; Arens, Marlene [Fraunhofer Inst. for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-31

    Iron and steel manufacturing is among the most energy-intensive industries and accounts for the largest share, approximately 27 percent, of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the manufacturing sector. The ongoing increase in world steel demand means that this industry’s energy use and CO2 emissions continue to grow, so there is significant incentive to develop, commercialize and adopt emerging energy-efficiency and CO2 emissions-reduction technologies for steel production. Although studies from around the world have identified a wide range of energy-efficiency technologies applicable to the steel industry that have already been commercialized, information is limited and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on 56 emerging iron and steel industry technologies, with the intent of providing a well-structured database of information on these technologies for engineers, researchers, investors, steel companies, policy makers, and other interested parties. For each technology included, we provide information on energy savings and environmental and other benefits, costs, and commercialization status; we also identify references for more information.

  8. Optimization of Flotation Process for Reduction of Alumina and Silica from Screw Classifier Overflow of an Iron Ore Washing Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Vijaya Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reverse flotation process was optimized by an experimental programme based on statistical analysis for reduction of silica and alumina levels from screw classifier overflow so as to enrich iron values. Flotation of alumina and silica bearing minerals with Sokem 521C and starch as collector and depressant respectively was studied to estimate their optimum levels at different particle sizes. A two-level three factor design of experiments showed that particle size is insignificant in the ranges of study. Tests on an orthogonal design of the hexagonal type were then carried out to determine the effects of the other two variables, on the response, Selectivity Index (SI, a measure of separation efficiency of iron values from alumina and silica. Regression equations were developed as models and response contours were plotted. Maximum response (SI of 2.25 has been optimized at 0.306 kg/t of amine collector, 1.0043 kg/t of starch at a particle size of 40 µm.

  9. Thermal stability and reduction of iron oxide nanowires at moderate temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Paolone

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The thermal stability of iron oxide nanowires, which were obtained with a hard template method and are promising elements of Li-ion based batteries, has been investigated by means of thermogravimetry, infrared and photoemission spectroscopy measurements.Results: The chemical state of the nanowires is typical of the Fe2O3 phase and the stoichiometry changes towards a Fe3O4 phase by annealing above 440 K. The shape and morphology of the nanowires is not modified by moderate thermal treatment, as imaged by scanning electron microscopy.Conclusion: This complementary spectroscopy–microscopy study allows to assess the temperature limits of these Fe2O3 nanowires during operation, malfunctioning or abuse in advanced Li-ion based batteries.

  10. Size Control of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Reverse Microemulsion Method: Morphology, Reduction, and Catalytic Activity in CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by microemulsion method and evaluated in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The precipitation process was performed in a single-phase microemulsion operating region. Different HLB values of surfactant were prepared by mixing of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and Triton X-100. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, surface area, pore volume, average pore diameter, pore size distribution, and XRD patterns were used to analyze size distribution, shape, and structure of precipitated hematite nanoparticles. Furthermore, temperature programmed reduction (TPR and catalytic activity in CO hydrogenation were implemented to assess the performance of the samples. It was found that methane and CO2 selectivity and also the syngas conversion increased as the HLB value of surfactant decreased. In addition, the selectivity to heavy hydrocarbons and chain growth probability (α decreased by decreasing the catalyst crystal size.

  11. Graphenothermal reduction synthesis of 'exfoliated graphene oxide/iron (II) oxide' composite for anode application in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petnikota, Shaikshavali; Marka, Sandeep Kumar; Banerjee, Arkaprabha; Reddy, M. V.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Chowdari, B. V. R.

    2015-10-01

    Graphenothermal Reduction process is used to obtain exfoliated graphene oxide (EG)/iron (II) oxide (FeO) composite prepared at 650 °C for 5 h in argon. Structural and compositional analyses of the sample confirm the formation of EG/FeO composite. This composite shows a reversible capacity of 857 mAh g-1 at a current rate of 50 mA g-1 in the voltage range 0.005-3.0 V versus Li. An excellent capacity retention up to 60 cycles and high coulombic efficiency of 98% are also observed. Characteristic Fe2+/0 redox peaks observed in Cyclic Voltammetry measurement are explained in correlation with lithium storage mechanism. Thermal, electrical and impedance spectroscopy studies of EG/FeO composite are discussed in detail. Comparative electrochemical cycling studies of EG/FeO composite with Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 materials prepared under controlled conditions are also discussed.

  12. Improved Understanding of Microbial Iron and Sulfate Reduction Through a Combination of Bottom-up and Top-down Functional Proteomics Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Ruth [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-02-28

    Our overall goal was to improve the understanding of microbial iron and sulfate reduction by evaluating a diverse iron and sulfate reducing organisms utilizing a multi-omics approach combining “top-down” and “bottom-up” omics methodologies. We initiated one of the first combined comparative genomics, shotgun proteomics, RTqPCR, and heterologous expression studies in pursuit of our project objectives. Within the first year of this project, we created a new bioinformatics tool for ortholog identification (“SPOCS”). SPOCS is described in our publication, Curtis et al., 2013. Using this tool we were able to identify conserved orthologous groups across diverse iron and sulfate reducing microorganisms from Firmicutes, gamma-proteobacteria and delta-proteobacteria. For six iron and sulfate reducers we also performed shotgun proteomics (“bottom-up” proteomics including accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and iTRAQ approaches). Cultures include Gram (-) and Gram (+) microbes. Gram (-) were: Geobacter sulfureducens (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Geobacter bemidjiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Shewanella oneidiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate) and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans (grown on iron citrate and fumarate). Although all cultures grew on insoluble iron, the iron precipitates interfered with protein extraction and analysis; which remains a major challenge for researchers in disparate study systems. Among the Gram (-) organisms studied, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans remains the most poorly characterized. Yet, it is arguably the most versatile organisms we studied. In this work we have used comparative proteomics to hypothesize which two of the dozens of predicted c-type cytochromes within Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans may be directly involved in soluble iron reduction. Unfortunately, heterologous expression of these Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans ctype cytochromes led to poor protein production and/or formation of inclusion bodies

  13. [Experimental studies on low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO on magnetic iron-based catalysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gui-huan; Zhang, Qi; Qin, Ye; Wang, Fang; Lu, Fang; Gui, Ke-ting

    2009-10-15

    Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO is a new technique needing urgent development in flue gas cleaning. Elementary studies were done about selective catalytic reduction of NO from flue gas on magnetic iron oxides with ammonia at low and medium temperatures in a fluidized bed, such as Fe3O4 and gamma-Fe2O3. Magnetic field effects for NO removal on gamma-Fe2O3 were also researched with low assisted magnetic fileds. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy was used to identify and characterize the iron oxides catalysts. Results show that gamma-Fe2O3 is active in SCR at low temperatures, and Fe3O4 is apparently less active in SCR than gamma-Fe2O3, but Fe2O3 is also active in ammonia oxidation by O2 above 25 degrees C. Therefore, the optimal catalytic temperature zone in SCR on gamma-Fe2O3 includes 250 degrees C and adjacent temperature zone below it. Furthermore, a better NO conversion, which is 90%, is obtained at 250 degrees C on the gamma-Fe2O3 particle catalyst. In addition, chemisorption of NO on gamma-Fe2O3 is accelerated by assisted magnetic fields at 150-290 degrees C, thus the NO conversion is improved and higher NO removal efficiency of 95% is obtained at 250 degrees C. But the efficiency of NO removal decreases above 290 degrees C with the magnetic field. It is concluded that gamma-FeO3 catalyst is fit to be used in low-temperature SCR of NO with ammonia at 200-250 degrees C, which may suppress oxidation of ammonia and take advantage of positive effects by external magnetic fields.

  14. Vivianite Precipitation and Phosphate Sorption following Iron Reduction in Anoxic Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Lisa; Bender Koch, Christian; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    and EPC0 increased from 1.7 to 83 μM, after 322 d of anoxic incubation. The fast Fe(III) reduction made the peat soils particularly vulnerable to changes in redox conditions. However, the precipitation of vivianite/metavivianite minerals may control soluble Pi concentrations to between 2 and 3 μ...

  15. Characterization of the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase of Dehalobacter restrictus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillard, J.; Schumacher, W.; Vazquez, F.; Regeard, C.; Hagen, W.R.; Holliger, C.

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-bound tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase (PCE-RDase) (PceA; EC 1.97.1.8), the terminal component of the respiratory chain of Dehalobacter restrictus, was purified 25-fold to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a

  16. Vivianite precipitation and phosphate sorption following iron reduction in anoxic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiberg, Lisa; Koch, Christian Bender; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Jensen, Henning S; Hans Christian, B Hansen

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus retention in lowland soils depends on redox conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the Fe(III) reduction degree affects phosphate adsorption and precipitation. Two similarly P-saturated, ferric Fe-rich lowland soils, a sandy and a peat soil, were incubated under anaerobic conditions. Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that Fe(III) in the sandy soil was present as goethite and phyllosilicates, whereas Fe(III) in the peat soil was mainly present as polynuclear, Fe-humic complexes. Following anoxic incubation, extensive formation of Fe(II) in the solids occurred. After 100 d, the Fe(II) production reached its maximum and 34% of the citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite extractable Fe (Fe(CBD)) was reduced to Fe(II) in the sandy soil. The peat soil showed a much faster reduction of Fe(III) and the maximum reduction of 89% of Fe(CBD) was reached after 200 d. Neoformation of a metavivianite/vivianite phase under anoxic conditions was identified by X-ray diffraction in the peat. The sandy soil exhibited small changes in the point of zero net sorption (EPC₀) and P(i) desorption with increasing Fe(III) reduction, whereas in the peat soil P desorption increased from 80 to 3100 μmol kg⁻¹ and EPC₀ increased from 1.7 to 83 μM, after 322 d of anoxic incubation. The fast Fe(III) reduction made the peat soils particularly vulnerable to changes in redox conditions. However, the precipitation of vivianite/metavivianite minerals may control soluble P(i) concentrations to between 2 and 3 μM in the long term if the soil is not disturbed.

  17. Methods for accelerating nitrate reduction using zerovalent iron at near-neutral pH: effects of H2-reducing pretreatment and copper deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Y H; Lo, S L; Lin, C I; Hu, C Y; Kuan, W H; Weng, S C

    2005-12-15

    Both surface treatments, H2-reducing pretreatment at 400 degrees C and the deposition of copper as a catalyst, were attempted to enhance the removal of nitrate (40 (mg N) L(-1)) using zerovalent iron in a HEPES buffered solution at a pH of between 6.5 and 7.5. After the iron surface was pretreated with hydrogen gas, the removal of the passive oxide layers that covered the iron was indicated by the decline in the oxygen fraction (energy dispersive X-ray analysis) and the overlap of the cyclic polarization curves. The reaction rate was doubled, and the lag of the early period disappeared. Then, the deposition of copper onto freshly pretreated iron promoted nitrate degradation more effectively than that onto a nonpretreated iron surface, because of the high dispersion and small size of the copper particles. An optimum of 0.25-0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe accelerated the rate by more than six times that of the nonpretreated iron. The aged 0.5% (w/w) Cu/Fe with continual dipping in nitrate solution for 20 days completely restored its reactivity by a regeneration process with H2 reduction. Hence, these two iron surface treatments considerably promoted the removal of nitrate from near-neutral water; the reactivity of Cu/Fe was effectively recovered.

  18. An experimental and ab initio study on the abiotic reduction of uranyl by ferrous iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Rosso, K. M.; Becker, U.

    2015-05-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms controlling the removal of uranyl from solution from an environmental standpoint, particularly whether soluble Fe(II) is capable of reducing soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Experiments were performed to shed light into discrepancies of recent studies about precipitation of U-containing solids without changing oxidation states versus precipitation/reduction reactions, especially with respect to the kinetics of these reactions. To understand the atomistic mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics of these redox processes, ab initio electron transfer (ET) calculations, using Marcus theory, were applied to study the reduction of U(VI)aq to U(V)aq by Fe(II)aq (the first rate-limiting ET-step). Outer-sphere (OS) and inner-sphere (IS) Fe-U complexes were modeled to represent simple species within a homogeneous environment through which ET could occur. Experiments on the chemical reduction were performed by reacting 1 mM Fe(II)aq at pH 7.2 with high (i.e., 0.16 mM) and lower (i.e., 0.02 mM) concentrations of U(VI)aq. At higher U concentration, a rapid decrease in U(VI)aq was observed within the first hour of reaction. XRD and XPS analyses of the precipitates confirmed the presence of (meta)schoepite phases, where up to ∼25% of the original U was reduced to U4+ and/or U5+-containing phases. In contrast, at 0.02 mM U, the U(VI)aq concentration remained fairly constant for the first 3 h of reaction and only then began to decrease due to slower precipitation kinetics. XPS spectra confirm the partial chemical reduction U associated with the precipitate (up to ∼30%). Thermodynamic calculations support that the reduction of U(VI)aq to U(IV)aq by Fe(II)aq is energetically unfavorable. The batch experiments in this study show U(VI) is removed from solution by precipitation and that transitioning to a heterogeneous system in turn enables the solid U phase to be partially reduced. Ab initio ET calculations revealed that OS ET is

  19. Reduction Pathways of Cyclooctatetraene Iron Tricarbonyl as Examined Using Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-25

    Examined using Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry by 00 NM. N. Golovin and M. J. Weaver Prepared for Publication 00 00 in the I- Inorg. Chim. Acta IDTlC 0...Examined using Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry M. N. Golovin and M. J. Weaver* Department of Chemistry Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana...spectra. Upon reduction to (COT)Fe(CO)3 : these bands are both shifted substantially to lower -19 frequencies, 1890 and 1940 cm 1 (Fig. 2B). These

  20. Assessment of air quality in and around a steel industry with direct reduction iron route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Pradip K; Behera, Dillip K; Mishra, C S K; Mohanty, Saswat K

    2011-10-01

    The coal based Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) route for secondary steel production is now a preferred choice in India. Steel making is invariably associated with emission of air pollutants into the environment. Air quality monitoring was carried out in Winter, Summer and Rainy seasons of 2008 in eight monitoring stations in the work zone and five stations in the residential zone of an Integrated Steel Industry located in Orissa state, India. Four air quality parameters i.e. SPM, RSPM, SO2 and NO2 were monitored. Mean SPM and RSPM values were found to be significantly high (p < 0.01) at stations nearer to source in both work zone and residential zone .The highest average SPM and RSPM values in the work zone recorded were 4869 microg/m3 and 1420 microg/m3 and in the residential zone 294 microg/m3 and 198 microg/m3 respectively. No significant difference in the SO2 and NO2 levels was observed between the work and residential zones. In general, the values of air pollutants were highest in Winter followed by Summer and Rainy season. SPM and RSPM values exceeded the National Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in both the residential and work zones.

  1. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  2. Interactions of iron with manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium as related to prophylaxis and treatment of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørklund, Geir; Aaseth, Jan; Skalny, Anatoly V; Suliburska, Joanna; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Tinkov, Alexey A

    2017-05-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is considered as the most common nutritional deficiency. Iron deficiency is usually associated with low Fe intake, blood loss, diseases, poor absorption, gastrointestinal parasites, or increased physiological demands as in pregnancy. Nutritional Fe deficiency is usually treated with Fe tablets, sometimes with Fe-containing multimineral tablets. Trace element interactions may have a significant impact on Fe status. Existing data demonstrate a tight interaction between manganese (Mn) and Fe, especially in Fe-deficient state. The influence of Mn on Fe homeostasis may be mediated through its influence on Fe absorption, circulating transporters like transferrin, and regulatory proteins. The existing data demonstrate that the influence of zinc (Zn) on Fe status may be related to their competition for metal transporters. Moreover, Zn may be involved in regulation of hepcidin production. At the same time, human data on the interplay between Fe and Zn especially in terms of Fe-deficiency and supplementation are contradictory, demonstrating both positive and negative influence of Zn on Fe status. Numerous data also demonstrate the possibility of competition between Fe and chromium (Cr) for transferrin binding. At the same time, human data on the interaction between these metals are contradictory. Therefore, while managing hypoferremia and Fe-deficiency anemia, it is recommended to assess the level of other trace elements in parallel with indices of Fe homeostasis. It is supposed that simultaneous correction of trace element status in Fe deficiency may help to decrease possible antagonistic or increase synergistic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Fe-saponite pillared and impregnated catalysts. Part 2. Nature of the iron species active for the reduction of NO{sub x} with propene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belver, C.; Vicente, M.A. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-15

    A study of the NO{sub x} reduction with propene in the absence/presence of oxygen over Fe-saponite clay catalysts with different iron loadings (ca. 1-28wt.%) has been performed. The catalysts were prepared by pillaring and impregnation methods and the iron active phases were characterized by using X-ray absorption spectroscopies and electron paramagnetic resonance. The samples display significant activity in the NO{sub x} reduction in the absence of oxygen with a maximum for a Fe content close to 10wt.%. A strong decay of catalytic activity was observed with the introduction of increasing quantities of oxygen in the feed. Iron is mostly present in all catalysts as Fe(III) with a slightly distorted local octahedral symmetry. The catalytic behavior was explained in terms of the nature and properties of the Fe existing phases.

  4. Surface-Plasmon-Enhanced Photodriven CO2 Reduction Catalyzed by Metal-Organic-Framework-Derived Iron Nanoparticles Encapsulated by Ultrathin Carbon Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huabin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Junjie; Liu, Huimin; Dao, Thang Duy; Li, Mu; Liu, Guigao; Meng, Xianguang; Chang, Kun; Shi, Li; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-05-01

    Highly efficient utilization of solar light with an excellent reduction capacity is achieved for plasmonic Fe@C nanostructures. By carbon layer coating, the optimized catalyst exhibits enhanced selectivity and stability applied to the solar-driven reduction of CO2 into CO. The surface-plasmon effect of iron particles is proposed to excite CO2 molecules, and thereby facilitates the final reaction activity.

  5. Reductive transformation and detoxification mechanism of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene in combined zero valent iron and anaerobic-aerobic process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinyou Shen; Zongyuan Zhou; Changjin Ou; Xiuyun Sun; Jiansheng Li; Weiqing Han; Lin Zhou; Lianjun Wang

    2012-01-01

    A combined zero valent iron (ZVI) and anaerobic-aerobic process was adopted for the treatment of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-containing wastewater.The transformation pathway,reduction of acute toxicity and enhancement of biodegradability were investigated.After pretreatment by ZVI,DNCB in wastewater could be completely converted into 2,4-diaminochlorobenzene (DACB).The ratio of BOD5/COD increased from 0.005 ± 0.001 to 0.168 ± 0.007,while EC50,48 hr (V/V) increased from 0.65% to 5.20%,indicating the enhancement of biodegradability and reduction of acute toxicity with the pretreatment by ZVI.DACB was further dechlorinated to m-phenylenediamine during the anaerobic process using methanol as electron donor,with EC50,48 hr increasing from 5.20% to 48.2%.After the subsequent anaerobic-aerobic process,m-phenylenediamine was degraded completely,with effluent COD of 67.5 ± 10.8 mg/L.This effluent of the subsequent anaerobic-aerobic process was not toxic to zebrafish.The combined ZVI and anaerobic-aerobic process offers bright prospects for the treatment of chlorinated nitroaromatic compound-containing wastewater.

  6. Rhizosphere microbial community structure in relation to root location and plant iron nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C H; Crowley, D E

    2000-01-01

    Root exudate composition and quantity vary in relation to plant nutritional status, but the impact of the differences on rhizosphere microbial communities is not known. To examine this question, we performed an experiment with barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants under iron-limiting and iron-sufficient growth conditions. Plants were grown in an iron-limiting soil in root box microcosms. One-half of the plants were treated with foliar iron every day to inhibit phytosiderophore production and to alter root exudate composition. After 30 days, the bacterial communities associated with different root zones, including the primary root tips, nonelongating secondary root tips, sites of lateral root emergence, and older roots distal from the tip, were characterized by using 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fingerprints generated by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results showed that the microbial communities associated with the different root locations produced many common 16S rDNA bands but that the communities could be distinguished by using correspondence analysis. Approximately 40% of the variation between communities could be attributed to plant iron nutritional status. A sequence analysis of clones generated from a single 16S rDNA band obtained at all of the root locations revealed that there were taxonomically different species in the same band, suggesting that the resolving power of DGGE for characterization of community structure at the species level is limited. Our results suggest that the bacterial communities in the rhizosphere are substantially different in different root zones and that a rhizosphere community may be altered by changes in root exudate composition caused by changes in plant iron nutritional status.

