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Sample records for iron phyllosilicate catalysts

  1. Reactivity of iron-rich phyllosilicates with uranium and chromium through redox transition zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, William D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This project performed thermodynamic, kinetic, and mineral structural studies on the reactivity of phyllosilicate Fe(II/III) with metal-reducing bacteria, and with two important poly-valent DOE contaminants (chromium and uranium) that show high mobility in their oxidized state. We focused on Fe-bearing phyllosilicates because these are important components of the reactive, fines fraction of Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Idaho National Laboratory sediments. Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of Cr and U because of their limited hydraulic conductivity, high specific surface area, and redox reactivity. This was a collaborative project between Penn State (W.D. Burgos – PI), Miami University (H. Dong – Co-PI), and Argonne National Laboratory (K. Kemner and M. Boyanov – Co-PIs). Penn State and Miami University were funded together but separately from ANL. This report summarizes research findings and publications produced by Penn State and Miami University.

  2. The direct transformation of ethanol to ethyl acetate over Cu/SiO2 catalysts that contain copper phyllosilicate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xue Yu; Shubo Zhai; Wanchun Zhu; Shuang Gao; Jianbiao Yan; Hongjing Yuan; Lili Chen; Jiahuan Luo; Wenxiang Zhang; Zhenlu Wang

    2014-07-01

    Cu/SiO2 catalysts that contain copper phyllosilicate, were successfully prepared using the ammonia-evaporation method. The catalysts were characterized via XRD, ICP, BET, FTIR, TPR, XPS, NH3-TPD and FTIR of Pyridine Adsorption techniques. The results demonstrated that the formation of the copper phyllosilicate species significantly affected the structural properties and caused the CuO nanoparticles to become highly dispersed, and the copper phyllosilicate would provide access to the Lewis acidic Cu+ species. It was found that the catalyst with a 23.7 wt% copper loading exhibited the best ethanol conversion and ethyl acetate selectivity. When compared to a catalyst with the same copper loading which was prepared with the impregnation method, the higher activity and selectivity of catalysts might be ascribed to the homogenous distribution of copper nanoparticles, which was the active site for the dehydrogenation, and the amount of Lewis acidic Cu+ sites active for esterification. The synergetic effect between the Cu0 and Lewis acidic sites was the key factor to achieve direct transformation of ethanol to ethyl acetate.

  3. Infrared Spectra Analysis of Thermally Altered Iron Phyllosilicates and the Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, William

    2013-12-01

    This study looks at two iron-rich phyllosilicates, which may be present on Mars. The minerals, greenalite and hisingerite, are rich in iron-II and iron-III, respectively. Small samples (~0.40 grams) of each mineral were crushed and heated in a Lindberg Tube Oven for approximately twenty-four hours at temperatures selected to mimic lava flows and impact events. Following heating, each sample was placed in a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer to collect the near- and mid-infrared spectra. The spectra allowed for these terrestrial analogs to be analyzed with regards to how their structure breaks down with increasing temperature. The samples' colors were also recorded and show varying degrees of oxidation following heating, which is expected in the oxygen-rich ambient atmosphere they were heated under. It is apparent from the spectra that for greenalite, heating at 765°C and higher breaks the mineral down into hematite and a high-temperature silica, such as cristobalite. Hisingerite exhibits the same behavior, but its basic spectra structure is retained in the 710°C sample. The near-infrared spectra were compared with spectra from different locations on Mars, collected by both Mars Express and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The spectra were also compared with each other to allow for analysis of how the iron-III polymorph of a mineral reacts differently from its iron-II counterpart. The multiple facets of the study aim to help understand the current state, history, and evolution of Mars, specifically if clay formation occurred deep in Mars' past or as the result of impact-induced hydrothermal activity more recently in its history.

  4. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  5. Heat, Aromatic Units, and Iron-Rich Phyllosilicates: A Mechanism for Making Macromolecules in the Early Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jonathan S; Sephton, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    The major organic component in carbonaceous chondrites is a highly aromatic macromolecular material. Aromatic organic matter and phyllosilicates are colocated in these meteorites, and it is possible that the physical association represents a synthetic chemical relationship. To explore the potential reactions that could take place to produce the aromatic macromolecular material, we heated various simple aromatic units in the presence of montmorillonite with different exchanged cations. The majority of cation-exchanged montmorillonites tested, sodium-, aluminum-, iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-rich montmorillonites, do not produce polymerization products. By contrast, Fe(3+) cation-exchanged montmorillonite readily facilitates addition reactions between aromatic hydrocarbons. A feasible mechanism for the process is oxidative coupling, which involves a corresponding reduction of the Fe(3+) cation to its Fe(2+) counterpart. A similar reduction process for the other metal cations does not take place, highlighting the importance of iron. This simple process is one feasible mechanism for the construction of aromatic macromolecules such as those found in carbonaceous chondrites. The search for a relationship between Fe(3+)-rich phyllosilicates and aromatic organic structures (particularly dimers, trimers, and more polymerized forms) in carbonaceous chondrites would represent an effective test for constraining the role of clay catalysis in the early Solar System.

  6. Isolation of phyllosilicate-iron redox cycling microorganisms from an illite-smectite rich hydromorphic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenya S Shelobolina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The biogeochemistry of phyllosilicate-Fe redox cycling was studied in a Phalaris arundinacea (Reed Canary Grass dominated redoximorphic soil from Shovelers Sink, a small glacial depression near Madison, WI. The clay size fraction of Shovelers Sink soil accounts for 16% of the dry weight of the soil, yet contributes 74% of total Fe. The dominant mineral in the clay size fraction is mixed-layer illite-smectite, and in contrast to many other soils and sediments, Fe(III oxides are present in low abundance. We examined the Fe biogeochemistry of Shovelers Sink soils, estimated the abundance of Fe redox cycling microorganisms, and isolated in pure culture representative phyllosilicate-Fe oxidizing and reducing organisms. The abundance of phyllosilicate-Fe reducing and oxidizing organisms was low compared to culturable aerobic heterotrophs. Both direct isolation and dilution-to-extinction approaches using structural Fe(II in Bancroft biotite as a Fe(II source, and O2 as the electron acceptor, resulted in recovery of common rhizosphere organisms including Bradyrhizobium spp and strains of Cupriavidus necator and Ralstonia solanacearum. In addition to oxidizing biotite and soluble Fe(II with O2, each of these isolates was able to oxidize Fe(II in reduced NAu-2 smectite with NO3- as the electron acceptor. Oxidized NAu-2 smectite or amorphous Fe(III oxide served as electron acceptors for enrichment and isolation of Fe(III- reducing microorganisms, resulting in recovery of a strain related to G. toluenoxydans. The ability of the recovered microorganisms to cycle phyllosilicate Fe was verified in an experiment with native Shovelers Sink clay. This study confirms that Fe in the native Shovelers Sink clay is readily available for microbial redox transformation and can be cycled by the Fe(III-reducing and Fe(II-oxidizing microorganisms recovered from the soil.

  7. Isolation of phyllosilicate-iron redox cycling microorganisms from an illite-smectite rich hydromorphic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelobolina, Evgenya; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Benzine, Jason; Xiong, Mai Yia; Wu, Tao; Blöthe, Marco; Roden, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of phyllosilicate-Fe redox cycling was studied in a Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass) dominated redoximorphic soil from Shovelers Sink, a small glacial depression near Madison, WI. The clay size fraction of Shovelers Sink soil accounts for 16% of the dry weight of the soil, yet contributes 74% of total Fe. The dominant mineral in the clay size fraction is mixed layer illite-smectite, and in contrast to many other soils and sediments, Fe(III) oxides are present in low abundance. We examined the Fe biogeochemistry of Shovelers Sink soils, estimated the abundance of Fe redox cycling microorganisms, and isolated in pure culture representative phyllosilicate-Fe oxidizing and reducing organisms. The abundance of phyllosilicate-Fe reducing and oxidizing organisms was low compared to culturable aerobic heterotrophs. Both direct isolation and dilution-to-extinction approaches using structural Fe(II) in Bancroft biotite as a Fe(II) source, and O(2) as the electron acceptor, resulted in recovery of common rhizosphere organisms including Bradyrhizobium spp. and strains of Cupriavidus necator and Ralstonia solanacearum. In addition to oxidizing biotite and soluble Fe(II) with O(2), each of these isolates was able to oxidize Fe(II) in reduced NAu-2 smectite with [Formula: see text] as the electron acceptor. Oxidized NAu-2 smectite or amorphous Fe(III) oxide served as electron acceptors for enrichment and isolation of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms, resulting in recovery of a strain related to Geobacter toluenoxydans. The ability of the recovered microorganisms to cycle phyllosilicate-Fe was verified in an experiment with native Shovelers Sink clay. This study confirms that Fe in the native Shovelers Sink clay is readily available for microbial redox transformation and can be cycled by the Fe(III)-reducing and Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms recovered from the soil.

  8. Moessbauer study of function of magnesium in iron oxide catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangJie-Xin; MaoLian-Sheng; 等

    1997-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been utilized for studying the action of Mg element in iron oxide catalysts used for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to sytrene.The experimental results show that the presence of opportune amount of Mg can enhance the stability and dispersion of catalysts,i.e.Mg is an sueful structure promoter in this kind of catalysts.

  9. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  10. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-04-30

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}; however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94% {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C.

  11. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  12. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  13. Fe K-edge XANES and pre-edge polarization dependance for the determination of the oxidation state of iron in antigorite and other phyllosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, M.; Vidal, O.; Marcaillou, C.; Pascarelli, S.; Mathon, O.; Farges, F.

    2012-04-01

    Iron oxidation state in minerals is often a crucial indicator for the understanding of mineralogical reactions related to hydrothermalism, or various natural processes. We investigated here the influence of the linear polarization of the synchrotron X-ray beam on the determination of the iron oxidation state in phyllosilicates. Fe K-edge XANES spectra and pre-peaks of biotite (Bt), chlorite (Chl), talc (Tlc) and antigorite (Atg) crystals have been recorded at different crystal orientations. As a function of the crystal orientation, the experimental results show, 1) important changes both for XANES and pre-peaks, 2) typical changes of spectral signatures for all mineral species, 3) uncorrelated changes between XANES and pre-peaks, 4) important changes of the pre-peak energies, but no significant change of the integrated areas. Ab initio XANES calculations, performed for 6 orientations of the Bt structure are consistent with the experimental measurements. The energy position of the pre-peak centroids changes with crystal orientation by 0.4 eV for Bt and Tlc crystals, and by 0.2 eV for Chl and Atg, which correspond to XFe(apparent)3+ variations (2δ) of 0.22 and 0.15, respectively. Measurements on powdered crystals show that - (2/3)2δ

  14. A bioinspired iron catalyst for nitrate and perchlorate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Courtney L; Park, Yun Ji; Matson, Ellen M; Gordon, Zachary; Fout, Alison R

    2016-11-11

    Nitrate and perchlorate have considerable use in technology, synthetic materials, and agriculture; as a result, they have become pervasive water pollutants. Industrial strategies to chemically reduce these oxyanions often require the use of harsh conditions, but microorganisms can efficiently reduce them enzymatically. We developed an iron catalyst inspired by the active sites of nitrate reductase and (per)chlorate reductase enzymes. The catalyst features a secondary coordination sphere that aids in oxyanion deoxygenation. Upon reduction of the oxyanions, an iron(III)-oxo is formed, which in the presence of protons and electrons regenerates the catalyst and releases water.

  15. Iron Contamination Mechanism and Reaction Performance Research on FCC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracking catalyst iron poisoning would not only influence units’ product slate; when the poisoning is serious, it could also jeopardize FCC catalysts’ fluidization in reaction-regeneration system and further cause bad influences on units’ stable operation. Under catalytic cracking reaction conditions, large amount of iron nanonodules is formed on the seriously iron contaminated catalyst due to exothermic reaction. These nodules intensify the attrition between catalyst particles and generate plenty of fines which severely influence units’ smooth running. A dense layer could be formed on the catalysts’ surface after iron contamination and the dense layer stops reactants to diffuse to inner structures of catalyst. This causes extremely negative effects on catalyst’s heavy oil conversion ability and could greatly cut down gasoline yield while increasing yields of dry gas, coke, and slurry largely. Research shows that catalyst’s reaction performance would be severely deteriorated when iron content in E-cat (equilibrium catalyst exceeds 8000 μg/g.

  16. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C H

    1991-02-14

    Progress is reported for a four-year fundamental investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which were to (1) determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation and (2) model the global rates of deactivation at the surface of the catalyst for the same catalysts. A computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was designed, constructed and tested. Kinetic data for CO hydrogenation on unsupported, unpromoted iron, 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K-promoted 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were obtained as functions of temperature, reactant particle pressures and time. The activity/selectivity and kinetic data are consistent with those previously reported for supported, unpromoted and promoted iron. Two kinds of deactivation were observed during FT synthesis on these samples: (1) loss of surface area after reduction of unsupported, unpromoted iron at 400{degree}C and (2) loss of activity with time due to carbon deposition, especially in the case of K-promoted 99% Fe/1% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deactivation rate data were obtained for CO hydrogenation on promoted Fe as a function of time, temperature, and H{sub 2}/CO ratio. 50 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.J.; Raje, A.; Keogh, R.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low-or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the {open_quotes}standard-catalyst{close_quotes} developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  19. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  20. Sulfiding behavior of iron based coal liquefaction catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikenaga, N.; Taniguchi, H.; Watanabe, A.; Suzuki, T. [Kansai University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-03-01

    In order to understand the transformation mechanisms of iron-sulfur catalyst systems to pyrrhotite, the iron catalysts ({gamma}-FeOOH, {alpha}-FeOOH, Fe(CO){sub 5} and Fe{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}) and sulfur compounds (S and H{sub 2}S) were treated at 150-420{degree}C with or without an activated carbon, and then subjected to XRD and XPS analyses. Pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) was the major phase above 200{degree}C in the XRD profiles of all iron-sulfur catalyst systems. However, the formation of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) from {gamma}-FeOOH and {gamma}-FeOOH on the catalyst surface was observed at 150-325{degree}C by XPS analyses. This result seems to indicate that active species (Fe{sub 1-x}S) would be transformed through FeS{sub 2} as an intermediate, but iron carbonyl complexes were directly transformed into pyrrhotite without the formation of FeS{sub 2}. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Bio-inspired Iron Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Oxidations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Que, Jr., Lawrence [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-03-22

    Stereoselective oxidation of C–H and C=C bonds are catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Inspired by these bioinorganic systems, our group has been exploring the use of nonheme iron complexes as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons using H2O2 as an environmentally friendly and atom-efficient oxidant in order to gain mechanistic insights into these novel transformations. In particular, we have focused on clarifying the nature of the high-valent iron oxidants likely to be involved in these transformations.

  2. Distribution of phyllosilicates on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammannito, Eleonora; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ciarniello, Mauro; Frigeri, Alessandro; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Combe, Jean Philippe; Ehlmann, Bethany; Marchi, Simone; McSween, Hap Y.; Raponi, Andrea; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Toplis, Michael J.; Tosi, Federico; Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; Pieters, Carle M.; Raymond, Carol A.; Schenk, Paul; Zambon, Francesca; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Studies of the dwarf planet Ceres using ground-based and orbiting telescopes proposed a variety of possible surficial composition including water in clay minerals [1], ammoniated phyllosilicates [2], or a mixture of brucite, Mg2CO3 and iron-rich serpentine [3, 4]. But the lack of spectral data in the 2.5 to 2.9 μm interval has precluded definitive identifications. The Dawn spacecraft has been acquiring spectra of the surface of Ceres since January 2015 [5, 6, 7]. The average thermally corrected reflectance spectrum of Ceres shows that the 2.6-4.2μm region is characterized by a broad asymmetric feature, characteristic of H2O/OH bearing materials, with several distinct narrower absorption bands [8]. This spectrum is compatible with the presence on the surface of a mixture of ammoniated-phyllosilicates, Mg-phyllosilicates, carbonates, and dark materials [8]. A strong 2.7-μm absorption dominates the overall spectral properties, and it has been attributed to OH-stretching vibrations in phyllosilicates [9] while the weaker 3.05 μm absorption has been attributed to the presence of NH4+ in phyllosilicates [10]. The spectral parameters of the absorption features at 2.7 and 3.05 μm have been computed to study their position and intensity. The computed spectral position of both absorption features is remarkably homogeneous. The average values are 2.727±0.005 and 3.061±0.005 μm respectively. Since the position of both features is sensitive to the chemical composition of the phyllosilicates, we conclude that the composition of phyllosilicates does not significantly change across the mapped portion of Ceres' surface. The computed values are indicative of Mg-OH phases, like antigorite (Mg-serpentine) or saponite (Mg-smectite) [9]. The presence of Mg-, rather than Fe-serpentine on Ceres may be interpreted as an indication that alteration had been extensive, while the lack of geochemical variation indicates that this is true throughout the exposed upper layer with no

  3. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrevaya, H.

    1992-05-06

    The objective of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. The performance targets are 88% CO+H{sub 2} conversion with less than 1% deactivation/day for 1 month and a methane and ethane selectivity of no more than 7% (based on hydrocarbons and oxygenates only) at a space velocity of at least 2 normal liters per hr gram iron (NL/hr/gFe) using a synthesis gas with 0.5--1.0 H{sub 2}:Co ratio in a slurry reactor.

  4. Sequential extraction method for determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in suspensions of iron-bearing phyllosilicates and uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fubo; Burgos, William D

    2012-11-06

    Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of uranium because of their limited hydraulic conductivity, high specific surface area, and redox reactivity. Standard extraction procedures cannot be accurately applied for the determination of clay-Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in clay mineral-U suspensions such that advanced spectroscopic techniques are required. Instead, we developed and validated a sequential extraction method for determination of clay-Fe(II/III) and U(IV/VI) in clay-U suspensions. In our so-called "H(3)PO(4)-HF-H(2)SO(4) sequential extraction" method, H(3)PO(4)-H(2)SO(4) is used first to solubilize and remove U, and the remaining clay pellet is subject to HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion. Physical separation of U and clay eliminates valence cycling between U(IV/VI) and clay-Fe(II/III) that otherwise occurred in the extraction solutions and caused analytical discrepancies. We further developed an "automated anoxic KPA" method to measure soluble U(VI) and total U (calculate U(IV) by difference) and modified the conventional HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion method to eliminate a series of time-consuming weighing steps. We measured the kinetics of uraninite oxidation by nontronite using this sequential extraction method and anoxic KPA method and measured a stoichiometric ratio of 2.19 ± 0.05 mol clay-Fe(II) produced per mol U(VI) produced (theoretical value of 2.0). We found that we were able to recover 98.0-98.5% of the clay Fe and 98.1-98.5% of the U through the sequential extractions. Compared to the theoretical stoichiometric ratio of 2.0, the parallel extractions of 0.5 M HCl for clay-Fe(II) and 1 M NaHCO(3) for U(VI) leached two-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). The parallel extractions of HF-H(2)SO(4) for clay Fe(II) and 1 M NaHCO(3) for U(VI) leached six-times more Fe(II) than U(VI).

  5. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-29

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the fourteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made towards testing of the system hardware and software. 47 refs.

  6. A chameleon catalyst for nonheme iron-promoted olefin oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shyam R; Javadi, Maedeh Moshref; Feng, Yan; Hyun, Min Young; Oloo, Williamson N; Kim, Cheal; Que, Lawrence

    2014-11-18

    We report the chameleonic reactivity of two nonheme iron catalysts for olefin oxidation with H2O2 that switch from nearly exclusive cis-dihydroxylation of electron-poor olefins to the exclusive epoxidation of electron-rich olefins upon addition of acetic acid. This switching suggests a common precursor to the nucleophilic oxidant proposed to Fe(III)-η(2)-OOH and electrophilic oxidant proposed to Fe(V)(O)(OAc), and reversible coordination of acetic acid as a switching pathway.

  7. Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1994-08-01

    The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

  8. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Characterization of the impregnated iron based catalyst for direct coal liquefaction by EXAFS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianliYang; JishengZhun; 等

    2001-01-01

    Catalyst plays an important role in direct cola liquefaction(DCL)[1],Due to relatively high activity,low cost and environmentally benign for disposal,iron catalysts are regarded as the most attractive catalysts for DCL.To maximize catalytic effect and minimize catalyst usage,ultra-fine size catalysts are preferred.The most effective catalysts are found to be those impregnated onto coal because of their high dispersion on coal surface and intimate contact with coal particles.

  10. Fabrication of Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts by Deposition of Iron Nanocrystals on Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casavola, Marianna; Hermannsdoerfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels; Dugulan, A. Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of supported catalysts consisting of colloidal iron oxide nanocrystals with tunable size, geometry, and loadinghomogeneously dispersed on carbon nanotube (CNT) supportsis described herein. The catalyst synthesis is performed in a two-step approach. First, colloidal iron and iron oxid

  11. Manganese and Iron Catalysts in Alkyd Paints and Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hage

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many paint, ink and coating formulations contain alkyd-based resins which cure via autoxidation mechanisms. Whilst cobalt-soaps have been used for many decades, there is a continuing and accelerating desire by paint companies to develop alternatives for the cobalt soaps, due to likely classification as carcinogens under the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals legislation. Alternative driers, for example manganese and iron soaps, have been applied for this purpose. However, relatively poor curing capabilities make it necessary to increase the level of metal salts to such a level that often coloring of the paint formulation occurs. More recent developments include the application of manganese and iron complexes with a variety of organic ligands. This review will discuss the chemistry of alkyd resin curing, the applications and reactions of cobalt-soaps as curing agents, and, subsequently, the paint drying aspects and mechanisms of (model alkyd curing using manganese and iron catalysts.

  12. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun‐Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-01-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique...

  13. Study on iron-manganese catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOSTAFA FEYZI; FATANEH JAFARI

    2012-01-01

    Iron-manganese catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method.Characterization of catalysts was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),temperature program reduction (TPR),N2 adsorptiondesorption measurements.The results from catalytic performance tests in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis showed that the iron-manganese catalysts are supersensitive to catalyst composition and materials source.It was found that C2~4 light olefins increased while CH4 and CO2 decreased by using iron-manganese catalyst prepared from iron (Ⅱ) sulfate (A catalyst).The activity and selectivity of A catalyst was studied in different operational conditions.The results showed that the best operational conditions for C2~4 light olefins production were H2/CO=1/1 (GHSV=2 400 h-1) at 260 ℃ under 0.3 MPa total pressure.

  14. Mixed iron-erbium vanadate NH3-SCR catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Casanova, Marzia; Llorca Piqué, Jordi; Schermanz, Karl; Trovarelli, Alessandro; Sagar, Amod

    2015-01-01

    A series of SCR catalysts of mixed iron-erbium vanadates supported on TiO2-WO3-SiO2 were prepared and their reduction, textural, structural and morphological properties characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray powder diffraction, B.E.T. methods and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of Fe/Er ratio in the vanadate as well as the effect of aging conditions on their activity in ammonia SCR reaction was investigated. SCR activity at medium/low temperature was found to...

  15. The precursor phase composition of iron catalyst and discovery of FeO based catalyst for ammonia synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘化章; 李小年

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between the activity and the precursor phase composition of the molten iron catalyst for ammonia synthesis has been studied with high pressure testing equipment and XRD. A humped curve between the activity and Fe2+/Fe3+ has been obtained. It is found that the unicity of the iron oxidate phase in precursor is an essential condition of the high activity of the iron catalyst and that the uniform distribution of the adominant phase and the promoters is the key to preparing a catalyst with better performance The humped curve is interpreted using the ratio f of the phase compositions in precursor. A new idea has been obtained that the activity change of the molten iron catalyst depends essentially on the molecule ratio of the different iron oxidates in precursor under the certain promoters, and it is found that the FeO based catalyst for ammonia synthesis with Wustite phase structure (Fe1-xO, 0.04≤x≤0.10) has the highest activity of all the molten iron catalysts for ammonia synthesis.

  16. Directed plant cell-wall accumulation of iron: embedding co-catalyst for efficient biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien-Yuan Lin; Joseph E. Jakes; Bryon S. Donohoe; Peter N. Ciesielski; Haibing Yang; Sophie-Charlotte Gleber; Stefan Vogt; Shi-You Ding; Wendy A. Peer; Angus S. Murphy; Maureen C. McCann; Michael E. Himmel; Melvin P. Tucker; Hui Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plant lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, renewable feedstock for the production of biobased fuels and chemicals. Previously, we showed that iron can act as a co-catalyst to improve the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, directly adding iron catalysts into biomass prior to pretreatment is diffusion limited,...

  17. A novel fused iron catalyst for ammonia synthesis promoted with rare earth gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiujin; LIN Bingyu; LIN Jianxin; WANG Rong; WEI Kemei

    2008-01-01

    Rare earth gangue, which mainly consists of mixtures of fight rare earths such as lanthana, ceda, neodymium oxide and praseo-dymium oxide, was used as the promoter of fused iron catalysts for ammonia synthesis. The result showed that the activity of the catalyst promoted with rare earth gangue was comparable with those of commercial iron catalysts with high amount of cobalt. The role of rare earths was owed to their advantages for favoring the deep reduction of the main composite in catalyst, i.e., iron oxide. This finding indicated that the use of rare earth gangue could decrease the content of cobalt or even completely replace cobalt, which was used to be regarded as unsub-stitutable promoters for high performance ammonia catalyst; therefore, the cost of fused iron catalysts would decrease significantly.

  18. Alternative Models of Iron and Cobalt Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization and Polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrin; Wedeking; Sherrif; Adewuyi; Maliha; Asma; Igor; Vystorop; Saliu; Amolegbe; Elena; Novikova

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Great progresses have been made in the field of transition metal-based complexes as catalytic precursors for olefin oligomerization and polymerization,in which the core subjects will remain as "know and how" to develop novel catalysts both in academic and industrial consideration.The key advantage of iron and cobalt catalyst for ethylene polymerization is to produce vinyl-type polyethylenes.Therefore following the pioneering works of bis(imino) pyridyl iron and cobalt catalyst by Brookhart[1] ...

  19. Mechanochemical activation of iron ore-based catalysts for the hydrogenation of brown coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Chumakov, V.G.; Moiseeva, G.A. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Chemistry and Chemical Technology

    2000-10-01

    Genesis of pyrrhotite catalysts from different iron ore concentrates and pure iron oxides was investigated using the method of mechanochemical treatment in a planetary mill. The dispersion and fine crystalline structure of oxide and pyrrhotite particles were studied as the function of mechanical load, sulfiding temperature and mode of preparation. Methods for the preparation of high performance iron ore-based catalysts for brown coal hydrogenation have been developed. (orig.)

  20. Monolayer Iron Carbide Films on Au(111) as a Fischer–Tropsch Model Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannie, Gilbère; Lammich, Lutz; Li, Yong-Wang;

    2014-01-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we characterize the atomic-scale details of ultrathin films of iron carbide (FexCy) on Au(111) synthesized as a potential model system for the active iron carbide phase in iron Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. The experiments show that room...

  1. Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites and their preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.

    2007-01-09

    Polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites that exhibit superior properties compared to the polymer alone, and methods-for producing these polymer-phyllosilicate nanocomposites, are provided. Polymeric surfactant compatabilizers are adsorbed onto the surface of hydrophilic or natural phyllosilicates to facilitate the dispersal and exfoliation of the phyllosilicate in a polymer matrix. Utilizing polymeric glycol based surfactants, polymeric dicarboxylic acids, polymeric diammonium surfactants, and polymeric diamine surfactants as compatabilizers facilitates natural phyllosilicate and hydrophilic organoclay dispersal in a polymer matrix to produce nanocomposites.

  2. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitava Sarkar; James K. Neathery; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-12-31

    A fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of operation since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products in one approach may be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase iron-based FTS and is a key factor for optimizing operating costs. The separation problem is further compounded by attrition of iron catalyst particles and the formation of ultra-fine particles.

  3. Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-based Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaly, Ahmad; Georgas, Adam; Leboreiro, Jose; Arora, Salil; Head, Megann; Trembly, Jason; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2011-09-30

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a hydrogen production technology for gasification applications based on a circulating fluid-bed reactor and an attrition resistant iron catalyst. The work towards achieving this objective consisted of three key activities: • Development of an iron-based catalyst suitable for a circulating fluid-bed reactor • Design, construction, and operation of a bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor system for hydrogen production • Techno-economic analysis of the steam-iron and the pressure swing adsorption hydrogen production processes. This report describes the work completed in each of these activities during this project. The catalyst development and testing program prepared and iron-based catalysts using different support and promoters to identify catalysts that had sufficient activity for cyclic reduction with syngas and steam oxidation and attrition resistance to enable use in a circulating fluid-bed reactor system. The best performing catalyst from this catalyst development program was produced by a commercial catalyst toll manufacturer to support the bench-scale testing activities. The reactor testing systems used during material development evaluated catalysts in a single fluid-bed reactor by cycling between reduction with syngas and oxidation with steam. The prototype SIP reactor system (PSRS) consisted of two circulating fluid-bed reactors with the iron catalyst being transferred between the two reactors. This design enabled demonstration of the technical feasibility of the combination of the circulating fluid-bed reactor system and the iron-based catalyst for commercial hydrogen production. The specific activities associated with this bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor systems that were completed in this project included design, construction, commissioning, and operation. The experimental portion of this project focused on technical demonstration of the performance of an iron-based catalyst and a

  4. The microphysics of phyllosilicate friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts most of the experimentally observed trends in frictional behaviour and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  5. Mordenite - Type Zeolite SCR Catalysts with Iron or Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Cu/mordenite catalysts were found to be highly active for the SCR of NO with NH3 and exhibited high resistance to alkali poisoning. Redox and acidic properties of Cu/mordenite were well preserved after poisoning with potassium unlike that of vanadium catalysts. Fe-mordenite catalysts also reveale...... to be essential requirements for the high alkali resistance. Mordenite-type zeolite based catalysts could therefore be attractive alternatives to conventional SCR catalysts for biomass fired power plant flue gas treatment....

  6. A nickel iron diselenide-derived efficient oxygen-evolution catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

    2016-08-01

    Efficient oxygen-evolution reaction catalysts are required for the cost-effective generation of solar fuels. Metal selenides have been reported as promising oxygen-evolution catalysts; however, their active forms are yet to be elucidated. Here we show that a representative selenide catalyst, nickel selenide, is entirely converted into nickel hydroxide under oxygen-evolution conditions. This result indicates that metal selenides are unstable during oxygen evolution, and the in situ generated metal oxides are responsible for their activity. This knowledge inspired us to synthesize nanostructured nickel iron diselenide, a hitherto unknown metal selenide, and to use it as a templating precursor to a highly active nickel iron oxide catalyst. This selenide-derived oxide catalyses oxygen evolution with an overpotential of only 195 mV for 10 mA cm-2. Our work underscores the importance of identifying the active species of oxygen-evolution catalysts, and demonstrates how such knowledge can be applied to develop better catalysts.

  7. The surface of iron molybdate catalysts used for the selective oxidation of methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Benjamin R.; Pudge, Geoffrey J. F.; Bugler, Keith G.; Rushby, Alice V.; Kondrat, Simon; Bartley, Jonathan; Golunski, Stanislaw; Taylor, Stuart H.; Gibson, Emma; Wells, Peter. P.; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is a major chemical process carried out catalytically and iron molybdate is one of the major catalysts for this process. In this paper we explore the nature of the active and selective surfaces of iron molybdate catalysts and show that the effective catalysts comprise molybdenum rich surfaces. We conclude that it is therefore important to maximise the surface area of these active catalysts and to this end we have studied catalysts made using a new physical grinding method with oxalic acid. For super-stoichiometric materials (Fe:Mo = 1:2.2) the reaction data show that physical mixing produces effective catalysts, possibly offering an improvement over the conventional co-precipitation method.

  8. Effects of Cerium on Reduction of Non-Chromium Iron Based CO Shift Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏运来; 胡捷; 马卓娜; 杜宝石; 郭益群

    2001-01-01

    The effects of Ce on reduction of non-chromium iron based CO shift catalyst were studied by XRD, TPR, SEM and XPS. The results show that Ce refines Fe2O3 grains and riches on the surface of catalyst in the process of reduction, which leads to decrease of the initial reductive temperature and increase of the final reductive temperature.

  9. Use of phyllosilicates in electrochemical devices: possible use of sepiolite as a support of catalysts in direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC); Utilizacao de filosilicatos em dispositivos eletroquimicos: possivel uso da sepiolita como suporte de catalisadores em celulas a combustivel com uso direto de etanol (DAFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra-Silva, J.; Silva, A.C.; Mello-Castanho, S.R.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cerpa, A. [Universidad Europea de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Direct alcohol Fuel cells (DAFC) are interesting to use Brazil for reasons of fuel logistics and availability. The catalysts used in these devices to promote the oxidation of alcohol at the anode need to be fixed on a substrate which must provide high specific surface area, porosity, chemical and thermal resistance, this target can be achieved with the characteristics sepiolite. This paper proposes sepiolite as catalyst support for DAFC. Sepiolite is a phyllosilicate with double layered tetrahedral silicon cells and fibrillar structure. Catalysts (Pt / Sb / Sn) were prepared by cation substitution method and tested by cyclic voltammetry. Techniques as XRD and FT-IR were also used for characterizing materials. Was obtained up to 35 mA / g (Pt) peak current (redox ethanol) indicating the possibility of sepiolite technology development to use un proposed purpose. (author)

  10. Nanocrystalline Iron-Ore-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Seok; Park, Ji Chan; Lee, Ho-Tae; Yang, Jung-Il; Hong, SungJun; Jung, Heon; Chun, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Nanocrystalline iron ore particles were fabricated by a wet-milling process using an Ultra Apex Mill, after which they were used as raw materials of iron-based catalysts for low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) below 280 degrees C, which usually requires catalysts with a high surface area, a large pore volume, and a small crystallite size. The wet-milling process using the Ultra Apex Mill effectively destroyed the initial crystallite structure of the natural iron ores of several tens to hundreds of nanometers in size, resulting in the generation of nanocrystalline iron ore particles with a high surface area and a large pore volume. The iron-ore-based catalysts prepared from the nanocrystalline iron ore particles effectively catalyzed the low-temperature FTS, displaying a high CO conversion (about 90%) and good C5+ hydrocarbon productivity (about 0.22 g/g(cat)(-h)). This demonstrates the feasibility of using the iron-ore-based catalysts as inexpensive and disposable catalysts for the low-temperature FTS.

  11. Study on the Precursor Phase Composition of Fused Iron Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the precursor composition of fused iron catalyst on the performance of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was investigated. XRD, BET and CO2 adsorption experiments were carried out to provide better insight into the relationship therein. The results showed that the selectivity of C5+ hydrocarbon products was dependent on the mole ratio of Fe2+/Fe3+, which was represented by a hump-shaped curve. Catalysts with precursors containing Fe3O4 phase favored the magnetite spinal formation during F-T reaction, while Fe1-xO-based catalysts were more likely to favor the formation and growth of the iron carbide crystals.

  12. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability; Final report, September 1987--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrevaya, H.

    1993-12-27

    Precipitated iron catalysts are expected to be used in next generation slurry reactors for large-scale production of transportation fuels from synthesis gas. These reactors are expected to operate at higher temperatures and lower H{sub 2}:CO ratios relative to the Sasol Arge reactor (Table 1A). The feasibility of using iron catalysts has been demonstrated under relatively mild Arge-type conditions but not under more severe slurry conditions. Possibly, an improvement in catalytic stability will be needed to make iron catalysts suitable for slurry operation. This program was aimed at identifying the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and use of these chemical principles in the design of more stable catalysts. A new precipitated Fe catalyst was developed in this program for slurry reactor operation. The new Fe catalyst is predicted to perform slightly below the performance targets for slurry bubble column operation. Stability targets appear to be achievable. This catalyst did not noticeably deactivate during 1,740 hours on-stream. Compared to the selectivity target, an excess of 2% C{sub 1} + C{sub 2} was formed at 265{degrees}C. Based on the initial catalyst inventory in the autoclave, the catalyst seems to be short of the activity target by a factor of 1.8 at 265{degrees}C and 1.3 at 275{degrees}C. However, actual specific activities are likely to be closer to target because of catalyst inventory loss across the filter during the run and because catalytic activities were underestimated at low conversions.

  13. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Nonprecious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction are the ultimate materials and the foremost subject for low‐temperature fuel cells. A novel type of catalysts prepared by high‐pressure pyrolysis is reported. The catalyst is featured by hollow spherical morphologies consisting...... of uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR......). As a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  14. Mordenite - Type Zeolite SCR Catalysts with Iron or Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Cu/mordenite catalysts were found to be highly active for the SCR of NO with NH3 and exhibited high resistance to alkali poisoning. Redox and acidic properties of Cu/mordenite were well preserved after poisoning with potassium unlike that of vanadium catalysts. Fe-mordenite catalysts also reveale...... to be essential requirements for the high alkali resistance. Mordenite-type zeolite based catalysts could therefore be attractive alternatives to conventional SCR catalysts for biomass fired power plant flue gas treatment.......Cu/mordenite catalysts were found to be highly active for the SCR of NO with NH3 and exhibited high resistance to alkali poisoning. Redox and acidic properties of Cu/mordenite were well preserved after poisoning with potassium unlike that of vanadium catalysts. Fe-mordenite catalysts also revealed...

  15. Novel, high-activity hydroprocessing catalysts: Iron group phosphides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianqin

    A series of iron, cobalt and nickel transition metal phosphides was synthesized by means of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of the corresponding phosphates. The same materials, Fe2P, CoP and NO, were also prepared on a silica (SiO2) support. The phase purity of these catalysts was established by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface properties were determined by N2 BET specific surface area (Sg) measurements and CO chemisorption. The activities of the silica-supported catalysts were tested in a three-phase trickle bed reactor for the simultaneous hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene using a model liquid feed at realistic conditions (30 atm, 370°C). The reactivity studies showed that the nickel phosphide (Ni2P/SiO2) was the most active of the catalysts. Compared with a commercial Ni-Mo-S/gamma-Al 2O3 catalyst at the same conditions, Ni2P/silica had a substantially higher HDS activity (100% vs. 76%) and HDN activity (82% vs. 38%). Because of their good hydrotreating activity, an extensive study of the preparation of silica supported nickel phosphides, Ni2P/SiO 2, was carried out. The parameters investigated were the phosphorus content and the weight loading of the active phase. The most active composition was found to have a starting synthesis Ni/P ratio close to 1/2, and the best loading of this sample on silica was observed to be 18 wt.%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements were employed to determine the structures of the supported samples. The main phase before and after reaction was found to be Ni2P, but some sulfur was found to be retained after reaction. A comprehensive scrutiny of the HDN reaction mechanism was also made over the Ni2P/SiO2 sample (Ni/P = 1/2) by comparing the HDN activity of a series of piperidine derivatives of different structure. It was found that piperidine adsorption involved an alpha-H activation

  16. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  17. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woongchul; Yang, Gang; Kim, Suk Lae; Liu, Peng; Sue, Hung-Jue; Yu, Choongho

    2016-05-01

    Prohibitively expensive precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been one of the major hurdles in a wide use of electrochemical cells. Recent significant efforts to develop precious metal free catalysts have resulted in excellent catalytic activities. However, complicated and time-consuming synthesis processes have negated the cost benefit. Moreover, detailed analysis about catalytically active sites and the role of each element in these high-performance catalysts containing nanomaterials for large surface areas are often lacking. Here we report a facile one-step synthesis method of nitrogen-iron coordinated carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts without precious metals. Our catalysts show excellent long-term stability and onset ORR potential comparable to those of other precious metal free catalysts, and the maximum limiting current density from our catalysts is larger than that of the Pt-based catalysts. We carry out a series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without iron and nitrogen in CNT, and identify that the coordination of nitrogen and iron in CNT plays a key role in achieving the excellent catalytic performances. We anticipate our one-step process could be used for mass production of precious metal free electrocatalysts for a wide range of electrochemical cells including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  18. THE BEHAVIOR OF HOMOGENEOUS IRON-BASED CATALYSTS BEARING PYRIDINE DIIMINE LIGANDS FOR ETHYLENE POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao-ming Qiu; Ling-gang Sun; You-liang Hu; Yu-fei Li

    2000-01-01

    The polymerization of ethylene by two iron-based catalysts,{[2,6-ArN=C(Me)2C5H3N]FeCl2} (Ar = 2,6-C6H3-Me2Ⅰ; 2,6-C6H3 (I-Pr)2 Ⅱ) has been investigated. Catalyst Ⅱ produces higher molecular weight polyethylene (PE) and broadened polydispersities relative to catalyst Ⅰ under analogous conditions and all polymers are linear. The kinetic profiles with iron catalysts showed a smooth pattern during both rate build-up and rate lowering, which are different from the metallocene catalysts. The polymerization activity increases with Al/Fe value and an optimum temperature range at 40~45 ℃ was observed. The molecular weight of PE decreases with the increase of Al/Fe ratio and rise of polymerization temperature.

  19. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    of uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR......). As a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  20. Effect of mass transfer limitations on catalyst performance during reduction and carburization of iron based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akbar; Zamaniyan; Yadollah; Mortazavi; Abbas; Ali; Khodadadi; Ali; Nakhaei; Pour

    2013-01-01

    Existence of intraparticle mass transfer limitations under typical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has been reported previously,but there is no suitable study on the existence of intraparticle diffusion limitations under pretreatment steps (reduction and activation) and their effect on catalytic performance for iron based catalysts.In this study,Fe-Cu-La-SiO2 catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method.To investigate the intraparticle mass transfer limitation under reduction,activation and reaction steps,and its effect on catalytic performance,catalyst pellets with different sizes of 6,3,1 and 0.5 mm have been prepared.All catalysts were calcined,pretreated and tested under similar conditions.The catalysts were activated in hydrogen (5%H2in N2) at 450℃ for 3 h and exposed to syngas (H2/CO=1) at 270℃ and atmospheric pressure for 40 h.Afterwards,FTS reaction tests were performed for approximately 120 h to reach steady state conditions at 290℃,17 bar and a feed flow (syngas H2/CO=1) rate of 3 L/h (STP).Using small pellets resulted in higher CO conversion,FT reaction rate and C5+ productivity as compared with larger pellets.The small pellets reached steady state conditions just 20 h after starting the reaction.Whereas for larger pellets,CO conversion,FT reaction rate and C5+ productivity increased gradually,and reached steady state and maximum values after 120 h of operation.The results illustrate that mass transfer limitations exist not only for FTS reaction but also for the reduction and carburization steps which lead to various phase formation through catalyst activation.Also the results indicate that some effects of mass transfer limitations in activation step,can be compensated in the reaction step.The results can be used for better design of iron based catalyst to improve the process economy.

  1. Recycling of a spent iron based catalyst for the complete oxidation of toluene: effect of palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Chai; Nah, Jae Woon

    2015-01-01

    Complete oxidation of volatile organic compound (toluene) was carried out to assess the property and activity of the palladium-spent iron based catalyst. The properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized by using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and by conducting temperature-programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission transmission electron microscopy. The addition of palladium to the spent iron based catalyst pretreated with oxalic acid shifted the conversion curve for the total oxidation of toluene to lower temperature. An increase in the toluene conversion due to palladium was highly related to the easier lattice oxygen mobility of the catalysts. Instrumental analysis suggested the presence of a strong interaction between palladium and iron oxide species. Moreover, in the case of reducing the Pd/Fe catalyst with hydrogen, palladium accelerated the reducing iron oxides, subsequently decreasing the toluene conversion. As a result, the oxidation states of palladium and iron had an important effect on the catalytic activity.

  2. Effect of Manganese Incorporation Manner on an Iron-Based Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingzhen Li; Yong Yang; Chenghua Zhang; Zhichao Tao; Haijun Wan; Xia An; Hongwei Xiang; Yongwang Li

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the manganese incorporation manner on the textural properties,bulk and surface phase compositions,reduction/carburization behaviors,and surface basicity of an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst.The catalyst samples were characterized by N2 Physisorption,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS),H2(or CO) temperature-programmed reduction(TPR),CO2 temperature-programmed desorption(TPD),and Mossbauer spectroscopy.The FTS performance of the catalysts was studied in a slurry-phase continuously stirred tank reactor(CSTR).The characterization results indicated that the manganese promoter incor-porated by using the coprecipitation method could improve the dispersion of iron oxide,and decrease the size of the iron oxide crystallite.The manganese incorporated with the impregnation method is enriched on the catalyst's surface.The manganese promoter added with the impregnation method suppresses the reduction and carburization of the catalyst in H2,CO,and syngas because of the excessive enrichment of manganese on the catalyst surface.The catalyst added manganese using the coprecipitation method has the highest CO conversion (51.9%) and the lowest selectivity for heavy hydrocarbons(C12+).

  3. Electrophoretic deposition of iron catalyst on C-fiber textiles for the growth of carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2014-11-01

    In this study, carbon nanofibers synthesis has been conducted by chemical vapor deposition on C-fiber textiles coated with an iron catalyst via electrophoretic deposition. C-fiber textiles were oxidized with nitric acid before the iron catalyst was plated by electrophoretic deposition. Due to oxidation, the hydroxyl group was created on the C-fiber textiles and was used as an active site for iron catalyst deposition. It was verified that the iron catalyst was deposited on the C-fiber textiles, while current, voltage, and deposition time varied and the concentration of electrolyte was kept constant in electrophoretic deposition. After being deposited, the iron particles were dried in oven for 24 hours and reduced by hydrogen gas in a furnace. Ethylene gas was introduced for the growth of carbon nanofibers and the growth temperature was then varied to find the optimal growth temperature of the carbon nanofibers. Thus, the characteristics of carbon nanofibers were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It is verified that the iron particles were most evenly deposited at 0.1 A for 3 minutes. Carbon nanofibers grew to 150-200 nm most evenly at 600 degrees C via temperature variations in CVD.

  4. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-10-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

  5. Iron-Mediated Homogeneous ICAR ATRP of Methyl Methacrylate under ppm Level Organometallic Catalyst Iron(III Acetylacetonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP is an important polymerization process in polymer synthesis. However, a typical ATRP system has some drawbacks. For example, it needs a large amount of transition metal catalyst, and it is difficult or expensive to remove the metal catalyst residue in products. In order to reduce the amount of catalyst and considering good biocompatibility and low toxicity of the iron catalyst, in this work, we developed a homogeneous polymerization system of initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP with just a ppm level of iron catalyst. Herein, we used oil-soluble iron (III acetylacetonate (Fe(acac3 as the organometallic catalyst, 1,1′-azobis (cyclohexanecarbonitrile (ACHN with longer half-life period as the thermal initiator, ethyl 2-bromophenylacetate (EBPA as the initiator, triphenylphosphine (PPh3 as the ligand, toluene as the solvent and methyl methacrylate (MMA as the model monomer. The factors related with the polymerization system, such as concentration of Fe(acac3 and ACHN and polymerization kinetics, were investigated in detail at 90 °C. It was found that a polymer with an acceptable molecular weight distribution (Mw/Mn = 1.43 at 45.9% of monomer conversion could be obtained even with 1 ppm of Fe(acac3, making it needless to remove the residual metal in the resultant polymers, which makes such an ICAR ATRP process much more industrially attractive. The “living” features of this polymerization system were further confirmed by chain-extension experiment.

  6. Gold-Iron Oxide Catalyst for CO Oxidation: Effect of Support Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Zhen Cui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold-iron oxide (Au/FeOx is one of the highly active catalysts for CO oxidation, and is also a typical system for the study of the chemistry of gold catalysis. In this work, two different types of iron oxide supports, i.e., hydroxylated (Fe_OH and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O, have been used for the deposition of gold via a deposition-precipitation (DP method. The structure of iron oxide has been tuned by either selecting precipitated pH of 6.7–11.2 for Fe_OH or changing calcination temperature of from 200 to 600 °C for Fe_O. Then, 1 wt. % Au catalysts on these iron oxide supports were measured for low-temperature CO oxidation reaction. Both fresh and used samples have been characterized by multiple techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES and temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H2-TPR. It has been demonstrated that the surface properties of the iron oxide support, as well as the metal-support interaction, plays crucial roles on the performance of Au/FeOx catalysts in CO oxidation.

  7. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jalan A. Yani KM. 36 Banjarbaru, 70714, South Kalimantan (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Sutijan; Rochmadi [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Budiman, Arief, E-mail: abudiman@ugm.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Center for Energy Studies, Gadjah Mada University, Sekip K1A, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-03

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 – 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 – 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H{sup 2} productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  8. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat; Sutijan, Rochmadi, Budiman, Arief

    2016-06-01

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 - 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 - 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H2 productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  9. Water Soluble Iron aminoclay for Catalytic Reduction of Nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. ANBU ANJUGAM VANDARKUZHALI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble iron decorated phyllosilicate is synthesized through one pot sol-gel synthesis by a wet chemical method using NaBH4 as reducing agent. The as-synthesized nanocomposite is characterized by powder-XRD and TGA techniques. The morphology of the composite is obtained using HRSEM and HRTEM. The prepared nanocomposite is an efficient catalyst for the reduction of nitrophenol.

  10. The formation of filamentous carbon on iron and nickel catalysts : II. Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, A.J.H.M.; Bokx, P.K. de; Boellaard, E.; Klop, W.; Geus, John W.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of filamentous carbon growth on iron and nickel catalysts has been studied using a combination of magnetic techniques and temperature-programmed hydrogenation. CO and CH4 were used as carburizing agents. It is concluded that high carbide contents are a prerequisite for the nucleation o

  11. Morphological transformation during activation and reaction of an iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, N.B.; Kohler, S.; Harrington, M. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to support the development of slurry-phase bubble column processes being studied at the La Porte Alternative Fuel Development Unit. This paper describes the aspects of Sandia`s recent work regarding the advancement and understanding of the iron catalyst used in the slurry phase process. A number of techniques were used to understand the chemical and physical effects of pretreatment and reaction on the attrition and carbon deposition characteristics of iron catalysts. Unless otherwise stated, the data discussed was derived form experiments carried out on the catalyst chosen for the summer 1994 Fischer-Tropsch run at LaPorte, UCI 1185-78-370, (an L 3950 type) that is 88% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11% CuO, and 0.052%K{sub 2}O.

  12. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Catalysts For F-T SBCRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2006-01-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+ H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-(FE) based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment; makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult, if not impossible; and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Under a previous Department of Energy (DOE)/University Research Grant (UCR) grant, Hampton University reported, for the first time, the development of demonstrably attrition-resistant Fe F-T synthesis catalysts having good activity, selectivity, and attrition resistance. These catalysts were prepared by spray drying Fe catalysts with potassium (K), copper (Cu), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) as promoters. SiO{sub 2} was also used as a binder for spray drying. These catalysts were tested for activity and selectivity in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. Fundamental understanding of attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried HPR-43 catalyst having average particle size (aps) of 70 {micro}m with high attrition resistance. This HPR-43 attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C{sub 5+} selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of less than 5% at an

  13. Spectroscopic investigation and direct comparison of the reactivities of iron pyridyl oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Mayes, Howard G.; Queensen, Matthew J.; Bauer, Eike B.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.

    2017-03-01

    The growing interest in green chemistry has fueled attention to the development and characterization of effective iron complex oxidation catalysts. A number of iron complexes are known to catalyze the oxidation of organic substrates utilizing peroxides as the oxidant. Their development is complicated by a lack of direct comparison of the reactivities of the iron complexes. To begin to correlate reactivity with structural elements, we compare the reactivities of a series of iron pyridyl complexes toward a single dye substrate, malachite green (MG), for which colorless oxidation products are established. Complexes with tetradentate, nitrogen-based ligands with cis open coordination sites were found to be the most reactive. While some complexes reflect sensitivity to different peroxides, others are similarly reactive with either H2O2 or tBuOOH, which suggests some mechanistic distinctions. [Fe(S,S-PDP)(CH3CN)2](SbF6)2 and [Fe(OTf)2(tpa)] transition under the oxidative reaction conditions to a single intermediate at a rate that exceeds dye degradation (PDP = bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl) bipyrrolidine; tpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). For the less reactive [Fe(OTf)2(dpa)] (dpa = dipicolylamine), this reaction occurs on a timescale similar to that of MG oxidation. Thus, the spectroscopic method presented herein provides information about the efficiency and mechanism of iron catalyzed oxidation reactions as well as about potential oxidative catalyst decomposition and chemical changes of the catalyst before or during the oxidation reaction.

  14. Synthesis of iron/GAC catalyst for wastewater treatment using heterogeneous Fenton reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S T T Le; T T Ngo; W Khanitchaidecha; A Nakaruk

    2015-08-01

    Iron catalyst dispersed on granular activated carbon (GAC) was prepared by impregnating Fe(NO3)3 solution on GAC. The mixed solution was annealed at 600°C in muffle furnace under ambient condition for 1 h. The structural property of the catalyst was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The catalyst’s activity and lifetime were tested using the degradation of 50 ppm methyl orange (MO) solution. In addition, the optimum conditions of the Fenton reaction such as initial pH, initial MO concentration hydrogen peroxide concentration and the amount of catalyst were also investigated. The XRD results showed that magnetite and haematite were two main compositions of the synthesized catalyst. The investigation of optimum conditions suggested that initial pH at 3 provided the highest efficiency of MO removal. In addition, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide at 8 ppm was the most suitable. The optimum condition of amount of catalyst was 5 g l−1. The efficiencies of MO removal reached 95% at 60 min of reaction time at low initial MO concentration (25–500 mg l−1). In the meantime, the removal efficiency was found to decrease with the increase in the initial MO concentration. The efficiency decreased to 70 and 30% at 1000 and 3000 mg l−1 of initial MO concentration, respectively. Additionally, after reuse the synthesized catalyst 3 times the MO removal efficiency still remained over 90%. In conclusion, the iron/GAC catalyst was successfully synthesized and applied to dye treatment using heterogeneous Fenton reaction. The catalyst showed high efficiency of MO removal and could be reused many times.

  15. Ethylene Oligomerization and Polymerization: Alternative Iron Catalysts beyond 2,6-Bisiminopyridyl Iron Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyun Jie; Shu Zhang; Wenjuan Zhang; Yingxia Song; Junxian Hou; Wen-Hua Sun

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polyolefin industry arrives the option to transfer from multiple-site systems of the classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts to more sophisticated single-site catalysts. The late-transition metal compounds were traditionally assumed with poor polymerization properties due to the highly competitive chain-termination step, and produced the short-chain oligomers up to 40 carbon atoms (SHOP catalysts). Recently the polyolefins employing latetransition metal complexes as catalysts became a hot research subject with the pioneering works by Brookhart and Gibson. It is promising for nickel catalysts to use solely ethylene as monomer for highly branched polyethylenes, and the designed nickel catalysts were not useful in industry. It is critical time to investigate the relationship of coordination modes of nickel complexes and its catalytic activities and the properties of resultant polyethylenes.

  16. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Adam Crawford; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-09-30

    In the previous reporting period, modifications were completed for integrating a continuous wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor. During the current reporting period, a shakedown of the system was completed. Several problems were encountered with the progressive cavity pump used to circulate the wax/catalyst slurry though the cross-flow filter element and reactor. During the activation of the catalyst with elevated temperature (> 270 C) the elastomer pump stator released sulfur thereby totally deactivating the iron-based catalyst. Difficulties in maintaining an acceptable leak rate from the pump seal and stator housing were also encountered. Consequently, the system leak rate exceeded the expected production rate of wax; therefore, no online filtration could be accomplished. Work continued regarding the characterization of ultra-fine catalyst structures. The effect of carbidation on the morphology of iron hydroxide oxide particles was the focus of the study during this reporting period. Oxidation of Fe (II) sulfate results in predominantly {gamma}-FeOOH particles which have a rod-shaped (nano-needles) crystalline structure. Carbidation of the prepared {gamma}-FeOOH with CO at atmospheric pressure produced iron carbides with spherical layered structure. HRTEM and EDS analysis revealed that carbidation of {gamma}-FeOOH particles changes the initial nano-needles morphology and generates ultrafine carbide particles with irregular spherical shape.

  17. Selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde by oxygen over silica-supported iron catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jieli He; Yang Li; Dongli An; Qinghong Zhang; Ye Wang

    2009-01-01

    FeO_x-SiO_2 catalysts prepared by a sol-gel method were studied for the selective oxidation of methane by oxygen. A single-pass formaldehyde yield of 2.0% was obtained over the FeO_x-SiO_2 with an iron content of 0.5 wt% at 898 K. This 0.5 wt% FeO_x-SiO_2 catalyst demonstrated significantly higher catalytic performances than the 0.5 wt% FeO_x/SiO_2 prepared by an impregnation method. The correlation between the catalytic performances and the characterizations with UV-Vis and H_2-TPR suggested that the higher dispersion of iron species in the catalyst prepared by the sol-gel method was responsible for its higher catalytic activity for formaldehyde formation. The modification of the FeO_x-SiO_2 by phosphorus enhanced the formaldehyde selectivity,and a single-pass formaldehyde yield of 2.4% could be attained over a P-FeO_x-SiO_2 catalyst (P/Fe = 0.5) at 898 K. Raman spectroscopic measurements indicated the formation of FePO_4 nanoclusters in this catalyst,which were more selective toward formaldehyde formation.

  18. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-01-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique. Fe ions in solution form red–orange complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline, producing an absorption peak at λ=510 nm, the intensity of which is proportional to the solution Fe concentration. A series of standard Fe solutions were formulated to establish the relationship ...

  19. Analysis on Ammonia Synthesis over Wuestite-Based Iron Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小年; 刘化章; 等

    2003-01-01

    Wuestite-based catalyst for ammonia synthesis exhibits extremely high activity and easy to reduction under a wide range of conditions.The reaction kinetics of ammonia synthesis can be illustrated perfectly by both the classical Temkin-Pyzhev and modified Tecmkin equations with optimized α of 0.5,The pre-exponent factors and activation energies at the pressures of 8.0 and 15.0MPa are respectively κ0=1.09×1015,7.35×1014Pa0.5·s-1,and E=156.6,155.5kJ·mol-1 derived from the classical Temkin-Phyzhev equation,as well as k0=2.45×1014 ,1.83×1014Pa0.5·s-1,and E=147.7,147.2kJ·mol-1 derived from the modified Temkin equation.Although the degree of reduction under isothermal condition is primarily dependent upon temperature,low pressure seems to be imperative for reduction under high temperature and low space velocity to be considered as a high activity catalyst.The reduction behavior with dry feed gas can be illustrated perfectly by the shrinking-sphere-particle model,by which the reduction-rate constants of 4248exp(-71680/RT) and 644exp(-87260/RT) were obtained for the powder (0.045-0.054mm) and irregular shape(nominal diameter 3.17mm) catalysts respectively.The significant effect of particle size on reduction rate was observed,therefore,it is important to take into account the influence of particle size on reduction for the optimization of reduction process in industry.

  20. Amine(imine)diphosphine iron catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones and imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Weiwei; Lough, Alan J; Li, Young Feng; Morris, Robert H

    2013-11-29

    A rational approach is needed to design hydrogenation catalysts that make use of Earth-abundant elements to replace the rare elements such as ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium that are traditionally used. Here, we validate a prior mechanistic hypothesis that partially saturated amine(imine)diphosphine ligands (P-NH-N-P) activate iron to catalyze the asymmetric reduction of the polar bonds of ketones and imines to valuable enantiopure alcohols and amines, with isopropanol as the hydrogen donor, at turnover frequencies as high as 200 per second at 28°C. We present a direct synthetic approach to enantiopure ligands of this type that takes advantage of the iron(lI) ion as a template. The catalytic mechanism is elucidated by the spectroscopic detection of iron hydride and amide intermediates.

  1. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  2. Effect of Addition Sequence during Neutralization and Precipitation on Iron-based Catalysts for High Temperature Shift Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wei; Zhu Jianhua; Mou Zhanjun

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of the iron-based catalysts promoted by cobalt with a small amount of copper and aluminum for the high temperature shift reaction (HTS) with different sequences of adding catalyst raw materials during neutralization and precipitation was investigated. XRD,BET and particle size distribution (PSD) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. It was found that the catalyst crystals were all γ-Fe2O3,and the intermediate of the catalyst after aging was Fe3O4. The crystallographic form of the catalyst and its intermediate was not affected by the addition sequence in the neutralization and precipitation process. The results showed that the specific surface area and the particle size of the catalysts depended on the addition sequence to the mother liquor. Cobalt with a small amount of copper and aluminum could increase the specific surface area and decrease the particle size of catalysts.

  3. Effect of operating conditions and potassium content on Fischer-Tropsch liquid products produced by potassium-promoted iron catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco E. M. Farias; Fernando G. Sales; Fabiano A. N. Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    The dependencies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis liquid hydrocarbon product distribution on operating pressure and temperature have been studied over three potassium-promoted iron catalysts with increasing potassium molar content. The study followed an experimental planning and the results were analyzed based on surface response methodology. The effects of different operating conditions and potassium contents on the liquid product distribution were compared based on number average carbon number and dispersion. Results showed that high pressures (25 to 30 atm) favored the production of waxes that could be converted into liquid fuels through hydrocracking, while greater direct selectivity towards diesel was favored by low pressure (20 atm) using catalysts with low potassium to iron molar ratios. The liquid product distribution produced using an iron catalyst with high potassium content presented higher number-average number of carbons when compared to the distribution obtained using an iron catalyst with low potassium content.