  7. Preparation of Sulphur-containing Aromatic Amines by Reduction of the Corresponding Aromatic Nitro Compounds with Hydrazine Hydrate over Iron Oxide Hydroxide Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Xun SHI; Rong Wen LU; Zhu Xia ZHANG; De Feng ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    Sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds were rapidly reduced to the corresponding amines in high yields by employing hydrazine hydrate as a hydrogen donor in the presence of iron oxide hydroxide catalyst. It was worth noting that the catalyst exhibited extremely high activity. The reduction could be completed within 20-50 min and the yields were up to 97-99 %.

  8. Kinetics of nitrate adsorption and reduction by nano-scale zero valent iron (NZVI): Effect of ionic strength and initial pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Do-Gun; Hwang, Yuhoon; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models for pollutants reduction by Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron (NZVI) were tested in this study to gain a better understanding and description of the reaction. Adsorption kinetic models and a heterogeneous catalytic reaction kinetic equation were proposed for nitrate removal and for ammon...

  9. Synthesis of high intrinsic loss power aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted hydrothermal-reduction route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behdadfar, Behshid, E-mail: bbehdadfar@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, Ahmad [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat [School of Pharmacy, Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Morales, Maria del Puerto [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Mozaffari, Morteza [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticle were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The results showed that certain concentrations of citric acid (CA) are required to obtain only magnetic iron oxides with mean particle sizes around 8 nm. CA acts as a modulator and reducing agent in iron oxide formation which controls nanoparticle size. The XRD, magnetic and heating measurements showed that the temperature and time of hydrothermal reaction can affect the magnetic properties of obtained ferrofluids. The synthesized ferrofluids were stable at pH 7. Their mean hydrodynamic size was around 80 nm with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.158. The calculated intrinsic loss power (ILP) was 9.4 nHm{sup 2}/kg. So this clean and cheap route is an efficient way to synthesize high ILP aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. - Graphical abstract: Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction method with citric acid as reductant which is an efficient way to synthesize aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citric acid acted as reducing agent and surfactant in the route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is a facile, low energy and environmental friendly route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were monodispersed and stable at pH of 7. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated intrinsic loss power of the synthesized ferrofluids was very high.

  10. Reduction chemistry of aryl- and alkyl-substituted bis(imino)pyridine iron dihalide compounds: molecular and electronic structures of [(PDI)2Fe] derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wile, Bradley M; Trovitch, Ryan J; Bart, Suzanne C; Tondreau, Aaron M; Lobkovsky, Emil; Milsmann, Carsten; Bill, Eckhard; Wieghardt, Karl; Chirik, Paul J

    2009-05-04

    Sodium amalgam reduction of the aryl-substituted bis(imino)pyridine iron dibromide complex, ((Et)PDI)FeBr2 ((Et)PDI = 2,6-(2,6-Et2-C6H3N=CMe)2C5H3N), under a dinitrogen atmosphere in pentane furnished the bis(chelate)iron compound, ((Et)PDI)2Fe. Characterization by X-ray crystallography established a distorted four-coordinate iron center with two kappa2-bis(imino)pyridine ligands. Reducing the steric demands of the imine substituent to either a less sterically encumbered aryl ring (e.g., C6H4-4-OMe) or an alkyl group (e.g., Cy, iPr, cis-myrtanyl) also yielded bis(chelate) compounds from sodium amalgam reduction of the corresponding dihalide. Characterization of the compounds with smaller imine substituents by X-ray diffraction established six-coordinate, pseudo-octahedral compounds. In one case, a neutral bis(chelate)iron compound was prepared by reduction of the corresponding iron dication, [(PDI)2Fe]2+, providing chemical confirmation of electrochemically generated species that were previously reported as too reducing to isolate. Magnetic measurements, metrical parameters from X-ray structures, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and open-shell, broken symmetry DFT calculations were used to establish the electronic structure of both types (four- and six-coordinate) of neutral bis(chelate) compounds. The experimentally observed S = 1 compounds are best described as having high-spin ferrous (S(Fe) = 2) centers antiferromagnetically coupled to two bis(imino)pyridine radical anions. Thus, the two-electron reduction of the diamagnetic, low-spin complex [(PDI)2Fe]2+ to [(PDI)2Fe] is ligand-based with a concomitant spin change at iron.

  11. Kinetics of homogeneous and surface-catalyzed mercury(II) reduction by iron(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirbahman, Aria; Kent, Douglas B.; Curtis, Gary P.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Production of elemental mercury, Hg(0), via Hg(II) reduction is an important pathway that should be considered when studying Hg fate in environment. We conducted a kinetic study of abiotic homogeneous and surface-catalyzed Hg(0) production by Fe(II) under dark anoxic conditions. Hg(0) production rate, from initial 50 pM Hg(II) concentration, increased with increasing pH (5.5–8.1) and aqueous Fe(II) concentration (0.1–1 mM). The homogeneous rate was best described by the expression, rhom = khom [FeOH+] [Hg(OH)2]; khom = 7.19 × 10+3 L (mol min)−1. Compared to the homogeneous case, goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) increased and γ-alumina (γ-Al2O3) decreased the Hg(0) production rate. Heterogeneous Hg(0) production rates were well described by a model incorporating equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption, rate-limited Hg(II) reduction by dissolved and adsorbed Fe(II), and rate-limited Hg(II) adsorption. Equilibrium Fe(II) adsorption was described using a surface complexation model calibrated with previously published experimental data. The Hg(0) production rate was well described by the expression rhet = khet [>SOFe(II)] [Hg(OH)2], where >SOFe(II) is the total adsorbed Fe(II) concentration; khet values were 5.36 × 10+3, 4.69 × 10+3, and 1.08 × 10+2 L (mol min)−1 for hematite, goethite, and γ-alumina, respectively. Hg(0) production coupled to reduction by Fe(II) may be an important process to consider in ecosystem Hg studies.

  12. Aggregate-scale heterogeneity in iron (hydr)oxide reductive transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufano, K.J.; Benner, S.G.; Mayer, K.U.; Marcus, M.A.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-06-15

    There is growing awareness of the complexity of potential reaction pathways and the associated solid-phase transformations during the reduction of Fe (hydr)oxides, especially ferrihydrite. An important observation in static and advective-dominated systems is that microbially produced Fe(II) accelerates Ostwald ripening of ferrihydrite, thus promoting the formation of thermodynamically more stable ferric phases (lepidocrocite and goethite) and, at higher Fe(II) surface loadings, the precipitation of magnetite; high Fe(II) levels can also lead to green rust formation, and with high carbonate levels siderite may also be formed. This study expands this emerging conceptual model to a diffusion-dominated system that mimics an idealized micropore of a ferrihydrite-coated soil aggregate undergoing reduction. Using a novel diffusion cell, coupled with micro-x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies, we determined that diffusion-controlled gradients in Fe{sup 2+}{sub (aq)} result in a complex array of spatially distributed secondary mineral phases. At the diffusive pore entrance, where Fe{sup 2+} concentrations are highest, green rust and magnetite are the dominant secondary Fe (hydr)oxides (30 mol% Fe each). At intermediate distances from the inlet, green rust is not observed and the proportion of magnetite decreases from approximately 30 to <10%. Across this same transect, the proportion of goethite increases from undetectable up to >50%. At greater distances from the advective-diffusive boundary, goethite is the dominant phase, comprising between 40 and 95% of the Fe. In the presence of magnetite, lepidocrocite forms as a transient-intermediate phase during ferrihydrite-to-goethite conversion; in the absence of magnetite, conversion to goethite is more limited. These experimental observations, coupled with results of reactive transport modeling, confirm the conceptual model and illustrate the potential importance of diffusion-generated concentration gradients in

  13. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide by carbon monoxide over iron oxide supported on activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The selective reduction of sulfur dioxide with carbon monoxide to elemental sulfur was studied over AC-supported transition-metal oxide catalysts. According to the study, Fe2O3/AC was the most active catalyst among the 4 AC-supported catalysts tested. By using Fe2O3/AC, the best catalyst, when the feed conditions were properly optimized (CO/SO2 molar ratio = 2:1; sulfidation temperature, 400 °C; Fe content, 20 wt%; GHSV = 7000 mL g-1 h-1), 95.43% sulfur dioxide conversion and 86.59% sulfur yi...

  14. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  15. 硫酸烧渣加压浸取铁%Pressure Reduction Leaching Iron from Sulfate Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金程; 王恩强; 李登新

    2011-01-01

    Ferric iron was reduction leached from sulfate slag with sulfide agent. Effects of the following factors on leaching were studied, such as, dosage of additives, sulfuric acid consumption, initial sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, stirring speed, and reaction time. The results show that iron leaching rate reaches 99. 4%, efficiency of additive usage reaches 98. 9% on the following conditions: surplus coefficient of leaching agent is 1. 1, surplus coefficient of sulfuric acid is 1. 4, 3. 5 mol/L initial sulfuric acid concentration with 800 r/min stirring rate, 95 °C? 3 h.%采用自制硫化物助浸剂在密闭反应釜中还原浸出硫酸烧渣中的铁.分别进行了助浸剂用量、硫酸用量、始酸浓度、反应温度、搅拌速度、反应时间等条件试验,考察各因素对浸取效果的影响.结果表明:当酸浸渣25.0 g,助浸剂过剩系数1.1,硫酸过剩系数1.4,始酸浓度3.5 mol/L,反应温度95℃,搅拌速度800 r/min,反应时间3h时,铁浸取率达99.4%,助浸剂有效利用率达98.9%.

  16. Simultaneous adsorption and reduction of U(VI) on reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zerovalent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yubing [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Wang, Xiangke, E-mail: xkwang@ipp.ac.cn [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sorption and in-situ reduction of U(VI) is observed. • The composites are more effective for U(VI) removal and solidification. • The inner-sphere surface complexes are observed. - Abstract: The reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were synthesized by chemical deposition method and were characterized by SEM, high resolution TEM, Raman and potentiometric acid-base titrations. The characteristic results showed that the nZVI nanoparticles can be uniformly dispersed on the surface of rGO. The removal of U(VI) on nZVI/rGO composites as a function of contact time, pH and U(VI) initial concentration was investigated by batch technique. The removal kinetics of U(VI) on nZVI and nZVI/rGO were well simulated by a pseudo-first-order kinetic model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. The presence of rGO on nZVI nanoparticles increased the reaction rate and removal capacity of U(VI) significantly, which was attributed to the chemisorbed OH{sup −} groups of rGO and the massive enrichment of Fe{sup 2+} on rGO surface by XPS analysis. The XRD analysis revealed that the presence of rGO retarded the transformation of iron corrosion products from magnetite/maghemite to lepidocrocite. According to the fitting of EXAFS spectra, the U-C (at ∼2.9 Å) and U-Fe (at ∼3.2 Å) shells were observed, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes on nZVI/rGO composites. Therefore, the nZVI/rGO composites can be suitable as efficient materials for the in-situ remediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater in the environmental pollution management.

  17. Iron(III) Chloride mediated reduction of Bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl)amide to an Amide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rojalin Sahu; Papuli Chaliha; Vadivelu Manivannan

    2016-01-01

    In methanol, FeCl3 reacted readily with L1H (L1H = bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl)amide) and afforded a complex having the formula [Fe(L2)Cl2] (1) {L2− = -((1-isoquinolyl)(methoxy)methyl)isoquinoline-1-carboxamide ion}. This reaction involves reduction of one of the two carbonyl groups present in L1H to (methoxy)methyl group. A plausible mechanism for the conversion of L1H to L2− has been proposed. Determination of molecular structure of 1 confirmed this conversion. Fe(III) ion is surrounded by three nitrogen atoms of the ligand and two chloride ions, imparting a rare distorted trigonal bipyramidal N3Cl2 coordination environment.

  18. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefinejad Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X΂, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05. A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them.

  19. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  20. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 over iron-cerium-tungsten mixed oxide catalyst prepared by different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhi-bo; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Fei; Liu, Dun-yu; Lu, Wei; Jin, Jing; Ding, Shi-fa

    2017-06-01

    A series of magnetic Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz catalysts were synthesized by three different methods(Co-precipitation(Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-CP), Hydrothermal treatment assistant critic acid sol-gel method(Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-HT) and Microwave irradiation assistant critic acid sol-gel method(Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW)), and the catalytic activity was evaluated for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, XPS, H2-TPR and NH3-TPD. Among the tested catalysts, Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW shows the highest NOx conversion over per gram in unit time with NOx conversion of 60.8% at 350 °C under a high gas hourly space velocity of 1,200,000 ml/(g h). Different from Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-CP catalyst, there exists a large of iron oxide crystallite(γ-Fe2O3 and α-Fe2O3) scattered in Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz catalysts prepared through hydrothermal treatment or microwave irradiation assistant critic acid sol-gel method, and higher iron atomic concentration on their surface. And Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW shows higher surface absorbed oxygen concentration and better dispersion compared with Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-HT catalyst. These features were favorable for the high catalytic performance of NO reduction with NH3 over Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW catalyst.

  1. Incorporation of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles inside the channels of SBA-15 silica rods by a “two solvents” reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xia [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lian yungang 222005 (China); Yu, Hongxia; Zheng, Da [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang, Xuesong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lian yungang 222005 (China); Li, Jiansheng, E-mail: lijsh@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang, Lianjun, E-mail: wanglj@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-08-15

    A new reduction method named a “two solvents” reduction technique was developed for incorporation of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVIs) inside the channels of SBA-15 silica rods under mild conditions. The resulting NZVIs/SBA-15 composites were compared with the ones prepared by the conventional liquid phase reduction method in structure, morphology and reactivity. All the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and all-direct-reading plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall zero-valent iron particles were synthesized and well dispersed in the mesopores of SBA-15 silica rods by the new reduction technique, whereas larger iron particles were supported and aggregated on the surface of the silica rods by conventional reduction method. Batch experiment demonstrated that NZVIs incorporated inside the silica channels had higher reactivity for the removal of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution than those supported on the surface.

  2. Chemical reduction synthesis and ac field effect of iron based core-shell magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Bonder, Michael J.; Hadjipanayis, George C.

    2009-12-01

    High magnetization nanoparticles coated with a biocompatible polymer have attracted considerable interest in recent times as potential materials for biomedical applications associated with targeted drug delivery, detection and the treatment of cancer. This paper considers the use of sodium borohydride reduction of metal salts to form Fe based nanoparticles coated with carboxyl terminated polyethylene glycol (cPEG). By mixing the reactants in a Y-junction, the synthesis produces uniform nanoparticles in the size range 10-20 nm with a core-shell structure. The particles are subsequently coated with a 1-3 nm thick layer of cPEG. These nanoparticles are soft ferromagnets with Hc = 400 Oe. Exciting these nanoparticles with a 4 Oe, 500 kHz alternating magnetic field leads to particle heating with a maximal increase in the saturation temperature as the particle size is decreased. For the largest particles considered here, the temperature reaches 35 °C with a 10 mg sample mass whilst for the smallest nanoparticles considered the temperature exceeds 40 °C.

  3. Iron oxide nanocomposite magnets produced by partial reduction of strontium hexaferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikkanen Jussi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Isotropic bulk nanocomposite permanent magnets were produced with strontium hexaferrite, SrO·6Fe2O3, and magnetite, Fe3O4, as the magnetically hard and soft components. A novels synthesis scheme based on the partial reduction of SrO·6Fe2O3 was employed. In two parallel experiments, nano- and microcrystalline SrO·6Fe2O3 particles were compacted into pellets along with a controlled, understoichiometric amount of potato starch as a reducing agent. The pellets were then sintered in a passive atmosphere. Based on XRD and room temperature magnetic hysteresis measurements, it was concluded that a fraction of the SrO·6Fe2O3 input material had been reduced into Fe3O4. In comparison with pure SrO·6Fe2O3 control pellets, these composites exhibited maximum energy product increases in excess of 5 % due to remanence boosting. The improvement of magnetic properties was attributed to an efficient exchange spring coupling between the magnetic phases. Interestingly, as the synthesis scheme also worked for microcrystalline SrO·6Fe2O3 , the method could presumably be adapted to yield crystallographically oriented bulk nanocomposite magnets.

  4. Increased endogenous DNA oxidation correlates to increased iron levels in melanocytes relative to keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelle, Edward; Huang, Xi; Zhang, Qi; Pernodet, Nadine; Yarosh, Daniel B; Frenkel, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous oxidative state of normal human epidermal melanocytes was investigated and compared to normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) in order to gain new insight into melanocyte biology. Previously, we showed that NHEKs contain higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than melanocytes and that it can migrate from NHEKs to melanocytes by passive permeation. Nevertheless, despite lower concentrations of H2O2, we now report higher levels of oxidative DNA in melanocytes as indicated by increased levels of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG): 4.49 (±0.55 SEM) 8-oxo-dG/10(6) dG compared to 1.49 (±0.11 SEM) 8-oxo-dG/10(6) dG for NHEKs. An antioxidant biomarker, glutathione (GSH), was also lower in melanocytes (3.14 nmoles (±0.15 SEM)/cell) in comparison to NHEKs (5.98 nmoles (±0.33 SEM)/cell). Intriguingly, cellular bioavailable iron as measured in ferritin was found to be nearly fourfold higher in melanocytes than in NHEKs. Further, ferritin levels in melanocytes were also higher than in hepatocarcinoma cells, an iron-rich cell, and it indicates that higher relative iron levels may be characteristic of melanocytes. To account for the increased oxidative DNA and lower GSH and H2O2 levels that we observe, we propose that iron may contribute to higher levels of oxidation by reacting with H2O2 through a Fenton reaction leading to the generation of DNA-reactive hydroxyl radicals. In conclusion, our data support the concept of elevated oxidation and high iron levels as normal parameters of melanocytic activity. We present new evidence that may contribute to our understanding of the melanogenic process and lead to the development of new skin care products.

  5. Reduction of Thyroxine and Related Compounds on Silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    cathodic stripping . Stripping voltammetry in d flow system is feasible and sensitive, has been employed by Wang L17,18] and others [19] in flow injection...oxidation peak and cathodic stripping peak due to the presence of iodide ions in the region of the electrode as a product of the reduction of T4 is seen...oxidation, chemical or electrochemical, to iodine with spectroscopic detection, and (d) stripping voltammetry of iodide on a silver electrode. For liquid

  6. Effect of phytate reduction of sorghum, through genetic modification, on iron and zinc availability as assessed by an in vitro dialysability bioaccessibility assay, Caco-2 cell uptake assay, and suckling rat pup absorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Johanita; Taylor, John R N; Du, Xiaogu; De Moura, Fabiana F; Lönnerdal, Bo; Oelofse, André

    2013-11-15

    Improved iron and zinc availability from sorghum, a commonly consumed staple, will benefit many malnourished communities in rural Africa burdened with high prevalence of iron and zinc deficiency. This research compared the effect of genetic phytate reduction in sorghum on iron and zinc bioaccessibility and uptake measured by in vitro dialysability and Caco-2 cell uptake assays to that of iron and zinc absorption measured by a suckling rat pup model. The phytate reduction (80-86%) in these sorghums significantly increased zinc availability. The Caco-2 cell method, but not the dialysability assay, proved useful in estimating zinc absorption. The measured increase in iron availability differed between the methods, possibly due to the effect of varying mineral (Ca, Fe, Zn, P) contents of the sorghums. This effect was most prominent in the iron uptake results. More research is needed to determine the effect of naturally occurring variations in mineral contents of sorghum on the iron uptake by Caco-2 cells.