  4. An Optically Transparent Iron Nickel Oxide Catalyst for Solar Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Mayer, Matthew T; Yella, Aswani; Tilley, S David; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2015-08-12

    Sunlight-driven water splitting to produce hydrogen fuel is an attractive method for renewable energy conversion. Tandem photoelectrochemical water splitting devices utilize two photoabsorbers to harvest the sunlight and drive the water splitting reaction. The absorption of sunlight by electrocatalysts is a severe problem for tandem water splitting devices where light needs to be transmitted through the larger bandgap component to illuminate the smaller bandgap component. Herein, we describe a novel method for the deposition of an optically transparent amorphous iron nickel oxide oxygen evolution electrocatalyst. The catalyst was deposited on both thin film and high-aspect ratio nanostructured hematite photoanodes. The low catalyst loading combined with its high activity at low overpotential results in significant improvement on the onset potential for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. This transparent catalyst further enables the preparation of a stable hematite/perovskite solar cell tandem device, which performs unassisted water splitting.

  5. New way for iron introduction in LDH matrix used as catalysts for Friedel–Crafts reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kerchiche

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The alkylation of toluene, reaction employing benzyl chloride as the alkylating agent over basic hydrotalcite materials: Fe–Mg–Al-LDH prepared by different synthesis methods, including the method of co-precipitation, impregnation and a new method called the method of intercalation by anion exchange in the lamellar space of the host structure LDH. Our prepared solids were characterized by chemical analysis, XRD analysis, BET method and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and tested in the alkylation of toluene by benzyl chloride reaction. Fe–Mg–Al-LDH clay without or with calcination (at 773 K has been investigated. The catalyst derived from the hydrotalcite by its calcination at 773 K shows high catalytic activity for the alkylation of toluene and other aromatic compounds. The catalytically active species present in the catalyst in its most active form are the oxides of iron on the catalyst surface.

  6. The nature of the potassium compound acting as a promoter in iron-alumina catalysts for ammonia synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommen, van J.G.; Bolink, W.J.; Prasad, J.; Mars, P.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical form of the potassium promoter on an iron-alumina catalyst during ammonia synthesis has been studied by two methods, viz, (i) the measurement of the equilibrium constant of the process KNH2 + H2 KH + NH3, and (ii) chemical analysis of the used catalyst. The equilibrium constant measurem

  7. Reduction of Sulphur-containing Aromatic Nitro Compounds with Hydrazine Hydrate over Iron(Ⅲ) Oxide-MgO Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sulphur-containing aromatic amines were prepared efficiently in good to excellent yields by reduction of the corresponding sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds with hydrazine hydrate in the presence of iron(Ⅲ) oxide-MgO catalyst. The catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the reduction of sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds. The yields of sulphur-containing aromatic amines were up to 91-99 % at 355 K after reduction for 1-4 h over this catalyst.

  8. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  9. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  10. Effect of niobium promoter on iron-based catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sardar ALI; Noor Asmawati MOHD ZABIDI; Duvvuri SUBBARAO

    2012-01-01

    Niobium-promoted Fe/CNTs catalysts were prepared using a wet impregnation method.Samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption,H2-TPR,TPD,XRD and TEM.The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 220 ℃,1 atm and H2/CO =2 for 5 h.Addition of niobium into Fe/CNTs increased the dispersion,decreased the average size of iron oxide nanoparticles and the catalyst reducibility.Niobium-promoted Fe catalyst resulted in appreciable increase in the selectivity of C5+ hydrocarbons and suppressed methane formation.These effects were more pronounced for the 0.04% Nb/Fe/CNTs catalyst,compared to those observed from other niobium compositions.The 0.04% Nb/Fe/CNTs catalyst enhanced the C5+ hydrocarbons selectivity by a factor of 67.5% and reduced the methane selectivity by a factor of 59.2%.

  11. Iron-based materials as tar cracking catalyst in waste gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgreen, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) in Sweden has changed during the past decades due to national legislation and European Union directives. The former landfills have more or less been abandoned in favour of material recycling and waste incineration. On a yearly basis approximately 2.2 million tonnes waste are incinerated in Sweden with heat recovery and to some extent also with electricity generation, though at a low efficiency. It is desirable to alter this utilisation and instead employ MSW as fuel in a fluid bed gasification process. Then electrical energy may be produced at a much higher efficiency. However, MSW contain about 1 % chlorine in the form of ordinary table salt (NaCl) from food scraps. This implies that the tar cracking catalyst, dolomite, which is normally employed in gasification, will suffer from poisoning if applied under such conditions. Then the tar cracking capacity will be reduced or vanish completely with time. Consequently, an alternative catalyst, more resistant to chlorine, is needed. Preliminary research at KTH has indicated that iron in its metallic state may possess tar cracking ability. With this information at hand and participating in the project 'Energy from Waste' an experimental campaign was launched. Numerous experiments were conducted using iron as tar cracking catalyst. First iron sinter pellets from LKAB were employed. They were reduced in situ with a stream of hydrogen before they were applied. Later iron-based granules from Hoeganaes AB were tested. These materials were delivered in the metallic state. In all tests the KTH atmospheric fluidised bed gasifier with a secondary catalytic reactor housing the catalytic material was deployed. Mostly, the applied fuel was birch. The results show that metallic iron possesses an intrinsic ability, almost in the range of dolomite, to crack tars. Calculations indicate that iron may be more resistant to chlorine than dolomite. The exploration of metallic iron

  12. Selective catalytic oxidation of H{sub 2}S over iron oxide supported on alumina-intercalated Laponite clay catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xin; Dou, Guangyu; Wang, Zhuo [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Li, Li [Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Wang, Yufei; Wang, Hailin [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Hao, Zhengping, E-mail: zpinghao@rcees.ac.cn [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The catalytic reaction and deactivation mechanisms for H{sub 2}S selective oxidation over Fe/Al-Lap catalysts are shown in the illustration. The catalytic reaction follows Mars–van Krevelen mechanism. Moreover, the interaction between iron oxide and alumina, the strong acidity of the catalysts and the well dispersion of iron oxide improve the catalytic performance efficiently. Meanwhile, the catalyst deactivation is mainly due to the formation of Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and elemental sulfur deposits on the surface. -- Highlights: • Fe/Al-Lap catalysts with mesoporous structure were synthesized. • Iron oxide mainly exists in form of isolate Fe{sup 3+} in an oxidic environment. •Fe/Al-Lap catalysts show high catalytic activities at low temperature. •The high catalytic activities are ascribed to the interaction between iron oxide and alumina. •The formed Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} and elemental sulfur deposits on surface cause catalyst deactivation. -- Abstract: A series of iron oxide supported on alumina-intercalated clay catalysts (named Fe/Al-Lap catalysts) with mesoporous structure and high specific surface area were prepared. The structural and chemical properties were studied by nitrogen sorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV–vis DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and NH{sub 3} temperature-programmed desorption (NH{sub 3}-TPD) techniques. It was realized that iron oxide mainly existed in the form of isolated Fe{sup 3+} in an oxidic environment. Fe/Al-Lap catalysts showed high catalytic activities in the temperature range of 120–200 °C without the presence of excessive O{sub 2}. This can be attributed to the interaction between iron oxide and alumina, which improve the redox property of Fe{sup 3+} efficiently. In addition, the strong acidity of catalysts and good

  13. Characterization of rapidly and naturally quenched skeletal iron catalysts for FT synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shi-run; QIAO Ming-hua; ZHU Yuan-long; FAN Kang-nian

    2004-01-01

    The slurry phase is a promising system for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. Since the liquid medium efficiently removes the heat of reaction so that the steady-state reaction is easily achieved. High catalytic activity is maintained due to removal of waxy products from the catalyst surface by the action of solvent. In addition, CO-rich syngas from coal gasification can be directly used in FT synthesis which may increase the thermal efficiency of the indirect coal liquefaction. One of the important problems to be solved for slurry phase FT is the catalyst attrition and separation from wax residue. Fused iron and Raney iron were found to have high attrition resistance and easy to separate from wax in slurry phase FT synthesis, but their activity is relatively low. Amorphous alloys made by rapid quenching techniques have drawn increasing interest due to their superior mechanical,chemical and magnetic properties compared to the thermodynamically stable crystalline alloys of the same compositions. It is reported that rapidly quenched skeletal Ni catalyst showed higher catalytic activity than Raney Ni in selective hydrogenation of unsaturated organic functional groups.In this paper, Fe50Al50 (by weight) alloys with different quenching rates, rapid quenching (RQ) and natural quenching (NQ) were prepared for FT synthesis. The phase composition of alloys was characterized by XRD. The physical properties, thermal-stability and adsorption properties of skeletal Fe that was prepared by leaching aluminum of the corresponding alloy with aqueous solution of NaOH were also studied by BET, in situ XRD and H2- and CO-TPD. It is found from XRD patterns of the alloys that RQ Fe50Al50 is composed of orthorhombic phase, and NQ Fe50Al50 alloy is mainly composed of monoclinic phase. Meanwhile, diffraction peaks of the RQ alloy are seriously broadened. After leaching aluminum by aqueous solution of NaOH at the same conditions,skeletal Fe from the RQ alloy give the higher specific surface

  14. Visible-light-driven methane formation from CO2 with a molecular iron catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Heng; Schmidt, Luciana C.; Bonin, Julien; Robert, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Converting CO2 into fuel or chemical feedstock compounds could in principle reduce fossil fuel consumption and climate-changing CO2 emissions. One strategy aims for electrochemical conversions powered by electricity from renewable sources, but photochemical approaches driven by sunlight are also conceivable. A considerable challenge in both approaches is the development of efficient and selective catalysts, ideally based on cheap and Earth-abundant elements rather than expensive precious metals. Of the molecular photo- and electrocatalysts reported, only a few catalysts are stable and selective for CO2 reduction; moreover, these catalysts produce primarily CO or HCOOH, and catalysts capable of generating even low to moderate yields of highly reduced hydrocarbons remain rare. Here we show that an iron tetraphenylporphyrin complex functionalized with trimethylammonio groups, which is the most efficient and selective molecular electro- catalyst for converting CO2 to CO known, can also catalyse the eight-electron reduction of CO2 to methane upon visible light irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure. We find that the catalytic system, operated in an acetonitrile solution containing a photosensitizer and sacrificial electron donor, operates stably over several days. CO is the main product of the direct CO2 photoreduction reaction, but a two-pot procedure that first reduces CO2 and then reduces CO generates methane with a selectivity of up to 82 per cent and a quantum yield (light-to-product efficiency) of 0.18 per cent. However, we anticipate that the operating principles of our system may aid the development of other molecular catalysts for the production of solar fuels from CO2 under mild conditions.

  15. A Microphysical Model for Phyllosilicate Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, S. A. M.; Faulkner, D.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts the experimentally observed temperature dependence of (a-b) and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  16. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-10-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique. Fe ions in solution form red-orange complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline, producing an absorption peak at λ=510 nm, the intensity of which is proportional to the solution Fe concentration. A series of standard Fe solutions were formulated to establish the relationship between optical absorbance and Fe concentration. Many Fe catalysts were microscopically observed to be encased by graphitic layers, thus preventing their extraction. Fe catalyst dissolution from CNTs was investigated with various single and mixed acids, and Fe concentration was found to be highest with CNTs being held at reflux in HClO4/HNO3 and H2SO4/HNO3 mixtures. This novel colorimetric method to measure Fe concentrations by UV/Vis spectroscopy was validated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, indicating its reliability and applicability to asses Fe content in CNTs.

  17. Development of improved iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Final technical report: Project 6464

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukur, D.B.; Ledakowicz, S.; Koranne, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [and others

    1994-02-28

    Despite the current worldwide oil glut, the United States will ultimately require large-scale production of liquid (transportation) fuels from coal. Slurry phase Fischer Tropsch (FT) technology, with its versatile product slate, may be expected to play a major role in production of transportation fuels via indirect coal liquefaction. Texas A&M University (TAMU) with sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Center for Energy and Mineral Resources at TAMU, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., has been working on development of improved iron FT catalysts and characterization of hydrodynamic parameters in two- and three-phase bubble columns with FT derived waxes. Our previous studies have provided an improved understanding of the role of promoters (Cu and K), binders (silica) and pretreatment procedures on catalyst activity, selectivity and longevity (deactivation). The objective of the present contract was to develop improved catalysts with enhanced slurry phase activity and higher selectivity to liquid fuels and wax. This was accomplished through systematic studies of the effects of pretreatment procedures and variations in catalyst composition (promoters and binders). The major accomplishments and results in each of these two main areas of research are summarized here.

  18. Color removal of distillery wastewater by ozonation in the absence and presence of immobilized iron oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreethawong, Thammanoon; Chavadej, Sumaeth

    2008-07-15

    Ozone is a strong oxidant, which can oxidize both biodegradable and non-biodegradable organics. The main objective of this study was to use iron oxide as a heterogeneous catalyst to enhance the ozone oxidation process. The wastewater used in this study was distillery wastewater, which was diluted 20 times before use. The diluted distillery wastewater was fed continuously in a downflow direction in an ozonation column. The iron oxide catalyst was coated on 10.3mm diameter alumina balls (5.5 m2/g specific surface area) by using Fe(NO3)3 as a precursor. The prepared catalyst was in the form of ferric oxide, and its loading was 0.07%. From the experimental results of both with and without the iron oxide catalyst, an increase in hydraulic retention time resulted in an increase in the treatment efficiencies of both chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color reduction, since the residence time of ozone increased. When the ozone mass flow rate increased, both COD and color reduction increased, resulting from an increase in the hydroxyl radical available in the system. The ozonation system with the iron oxide catalyst gave the highest efficiency in both COD and color removals because the hydroxyl free radical generated from the catalyst is more reactive than the ozone molecule itself.

  19. Gold/Iron Carbonyl Clusters for Tailored Au/FeOx Supported Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Albonetti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel preparation method was developed for the preparation of gold/iron oxide supported catalysts using the bimetallic carbonyl cluster salts [NEt4]4[Au4Fe4(CO16] and [NEt4][AuFe4(CO16] as precursors of highly dispersed nanoparticles over different supports. A series of catalysts with different metal loadings were prepared and tested in the complete oxidation of dichlorobenzene, toluene, methanol and in the preferential oxidation of CO in the presence of H2 (PROX as model reactions. The characterization by BET, XRD, TEM, H2-TPR, ICP-AES and XPS point out the way the nature of the precursors and the thermal treatment conditions affected the dispersion of the active phase and their catalytic activity in the studied reactions.

  20. Preparation of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts from cobalt/iron hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, B.H.; Boff, J.J.; Zarochak, M.F. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Compounds with the (hydrotalcites) have properties that make them attractive as precursors for Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. A series of single-phase hydrotalcites with cobalt/iron atom ratios ranging from 75/25 to 25/75 has been synthesized. Mixed cobalt/iron oxides have been prepared from these hydrotalcites by controlled thermal decomposition. Thermal decomposition at temperatures below 600 {degrees}C typically produced a single-phase mixed metal oxide with a spinel structure. The BET surface areas of the spinal samples have been found to be as high as about 150 m{sup 2}/g. Appropriate reducing pretreatments have been developed for several of these spinels and their activity, selectivity, and activity and selectivity maintenance have been examined at 13 MPa in a fixed-bed microreactor.

  1. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  2. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp (2) carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  3. Iron oxychloride (FeOCl): an efficient Fenton-like catalyst for producing hydroxyl radicals in degradation of organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-jing; Xu, Xi-meng; Xu, Jing; Han, Yi-fan

    2013-10-30

    An iron oxychloride (FeOCl) catalyst was developed for oxidative degradation of persistent organic compounds in aqueous solutions. Exceptionally high activity for the production of hydroxyl radical (OH·) by H2O2 decomposition was achieved, being 2-4 orders of magnitudes greater than that over other Fe-based heterogeneous catalysts. The relationship of catalyst structure and performance has been established by using multitechniques, such as XRD, HRTEM, and EPR. The unique structural configuration of iron atoms and the reducible electronic properties of FeOCl are responsible for the excellent activity. This study paves the way toward the rational design of relevant catalysts for applications, such as wastewater treatment, soil remediation, and other emerging environmental problems.

  4. Selective catalytic oxidation of H₂S over iron oxide supported on alumina-intercalated Laponite clay catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Dou, Guangyu; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Li; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Hailin; Hao, Zhengping

    2013-09-15

    A series of iron oxide supported on alumina-intercalated clay catalysts (named Fe/Al-Lap catalysts) with mesoporous structure and high specific surface area were prepared. The structural and chemical properties were studied by nitrogen sorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), H₂ temperature-programmed reduction (H₂-TPR) and NH₃ temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) techniques. It was realized that iron oxide mainly existed in the form of isolated Fe(3+) in an oxidic environment. Fe/Al-Lap catalysts showed high catalytic activities in the temperature range of 120-200 °C without the presence of excessive O₂. This can be attributed to the interaction between iron oxide and alumina, which improve the redox property of Fe(3+) efficiently. In addition, the strong acidity of catalysts and good dispersion of iron oxide were also beneficial to oxidation reaction. Among them, 7% Fe/Al-Lap catalyst presented the best catalytic performance at 180 °C. Finally, the catalytic and deactivation mechanisms were explored.

  5. ATOMIC-SCALE DESIGN OF IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS: A COMBINED COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, EXPERIMENTAL, AND MICROKINETIC MODELING APPROACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2005-03-22

    Efforts during this first year focused on four areas: (1) searching/summarizing published FTS mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) construction of mass spectrometer-TPD and Berty CSTR reactor systems; (3) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts at various iron loadings (4) Determination of thermochemical parameters such as binding energies of reactive intermediates, heat of FTS elementary reaction steps, and kinetic parameters such as activation energies, and frequency factors of FTS elementary reaction steps on a number of model surfaces. Literature describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts was compiled in a draft review. Construction of the mass spectrometer-TPD system is 90% complete and of a Berty CSTR reactor system 98% complete. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by nonaqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2}, thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. The alumina-supported iron catalysts will be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies. In the coming year, adsorption/desorption properties, rates of elementary steps, and global reaction rates will be measured for these catalysts, with and without promoters, providing a database for understanding effects of dispersion, metal loading, and support on elementary kinetic parameters and for validation of computational models that incorporate effects of surface structure and promoters. Furthermore, using state-of-the-art self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods, we have extensively studied the thermochemistry and kinetics of various elementary steps on

  6. Oxidative Desulfurization of kerosene in the presence of iron chlorideionic liquid catalyst and ultrasound waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sadat Seyedi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative Desulfurization of kerosene refinery in Tehran with sulfur content of 0/293% with iron chloride - hydrogen peroxide and ultrasonic liquid catalysts in the presence of acetic acid - formic acid and an oxidizinghydrogen peroxide has been studied. The effects of operating parameters such as temperature, reaction time, mole ratio of moles of sulfur oxidation (no/ ns,mole ratio of moles of acid per mol of sulfur (nacid/ ns (on the desulfurization of kerosene checked(the molar ratio of oxidant to 15-40 and 20-80 mole ratio of sulfur to sulfur acidThe results showed that the optimal conditions for the removal of sulfur from iron chloride catalyst system kerosene by 93% and sulfur content of residual 128 ppm is obtained. The effect of ultrasonic waves on system performance oxidationwas studied, the results showed that the percentage of desulfurization systems, oxidation of acetic acid- hydrogen peroxide in combination with ultrasound (96% and without ultrasound was 93%, which indicates improved performance oxidation The presence of ultrasound.

  7. 反应条件对钌催化剂和铁催化剂的氨合成性能影响%Effects of Reaction Conditions on Performance of Ru Catalyst and Iron Catalyst for Ammonia Synthesis*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘崇根; 李瑛; 蒋文; 刘化章

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon-supported Ru-based catalyst and A301 iron catalyst were prepared, and the influences of reaction temperature, space velocity, pressure, and H2/N2 ratio on performance of iron catalyst coupled with Ru catalyst in series for ammonia synthesis were investigated. The activity tests were also performed on the single Ru and Fe catalysts as comparison. Results showed that the activity of the Ru catalyst for ammonia synthesis was higher than that of the iron catalyst by 33.5%-37.6% under the reaction conditions: 375-400 ℃, 10 MPa, 10000 h-1, H2: N2 = 3, and the Ru catalyst also had better thermal stability when treated at 475 ℃ for 20 h. The outlet ammonia concentration using Fe-Ru catalyst was increased by 45.6%-63.5% than that of the single-iron catalyst at low temperature (375-400 ℃), and the outlet ammonia concentration increased with increasing Ru catalyst loading.

  8. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  9. The use of ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Vinciane; Wendt, Bianca; Werkmeister, Svenja; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias; Chaudret, Bruno

    2013-04-28

    The performance of well-defined ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C and C=X bonds is reported. Monodisperse iron nanoparticles of about 2 nm size are synthesized by the decomposition of {Fe(N[Si(CH3)3]2)2}2 under dihydrogen. They are found to be active for the hydrogenation of various alkenes and alkynes under mild conditions and weakly active for C=O bond hydrogenation.

  10. Kinetics modeling of ethylbenzene dehydrogenation to styrene over a mesoporous alumina supported iron catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2012-10-01

    The kinetics of ethylbenzene (EB) dehydrogenation over a FeO x-meso-Al 2O 3 catalyst is studied. The models were developed based on physicochemical characterization and a CREC fluidized Riser Simulator data. N 2 adsorption shows that the synthesized FeO x-meso-Al 2O 3 catalyst is mesoporous with pore size between 9 and 35nm. TPR profile indicates that iron on meso-Al 2O 3 forms easily reducible nanostructured crystals which is confirmed by TEM image. NH 3- and CO-TPD analysis, respectively reveals the availability of both acidic and basic sites. The dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene on FeO x-meso-Al 2O 3 catalyst mainly gives styrene (∼99%) while a small amount of benzene, toluene and coke are also detected. Based on the experimental observations two Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetics models are formulated. The possible catalyst deactivation is expressed as function of EB conversion. Parameters are estimated by fitting of the experimental data implemented in MATLAB. Results show that one type site Langmuir-Hinshelwood model appropriately describes the experimental data, with adequate statistical fitting indicators and also satisfied the physical constraints. The activation energy for the formation of styrene (80kJ/mol) found to be significantly lower than that of the undesired products benzene (144kJ/mol) and toluene (164kJ/mol). The estimated heat of adsorptions of EB and ST are found to be 55kJ/mol and 19kJ/mol, respectively. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Graphitic Layer Encapsulated Iron Based Non‐precious Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Lijie

    -containing nanoparticles, is essentially maintained during the pyrolysis of varied durations and temperatures. The metal-containing nanoparticles showed changes in the iron phases and their contents, as characterized by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The iron containing components include reduced metals (α-Fe and γ......-Fe), oxide (γ-Fe2O3), carbide (Fe3C) as well as a minor paramagnetic component due to Fe3+ (high spin) and/or possibly Fe2+ (low spin), likely coordinated with nitrogen (FeNx/C) as well identified for the Fe/N/C type catalysts in the literatures. Quantitative determination of these metal containing...... components by low temperature 57Mössbauer spectra shows that the content of the reduced metal component is steadily increasing with the pyrolytic time and temperature while the content of iron oxide is nearly constant. The most interesting finding is that the Fe3C content shows a peak in both the temperature...

  12. Carbon Xerogel-supported Iron as a Catalyst in Combustion Synthesis of Carbon Fibrous Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech Kiciriski; Joanna Lasota

    2012-01-01

    The catalytically assisted self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of carbon fibrous nanostructures, where the iron-doped colloidal carbon xerogel is proposed as a catalyst system, was examined. The carbon xerogel was prepared through carbonization of an iron doped organic xerogel at temperatures ranging from 600 to 1050℃. The reaction between calcium carbide and hexachloroethane in the presence of sodium azide is exothermic enough to proceed at a high temperature, self-sustaining regime. The combustion reactions of those mixtures enriched with iron-doped carbon xerogels were conducted in a stainless steel reactor---calorimetric bomb under an initial pressure of 1 MPa of argon. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the combustion products revealed low yield of various type of carbon fibers (presumably nanotubes), which grew via the tip-growth mechanism. The fibrous nanostructures were found in the vicinity of the spot of ignition, while in the outer and cooler area of the reactor, dusty products with soot-like morphology dominated. No significant correlation between the pyrolysis temperature of the carbon xerogel and the morphology of the obtained carbon fibrous nanostructures was observed.

  13. Solvent-Free Esterification of Carboxylic Acids Using Supported Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as an Efficient and Recoverable Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rajabi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Supported iron oxide nanoparticles on mesoporous materials (FeNP@SBA-15 have been successfully utilized in the esterification of a variety carboxylic acids including aromatic, aliphatic, and long-chain carboxylic acids under convenient reaction conditions. The supported catalyst could be easily recovered after reaction completion and reused several times without any loss in activity after up to 10 runs.

  14. An iron molybdate catalyst for methanol to formaldehyde conversion prepared by a hydrothermal method and its characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beale, A.M.; Jacques, S.D.M.; Sacaliuc-Parvulescu, E.; O'Brien, M.G.; Barnes, P.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    A one-step, low-temperature hydrothermal method has been successfully employed to prepare iron molybdate catalysts with Mo:Fe ratios ranging from 1.5:1 to 3.0:1. The resulting materials were characterized using a number of techniques including: XRD, Raman, N2 adsorption, SEM/EDX, DTA, EDXRD and comb

  15. Fischer-tropsch synthesis on iron-based catalysts: the effect of co-feeding small oxygenates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Ruud; Espinoza, Rafael L.

    1989-01-01

    Co-feeding experiments have shown that ethers can participate substantially in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with iron catalysts. Dimethyl ether is thought to be capable of building up surface complexes which are very similar to those naturally occurring during synthesis. Diethyl ether undergoes rap

  16. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  17. Iron phthalocyanine supported on amidoximated PAN fiber as effective catalyst for controllable hydrogen peroxide activation in oxidizing organic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhenbang; Han, Xu; Zhao, Xiaoming; Yu, Jiantao; Xu, Hang

    2016-12-15

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine was immobilized onto amidoximated polyacrylonitrile fiber to construct a bioinspired catalytic system for oxidizing organic dyes by H2O2 activation. The amidoxime groups greatly helped to anchor Iron(II) phthalocyanine molecules onto the fiber through coordination interaction, which has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analyses. Electron spin resonance studies indicate that the catalytic process of physically anchored Iron(II) phthalocyanine performed via a hydroxyl radical pathway, while the catalyst bonded Iron(II) phthalocyanine through coordination effect could selectively catalyze the H2O2 decomposition to generate high-valent iron-oxo species. This may result from the amidoxime groups functioning as the axial fifth ligands to favor the heterolytic cleavage of the peroxide OO bond. This feature also enables the catalyst to only degrade the dyes adjacent to the catalytic active centers and enhances the efficient utilization of H2O2. In addition, this catalyst could effectively catalyze the mineralization of organic dyes and can be easily recycled without any loss of activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Iron Manganese Catalysts: Effect of Preparation and Operating Conditions on Catalyst Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Mirzaei

    2009-01-01

    molar basis which is the most active catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas to light olefins. The effects of different promoters and supports with loading of optimum support on the catalytic performance of catalysts are also studied. It was found that the catalyst containing 50%Fe/50%Mn/5 wt.%Al2O3 is an optimum-modified catalyst. The catalytic performance of optimal catalyst has been studied in operation conditions such as a range of reaction temperatures, H2/CO molar feed ratios and a range of total pressures. Characterization of both precursors and calcined catalysts is carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, BET specific surface area and thermal analysis methods such as TGA and DSC.

  19. Effect of Al2O3 Binder on the Precipitated Iron-Based Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jun Wan; Bao-Shan Wu; Xia An; Ting-Zhen Li; Zhi-Chao Tao; Hong-Wei Xiang; Yong-Wang Li

    2007-01-01

    A series of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts incorporated with Al2O3 binder were prepared by the combination of co-precipitation and spray drying technology. The catalyst samples were characterized by using N2 physical adsorption, temperature-programmed reduction/desorption (TPR/TPD) and M(o)ssbauer effect spectroscopy (MES) methods. The characterization results indicated that the BET surface area increases with increasing Al2O3 content and passes through a maximum at the Al2O3/Fe ratio of 10/100 (weight basis). After the point, it decreases with further increase in Al2O3 content. The incorporation of Al2O3 binder was found to weaken the surface basicity and suppress the reduction and carburization of iron-based catalysts probably due to the strong K-Al2O3 and Fe-Al2O3 interactions. Furthermore, the H2 adsorption ability of the catalysts is enhanced with increasing Al2O3 content. The FTS performances of the catalysts were tested in a slurry-phase continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under the reaction conditions of 260 ℃, 1.5 MPa, 1000 h-1 and molar ratio of H2/CO 0.67 for 200 h. The results showed that the addition of small amounts of Al2O3 affects the activity of iron-based catalysts to a little extent. However, with further increase of Al2O3 content, the FTS activity and water gas shift reaction (WGS) activity are decreased severely. The addition of appropriate Al2O3 do not affect the product selectivity, but the catalysts incorporated with large amounts of Al2O3 have higher selectivity for light hydrocarbons and lower selectivity for heavy hydrocarbons.

  20. Reduction and Immobilization of Potassium Permanganate on Iron Oxide Catalyst by Fluidized-Bed Crystallization Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Xia Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A manganese immobilization technology in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR was developed by using a waste iron oxide (i.e., BT-3 as catalyst which is a by-product from the fluidized-bed Fenton reaction (FBR-Fenton. It was found that BT-3 could easily reduce potassium permanganate (KMnO4 to MnO2. Furthermore, MnO2 could accumulate on the surface of BT-3 catalyst to form a new Fe-Mn oxide. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the KMnO4-reduction mechanism, including the effect of KMnO4 concentration, BT-3 dosage, and operational solution pH. The results showed that the pH solution was a significant factor in the reduction of KMnO4. At the optimum level, pHf 6, KMnO4 was virtually reduced in 10 min. A pseudo-first order reaction was employed to describe the reduction rate of KMnO4.

  1. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-03-31

    The morphological and chemical nature of ultrafine iron catalyst particles (3-5 nm diameters) during activation/FTS was studied by HRTEM, EELS, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With the progress of FTS, the carbide re-oxidized to magnetite and catalyst activity gradually decreased. The growth of oxide phase continued and average particle size also increased simultaneously. The phase transformation occurred in a ''growing oxide core'' manner with different nano-zones. The nano-range carbide particles did not show fragmentation or attrition as generally observed in micrometer range particles. Nevertheless, when the dimension of particles reached the micrometer range, the crystalline carbide phase appeared to be sprouted on the surface of magnetite single crystal. In the previous reporting period, a design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. During the current reporting period, we have started construction of the new filtration system and began modifications to the 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) reactor. The system will utilize a primary wax separation device followed by a Pall Accusep or Membralox ceramic cross-flow membrane. As of this writing, the unit is nearly complete except for the modification of a moyno-type pump; the pump was shipped to the manufacturer to install a special leak-free, high pressure seal.

  2. Iron-based cathode catalyst with enhanced power density in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Eric; Jaouen, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Michel; Larouche, Nicholas; Tian, Juan; Herranz, Juan; Dodelet, Jean-Pol

    2011-08-02

    H(2)-air polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells are electrochemical power generators with potential vehicle propulsion applications. To help reduce their cost and encourage widespread use, research has focused on replacing the expensive Pt-based electrocatalysts in polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells with a lower-cost alternative. Fe-based cathode catalysts are promising contenders, but their power density has been low compared with Pt-based cathodes, largely due to poor mass-transport properties. Here we report an iron-acetate/phenanthroline/zeolitic-imidazolate-framework-derived electrocatalyst with increased volumetric activity and enhanced mass-transport properties. The zeolitic-imidazolate-framework serves as a microporous host for phenanthroline and ferrous acetate to form a catalyst precursor that is subsequently heat treated. A cathode made with the best electrocatalyst from this work, tested in H(2)-O(2,) has a power density of 0.75 W cm(-2) at 0.6 V, a meaningful voltage for polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells operation, comparable with that of a commercial Pt-based cathode tested under identical conditions.

  3. Interactions Between Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates During Microbial Reduction 2: Natural Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, T.; Griffin, A. M.; Gorski, C. A.; Shelobolina, E. S.; Xu, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Roden, E. E.

    2016-04-19

    Dissimilatory microbial reduction of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates (Fe(III)-phyllosilicates) is an important process in anoxic soils, sediments, and subsurface materials. Although various studies have documented the relative extent of microbial reduction of single-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates, detailed information is not available on interaction between these two processes in situations where both phases are available for microbial reduction. The goal of this research was to use the model dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium (DIRB) Geobacter sulfurreducens to study Fe(III)-oxide vs. Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction in a range of subsurface materials and Fe(III)-oxide stripped versions of the materials. Low temperature (12K) Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to infer changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate). A Fe partitioning model was employed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. The results showed that in most cases Fe(III)- oxide utilization dominated (70-100 %) bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, and that electron transfer from oxide-derived Fe(II) played only a minor role (ca. 10-20 %) in Fe partitioning. In addition, the extent of Fe(III)-oxide reduction was positively correlated to surface area-normalized cation exchange capacity and the phyllosilicate-Fe(III)/total Fe(III) ratio, which suggests that the phyllosilicates in the natural sediments promoted Fe(III)-oxide reduction by binding of oxide-derived Fe(II), thereby enhancing Fe(III)-oxide reduction by reducing or delaying the inhibitory effect that Fe(II) accumulation on oxide and DIRB cell surfaces has on Fe(III)-oxide reduction. In general our results suggest that although Fe(III)-oxide reduction is likely to dominate bulk Fe(III) reduction in most subsurface sediments, Fe

  4. Postsynthesis-Treated Iron-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Selective Catalysts for the Sustainable Synthesis of Nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapeyko, Anastasia; Climent, Maria J; Corma, Avelino; Concepción, Patricia; Iborra, Sara

    2015-10-12

    The dehydration of aldoximes to the corresponding nitriles can be performed with excellent activity and selectivity by using iron trimesate as a homogeneous catalyst. Iron trimesate has been heterogenized by synthesizing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) from iron trimesate, that is, Fe(BTC), and MIL-100 (Fe). These materials were active and selective aldoxime dehydration catalysts, and postsynthesis-treated MIL-100 (Fe) produced the desired nitriles with 100 % conversion and selectivities >90 % under mild reaction conditions and in short reaction times. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of different Fe species in the catalyst, and in situ IR spectroscopy combined with catalytic results indicates that the catalytic activity is associated with Fe framework species. The postsynthesis-treated MIL-100 (Fe)-NH4 F can be recycled several times and has an excellent reaction scope, which gives better catalytic results than other solid acid or base catalysts. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effects and characterization of an environmentally-friendly, inexpensive composite Iron-Sodium catalyst on coal gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterroso, Rodolfo

    Coal gasification has been commercially used for more than 60 years in the production of fuels and chemicals. Recently, and due to the lowered environmental impacts and high efficiency derived from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), this process has received increased attention. Furthermore, upcoming strict CO2 emissions regulations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will no longer be achievable by traditional means of coal combustion, therefore, growing dependence on different energy sources has drawn attention to clean coal technologies, such as coal-to-liquids processing, and the core of this process is also gasification. Gasification is an energy intensive process that can be substantially improved in terms of efficiency through the use of catalysts. In this study, the effect of the composite catalyst, FeCO3-Na2CO3, on gasification of a low-sulfur sub-bituminous Wyodak coal from the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming was investigated. The catalytic effects of the composite catalysts were evaluated by comparing their effluent gas compositions and carbon conversion kinetics to those achieved in the presence of either FeCO3 or Na2CO3 catalyst alone or without the presence of any catalyst. All of the evaluation work was conducted in a fixed bed gasifier at atmospheric pressure. Compared to raw coal with no catalyst, the composite catalyst is efficient in increasing the carbon conversion rate constant by as much as two times within the 700-800°C range due to its ability to reduce the activation energy of gasification by about 30-40%. Compared to pure sodium and iron catalysts, the composite catalyst can increase the yields of desired products H2 and CO at 800°C by 15% and 40%, respectively. The composite catalyst can not only synergize the advantages, but also overcome the challenges of pure iron or pure sodium based catalytic coal gasification processes. Moreover, the mechanisms of this particular catalytic coal gasification process

  6. Hydrogen production by ethanol partial oxidation over nano-iron oxide catalysts produced by chemical vapour synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Wael Ahmed Abou Taleb Sayed

    2011-01-13

    This work presents the experimental results of the synthesis of unsupported and supported SiC iron oxide nanoparticles and their catalytic activity towards ethanol partial oxidation. For comparison, further unsupported iron oxide phases were investigated towards the ethanol partial oxidation. These {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase catalysts were prepared by the CVS method using Fe(CO){sub 5} as precursor, supplied by another author. The {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles were prepared by the CVS method using a home made hot wall reactor technique at atmospheric pressure. Ferrocene and tetramethylsilane were used as precursor for the production process. Process parameters of precursor evaporation temperature, precursor concentration, gas mixture velocity and gas mixture dilution were investigated and optimised to produce particle sizes in a range of 10 nm. For Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC catalyst series production, a new hot wall reactor setup was used. The particles were produced by simultaneous thermal decomposition of ferrocene and tetramethylsilane in one reactor from both sides. The production parameters of inlet tube distance inside the reactor, precursor evaporation temperature and carrier gas flow were investigated to produce a series of samples with different iron oxide content. The prepared catalysts composition, physical and chemical properties were characterized by XRD, EDX, SEM, BET surface area, FTIR, XPS and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The catalytic activity for the ethanol gas-phase oxidation was investigated in a temperature range from 260 C to 290 C. The product distributions obtained over all catalysts were analysed with mass spectrometry analysis tool. The activity of bulk Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles was compared with prepared nano-iron oxide phase catalysts. The reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature and O{sub 2}/ethanol ratio were investigated. The catalysts

  7. Study on the physicochemical properties of Fe/CeO2 catalysts as an effect from different iron loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Mas Fatiha; Ramli, Anita; Yusup, Suzana

    2012-11-01

    The use of catalyst in the biomass gasification is effective to elevate hydrogen content and to reduce tar formation. This study presents the development of 2.5-10 wt% Fe/CeO2 catalysts for biomass gasification to hydrogen. The catalysts were prepared using incipient wetness impregnation method. Different characterization methods such as Powder XRay Diffraction (XRD), Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. BET analysis clearly indicates that Fe/CeO2 catalysts are mainly nonporous and the surface area of the catalysts increases with increasing of Fe loading. Characterization by XRD exhibited the formation of a solid solution of iron-cerium oxide, with the presence of cubic CeO2 structure which is in agreement with FESEM images. The TPR results show the emergence of two reduction peaks, corresponding to the surface and bulk reduction of CeO2 to Ce2O3. No distinct peak related to the reduction of Fe2O3 to Fe3O4, instead a shoulder evolved, related to the reduction of Fe3O4 to Fe.

  8. Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Gel in the Nakhlites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of the nakhlite martian meteorites have revealed hydrothermal minerals present within the fractures of the olivine minerals and the mesostasis. The olivine fractures of the Lafayette nakhlite reveal variations with initial deposits of siderite on the fracture walls, followed by crystalline phyllosilicates (smectite), and finishing with a rapidly cooled amorphous silicate gel within the central regions of the fractures. The mesostasis fractures of Lafayette also contain a crystalline phyllosilicate (serpentine). The amorphous gel is the most abundant secondary phase within the fractures of the other nakhlites [1, 2]. By studying nine nakhlite samples, including Lafayette, Governador Valadares, Nakhla, Y-000593, Y-000749, Miller-Range 03346, NWA 817, NWA 998, and NWA 5790, our aim is to constrain the identity of the phyllosilicate secondary phase minerals found throughout the nakhlite martian meteorites. This is achieved using methods including Electron Probe Micro-analysis (EPMA); X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (Fe-K XANES) spectroscopy measured using Beamline I-18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron; and the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) at the University of Leicester for High-Resolution (HR) imaging and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). BF studying nine nakhlite samples, including Lafayette, Governador Valadares, Nakhla, Y-000593, Y-000749, Miller-Range 03346, NWA 817, NWA 998, and NWA 5790, our aim is to constrain the identity of the phyllosilicate secondary phase minerals found throughout the nakhlite martian meteorites. This is achieved using methods including Electron Probe Micro-analysis (EPMA); X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (Fe-K XANES) spectroscopy measured using Beamline I-18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron; and the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) at the University of Leicester for High-Resolution (HR) imaging and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED).

  9. Moessbauer study of the evolution of a laterite iron mineral based catalyst: effect of the activation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubeiro, M.L. (Escuela de Quimica, Caracas (Venezuela)); Goldwasser, M.R. (Escuela de Quimica, Caracas (Venezuela)); Perez Zurita, M.J. (Escuela de Quimica, Caracas (Venezuela)); Franco, C. (Escuela de Quimica, Caracas (Venezuela)); Gonzalez-Jimenez, F. (Dept. de Fisica, Caracas (Venezuela)); Jaimes, E. (Dept. de Fisica, Caracas (Venezuela))

    1994-11-01

    The syngas reaction has been studied using a laterite iron mineral, promoted with K and Mn. In situ activation under syngas, as well as pre-treatment with H[sub 2] followed by CO under mild and more severe conditions were tested. These activation procedures led to different iron phase compositions and to different catalytic selectivities. The C[sub 2]-C[sub 4]/CH[sub 4] ratio was significantly lower for those catalysts which after reaction showed the presence of hexagonal carbide and magnetite compared to the solid, which showed the highest proportion of Haegg carbide. (orig.)

  10. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2006-03-03

    Efforts during this second year focused on four areas: (1) continued searching and summarizing of published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) investigation of CO adsorption/desorption and temperature programmed hydrogenation (TPH) of carbonaceous species after FTS on unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts; (3) activity tests of alumina-supported iron catalysts in a fixed bed reactor; (4) sequential design of experiments, for the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor, and nonlinear-regression analysis to obtain kinetic parameters. Literature sources describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts were compiled in a review. Temperature-programmed desorption/reaction methods (the latter using mass-spectrometry detection and also thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA)) were utilized to study CO adsorption/-desorption on supported and unsupported iron catalysts. Molecular and dissociative adsorptions of CO occur on iron catalysts at 25-150 C. The amounts adsorbed and bond strengths of adsorption are influenced by supports and promoters. That CO adsorbs dissociatively on polycrystalline Fe at temperatures well below those of FT reaction indicates that CO dissociation is facile and unlikely to be the rate-limiting step during FTS. Carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for only 5 minutes at 200 C were initially hydrogenated under mild, isothermal condition (200 C and 1 atm), followed by TPH to 800 C. During the mild, isothermal hydrogenation, only about 0.1-0.2 mL of atomic carbon is apparently removed, while during TPH to 800 C multilayer equivalents of atomic, polymeric, carbidic, and graphitic carbons are removed. Rates of CO conversion on alumina-supported iron catalysts at 220-260 C and 20 atm are correlated well by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be

  11. Acid Activation of Natural Zeolite with High Content of Iron Oxides in Creation of Selective Sorbents and Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadirbekov Kairat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the influence of the nature of modifying acids (mineral, organic and heteropolyacids, and their combination on the composition and structure of the iron oxide rich clinoptilolit from Shankanay field in Kazakhstan for creation of selective catalysts in hydracarbon processing and sorbents for extracting ions of lanthanide and actinide elements. It is shown that sequential processing of natural zeolite in optimal conditions, by hydrochloric and sulfosalicylic acids lead to intensive decationization and dealumination, as well as maximum removal of iron ions from the zeolite framework without destroying it. It is found that the combination of activated clinoptilolite with hydrochloric acid and phosphotungstic heteropolyacid contributes to obtain catalyst system with high surface area and acidity.

  12. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability. Technical progress report No. 10, December 16, 1989--April 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrevaya, H.

    1992-05-06

    The objective of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. The performance targets are 88% CO+H{sub 2} conversion with less than 1% deactivation/day for 1 month and a methane and ethane selectivity of no more than 7% (based on hydrocarbons and oxygenates only) at a space velocity of at least 2 normal liters per hr gram iron (NL/hr/gFe) using a synthesis gas with 0.5--1.0 H{sub 2}:Co ratio in a slurry reactor.

  13. Preparation of Sulphur-containing Aromatic Amines by Reduction of the Corresponding Aromatic Nitro Compounds with Hydrazine Hydrate over Iron Oxide Hydroxide Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Xun SHI; Rong Wen LU; Zhu Xia ZHANG; De Feng ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    Sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds were rapidly reduced to the corresponding amines in high yields by employing hydrazine hydrate as a hydrogen donor in the presence of iron oxide hydroxide catalyst. It was worth noting that the catalyst exhibited extremely high activity. The reduction could be completed within 20-50 min and the yields were up to 97-99 %.

  14. Acetones Removal with Fe Doped Titanium Nano Tube Catalysts Prepared from Slag Iron in Steel Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Wen-ZhiCao; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2016-01-01

    TiO₂ has been studied most commonly because it has high stability, non-toxicity, high catalytic activity, and highly conductivity. Many studies have shown that TiO₂ would generate electron-hole pairs illuminated with UV and surround more energy than that before being illuminated. However, the surface area of TiO₂ is not large enough and the adsorption capacity is small. In this study, the titanium nano tube (TNT) catalysts were prepared to increase the surface area and adsorption capacity. The Fe-TNT was also prepared from slag iron since many slag iron cause waste treatment problems. In this study, the effect of Fe loading, including 0.77%, 1.13%, 2.24% and 4.50%, on acetone removal was also assessed since TNT doped with transitional or precious metals can be used to improve catalytic reaction efficiency. Furthermore, four kinds of VOCs concentration, including 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 ppm were tested. Four kinds of retention time, including 0.4, 0.8, 4.0 and 6.0 sec, and four kinds of dosage, including 0.15, 0.25, 0.30 and 0.45 g cm⁻³, were also assessed. In this study, the adsorption capacity of Fe-TNT was 18.8, 23.3, 28.9 and 32.6 mg g⁻¹ for acetone of 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 ppm, respectively. Four kinds of temperature, including 150, 200, 250 and 300 °C were tested in catalytic reaction system. The results showed removal efficiency increased with increasing temperature. The efficiency can be reached 95% under the conditions with the dosage higher than 0.3 g cm⁻³, temperature higher than 270 °C and retention time higher than 270 °C. Reaction efficiency was 20, 31, 41 and 96% at the temperature of 150, 200, 250 and 300 °C, respectively.

  15. Purity-enhanced bulk synthesis of thin single-wall carbon nanotubes using iron-copper catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. E.; Miyata, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Chen, S.; Kitaura, R.; Shinohara, H.

    2011-09-01

    We report high purity and high yield synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of narrow diameter from iron-copper bimetal catalysts. The SWCNTs with diameter of 0.8-1.2 nm are synthesized using the zeolite-supported alcohol chemical vapour deposition method. Single metal and bimetal catalysts are systematically investigated to achieve both the enhancement of SWCNT yield and the suppression of the undesired formation of graphitic impurities. The relative yield and purity of SWCNTs are quantified using optical absorption spectroscopy with an ultracentrifuge-based purification technique. For the single metal catalyst, iron shows the highest catalytic activity compared with the other metals such as cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, copper, and platinum. It has been found that the addition of copper to iron results in the suppression of carbonaceous impurity formation without decreasing the SWCNT yield. The purity-enhanced SWCNT shows fairly low sheet resistance due to the improvement of inter-nanotube contacts. This scalable design of SWCNT synthesis with enhanced purity is therefore a promising tool for shaping future high performance devices.

  16. Active Iron Sites of Disordered Mesoporous Silica Catalyst FeKIL-2 in the Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Rangus

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron-functionalized disordered mesoporous silica (FeKIL-2 is a promising, environmentally friendly, cost-effective and highly efficient catalyst for the elimination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from polluted air via catalytic oxidation. In this study, we investigated the type of catalytically active iron sites for different iron concentrations in FeKIL-2 catalysts using advanced characterization of the local environment of iron atoms by a combination of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Techniques (XANES, EXAFS and Atomic-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (AR STEM. We found that the molar ratio Fe/Si ≤ 0.01 leads to the formation of stable, mostly isolated Fe3+ sites in the silica matrix, while higher iron content Fe/Si > 0.01 leads to the formation of oligonuclear iron clusters. STEM imaging and EELS techniques confirmed the existence of these clusters. Their size ranges from one to a few nanometers, and they are unevenly distributed throughout the material. The size of the clusters was also found to be similar, regardless of the nominal concentration of iron (Fe/Si = 0.02 and Fe/Si = 0.05. From the results obtained from sample characterization and model catalytic tests, we established that the enhanced activity of FeKIL-2 with the optimal Fe/Si = 0.01 ratio can be attributed to: (1 the optimal concentration of stable isolated Fe3+ in the silica support; and (2 accelerated diffusion of the reactants in disordered mesoporous silica (FeKIL-2 when compared to ordered mesoporous silica materials (FeSBA-15, FeMCM-41.

  17. Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Prepared by Solvent-Deficient Precipitation (SDP: Effects of Washing, Promoter Addition Step, and Drying Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M. Brunner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel, solvent-deficient precipitation (SDP method for catalyst preparation in general and for preparation of iron FT catalysts in particular is reported. Eight catalysts using a 23 factorial design of experiments to identify the key preparation variables were prepared. The catalysts were characterized by electron microprobe, N2 adsorption, TEM, XRD, and ICP. Results show that the morphology of the catalysts, i.e., surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, crystallite sizes, and promoter distribution are significantly influenced by (1 whether or not the precursor catalyst is washed, (2 the promoter addition step, and (3 the drying condition (temperature. Consequently, the activity, selectivity, and stability of the catalysts determined from fixed-bed testing are also affected by these three variables. Unwashed catalysts prepared by a one-step method and dried at 100 °C produced the most active catalysts for FT synthesis. The catalysts of this study prepared by SDP compared favorably in activity, productivity, and stability with Fe FT catalysts reported in the literature. It is believed that this facile SDP approach has promise for development of future FT catalysts, and also offers a potential alternate route for the preparation of other catalysts for various other applications.

  18. Halogen-Bonding-Assisted Iodosylbenzene Activation by a Homogenous Iron Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Sousa, David P.; Wegeberg, Christina; Vad, Mads Sørensen;

    2016-01-01

    The iron(III) complex of hexadentate N,N,N′-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylendiamine-N′-acetate (tpena−) is a more effective homogenous catalyst for selective sulfoxidation and epoxidation with insoluble iodosylbenzene, [PhIO]n, compared with soluble methyl-morpholine-N-oxide (NMO). We propose that two...... molecules of [Fe(tpena)]2+ cooperate to solubilize PhIO, extracting two equivalents to form the halogen-bonded dimeric {[Fe(tpena)OIPh]2}4+. The closest intradimeric I⋅⋅⋅O distance, 2.56 Å, is nearly 1 Å less than the sum of the van de Waals radii of these atoms. A correlation of the rates of the reaction...... of {[Fe(tpena)OIPh]2}4+ with para-substituted thioanisoles indicate that this species is a direct metal-based oxidant rather than a derived ferryl or perferryl complex. A study of gas-phase reactions indicate that an ion at m/z=231.06100 originates from solution-state {[Fe(tpena)OIPh]2}4+ and is ascribed...

  19. Effect of Potassium Addition on Coprecipitated Iron Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Using Bio-oil-syngas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-xiang Wang; Ting Dong; Tao Kan; Quan-xin Li

    2008-01-01

    The effects of potassium addition and the potassium content on the activity and selectivity of coprecipitated iron catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) were studied in a fixed bed reactor at 1.5 MPa,300℃, and contact time (W/F) of 12.5 gcath/mol using the model bio-oil-syngas of H2/CO/CO2/N2 (62/8/25/5, vol%).It was found that potassium addition increases the catalyst activity for FTS and the reverse water gas shift reaction.Moreover,potassium increases the average molecular weight (chain length) of the hydrocarbon products.With the increase of potassium content,it was found that CH4 selectivity decreases and the selectivity of liquid phase products (C5+) increases.The characteristics of FTS catalysts with different potassium content were also investigated by various characterization measurements including X-ray diffraction,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area.Based on experimental results,100Fe/6Cu/16Al/6K (weight ratio) was selected as the optimal catalyst for FTS from bio-oil-syngas. The results indicate that the 100Fe/6Cu/16Al/6K catalyst is one of the most promising candidates to directly synthesize liquid bio-fuel using bio-oil-syngas.

  20. Green synthesis of iron nanoparticles and their application as a Fenton-like catalyst for the degradation of aqueous cationic and anionic dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Shahwan, Talal; Abu-Sirriah, Sadieh; Nairat, Muath; Boyacı, Ezel; Eroğlu, Ahmet E.; Thomas B. Scott; Keith. R. Hallam

    2011-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were produced using extracts of green tea leaves (GT-Fe NPs). The materials were characterized using TEM, SEM/EDX, XPS, XRD, and FTIR techniques and were shown to contain mainly iron oxide and iron oxohydroxide. The obtained nanoparticles were then utilized as a Fenton-like catalyst for decolorization of aqueous solutions containing methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) dyes. The related experiments investigated the removal kinetics and the effect of concentration for ...

  1. Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticle Catalysts Prepared by Galvanic Displacement into a Porous Si-Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Fu, Xin; Warther, David; Sailor, Michael J

    2017-02-21

    Porous silicon nanoparticles containing both Pd and iron oxide nanoparticles are prepared and studied as magnetically recoverable catalysts for organic reductions. The Pd nanoparticles are generated in situ by electroless deposition of Pd(NH3)4(2+), where the porous Si skeleton acts as both a template and as a reducing agent and the released ammonia ligands raise the local pH to exert control over the size of the Pd nanoparticles. The nanocomposites are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, superconducting quantum interference device magnetization, and dynamic light scattering. The nanocomposite consists of a porous Si nanoparticle (150 nm mean diameter) containing ∼20 nm pores, uniformly decorated with a high loading of surfactant-free Pd nanoparticles (12 nm mean diameter) and superparamagnetic γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (∼7 nm mean diameter). The reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by sodium borohydride is catalyzed by the nanocomposite, which is stable through the course of the reaction. Catalytic reduction of the organic dyes methylene blue and rhodamine B is also demonstrated. The conversion efficiency and catalytic activity are found to be superior to a commercial Pd/C catalyst compared under comparable reaction conditions. The composite catalyst can be recovered from the reaction mixture by applying an external magnetic field due to the existence of the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the construct. The recovered particles retain their catalytic activity.

  2. Residue-based iron oxide catalyst for the degradation of simulated petrochemical wastewater via heterogeneous photo-Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaratti, Gidiane; Rauen, Thalita Grando; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon; José, Humberto Jorge; Moreira, Regina De Fátima Peralta Muniz

    2017-08-10

    Iron oxide with a high degree of purity was recovered from waste and used as an environmentally friendly, low-cost catalyst in the application of the photo-Fenton process to simulated petrochemical wastewater (SPW). Iron oxide nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, zeta potential, toxicity and atomic absorption spectrometry. The experiments were performed in a batch photochemical reactor, at 20 ± 2.0°C and pH 3.0. The SPW was efficiently mineralized and oxidized using a low catalyst dosage. The results showed that the organic compounds present in the wastewater were not adsorbed onto the solid surface. The solid was found to be stable with negligible leaching and low toxicity. The kTOC/kCOD ratios were calculated and varied according to the process: for a homogeneous reaction, the ratio obtained was 0.31 and for the heterogenous photo-Fenton process, it was closer to 1. The chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon removal values were very close, indicating that the SPW is immediately mineralized, without producing partially oxidized compounds. The residue-based goethite studied represents a good alternative to commercially available catalysts in terms of sources and availability.

  3. Magnetic iron species highly dispersed over silica: use as catalysts for removal of pollutants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Victor A A; Maia, Laura A; Belardinelli, Rolando E; Ardisson, Jose D; Pereira, Márcio C; Oliveira, Luiz C A

    2016-04-04

    Fe2O3-SiO2 composites were prepared by impregnation (sample FeIMP) or doping (sample FeDOP) in the structure of porous silica. The dye removal capacity of the materials was investigated through adsorption and oxidation studies of methylene blue and rhodamine B. N2 adsorption/desorption measurements on FeIMP and FeDOP resulted in specific areas of 27 and 235 m(2) g(-1), respectively. Mössbauer spectroscopy and XRD data detected hematite and maghemite as the iron phases in the samples FeIMP and FeDOP, respectively. Adsorption isotherms and kinetic studies of the dyes were better fitted in DKR model for FeDOP, where the process follows a pseudo-second order with the interparticle diffusion step being the rate-limiting step. On the other hand, FeIMP has better fit in the Langmuir model. Photocatalytic activity was observed in FeDOP under UV irradiation by the presence of reaction-hydroxylated intermediates for MB (m/z = 301) and RhB (m/z = 459). However, the photocatalytic activity was strongly influenced by the adsorption affinity between dye/catalyst. Photogenerated holes are the species responsible for the dye degradation when the adsorption is too strong, while hydroxyl radical action will be favored when the adsorption is not vigorous as detected by ESI-MS. Graphical Abstract Action of photogenerated holes and free electrons into the photocatalytically mechanism of methylene blue degradation over a semiconductor.

  4. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 over iron-cerium-tungsten mixed oxide catalyst prepared by different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhi-bo; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Fei; Liu, Dun-yu; Lu, Wei; Jin, Jing; Ding, Shi-fa

    2017-06-01

    A series of magnetic Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz catalysts were synthesized by three different methods(Co-precipitation(Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-CP), Hydrothermal treatment assistant critic acid sol-gel method(Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-HT) and Microwave irradiation assistant critic acid sol-gel method(Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW)), and the catalytic activity was evaluated for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, XPS, H2-TPR and NH3-TPD. Among the tested catalysts, Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW shows the highest NOx conversion over per gram in unit time with NOx conversion of 60.8% at 350 °C under a high gas hourly space velocity of 1,200,000 ml/(g h). Different from Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-CP catalyst, there exists a large of iron oxide crystallite(γ-Fe2O3 and α-Fe2O3) scattered in Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz catalysts prepared through hydrothermal treatment or microwave irradiation assistant critic acid sol-gel method, and higher iron atomic concentration on their surface. And Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW shows higher surface absorbed oxygen concentration and better dispersion compared with Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-HT catalyst. These features were favorable for the high catalytic performance of NO reduction with NH3 over Fe0.85Ce0.10W0.05Oz-MW catalyst.

  5. Noachian and more recent phyllosilicates in impact craters on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairén, Alberto G; Chevrier, Vincent; Abramov, Oleg; Marzo, Giuseppe A; Gavin, Patricia; Davila, Alfonso F; Tornabene, Livio L; Bishop, Janice L; Roush, Ted L; Gross, Christoph; Kneissl, Thomas; Uceda, Esther R; Dohm, James M; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Rodríguez, J Alexis P; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P

    2010-07-06

    Hundreds of impact craters on Mars contain diverse phyllosilicates, interpreted as excavation products of preexisting subsurface deposits following impact and crater formation. This has been used to argue that the conditions conducive to phyllosilicate synthesis, which require the presence of abundant and long-lasting liquid water, were only met early in the history of the planet, during the Noachian period (> 3.6 Gy ago), and that aqueous environments were widespread then. Here we test this hypothesis by examining the excavation process of hydrated minerals by impact events on Mars and analyzing the stability of phyllosilicates against the impact-induced thermal shock. To do so, we first compare the infrared spectra of thermally altered phyllosilicates with those of hydrated minerals known to occur in craters on Mars and then analyze the postshock temperatures reached during impact crater excavation. Our results show that phyllosilicates can resist the postshock temperatures almost everywhere in the crater, except under particular conditions in a central area in and near the point of impact. We conclude that most phyllosilicates detected inside impact craters on Mars are consistent with excavated preexisting sediments, supporting the hypothesis of a primeval and long-lasting global aqueous environment. When our analyses are applied to specific impact craters on Mars, we are able to identify both pre- and postimpact phyllosilicates, therefore extending the time of local phyllosilicate synthesis to post-Noachian times.

  6. The effect of preparation factors on the structural and catalytic properties of mesoporous nanocrystalline iron-based catalysts for high temperature water gas shift reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkani, Fereshteh; Rezaei, Mehran [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A systematic study was done on the effect of preparation factors on the structural and catalytic properties of mesoporous nanocrystalline iron-based catalysts in high temperature water gas shift reaction. The catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation method, and the effect of the main preparation factors (pH, refluxing temperature, refluxing time, concentration of the precursors solution) was studied. The catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET), Temperature programmed reduction (TPR), transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM, SEM) techniques. The results revealed that the preparation factors affected the textural and catalytic properties of the Fe-Cr-Cu catalyst. The results showed that the prepared catalyst with the highest activity showed higher specific surface area compared to commercial catalyst and consequently exhibited higher activity in high temperature water gas shift reaction. The TEM analysis showed a nanostructure for this sample with crystallite size less than 20 nm.