  7. Biochar increases arsenic release from an anaerobic paddy soil due to enhanced microbial reduction of iron and arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Xue, Xi-Mei; Juhasz, Albert L; Chang, Zhi-Zhou; Li, Hong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biochar enhances microbial reduction of iron (Fe) oxyhydroxide under anaerobic incubation. However, there is a lack of data on its influence on arsenic (As) release from As-contaminated paddy soils. In this study, paddy soil slurries (120 mg As kg(-1)) were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 60 days with and without the addition of biochar (3%, w/w) prepared from rice straw at 500 °C. Arsenic release, Fe reduction, and As fractionation were determined at 1, 10, 20, 30, and 60 d, while Illumina sequencing and real-time PCR were used to characterize changes in soil microbial community structure and As transformation function genes. During the first month of incubation, As released into soil solution increased sharply from 27.9 and 55.9 to 486 and 630 μg kg(-1) in unamended and biochar amended slurries, with inorganic trivalent As (As(III)) being the dominant specie (52.7-91.0% of total As). Compared to unamended slurries, biochar addition increased As and ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) concentrations in soil solution but decreased soil As concentration in the amorphous Fe/Al oxide fraction (F3). Difference in released As between biochar and unamended treatments (ΔAs) increased with incubation time, showing strong linear relationships (R(2) = 0.23-0.33) with ΔFe(2+) and ΔF3, confirming increased As release due to enhanced Fe reduction. Biochar addition increased the abundance of Fe reducing bacteria such as Clostridum (27.3% vs. 22.7%), Bacillus (3.34% vs. 2.39%), and Caloramator (4.46% vs. 3.88%). In addition, copy numbers in biochar amended slurries of respiratory As reducing (arrA) and detoxifying reducing genes (arsC) increased 19.0 and 1.70 fold, suggesting microbial reduction of pentavalent As (As(V)) adsorbed on Fe oxides to As(III), further contributing to increased As release.

  8. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in China’s and India’s iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., China’s, and India’s iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are

  9. Nitrate reduction by mixed iron(II-III) hydroxycarbonate green rust in the presence of phosphate anions: the key parameters influencing the ammonium selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etique, Marjorie; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Carteret, Cédric; Ruby, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The reduction of nitrate anions by a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) carbonated green rust (GR) in aqueous medium is studied as a function of the initial pH and the initial concentrations of iron, phosphate and nitrate. The influence of these parameters on the fraction of nitrate removed and the production of ammonium is investigated by the help of statistical experimental designs. The goal is to determine experimental conditions that maximize the fraction of NO3(-) removed and concomitantly minimize the production of NH4(+). Increasing the phosphate concentration relatively to the initial Fe(II) concentration inhibits the reduction of nitrate probably due to a surface saturation of the lateral sites of the GR crystals. The kinetics of the reaction is greatly enhanced by increasing the initial pH at 10.5, however it leads to a global increase of the NH4(+) production. A partial saturation of the surface sites by phosphate leads to a global decrease of selectivity of the reaction towards ammonium. The evolution of the ratio of the NH4(+) concentration to the Fe(II) concentration confirms that the NO3(-) species are only partially transformed into ammonium. Interestingly at an initial pH of 7.5, the selectivity of the reaction towards NH4(+) is often lower than ∼30%. The reduction of nitrate by carbonated GR differs from the behavior of other GRs incorporating Cl(-), F(-) and SO4(2-) anions that fully transform nitrate into ammonium. Finally, if GR is intended to be used during a passive water denitrification process, complementary dephosphatation and ammonium treatments should be considered.

  10. Iron Supplementation Reverses the Reduction of Hydroxymethylcytosine in Hepatic DNA Associated With Chronic Alcohol Consumption in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammen, Stephanie A.; Park, Jung Eun; Shin, Phil Kyung; Friso, Simonetta; Chung, Jayong; Choi, Sang-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol is known to affect two epigenetic phenomena, DNA methylation and DNA hydroxymethylation, and iron is a cofactor of ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes that catalyze the conversion from methylcytosine to hydroxymethylcytosine. In the present study we aimed to determine the effects of alcohol on DNA hydroxymethylation and further effects of iron on alcohol associated epigenetic changes. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either Lieber-DeCarli alcohol diet (36% calories from ethanol) or Lieber-DeCarli control diet along with or without iron supplementation (0.6% carbonyl iron) for 8 weeks. Hepatic non-heme iron concentrations were measured by colorimetric assays. Protein levels of hepatic ferritin and transferrin receptor were determined by Western blotting. Methylcytosine, hydroxymethylcytosine and unmodified cytosine in DNA were simultaneously measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method. Results Iron supplementation significantly increased hepatic non-heme iron contents (P iron significantly increased hepatic ferritin levels and decreased hepatic transferrin receptor levels (P iron supplementation to alcohol diet did not change DNA hydroxymethylation. There was no significant difference in methylcytosine levels, while unmodified cytosine levels were significantly increased in alcohol-fed groups compared to control (95.61% ± 0.08% vs. 95.26% ± 0.12%, P = 0.03), suggesting that alcohol further increases the conversion from hydroxymethylcytosine to unmodified cytosine. Conclusions Chronic alcohol consumption alters global DNA hydroxymethylation in the liver but iron supplementation reverses the epigenetic effect of alcohol. PMID:28053961

  11. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe3C and Co3C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe3C, and Co3C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  12. Design of Iron(II) Phthalocyanine-Derived Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts for High-Power-Density Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Gokhale, Rohan; Mecheri, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Licoccia, Silvia; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2017-08-24

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) deposited onto two different carbonaceous supports was synthesized through an unconventional pyrolysis-free method. The obtained materials were studied in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in neutral media through incorporation in an air-breathing cathode structure and tested in an operating microbial fuel cell (MFC) configuration. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) analysis revealed high performances of the Fe-based catalysts compared with that of activated carbon (AC). The FePc supported on Black-Pearl carbon black [Fe-BP(N)] exhibits the highest performance in terms of its more positive onset potential, positive shift of the half-wave potential, and higher limiting current as well as the highest power density in the operating MFC of (243±7) μW cm(-2) , which was 33 % higher than that of FePc supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNT(N); 182±5 μW cm(-2) ). The power density generated by Fe-BP(N) was 92 % higher than that of the MFC utilizing AC; therefore, the utilization of platinum group metal-free catalysts can boost the performances of MFCs significantly. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Graphene oxide nanoplatforms to enhance catalytic performance of iron phthalocyanine for oxygen reduction reaction in bioelectrochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa de Oliveira, Maida Aysla; Mecheri, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Placidi, Ernesto; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Valentini, Federica; Perandini, Alessando; Valentini, Veronica; Licoccia, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    We report the development of electrocatalysts based on iron phthalocyanine (FePc) supported on graphene oxide (GO), obtained by electrochemical oxidation of graphite in aqueous solution of LiCl, LiClO4, and NaClO4. Structure, surface chemistry, morphology, and thermal stability of the prepared materials were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at neutral pH was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrate that the oxidation degree of GO supports affects the overall catalytic activity of FePc/GO, due to a modulation effect of the interaction between FePc and the basal plane of GO. On the basis of electrochemical, spectroscopic, and morphological investigations, FePc/GO_LiCl was selected to be assembled at the cathode side of a microbial fuel cell prototype, demonstrating a good electrochemical performance in terms of voltage and power generation.

  14. Efficient sorption and reduction of U(VI) on zero-valent iron-polyaniline-graphene aerogel ternary composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; Feng, Shaojie; Zhao, Donglin; Chen, Shaohua; Li, Feifei; Chen, Changlun

    2017-03-15

    In this work, zero-valent iron-polyaniline-graphene aerogel composite (Fe-PANI-GA) was prepared and applied in the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions by batch sorption experiments. The experimental results showed that the Fe-PANI-GA composite had an excellent removal capacity for the removal of U(VI) in acidic solutions. The results also showed that the maximum removal capacity of the Fe-PANI-GA toward U(VI) was 350.47mg/g at pH 5.5. The sorption kinetics data were well-described by pseudo-second-order. The sorption isotherms of U(VI) fitted well with Langmuir isotherm and exhibited better removal efficiency with the increase of temperature. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔS, ΔH) indicated that the sorption of U(VI) on the Fe-PANI-GA was an endothermic and spontaneous process. Moreover, removal mechanisms were studied based on the results of XRD, FTIR and XPS. Both U(VI) sorption and partially reductive precipitation of U(VI) to U(IV) contributed to the removal of U(VI) on Fe-PANI-GA. Therefore, Fe-PANI-GA was an economic and effective material for the removal of uranium from nuclear waste in practical application.

  15. Biologically inspired highly durable iron phthalocyanine catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenmu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew C; Llanos, Bernard G; Chen, Zhongwei

    2010-12-08

    In the present work, we have designed and synthesized a new highly durable iron phtalocyanine based nonprecious oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst (Fe-SPc) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The Fe-SPc, with a novel structure inspired by that of naturally occurring oxygen activation catalysts, is prepared by a nonpyrolyzing method, allowing adequate control of the atomic structure and surface properties of the material. Significantly improved ORR stability of the Fe-SPc is observed compared with the commercial Fe-Pc catalysts. The Fe-SPc has similar activity to that of the commercial Fe-Pc initially, while the Fe-SPc displays 4.6 times higher current density than that of the commercial Fe-Pc after 10 sweep potential cycles, and a current density that is 7.4 times higher after 100 cycles. This has been attributed to the incorporation of electron-donating functional groups, along with a high degree of steric hindrance maintaining active site isolation. Nonprecious Fe-SPc is promising as a potential alternative ORR electrocatalyst for PEMFCs.

  16. Iron Deficiency Anemia Coexists with Cancer Related Anemia and Adversely Impacts Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Sawhney, Ritica; Varghese, Jeeva; Britto, Madonna; Shet, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related anemia (CRA) adversely affects patient Quality of Life (QoL) and overall survival. We prospectively studied the prevalence, etiology and the impact of anemia on QoL in 218 Indian cancer patients attending a tertiary referral hospital. The study used the sTfR/log Ferritin index to detect iron deficiency anemia and assessed patient QoL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) tool, standardized for language. Mean patient age was 51±13 years and 60% were female. The prevalence of cancer related anemia in this setting was 64% (n = 139). As expected, plasma ferritin did not differ significantly between anemic (n = 121) and non-anemic cancer patients (n = 73). In contrast, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in anemic cancer patients compared to non-anemic cancer patients (31 nmol/L vs. 24 nmol/L, p = 0.002). Among anemic cancer patients, using the sTfR/log Ferritin index, we found that 60% (n = 83) had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Interestingly, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in cancer patients with CRA+IDA (n = 83) compared with patients having CRA (n = 38) alone (39 nmol/L vs. 20 nmol/L, p<0.001). There was a significant linear correlation between Hb and QoL (Spearman ρ = 0.21; p = 0.001) and multivariate regression analysis revealed that every gram rise in Hb was accompanied by a 3.1 unit increase in the QoL score (95% CI = 0.19–5.33; p = 0.003). The high prevalence of anemia in cancer patients, a major portion of which is due to iron deficiency anemia, the availability of sensitive and specific biomarkers of iron status to detect IDA superimposed on anemia of inflammation, suggests an urgent need to diagnose and treat such patients. Despite the potential negative consequences of increasing metabolically available plasma iron in cancer, our clinical data suggest that detecting and treating IDA in anemic cancer patients will have important consequences to their QoL and overall survival. Clinical

  17. Synthesis of high intrinsic loss power aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted hydrothermal-reduction route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behdadfar, Behshid; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Mozaffari, Morteza

    2012-03-01

    Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticle were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The results showed that certain concentrations of citric acid (CA) are required to obtain only magnetic iron oxides with mean particle sizes around 8 nm. CA acts as a modulator and reducing agent in iron oxide formation which controls nanoparticle size. The XRD, magnetic and heating measurements showed that the temperature and time of hydrothermal reaction can affect the magnetic properties of obtained ferrofluids. The synthesized ferrofluids were stable at pH 7. Their mean hydrodynamic size was around 80 nm with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.158. The calculated intrinsic loss power (ILP) was 9.4 nHm2/kg. So this clean and cheap route is an efficient way to synthesize high ILP aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia.

  18. Age-related iron deposition in the basal ganglia of controls and Alzheimer disease patients quantified using susceptibility weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Li, Yan-Ying; Luo, Jian-Hua; Li, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate age-related iron deposition changes in healthy subjects and Alzheimer disease patients using susceptibility weighted imaging. The study recruited 182 people, including 143 healthy volunteers and 39 Alzheimer disease patients. All underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging and susceptibility weighted imaging sequences. The groups were divided according to age. Phase images were used to investigate iron deposition in the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, and the angle radian value was calculated. We hypothesized that age-related iron deposition changes may be different between Alzheimer disease patients and controls of the same age, and that susceptibility weighted imaging would be a more sensitive method of iron deposition quantification. The results revealed that iron deposition in the globus pallidus increased with age, up to 40 years. In the head of the caudate nucleus, iron deposition peaked at 60 years. There was a general increasing trend with age in the putamen, up to 50-70 years old. There was significant difference between the control and Alzheimer disease groups in the bilateral globus pallidus in both the 60-70 and 70-80 year old group comparisons. In conclusion, iron deposition increased with age in the globus pallidus, the head of the caudate nucleus and putamen, reaching a plateau at different ages. Furthermore, comparisons between the control and Alzheimer disease group revealed that iron deposition changes were more easily detected in the globus pallidus. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deferasirox and deferiprone remove cardiac iron in the iron-overloaded gerbil

    Science.gov (United States)

    WOOD, JOHN C.; OTTO-DUESSEL, MAYA; GONZALEZ, IGNACIO; AGUILAR, MICHELLE I.; SHIMADA, HIRO; NICK, HANSPETER; NELSON, MARVIN; MOATS, REX

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Deferasirox effectively controls liver iron concentration; however, little is known regarding its ability to remove stored cardiac iron. Deferiprone seems to have increased cardiac efficacy compared with traditional deferoxamine therapy. Therefore, the relative efficacy of deferasirox and deferiprone were compared in removing cardiac iron from iron-loaded gerbils. Methods Twenty-nine 8- to 10-week-old female gerbils underwent 10 weekly iron dextran injections of 200 mg/kg/week. Prechelation iron levels were assessed in 5 animals, and the remainder received deferasirox 100 mg/kg/D po QD (n = 8), deferiprone 375 mg/kg/D po divided TID (n = 8), or sham chelation (n = 8), 5 days/week for 12 weeks. Results Deferasirox reduced cardiac iron content 20.5%. No changes occurred in cardiac weight, myocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, or weight-to-dry weight ratio. Deferasirox treatment reduced liver iron content 51%. Deferiprone produced comparable reductions in cardiac iron content (18.6% reduction). Deferiprone-treated hearts had greater mass (16.5% increase) and increased myocyte hypertrophy. Deferiprone decreased liver iron content 24.9% but was associated with an increase in liver weight and water content. Conclusion Deferasirox and deferiprone were equally effective in removing stored cardiac iron in a gerbil animal model, but deferasirox removed more hepatic iron for a given cardiac iron burden. PMID:17145573

  20. Relative Error Model Reduction via Time-Weighted Balanced Stochastic Singular Perturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    A new mixed method for relative error model reduction of linear time invariant (LTI) systems is proposed in this paper. This order reduction technique is mainly based upon time-weighted balanced stochastic model reduction method and singular perturbation model reduction technique. Compared...... to the other analogous counterparts, the proposed method shows to provide more accurate results in terms of time weighted norms when applied to the practical examples. It is shown that important properties of the time-weighted stochastic balanced reduction technique are extended to the mixed reduction method...

  1. Meat and haem iron intake in relation to glioma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Heather A; Gayle, Alicia; Jakszyn, Paula; Merritt, Melissa; Melin, Beatrice; Freisling, Heinz; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Kyrozis, Andreas; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Mattiello, Amalia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Quirós, José Ramón; Agudo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Larrañaga, Nerea; Huerta, José M; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sonestedt, Emily; Drake, Isabel; Sandström, Maria; Travis, Ruth C; Ferrari, Pietro; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J

    2016-11-11

    Diets high in red or processed meat have been associated positively with some cancers, and several possible underlying mechanisms have been proposed, including iron-related pathways. However, the role of meat intake in adult glioma risk has yielded conflicting findings because of small sample sizes and heterogeneous tumour classifications. The aim of this study was to examine red meat, processed meat and iron intake in relation to glioma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. In this prospective cohort study, 408 751 individuals from nine European countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine intake of red meat, processed meat, total dietary iron and haem iron in relation to incident glioma. During an average follow-up of 14.1 years, 688 incident glioma cases were diagnosed. There was no evidence that any of the meat variables (red, processed meat or subtypes of meat) or iron (total or haem) were associated with glioma; results were unchanged when the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded. This study suggests that there is no association between meat or iron intake and adult glioma. This is the largest prospective analysis of meat and iron in relation to glioma and as such provides a substantial contribution to a limited and inconsistent literature.

  2. Symmetry reduction related with nonlocal symmetry for Gardner equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Based on the truncated Painlevé method or the Möbious (conformal) invariant form, the nonlocal symmetry for the (1+1)-dimensional Gardner equation is derived. The nonlocal symmetry can be localized to the Lie point symmetry by introducing one new dependent variable. Thanks to the localization procedure, the finite symmetry transformations are obtained by solving the initial value problem of the prolonged systems. Furthermore, by using the symmetry reduction method to the enlarged systems, many explicit interaction solutions among different types of solutions such as solitary waves, rational solutions, Painlevé II solutions are given. Especially, some special concrete soliton-cnoidal interaction solutions are analyzed both in analytical and graphical ways.

  3. Quantifying child mortality reductions related to measles vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study characterizes the historical relationship between coverage of measles containing vaccines (MCV and mortality in children under 5 years, with a view toward ongoing global efforts to reduce child mortality. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using country-level, longitudinal panel data, from 44 countries over the period 1960-2005, we analyzed the relationship between MCV coverage and measles mortality with (1 logistic regressions for no measles deaths in a country-year, and (2 linear regressions for the logarithm of the measles death rate. All regressions allowed a flexible, non-linear relationship between coverage and mortality. Covariates included birth rate, death rates from other causes, percent living in urban areas, population density, per-capita GDP, use of the two-dose MCV, year, and mortality coding system. Regressions used lagged covariates, country fixed effects, and robust standard errors clustered by country. The likelihood of no measles deaths increased nonlinearly with higher MCV coverage (ORs: 13.8 [1.6-122.7] for 80-89% to 40.7 [3.2-517.6] for ≥95%, compared to pre-vaccination risk levels. Measles death rates declined nonlinearly with higher MCV coverage, with benefits accruing more slowly above 90% coverage. Compared to no coverage, predicted average reductions in death rates were -79% at 70% coverage, -93% at 90%, and -95% at 95%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: 40 years of experience with MCV vaccination suggests that extremely high levels of vaccination coverage are needed to produce sharp reductions in measles deaths. Achieving sustainable benefits likely requires a combination of extended vaccine programs and supplementary vaccine efforts.

  4. Blood iron stores reduction affects lipoprotein status – a potential benefit of blood donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoj Jadrić

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the lipoprotein proile of voluntary blood donors, and on the basis of parameters to evaluate the risk of atherosclerosis. Methods The study included voluntary blood donors of both sexes. Participants were divided into two groups. The irst group of subjects consisted of men and women in menopause (BD1. Thesecond group consisted of women in reproductive age (BD2. Analysisof concentration of lipoproteins was performed by direct determination of total cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C. From the totalserum cholesterol and concentration of lipoproteins ratios of totalcholesterol/ HDL-C ratio and LDL-C/HDL-C were calculated. Results Signiicantly higher concentration of LDL-C was obtained in the serum of BD 1, compared to LDL-C in the serum of BD 2, within the reference range. Mean concentration of HDL-C in the serum of BD 2 group was higher than the values measured in the BD group 1, without signiicant difference. The ratio of total cholesterol / HDL-C showed signiicantly higher values in the BD 1 group compared with results in the BD 2 group. Signiicantly higher values in the BD group 1 were observed for the ratio of LDL-C/HDL-C. Obtained results showed that all voluntary blood donors had a concentration of individual lipoprotein fractions in a lower risk range for atherosclerosis development. Conclusion Female voluntary blood donors in reproductive age have a more favorable lipid status in relation to the voluntary blood donors, men and women in menopause, indicating that this population of women is exposed to lower risk of developing atherosclerosis.

  5. Inhibition of nitrate reduction by NaCl adsorption on a nano-zero-valent iron surface during a concentrate treatment for water reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, Dogun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been considered as a possible material to treat water and wastewater. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in different types of target water. In this study, different effects depending on the sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration on reductions of nitrates and on the characteristics of NZVI were investigated. Although NaCl is known as a promoter of iron corrosion, a high concentration of NaCl (>3 g/L) has a significant inhibition effect on the degree of NZVI reactivity towards nitrate. The experimental results were interpreted by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson reaction in terms of inhibition, and the decreased NZVI reactivity could be explained by the increase in the inhibition constant. As a result of a chloride concentration analysis, it was verified that 7.7-26.5% of chloride was adsorbed onto the surface of NZVI. Moreover, the change of the iron corrosion product under different NaCl concentrations was investigated by a surface analysis of spent NZVI. Magnetite was the main product, with a low NaCl concentration (0.5 g/L), whereas amorphous iron hydroxide was observed at a high concentration (12 g/L). Though the surface was changed to permeable iron hydroxide, the Fe(0) in the core was not completely oxidized. Therefore, the inhibition effect of NaCl could be explained as the competitive adsorption of chloride and nitrate.

  6. New insights into transfusion-related iron toxicity: Implications for the oncologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porter, J.B.; Witte, T.J. de; Cappellini, M.D.; Gattermann, N.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload is a potentially life-threatening consequence of multiple red-blood-cell transfusions. Here, we review factors affecting excess iron distribution and its damage to specific tissues, as well as mechanisms of oncogenesis by iron. Although consequences of transfusional iron overload are b

  7. Relative Error Model Reduction via Time-Weighted Balanced Stochastic Singular Perturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    A new mixed method for relative error model reduction of linear time invariant (LTI) systems is proposed in this paper. This order reduction technique is mainly based upon time-weighted balanced stochastic model reduction method and singular perturbation model reduction technique. Compared...... by using the concept and properties of the reciprocal systems. The results are further illustrated by two practical numerical examples: a model of CD player and a model of the atmospheric storm track....

  8. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  9. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD’s acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  10. Haematological and iron-related parameters in male and female athletes according to different metabolic energy demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Radoje; Martinovic, Jelena; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Dopsaj, Violeta

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the iron-related haematological parameters in both male and female athletes participating in different sporting disciplines necessitating different metabolic energy demands. A total of 873 athletes (514 males, mean age: 22.08 ± 4.95 years and 359 females, mean age: 21.38 ± 3.88 years) were divided according to gender and to the predominant energy system required for participation in sport (aerobic, anaerobic or mixed) and haematological and iron-related parameters were measured. For both male and female athletes, significant differences related to the predominant energy system were found at a general level: male (Wilks' λ = 0.798, F = 3.047, p iron and sTfR significantly differed in all three groups of male and female athletes (p athletes was significantly higher only in those who required an anaerobic energy source (p athletes. According to the ferritin cutoff value of 22 μg/L, in females, whole body iron, sTfR and hypochromic erythrocytes were significantly higher in all three groups of athletes than those below the aforementioned cutoff value (p iron proved to be reliable parameters for monitoring the dynamics of iron metabolism and could contribute to successful iron-deficiency prevention.

  11. Relative bioavailability of iron and folic acid from a new powdered supplement compared to a traditional tablet in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Deborah L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficiencies of iron and folic acid during pregnancy can lead to adverse outcomes for the fetus, thus supplements are recommended. Adherence to current tablet-based supplements is documented to be poor. Recently a powdered form of micronutrients has been developed which may decrease side-effects and thus improve adherence. However, before testing the efficacy of the supplement as an alternate choice for supplementation during pregnancy, the bioavailability of the iron needs to be determined. Our objective was to measure the relative bioavailability of iron and folic acid from a powdered supplement that can be sprinkled on semi-solid foods or beverages versus a traditional tablet supplement in pregnant women. Methods Eighteen healthy pregnant women (24 – 32 weeks gestation were randomized to receive the supplements in a crossover design. Following ingestion of each supplement, the changes (over baseline in serum iron and folate over 8 hours were determined. The powdered supplement contained 30 mg of iron as micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate with an emulsifier coating and 600 μg folic acid; the tablet contained 27 mg iron from ferrous fumarate and 1000 μg folic acid. Results Overall absorption of iron from the powdered supplement was significantly lower than the tablet (p = 0.003. There was no difference in the overall absorption of folic acid between supplements. Based on the differences in the area under the curve and doses, the relative bioavailability of iron from powdered supplement was lower than from the tablet (0.22. Conclusion The unexpected lower bioavailability of iron from the powdered supplement is contrary to previously published reports. However, since pills and capsules are known to be poorly accepted by some women during pregnancy, it is reasonable to continue to explore alternative micronutrient delivery systems and forms of iron for this purpose. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00789490

  12. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Anemia, Depletes Serum Iron Storage, and Alters Local Iron-Related and Adult Brain Gene Expression in Male INS-GAS Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Burns

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA affects > 500 million people worldwide, and is linked to impaired cognitive development and function in children. Helicobacter pylori, a class 1 carcinogen, infects about half of the world's population, thus creating a high likelihood of overlapping risk. This study determined the effect of H. pylori infection on iron homeostasis in INS-GAS mice. Two replicates of INS-GAS/FVB male mice (n = 9-12/group were dosed with H. pylori (Hp strain SS1 or sham dosed at 6-9 weeks of age, and were necropsied at 27-29 weeks of age. Hematologic and serum iron parameters were evaluated, as was gene expression in gastric and brain tissues. Serum ferritin was lower in Hp SS1-infected mice than uninfected mice (p < 0.0001. Infected mice had a lower red blood cell count (p<0.0001, hematocrit (p < 0.001, and hemoglobin concentration (p <0.0001 than uninfected mice. Relative expression of gastric hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (Hamp was downregulated in mice infected with Hp SS1 compared to sham-dosed controls (p<0.001. Expression of bone morphogenic protein 4 (Bmp4, a growth factor upstream of hepcidin, was downregulated in gastric tissue of Hp SS1-infected mice (p<0.001. Hp SS1-infected mice had downregulated brain expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (Th (p = 0.02. Expression of iron-responsive genes involved in myelination (myelin basic protein (Mbp and proteolipid protein 2 (Plp2 was downregulated in infected mice (p = 0.001 and p = 0.02. Expression of synaptic plasticity markers (brain derived neurotrophic factor 3 (Bdnf3, Psd95 (a membrane associated guanylate kinase, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1 was also downregulated in Hp SS1-infected mice (p = 0.09, p = 0.04, p = 0.02 respectively. Infection of male INS-GAS mice with Hp SS1, without concurrent dietary iron deficiency, depleted serum ferritin, deregulated gastric and hepatic expression of iron regulatory genes, and altered iron-dependent neural processes. The use of Hp SS

  13. Selective recovery of nickel over iron from a nickel-iron solution using microbial sulfate reduction in a gas-lift bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmans, M.F.M.; Helvoort, van P.J.; Dar, S.; Dopson, M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Process streams with high concentrations of metals and sulfate are characteristic for the mining and metallurgical industries. This study aims to selectively recover nickel from a nickel-iron-containing solution at pH 5.0 using a single stage bioreactor that simultaneously combines low pH sulfate

  14. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wankel, Scott David [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Buchwald, Carolyn [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Hansel, Colleen [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States)

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  15. Iron acquisition and allocation in stramenopile algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A

    2013-05-01

    The essential element iron has a low biological availability in the surface ocean where photosynthetic organisms live. Recent advances in our understanding of iron acquisition mechanisms in brown algae and diatoms (stramenopile algae) show the importance of the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron prior to, or during, transport in the uptake process. The uses of iron in photosynthetic stramenopiles resembles that in other oxygenic organisms, although (with the exception of the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica from an iron-deficient part of the ocean) they lack plastocyanin, instead using cytochrome c 6, This same diatom further economizes genotypically on the use of iron in photosynthesis by decreasing the expression of photosystem I, cytochrome c 6, and the cytochrome b 6 f complex per cell and per photosystem II relative to the coastal Thalassiosira pseudonana; similar changes occur phenotypically in response to iron deficiency in other diatoms such as Phaeodactylum tricornutum. In some diatoms grown under iron-limiting conditions, essentially all of the iron in the cells can be accounted for by the iron occurring in catalytic proteins. However, stramenopiles can store iron. Genomic studies show that pennate, but not centric, diatoms have the iron storage protein ferritin. While Mössbauer and X-ray analysis of (57)Fe-labelled Ectocarpus siliculosus shows iron in an amorphous mineral phase resembling the core of ferritin, the genome shows no protein with significant sequence similarity to ferritin.

  16. Pre-Reduction of Au/Iron Oxide Catalyst for Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reaction Below 150 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fukuda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature water-gas shift reaction (WGS using gold catalyst is expected to be an attractive technique to realize an efficient on-site hydrogen production process. In this paper, Au/Fe3O4 catalysts for promoting the WGS below 150 °C were developed by a preliminary reduction of Au/iron oxide (Fe3+ catalyst utilizing high reactivity of Au nano-particles. The reduction was conducted under a CO, H2, or CO/H2O stream at either 140 or 200 °C, and the effect of reduction conditions on the characteristics of the Au/Fe3O4 catalyst and on the catalytic activity in WGS at 80 °C was investigated. The reaction progress during the pre-reduction treatment was qualitatively analyzed, and it was found that the iron oxide in Au/Fe2O3 calcined at 200 °C was easily reduced to Fe3O4 phase in all reduction conditions. The reduction conditions affected the characteristics of both Au and iron oxide, but all of the reduced catalysts had small Fe3O4 particles of less than 20 nm with Au particles on the surface. The surface area and content of cationic Au were high in the order of CO, H2, CO/H2O, and 140, 200 °C. In the WGS test at 80 °C using the developed catalysts, the activities of the catalysts pre-reduced by CO at 140 or 200 °C and by H2 at 140 °C were very high with 100% CO conversion even at such a low temperature. These results indicated that factors such as higher surface area, crystallized Fe3O4, and cationic Au content contributed to the catalytic activity.

  17. Continuous preparation of nanoscale zero-valent iron using impinging stream-rotating packed bed reactor and their application in reduction of nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Weizhou; Qin, Yuejiao; Luo, Shuai; Feng, Zhirong; Liu, Youzhi

    2017-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was continuously prepared by high-gravity reaction precipitation through a novel impinging stream-rotating packed bed (IS-RPB). Reactant solutions of FeSO4 and NaBH4 were conducted into the IS-RPB with flow rates of 60 L/h and rotating speed of 1000 r/min for the preparation of nZVI. As-prepared nZVI obtained by IS-RPB were quasi-spherical morphology and almost uniformly distributed with a particle size of 10-20 nm. The reactivity of nZVI was estimated by the degradation of 100 ml nitrobenzene (NB) with initial concentration of 250 mg/L. The optimum dosage of nZVI obtained by IS-RPB was 4.0 g/L as the NB could be completely removed within 10 min, which reduced 20% compared with nZVI obtained by stirred tank reactor (STR). The reduction of NB and production of aniline (AN) followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the pseudo-first-order rate constants were 0.0147 and 0.0034 s-1, respectively. Furthermore, the as-prepared nZVI using IS-RPB reactor in this work can be used within a relatively wide range pH of 1-9.

  18. The Deterioration Seen in Myelin Related Morphophysiology in Vanadium Exposed Rats is Partially Protected by Concurrent Iron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usende, Ifukibot Levi; Leitner, Dominque F; Neely, Elizabeth; Connor, James R; Olopade, James O

    2016-08-30

    Oligodendrocyte development and myelination occurs vigorously during the early post natal period which coincides with the period of peak mobilization of iron. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are easily disturbed by any agent that affects iron homeostasis and its assimilation into these cells. Environmental exposure to vanadium, a transition metal can disrupt this iron homeostasis. We investigated the interaction of iron deficiency and vanadium exposure on the myelination infrastructure and its related neurobehavioural phenotypes, and neurocellular profiles in developing rat brains. Control group (C) dams were fed normal diet while Group 2 (V) dams were fed normal diet and pups were injected with 3mg/kg body weight of sodium metavanadate daily from postnatal day (PND) 1-21. Group 3 (I+V) dams were fed iron deficient diet after delivery and pups injected with 3mg/kg body weight sodium metavanadate from PND1-21. Body and brain weights deteriorated in I+V relative to C and V while neurobehavioral deficit occurred more in V. Whereas immunohistochemical staining shows more astrogliosis and microgliosis indicative of neuroinflammation in I+V, more intense OPCs depletion and hypomyelination were seen in the V, and this was partially protected in I+V. In in vitro studies, vanadium induced glial cells toxicity was partially protected only at the LD 50 dose with the iron chelator, desferroxamine. The data indicate that vanadium promotes myelin damage and iron deficiency in combination with vanadium partially protects this neurotoxicological effects of vanadium.

  19. Perception and Homeostatic Control of Iron in the Rhizobia and Related Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient, but it can also be toxic. Therefore, iron homeostasis must be strictly regulated. Transcriptional control of iron-dependent gene expression in the rhizobia and other taxa of the Alphaproteobacteria is fundamentally different from the Fur paradigm in Escherichia coli and other model systems. Rather than sense iron directly, the rhizobia employ the iron response regulator (Irr) to monitor and respond to the status of an iron-dependent process, namely, heme biosynthesis. This novel control mechanism allows iron homeostasis to be integrated with other cellular processes, and it permits differential control of iron regulon genes in a manner not readily achieved by Fur. Moreover, studies of Irr have defined a role for heme in conditional protein stability that has been subsequently described in eukaryotes. Finally, Irr-mediated control of iron metabolism may reflect a cellular strategy that accommodates a greater reliance on manganese.

  20. Effect of Relative Reduction on Property of Steel-Mushy Cu-Graphite Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng ZHANG; Yunhui DU; Hanwu LIU; Daben ZENG; Jianzhong CUI; Limin BA

    2005-01-01

    The rolling treatment of steel-mushy QTi3.5-3.5 graphite composite was conducted under different relative reduction at room temperature. The effect of room-temperature rolling on interfacial mechanical property of steel-mushy QTi3.5-3.5 graphite composite was studied and the relationship between interfacial shear strength and relative reduction was established. The results show that, for steel-mushy QTi3.5-3.5 graphite composite, which consists of 1.2 mm-thick 08Al steel plate and 2.8 mm-thick QTi3.5-3.5 graphite layer, there is a nonlinear relationship between interfacial shear strength and relative reduction in graphite layer. When relative reduction is smaller than 1.1%,interfacial shear strength increases with increasing the relative reduction. When relative reduction is larger than 1.1%, interfacial shear strength decreases with increasing the relative reduction. When relative reduction is 1.1%,the largest interfacial shear strength of 145.2 MPa can be obtained.

  1. 19 CFR 10.198a - Duty reduction for certain leather-related articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duty reduction for certain leather-related... Basin Initiative § 10.198a Duty reduction for certain leather-related articles. Except as otherwise..., flat goods, work gloves, and leather wearing apparel that were not designated on August 5, 1983,...

  2. Neurorescue activity, APP regulation and amyloid-beta peptide reduction by novel multi-functional brain permeable iron- chelating- antioxidants, M-30 and green tea polyphenol, EGCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramovich-Tirosh, Yael; Reznichenko, Lydia; Mit, Tamar; Zheng, Hailin; Fridkin, Mati; Weinreb, Orly; Mandel, Silvia; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2007-09-01

    Accumulation of iron at sites where neurons degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to have a major role in oxidative stress induced process of neurodegeneration. The novel non-toxic lipophilic brain- permeable iron chelators, VK-28 (5- [4- (2- hydroxyethyl) piperazine-1-ylmethyl]- quinoline- 8- ol) and its multi-functional derivative, M-30 (5-[N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline), as well as the main polyphenol constituent of green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which possesses iron metal chelating, radical scavenging and neuroprotective properties, offer potential therapeutic benefits for these diseases. M-30 and EGCG decreased apoptosis of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in a neurorescue, serum deprivation model, via multiple protection mechanisms including: reduction of the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bad and Bax, reduction of apoptosis-associated Ser139 phosphorylated H2A.X and inhibition of the cleavage and activation of caspase-3. M-30 and EGCG also promoted morphological changes, resulting in axonal growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) implicating neuronal differentiation. Both compounds significantly reduced the levels of cellular holo-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in SH-SY5Y cells. The ability of theses novel iron chelators and EGCG to regulate APP are in line with the presence of an iron-responsive element (IRE) in the 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of APP. Also, EGCG reduced the levels of toxic amyloid-beta peptides in CHO cells over-expressing the APP "Swedish" mutation. The diverse molecular mechanisms and cell signaling pathways participating in the neuroprotective/neurorescue and APP regulation/processing actions of M-30 and EGCG, make these multifunctional compounds potential neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD, AD, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  3. Infection structure-specific reductive iron assimilation is required for cell wall integrity and full virulence of the maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarouki, Emad; Deising, Holger B

    2013-06-01

    Ferroxidases are essential components of the high-affinity reductive iron assimilation pathway in fungi. Two ferroxidase genes, FET3-1 and FET3-2, have been identified in the genome of the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. Complementation of growth defects of the ferroxidase-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Δfet3fet4 showed that both Fet3-1 and Fet3-2 of C. graminicola represent functional ferroxidases. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein fusions in yeast and C. graminicola indicated that both ferroxidase proteins localize to the plasma membrane. Transcript abundance of FET3-1 increased dramatically under iron-limiting conditions but those of FET3-2 were hardly detectable. Δfet3-1 and Δfet3-2 single as well as Δfet3-1/2 double-deletion strains were generated. Under iron-sufficient or deficient conditions, vegetative growth rates of these strains did not significantly differ from that of the wild type but Δfet3-1 and Δfet3-1/2 strains showed increased sensitivity to reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, under iron-limiting conditions, appressoria of Δfet3-1 and Δfet3-1/2 strains showed significantly reduced transcript abundance of a class V chitin synthase and exhibited severe cell wall defects. Infection assays on intact and wounded maize leaves, quantitative data of infection structure differentiation, and infection stage-specific expression of FET3-1 showed that reductive iron assimilation is required for appressorial penetration, biotrophic development, and full virulence.

  4. The influence of relative humidity on iron corrosion under proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuerta, S.; Bérerd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Jaffrézic, H.; Crusset, D.; Féron, D.

    2008-03-01

    With regard to the storage for high-level radioactive waste and the reversible period of a geological repository, the influence of proton irradiation on the indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron has been investigated in relation to the relative humidity (RH) in the atmosphere. Irradiation experiments were performed using a 3-MeV extracted proton beam. Relative humidity varies from 0% to 85%. Before and after each irradiation, the surfaces of the sample were characterised by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in order to determine oxygen concentrations in the metal. The maximum oxidation rate was observed for 45% RH in air under proton irradiation and was compared with literature data without irradiation where the maximum oxidation rate was observed at 95% RH. The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model: they are explained by the contrast between the adsorption of O 2 and H 2O species on the active cathodic sites of the iron surface and by the formation of H +(H 2O) n.