  7. Ammoniated phyllosilicates with a likely outer Solar System origin on (1) Ceres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M C; Ammannito, E; Raponi, A; Marchi, S; McCord, T B; McSween, H Y; Capaccioni, F; Capria, M T; Carrozzo, F G; Ciarniello, M; Longobardo, A; Tosi, F; Fonte, S; Formisano, M; Frigeri, A; Giardino, M; Magni, G; Palomba, E; Turrini, D; Zambon, F; Combe, J-P; Feldman, W; Jaumann, R; McFadden, L A; Pieters, C M; Prettyman, T; Toplis, M; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2015-12-10

    Studies of the dwarf planet (1) Ceres using ground-based and orbiting telescopes have concluded that its closest meteoritic analogues are the volatile-rich CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. Water in clay minerals, ammoniated phyllosilicates, or a mixture of Mg(OH)2 (brucite), Mg2CO3 and iron-rich serpentine have all been proposed to exist on the surface. In particular, brucite has been suggested from analysis of the mid-infrared spectrum of Ceres. But the lack of spectral data across telluric absorption bands in the wavelength region 2.5 to 2.9 micrometres--where the OH stretching vibration and the H2O bending overtone are found--has precluded definitive identifications. In addition, water vapour around Ceres has recently been reported, possibly originating from localized sources. Here we report spectra of Ceres from 0.4 to 5 micrometres acquired at distances from ~82,000 to 4,300 kilometres from the surface. Our measurements indicate widespread ammoniated phyllosilicates across the surface, but no detectable water ice. Ammonia, accreted either as organic matter or as ice, may have reacted with phyllosilicates on Ceres during differentiation. This suggests that material from the outer Solar System was incorporated into Ceres, either during its formation at great heliocentric distance or by incorporation of material transported into the main asteroid belt.

  8. Catalyst Design Using Nanoporous Iron for the Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Abdel-Fattah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs have been synthesized via a novel chemical vapor deposition (CVD approach utilizing nanoporous, iron-supported catalysts. Stable aqueous dispersions of the CVD-grown nanotubes using an anionic surfactant were also obtained. The properties of the as-produced SWNTs were characterized through atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy and compared with purified SWNTs produced via the high-pressure CO (HiPCO method as a reference, and the nanotubes were observed with greater lengths than those of similarly processed HiPCO SWNTs.

  9. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2002-08-02

    The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

  10. Nanoscale zero-valent iron/AC as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts in three-dimensional electrode system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xinmin; Jiang, Yonghai; Zhou, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron/activated carbon (NZVI/AC) was investigated as heterogeneous Fenton catalyst in three-dimensional (3D) electrode system for methyl orange (MO) degradation. Some important operating parameters such as cathodic potential, pH, and O₂ flow rate were investigated, exhibiting good decolorization. The mineralization of MO was significantly improved by 20-35% compared to two-dimensional (2D) AC system at the optimum conditions. Although the TOC removal of AC was higher than NZVI/AC due to its good adsorption capacity initially, heterogeneous Fenton catalysis played a more and more important roles in the following test. After eight runs, NZVI/AC still exhibited excellent catalytic properties with low iron leaching. Further, a relatively comprehensive mechanism of NZVI/AC as particle electrodes in 3D system was proposed.

  11. Heterogeneous advanced photo-fenton oxidation of phenolic aqueous solutions over iron-containing SBA-15 catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailiche Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron-containing SBA15 catalysts have been prepared following different synthesisroutes, direct synthesis by adjusting pH at 3 and 6 and with post synthesis procedure. Activity and stability of these materials were assessed on the photo-Fenton degradation of phenolic aqueous solutions by H2O2 using near UV irradiation (254 nm at room temperature and initial neutral pH. Their catalytic performance was mentioned in terms of phenol and total organic carbon (TOC conversions. Several complementary techniques, including XRD, Nitrogen sorption isotherms, UV visible, were used to evaluate the final structural and textural properties of calcined Fe-SBA15 materials. These materials show a high activity and stability of iron species.

  12. Ammonia synthesis over multi-promoted iron catalysts obtained by high-energy ball-milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Mørup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of producing ammonia synthesis catalysts from high-energy ball-milling of a simple mixture of the constituent oxides has been investigated. The effect of ball-milling the fused oxidic precursor of the industrial KM1 ammonia synthesis catalyst has also been studied. The results show...

  13. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eBenzine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ i-chip enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria and six Fe(II phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8, Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5, and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31 were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  14. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzine, Jason; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ "i-chip" enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  15. Steam reforming of tar derived from lignin over pompom-like potassium-promoted iron-based catalysts formed on calcined scallop shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guoqing; Kaewpanha, Malinee; Hao, Xiaogang; Zhu, Ai-Min; Kasai, Yutaka; Kakuta, Seiji; Kusakabe, Katsuki; Abudula, Abuliti

    2013-07-01

    In order to understand the improvement effect of potassium (K) on the catalytic activity of iron-loaded calcined scallop shell (CS) for the steam reforming tar derived from biomass, various K precursors were applied for the catalyst preparation. It is found that pompom-like iron-based particles with a mesoporous structure were easily formed on the surface of calcined scallop shell (CS) when K2CO3 was used as K precursor while no such kind of microsphere was formed when other kinds of K precursors such as KOH and KNO3 were applied. The optimum K-loading amount for the preparation of this catalyst was investigated. Based on the experimental results obtained, a mechanism for the formation of these microspheres was proposed. This pompom-like potassium-promoted iron-based catalyst showed a better catalytic activity and reusability for the steam reforming of tar derived from lignin.

  16. Fe-saponite pillared and impregnated catalysts. Part 2. Nature of the iron species active for the reduction of NO{sub x} with propene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belver, C.; Vicente, M.A. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-15

    A study of the NO{sub x} reduction with propene in the absence/presence of oxygen over Fe-saponite clay catalysts with different iron loadings (ca. 1-28wt.%) has been performed. The catalysts were prepared by pillaring and impregnation methods and the iron active phases were characterized by using X-ray absorption spectroscopies and electron paramagnetic resonance. The samples display significant activity in the NO{sub x} reduction in the absence of oxygen with a maximum for a Fe content close to 10wt.%. A strong decay of catalytic activity was observed with the introduction of increasing quantities of oxygen in the feed. Iron is mostly present in all catalysts as Fe(III) with a slightly distorted local octahedral symmetry. The catalytic behavior was explained in terms of the nature and properties of the Fe existing phases.

  17. Enhancement of Treatment Efficiency of Recalcitrant Wastewater Containing Textile Dyes Using a Newly Developed Iron Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 Heterogeneous Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mushtaq; Asghar, Anam; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Fenton oxidation, an advanced oxidation process, is an efficient method for the treatment of recalcitrant wastewaters. Unfortunately, it utilizes H2O2 and iron-based homogeneous catalysts, which lead to the formation of high volumes of sludge and secondary pollutants. To overcome these problems, an alternate option is the usage of heterogeneous catalyst. In this study, a heterogeneous catalyst was developed to provide an alternative solution for homogeneous Fenton oxidation. Iron Zeolite Socony Mobile-5 (Fe-ZSM-5) was synthesized using a new two-step process. Next, the catalyst was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis and tested against a model wastewater containing the azo dye Acid Blue 113. Results showed that the loading of iron particles reduced the surface area of the catalyst from 293.59 to 243.93 m2/g; meanwhile, the average particle size of the loaded material was 12.29 nm. Furthermore, efficiency of the developed catalyst was evaluated by performing heterogeneous Fenton oxidation. Taguchi method was coupled with principal component analysis in order to assess and optimize mineralization efficiency. Experimental results showed that under optimized conditions, over 99.7% degradation and 77% mineralization was obtained, with a 90% reduction in the consumption of the developed catalyst. Furthermore, the developed catalyst was stable and reusable, with less than 2% leaching observed under optimized conditions. Thus, the present study proved that newly developed catalyst has enhanced the oxidation process and reduced the chemicals consumption.

  18. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2016-09-29

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  19. Biologically inspired highly durable iron phthalocyanine catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenmu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew C; Llanos, Bernard G; Chen, Zhongwei

    2010-12-08

    In the present work, we have designed and synthesized a new highly durable iron phtalocyanine based nonprecious oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst (Fe-SPc) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The Fe-SPc, with a novel structure inspired by that of naturally occurring oxygen activation catalysts, is prepared by a nonpyrolyzing method, allowing adequate control of the atomic structure and surface properties of the material. Significantly improved ORR stability of the Fe-SPc is observed compared with the commercial Fe-Pc catalysts. The Fe-SPc has similar activity to that of the commercial Fe-Pc initially, while the Fe-SPc displays 4.6 times higher current density than that of the commercial Fe-Pc after 10 sweep potential cycles, and a current density that is 7.4 times higher after 100 cycles. This has been attributed to the incorporation of electron-donating functional groups, along with a high degree of steric hindrance maintaining active site isolation. Nonprecious Fe-SPc is promising as a potential alternative ORR electrocatalyst for PEMFCs.

  20. Application of Principal Component Analysis to NIR Spectra of Phyllosilicates: A Technique for Identifying Phyllosilicates on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Lanza, N. L.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra of the martian surface from the OMEGA and CRISM instruments have identified a variety of phyllosilicates in Noachian terrains. The types of phyllosilicates present on Mars have important implications for the aqueous environments in which they formed, and, thus, for recognizing locales that may have been habitable. Current identifications of phyllosilicates from martian NIR data are based on the positions of spectral absorptions relative to laboratory data of well-characterized samples and from spectral ratios; however, some phyllosilicates can be difficult to distinguish from one another with these methods (i.e. illite vs. muscovite). Here we employ a multivariate statistical technique, principal component analysis (PCA), to differentiate between spectrally similar phyllosilicate minerals. PCA is commonly used in a variety of industries (pharmaceutical, agricultural, viticultural) to discriminate between samples. Previous work using PCA to analyze raw NIR reflectance data from mineral mixtures has shown that this is a viable technique for identifying mineral types, abundances, and particle sizes. Here, we evaluate PCA of second-derivative NIR reflectance data as a method for classifying phyllosilicates and test whether this method can be used to identify phyllosilicates on Mars.

  1. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Rahul P. Nabar

    2006-09-29

    Work continued on the development of a microkinetic model of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on supported and unsupported Fe catalysts. The following aspects of the FT mechanism on unsupported iron catalysts were investigated on during this third year: (1) the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor based on sequential design of experiments; (2) CO adsorption and CO-TPD for obtaining the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron; and (3) isothermal hydrogenation (IH) after Fischer Tropsch reaction to identify and quantify surface carbonaceous species. Rates of C{sub 2+} formation on unsupported iron catalysts at 220 C and 20 atm correlated well to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be rate-determining steps. From desorption of molecularly adsorbed CO at different temperatures the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron was determined to be 100 kJ/mol. Amounts and types of carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for 5-10 minutes at 150, 175, 200 and 285 C vary significantly with temperature. Mr. Brian Critchfield completed his M.S. thesis work on a statistically designed study of the kinetics of FTS on 20% Fe/alumina. Preparation of a paper describing this work is in progress. Results of these studies were reported at the Annual Meeting of the Western States Catalysis and at the San Francisco AIChE meeting. In the coming period, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on unsupported Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters by SSITKA method. This study will help us to (1) understand effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) build a microkinetics model for FTS on iron. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on models of defected Fe surfaces, most significantly the stepped Fe(211) surface. Binding

  2. [Experimental studies on low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO on magnetic iron-based catalysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gui-huan; Zhang, Qi; Qin, Ye; Wang, Fang; Lu, Fang; Gui, Ke-ting

    2009-10-15

    Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO is a new technique needing urgent development in flue gas cleaning. Elementary studies were done about selective catalytic reduction of NO from flue gas on magnetic iron oxides with ammonia at low and medium temperatures in a fluidized bed, such as Fe3O4 and gamma-Fe2O3. Magnetic field effects for NO removal on gamma-Fe2O3 were also researched with low assisted magnetic fileds. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy was used to identify and characterize the iron oxides catalysts. Results show that gamma-Fe2O3 is active in SCR at low temperatures, and Fe3O4 is apparently less active in SCR than gamma-Fe2O3, but Fe2O3 is also active in ammonia oxidation by O2 above 25 degrees C. Therefore, the optimal catalytic temperature zone in SCR on gamma-Fe2O3 includes 250 degrees C and adjacent temperature zone below it. Furthermore, a better NO conversion, which is 90%, is obtained at 250 degrees C on the gamma-Fe2O3 particle catalyst. In addition, chemisorption of NO on gamma-Fe2O3 is accelerated by assisted magnetic fields at 150-290 degrees C, thus the NO conversion is improved and higher NO removal efficiency of 95% is obtained at 250 degrees C. But the efficiency of NO removal decreases above 290 degrees C with the magnetic field. It is concluded that gamma-FeO3 catalyst is fit to be used in low-temperature SCR of NO with ammonia at 200-250 degrees C, which may suppress oxidation of ammonia and take advantage of positive effects by external magnetic fields.

  3. Enhanced E/Z Isomerization of (All-E)-lycopene by Employing Iron(III) Chloride as a Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaki; Kawana, Takahiro; Takehara, Munenori; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2015-07-01

    Catalytic isomerization of (all-E)-lycopene to Z-isomers using iron(III) chloride was investigated and optimized under various conditions of solvents, concentrations of iron(III) chloride, and reaction temperatures. The total contents of Z-isomers converted were higher in the order of CH2 Cl2 (78.4%) > benzene (61.4%) > acetone (51.5%) > ethyl acetate (50.8%) at 20 °C for 3 h using 1.0 × 10(-3) mg/mL iron(III) chloride for 0.1 mg/mL (all-E)-lycopene. However, the decomposition of lycopene was markedly accelerated in CH2 Cl2 : the remaining lycopene after the reaction for 3 h and 12 h was only 79.4% and 47.5%, respectively. As the concentration of catalyst increased in acetone, the Z-isomerization ratio of lycopene increased to more than 80%, followed by rapid degradation of lycopene to undetectable levels using >4.0 × 10(-3) mg/mL iron(III) chloride with the above concentration of (all-E)-lycopene. Finally, greater isomerization (79.9%) was attained at 60 °C in acetone for 3 h in the presence of 1.0 × 10(-3) mg/mL iron(III) chloride, largely without decomposition of lycopene (remaining ratio of total amount of lycopene isomers after the reaction, 96.5%). As iron(III) chloride has found general use as a food additive for iron fortification and acetone is also widely used in the food field, this method can be applied to the food and beverage processing industry. The dietary intake of lycopene, a natural red pigment found in brightly colored vegetables and fruits such as tomatoes and watermelons, has been reported to lower the risk of some diseases, including cancer. Lycopene molecules occur naturally in a long and “straight” shape, but on the other hand lycopene molecules with “bent” forms are highly absorbed by living cells, and showed good antioxidant activity. This study has demonstrated the efficient production of the “bent” lycopene using ionic iron as an accelerator, which is often contained in nutritional supplements. © 2015 Institute of Food

  4. Prussian blue analogue derived magnetic carbon/cobalt/iron nanocomposite as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for activation of peroxymonosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chen, Bo-Jau

    2017-01-01

    A Prussian blue analogue, cobalt hexacyanoferrate Co3[Fe(CN)6]2, was used for the first time to prepare a magnetic carbon/cobalt/iron (MCCI) nanocomposite via one-step carbonization of Co3[Fe(CN)6]2. The resulting MCCI consisted of evenly-distributed cobalt and cobalt ferrite in a porous carbonaceous matrix, making it an attractive magnetic heterogeneous catalyst for activating peroxymonosulfate (PMS). As Rhodamine B (RhB) degradation was adopted as a model test for evaluating activation capability of MCCI, factors influencing RhB degradation were thoroughly examined, including MCCI and PMS dosages, temperature, pH, salt and radical scavengers. A higher MCCI dosage noticeably facilitated the degradation kinetics, whereas insufficient PMS dosage led to ineffective degradation. RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS was much more favorable at high temperatures and under neutral conditions. The presence of high concentration of salt slightly interfered with RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS. Through examining effects of radical scavengers, RhB degradation by MCCI-activated PMS can be primarily attributed to sulfate radicals instead of a combination of sulfate and hydroxyl radicals. Compared to Co3O4, a typical catalyst for PMS activation, MCCI also exhibited a higher catalytic activity for activating PMS. In addition, MCCI was proven as a durable and recyclable catalyst for activating PMS over multiple cycles without efficiency loss and significant changes of chemical characteristics. These features demonstrate that MCCI, simply prepared from a one-step carbonization of Co3[Fe(CN)6]2 is a promising heterogeneous catalyst for activating PMS to degrade organic pollutants.

  5. Microwave assisted organic modification and surface functionalization of Phyllosilicates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Organically modified phyllosilicates (montmorillonite and palygorskite) using Arquad 2HT-75 surfactant were effectively synthesized utilizing a microwave irradiation technique. The microwave method was successfully used also for the surface...

  6. Bio-inspired computational design of iron catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzheng

    2015-08-25

    Inspired by the active site structure of monoiron hydrogenase, a series of iron complexes are built using experimentally ready-made acylmethylpyridinol and aliphatic PNP pincer ligands. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the newly designed iron complexes are very promising to catalyze the formation of formic acid from H2 and CO2.

  7. Iron (III) aquacomplexes as catalysts for pesticides mineralisation by sunlight irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catastini, C.; Mailhot, G.; Malato, S.; Sarakha, M.

    2002-07-01

    The experimental results of the photo catalytic degradation of the pesticide asulam (4-amino-benzosulfonyl-methylcarbamate) in aqueous solutions using iron (III) aquacomplexes as photo inducer and sunlight as irradiation source are reported. The experiments were conducted in a compound parabolic collector reactor (CPC) of Plataforma solar de Almeria. In the early stages of the irradiation, the degradation is clearly due to the photo redox process involving the most photoactive species of iron (III) (Fe(OH)''2+). The degradation was also shown to proceed when iron (II) was used as a photo inducer in aerated aqueous solutions. In both cases, the complete degradation of the substrate to CO{sub 2} in aerated aqueous solutions needed exposition to solar light of about 13-14 hours. A catalytic process involving iron (III), iron (II), oxygen and light is proposed. (Author) 24 refs.

  8. Systematic variation of the sodium/sulfur promoter content on carbon-supported iron catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch to olefins reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oschatz, M.; Krans, N.A.; Xie, J.; de Jong, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch to olefins (FTO) process is a method for the direct conversion of synthesis gas to lower C2–C4 olefins. Carbon-supported iron carbide nanoparticles are attractive catalysts for this reaction. The catalytic activity can be improved and undesired formation of alkanes can be suppres

  9. Systematic variation of the sodium/sulfur promoter content on carbon-supported iron catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch to olefins reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oschatz, M.; Krans, N.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41128942X; Xie, J.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer–Tropsch to olefins (FTO) process is a method for the direct conversion of synthesis gas to lower C2–C4 olefins. Carbon-supported iron carbide nanoparticles are attractive catalysts for this reaction. The catalytic activity can be improved and undesired formation of alkanes can be

  10. Facile and large-scale synthesis of high quality few-layered graphene nano-platelets via methane decomposition over unsupported iron family catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awadallah, Ahmed E., E-mail: ahmedelsayed_epri@yahoo.com [Process Development Division, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Aboul-Enein, Ateyya A. [Process Development Division, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Kandil, Usama F. [Petroleum Application Department, Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, 11727 Cairo (Egypt); Taha, Mahmoud Reda [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    High quality few-layered graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) were successfully prepared via catalytic chemical vapor deposition of methane under ambient pressure using substrate-free unsupported iron, cobalt, and nickel metallic sheets as catalysts. The bulk catalysts were prepared via combustion method using citric acid as a fuel. Various analytical techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the fresh and reduced catalysts and to identify the morphological structure of the as-grown GNPs. TEM images of the reduced metal catalysts showed that polycrystalline metallic sheets were easily produced after complete reduction of unsupported metal oxides. The data demonstrated that the formation of zero-valent metallic sheets could effectively promote the growth of GNPs on their surfaces. The unsupported Ni catalyst exhibits higher catalytic growth activity in terms of GNPs yield (254 wt%) compared with all other catalysts. Raman spectra and TEM results established that a few layers of GNPs with high crystallinity and good graphitization were produced. TGA results further demonstrated that the as-grown GNPs exhibit significantly higher thermal stability in air atmosphere compared with other synthesis methods. - Highlights: • Few-layered graphene nanoplatelets were prepared via methane catalytic decomposition. • Metallic sheets of iron group metals were used as novel catalysts. • The surfaces of metallic sheets were found to be very effective for GNPs growth. • The number of layers is dependent on the morphological structure of the catalysts. • The unsupported metallic Ni catalyst exhibited higher catalytic growth activity.

  11. Characterization of Mo additions in iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, A. [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)], E-mail: acampo2@lsu.edu; Spivey, J.J. [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Roy, A. [J. Bennett Johnson, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Lohitharn, N.; Goodwin, J.; Lotero, E. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, 127 Earle Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 0909 (United States); Lamb, H. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Engineering Building I, Box 7905, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2007-11-11

    An iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst with a low concentration of molybdenum (90Fe/10Mo/5Cu/17Si) used as a promoter was characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The catalyst was prepared using coprecipitation, pretreated in CO, then one sample passivated and one calcined. The XRD data show that after CO pretreatment the calcined and passivated catalysts are almost amorphous with respect to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with nanoparticle size of 10 and 100 A for Fe{sub 3}C (only present in the passivated sample). Least squares fitting of the XANES region show that the calcined and passivated samples were similar in the bulk and surface structures, with the calcined samples completely oxidized. As expected, K and L{sub III} edges Mo-XANES shows only small molybdenum carbide formation compared to iron carbide.

  12. The catalytic activity of the iron-coated pumice particles used as heterogeneous catalysts in the oxidation of natural organic matter by H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, Alper; Karaarslan, Mihrican; Kılıç, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    The oxidative removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from waters was investigated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and iron-coated pumice particles in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation process (HCOP). Removal of trihalomethane (THM) precursors, which is formed THM by the reacts with chloride, was performed with the hydroxyl radicals. Coating the original pumice particles with iron oxides significantly enhanced the removal of NOM with peroxide. The studies were carried out in two sections: (1) decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in pure water with iron-coated pumice and (2) oxidation of THM Precursor (NOM) by hydrogen peroxide with iron-coated pumice. The monitored parameters in this study include dissolved organic carbon and trihalomethanes formation potential. The results show that iron-coated pumice catalyst significantly increased the removal efficiency of NOM in the HCOP. The results show that iron-coated pumice catalyst significantly increased the removal efficiency of NOM in the HCOP. Results show that the oxidation of NOM and remaining NOM with H2O2 is improved by the addition of iron-coated pumice particles which activate the H2O2 molecule, leading to the formation of hydroxyl radicals in a Fenton-like process.

  13. Ultradispersed Hydrocarbon Synthesis Catalyst from CO and H[2] Based on Electroexplosion of Iron Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Popok, Evgeniy Vladimirovich; Levashova, Albina Ivanovna; Chekantsev, Nikita Vitalievich; Kirgina, Mariya Vladimirovna; Rafegerst, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure and properties of disperse particles of electroexplosive iron-based powder are studied with a laser diffraction method, transmission electron microscopy analysis and X-ray photography. The catalytic activity of ultradispersed iron powders in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H[2] by Fischer - Tropsch method is measured by concentration of the paramagnetic particles with electron paramagnetic resonance. In the laboratory of catalytic plant, hydrocarbons are synthesized at...

  14. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic performance of nanosized iron-cobalt catalysts for light olefins production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Feyzi; Asadollah Hassankhani

    2011-01-01

    Nanosized Fe-Co catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method and studied for the conversion of synthesis gas to light olefins.In particular,the effects of a range of preparation variables such as Co/Fe molar ratios of the precipitation solution,pH value of precipitate,temperature of precipitation,promoters and loading of optimum promoter on the structure and catalytic performance are investigated.The optimal nano catalyst for light olefins (C2-C4) production was obtained overthe catalyst with Co/Fe molar ratio of 3/1 which promoted with 2 wt% K.The results show that the best operational conditions were GHSV =2200 h-1 (H2/CO =2/1) at 260 ℃ under atmospheric pressure.Characterization of catalysts were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD),thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA),differential scanning calorimetry (DSC),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N2 physisorption measurements such as BrunauerEmmett-Teller (BET) and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) methods.

  15. Effects of Loading and Doping on Iron-Based CO2 Hydrogenation Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-24

    hydrogenation reactions with the catalyst described within were conducted in a 1 L Parr Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR). Upon completion of the...63 (1990) 2459-2462. [13] W.W. Russell , and G.H. Miller, Journal of the American Chemical Society 72 (1950) 2446-2454. [14] R.W. Dorner, D.R

  16. Pre-Reduction of Au/Iron Oxide Catalyst for Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reaction Below 150 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fukuda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature water-gas shift reaction (WGS using gold catalyst is expected to be an attractive technique to realize an efficient on-site hydrogen production process. In this paper, Au/Fe3O4 catalysts for promoting the WGS below 150 °C were developed by a preliminary reduction of Au/iron oxide (Fe3+ catalyst utilizing high reactivity of Au nano-particles. The reduction was conducted under a CO, H2, or CO/H2O stream at either 140 or 200 °C, and the effect of reduction conditions on the characteristics of the Au/Fe3O4 catalyst and on the catalytic activity in WGS at 80 °C was investigated. The reaction progress during the pre-reduction treatment was qualitatively analyzed, and it was found that the iron oxide in Au/Fe2O3 calcined at 200 °C was easily reduced to Fe3O4 phase in all reduction conditions. The reduction conditions affected the characteristics of both Au and iron oxide, but all of the reduced catalysts had small Fe3O4 particles of less than 20 nm with Au particles on the surface. The surface area and content of cationic Au were high in the order of CO, H2, CO/H2O, and 140, 200 °C. In the WGS test at 80 °C using the developed catalysts, the activities of the catalysts pre-reduced by CO at 140 or 200 °C and by H2 at 140 °C were very high with 100% CO conversion even at such a low temperature. These results indicated that factors such as higher surface area, crystallized Fe3O4, and cationic Au content contributed to the catalytic activity.

  17. Silver/iron oxide/graphitic carbon composites as bacteriostatic catalysts for enhancing oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; You, Shijie; Gong, Xiaobo; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jinlong; Fu, Honggang

    2015-06-01

    Biofilms from anode heterotrophic bacteria are inevitably formed over cathodic catalytic sites, limiting the performances of single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Graphitic carbon (GC) - based nano silver/iron oxide (AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC) composites are prepared from waste pomelo skin and used as antibacterial oxygen reduction catalysts for MFCs. AgNPs and Fe3O4 are introduced in situ into the composites by one-step carbothermal reduction, enhancing their conductivity and catalytic activity. To investigate the effects of Fe species on the antibacterial and catalytic properties, AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC is washed with sulfuric acid (1 mol L-1) for 0.5 h, 1 h, and 5 h and marked as AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-x (x = 0.5 h, 1 h and 5 h, respectively). A maximum power density of 1712 ± 35 mW m-2 is obtained by AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-1 h, which declines by 4.12% after 17 cycles. Under catalysis of all AgNP-containing catalysts, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds via the 4e- pathway, and no toxic effects to anode microorganisms result from inhibiting the cathodic biofilm overgrowth. With the exception of AgNPs/Fe3O4/GC-5 h, the AgNPs-containing composites exhibit remarkable power output and coulombic efficiency through lowering proton transfer resistance and air-cathode biofouling. This study provides a perspective for the practical application of MFCs using these efficient antibacterial ORR catalysts.

  18. Characterization of platinum–iron catalysts supported on MCM-41 synthesized with rice husk silica and their performance for phenol hydroxylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitlada Chumee, Nurak Grisdanurak, Arthit Neramittagapong and Jatuporn Wittayakun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous material RH-MCM-41 was synthesized with rice husk silica by a hydrothermal method. It was used as a support for bimetallic platinum−iron catalysts Pt–Fe/RH-MCM-41 for phenol hydroxylation. The catalysts were prepared by co-impregnation with Pt and Fe at amounts of 0.5 and 5.0 wt.%, respectively. The RH-MCM-41 structure in the catalysts was studied with x-ray diffraction, and their surface areas were determined by nitrogen adsorption. The oxidation number of Fe supported on RH-MCM-41 was + 3, as determined by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES analysis. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of all the catalysts displayed well-ordered structures, and metal nanoparticles were observed in some catalysts. All the catalysts were active for phenol hydroxylation using H2O2 as the oxidant at phenol : H2O2 mole ratios of 2 : 1, 2 : 2, 2 : 3 and 2 : 4. The first three ratios produced only catechol and hydroquinone, whereas the 2 : 4 ratio also produced benzoquinone. The 2 : 3 ratio gave the highest phenol conversion of 47% at 70 °C. The catalyst prepared by co-impregnation with Pt and Fe was more active than that prepared using a physical mixture of Pt/RH-MCM-41 and Fe/RH-MCM-41.

  19. Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air–Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Xue

    2013-08-28

    Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m2, which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m 2) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m2). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxides Efficiently Catalyzed by Thioether-Triphenolate Bimetallic Iron(III) Complexes: Catalyst Structure-Reactivity Relationship and Mechanistic DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Della Monica, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    A series of dinuclear iron(III)I complexes supported by thioether-triphenolate ligands have been prepared to attain highly Lewis acidic catalysts. In combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) they are highly active catalysts in the synthesis of cyclic organic carbonates through the coupling of carbon dioxide to epoxides with the highest initial turnover frequencies reported to date for the conversion of propylene oxide to propylene carbonate for iron-based catalysts (5200h-1; 120°C, 2MPa, 1h). In particular, these complexes are shown to be highly selective catalysts for the coupling of carbon dioxide to internal oxiranes affording the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yield and with retention of the initial stereochemical configuration. A density functional theory (DFT) investigation provides a rational for the relative high activity found for these Fe(III) complexes, showing the fundamental role of the hemilabile sulfur atom in the ligand skeleton to promote reactivity. Notably, in spite of the dinuclear nature of the catalyst precursor only one metal center is involved in the catalytic cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Catalytic oxidation of Methyl Orange by an amorphous FeOOH catalyst developed from a high iron-containing fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Li; Fu-Shen Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences

    2010-04-15

    Heterogeneous photo-Fenton process using an amorphous FeOOH as catalyst was studied to degrade Methyl Orange (MO) dye in aqueous solution. The amorphous FeOOH was prepared by dissolution and precipitation using a high iron-containing fly ash as raw material. The ash not only provided iron source but also acted as a supporter of amorphous FeOOH. Coating the fly ash particles with the amorphous FeOOH significantly enhanced the removal of MO, and 2.5 g of catalyst was sufficient to degrade 50 mg MO from 1 l of aqueous solution at pH 7.0 after 80 min. Oxidant concentration, solution pH, UV/dark/sunlight and recycling of the catalyst were investigated in order to evaluate the photo-Fenton effects. Moreover, variations of particle size before and after preparation, separation of solid-liquid and stability of the amorphous FeOOH in the catalyst were studied. It was testified that the amorphous FeOOH on the surface of fly ash was stable and the Fenton catalyst was easily separated from the aqueous system.