  5. Experimental Study on Iron Increase and Silicon Reduction of Some Hematite%某地赤铁矿提铁降硅选矿试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵荣艳; 范娜

    2012-01-01

    针对某地赤铁矿硅含量高的特点,进行了提铁降硅试验研究.采用抑铁浮脉石的单一反浮选工艺流程,使用调整剂氢氧化钠、铁抑制剂淀粉、脉石活化剂HJ、脉石捕收剂TZ33#组合药剂,获得的闭路试验指标为:铁精矿TFe品位65.67%,铁精矿中SiO2含量5.45%,铁回收率88.67%.对铁精矿浓缩脱泥可使铁精矿TFe品位提高2%左右、SiO2含量降低1%左右.%Systematic study on iron increase and silicon reduction was conducted for a hematite with a high silicon. A single reverse flotation process was adoped to depress iron minerals while float gangue,with sodium hydroxide as regulator,starch as iron depressant,HJ as gangue activator and TZ33 as gangue collector. An iron concentrate with a TFe grade of 65. 67% ,an iron recovery of 88. 67% and a silicon content of 5. 45% was obtained. As for the iron concentrate,the TFe grade can be increased by 2% and the SiO2 content can be reduced by 1% with a further thickening and desliming.

  6. Moessbauer studies of frataxin role in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and dysfunction-related disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Serres, Ricardo [Universite Joseph Fourier (France); Clemancey, Martin [CNRS, UMR5249 (France); Oddou, Jean-Louis [Universite Joseph Fourier (France); Pastore, Annalisa [Medical Research Council National Institute for Medical Research (United Kingdom); Lesuisse, Emmanuel [Laboratoire Mitochondries, Metaux et Stress oxydant, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris (France); Latour, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.latour@cea.fr [CEA, iRTSV, LCBM (France)

    2012-03-15

    Friedreich ataxia is a disease that is associated with defects in the gene coding for a small protein frataxin. Several different roles have been proposed for the protein, including iron chaperoning and iron storage. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to probe these hypotheses. Iron accumulation in mutant mitochondria unable to assemble iron sulfur clusters proved to be insensitive to overexpression of frataxin, ruling out its potential involvement as an iron storage protein similar to ferritin. Rather, it was found that frataxin negatively regulates iron sulfur cluster assembly.

  7. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Masanet, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    China’s annual crude steel production in 2010 was 638.7 Mt accounting for nearly half of the world’s annual crude steel production in the same year. Around 461 TWh of electricity and 14,872 PJ of fuel were consumed to produce this quantity of steel in 2010. We identified and analyzed 23 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the iron and steel industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model, the cumulative cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Chinese iron and steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh, and the total technical electricity saving potential is 416 TWh. The CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 139 Mt CO2 and the CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 237 Mt CO2. The FCSC model for the iron and steel industry shows cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 11,999 PJ, and the total technical fuel saving potential is 12,139. The CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective and technical fuel savings is 1,191 Mt CO2 and 1,205 Mt CO2, respectively. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Chinese iron and steel industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  8. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  9. Nutritional status of iron in children from 6 to 59 months of age and its relation to vitamin A deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Sales

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the iron nutritional status of children from 6 to 59 months of age and its relation to vitamin A deficiency. Method: Cross-sectional study involving 100 children, living in nine cities in the state of Paraiba, which were selected for convenience to form two study groups: children with vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol 0.70 μmol/L; n = 50. The iron nutritional status was evaluated by biochemical, hematological and hematimetric indices. The cases of subclinical infection (C-Reactive Protein > 6 mg/L were excluded. Results: Children with vitamin A deficiency had serum iron values statistically lower than the corresponding values in children without deficiency. The other iron nutritional status indices showed no statistical difference according to presence/absence of vitamin A deficiency. Conclusion: The interaction between iron and vitamin A deficiencies was evidenced in the case of circulating iron deficiency (serum iron, suggesting failure in the transport mechanisms of the mineral in children with vitamin A deficiency.

  10. Relation between serum lipoperoxide concentrations and iron or copper status over one year in Cuban adult men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, J.; Renversez, J.C.; Favier, A.E. [Dept. de Biologie Integree, CHUG, Grenoble (France); Fleites, P.; Perez-Cristia, R. [Centro national de Toxicologia (CENATOX), La Habana (Cuba); Chassagne, M.; Barnouin, J. [INRA, Unite d' Ecopathologie, Saint Genes Champanelle (France); Verdura, T. [Inst. Finlay, La Lisa, La Habana (Cuba); Garcia, I.G. [Inst. de Farmacia y Alimentos, La Coronela, La Lisa, Ciudad de la Habana (Cuba); Tressol, J.C. [INRA, Unite maladies metaboliques et micronutriments, Saint Genes Champanelle (France)

    2001-07-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the relations between iron and copper status and lipid peroxidation at different periods over one year in low-income and low-energy intake healthy subjects. The study was conducted in 199 middle-aged healthy Cuban men from March 1995 to February 1996. Iron status was assessed by the determination of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, whole blood hemoglobin and iron intakes. Copper status was evaluated by the determination of serum copper and copper intakes. Serum thiobarbituric acid substances (TBARS) determination was used as an index of lipid peroxidation. Rank correlations were observed between serum TBARS concentrations and iron or copper status indices at different periods. In period 3 (end of the rainy season), serum TBARS and ferritin concentrations were maximum whereas blood hemoglobin levels and iron intake were minimum. Serum TBARS concentrations were significantly higher than the reference values of the laboratory whereas, iron and copper status were within the reference ranges. These results suggested that iron and copper status may be associated with lipid peroxidation in subjects without metal overloads and that variations over the year needed to be taken in account. (orig.)

  11. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  12. Iron-rich dune grasslands: Relations between soil organic matter and sorption of Fe and P

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.; Lubbers, I.; van Til, M.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of high atmospheric nitrogen-deposition partly depend on availability of phosphate. Lime-poor, but iron-rich dune grasslands are supposedly protected from grass-encroachment, due to P-fixation in iron phosphate. However, in iron-rich Dutch hinterdunes, dunes have low, but dry former beach pl

  13. Effect of Native American ancestry on iron-related phenotypes of Alabama hemochromatosis probands with HFE C282Y homozygosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton Ellen H

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In age-matched cohorts of screening study participants recruited from primary care clinics, mean serum transferrin saturation values were significantly lower and mean serum ferritin concentrations were significantly higher in Native Americans than in whites. Twenty-eight percent of 80 Alabama white hemochromatosis probands with HFE C282Y homozygosity previously reported having Native American ancestry, but the possible effect of this ancestry on hemochromatosis phenotypes was unknown. Methods We compiled observations in these 80 probands and used univariate and multivariate methods to analyze associations of age, sex, Native American ancestry (as a dichotomous variable, report of ethanol consumption (as a dichotomous variable, percentage transferrin saturation and loge serum ferritin concentration at diagnosis, quantities of iron removed by phlebotomy to achieve iron depletion, and quantities of excess iron removed by phlebotomy. Results In a univariate analysis in which probands were grouped by sex, there were no significant differences in reports of ethanol consumption, transferrin saturation, loge serum ferritin concentration, quantities of iron removed to achieve iron depletion, and quantities of excess iron removed by phlebotomy in probands who reported Native American ancestry than in those who did not. In multivariate analyses, transferrin saturation (as a dependent variable was not significantly associated with any of the available variables, including reports of Native American ancestry and ethanol consumption. The independent variable quantities of excess iron removed by phlebotomy was significantly associated with loge serum ferritin used as a dependent variable (p e serum ferritin was the only independent variable significantly associated with quantities of excess iron removed by phlebotomy used as a dependent variable (p Conclusion We conclude that the iron-related phenotypes of hemochromatosis probands with HFE

  14. Effects of ferrous iron on the performance and microbial community in aerobic granular sludge in relation to nutrient removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gulsum; Cetin, Ender; Bozkurt, Umit; Aleksanyan Magden, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Lab-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ferrous iron on nutrient removal performance and variations in the microbial community inside aerobic granular sludge for 408 days. Two reactors were simultaneously operated, one without added ferrous iron (SBR1), and one with 10 mg Fe(2+)  L(-1) of added ferrous iron (SBR2). A total of 1 mg Fe(2+)  L(-1) of added ferrous iron was applied to SBR1 starting from the 191st day to observe the resulting variations in the nutrient removal performance and the microbial community. The results show that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) could not oxidize ammonia due to a lack of iron compounds, but they could survive in the aerobic granular sludge. Limited ferrous iron addition encouraged nitrification. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from both reactors could not be maintained regardless of the amount of ferrous iron that was applied. EBPR was established in both reactors when the concentration of mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) and the percentage of Accumulibacteria increased. A total of 10 mg Fe(2+)  L(-1) of added ferrous iron had a relatively adverse effect on the growth of AOB species compared to 1 mg Fe(2+)  L(-1) of added ferrous iron, but it encouraged the growth of Nitrospira sp. and Accumulibacteria, which requires further study. It could be said that the compact and stable structure of aerobic granular sludge preserved AOB and NOB from Fe-deficient conditions, and wash-out during the disintegration period. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:716-725, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Reduction of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid iron(III) by Klebsiella sp. FD-3 immobilized on iron(II, III) oxide poly (styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) magnetic porous microspheres: effects of inorganic compounds and kinetic study of effective diffusion in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zuo-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Lin, Tian-Ming; Jing, Guo-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Fe3O4 poly (styrene-glycidyl methacrylate) magnetic porous microspheres (MPPMs) were introduced to immobilize Klebsiella sp. FD-3, an iron-reducing bacterium applied to reduce Fe(III)EDTA. The effects of potential inhibitors (S(2-), SO3(2-), NO3(-), NO2(-) and Fe(II)EDTA-NO) on Fe(III)EDTA reduction were investigated. S(2-) reacted with Fe(III)EDTA as an electron-shuttling compound and enhanced the reduction. But Fe(III)EDTA reduction was inhibited by SO3(2-) and Fe(II)EDTA-NO due to their toxic to microorganisms. Low concentrations of NO3(-) and NO2(-) accelerated Fe(III)EDTA reduction, but high concentrations inhibited the reduction, whether by free or immobilized FD-3. The immobilized FD-3 performed better than freely-suspended style. The substrate mass transfer and diffusion kinetics in the porous microspheres were calculated. The value of Thiele modulus and effectiveness factors showed that the intraparticle diffusion was fairly small and neglected in this carrier. Fe(III)EDTA reduction fitted first-order model at low Fe(III)EDTA concentration, and changed to zero-order model at high concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  17. Is iron overload in alcohol-related cirrhosis mediated by hepcidin?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tariq Iqbal; Azzam Diab; Douglas G Ward; Matthew J Brookes; Chris Tselepis; Jim Murray; Elwyn Elias

    2009-01-01

    In this case report we describe the relationship between ferritin levels and hepcidin in a patient with alcohol-related spur cell anemia who underwent liver transplantation. We demonstrate a reciprocal relationship between serum or urinary hepcidin and serum ferritin, which indicates that inadequate hepcidin production by the diseased liver is associated with elevated serum ferritin. The ferritin level falls with increasing hepcidin production after transplantation. Neither inflammatory indices (IL6) nor erythropoietin appear to be related to hepcidin expression in this case. We suggest that inappropriately low hepcidin production by the cirrhotic liver may contribute substantially to elevated tissue iron stores in cirrhosis and speculate that hepcidin replacement in these patients may be of therapeutic benefit in the future.

  18. Silicon isotope fractionation during microbial reduction of Fe(III)-Si gels under Archean seawater conditions and implications for iron formation genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thiruchelvi R.; Zheng, Xin-Yuan; Roden, Eric E.; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-10-01

    Microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) is a deeply rooted metabolism in the Bacteria and Archaea. In the Archean and Proterozoic, the most likely electron acceptor for DIR in marine environments was Fe(III)-Si gels. It has been recently suggested that the Fe and Si cycles were coupled through sorption of aqueous Si to iron oxides/hydroxides, and through release of Si during DIR. Evidence for the close association of the Fe and Si cycles comes from banded iron formations (BIFs), which consist of alternating bands of Fe-bearing minerals and quartz (chert). Although there has been extensive study of the stable Fe isotope fractionations produced by DIR of Fe(III)-Si gels, as well as studies of stable Fe isotope fractionations in analogous abiologic systems, no studies to date have investigated stable Si isotope fractionations produced by DIR. In this study, the stable Si isotope fractionations produced by microbial reduction of Fe(III)-Si gels were investigated in simulated artificial Archean seawater (AAS), using the marine iron-reducing bacterium Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. Microbial reduction produced very large 30Si/28Si isotope fractionations between the solid and aqueous phase at ˜23 °C, where Δ30Sisolid-aqueous isotope fractionations of -3.35 ± 0.16‰ and -3.46 ± 0.09‰ were produced in two replicate experiments at 32% Fe(III) reduction (solid-phase Fe(II)/FeTotal = 0.32). This isotopic fractionation was substantially greater than that observed in two abiologic controls that had solid-phase Fe(II)/FeTotal = 0.02-0.03, which produced Δ30Sisolid-aqueous isotope fractionations of -2.83 ± 0.24‰ and -2.65 ± 0.28‰. In a companion study, the equilibrium Δ30Sisolid-aqueous isotope fractionation was determined to be -2.3‰ for solid-phase Fe(II)/FeTotal = 0. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of Fe(II) in Fe-Si gels in producing large changes in Si isotope fractionations. These results suggest that DIR should produce highly

  19. Effect of parenteral iron sucrose therapy to improve the feto-maternal prognosis related to iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Goen

    2013-08-01

    Results: Hemoglobin level was significantly (p<0.001 increased from baseline (8.33±1.13 to 30th (9.45±1.02, at delivery (11.89±0.89 and at first postpartum day (12.15±1.11. However, TIBC significantly (p=0.01 decreased from baseline to first postpartum day. Significant (p<0.0001 increase was also noted in serum ferritin and serum folate levels from baseline to 30th day, at delivery and at first postpartum day. MCV and MCH were significantly (p=0.01 increased from baseline to only at delivery and at first postpartum day. Percent change analysis showed that there was higher change in serum ferritin and serum folate levels than Hb, MCV and MCH levels. About one third (34% of the patients did not complain any complications during supplementation. Conclusion: With regard to the use of intravenous iron in obstetrics, there is increasing evidence that iron sucrose is safe for the mother and the fetus using the recommended dosages and therapy regimens. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(4.000: 595-599

  20. Direct iron ore reduction by methane in a fluidized bed. Second annual report, November 1990-November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Vaart, D.R.; Conger, W.L.

    1992-02-01

    The partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane was studied in both fixed- and fluidized-bed reactors (both bench-scale). In the absence of iron particles, both pathways were found to produce a mixture of CO and H2 in a proportion consistent with equilibrium calculations at temperatures above 1050 C. When iron oxide particles were added, however, virtually no H2 was detected while the proportion of CO2 and CO depended strongly on the amount of water in the feed stream. Preliminary studies using reduced iron particles indicate that Fe/FeO is an active dissociation catalyst for methane. Finally, a fluidized reactor model has been shown to accurately describe both gas-phase and catalytic reactions in a fluidized bed. In this regard, new theory is presented which can explain the peculiar shape of the axial concentration profile in a fluidized bed as measured by in-bed sampling.

  1. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

    2002-05-29

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated.

  2. Expression of iron-related proteins in the duodenum is up-regulated in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms responsible for derangements in iron homeostasis in chronic inflammatory conditions are not entirely clear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that inflammation affects expression of iron-related proteins in the duodenum and monocytes in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders, thus contributing to dysregulated iron homeostasis. Duodenal mucosal samples and peripheral blood monocytes obtained from patients with chronic inflammatory disorders, viz. ulcerative colitis (UC, Crohn’s disease (CD and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, were used for gene and protein expression studies. Haemoglobin levels were significantly lower and serum C-reactive protein (CRP levels significantly higher in those in the disease groups. Gene expression of several iron-related proteins in the duodenum was significantly up-regulated in patients with UC and CD. In those with UC, it was found that protein expression of divalent metal transporter (DMT1 and ferroportin, which are involved in absorption of dietary non-heme iron, was also significantly higher in the duodenal mucosa. Gene expression of the duodenal proteins of interest correlated positively with one another and negatively with haemoglobin. Gene expression of iron-related proteins in monocytes was studied in patients with UC and found to be unaffected. In a separate group of patients with UC, serum hepcidin levels were found to be significantly lower than in control subjects. In conclusion, expression of iron related proteins was up-regulated in the duodenum of patients with chronic inflammatory conditions in this study. The effects appeared to be secondary to anemia and the consequent erythropoietic drive.

  3. Effects of operational parameters and common ions on the reduction of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by scrap copper-modified cast iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jin-Hong; Wang, Hong-Wu

    2015-07-01

    Scrap Cu-modified cast iron (CMCI) is a potent material for the reduction of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by a surface-mediated reaction. However, the effects of operational parameters and common ions on its reduction and final rate are unknown. Results show that the 2,4-DNT reduction was significantly affected by Cu:Fe mass ratio and the optimum m(Cu:Fe) was 0.25%. The slight pH-dependent trend of 2,4-DNT reduction by CMCI was observed at pH 3 to 11, and the maximum end product, 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT), was generated at pH 7. Dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water reduced the 2,4-DNT degradation and the formation of 2,4-DAT. CMCI effectively treated high concentrations of 2,4-DNT (60 to 150 mg L(-1)). In addition, varying the concentration of (NH4)2SO4 from 0.001 to 0.1 mol L(-1) improved the efficiency of the reduction process. The green rust-like corrosion products (GR-SO4 (2-)) were also effective for 2,4-DNT reduction, in which Na2CO3 (0.01 to 0.2 mol L(-1)) significantly inhibited this reduction. The repeated-use efficiency of CMCI was also inhibited. Moreover, 2,4-DNT and its products, such as 4A2NT, 2A4NT, and 2,4-DAT, produced mass imbalance (<35%). Hydrolysis of Fe(3+) and CO3 (2-) leading to the generation of Fe(OH)3 and conversion to FeOOH that precipitated on the surface and strongly adsorbed the products of reduction caused the inhibition of CO3 (2-). The 2,4-DNT reduction by CMCI could be described by pseudo-first-order kinetics. The operational conditions and common ions affected the 2,4-DNT reduction and its products by enhancing the corrosion of iron or accumulating a passive oxide film on the reactivity sites.

  4. Deferasirox demonstrates a dose-dependent reduction in liver iron concentration and consistent efficacy across subgroups of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Ali T; Porter, John B; Viprakasit, Vip; Kattamis, Antonis; Chuncharunee, Suporn; Sutcharitchan, Pranee; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Galanello, Renzo; Karakas, Zeynep; Lawniczek, Tomasz; Habr, Dany; Ros, Jacqueline; Zhang, Yiyun; Cappellini, M Domenica

    2013-06-01

    The 1-year THALASSA study enrolled 166 patients with various non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT) syndromes, degrees of iron burden and patient characteristics, and demonstrated the overall efficacy and safety of deferasirox in reducing liver iron concentration (LIC) in these patients. Here, reduction in LIC with deferasirox 5 and 10 mg/kg/day starting dose groups is shown to be consistent across the following patient subgroups-baseline LIC/serum ferritin, age, gender, race, splenectomy (yes/no), and underlying NTDT syndrome (β-thalassemia intermedia, HbE/β-thalassemia or α-thalassemia). These analyses also evaluated deferasirox dosing strategies for patients with NTDT. Greater reductions in LIC were achieved in patients dose-escalated at Week 24 from deferasirox 10 mg/kg/day starting dose to 20 mg/kg/day. Patients who received an average actual dose of deferasirox >12.5-≤17.5 mg/kg/day achieved a greater LIC decrease compared with the ≥7.5-≤12.5 mg/kg/day and >0-<7.5 mg/kg/day subgroups, demonstrating a dose-response efficacy. LIC reduction across patient subgroups was generally consistent with the primary efficacy analysis with a similar safety profile.