  2. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  3. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  4. Pulsed-laser deposition of nanostructured iron oxide catalysts for efficient water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Michele; Caramori, Stefano; Ronconi, Federico; Bignozzi, Carlo A; El Koura, Zakaria; Bazzanella, Nicola; Meda, Laura; Miotello, Antonio

    2014-05-14

    Amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) for functionalization of indium-tin oxide surfaces, resulting in electrodes capable of efficient catalysis in water oxidation. These electrodes, based on earth-abundant and nonhazardous iron metal, are able to sustain high current densities (up to 20 mA/cm2) at reasonably low applied potential (1.64 V at pH 11.8 vs reversible hydrogen electrode) for more than 1 h when employed as anodes for electrochemical water oxidation. The good catalytic performance proves the validity of PLD as a method to prepare nanostructured solid-state materials for catalysis, enabling control over critical properties such as surface coverage and morphology.

  5. Nanosized iron and iron–cobalt spinel oxides as catalysts for methanol decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Manova, Elina; Tsoncheva, Tanya; Estournès, Claude; Paneva, Daniela; Tenchev, K.; Mitov, Ivan; Petrov, L.

    2006-01-01

    Nanosized iron and mixed iron–cobalt oxides supported on activated carbon materials and their bulk analogues prepared by thermal synthesis are studied by X-rays diffraction, Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements and temperature programmed reduction. Their catalytic behavior in methanol decomposition to H2, CO and methane is tested. Phase transformations in the metal oxides affected by the reaction medium are also investigated. Changes in the reaction mechanism of the methanol decompo...

  6. Preparation of Nano-Sized γ-Al2O3 Supported Iron Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis by Solvated Metal Atom Impregnation Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two types of small iron clusters supported on γ-Al2O3-RT(dehydroxylated at room temperature) and γ-Al2O3-800 (dehydroxylated at 800 ℃) were prepared by solvated metal atom impregnation (SMAI) techniques. The iron atom precursor complex, bis(toluene)iron(0) formed in the metal atom reactor, was impregnated into γ-Al2O3 having different concentrations of surface hydroxyl groups to study the effect of surface hydroxylation on the crucial stage of iron cluster formation. Catalysts prepared in this way were characterized by TEM, M(o)ssbauer, and chemisorption measurements, and the results show that higher concentration of surface hydroxyl groups of γ-Al2O3-RT favors the formation of more positively charged supported iron cluster Fen/γ-Al2O3-RT, and the lower concentration of surface hydroxyl groups of γ-Al2O3-800 favors the formation of basically neutral supported iron cluster Fen/γ-Al2O3-800. The measured results also indicate that the higher concentration of surface hydroxyl groups causes the rapid decomposition of precursor complex, bis(toluene)iron(0), and favors the formation of relatively large iron cluster. Consequently, these two types of catalysts show different catalytic properties in Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The catalytic pattern of Fen/γ-Al2O3-RT in F-T reaction is similar to that of the unreduced α-Fe2O3 and that of Fen/γ-Al2O3-800 is similar to that of the reduced α-Fe2O3.

  7. Phyllosilicate diversity and past aqueous activity revealed at Mawrth Vallis, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J.L.; Dobrea, E.Z.N.; McKeown, N.K.; Parente, M.; Ehlmann, B.L.; Michalski, J.R.; Milliken, R.E.; Poulet, F.; Swayze, G.A.; Mustard, J.F.; Murchie, S.L.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    Observations by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter/Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars in the Mawrth Vallis region show several phyllosilicate species, indicating a wide range of past aqueous activity. Iron/magnesium (Fe/Mg)-smectite is observed in light-toned outcrops that probably formed via aqueous alteration of basalt of the ancient cratered terrain. This unit is overlain by rocks rich in hydrated silica, montmorillonite, and kaolinite that may have formed via subsequent leaching of Fe and Mg through extended aqueous events or a change in aqueous chemistry. A spectral feature attributed to an Fe2+ phase is present in many locations in the Mawrth Vallis region at the transition from Fe/Mg-smectite to aluminum/silicon (Al/Si)-rich units. Fe2+-bearing materials in terrestrial sediments are typically associated with microorganisms or changes in pH or cations and could be explained here by hydrothermal activity. The stratigraphy of Fe/Mg-smectite overlain by a ferrous phase, hydrated silica, and then Al-phyllosilicates implies a complex aqueous history.

  8. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  9. Promotional Effect of Ce on Iron-Based Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with NH3

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaobo Wang; Lei Zhang; Shiguo Wu; Weixin Zou; Shuohan Yu; Ye Shao; Lin Dong

    2016-01-01

    A series of Fe–Ce–Ti catalysts were prepared via co-precipitation method to investigate the effect of doping Ce into Fe–Ti catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3. The NO conversion over Fe–Ce–Ti catalysts was considerably improved after Ce doping compared to that of Fe–Ti catalysts. The Fe(0.2)–Ce(0.4)–Ti catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity to that of Fe(0.2)–Ti catalysts. The obtained catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD)...

  10. Origin and evolution of phyllosilicate deformation bands in the poorly lithified sandstones of the Rio do Peixe Basin, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Francisco; Nicchio, Matheus; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Bezerra, Francisco; Souza, Jorge; Carvalho, Bruno; Storti, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    indicates that the only external element present in phyllosilicate deformation bands formed by clay authigenesis is iron oxide. This feature suggests formation at very shallow depth, in the vadose zone where fluid flow preferentially occurs by capillarity in deformation band cores. Petrophysical analysis shows that both types of phyllosilicate deformation bands have high sealing potential. Clay smearing deformation bands reduce rock permeability by three orders of magnitude whereas phyllosilicate deformation bands formed by authigenesis causes permeability reduction of about two orders of magnitude with respect to the corresponding host rock.

  11. Effective heterogeneous electro-Fenton process for the degradation of a malodorous compound, indole using iron loaded alginate beads as a reusable catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Hammouda, Samia Ben; Fourcade, Florence; Assadi, Aymen,; Soutrel, Isabelle; Adhoum, Nafâa; Amrane, Abdeltif; MONSER, LOTFI

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this work the characterization and the performance of iron immobilized in alginate beads (Fe-ABs) as catalyst for heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) treatment of a malodorous compound, indole, was investigated. Experimental results demonstrated that indole was effectively removed through the electro-Fenton process; while in the considered experimental conditions, the performances of EF were only slightly improved by the addition of UVA radiation. The most efficient o...

  12. Iron(Ⅲ) Trifluoroacetate:Chemoselective and Recyclable Lewis Acid Catalyst for Diacetylation of Aldehydes,Thioacetalization and Transthioacetalization of Carbonyl Compounds and Aerobic Coupling of Thiols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ADIBI Ha-di; SAMIMI Heshmat Allah; IRANPOOR Nasser

    2008-01-01

    Iron(Ⅲ)trifluoroacetate [Fe(CF3CO2)3] was found to be a recyclable,highly efficient and chemoselective Lewis acid catalyst for protection of a variety of carbonyl compounds as thioacetals under nearly neutral conditions.With the use of this catalyst,1,3-dithiolanes and 1,3-dithianes were obtained in high yields from various aldehydes.Un-der the same conditions ketones were similarly but more slowly thioketalized.This difference in reactivity between aldehydes and ketones was successfully utilized for the selective thioacetalization of aldehydes in the presence of ketones and also for the chemoselective conversion of β-diketone into the corresponding dithioacetal.Transthio-acetalization of O,O-acetals and O,O-ketals into cyclic thioacetals was also achieved by using this catalyst.Addi-tionally,iron(Ⅲ)trifluoroacetate has been found to be efficient catalyst for the addition of acetic anhydride to both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes to afford 1,1-diacetates(gem diacetates).Aerobic dimerization of thiols was achieved by this reagent mediated by sodium iodide and air atmosphere.

  13. Direct decomposition of nitric oxide in low temperature over iron-based perovskite-type catalyst modified by Ru

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; ZHANG Mi-lin; YUAN Fu-long; SHI Ke-ying; ZHANG Guo; ZHANG Dan

    2006-01-01

    Iron-based perovskite-type compounds modified by Ru were prepared through sol-gel process to study its catalytic activity of NOx direct decomposition at low temperature and evaluate the conversion of NO under the experimental conditions. The catalytic activity of La0.9Ce0.1Fe0.8-nCo0.2RunO3 ( n = 0.01,0.03,0.05,0.07,0.09)series for the NO, NO-CO two components, CO-HC-NO three components were also analyzed. The catalytic investigation evidenced that the presence of Ru is necessary for making highly activity in decomposition of nitric oxide even at low temperature (400 ℃ ) and La0.9Ce0.9Fe0.75Co0.2Ru0.05O3( n = 0. 05 ) has better activity in all the samples, the conversion of it is 58.5%. With the reducing gas (CO, C3 H6 )added into the gas, the catalyst displayed very high activity in decomposition of NO and the conversion of it is 80% and 92. 5% separately.

  14. Novel activated alumina-supported iron oxide-composite as a heterogeneous catalyst for photooxidative degradation of reactive black 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsueh, C.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: ccy7@ccmail.ncku.edu.tw

    2006-02-28

    A novel activated alumina-supported iron oxide-composite (denoted as FeAA-500) was prepared by so-called fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) crystallization. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to characterize the FeAA-500. The photo-catalytic activity of the FeAA-500 was evaluated in the photooxidative degradation of 0.1 mM azo-dye reactive black 5 (RB5) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and UVA light ({lambda} = 365 nm) in a solution with a pH of 2.5. Complete decolorization of the model pollutant RB5 was achieved; the total organic carbon (TOC) removal ratio was 95%, and a trace amount of leached ferric ion was detected following 75 min of reaction when 2.0 g/L FeAA-500 was used as a catalyst. FeAA-500 has high photo-catalytic activity; it is therefore a promising heterogeneous photocatalysis of the degradation of organic compounds.

  15. Biogeneration of iron-based catalyst precursors by Acidianus brierleyi on high- and low-pyrite coals for direct liquefaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, M.V.S.; Huggins, F.E.; Aleem, M.I.H.; Kermode, R.I.; Bhattacharyya, D. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-03-01

    Treatment of high-pyrite, high-sulphur Illinois (IBS) coals and pyrite-free Blind Canyon (DECS) coal with added pyrite in the presence of {ital Acidianus brierleyi} showed formation of iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) particles and subsequent sulphiding caused enhancement in liquefaction and oil yield. IBC No. 101 and 105, and DECS No. 17 containing different amounts of pyrite were treated with {ital A. brierleyi} to evaluate its effect on FeOOH formation. Chemical analysis of the liquid phase and Moessbauer analysis of the coals revealed that all the biotreated coals showed significant reduction in pyrite after 21 days (or less with pH alteration in the middle of IBC No. 105 coal run) of incubation. Further data on bioprocessed coals obtained from Moessbauer spectroscopy verified the formation of an FeOOH phase, which acts as a catalyst precursor for direct coal liquefaction (DCL). The direct liquefaction conversion and oil yield of the biotreated DECS No. 17 coal with added pyrite increased by 14 and 5% respectively, over the control which did not contain {ital A. brierleyi}. 40 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. An ethylene glycol intercalated monometallic layered double hydroxide based on iron as an efficient bifunctional catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Rajamani; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Poonam; Chakraborty, Pinki

    2016-11-01

    Given the fact that the literature describing the intercalation of organic molecules in monometallic LDH systems is scarce, the present investigation is aimed at the generation of ethylene glycol intercalated Fe(II)-Fe(III) LDH with the objective of enhancing the surface area for further catalytic applications of industrially important and environmentally harmful organics. The solvothermal reaction of FeCl3 with urea in an ethylene glycol medium yielded a brown colored powder which was characterized employing a wide range of analytical techniques including high resolution powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), elemental (C, H, N and S) analysis, UV-visible, photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements, BET surface area and pore-size analysis. The observed reflections in the PXRD pattern were indexed in a rhombohedral symmetry with a = 3.175 and c = 31.9 Å. Combining the results from the Fe 2p core level analysis and anion contents from elemental and thermogravimetric analysis, a formula of Fe(2+)1.06 Fe(3+)0.94 (O2C2H4) (OH)4 was deduced for the sample. The intercalation of EG in the interlayer was confirmed from FTIR and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The d-d transitions of the Fe(3+)-ion and the charge transfer transition of the Fe(ii)-Fe(iii) lattice were evident in the UV-visible spectrum. Blue indigoid emission bands arising from the transitions present in the Fe(3+)-ion were noticed in the photoluminescence spectrum. The measured BET surface area and pore diameter of the sample were 144 m(2) g(-1) and 12.5 nm, respectively. Almost instant decolourisation of the Xylenol Orange (XO) dye occurred in the presence of H2O2 and the LDH sample as catalyst. Similar observations were encountered for Methyl Orange (MO) and Methylene Blue (MB) dyes. All these reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics. The industrially important reductive conversion of nitro aromatics was catalyzed

  17. Monolayer Iron Carbide Films on Au(111) as a Fischer–Tropsch Model Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannie, Gilbère; Lammich, Lutz; Li, Yong-Wang

    2014-01-01

    .315 ± 0.005 nm. On the basis of the atom-resolved STM data, we propose that C2H4 dissociates at Fe island edges, after which the carbon diffuses inward into the interstitial region between the Fe and the Au substrate to form an FexCy surface that may be a good starting point for the investigation of iron......-temperature exposure of Fe islands gas to C2H4 deposited on the clean Au(111) surface results in partly converted Fe/FexCy islands. Multistep flash-heating treatment of the partly converted Fe/FexCy islands at 523 and 773 K results in pure highly crystalline FexCy islands with in-plane nearest-neighbor distances of 0...

  18. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  19. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETITE (Fe3O4CATALYST FROM IRON SANDS ON DESORPTION TEMPERATURE OF MgH2 HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulinda Maulinda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the future technologies for a safe hydrogen storage media is  metal hydrides. Currently, Mg-based metal hydride has a safety factor and efficient for vehicle applications. However, the thermodynamic properties of magnesium hydride (MgH2 found a relatively high temperature. High desorption temperatures caused MgH2 high thermodynamic stability resulting desorption enthalpy is also high. In this study, natural mineral (iron ore has been extracted from iron sand into powder of magnetite (Fe3O4 and used as a catalyst in an effort to improve the desorption properties of MgH2. Magnetie has been successfully extracted from iron sand using precipitation method with a purity of 85 % , where the purity of the iron sand before extracted was 81%. Then, MgH2-Fe3O4 was milling using mechanical alloying method with a variety of catalysts and milling time. The observation by XRD showed the material was reduced to nanocrystalline scale. MgH2 phase appears as the main phase. DSC test results showed with the addition of Fe3O4, the desorption temperature can be reduced up to 366oC, compared to pure pure MgH2 reached by 409o C. Furthermore, based on gravimetric test, the hydrogen release occurs at a temperature of 388o C, weight loss  of 0.66 mg during 16 minutes.

  20. Preparative treatment with NaOH to selectively concentrate iron oxides of a Chilean volcanic soil material to produce effective heterogeneous Fenton catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo, Valentina; Pizarro, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.pizarro@usach.cl; Rubio, Maria Angelica [USACH, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia (Chile); Cavalcante, Luis Carlos Duarte [UFMG, Departamento de Quimica-ICEx (Brazil); Garg, Vijayendra Kumar [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Fabris, Jose Domingos [UFMG, Departamento de Quimica-ICEx (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    A Chilean volcanic Ultisol material was first size-fractionated so as to obtain the fraction with mean particle sizes {phi} < 53 {mu}m. This sample was then sequentially treated three or five times with 5 mol L{sup - 1} NaOH, in an attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of the selective chemical dissolution to concentrate iron oxides, as a preparation procedure before using the materials as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts. The effects of those treatments on the iron oxides mineralogy were monitored with Moessbauer spectroscopy. The NaOH-treated samples were tested as catalysts towards the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition. Three or five sequential NaOH treatments were found to be comparably effective, by concentrating nearly the same proportion of iron oxides in the remaining solid phase (25.1 {+-} 0.4 and 23.3 {+-} 0.2 mass%, respectively). 298 K-Moessbauer patterns were similar for both samples, with a central (super)paramagnetic Fe{sup 3 + } doublet and a broad sextet, assignable to several closely coexisting magnetically ordered forms of iron oxides. Despite of this nearly similar effect of the two treatments, the Ultisol material treated three times with NaOH presents higher heterogeneous catalytic efficiency and is more suitable to decompose H{sub 2}O{sub 2} than that with five treatments.

  1. Thiolate-bridged dinuclear ruthenium and iron complexes as robust and efficient catalysts toward oxidation of molecular dihydrogen in protic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Masahiro; Sakata, Ken; Hirao, Yoshifumi; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Nakajima, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Thiolate-bridged dinuclear ruthenium and iron complexes are found to work as efficient catalysts toward oxidation of molecular dihydrogen in protic solvents such as water and methanol under ambient reaction conditions. Heterolytic cleavage of the coordinated molecular dihydrogen at the dinuclear complexes and the sequential oxidation of the produced hydride complexes are involved as key steps to promote the present catalytic reaction. The catalytic activity of the dinuclear complexes toward the chemical oxidation of molecular dihydrogen achieves up to 10000 TON (turnover number), and electrooxidation of molecular dihydrogen proceeds quite rapidly. The result of the density functional theory (DFT) calculation on the reaction pathway indicates that a synergistic effect between the two ruthenium atoms plays an important role to realize the catalytic oxidation of molecular dihydrogen efficiently. The present dinuclear ruthenium complex is found to work as an efficient organometallic anode catalyst for the fuel cell. It is noteworthy that the present dinuclear complex worked not only as an effective catalyst toward chemical and electrochemical oxidation of molecular dihydrogen but also as a good anode catalyst for the fuel cell. We consider that the result described in this paper provides useful and valuable information to develop highly efficient and low-cost transition metal complexes as anode catalysts in the fuel cell.

  2. Lignite air-steam gasification in the fluidized bed of iron-containing slag catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Shchipko, M.L.; Golovin, Yu. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Academgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    The influence of fluidized bed of iron-containing slag particles on air-steam gasification of powdered Kansk-Achinsk lignite in entrained flow was studied in pilot installation with productivity about 60 kg per hour. Slag of Martin process and boiler slag were used as catalytic active materials until their complete mechanical attrition. Two following methods of catalytic gasification of lignite were compared: the partial gasification in stationary fluidized bed of slag particles with degree of fuel conversion 40-70% and complete gasification in circulating bed of slag particles. In the first case only the most reactive part of fuel is gasified with the simultaneously formation of porous carbon residue with good sorption ability. It was found the catalytic fluidized bed improves heat transfer from combustion to reduction zone of gas-generator and increases the rate of fuel conversion at the temperature range 900-1000{degrees}C. At these temperatures the degree of conversion is depended considerably on the duration time of fuel particles in the catalytic fluidized bed. The influence of catalytic fluidized bed height and velocity of reaction mixture on the temperature profiles in the gas-generator was studied. The optimal relationship was found between the fluidized bed height and velocity of flow which makes possible to produce the gas with higher calorific value at maximum degree of fuel conversion.

  3. Promotional Effect of Ce on Iron-Based Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with NH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of Fe–Ce–Ti catalysts were prepared via co-precipitation method to investigate the effect of doping Ce into Fe–Ti catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3. The NO conversion over Fe–Ce–Ti catalysts was considerably improved after Ce doping compared to that of Fe–Ti catalysts. The Fe(0.2–Ce(0.4–Ti catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity to that of Fe(0.2–Ti catalysts. The obtained catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption (BET, X-ray diffraction (XRD, temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR, temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrophotometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The data showed that the introduction of Ce results in higher surface area and better dispersion of active components on the catalyst surface and enhances the amount of surface acid sites. The interactions between Fe and Ce species were found to improve the redox ability of the catalyst, which promotes catalytic performance at low temperature. The XPS results revealed that Fe3+/Fe2+ and Ce4+/Ce3+ coexisted on the catalyst surface and that Ti was in 4+ oxidation state on catalyst surface. Ce doping increased the atomic ratio of Fe/Ti and Ce/Ti and enhanced the surface adsorbed oxygen species. In addition, Fe(0.2–Ce(0.4–Ti catalyst also showed better tolerance to H2O and SO2 and up to 92% NO conversion at 270 °C with 200 ppm SO2 added over 25 h, which suggests that it is a promising industrial catalyst for mid-low temperature NH3–selective catalytic reduction (SCR reaction.

  4. Effect of iron-manganese-sepiolite as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst on the performance and microbial community of anaerobic granular sludge treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chengyuan; Li, Weiguang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Wu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Both short-term and long-term exposure experiments have been carried out to investigate the influence of iron (Fe)-manganese (Mn)-sepiolite, as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst, on the performance and microbial community of anaerobic granular sludge. During the short-term exposure experiments, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency decreased from 73.1% to 64.1% with the presence of 100mg/L of catalyst. However, long-term exposure to the catalyst did not significantly affect the COD removal efficiency (81.8%) as compared to the control (83.5%). Meanwhile, the absorption peaks of coenzyme F420 in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge samples were remarkable by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra. After long-term exposure, the presence of the catalyst increased secretions of EPS from 83.7mg/g VSS to 89.1mg/g VSS. Further investigations with high throughput sequencing indicated that the abundance of Methanosaeta increased from 57.7% to 70.4% after long-term exposure. In bacterial communities, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Synergistetes were predominant.

  5. Iron as a catalyst of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation: Critical factors involved in its oxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenna, Domenico; Ciofani, Giuliano; Obletter, Gabriele

    2017-05-01

    Iron-induced human LDL oxidation, which is relevant to atherosclerosis, has not yet been properly investigated. We addressed such issue using iron(II) and (III) basically in the presence of phosphates, which are present in vivo and influence iron oxidative properties, at pH 4.5 and 7.4, representative, respectively, of the lysosomal and plasma environment. In 10mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS), iron(II) induces substantial LDL oxidation at pH 4.5 at low micromolar concentrations, while at pH 7.4 has low oxidative effects; iron(III) promotes small LDL oxidation only at pH 4.5. In 10mM sodium acetate/NaCl buffer, pH 4.5, iron-induced LDL oxidation is far higher than in PBS, highlighting the relevance of phosphates in the inhibitory modulation of iron-induced LDL oxidation. LDL oxidation is related to iron binding to the protein and lipid moiety of LDL, and requires the presence of iron(II) bound to LDL together with iron(III). Chemical modification of LDL carboxyl groups, which could bind iron especially at pH 4.5, decreases significantly iron binding to LDL and iron-induced LDL oxidation. Hydroxyl radical scavengers are ineffective on iron-induced LDL oxidation, which is inhibited by metal chelation, scavengers of alkoxyl/peroxyl radicals, or removal of LDL lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH). Overall, substantial human LDL oxidation is induced LOOH-dependently by iron(II) at pH 4.5 even in the presence of phosphates, suggesting the occurrence of iron(II)-induced LDL oxidation in vivo within lysosomes, where pH is about 4.5, iron(II) and phosphates coexist, plasma with its antioxidants is absent, and glutathione peroxidase is poorly expressed resulting in LOOH accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Phyllosilicate Emission from Protoplanetary Disks: Is the Indirect Detection of Extrasolar Water Possible?

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Melissa A; 10.1089/ast.2008.0316

    2013-01-01

    Phyllosilicates are hydrous minerals formed by interaction between rock and liquid water and are commonly found in meteorites originating in the asteroid belt. Collisions between asteroids contribute to zodiacal dust, which therefore reasonably could include phyllosilicates. Collisions between planetesimals in protoplanetary disks may also produce dust containing phyllosilicates. These minerals possess characteristic emission features in the mid-infrared and could be detectable in extrasolar protoplanetary disks. Here we determine whether phyllosilicates in protoplanetary disks are detectable in the infrared using instruments such as those on board the Spitzer Space Telescope and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy). We calculate opacities for the phyllosilicates most common in meteorites and compute the emission of radiation from a protoplanetary disk using a 2-layer radiative transfer model. We find that phyllosilicates present at the 3% level lead to observationally significant differen...

  7. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to explore the significance of a magnetic transition in an iron based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst that is active for the hydrogenation of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warringham, Robbie; McFarlane, Andrew R.; Lennon, David, E-mail: David.Lennon@Glasgow.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Joseph Black Building, Glasgow, Scotland G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); MacLaren, Donald A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, The Kelvin Building, Glasgow, Scotland G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Webb, Paul B.; Tooze, Robert P. [Sasol Technology UK Ltd., Purdie Building, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Taylor, Jon; Ewings, Russell A.; Parker, Stewart F. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-07

    An iron based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst is evaluated using CO hydrogenation at ambient pressure as a test reaction and is characterised by a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), powder X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed oxidation, Raman scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The INS spectrum of the as-prepared bulk iron oxide pre-catalyst (hematite, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is distinguished by a relatively intense band at 810 cm{sup −1}, which has previously been tentatively assigned as a magnon (spinon) feature. An analysis of the neutron scattering intensity of this band as a function of momentum transfer unambiguously confirms this assignment. Post-reaction, the spinon feature disappears and the INS spectrum is characterised by the presence of a hydrocarbonaceous overlayer. A role for the application of INS in magnetic characterisation of iron based FTS catalysts is briefly considered.

  8. Mechanisms for dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of N-heterocycles using PNP-pincer-supported iron catalysts: a density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatlon, Boodsarin; Surawatanawong, Panida

    2016-10-14

    The catalytic dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of N-heterocycles have potential applications in organic hydrogen storage. Recently, Fe(HPNP)(CO)(H)(HBH3) (cp1) and Fe(HPNP)(CO)(H)(Br) (cp2), the iron(ii) complexes supported by bis(phosphino)amine pincer (Fe-PNP) (PNP = N(CH2CH2P(i)Pr2)2), have been reported to be the starting complexes which can catalyze the dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of N-heterocycles. The active species were proposed to be the trans-dihydride complexes, Fe(HPNP)(CO)(H)2 (cp4) and Fe(PNP)(CO)(H) (cp3), which can be interconverted. Here, our density functional study revealed that the N-heterocyclic substrate plays a role in the formation of cp4 from cp1, while the tert-butoxide base assists with the formation of cp3 from cp2. The mechanism for cp3 catalyzed dehydrogenation of a 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) substrate to quinoline (Q) involves two main steps: (i) dehydrogenation of THQ to 3,4-dihydroquinoline (34DHQ) and (ii) dehydrogenation of 34DHQ to Q. In each dehydrogenation step, the proton is transferred from the substrate to the N of the PNP ligand of cp3. An ion-pair complex between Fe-PNP and the deprotonated substrate is then formed before the hydride at the adjacent C is transferred to Fe. Notably, the isomerization of 34DHQ to 14DHQ or 12DHQ is not necessary, as the bifunctionality of Fe-PNP in cp3 can stabilize the ion-pair complex and facilitate direct dehydrogenation of the C3-C4 bond in 34DHQ. On the other hand, the mechanism for hydrogenation of Q involves the initial formation of 14DHQ, which can easily isomerize to 34DHQ with the assistance of a tert-butoxide base. Finally, 34DHQ is dehydrogenated to THQ. As the overall energy barriers for cp3 catalyzed dehydrogenation of THQ (+27.6 kcal mol(-1)) and cp4 catalyzed hydrogenation of Q (+23.8 kcal mol(-1)) are only slightly different, reaction conditions can be conveniently adjusted to favor either the dehydrogenation or hydrogenation process. Insights into the role of

  9. Degradation of tyrosol by a novel electro-Fenton process using pyrite as heterogeneous source of iron catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Salah; Oturan, Mehmet A; Labiadh, Lazhar; Guersalli, Amor; Abdelhedi, Ridha; Oturan, Nihal; Brillas, Enric

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosol (TY) is one of the most abundant phenolic components of olive oil mill wastewaters. Here, the degradation of synthetic aqueous solutions of 0.30 mM TY was studied by a novel heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process, so-called EF-pyrite, in which pyrite powder was the source of Fe(2+) catalyst instead of a soluble iron salt used in classical EF. Experiments were performed with a cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond anode and a carbon-felt cathode, where TY and its products were destroyed by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between Fe(2+) and H2O2 generated at the cathode. Addition of 1.0 g L(-1) pyrite provided an easily adjustable pH to 3.0 and an appropriate 0.20 mM Fe(2+) to optimize the EF-pyrite treatment. The effect of current on mineralization rate, mineralization current efficiency and specific energy consumption was examined under comparable EF and EF-pyrite conditions. The performance of EF-pyrite was 8.6% superior at 50 mA due to self-regulation of soluble Fe(2+) by pyrite. The TY decay in this process followed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The absolute rate constant for TY hydroxylation was 3.57 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), as determined by the competition kinetics method. Aromatic products like 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and catechol, as well as o-benzoquinone, were identified by GC-MS and reversed-phase HPLC. Short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids like maleic, glycolic, acetic, oxalic and formic were quantified by ion-exclusion HPLC. Oxalic acid was the major and most persistent product found. Based on detected intermediates, a plausible mineralization pathway for TY by EF-pyrite was proposed.