  5. Deferasirox demonstrates a dose-dependent reduction in liver iron concentration and consistent efficacy across subgroups of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Ali T; Porter, John B; Viprakasit, Vip; Kattamis, Antonis; Chuncharunee, Suporn; Sutcharitchan, Pranee; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Galanello, Renzo; Karakas, Zeynep; Lawniczek, Tomasz; Habr, Dany; Ros, Jacqueline; Zhang, Yiyun; Cappellini, M Domenica

    2013-01-01

    The 1-year THALASSA study enrolled 166 patients with various non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT) syndromes, degrees of iron burden and patient characteristics, and demonstrated the overall efficacy and safety of deferasirox in reducing liver iron concentration (LIC) in these patients. Here, reduction in LIC with deferasirox 5 and 10 mg/kg/day starting dose groups is shown to be consistent across the following patient subgroups—baseline LIC/serum ferritin, age, gender, race, splenectomy (yes/no), and underlying NTDT syndrome (β-thalassemia intermedia, HbE/β-thalassemia or α-thalassemia). These analyses also evaluated deferasirox dosing strategies for patients with NTDT. Greater reductions in LIC were achieved in patients dose-escalated at Week 24 from deferasirox 10 mg/kg/day starting dose to 20 mg/kg/day. Patients who received an average actual dose of deferasirox >12.5–≤17.5 mg/kg/day achieved a greater LIC decrease compared with the ≥7.5–≤12.5 mg/kg/day and >0–<7.5 mg/kg/day subgroups, demonstrating a dose–response efficacy. LIC reduction across patient subgroups was generally consistent with the primary efficacy analysis with a similar safety profile. Am. J. Hematol. 88:503–506, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23553596

  6. Effect of Amount of Carbon on the Reduction Efficiency of Iron Ore-Coal Composite Pellets in Multi-layer Bed Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srinibash; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2016-08-01

    The effect of carbon-to-hematite molar ratio has been studied on the reduction efficiency of iron ore-coal composite pellet reduced at 1523 K (1250 °C) for 20 minutes in a laboratory scale multi-layer bed rotary hearth furnace (RHF). Reduced pellets have been characterized through weight loss measurement, estimation of porosity, shrinkage, qualitative and quantitative phase analysis by XRD. Performance parameters such as the degree of reduction, metallization, carbon efficiency, productivity, and compressive strength have been calculated to compare the process efficacy at different carbon levels in the pellets. Pellets with optimum carbon-to-hematite ratio (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) that is much below the stoichiometric carbon required for direct reduction of hematite yielded maximum reduction, better carbon utilization, and productivity for all three layers. Top layer exhibited maximum reduction at comparatively lower carbon level (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio 2.33). Correlation between degree of reduction and metallization indicated non-isothermal kinetics influenced by heat and mass transfer in multi-layer bed RHF. Compressive strength of the partially reduced pellet with optimum carbon content (C/Fe2O3 molar ratio = 1.66) showed that they could be potentially used as an alternate feed in a blast furnace or any other smelting reactor.

  7. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jian-Xin [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); School of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Yu-Jun, E-mail: yjwang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Cun [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke [Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 United States (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils.

  8. Rankings of iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in relation to maternal characteristics of pregnant Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, Anne-Sophie; Weiler, Hope A; Dubois, Lise; Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Dodds, Linda; Massarelli, Isabelle; Vigneault, Michel; Arbuckle, Tye E; Fraser, William D

    2016-07-01

    Iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes in the prenatal period are important determinants of maternal and fetal health. The objective of this study was to examine iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes from diet and supplements in relation to maternal characteristics. Data were collected in a subsample of 1186 pregnant women from the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study, a cohort study including pregnant women recruited from 10 Canadian sites between 2008 and 2011. A food frequency questionnaire was administered to obtain rankings of iron, calcium, and vitamin D intake (16-21 weeks of pregnancy). Intakes from supplements were obtained from a separate questionnaire (6-13 weeks of pregnancy). Women were divided into 2 groups according to the median total intake of each nutrient. Supplement intake was an important contributor to total iron intake (median 74%, interquartile range (IQR) 0%-81%) and total vitamin D intake (median 60%, IQR 0%-73%), while the opposite was observed for calcium (median 18%, IQR 0%-27%). Being born outside of Canada was significantly associated with lower total intakes of iron, vitamin D, and calcium (p ≤ 0.01 for all). Consistent positive indicators of supplement use (iron, vitamin D, and calcium) were maternal age over 30 years and holding a university degree. In conclusion, among Canadian women, the probability of having lower iron, vitamin D, and calcium intakes is higher among those born outside Canada; supplement intake is a major contributor to total iron and vitamin D intakes; and higher education level and age over 30 years are associated with supplement intake.

  9. Effect of NaBH4 on properties of nanoscale zero-valent iron and its catalytic activity for reduction of p-nitrophenol

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Sungjun; Gim, Suji; Kim, Hyungjun; Hanna, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The reduction of p-nitrophenol (p-NP) to p-aminophenol (p-AP) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI)/NaBH4 system in an oxygen environment was studied by means of liquid chromatography, spectroscopy (vibration and X-ray photoelectron), solid analyses (transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Addition of NaBH4 into NZVI suspension showed the disintegration of NZVI (60-100 nm), resulting in the formation of m...

  10. Study on Direct Reduction of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag%铜渣直接还原制取铜铁合金的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑鹏

    2016-01-01

    本文以冶炼铜的尾渣为原料,对其采用直接还原-湿式磁选工艺进行实验研究,主要探究还原温度、还原时间对铜渣还原的影响。结果表明:在还原温度为1200℃、还原时间为20 min、磁选磁场强度为75.62 kA/m ,获得精矿的铜、铁品位分别是1.73%、4.57%,铜、铁的回收率依次为90.56%、70.23%,该产品可作为含铜铁素体不锈钢的冶炼原料。%In this paper , the slag of smelting copper is used as raw material , experimental study on the di‐rect reduction and wet magnetic separation process . The temperature and reduction time to effect reduction of copper slag are mainly explored . The results show that :the reduction temperature of 1 200 degrees , the reduction time of 20 min , magnetic field strength of 75 .62 kA/m . Under this condition , the copper and iron grade of concentrate are 1 .73% and 4 .57% respectively . The recovery rate of copper and iron are 90.56% and 70 .23% respectively . T he product can be used as raw material for smelting copper containing ferrite stainless steel .

  11. Phase relations in iron-rich systems and implications for the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William W.; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental data concerning the properties of iron, iron sulfide, and iron oxide at high pressures are combined with theoretical arguments to constrain the probable behavior of the Fe-rich portions of the Fe-O and Fe-S phase diagrams. Phase diagrams are constructed for the Fe-S-O system at core pressures and temperatures. These properties are used to evaluate the current temperature distribution and composition of the core.

  12. Inhibition of Nitrate Reduction by NaCl Adsorption on a Nano-Zero-Valent Iron Surface during a Concentrate Treatment for Water Reuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, Dogun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Cl) concentration on reductions of nitrates and on the characteristics of NZVI were investigated. Although NaCl is known as a promoter of iron corrosion, a high concentration of NaCl (>3 g/L) has a significant inhibition effect on the degree of NZVI reactivity toward nitrate. The experimental results were...... interpreted by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood Hougen-Watson (LHHW) reaction in terms of inhibition, and the decreased NZVI reactivity could be explained by the increase in the inhibition constant. As a result of a chloride concentration analysis, it was verified that 7.7-26.5% of chloride was adsorbed onto...... the surface of NZVI. Moreover, the change of the iron corrosion product under different NaCl concentrations was investigated by a surface analysis of spent NZVI. Magnetite was the main product, with a low NaCl concentration (0.5 g/L), whereas amorphous iron hydroxide was observed at a high concentration (12 g...

  13. Observation of iron-rich coating on lunar grains and a relation to low albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, T.; Bilson, E.; Baron, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The outermost few atomic layers of lunar soil samples were studied by Auger spectroscopy and were found to contain in each case two to three times more iron than the mean bulk composition of the sample. The amount of excess iron is found to be closely correlated with the optical albedo in the manner that would be theoretically expected if the iron provided absorption centers. Crushed lunar rocks of similar mean composition, but lacking the extra iron coating of the soil grains, have a much higher albedo than most lunar soils sampled or observed on the lunar surface.

  14. Enhanced oxygen reduction reaction activity of iron-containing nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratso, Sander; Kruusenberg, Ivar; Sarapuu, Ave; Rauwel, Protima; Saar, Rando; Joost, Urmas; Aruväli, Jaan; Kanninen, Petri; Kallio, Tanja; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2016-11-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction are synthesised by pyrolysis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of nitrogen and iron precursors. For the physico-chemical characterisation of the catalysts transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are used. The electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts for oxygen reduction is studied in 0.1 M KOH solution using the rotating disk electrode method. The Fe-containing nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes exhibit an enhanced electrocatalytic performance as compared to metal-free counterparts and their electrocatalytic activity is comparable to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. Alkaline direct methanol fuel cell tests also show performance close to Pt/C. Thus, these materials can be considered as promising cathode catalysts for application in alkaline fuel cells.

  15. Role of a silicate phase in the reduction of iron and chromium and their oxidation with carbide formation during the manufacture of carbon ferrochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchin, V. E.; Roshchin, A. V.; Akhmetov, K. T.; Salikhov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    The reactions of reduction of chromium and iron from chromospinelide and the reactions of carbide formation from the reduced metals are separated in space in experiments performed on ore grains with an artificially applied silicate shell. It is found that the silicate layer that isolates spinelide fro direct contact with carbon takes part in the reactions of both reduction and carbide formation. Free carbon extracts oxygen anions from the layer at the contact surface with the formation of CO, and the forming anion vacancies transfer "excess" electrons to the iron and chromium cations in the spinelide lattice and reduce them. Free and carbide-fixed carbon extracts iron and chromium cations from the silicate layer, and carbides form on the surface. The cation vacancies and electron holes (high-charge cations) that form in the silicate phase under these conditions are involved in the oxidation of the metal reduced in spinelide and cause its dissolution in the silicate phase and the precipitation of lower carbides on the surface of the silicate phase. The structure that is characterized of carbon ferrochrome forms on the surface of the silicate phase. Carbide formation is slower than reduction because of higher energy consumed for the formation of high-charge cations and the transfer of cations from the spinelide volume to the outer surface of the silicate phase. In the absence of a silicate layer, a carbide shell blocks the contact of carbon with oxides, which leads to the stop of reduction and, then, carbide formation. In the presence of a silicate (slag) shell around a spinelide grain, the following two concentration galvanic cells operate in parallel: an oxygen (reduction) cell and a metal (oxidation) cell. The parallel operation of the two galvanic cells with a common electrolyte (silicate phase) results in a decrease in the electric potentials between spinelide inside the silicate phase and carbon and carbides on its surface, and each of the processes is

  16. Haematological and iron-related parameters of male endurance and strength trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodaryk, K

    1993-01-01

    To obtain more information on the effects of long-lasting endurance and strength training on the constituents of the blood, several haematological and iron-related parameters were measured at rest in 39 male athletes from the Polish team who participated in the Olympics in Seoul in 1988. The athletes were divided into two groups: endurance-trained subjects (group E, cyclists, canoeists and rowers; n = 22) and strength-trained subjects (group S, wrestlers and judo; n = 17). The control group was composed of untrained male subjects (n = 48). Blood samples were taken from an antecubital vein with the subject at rest for determinations of haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]), packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte (RBC) and reticulocyte count, plasma free haemoglobin concentration, haptoglobin concentration, serum iron, transferrin concentration and ferritin concentrations ([Ferr]); red blood cells were used for estimation of glutamato-oxalate transaminase (GOT) activity and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration ([FEP]). The mean [Hb], PVC, RBC measured in the E athletes were significantly lower than in the control group but were comparable to those obtained in the S atheletes. There were no significantly differences in the haematological indices [mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean copuscular haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration] between the groups of atheletes and the control group. A significant increase in reticulocytosis and GOT activity was observed in the endurance-trained athletes. No impairment of erythropoiesis was observed as indicated by several sensitive markers of haemoglobin formation (FEP, MCV and inspection of blood smears) in the athletes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Using learning curves on energy-efficient technologies to estimate future energy savings and emission reduction potentials in the U.S. iron and steel industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karali, Nihan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Park, Won Young [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McNeil, Michael A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Increasing concerns on non-sustainable energy use and climate change spur a growing research interest in energy efficiency potentials in various critical areas such as industrial production. This paper focuses on learning curve aspects of energy efficiency measures in the U.S iron and steel sector. A number of early-stage efficient technologies (i.e., emerging or demonstration technologies) are technically feasible and have the potential to make a significant contribution to energy saving and CO2 emissions reduction, but fall short economically to be included. However, they may also have the cost effective potential for significant cost reduction and/or performance improvement in the future under learning effects such as ‘learning-by-doing’. The investigation is carried out using ISEEM, a technology oriented, linear optimization model. We investigated how steel demand is balanced with/without the availability learning curve, compared to a Reference scenario. The retrofit (or investment in some cases) costs of energy efficient technologies decline in the scenario where learning curve is applied. The analysis also addresses market penetration of energy efficient technologies, energy saving, and CO2 emissions in the U.S. iron and steel sector with/without learning impact. Accordingly, the study helps those who use energy models better manage the price barriers preventing unrealistic diffusion of energy-efficiency technologies, better understand the market and learning system involved, predict future achievable learning rates more accurately, and project future savings via energy-efficiency technologies with presence of learning. We conclude from our analysis that, most of the existing energy efficiency technologies that are currently used in the U.S. iron and steel sector are cost effective. Penetration levels increases through the years, even though there is no price reduction. However, demonstration technologies are not economically

  18. Utilization of subsurface microbial electrochemical systems to elucidate the mechanisms of competition between methanogenesis and microbial iron(III)/humic acid reduction in Arctic peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E. S.; Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Angenent, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    High-latitude peat soils are a major carbon reservoir, and there is growing concern that previously dormant carbon from this reservoir could be released to the atmosphere as a result of continued climate change. Microbial processes, such as methanogenesis and carbon dioxide production via iron(III) or humic acid reduction, are at the heart of the carbon cycle in Arctic peat soils [1]. A deeper understanding of the factors governing microbial dominance in these soils is crucial for predicting the effects of continued climate change. In previous years, we have demonstrated the viability of a potentiostatically-controlled subsurface microbial electrochemical system-based biosensor that measures microbial respiration via exocellular electron transfer [2]. This system utilizes a graphite working electrode poised at 0.1 V NHE to mimic ferric iron and humic acid compounds. Microbes that would normally utilize these compounds as electron acceptors donate electrons to the electrode instead. The resulting current is a measure of microbial respiration with the electrode and is recorded with respect to time. Here, we examine the mechanistic relationship between methanogenesis and iron(III)- or humic acid-reduction by using these same microbial-three electrode systems to provide an inexhaustible source of alternate electron acceptor to microbes in these soils. Chamber-based carbon dioxide and methane fluxes were measured from soil collars with and without microbial three-electrode systems over a period of four weeks. In addition, in some collars we simulated increased fermentation by applying acetate treatments to understand possible effects of continued climate change on microbial processes in these carbon-rich soils. The results from this work aim to increase our fundamental understanding of competition between electron acceptors, and will provide valuable data for climate modeling scenarios. 1. Lipson, D.A., et al., Reduction of iron (III) and humic substances plays a major

  19. Nata de coco (NDC) hydrogel as nanoreactors for preparation iron nanoparticles (FeNps) from ferrocenium reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andarini, Mellissa; Lazim, Azwan [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    This study focuses on hydrogel as nano template to produce iron nanoparticles (FeNps). Radical polymerization was used to synthesize the hydrogel from nata de coco (NDC-g-PAA). Ferrocenium (FcCL) with 1 × 10{sup −4} g/ml has successfully incorporated with NDC-g-PAA hydrogel system and reduce using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at different concentrations. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) result demonstrates that the size of FeNps produced was about 5 – 20 nm. Morphological analysis of hydrogel is carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-EDEX is used to determine percentage of iron (Fe) in hydrogel. The results offer a wide range of application in various areas, especially the use of hydrogel system as a responsive template.

  20. Evidence of iron (III) reduction in γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles due to meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eloiza S.; Lima, Emilia C. D.; Soler, Maria A. G.; Silva, Fabio R. L.; Azevedo, Ricardo B.; Morais, Paulo C.

    2014-03-01

    In this study we report on the meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) surface functionalization of nanosized maghemite particles which were obtained from oxidation of freshly-precipitated magnetite nanoparticles. Stable magnetic sols were produced while using [DMSA]/[Fe] in a wide range (2 to 90%) of values for the surface functionalization protocol. We found experimental evidence of Fe (III) reduction down to Fe (II) in the whole range of [DMSA]/[Fe] values employed, though presenting differences for lower and higher values of DMSA/Fe molar ratio. At lower (up to 10%) [DMSA]/[Fe] values the DMSA-functionalized iron oxide core remains essentially maghemite while the reduced Fe (II) ions move out to the bulk solution as soluble species. In contrast, at higher (20% and above) [DMSA]/[Fe] values the DMSA-functionalized iron oxide core holds the reduced Fe (II) on its crystal structure. The thiol group oxidation, via disulfide bridge formation, plays a key role in the Fe (III) reduction to Fe (II) during the surface functionalization process. We hypothesize that at higher [DMSA]/[Fe] values (20% and above) intermolecular disulfide bridge formation dominates, leading to the onset of a network at the nanoparticle’s surface, thus preventing the surface reduced Fe (II) ions moving out into the bulk solution. Experimental evidence based on visual inspection and different techniques (UV-vis-IR spectroscopy, chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy) are present to support the model picture herein introduced.

  1. Evidence of a reduction reaction of oxidized iron/cobalt by boron atoms diffused toward naturally oxidized surface of CoFeB layer during annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Soshi, E-mail: sato.soshi@cies.tohoku.ac.jp; Honjo, Hiroaki; Niwa, Masaaki [Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems, Tohoku University, 468-1 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); JST-ACCEL, 468-1 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Ikeda, Shoji [Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems, Tohoku University, 468-1 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); JST-ACCEL, 468-1 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ohno, Hideo [Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems, Tohoku University, 468-1 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Endoh, Tetsuo [Center for Innovative Integrated Electronic Systems, Tohoku University, 468-1 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); JST-ACCEL, 468-1 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-04-06

    We have investigated the redox reaction on the surface of Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction stack samples after annealing at 300, 350, and 400 °C for 1 h using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for precise analysis of the chemical bonding states. At a capping tantalum layer thickness of 1 nm, both the capping tantalum layer and the surface of the underneath CoFeB layer in the as-deposited stack sample were naturally oxidized. By comparison of the Co 2p and Fe 2p spectra among the as-deposited and annealed samples, reduction of the naturally oxidized cobalt and iron atoms occurred on the surface of the CoFeB layer. The reduction reaction was more significant at higher annealing temperature. Oxidized cobalt and iron were reduced by boron atoms that diffused toward the surface of the top CoFeB layer. A single CoFeB layer was prepared on SiO{sub 2}, and a confirmatory evidence of the redox reaction with boron diffusion was obtained by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the naturally oxidized surface of the CoFeB single layer after annealing. The redox reaction is theoretically reasonable based on the Ellingham diagram.

  2. Simulation on reduction of hexavalent chromium from groundwater using zero valent iron%Fe0去除地下水中六价铬的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雅; 张增强; 唐次来; 易磊

    2011-01-01

    为了研究零价铁去除水中Cr(Ⅵ)的效果及影响因素.在实验室条件下,通过批试验,考察了铁粉预处理、铁粉用量、初始pH及阳离子对六价铬去除的影响.结果表明:零价铁能够有效、快速的去除污染水体中的六价铬,机理为氧化还原和共沉淀;其去除率受铁粉预处理、铁粉投加量、初始pH及阳离子的影响;在酸性条件下,Fe2+浓度可以作为六价铬是否完全去除的指示剂.%In order to provide guidance for practical application in the remediation of groundwater pollution, the influencing factors of reduction of hexavalent chromium from solution were studied by batch experiment at laboratory scale, such as pretreated, amount of iron, initial pH and cation. The results showed that hexavalent chromium was removed quickly and effectively by zero valent iron, removal mechanism was redox and coprecipitation;the removal ratio was effected by the pretreatment with acid and nickelaqe,the amount of iron,initial pH and cation;Fe2+ could be used as an indicator for complete reduction of hexavalent chromium in the acidic condition.