  10. Organics-bearing Clays from the Rio Tinto (spain): A Novel Analog for the Phyllosilicates Outcrops Seen By Omega-mex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, Rosalba

    2007-12-01

    The Rio Tinto (RT) is considered an important analog of Sinus Meridiani on Mars and an ideal model analog for a subsurface Martian setting [1]. The RT system comprises the upper sequence of an acid rock drainage system where weathered iron -rich rocks, overlain a massive-pyrite deposit. The RT analog site is ideal for testing on the preservation of organics in hematite-rich vs. phyllosilicates-rich environments [3]. It is suggested here that RT near-surface rocks, which embed pockets of Clays, represent also a potential new model analog for the phyllosilicates-rich outcrops seen by OMEGA-MEx on the surface of Mars [5]. Results from the analysis of cores drilled under the 2005 Robotic experiment of the MARTE project (Borehole#7 Site 607cm) [2-3] are presented in this paper. Primary mineral assemblages include hematite, goethite, and Phyllosilicates e.g.,smectite, kaolinite, as quantified by X-ray diffraction [4]. Organic carbon is at low concentration (<0.05%) beneath the soil horizon in most cores dominated by iron minerals but is considerably higher in Phyllosilicate-rich levels i.e., 0.2-0.3Wt% at 385 -550 cm-depth [2-3]. Phyllosilicate-rich terrains have been identified OMEGA/MEx in the Nili Fossae, Mawrth Valles and Candor Chasma regions [e.g., 5]. These outcrops are surrounded by hematite-rich deposits, which are potentially barren in organics [6]. The potential of phyllosilicates to preserve higher amounts of organics/ biosignatures is well known for several Earth environments as well as the RT near subsurface. This potential brings a relevant element for the selection of candidate sites for the MSL mission [e.g., 1]. References: [1]Fernandez-Remolar et al.,2005 EPSL, 240,149-167; [2]Stoker et al., 2007; [3] Bonaccorsi et al., 2007; [4] Sutter et al., 2007 in Astrobiology,MARTE Spec. Issue; [5] Bibring et al., 2006, Science 312, 400-404; [6] Sumner, 2004, JGR 109. Anknowlegments: NASA-Postdoctoral-Program/C.Stoker, B.Sutter, A.F Davila and the MARTE team for

  11. Creep of phyllosilicates at the onset of plate tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiguet, Elodie; Reynard, Bruno; Caracas, Razvan; Van de Moortele, Bertrand; Hilairet, Nadege; Wang, Yanbin (ENSL); (UC)

    2012-10-24

    Plate tectonics is the unifying paradigm of geodynamics yet the mechanisms and causes of its initiation remain controversial. Some models suggest that plate tectonics initiates when the strength of lithosphere is lower than 20-200 MPa, below the frictional strength of lithospheric rocks (>700 MPa). At present-day, major plate boundaries such as the subduction interface, transform faults, and extensional faults at mid-oceanic ridge core complexes indicate a transition from brittle behaviour to stable sliding at depths between 10 and 40 km, in association with water-rock interactions forming phyllosilicates. We explored the rheological behaviour of lizardite, an archetypal phyllosilicate of the serpentine group formed in oceanic and subduction contexts, and its potential influence on weakening of the lithospheric faults and shear zones. High-pressure deformation experiments were carried out on polycrystalline lizardite - the low temperature serpentine variety - using a D-DIA apparatus at a variety of pressure and temperature conditions from 1 to 8 GPa and 150 to 400 C and for strain rates between 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -6} s{sup -1}. Recovered samples show plastic deformation features and no evidence of brittle failure. Lizardite has a large rheological anisotropy, comparable to that observed in the micas. Mechanical results and first-principles calculations confirmed easy gliding on lizardite basal plane and show that the flow stress of phyllosilicate is in the range of the critical value of 20-200 MPa down to depths of about 200 km. Thus, foliated serpentine or chlorite-bearing rocks are sufficiently weak to account for plate tectonics initiation, aseismic sliding on the subduction interface below the seismogenic zone, and weakening of the oceanic lithosphere along hydrothermally altered fault zones. Serpentinisation easing the deformation of the early crust and shallow mantle reinforces the idea of a close link between the occurrence of plate tectonics and water at

  12. Oxidative Debromination and Degradation of Tetrabromo-bisphenol A by a Functionalized Silica-Supported Iron(III-tetrakis(p-sulfonatophenylporphyrin Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Fukushima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA, a commonly used brominated flame retardant, also functions as an endocrine disruptor. Thus, the degradation of TBBPA has attracted considerable interest among the scientific community. Iron(III-porphyrin complexes are generally regarded as “green” catalysts and have been reported to catalyze the efficient degradation and dehalogenation of halogenated phenols in environmental wastewaters. However, they are quickly deactivated due to self-degradation in the presence of an oxygen donor, such as KHSO5. In the present study, an iron(III-tetrakis (p-sulfonatophenyl-porphyrin (FeTPPS was immobilized on imidazole-modified silica (FeTPPS/IPS via coordination of the Fe(III with the nitrogen atom in imidazole to suppress self-degradation and thus enhance the catalyst reusability. The oxidative degradation and debromination of TBBPA and the influence of humic acid (HA, a major component in leachates, on the oxidation of TBBPA was investigated. More than 95% of the TBBPA was degraded in the pH range from 3 to 8 in the absence of HA, while the optimal pH for the reaction was at pH 8 in the presence of HA. Although the rate of degradation was decreased in the presence of HA, over 95% of the TBBPA was degraded within 12 h in the presence of 28 mg-C L−1 of HA. At pH 8, the FeTPPS/IPS catalyst could be reused up to 10 times without any detectable loss of activity for TBBPA for degradation and debromination, even in the presence of HA.

  13. Development of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July 1995--30 September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukur, D.B.

    1995-12-20

    The following accomplishments were made on task 4. Reproducibility of Catalyst Preparation: (1) Five slurry reactor tests were completed. Three tests were conducted using catalyst C (100 Fe/3 Cu/4 K/16 SiO{sub 2}) from three different batches (runs SB-2695, SB-2145 and SA-2715), and two tests were conducted with catalyst B (100 Fe/5 Cu/6 K/24 SiO{sub 2}) from two different preparation batches (runs SA-2615 and SB-2585). Performance of catalysts from different batches (activity, selectivity and deactivation rates) was similar to that of catalysts from the original batch (synthesized during DOE Contract DE- AC22-89PC89868). Thus, another major objective of the present contract, demonstration of reproducibility of catalyst preparation procedure and performance, has been accomplished. With these tests the work on Task 4 has been successfully completed. Two fixed bed reactor tests of catalysts B and C synthesized using potassium silicate solution as the source of potassium promoter were completed during this period (Task 5. The Effect of Source of Potassium and Basic Oxide Promoter). Activity of catalysts prepared using potassium silicate as the source of potassium promotion was somewhat higher, and their methane selectivities were higher than those of the corresponding catalysts prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using KHCO{sub 3} as the source of potassium promoter. However, these differences were not large, and may have been caused by experimental artifacts (e.g. existence of local hot spots in a reactor). A slurry reactor test (SA-2405) of catalyst with nominal composition 100 Fe/5 Cu/2 Ca/24 SiO{sub 2} was completed (Task 5). In general, the catalyst activity, space-time-yield, and hydrocarbon selectivities in this run during testing at:260{degrees}C, 2.17 MPa (300 psig), 2-2.6 Nl/g-cat/h and H{sub 2}CO=0.67 were quite good, and comparable to the best results obtained in our Laboratory.

  14. NATURAL IRON OXIDE AS A HETEROGENEOUS PHOTO-FENTON-LIKE CATALYST FOR THE DEGRADATION OF 1-NAPHTHOL UNDER ARTIFICIAL AND SOLAR LIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L MAMMERI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A heterogeneous photo-Fenton-like degradation process of 1-naphthol (1-NP promoted by natural iron oxide (NIO in the presence of H2O2 was studied under artificial (365 nm and solar irradiation. This is an important reaction for the environment since both H2O2 and iron oxides are common constituents of natural waters. Furthermore, iron oxides function as catalysts in chemical oxidation processes used with H2O2 for treatment of contaminated waters. The NIO used in this study was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET methods. The results show that the NIO is a composite material that contains predominantly crystalline hematite particales (Fe2O3. The Fe2O3 in NIO was able to initiate the Fenton-like and photo-Fenton-like reactions. The effects of initial pH, catalyst dosage, H2O2 concentration and the wavelength of the light source (UV and solar on the photodegradation of 1-NP were investigated. The optimal content of the NIO was 1 g L-1 and the optimal H2O2 concentration was 10 mM. The degradation could occur efficiently over a wide pH range of 3-8.3. Furthermore, an important effect of light was observed. The photo-oxidation of 1-NP in NIO-H2O2 system under solar light was significantly accelerated in comparison with artificial irradiation at 365 nm.

  15. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...... pose an environmental risk. The focus was put on iron-containing zeolite catalysts, since these recently have shown great potential as catalysts for the process. A number of different zeolites were compared. BEA was found to be the most active, thus focus was put on this material. Different preparation...

  16. Resource Recovery and Reuse: Recycled Magnetically Separable Iron-based Catalysts for Phosphate Recovery and Arsenic Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmentally friendly processes that aid human and environmental health include recovering, recycling, and reusing limited natural resources and waste materials. In this study, we re-used Iron-rich solid waste materials from water treatment plants to synthesize magnetic iron-o...

  17. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-Weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed under neutral to alkaline conditions during Mars' earliest Noachian geologic era (approx. 4.1-3.7 Gya). Sulfate formation, on the other hand, requires more acidic conditions which are thought to have occurred later during Mars' Hesperian era (approx. 3.7-3.0 Gya). Therefore, regions on Mars where phyllosilicates and sulfates are found in close proximity to each other provide evidence for the geologic and aqueous conditions during this global transition. Both phyllosilicates and sulfates form in the presence of water and thus give clues to the aqueous history of Mars and its potential for habitability. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era may have been weathered by the prevailing acidic conditions that characterize the Hesperian. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the alteration products resulting from acid-sulfate weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments. This study focuses on two phyllosilicates commonly identified with sulfates on Mars: nontronite and saponite. We also compare our results to observations of phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars to better understand the formation process of sulfates in close proximity to phyllosilicates on Mars and constrain the aqueous conditions of these regions on Mars.

  18. Phyllosilicate emission from protoplanetary disks: is the indirect detection of extrasolar water possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melissa A; Desch, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    Phyllosilicates are hydrous minerals formed by interaction between rock and liquid water, and are commonly found in meteorites that originate in the asteroid belt. Collisions between asteroids contribute to zodiacal dust, which therefore reasonably could include phyllosilicates. Collisions between planetesimals in protoplanetary disks may also produce dust that contains phyllosilicates. These minerals possess characteristic emission features in the mid-infrared and could be detectable in extrasolar protoplanetary disks. We have determined whether phyllosilicates in protoplanetary disks are detectable in the infrared, using instruments such as those on board the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). We calculated opacities for the phyllosilicates most common in meteorites and, using a two-layer radiative transfer model, computed the emission of radiation from a protoplanetary disk. We found that phyllosilicates present at the 3% level lead to observationally significant differences in disk spectra and should therefore be detectable with the use of infrared observations and spectral modeling. Detection of phyllosilicates in a protoplanetary disk would be diagnostic of liquid water in planetesimals in that disk and would demonstrate similarity to our own Solar System. We also discuss use of phyllosilicate emission to test the "water worlds" hypothesis, which proposes that liquid water in planetesimals should correlate with the inventory of short-lived radionuclides in planetary systems, especially (26)Al.

  19. Studies on Dechlorination of DDT with Alkaline 2-propanol and Iron-Nickel (Fe-Ni) Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, A.; Zaman, S. U.

    2009-05-01

    The Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) pesticides were previously extensively used in the cotton production and other agricultural activities in Pakistan and at least three thousand metric tons of obsolete pesticides have been stored under extreme hazardous conditions in more than thousand sites. Locally banned or severely restricted pesticides are easily available and DDT is continuously illegally imported and use in our country. Elimination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) waste has received considerable attention over the past two decades. Existing catalytic hydrodechlorinated techniques for disposing of OCPs are very costly due to the use of noble metals as catalysts. The aim of our study is to develop the cost effective and efficient method for the safe disposal of OCPs. This study is in continuation work on dechlorination of organochlorine pesticides with Fe-Ni catalyst in alkaline 2-propanol media. We turned our attention to the development of DDT disposal method for the third world countries. Herein, we report our first finding that in alkaline 2-propanol with Fe-Ni catalyst is an effective method for dechlorination of DDT. Catalytic dechlorination of DDT was carried out in an alkaline solution of NaOH and 2-propanol in the presence of catalyst at the temperature below 82 oC and end products were analyzed by using Gas Chromatography (GC-ECD) and Ion Chromatography (IC) techniques. Results obtained with initial concentration of DDT ranging between 10-100 μg/ml showed conversion of DDT to chlorine free product within 4 hrs.

  20. Template Effect and Ligand Substitution Methods for the Synthesis of Iron Catalysts: A Two-Part Experiment for Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sues, Peter E.; Cai, Kuihua; McIntosh, Douglas F.; Morris, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation is an important transformation for the production of fine chemicals. Traditionally, platinum group metals are used to catalyze this reaction, but recent pressure for greener practices has driven the development of base-metal catalysts. Due to the growing interest in this area of research, the underlying concepts…

  1. Template Effect and Ligand Substitution Methods for the Synthesis of Iron Catalysts: A Two-Part Experiment for Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sues, Peter E.; Cai, Kuihua; McIntosh, Douglas F.; Morris, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation is an important transformation for the production of fine chemicals. Traditionally, platinum group metals are used to catalyze this reaction, but recent pressure for greener practices has driven the development of base-metal catalysts. Due to the growing interest in this area of research, the underlying concepts…

  2. Selective oxidation catalysts obtained by immobilization of iron(III) porphyrins on thiosalicylic acid-modified Mg-Al layered double hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Castro, Kelly Aparecida Dias; Wypych, Fernando; Antonangelo, Ariana; Mantovani, Karen Mary; Bail, Alesandro; Ucoski, Geani Maria; Ciuffi, Kátia Jorge; Cintra, Thais Elita; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2016-09-15

    Nitrate-intercalated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized and exfoliated in formamide. Reaction of the single layer suspension with thiosalicylic acid under different conditions afforded two types of solids: LDHA1, in which the outer surface was modified with the anion thiosalicylate, and LDHA2, which contained the anion thiosalicylate intercalated between the LDH layers. LDHA1 and LDHA2 were used as supports to immobilize neutral (FeP1 and FeP2) and anionic (FeP3) iron(III) porphyrins. For comparison purposes, the iron(III) porphyrins (FePs) were also immobilized on LDH intercalated with nitrate anions obtained by the co-precipitation method. Chemical modification of LDH facilitated immobilization of the FePs through interaction of the functionalizing groups in LDH with the peripheral substituents on the porphyrin ring. The resulting FePx-LDHAy solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (powder) and UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopies and were investigated as catalysts in the oxidation of cyclooctene and cyclohexane. The immobilized neutral FePs and their homogeneous counterparts gave similar product yields in the oxidation of cyclooctene, suggesting that immobilization of the FePs on the thiosalicylate-modified LDHs only supported the catalyst species without interfering in the catalytic outcome. On the other hand, in the oxidation of cyclohexane, the thiosalicylate anions on the outer surface of LDHA1 or intercalated between the LDHA2 layers influenced the catalytic activity of FePx-LDHAy, leading to different efficiency and selectivity results. FeP1-LDHA2 performed the best (29.6% alcohol yield) due to changes in the polarity of the surface of the support and the presence of FeP1. Interestingly, FeP1 also performed better in solution as compared to the other FePs. Finally, it was possible to recycle FeP1-LDHA2 at least three times.

  3. The Study of Diamond Graphitization under the Action of Iron-based Catalyst%铁基作用下的金刚石石墨化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓光; 翟昌恒; 金洙吉; 郭东明

    2015-01-01

    通过构建含催化剂铁的金刚石仿真模型,进行了金刚石石墨化的三维分子动力学仿真,获得了金刚石在铁基催化剂作用下的石墨化机理.并对化学气相沉积金刚石进行了摩擦化学抛光试验,验证了铁基金属对金刚石石墨化的催化作用.分子动力学仿真结果表明铁原子的存在会降低金刚石石墨化的转变温度,进一步的微观结构分析可以得出,在催化剂作用下的石墨化机理是:铁原子价电子层中的未配对电子与金刚石原子的电子相互作用,形成了化学键,对金刚石原子产生吸引作用,使其逐渐变为石墨结构.所以铁基催化剂具有催化作用的原因就是铁原子价电子层结构中含有未配对的电子,而且与金刚石原子结构符合对准原则.试验结果验证了仿真结论的正确性.研究结果表明,金属铁的存在会加速金刚石石墨化的过程,利于对金刚石刀具的超精密加工.%In order to get the graphitization mechanism of diamond under the action of iron-based catalyst, a three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed on a particular model containing iron and diamond atoms. And the friction chemical polishing experiments for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond is conducted to validate the catalytic action of the iron-based metal on diamond graphitization. The results of molecular dynamics simulation show that the presence of iron atoms will reduce the transformation temperature of diamond graphitization. By analyzing the microstructure, the graphitization mechanism with catalyst can be concluded that the chemical bonds are formed by the interaction between the unpaired electrons in the valence shell of iron atoms and the electrons of diamond atoms, which will attract the diamond atoms and make them become graphite structure gradually. For the mechanism of the catalysis of iron for diamond graphitization, there are two critical reasons. On one hand, there are

  4. 铁铈复合氧化物催化剂SCR脱硝的改性研究%Study on the modification of iron-cerium mixed oxide catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊志波; 路春美

    2013-01-01

    利用共沉淀法制备了铁铈催化剂,考察添加钛、锆、钨和钼对其SCR脱硝的改性规律.结果表明,钨和钼的添加提高了铁铈催化剂高温脱硝性能,却使其低温活性有所降低;钛的添加对铁铈催化剂脱硝性能具有促进作用,尤其提高了其低温活性,并拓宽了其完全转化温度窗口,为最佳改性物.当钛的物质的量比逐渐由0.10增至0.40,铁铈钛催化剂低温脱硝效率先增大后减小,但其高温脱硝效率逐渐增大至100%,钛的最佳物质的量比为0.15.XRD和N2吸附分析结果表明,钛能优化铁铈催化剂的孔隙结构,增大其比表面积和比孔容,细化其孔径,并与催化剂中铁、铈氧化物形成良好的固溶体,从而提高了铁铈催化剂的SCR脱硝性能.Fe0.8Ce0.05Ti0.15Oz催化剂在150 ~400℃取得了高于90%的NOx转化率.%A series of iron-cerium mixed oxide catalysts modified titanium, zirconium, tungsten and molybdenum were prepared by co-precipitation. The selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3(NH3-SCR) activity of the catalysts were carried out in a fixed-bed quartz tube reactor. The research results indicated that the addition of tungsten and molybdenum could increase the high-temperature NH3-SCR activity of the iron-cerium mixed oxide catalysts, but decreased its low-temperature NH3-SCR activity. Titanium could improve the NH3-SCR activity of the iron-cerium mixed oxide catalyst within the range of reaction temperature, especially at low-temperature. Titanium was the most suitable assistant. When increasing the molar fraction of titanium from 0.10 to 0.40, the low-temperature NH3-SCR activity of iron-cerium-titanium mixed oxide catalysts firstly increased and then decreased while the high-temperature activity gradually increased to 100% , and the optimum molar fraction of titanium was 0.15. The results of X-ray diffraction(XRD) and N2 adsorption isotherms showed that the addition of titanium could optimize the pore

  5. Novel bifunctional catalysts based on crystalline multi-oxide matrices containing iron ions for CO2 hydrogenation to liquid fuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsis, N; Vidruk-Nehemya, R; Landau, M V; Herskowitz, M

    2016-07-04

    Seven solid mono-, bi- and tri-metallic oxide matrices where Fe(2+,3+) ions are distributed in different chemical/spatial environments were synthesized and characterized by XRD, N2-adsorption and EDAX methods. After basification with potassium, all matrices were activated by carburization or reduction-carburization under conditions selected based on the TPC/TPR spectra, tailoring the carburization extent of iron. The performances of the activated Fe-based catalysts with respect to CO2 conversion and C5+ selectivity were measured in a fixed-bed reactor under standard conditions in transient and continuous operation modes in units containing one or three reactors in series with water separations between the reactors. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2-adsorption, HRTEM-EELS and XPS before and after steady-state operation in the reactors. It was found that the rate of CO2 conversion is not limited by thermodynamic equilibrium but is strongly restricted by water inhibition and it depends on the nature of the Fe-oxide precursor. The ratio between the FTS and RWGS rates, which determines the C5+ hydrocarbons productivity, is strongly affected by the nature of the Fe-oxide matrix. The catalysts derived from the Fe-Al-O spinel and Fe-Ba-hexaaluminate precursors displayed the best balance of the two functions RFTS/RRWGS = 0.77-0.78. They were followed by magnetite, CuFe-delafossite, K-ferrite, Fe-La-hexaaluminate and LaFe-perovskite with a gradual lowering of RFTS/RRWGS from 0.60 to 0.15 and a gradual decrease in the C5+ productivity. The active sites that enhance the RWGS reaction are located on the surface of the Fe-oxide phases, while the FTS and methanation reactions occur on the surface of the Fe-carbide phases.

  6. Effects of an iron-based fuel-borne catalyst and a diesel particle filter on exhaust toxicity in lung cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Sandro; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Heeb, Norbert V; Mayer, Andreas; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Metal-containing fuel additives catalyzing soot combustion in diesel particle filters are used in a widespread manner, and with the growing popularity of diesel vehicles, their application is expected to increase in the near future. Detailed investigation into how such additives affect exhaust toxicity is therefore necessary and has to be performed before epidemiological evidence points towards adverse effects of their application. The present study investigates how the addition of an iron-based fuel additive (Satacen®3, 40 ppm Fe) to low-sulfur diesel affects the in vitro cytotoxic, oxidative, (pro-)inflammatory, and mutagenic activity of the exhaust of a passenger car operated under constant, low-load conditions by exposing a three-dimensional model of the human airway epithelium to complete exhaust at the air-liquid interface. We could show that the use of the iron catalyst without and with filter technology has positive as well as negative effects on exhaust toxicity compared to exhaust with no additives: it decreases the oxidative and, compared to a non-catalyzed diesel particle filter, the mutagenic potential of diesel exhaust, but increases (pro-)inflammatory effects. The presence of a diesel particle filter also influences the impact of Satacen®3 on exhaust toxicity, and the proper choice of the filter type to be used is of importance with regards to exhaust toxicity. Figure ᅟ.

  7. Science Letters: Structure relationship of nitrochlorobenzene catalytic degradation process in water over palladium-iron bimetallic catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Shao-feng; ZHOU Hong-yi; AO Xu-ping; XU Xin-hua; LOU Zhang-hua

    2006-01-01

    Two isomers of nitrochlorobenzene (o-, and p-NCB) were treated by a Pd/Fe catalyst in aqueous solutions through catalytic amination and dechlorination. Nitrochlorobenzenes are rapidly converted to form chloroanilines (CAN) first through an amination process, and then rapidly dechlorinated to become aniline (AN) and Cl-, without the involvement of any other intermediate reaction products. The amination and dechlorination reaction are believed to take place predominantly on the surface site of the Pd/Fe catalysts. The dechlorination rate of the reductive degradation of the two isomers of nitrochlorobenzene (o-, and p-NCB) in the presence of Pd/Fe as a catalyst was measured experimentally. In all cases, the reaction rate constants were found to increase with the decrease in the Gibbs free energy (correlation with the activation energy) of NCBs formation; the activation energy of each dechlorination reaction was measured to be 95.83 and 77.05 kJ/mol, respectively for o- and p-NCB. The results demonstrated that p-NCBs were reduced more easily than o-NCBs.

  8. Study of phyllosilicates and carbonates from the Capri Chasma region of Valles Marineris on Mars based on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter-Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (MRO-CRISM) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nirmala; Chauhan, Prakash

    2015-04-01

    Spectral reflectance data from the MRO-CRISM (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter-Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars) of Capri Chasma, a large canyon within Valles Marineris on Mars, have been studied. Results of this analysis reveal the presence of minerals, such as, phyllosilicates (illite, smectite (montmorillonite)) and carbonates (ankerite and manganocalcite). These minerals hint of the aqueous history of Noachian time on Mars. Phyllosilicates are products of chemical weathering of igneous rocks, whereas carbonates could have formed from local aqueous alteration of olivine and other igneous minerals. Four different locations within the Capri Chasma region were studied for spectral reflectance based mineral detection. The study area also shows the spectral signatures of iron-bearing minerals, e.g. olivine with carbonate, indicating partial weathering of parent rocks primarily rich in ferrous mineral. The present study shows that the minerals of Capri Chasma are characterized by the presence of prominent spectral absorption features at 2.31 μm, 2.33 μm, 2.22 μm, 2.48 μm and 2.52 μm wavelength regions, indicating the existence of hydrous minerals, i.e., carbonates and phyllosilicates. The occurrence of carbonates and phyllosilicates in the study area suggests the presence of alkaline environment during the period of their formation. Results of the study are important to understand the formation processes of these mineral assemblages on Mars, which may help in understanding the evolutionary history of the planet.

  9. Photo-Fenton oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B using an immobilized iron oxide as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Ho, Chien-Hung; Huang, Yao-Hui

    2013-04-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of azo dye Reactive Black B (RBB) by the photo-Fenton system catalyzed with an immobilized iron oxide, B1 (supported with SiO2 grain), was investigated. Reactive Black B oxidation was carried out in an expended-bed reactor in which the effect of B1 dosage on the decolorization and degradation of RBB was examined. Through pseudo-first-order kinetic studies, decolorization was found to be faster than degradation with a fixed rate constant ratio. By determining the iron dissolution from B1, RBB oxidation was supposed to mainly occur on the B1 surface, which catalyzed the generation of hydroxyl radicals in the photo-Fenton reaction. Accordingly, the efficiency of photo-Fenton could reach 100% and 91.2% of decolorization and degradation, respectively, in 300 minutes.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of niobium-promoted cobalt/iron catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra Gholami; Noor Asmawati Mohd Zabidi; Fatemeh Gholami; Mohammadtaghi Vakili

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic Co/Fe catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes ( CNTs) were prepared, and niobium ( Nb) was added as promoter to the 70Co:30Fe/CNT catalyst. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were characterized, and the catalytic performances were analyzed at the same operation conditions (H2:CO (volume ratio)= 2:1, p = 1 MPa, and t = 260℃) in a tubular fixed-bed microreactor system. The addition of Nb to the bimetallic catalyst decreases the average size of the oxide nanoparticles and improves the reducibility of the bimetallic catalyst. Evaluation of the catalyst performance in a Fischer-Tropsch reaction shows that the catalyst results in high selectivity to methane, and the selectivity to C5+ increased slightly in the bimetallic catalyst unlike that in the monometallic catalysts. The addition of 1% Nb to the bimetallic catalyst increases CO conversion and selectivity to C5+. Meanwhile, a decrease in methane selectivity is observed.

  11. Cafestol to Tricalysiolide B and Oxidized Analogues: Biosynthetic and Derivatization Studies Using Non-heme Iron Catalyst Fe(PDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Marinus A; Liu, Peng; Zou, Lufeng; Houk, K N; White, M Christina

    2012-12-01

    The tricalysiolides are a recently isolated class of diterpene natural products featuring the carbon backbone of the well-known coffee extract, cafestol. Herein we validate the use of our non-heme iron complex, Fe(PDP), as an oxidative tailoring enzyme mimic to test the proposal that this class of natural products derives from cafestol via cytochrome P-450-mediated furan oxidation. Thereafter, as predicted by computational analysis, C-H oxidation derivatization studies provided a novel 2° alcohol product as a single diastereomer.

  12. Activation of Hydrogen Peroxide by Iron-Containing Minerals and Catalysts in Circumneutral pH Solutions: Implications for ex situ and in situ Treatment of Contaminated Water and Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Anh Le Tuan

    The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on iron minerals can generate hydroxyl radical (•OH), a strong oxidant capable of transforming a wide range of contaminants. This reaction is critical to ex situ advanced oxidation processes employed in waste treatment systems, as well as in situ chemical oxidation processes used for soil and groundwater remediation. Unfortunately, the process in the ex situ treatment systems is relatively inefficient at circumneutral pH values. In this research, the development of iron-containing catalysts with improved efficiency was investigated. In addition, little is known about the factors that control the performance of in situ treatment systems. Another aim of this dissertation was to elucidate those factors to provide a basis for improving the efficiency of the remediation method. Two types of silica- and alumina-containing iron (hydr)oxide catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel processing techniques (Chapter 2). Relative to iron oxides, such as hematite and goethite, these catalysts were 10 to 80 times more effective in catalyzing the production of •OH from H2O2 under circumneutral conditions. The higher efficiency makes these catalysts promising candidates for ex situ advanced oxidation processes. Moreover, because alumina and silica alter the reactivity of the iron oxides with H2O2, understanding the activity of iron associated with natural aluminosilicates and silica-containing minerals in the subsurface is crucial to explaining the variability of •OH production observed in in situ treatment systems. In addition to the sol-gel technique used in Chapter 2, silica-containing iron (hydr)oxide catalysts were synthesized by immobilizing iron oxide onto mesoporous silica supports, such as SBA-15 (Chapter 5). The iron-containing SBA-15 was 10 times more effective than iron oxides in catalyzing the production of •OH from H2O2. Moreover, this catalyst could be employed for selective oxidation of small organic contaminants

  13. Low-cost adsorbent derived and in situ nitrogen/iron co-doped carbon as efficient oxygen reduction catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chun; Wei, Liling; Su, Min; Wang, Gang; Shen, Jianquan

    2016-08-01

    A novel low-cost adsorbent derived and in situ nitrogen/iron co-doped carbon (N/Fe-C) with three-dimensional porous structure is employed as efficient oxygen reduction catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The electrochemical active area is significantly improved to 617.19m(2)g(-1) in N/Fe-C by Fe-doping. And N/Fe-C (4.21at.% N, 0.11at.% Fe) exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity with the oxygen reduction potential of -0.07V (vs. Ag/AgCl) which is comparable to commercial Pt/C. In MFCs tests, the maximum power density and output voltage with N/Fe-C are enhanced to 745mWm(-2) and 562mV (external resistance 1kΩ), which are 11% and 0.72% higher than Pt/C (0.5mgPtcm(-2)), respectively. Besides, the long-term stability of N/Fe-C retains better for more than one week. Moreover, the charge transfer resistance (Rct) values are recorded by the impedance measurements, and the low Rct of N/Fe-C is also result in better catalytic activity.

  14. Hydrogen Isotopes of Glassy and Phyllosilicate Spherules in Al Rais (CR) and Orgueil (CI) Chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yunbin; Michael E. ZOLENSKY

    2004-01-01

    The hydroxyl in phyllosilicate minerals is the most common occurrence of water in primitive meteorites.Direct hydrogen isotopic analysis of this water component using an ion microprobe has been made in some glassy or phyllosilicate spherules from the Al Rais (CR) and Orgueil (CI) chondrites. The spherules from Al Rais show large deuterium excesses (δD = +200 - +800) relative to terrestrial standards, whereas deuterium-enrichments in the spherules from Orgueil are much smaller (δD = +40 - +130‰). The phyllosilicate spherules are products of aqueous alteration of glassy precursors. In A1 Rais the phyllosilicate spherules have relatively higher δD values than the glassy ones, indicating that water introduced during aqueous alteration was deuterium-enriched. The deuterium-enrichments in the phyllosilicate spherules from Orgueil could result from isotopic exchange under thermodynamic conditions within the solar nebula. The much larger δD excesses of the Al Rais spherules, however, cannot be attributed to the similar process;instead, an interstellar origin needs to be invoked.