  3. Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genkinger, J.M.; Friberg, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Wolk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Heme and total iron, present in meat, have been hypothesized to promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and endometrial cancer risk. Objective: We evaluated the associations between intakes of h

  4. Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genkinger, J.M.; Friberg, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Wolk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Heme and total iron, present in meat, have been hypothesized to promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and endometrial cancer risk. Objective: We evaluated the associations between intakes of h

  5. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    Iron isotopes have been widely applied to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. However, it is still unclear whether iron cycling in the water column or during diagenesis represents the major control on the iron isotope composition of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Interpretation of isotopic data in terms of oceanic redox conditions is only possible if water column processes dominate the isotopic composition, whereas redox interpretations are less straightforward if diagenetic iron cycling controls the isotopic composition. In the latter scenario, iron isotope data is more directly related to microbial processes such as dissimilatory iron reduction. Here we present bulk rock iron isotope data from late Proterozoic marine shales from Svalbard, northwestern Canada, and Siberia, to better understand the controls on iron isotope fractionation in late Proterozoic marine environments. Bulk shales span a δ 56Fe range from -0.45 ‰ to +1.04 ‰ . Although δ 56Fe values show significant variation within individual stratigraphic units, their mean value is closer to that of bulk crust and hydrothermal iron in samples post-dating the ca. 717-660 Ma Sturtian glaciation compared to older samples. After correcting for the highly reactive iron content in our samples based on iron speciation data, more than 90% of the calculated δ 56Fe compositions of highly reactive iron falls in the range from ca. -0.8 ‰ to +3 ‰ . An isotope mass-balance model indicates that diagenetic iron cycling can only change the isotopic composition of highly reactive iron by oxygen levels. Alternatively, increasing oxygen levels would have led to a higher proportion of Fe(II) being oxidized, without decreasing the initial size of the ferrous seawater iron pool. We consider the latter explanation as the most likely. According to this hypothesis, the δ 56Fe record reflects the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. δ 56Fe values in pre-Sturtian samples

  6. Meat and haem iron intake in relation to glioma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, Heather A; Gayle, Alicia; Jakszyn, Paula;

    2016-01-01

    Diets high in red or processed meat have been associated positively with some cancers, and several possible underlying mechanisms have been proposed, including iron-related pathways. However, the role of meat intake in adult glioma risk has yielded conflicting findings because of small sample siz...

  7. Reference Values of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content and Their Relation With Other Indicators of Iron Status in Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruzafa, Encarnación; Vázquez-López, Maria A; Lendinez-Molinos, Francisco; Poveda-González, Juan; Galera-Martínez, Rafael; Bonillo-Perales, Antonio; Martín-González, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) is considered an indicator of functional iron deficiency, but is understudied in children. The goals of this study are to determine the reference intervals for CHr in healthy children, and their relation with iron parameters, erythropoiesis, and individual conditions. A total of 902 children without iron deficiency, aged 1 to 11 years were analyzed in a cross-sectional study. Besides a physical examination of the subjects and a questionnaire completed by their parents, the complete blood count, serum transferrin receptor, ferritin, transferrin saturation, erythrocyte protoporphyrin, serum erythropoietin, C-reactive protein, and CHr levels were measured. Changes in CHr, iron status, and erythropoiesis at different age intervals were analyzed and linear multiple regression was used to identify the factors that determine CHr variability. Mean value obtained for CHr was 30.9±1.8 pg (P2.5-P97.5: 26.9 to 34.3 pg), but the influence of age on CHr (the values increased with age) and on the iron parameters justified the establishment of different reference ranges. In addition to age, nutritional status, hematologic measurements, reticulocytes, transferrin saturation, and erythrocyte protoporphyrin accounted for 39% of CHr variability.

  8. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significa...

  9. Pathogenic Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency and Iron Overload: New Insights for Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotze, M J; van Velden, D P; van Rensburg, S J; Erasmus, R

    2009-08-01

    Iron uptake, utilisation, release and storage occur at the gene level. Individuals with variant forms of genes involved in iron metabolism may have different requirements for iron and are likely to respond differently to the same amount of iron in the diet, a concept termed nutrigenetics. Iron deficiency, iron overload and the anemia of inflammation are the commonest iron-related disorders. While at least four types of hereditary iron overload have been identified to date, our knowledge of the genetic basis and consequences of inherited iron deficiency remain limited. The importance of genetic risk factors in relation to iron overload was highlighted with the identification of the HFE gene in 1996. Deleterious mutations in this gene account for 80-90% of inherited iron overload and are associated with loss of iron homeostasis, alterations in inflammatory responses, oxidative stress and in its most severe form, the disorder hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Elucidation of the genetic basis of HH has led to rapid clinical benefit through drastic reduction in liver biopsies performed as part of the diagnostic work-up of affected patients. Today, detection of a genetic predisposition in the presence of high serum ferritin and transferrin saturation levels is usually sufficient to diagnose HH, thereby addressing the potential danger of inherited iron overload which starts with the same symptoms as iron deficiency, namely chronic fatigue. This review provides the scientific back-up for application of pathology supported genetic testing, a new test concept that is well placed for optimizing clinical benefit to patients with regard to iron status.

  10. Iron Abundance in the Prototype PG 1159 Star, GW Vir Pulsator PG 1159-035, and Related Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Kruk, J. W.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    We performed an iron abundance determination of the hot, hydrogen deficient post-AGB star PG 1159-035. which is the prototype of the PG 1159 spectral class and the GW Vir pulsators, and of two related objects (PG 1520+525, PG 1144+005), based on the first detection of Fe VIII lines in stellar photospheres. In another PG 1159 star. PG 1424+535. we detect Fe VII lines. In all four stars, each within T(sub eff) = 110,000-150,000 K, we find a solar iron abundance. This result agrees with our recent abundance analysis of the hottest PG 1159 stars (T(sub eff) = 150,000-200,000 K) that exhibit Fe x lines. On the whole, we find that the PG 1159 stars are not significantly iron deficient, in contrast to previous notions.

  11. Iron abundance in the prototype PG1159 star, GW Vir pulsator PG1159-035, and related objects

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, Klaus; Kruk, Jeff W; Kurucz, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    We performed an iron abundance determination of the hot, hydrogen deficient post-AGB star PG1159-035, which is the prototype of the PG1159 spectral class and the GW Vir pulsators, and of two related objects (PG1520+525, PG1144+005), based on the first detection of Fe VIII lines in stellar photospheres. In another PG1159 star, PG1424+535, we detect Fe VII lines. In all four stars, each within Teff = 110,000 - 150,000 K, we find a solar iron abundance. This result agrees with our recent abundance analysis of the hottest PG1159 stars (Teff = 150,000 - 200,000 K) that exhibit Fe X lines. On the whole, we find that the PG1159 stars are not significantly iron deficient, in contrast to previous notions.

  12. Iron Isotope Fractionations Reveal a Finite Bioavailable Fe Pool for Structural Fe(III) Reduction in Nontronite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bingjie; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Smeaton, Christina M; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Roden, Eric E; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2016-08-16

    We report on stable Fe isotope fractionation during microbial and chemical reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1. (56)Fe/(54)Fe fractionation factors between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) ranged from -1.2 to +0.8‰. Microbial (Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens) and chemical (dithionite) reduction experiments revealed a two-stage process. Stage 1 was characterized by rapid reduction of a finite Fe(III) pool along the edges of the clay particles, accompanied by a limited release to solution of Fe(II), which partially adsorbed onto basal planes. Stable Fe isotope compositions revealed that electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) occurred between edge-bound Fe(II) and octahedral (structural) Fe(III) within the clay lattice, as well as between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) via a transient sorbed phase. The isotopic fractionation factors decreased with increasing extent of reduction as a result of the depletion of the finite bioavailable Fe(III) pool. During stage 2, microbial reduction was inhibited while chemical reduction continued. However, further ETAE between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) was not observed. Our results imply that the pool of bioavailable Fe(III) is restricted to structural Fe sites located near the edges of the clay particles. Blockage of ETAE distinguishes Fe(III) reduction of layered clay minerals from that of Fe oxyhydroxides, where accumulation of structural Fe(II) is much more limited.

  13. Using a relative health indicator (RHI) metric to estimate health risk reductions in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredo, Katherine A; Seidel, Chad; Ghosh, Amlan; Roberson, J Alan

    2017-03-01

    When a new drinking water regulation is being developed, the USEPA conducts a health risk reduction and cost analysis to, in part, estimate quantifiable and non-quantifiable cost and benefits of the various regulatory alternatives. Numerous methodologies are available for cumulative risk assessment ranging from primarily qualitative to primarily quantitative. This research developed a summary metric of relative cumulative health impacts resulting from drinking water, the relative health indicator (RHI). An intermediate level of quantification and modeling was chosen, one which retains the concept of an aggregated metric of public health impact and hence allows for comparisons to be made across "cups of water," but avoids the need for development and use of complex models that are beyond the existing state of the science. Using the USEPA Six-Year Review data and available national occurrence surveys of drinking water contaminants, the metric is used to test risk reduction as it pertains to the implementation of the arsenic and uranium maximum contaminant levels and quantify "meaningful" risk reduction. Uranium represented the threshold risk reduction against which national non-compliance risk reduction was compared for arsenic, nitrate, and radium. Arsenic non-compliance is most significant and efforts focused on bringing those non-compliant utilities into compliance with the 10 μg/L maximum contaminant level would meet the threshold for meaningful risk reduction.

  14. Reduction-induced inward diffusion and crystal growth on the surfaces of iron-bearing silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Tao, H.Z.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sodium inward diffusion (i.e., sodium diffusion from surface toward interior) in iron containing alkaline earth silicate glasses under reducing conditions around Tg and the induced surface crystallization. The surface crystallization is caused by formation of a silicate-gel layer...... first and then the growth of silica crystals on the glass surface. The type of alkaline earth cations has a strong impact on both the glass transition and the surface crystallization. In the Mg-containing glass, a quartz layer forms on the glass surface. This could be attributed to the fact that Mg2...

  15. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-03-26

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients' therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  16. Effects of time, soil organic matter, and iron oxides on the relative retention and redistribution of lead, cadmium, and copper on soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagboya, Paul N; Olu-Owolabi, Bamidele I; Adebowale, Kayode O

    2015-07-01

    In order to predict the bioavailability of toxic metals in soils undergoing degradation of organic matter (OM) and iron oxides (IOs), it is vital to understand the roles of these soil components in relation to metal retention and redistribution with time. In this present work, batch competitive sorptions of Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) were investigated between 1 and 90 days. Results showed that competition affected Cd(II) sorption more than Cu(II) and Pb(II). The sorption followed the trend Pb(II) > > Cu(II) > Cd(II), irrespective of aging, and this high preference for Pb(II) ions in soils reduced with time. Removal of OM led to reduction in distribution coefficient (K d) values of ≈33% for all cations within the first day. However, K d increased nearly 100% after 7 days and over 1000% after 90-day period. The enhanced K d values indicated that sorptions occurred on the long run on surfaces which were masked by OM. Removal of IO caused selective increases in the K d values, but this was dependent on the dominant soil constituent(s) in the absence of IO. The K d values of the IO-degraded samples nearly remained constant irrespective of aging indicating that sorptions on soil components other than the IO are nearly instantaneous while iron oxides played greater role than other constituents with time. Hence, in the soils studied, organic matter content determines the immediate relative metal retention while iron oxides determine the redistribution of metals with time.

  17. Evaluation of Social Performance and Related Factors in Iranian Central Iron Ore company workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossein Halvani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychological and social health is the main problems of workers population, which can increase productivity at work and physical and mental health and provide or decline in these aspects. Materials and Methods: this study was descriptive and crosses - sectional and has been performed on 388 Iranian central iron ore company workers. The tool of study was standard GHQ-28 question are that has been measured under social performance scale. Results: 49.3 and 49 percent of the people have favorable and average score from the state of the social function condition and 1.8 percent of people have severe social dysfunction and besides the employees have less work experienced that have more social dysfunction and there is a relationship between the P = 0.026. With satisfaction with the status of social dysfunction (P = 0 and with the consent of the income (P = 0 there is significant relationship. Conclusion: In this study, a significant percentage of mineworkers were not in good condition from health, social functioning. It reveals the importance of addressing health issues and vulnerable working class, Intervention studies conducted by employers to improve job satisfaction and increased income and received social support from him, can increase the health indicators related to the body and mind.

  18. Genes related to iron metabolism and susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease in Basque population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, L; De Juan, D; Ruiz-Martínez, J; Emparanza, J I; Sáenz, A; Otaegui, D; Sistiaga, A; Martínez-Lage, P; Lamet, I; Samaranch, L; Buiza, C; Etxeberria, I; Arriola, E; Cuadrado, E; Urdaneta, E; Yanguas, J; López de Munain, A

    2007-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementing disorder and presents with a progressive and irreversible cognitive decline of gradual onset. To date, several reports have involved iron in AD physiopathology. In this study, we have analysed TFC2 variant and HFE mutations (H63D and C282Y) in 211 AD patients and 167 controls recruited from an area of the Basque Country. Furthermore, we have studied APOE genotype as it is a well-known risk factor for AD. APOE epsilon 4 allele was associated with an increased risk of AD and an earlier age at onset, whereas no association was found between TFC2 or HFE C282Y mutation and disease susceptibility. The frequency of H63D mutation was higher in control population (29.9%) than in AD patients (18%), suggesting a protective role of this allele on AD either due to the presence of the mutation itself or through the effect of other related genes in the ancestral haplotype in which it is included.

  19. Contribution of Iron and Aluminum Oxides to Electrokinetic Characteristics of Variable Charge Soils in Relation to Surface Charge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHONG; ZHANGXIAO-NIAN

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of iron and aluminum oxides to electrokinetic characteristics of variable charge soils was studied through determination of electrophoretic mobilities of the red soils treated with either removal of iron oxides or coating of aluminum oxides,and of those deferrated under natural conditions.After removal of the iron oxides,zeta potentials of the latosol and the red earth decreased obviously with a shift of IEP to a lower pH,from 6.4 to 5.3 and 4.1 to 2.4 for the former and the latter,respectively,and the electrokinetic change for the latosol was greater than for the red earth.Zeta potentials of the kaolinite sample increased markedly after coated with iron oxides.The striking effect of iron oxides on electrokinetix properties of the soils was also demonstrated by the electrokinetic differences between the samples from the red and white zones of a plinthitic horizon formed naturally,and between the samples from the gley and bottom horizons of a paddy soil derived from a red earth.The coatings of aluminum oxides on the latosol and the yellow earth made their zeta potentials rise pronouncedly and their IEFs move toward higher pHs,from 6.2 to 6.8 and 4.3 to 5.3 for the former and the latter,respectively.The samples with different particle sizes also exhibited some electrokinetic variation.The experiment showed that the effects of iron and aluminum oxides were closely related to the pH and type of the soils.

  20. Rapid reductive degradation of aqueous p-nitrophenol using nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica with enhanced antioxidation effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lin, E-mail: tanglin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Tang, Jing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Guide; Xie, Xia; Zhou, Yaoyu [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Pang, Ya [Department of Biological Engineering and Environmental Science, Changsha College, Changsha 410003 (China); Fang, Yan; Wang, Jiajia [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Xiong, Weiping [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was doped in mesoporous silica (SBA-15). • High capacity and fast rate for the removal of p-nitrophenol. • Better antioxidant ability of nZVI/SBA-15 than nZVI. • p-Nitrophenol removal depended heavily on immobilized nZVI amount. • Mechanism of PNP removal by nZVI/SBA-15 was proposed. - Abstract: In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica (nZVI/SBA-15) were successfully prepared for effective degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). The nZVI/SBA-15 composites were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall nanoscale zero-valent iron particles were formed and well dispersed on mesoporous silica (SBA-15). Batch experiments revealed that PNP removal declined from 96.70% to 16.14% as solution pH increased from 3.0 to 9.0. Besides, degradation equilibrium was reached within 5 min, which was independent of initial PNP concentration. Furthermore, only a little PNP elimination on SBA-15 indicated that nZVI immobilized on mesoporous silica was mainly responsible for the target contaminant removal. The UV–vis spectrum and XPS measurement confirmed that the PNP removal was a reductive degradation process, which was further proved by the detected intermediates using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The excellent antioxidation ability had been discovered with more than 80% of PNP being removed by nZVI/SBA-15 treated with 30 days’ exposure to air. These results demonstrated the feasible and potential application of nZVI/SBA-15 composites in organic wastewater treatment.

  1. Silica and Pyroxene in IVA Irons; Possible Formation of the IVA Magma by Impact Melting and Reduction of L-LL-Chondrite Materials Followed by Crystallization and Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.; Matsunami, Yoshiyuki; Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Group IVA is a large magmatic group of iron meteorites. The mean DELTA O-17 (= delta O-17 - 0.52(raised dot) delta O-18) of the silicates is approx. plus or minus 1.2%o, similar to the highest values in L chondrites and the lowest values in LL chondrites; delta O-18 values are also in the L/LL range. This strongly suggests that IVA irons formed by melting L-LL parental material, but the mean Ni content of IVA irons (83 mg/g) is much lower than that of a presumed L-LL parent (approx. 170 mg/g) and the low-Ca pyroxene present in two IVA meteorites is Fs13, much lower than the Fs20-29 values in L and LL chondrites. Thus, formation from L-LL precursors requires extensive addition of metallic Fe, probably produced by reduction of FeS and FeO. Group IVA also has S/Ni, Ga/Ni, and Ge/Ni ratios that are much lower than those in L-LL chondrites or any chondrite group that preserves nebular compositions, implying loss of these volatile elements during asteroidal processing. We suggest that these reduction and loss processes occurred near the surface of the asteroid during impact heating, and resulted partly from reduction by C, and partly from the thermal dissociation of FeS and FeO with loss of O and S. The hot (approx. 1770 K) low-viscosity melt quickly moved through channels in the porous asteroid to form a core. Two members of the IVA group, Sao Joao Nepomuceno (hereafter, SJN) and Steinbach, contain moderate amounts of orthopyroxene and silica, and minor amounts of low-Ca clinopyroxene. Even though SJN formed after approx. 26% crystallization and Steinbach formed after approx. 77% Crystallization of the IVA core, both could have originated within several tens of meters of the core-mantle interface if 99% of the crystallization occurred from the center outwards. Two other members of the group (Gibeon and Bishop Canyon) contain tabular tridymite, which we infer to have initially formed as veins deposited from a cooling SiO-rich vapor. The silicates were clearly introduced

  2. The enhancement effect of pre-reduction using zero-valent iron on the solidification of chromite ore processing residue by blast furnace slag and calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinchunzi; Chen, Zhonglin; Shen, Jimin; Wang, Binyuan; Fan, Leitao

    2015-09-01

    A bench scale study was performed to assess the effectiveness of the solidification of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) by blast furnace slag and calcium hydroxide, and investigate the enhancement effect of pre-reduction using zero-valent iron (ZVI) on the solidification treatment. The degree of Cr immobilization was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) as well as the solid waste-extraction procedure for leaching toxicity-sulfuric acid & nitric acid method (Chinese standard HJ/T299-2007). Strength tests and semi-dynamic leaching tests were implemented to investigate the potential for reusing the final treatment product as a readily available construction material. The experimental results showed that the performance of pre-reduction/solidification (S/S) was superior to that of solidification alone. After pre-reduction, all of the S/S treated COPR samples met the TCLP limit for total Cr (5 mg L(-1)), whereas the samples with a COPR content below 40% met the pollution control limit of bricks and building block products (Chinese standard HJ/T 301-2007) produced with COPR for total Cr (0.3 mg L(-1)). At the same time, all of the S/S treated specimens tested were suitable for utilization at certain levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, W.D.

    2009-09-02

    This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  4. Sex-Related HIV Risk Reduction Behavior among Adolescents in DATOS-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vandana; Hser, Yih-Ing; Grella, Christine E.; Houlton, Roberta

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effect of drug treatment on reducing HIV-related risky sex behavior among 796 adolescents entering drug treatment programs in four U.S. cities. Found that 54 percent reported reductions in risky sex behavior after treatment. Lack of improvement was associated with conduct-disorder diagnosis, abuse history, unmet physical and emotional…

  5. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-07

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence.

  6. Decomplexation and subsequent reductive removal of EDTA-chelated Cu II by zero-valent iron coupled with a weak magnetic field: Performances and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xiao; Qiao, Junlian; Zhou, Gongming

    2015-12-30

    The feasibility of EDTA-chelated Cu(II) (Cu(II)-EDTA) removal by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) in the presence of a weak magnetic field (WMF) and the involved mechanisms were systematically investigated. Fe(0) combined with WMF (Fe(0)/WMF) was very effective for removing Cu(II)-EDTA at pH 4.0-6.0 with the rate constants ranging from 0.1190 min(-1) to 0.0704 min(-1). Little passivation of Fe(0) was observed during Cu(II)-EDTA removal by Fe(0)/WMF in 8 consecutive runs when 10.0 mg L(-1) Cu(II)-EDTA was dosed before the initiation of each run. The evidences presented in this study verified that Cu(II)-EDTA was removed by decomplexation followed by reduction/adsorption. In brief, Fe(II) released from Fe(0) corrosion was rapidly oxidized by oxygen to Fe(III) to chelate with EDTA and release free Cu(II), and the detached Cu(II) ions were subsequently reduced/removed by Fe(0)/Fe(II) and co-precipitated by the generated iron (hydr)-oxides. To advance the application of Fe(0)/WMF technology in real practice, a magnetic propeller agitator was designed to offer WMF inside the reactor, which could greatly improve Cu(II)-EDTA removal by Fe(0) and be easily amplified.

  7. Rapid reductive degradation of aqueous p-nitrophenol using nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica with enhanced antioxidation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lin; Tang, Jing; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Guide; Xie, Xia; Zhou, Yaoyu; Pang, Ya; Fang, Yan; Wang, Jiajia; Xiong, Weiping

    2015-04-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica (nZVI/SBA-15) were successfully prepared for effective degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). The nZVI/SBA-15 composites were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall nanoscale zero-valent iron particles were formed and well dispersed on mesoporous silica (SBA-15). Batch experiments revealed that PNP removal declined from 96.70% to 16.14% as solution pH increased from 3.0 to 9.0. Besides, degradation equilibrium was reached within 5 min, which was independent of initial PNP concentration. Furthermore, only a little PNP elimination on SBA-15 indicated that nZVI immobilized on mesoporous silica was mainly responsible for the target contaminant removal. The UV-vis spectrum and XPS measurement confirmed that the PNP removal was a reductive degradation process, which was further proved by the detected intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The excellent antioxidation ability had been discovered with more than 80% of PNP being removed by nZVI/SBA-15 treated with 30 days' exposure to air. These results demonstrated the feasible and potential application of nZVI/SBA-15 composites in organic wastewater treatment.

  8. Siliconizing of iron and molybdenum by electrochemical reduction of silicon in molten SiO{sub 2}–Li{sub 2}O–MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Hideaki, E-mail: hideakis@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Maeda, Masafumi

    2015-08-25

    Highlights: • Silicon in molten silicate was reduced electrochemically on metal electrodes. • Potentials of Fe and Mo electrodes were controlled in SiO{sub 2}–Li{sub 2}O–MgO at 1273 K. • Formation of a Si-containing layer was observed on Fe, depending on the potential. • MoSi{sub 2} layer was formed on the surface of the Mo electrode. - Abstract: Electrochemical reduction of silicon on metal electrodes in molten silicate was studied. An iron sheet was immersed in SiO{sub 2}–Li{sub 2}O–MgO at 1273 K, and the electrode potential was controlled for 1 h. Formation on the iron of a Si-containing layer about 10–30 μm thick was observed after the electrolysis, depending on the potential. When a molybdenum electrode was used, α-MoSi{sub 2} layer about 5 μm thick was formed on the surface. The results suggest the applicability of molten oxide electrolysis as a synthesis method of Si-containing alloy layers.

  9. Alcoholism Risk Reduction in France: A Modernised Approach Related to Alcohol Misuse Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Brousse

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During many years in France, risk reduction strategies for substance abuse concerned prevention strategies in the general population or interventions near users of illicit substances. In this spirit, the reduction of consumption only concerned opiate addicts. With regard to alcohol, the prevention messages relative to controlled consumption were difficult to transmit because of the importance of this product in the culture of the country. In addition, methods of treatment of alcoholism rested on the dogma of abstinence. Several factors have recently led to an evolution in the treatment of alcohol use disorders integrating the reduction of consumption in strategies. Strategies for reducing consumption should aim for consumption below recommended thresholds (two drinks per day for women, three for the men or, at least, in that direction. It must also be supported by pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, which offer possibilities. Failure to manage reduction will allow the goals to be revisited and to reconsider abstinence. Finally this evolution or revolution is a new paradigm carried in particular by a pragmatic approach of the disease and new treatments. The aims of this article are to give elements of comprehension relating to the evolution of the practices in France in prevention and treatment of alcohol use disorders and in particular with regard to the reduction of consumption.

  10. DIRECT INFUSION ESI-MS APPLIED IN THE DETECTION OF BYPRODUCTS DUE TO REDUCTIVE DEGRADATION OF ACETAMIPRID BY ZERO-VALENT IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Cruz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the reductive degradation of acetamiprid (5 mg L-1 in aqueous medium (at pH 2.0 induced by zero-valent iron (50 mg. The process was monitored using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to determine the degradation rate as a function of reaction time, and direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-MS to search for (and potentially characterize any possible byproducts formed during degradation. The results obtained via HPLC showed that after 60 min, the degradation of the substrate reached nearly 100% in an acidic medium, whereas the mineralization rate (as determined by total organic carbon measurements was as low as 3%. Data obtained by DI-ESI-MS showed that byproducts were formed mainly by insertions of hydrogen atoms into the nitrile, imine, and pyridine ring moieties, in addition to the observation of chlorine substitution by hydrogen replacement (hydrodechlorination reactions.

  11. Reduction of unusual iron-sulfur clusters in the H2-sensing regulatory Ni-Fe hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, Thorsten; Löscher, Simone; Lenz, Oliver; Schlodder, Eberhard; Zebger, Ingo; Andersen, Lars K; Hildebrandt, Peter; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Dau, Holger; Friedrich, Bärbel; Haumann, Michael

    2005-05-20

    The regulatory Ni-Fe hydrogenase (RH) from Ralstonia eutropha functions as a hydrogen sensor. The RH consists of the large subunit HoxC housing the Ni-Fe active site and the small subunit HoxB containing Fe-S clusters. The heterolytic cleavage of H(2) at the Ni-Fe active site leads to the EPR-detectable Ni-C state of the protein. For the first time, the simultaneous but EPR-invisible reduction of Fe-S clusters during Ni-C state formation was demonstrated by changes in the UV-visible absorption spectrum as well as by shifts of the iron K-edge from x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the wild-type double dimeric RH(WT) [HoxBC](2) and in a monodimeric derivative designated RH(stop) lacking the C-terminal 55 amino acids of HoxB. According to the analysis of iron EXAFS spectra, the Fe-S clusters of HoxB pronouncedly differ from the three Fe-S clusters in the small subunits of crystallized standard Ni-Fe hydrogenases. Each HoxBC unit of RH(WT) seems to harbor two [2Fe-2S] clusters in addition to a 4Fe species, which may be a [4Fe-3S-3O] cluster. The additional 4Fe-cluster was absent in RH(stop). Reduction of Fe-S clusters in the hydrogen sensor RH may be a first step in the signal transduction chain, which involves complex formation between [HoxBC](2) and tetrameric HoxJ protein, leading to the expression of the energy converting Ni-Fe hydrogenases in R. eutropha.

  12. Reduction of Mn-oxides by ferrous iron in a flow system: column experiment and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Appelo, C. A. J.

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of Mn-oxide by Fe21 was studied in column experiments, using a column filled with natural Mn-oxide coated sand. Analysis of the Mn-oxide indicated the presence of both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) in the Mn-oxide. The initial exchange capacity of the column was determined by displacement of a...

  13. Relation between Omega 3 Fatty Acid, Iron, Zinc and Treatment of ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Shalileh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In some studies, it is suggested that a number of dietary factors including essential fatty acid, iron and zinc deficiency, may be linked to attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD. However, the exact mechanism of this relationship is yet unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, and iron in etiopathology and management of ADHD. For the purpose of this study, Science Direct, PubMed, and Medline databases were explored and thirty-four relevant articles in english language were collected. Eighteen out of twenty-two studies confirmed the relationship between omega-3 fatty acid and ADHD. In addition, the role of insufficient store of iron in developing ADHD symptoms and the positive effect of iron supplement in improvement of ADHD behavioral symptoms have been shown. Also, plasma zinc concentration in children with ADHD was lower than the normal population, and the effect of zinc supplement on reducing on attentive-deficit symptoms was contradictory. Although polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and iron supplements are not suggested as main treatment for ADHD, but if future studies confirm the positive results of that, use of these supplements as complementary treatment will affect ADHD symptoms. Considering the little amount of studies on zinc, more research is necessary.

  14. Cohesive Relations for Surface Atoms in the Iron-Technetium Binary System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-technetium alloys are of relevance to the development of waste forms for disposition of radioactive technetium-99 obtained from spent nuclear fuel. Corrosion of candidate waste forms is a function of the local cohesive energy (loc of surface atoms. A theoretical model for calculating loc is developed. Density functional theory was used to construct a modified embedded atom (MEAM potential for iron-technetium. Materials properties determined for the iron-technetium system were in good agreement with the literature. To explore the relationship between local structure and corrosion, MEAM simulations were performed on representative iron-technetium alloys and intermetallics. Technetium-rich phases have lower loc, suggesting that these phases will be more noble than iron-rich ones. Quantitative estimates of loc based on numbers of nearest neighbors alone can lead to errors up to 0.5 eV. Consequently, atomistic corrosion simulations for alloy systems should utilize physics-based models that consider not only neighbor counts, but also local compositions and atomic arrangements.

  15. Microbial reduction of structural iron in interstratified illite-smectite minerals by a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D; Dong, H; Bishop, M E; Zhang, J; Wang, H; Xie, S; Wang, S; Huang, L; Eberl, D D

    2012-03-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks and could coexist with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic environments, however, the interactions of clay minerals and SRB are not well understood. The objective of this study was to understand the reduction rate and capacity of structural Fe(III) in dioctahedral clay minerals by a mesophilic SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the potential role in catalyzing smectite illitization. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where four different clay minerals (nontronite NAu-2, mixed-layer illite-smectite RAr-1 and ISCz-1, and illite IMt-1) were exposed to D. vulgaris in a non-growth medium with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and sulfate. Our results demonstrated that D. vulgaris was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in these clay minerals, and AQDS enhanced the reduction rate and extent. In the presence of AQDS, sulfate had little effect on Fe(III) bioreduction. In the absence of AQDS, sulfate increased the reduction rate and capacity, suggesting that sulfide produced during sulfate reduction reacted with the phyllosilicate Fe(III). The extent of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals was positively correlated with the percentage of smectite and mineral surface area of these minerals. X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed formation of illite after bioreduction. These data collectively showed that D. vulgaris could promote smectite illitization through reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals.

  16. Microbial reduction of structural iron in interstratified illite-smectite minerals by a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Dong, H.; Bishop, M.E.; Zhang, Jiahua; Wang, Hongfang; Xie, S.; Wang, Shaoming; Huang, L.; Eberl, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks and could coexist with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic environments, however, the interactions of clay minerals and SRB are not well understood. The objective of this study was to understand the reduction rate and capacity of structural Fe(III) in dioctahedral clay minerals by a mesophilic SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the potential role in catalyzing smectite illitization. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where four different clay minerals (nontronite NAu-2, mixed-layer illite-smectite RAr-1 and ISCz-1, and illite IMt-1) were exposed to D. vulgaris in a non-growth medium with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and sulfate. Our results demonstrated that D. vulgaris was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in these clay minerals, and AQDS enhanced the reduction rate and extent. In the presence of AQDS, sulfate had little effect on Fe(III) bioreduction. In the absence of AQDS, sulfate increased the reduction rate and capacity, suggesting that sulfide produced during sulfate reduction reacted with the phyllosilicate Fe(III). The extent of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals was positively correlated with the percentage of smectite and mineral surface area of these minerals. X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed formation of illite after bioreduction. These data collectively showed that D. vulgaris could promote smectite illitization through reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. The Richter Scale of Reduction: decoupling management and climatic related drivers of water conservation behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippy, Megan; Hemati, Azadeh; Grant, Stanley

    2016-04-01

    As global populations grow, cities in drought prone regions of the world such as South East Australia are faced with escalating water scarcity and water security challenges. The management approaches geared towards addressing these challenges are diverse, and background climatic variability further complicates the story. Here we use Melbourne, a city of 4.3 million people in South East Australia that recently faced and overcame a > 10 year "Millennium" drought, as a test case for evaluating the relative importance of various management-related and climatic factors in driving reductions in municipal water consumption (>50% in 12 years). Our analysis suggests that Melbourne's declining municipal consumption cannot be explained by potable substitution alone, as reductions in municipal consumption were not matched by increased use of alternative sources (e.g., urban rain or recycled water). Savings from non revenue water (NRW) reduction (through leak reduction and improved metering) also fell short of the total savings achieved during the drought. In the final analysis, conservation behavior emerged as the dominant driver of municipal water savings, forming a so-called "Richter Scale of Reduction" with conservation saving ~10 fold more water than NRW reduction, which in turn saved ~10 fold more water than alternative water sources. We also used wavelet analysis to illustrate that conservation behavior responds to climate variability at a variety of frequencies (annual-decadal and longer) which correspond to perturbations that impact water system vulnerability and sustainability. Interestingly the shared power of climatic and conservation responses declined as the drought progressed, perhaps reflecting the adoption of more consistent conservation behavior as the drought became increasingly severe.

  18. Frequency-domain generelaized singular peruturbation method for relative error model order reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Reza SHAKER

    2009-01-01

    A new mixed method for relative error model order reduction is proposed.In the proposed method the frequency domain balanced stochastic truncation method is improved by applying the generalized singular perturbation method to the frequency domain balanced system in the reduction procedure.The frequency domain balanced stochastic truncation method,which was proposed in [15] and [17] by the author,is based on two recently developed methods,namely frequency domain balanced truncation within a desired frequency bound and inner-outer factorization techniques.The proposed method in this paper is a carry over of the frequency-domain balanced stochastic truncation and is of interest for practical model order reduction because in this context it shows to keep the accuracy of the approximation as high as possible without sacrificing the computational efficiency and important system properties.It is shown that some important properties of the frequency domain stochastic balanced reduction technique are extended to the proposed reduction method by using the concept and properties of the reciprocal systems.Numerical results show the accuracy,simplicity and flexibility enhancement of the method.

  19. Relation between anemia and blood levels of lead, copper, zinc and iron among children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsy Amal A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is a health problem among infants and children. It is often associated with a decrease in some trace elements (iron, zinc, copper and an increase in heavy metals as lead. This study was done to determine the association of blood lead level > 10 μg/dl, with the increased risk to anemia, also, to investigate the relationship between anemia and changes in blood iron, zinc and copper levels, and measure lead level in drinking water. The study is a cross-sectional performed on 60 children. Venous blood samples were taken from the studied population for estimating hematological parameters as well as iron and ferritin levels. The concentrations of zinc, copper, and lead were measured. The studied population was divided into anemic and non-anemic (control groups. The anemic group was further classified into mild, moderate and severe anemia. The study subjects were also categorized into low and high blood lead level groups. Findings Approximately 63.33% of children had blood lead levels ≥ 10 μg/dl. At the blood lead level range of 10-20 μg/dl, a significant association was found for mild and severe anemia. The blood level of iron and ferritin was found to be significantly lower in high blood lead level and anemic groups than those of the low blood lead level and control groups. Lead level in drinking water was higher than the permissible limit. Conclusion Lead level ≥ 10 μg/dl was significantly associated with anemia, decreased iron absorption and hematological parameters affection. High blood lead levels were associated with low serum iron and ferritin. Lead level in drinking water was found to be higher than the permissible limits.

  20. Iron deficiency chlorosis in plants as related to Fe sources in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, I.; Delgado, A.; de Santiago, A.; del Campillo, M. C.; Torrent, J.

    2012-04-01

    Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a relevant agricultural problem in many areas of the World where calcareous soils are dominant. Although this problem has been traditionally ascribed to the pH-buffering effect of soil carbonates, the content and type of Fe oxides in soil contribute to explain Fe uptake by plants and the incidence of this problem. During the last two decades, it has been demonstrated Fe extraction with oxalate, related to the content of poorly crystalline Fe oxides, was well-correlated with the chlorophyll content of plants and thus with the incidence of IDC. This reveals the contribution of poorly crystalline Fe oxides in soil to Fe availability to plants in calcareous soils, previously shown in microcosm experiments using ferrihydrite as Fe source in the growing media. In order to supply additional information about the contribution of Fe sources in soil to explain the incidence of IDC and to perform accurate methods to predict it, a set of experiments involving different methods to extract soil Fe and plant cultivation in pots to correlate amounts of extracted Fe with the chlorophyll content of plants (measured using the SPAD chlorophyll meter) were performed. The first experiment involved 21 soils and white lupin cultivation, sequential Fe extraction in soil to study Fe forms, and single extractions (DTPA, rapid oxalate and non-buffered hydroxylamine). After that, a set of experiments in pot involving growing of grapevine rootstocks, chickpea, and sunflower were performed, although in this case only single extractions in soil were done. The Fe fraction more closely related to chlorophyll content in plants (r = 0.5, p citrate + ascorbate (CA) extraction, which was the fraction that releases most of the Fe related to poorly crystalline Fe oxides, thus revealing the key role of these compounds in Fe supply to plants. Fe extracted with CA was more correlated with chlorophyll content in plants that oxalate extractable Fe, probably due to a more

  1. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-01-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe−/− mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe−/− mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe−/− mice showed dec...

  2. Relation between anemia and blood levels of lead, copper, zinc and iron among children

    OpenAIRE

    Morsy Amal A; Abd el-hafez Manal A; Zaher Manal M; Hegazy Amal A; Saleh Raya A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Anemia is a health problem among infants and children. It is often associated with a decrease in some trace elements (iron, zinc, copper) and an increase in heavy metals as lead. This study was done to determine the association of blood lead level > 10 μg/dl, with the increased risk to anemia, also, to investigate the relationship between anemia and changes in blood iron, zinc and copper levels, and measure lead level in drinking water. The study is a cross-sectional perfo...

  3. Movement-related cortical potential amplitude reduction after cycling exercise relates to the extent of neuromuscular fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eSpring

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced fatigue affects the motor control and the ability to generate a given force or power. Surface electroencephalography allows researchers to investigate movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP, which reflect preparatory brain activity 1.5 seconds before movement onset. Although the MRCP amplitude appears to increase after repetitive single-joint contractions, the effects of large-muscle group dynamic exercise on such pre-motor potential remain to be described. Sixteen volunteers exercised 30 minutes at 60% of the maximal aerobic power on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10-km all-out time trial. Before and after each of these tasks, knee extensor neuromuscular function was investigated using maximal voluntary contractions (MVC combined with electrical stimulations of the femoral nerve. MRCP was recorded during 60 knee extensions after each neuromuscular sequence.The exercise resulted in a significant decrease in the knee extensor MVC force after the 30-min exercise (-10±8% and the time trial (-21±9%. The voluntary activation level (VAL (-6±8% and -12±10%, peak twitch (Pt (-21±16% and -32±17% and paired stimuli (P100Hz (-7±11% and -12±13% were also significantly reduced after the 30-min exercise and the time trial. The first exercise was followed by a decrease in the MRCP, mainly above the mean activity measured at electrodes FC1-FC2, whereas the reduction observed after the time trial was related to the FC1-FC2 and C2 electrodes. After both exercises, the reduction in the late MRCP component above FC1-FC2 was significantly correlated with the reduction in P100Hz (r=0.61, and the reduction