  15. Catalysts and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a catalyst including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle and a catalytic material comprising iron. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the catalyst. In some examples, the catalyst can be used to hydrotreat fatty acids or to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks.

  16. Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron (FEGSEM) and Transmission Electron (TEM) Microscopy of Phyllosilicates in Martian Meteorites ALH84001, Nakhla, and Shergotty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we document the occurrence of phyllosilicates and alteration phases in three martian meteorites, suggest formation conditions required for phyllosilicate formation and speculate on the extent of fluid:rock interactions during the past history of Mars.

  17. Linking sulfate and phyllosilicate formation at Mawrth Vallis: Weathering in ancient low-latitude ice deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P. B.; Michalski, J.

    2009-12-01

    A currently outstanding question in martian geology is the mechanism by which large and numerous deposits of sulfate-rich and phyllosilicate-rich sedimentary rocks were generated. Hypotheses proposed to explain the origin of layered, sulfate-rich sediments at Meridiani Planum include: a) alteration by acidic fluids in a shallow and intermittently wet groundwater/playa/sebkha system, b) alteration of volcanic ash-flows by acidic sulfur-rich gases, c) reworking of sulfate-rich material by impact base surge, and d) acidic weathering within massive low-latitude ice deposits. We favor the ice-weathering model because this scenario can best explain the geologic and geochemical observations made from orbit and the surface. In addition, this model is in accord with an emerging picture of Mars in which ice-related processes have driven many aspects of sedimentation through time. The ice weathering model may also be relevant for understanding the origin of phyllosilicate deposits located beneath the sulfate-rich deposits at Meridiani Planum as well as at Mawrth Vallis. The Mawrth Vallis phyllosilicate deposits have several special characteristics: they are laterally extensive - occurring within stratigraphic windows over >~2*106 km2, and the mineralogical stratigraphy is the same everywhere that they are observed (Al-phyllosilicates overlying Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates). These observations can only be explained by a process that operated on a large spatial scale, just as with the sulfate deposits at Meridiani. However, if there were in fact massive ice deposits at low latitudes as called for in the Meridiani ice-weathering model, basal melting of these deposits may have driven a large regional groundwater system. Groundwater derived from extensive basal melting would likely have been alkaline due to increased water-rock interaction and increased dilution of the acid present in the ice deposit. Thus, the mineralogical stratigraphy could be explained by this alkaline groundwater

  18. Fenton-like oxidation of 2,4-DCP in aqueous solution using iron-based nanoparticles as the heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renchao; Gao, Ying; Jin, Xiaoying; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra

    2015-01-15

    In this report, various iron-based nanoparticles (nZVI, n-Ni/Fe, n-Pd/Fe) were used for both heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and reductive dechlorination of 2,4-DCP in order to understand their roles in the Fenton oxidation and the reductive degradation of 2,4-DCP. The dechlorination efficiency of 2,4-DCP using nZVI, n-Ni/Fe, n-Fe/Pd and Fe(2)(+) was 6.48%, 6.80%, 15.95%, 5.02%, while Fenton oxidation efficiency of 2,4-DCP was 57.87%, 34.23%, 27.94%, 19.61% after 180 min, respectively. The new findings included a higher dechlorination using n-Fe/Pd due to Pd effective catalysis and the effective heterogeneous Fenton oxidation using nZVI depending on reductive dechlorination and heterogeneous Fenton oxidation occurs simultaneously. However, nZVI as the potential catalyst for heterogeneous Fenton was observed, and SEM, EDS and XRD demonstrate that change on the nZVI surface occurred due to the Fe(2+) leaching, and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) (30.71%) shows that 2,4-DCP was degraded. Furthermore, the experiment indicates that the pH values and concentration of 2,4-DCP significantly impacted on the heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of 2,4-DCP and the data fits well with the pseudo first-order kinetic model, which was a diffusion-controlled reaction. Finally, a possible mechanism for degradation of 2,4-DCP was proposed.

  19. Investigating α-particle radiation damage in phyllosilicates using synchrotron microfocus-XRD/XAS: implications for geological disposal of nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W. R.; Pearce, C. I.; Pimblott, S. M.; Haigh, S. J.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Pattrick, R. A. D.

    2014-12-01

    demonstrated in iron-bearing phyllosilicates in both naturally and artificially damaged samples. Alterations in mineral structure and chemistry will have implications for the phases' efficiency as a barrier material. 1. Pattrick, R A D et al., (2013) Min. Mag., 77, 2867-2882. 2. Bower et al., unpubl.

  20. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  1. Fundamental investigations of catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Christian Fink

    fundamental understanding of catalytic processes and our ability to make use of that understanding. This thesis presents fundamental studies of catalyst nanoparticles with particular focus on dynamic processes. Such studies often require atomic-scale characterization, because the catalytic conversion takes...... place on the molecular and atomic level. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has the ability to image nanostructures with atomic resolution and reveal the atomic configuration of the important nanoparticle surfaces. In the present work, TEM has been used to study nanoparticles in situ at elevated...... different topics, each related to different aspects of nanoparticle dynamics and catalysis. The first topic is the reduction of a homogeneous solid state precursor to form the catalytically active phase which is metal nanoparticles on an inert support. Here, we have reduced Cu phyllosilicate to Cu on silica...

  2. New efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis: barium-promoted cobalt on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Stefan; Barfod, Rasmus; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia......Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia...

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by CVD method using iron and molybdenum-based catalysts supported on ceramic matrices;Sintese de nanotubos de carbono por CVD utilizando catalisadores a base de ferro e molibdenio suportados em matrizes ceramicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Ana Paula de Carvalho

    2010-07-01

    Molybdenum is known for its synergistic effect in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD method). When added to typical catalysts like iron, nickel, and cobalt, even in small quantities, it is increases the yield of these nanostructures. The presence of Mo also has an influence on the type and number of CN walls formed. Although this effect is widely documented in the literature, there is not yet a consensus about the mechanism of action of molybdenum in catalytic systems. The objective of the present work is to study the influence of molybdenum on the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticle-based catalysts supported on magnesium oxide (Fe/MgO system) in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes by the CVD method. The Mo concentration was systematically varied from null to molar ratio values four times greater than the quantity of Fe, and the obtained material (catalysts and carbon nanotubes) were broadly characterized by different techniques. In order to also study the influence of the preparation method on the final composition of the catalytic system phases, the catalytic systems (Fe/MgO e FeMo{sub x}/MgO) were synthesized by two different methods: co-precipitation and impregnation. The greatest CN yields were observed for the catalysts prepared by coprecipitation. The difference was attributed to better dispersion of the Fe and Mo phases in the catalyst ceramic matrix. In the precipitation stage, it was observed the formation of layered double hydroxides whose concentration increased with the Mo content up to the ratio of Mo/Fe equal to 0.2. This phase is related to a better distribution of Fe and Mo in this concentration range. Another important characteristic observed is that the ceramic matrix is not inert. It can react both with Fe and Mo and form the iron solid solution in the magnesium oxide and the phases magnesium-ferrite (MgFe{sub 2}0{sub 4}) and magnesium molybdate (MgMo0{sub 4}). The MgFe{sub 2}0{sub 4} phase is observed in

  4. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  5. Efficient degradation of dye pollutants using dioxygen mediated by iron(Ⅱ) 2,2'-bipyridine loaded layered clay catalyst under visible irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Mingming; SUN Zhenying; MA Wanhong; CHEN Chuncheng; ZHAO Jincai; WANG Zhengping

    2006-01-01

    The organic-inorganic layered solid catalyst Fe(bpy)32+-laponite was able to photodegrade Rhodamine B (RhB) by activation of dioxygen under visible irradiation (λ>420 nm), while the homogeneous aqueous solution Fe(bpy)32+ showed no photoactivity. The catalyst could be repeatedly used and retained its reactivity. The hybrid catalyst could be separated from the suspension by centrifugation or sedimentation. The TOC removal yield of RhB was measured. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during degradation was detected by EPR. A possible mechanism was proposed on the basis of the experimental results.

  6. Effect of K promoter on the structure and catalytic behavior of supported iron-based catalysts in fischer-tropsch synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. M Farias

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of K addition on the performance of supported Fe catalysts for Fischer - Tropsch synthesis (FTS were studied in a slurry reactor at 240 to 270ºC, 2.0 to 4.0 MPa and syngas H2/CO = 1.0. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption, H2 temperature programmed reduction, X - ray diffraction, X - ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and dispersive X - ray spectroscopy. A strong interaction was observed between Fe and K, which inhibited the reduction of Fe catalyst. Addition of potassium increased the production of heavy hydrocarbons (C20+.

  7. Iron(III) complexes of 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol and acetate or nitrate as catalysts for epoxidation of olefins with hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Amit Kumar; Samanta, Suvendu; Dutta, Supriya; Lucas, C. Robert; Dawe, Louise N.; Biswas, Papu; Adhikary, Bibhutosh

    2016-07-01

    Cheap and environmentally friendly Fe(III) catalysts [Fe(L)2(CH3COO)] (1) and [Fe(L)2(NO3)]·2CH3OH (2) where HL = 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol for epoxidation of olefins have been developed. The catalysts have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and by X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structures reveal mononuclear compounds having a bidentate acetate or nitrate in 1 and 2, respectively. Catalytic epoxidations of styrene and cyclohexene have been carried out homogeneously by using 30% aqueous hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile in the presence of catalytic amounts of 1 or 2. Yields of the respective epoxides were fair (1) to good (2) and selectivities were good in all cases although 2 produced two to three times the yield, depending on the substrate, than 1 and higher selectivity as well. A hypothesis for these differences in catalytic efficacy between 1 and 2 that is consistent with mechanistic details of related enzymatic and biomimetic model systems is proposed. Herein we report [Fe(L)2(NO3)]·2CH3OH (2) as the first structurally characterized non-heme iron epoxidation catalyst with a bidentate nitrate ligand.

  8. Importance of Fabric and Phyllosilicates for the Strength and Dynamics of the Middle Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L. G.

    2011-12-01

    From the height of mountains to the recurrence of earthquakes, the strength of the lithosphere influences directly tectonic activity and patterns. Yet, strength remain a point of contention. On the one hand, laboratory experiments predicting stresses that are about ten times larger than estimates based on geodynamics observations such as stress direction, effective viscosity, and postseismic signals. On the other hand, stress estimates based on grain size in natural samples are in remarkable agreements with laboratory flow laws [Bürgmann and Dresen, AREPS, 2008; Behr and Platt, EPSL, 2011]. How can these discordant estimates be reconciled? I propose here that large-scale tectonic signals are strongly influenced by the presence of phyllosilicates in ductile shear zones. Shear zones in polymineral rocks display intense layering. In a layered aggregate, the weakest phase controls the aggregate strength - if its abundance is sufficient for it to be interconnected. Phyllosilicates, such as micas, are notoriously difficult to test experimentally but several studies [Kronenberg, JGR, 1990; Mariani et al., JSG, 2006] have confirmed a low activation energy and high non-linearity that makes the strength of phyllosilicate essentially independent of stress and depth. If deformation zones were sufficiently layered for phyllosilicates to dominate their rheology, the strength of the middle crust would be between 1 and 40 MPa, which is compatible with geodynamics estimates. In addition, micas have important dynamical implications. As their rheology is highly non-linear, changing the fabric from one in which micas are dispersed to one in which they are present in layers is accompanied by a dramatic increase in shear rate at constant stress, which can explain the generation of ductile shear zones. These shear zones would be very sensitive to even minor perturbations in stress and therefore generate rapid postseismic transient signals as observed following many earthquakes of

  9. Production of High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds on the Surfaces of Amorphous Iron Silicate Catalysts: Implications for Organic Synthesis in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, I.; Hill, H. G. M.; Pearson, V. K.; Sephton, M. A.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2002-01-01

    The high molecular weight organic products of Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch syntheses on the surfaces of Fe-silicate catalysts have been studied by GCMS. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Production of High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds on the Surfaces of Amorphous Iron Silicate Catalysts: Implications for Organic Synthesis in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, I.; Hill, H. G. M.; Pearson, V. K.; Sephton, M. A.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2002-01-01

    The high molecular weight organic products of Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch syntheses on the surfaces of Fe-silicate catalysts have been studied by GCMS. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Thermal alteration: A possible reason for the inconsistency between OMEGA/CRISM and TES detections of phyllosilicates on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Congcong; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous laboratory analyses have shown that high temperatures can modify the crystal structures of some phyllosilicates in such a way that their spectroscopic signatures appear different from various wavelength perspectives. This may be the case in the Nili Fossae region of Mars, where our analyses indicate that thermally altered (~400°C) Fe-rich smectites might be possible mineral analogs to the phyllosilicate-bearing units in addition to mineral assemblages formed by Fe/Mg smectite and amorphous weathering products. We suggest that thermal alteration of phyllosilicates induced by impact shock or other heat sources might be a widespread process throughout Martian history. The mixing of altered and unaltered phyllosilicates might be partially responsible for the apparent disconnect between VNIR and TIR observations of Fe/Mg smectite-bearing surfaces on Mars.

  12. Carbon-Oxygen Bond Cleavage by Bis(imino)pyridine Iron Compounds : Catalyst Deactivation Pathways and Observation of Acyl C-O Bond Cleavage in Esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trovitch, Ryan J.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Bouwkamp, Marco W.; Chirik, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Investigations into the substrate scope of bis(imino)pyridine iron-catalyzed hydrogenation and [2 pi + 2 pi]. diene cyclization reactions identified C-O bond cleavage as a principal deactivation pathway. Addition of diallyl or allyl ethyl ether to the bis(imino)pyridine iron dinitrogen complex, ((iP

  13. Energetic features of copper and lead sorption by innovative aminoalcohol-functionalized cobalt phyllosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Maurício Alves; Airoldi, Claudio

    2010-11-14

    Inorganic-organic cobalt phyllosilicate hybrids were synthesized by the sol-gel procedure under mild non-hydrothermal conditions with a silicon precursor, formed through individual reactions between the silane 3-glycidoxypropyltriethoxysilane and the aminoalcohols ethanol- or diethanolamine. These procedures generated talc-like phyllosilicates containing pendant organic chains with nitrogen and oxygen basic centres located in the interlamellar region. For organofunctionalized phyllosilicates the lamellar structure obtained through the sol-gel method was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction, while elemental analysis indicated that the densities of the organic groups attached to the new matrices were 3.31 ± 0.05 and 3.08 ± 0.07 mmol g(-1) for hybrids functionalized with ethanol- and diethanolamines, respectively. Infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance in the solid state for (13)C and (29)Si showed that the organic groups are indeed covalently bonded to the inorganic structures and the process of functionalization did not affect the original structures of the silylating agents employed. The thermally stable hybrids presented well-formed particles with a homogeneous distribution of cobalt and nitrogen atoms. Their abilities for copper removal from aqueous solutions gave maximum capacities of sorption of 2.01 ± 0.11 and 2.55 ± 0.15 mmol g(-1) for phyllosilicates containing ethanol- and diethanolamine groups, respectively. For lead sorption the values of 2.59 ± 0.11 and 2.43 ± 0.12 mmol g(-1) were found for this same sequence. These sorption data were adjusted to the non-linear regression of the Langmuir equation. Energetic features related to the interactions between the cations and the pendant basic centres were determined through calorimetric titrations. The acid-basic interactions reflect the spontaneity of the reactions, which are also enthalpically and entropically favourable for these chelating processes at the solid-liquid interface.

  14. Mineralogy and thermodynamic properties of magnesium phyllosilicates formed during the alteration of a simplified nuclear glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debure, Mathieu; De Windt, Laurent; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane; Vieillard, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The precipitation of crystallized magnesium phyllosilicates generally sustains the alteration rate of nuclear waste containment glass. However, glass alteration slows down to a residual rate as soon as Mg disappears from the solution. The identification of the phyllosilicates formed is therefore crucial for modeling the long-term behavior of nuclear glass. This study deals with batch alteration of the simplified nuclear glass ISG in presence of magnesium, and the characterization of the secondary phases. Morphological, chemical and structural analyses (MET, EDX, XRD) were performed to determine the nature and structure of the precipitated phases identified as trioctahedral smectites. Analyses conducted on the secondary phases proved the presence of Al, Na and Ca in the Mg-phyllosilicate phases. Such elements had been suspected but never quantitatively measured. The experimental results were then used to determine the thermodynamic solubility constants for each precipitated secondary phase at various temperatures. The calculated values were consistent with those available for sodium and magnesium saponites in the existing thermodynamic databases.

  15. Superiority of boron, nitrogen and iron ternary doped carbonized graphene oxide-based catalysts for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chun; Wei, Liling; Wang, Gang; Shen, Jianquan

    2017-03-09

    The exploration of highly active and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction is vitally important to facilitate the improvement of metal-air batteries and fuel cells. Herein, super-active catalysts made from an interesting metal-polymer network (MPN) that consist of Fe-Nx-C, B-N and Fe3O4/Fe3C alloys were prepared via facile one-pot carbonization. The achieved catalysts possessed an amazing porous structure that was derived from the MPN with the assistance of a "bubble-template". Remarkably, the content of highly active Fe-Nx-C can be regulated by introducing graphene, and the ORR activity of the catalyst was enhanced dramatically with an increase in the Fe3O4/Fe3C alloy content. The most active BNFe-C-G2 catalyst exhibited superior ORR activity/stability, and was then employed as an air cathode electrocatalyst in a microbial fuel cell. The results showed that the output voltage and power density of BNFe-C-G2 were significantly improved to 575 ± 11 mV and 1046.2 ± 35 mW m(-2), respectively. These values are 4.5% and 44.44% higher than those of commercial Pt/C. Thus, due to the synergistic electrocatalysis of the Fe-Nx-C, B-N and Fe3O4/Fe3C alloys, the super-active and low-cost BNFe-C-G2 material should be a promising ORR catalyst for application in biofuel cells, and in many other energy conversion and storage devices.

  16. Iron alteration minerals in the visible and near-infrared spectra of low-albedo asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Faith; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Gaffey, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption features centered near 0.60-0.65 and 0.80-0.90 micrometers have been identified in the spectra of five low-albedo main-belt and outer-belt asteroids. These absorption features are attributed respectively to the (6)A(sub 1) goes to (4)T(sub 2)(G) and (6)A(sub 1) goes to (4)T(sub 1)(G) charge transfer transitions in minerals such as goethite, hematite, and jarosite that are products of the aqueous alteration of anhydrous silicates. A shoulder near 0.63 micrometers has also been identified in the absorption feature centered near 0.7 micrometers attributed to oxidized iron in phyllosilicates found predominantly in C- and G-class asteroids reflectance spectra. The coexistence of iron oxides with phyllosilicates in asteroids believed to have undergone aqueous alteration would be expected based upon analogy with terrestrial aqueous alteration and the observed mineralogy of carbonaceous chondrites. The number of low-albedo asteroids having only iron alteration absorption features compared to the number of low-albedo asteroids having spectral characteristics indicative of phyllosilicates is small. Either the conditions under which these asteroids formed are rare, or the iron alteration minerals could be formed in the interiors of objects where phyllosilicates dominate the surface mineralogy.

  17. Using Australian Acidic Playa Lakes as Analogs for Phyllosilicate and Sulfate Depositional Environments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Michalski, J.; Kargel, J.; Hook, S.; Marion, G.; Crowley, J.; Bridges, N.; Brown, A.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza Filho, C. R.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    Recent work on the origin of martian sulfates and their relationship to phyllosilicate deposits suggest that these deposits formed in different eras of Mars' history, under distinct environmental conditions. In southwestern Meridiani Planum phyllosilicates exist in close proximity to sulfate deposits. One possible explanation for this relationship is that it is an unconformable stratigraphic sequence, representing a significant change in aqueous geochemical conditions over time. Specifically, it may be interpreted to record a change in environment from neutral pH aqueous alteration in the Noachian to an acidic evaporitic system in the late Noachian to the Hesperian. On Earth, two different geochemical systems need not be evoked to explain such chemical variation. Acidic playa lakes in Western Australia have large pH differences separated by only a few tens of meters and demonstrate how highly variable chemistries can coexist over short distances in natural environments. Playa lakes on Earth tend to be dominated by lateral flow of water and salts leading to lateral chemical variation. Heterogeneity of playa mineralogy in Australia is due to the varied source rocks of brines and the mixing of dilute oxidizing brines and freshwater with the saturated evaporitic brines. This is evidenced by the ferricretes in the near-shore environment and more soluble phases in basin interiors. Playa lakes on Mars would be much larger than their terrestrial counterparts, leading to the prevalence of large-scale surface and crustal advection of water and salt rather than short-distance lateral flow, except at lake boundaries. Little or no influx of freshwater would preclude the formation of playa rim (e.g., crater rim) ferricretes and silcretes. Instead, we expect to see mainly vertical facies changes, and any diachronous lateral facies changes are expected to occur on very large spatial scales. Comparison of high spatial resolution, hyperspectral airborne data for Australian playa

  18. Identification of Phyllosilicates in Mudstone Samples Using Water Releases Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogancamp, J. V. (Clark); Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D.; Morris, R. V.; Bristow, T. F.; Rampe, E. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Gellert, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Curiosity Rover has detected high temperature water releases from mud-stones in the areas of Yellowknife Bay, Pahrump Hills, Naukluft Plateau, and Murray Buttes in Gale crater. Dehydroxylation of phyllosilicates may have caused the high temperature water releases observed in these samples. Because each type of phyllosilicate undergoes dehydroxylation at distinct temperatures, these water releases can be used to help constrain the type of phyllosilicate present in each sample.

  19. Direct Oxidation of Benzene to Phenol: investigation of the active iron species in [Fe,Al]MFI catalysts by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taboada, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Steam-treated isomorphously substituted [Fe,Al]MFI zeolite is known to exhibit superior catalytic performance in the direct oxidation of benzene to phenol, using N2O as oxidant (BTOP). However, despite extensive efforts, the nature of the active sites in the [Fe,Al]MFI catalyst for the BTOP reaction

  20. Iron-embedded C2N monolayer: a promising low-cost and high-activity single-atom catalyst for CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, B L; Shen, J S; Tian, Z X

    2016-09-21

    An Fe-embedded C2N monolayer as a promising single-atom catalyst for CO oxidation by O2 has been investigated based on first-principles calculations. It is found that the single Fe atom can be strongly trapped in the cavity of the C2N monolayer with a large adsorption energy of 4.55 eV and a high diffusion barrier of at least 3.00 eV to leave the cavity, indicating that Fe should exist in the isolated single-atom form. Due to the localized metal 3d orbitals near the Fermi level, the embedded Fe single-atom catalyst has a high chemical activity for the adsorption of CO and O2 molecules. CO oxidation by O2 on the catalyst would proceed via a two-step mechanism. The first step of the CO oxidation reaction has been studied via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms with energy barriers of 0.46 and 0.65 eV, respectively. The second step of the CO oxidation reaction follows the Eley-Rideal mechanism with a much smaller energy barrier of 0.24 eV. For both the steps, the CO2 molecules produced are weakly adsorbed on the substrates, suggesting that the proposed catalyst will not be poisoned by the generated CO2. Our results indicate that the Fe-embedded C2N monolayer is a promising single-atom catalyst for CO oxidation by O2 at low temperatures.

  1. Replacement of glass in the Nakhla meteorite by berthierine: Implications for understanding the origins of aluminum-rich phyllosilicates on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin R.; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias

    2016-09-01

    A scanning and transmission electron microscope study of aluminosilicate glasses within melt inclusions from the Martian meteorite Nakhla shows that they have been replaced by berthierine, an aluminum-iron serpentine mineral. This alteration reaction was mediated by liquid water that gained access to the glasses along fractures within enclosing augite and olivine grains. Water/rock ratios were low, and the aqueous solutions were circumneutral and reducing. They introduced magnesium and iron that were sourced from the dissolution of olivine, and exported alkalis. Berthierine was identified using X-ray microanalysis and electron diffraction. It is restricted in its occurrence to parts of the melt inclusions that were formerly glass, thus showing that under the ambient physico-chemical conditions, the mobility of aluminum and silicon were low. This discovery of serpentine adds to the suite of postmagmatic hydrous silicates in Nakhla that include saponite and opal-A. Such a variety of secondary silicates indicates that during aqueous alteration compositionally distinct microenvironments developed on sub-millimeter length scales. The scarcity of berthierine in Nakhla is consistent with results from orbital remote sensing of the Martian crust showing very low abundances of aluminum-rich phyllosilicates.

  2. Chlorination of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained on the Different Metal Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Iwona Pełech; Robert Pełech; Urszula Narkiewicz; Dariusz Moszyński; Anna Jędrzejewska; Bartłomiej Witkowski

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a chlorination method is proposed for simultaneous purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes, thus increasing their ability to use. Carbon nanotubes were obtained by CVD method through ethylene decomposition on the nanocrystalline iron or cobalt or bimetallic iron-cobalt catalysts. The effects of temperature (50, 250, and 450°C) in the case of carbon nanotubes obtained on the Fe-Co catalyst and type of catalyst (Fe, Co, Fe/Co) on the effectiveness of the treatment ...

  3. Nano-sized magnetic iron oxides as catalysts for heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions-Influence of Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio on catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusevova, Klara; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-11-30

    Nano-sized Fe(II, III) oxides with various Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios were characterized and tested as catalysts for the oxidative degradation of phenol via Fenton-like reactions at neutral pH. Under conditions typically applied for wet peroxide oxidation, Fe(II) in magnetite is oxidized to Fe(III), successively converting the mineral into maghemite. The residual Fe(II) content in the catalyst core is of only minor benefit for the catalytic activity in phenol oxidation, i.e. magnetite is not superior to maghemite. Achievable reaction rates for phenol degradation appeared to be rather low, e.g. phenol half-life of about 12 h when 3 g L(-1) magnetite and 5 g L(-1) H(2)O(2) were applied. Preceding surface-reduction of maghemite by NaBH(4), leading to an over-stoichiometric Fe(II) content compared to magnetite, only enhanced the non-productive decomposition of H(2)O(2) rather than the rate of phenol degradation. Reaction rates were shown to be relatively insensitive to catalyst concentration in the range of 1-10 g L(-1), probably resulting from a scavenging of reactive species by the catalyst surface, whereby particle agglomeration seems to play a key role. Degradation experiments with various structurally distinct compounds were carried out, indicating a similar selectivity of the heterogeneous Fenton-like system to that known for oxidation with ·OH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fe-BEA Zeolite Catalysts for NH3-SCR of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette; Mert, Selcuk; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Iron-containing zeolites are known to be promising catalysts for the NH3-SCR reaction. Here, we will investigate the catalytic activity of iron-based BEA catalysts, which was found to exhibit improved activities compared to previously described iron-containing zeolite catalysts, such as ZSM-5...... and ZSM-12. Series of Fe-BEA zeolite catalysts were prepared using a range of different preparation methods. Furthermore, we found that an iron concentration around 3 wt% on BEA showed a small optimum in SCR activity compared to the other iron loadings studied....

  5. Adsorption of nucleotides onto ferromagnesian phyllosilicates: Significance for the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira-Segade, Ulysse; Feuillie, Cécile; Pelletier, Manuel; Michot, Laurent J.; Daniel, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    The concentration of prebiotic organic building blocks may have promoted the formation of biopolymers in the environment of the early Earth. We therefore studied the adsorption of RNA monomers AMP, GMP, CMP, and UMP, and DNA monomers dGMP, dCMP, and TMP, on minerals that were abundant in the early Earth environment as the result of aqueous or hydrothermal alteration of the primitive oceanic crust. We focused our study on swelling clays, i.e. nontronite and montmorillonite, and non-swelling phyllosilicates, i.e. pyrophyllite, chlorite, lizardite and chrysotile suspended in an aqueous saline solution analog to seawater. In this reference study, adsorption experiments were carried out under standard conditions of pressure and temperature and controlled pH. Under such conditions, this work is also relevant to the preservation of nucleic acids in Fe-Mg-rich terrestrial and Martian soils. We compared the adsorption of the different monomers on individual minerals, as well as the adsorption of single monomers on the whole suite of minerals. We found that DNA monomers adsorb much more strongly than RNA monomers, and that any monomer containing the G nucleobase adsorbed more strongly than one containing the C nucleobase. At high surface loadings (greater than about 1 mM monomer in aqueous solution) we also found a dramatic increase in the slope of adsorption isotherm on the swelling clays, leading to large increases in the amounts adsorbed. Data were processed in order to understand the adsorption mechanism of nucleotides onto mineral surfaces. We infer that all nucleotides behave as homologous molecules in regard to their adsorption onto the studied mineral surfaces. At low to moderate surface loadings, their adsorption is best explained by a single mechanism common to the suite of minerals of the present study. At pH 7, adsorption certainly proceeds by ligand exchange between the phosphate group and the hydroxyls of the broken edges of phyllosilicates leading to the

  6. Homogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, John C; Freixa, Zoraida; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2011-01-01

    This first book to illuminate this important aspect of chemical synthesis improves the lifetime of catalysts, thus reducing material and saving energy, costs and waste.The international panel of expert authors describes the studies that have been conducted concerning the way homogeneous catalysts decompose, and the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. The result is a ready reference for organic, catalytic, polymer and complex chemists, as well as those working in industry and with/on organometallics.

  7. Spectral analysis of Deccan intrabasaltic bole beds: Implications for the formation and alteration of phyllosilicates on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Patricia; Chevrier, Vincent; Sayyed, M. R. G.; Islam, R.

    2017-01-01

    To fully understand phyllosilicates on Mars, it is beneficial to study analog deposits on Earth. One attractive candidate for martian phyllosilicates is the intrabasaltic bole beds (palaeosols) from the Deccan Volcanic Province of India. Eleven samples from the upper-layer red Deccan bole beds and underlying yellow and green Deccan bole beds were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), near-infrared (1.0-2.5 μm) and mid-infrared (5-15 μm) reflectance spectroscopy. Analysis of the bole beds indicated that the red boles are composed of a mixture of montmorillonite and hematite, yellow boles contain vermiculite and minor montmorillonite and green boles are composed mainly of nontronite (smectite) and celadonite (mica). While the bole beds are all chemically similar to each other and to the underlying basalt from which they were weathered, they are mineralogically different. This suggests transformation from one mineral to the next without ion transfer or loss which could be indicative of a limited-water environment. In fact, celadonite can transform into smectites (such as montmorillonite), often with vermiculite as an intermediate step. This not only explains the stratigraphy and mineralogy of the Deccan bole beds but may also explain the layered phyllosilicates identified in various, global locations on Mars. The transition observed in the Deccan bole beds suggests an evolution of the alteration process from deuteric alteration to low-temperature weathering, likely due to changes in temperature, in a closed system (no significant ion transfer) as evidenced by the minerals' similar chemistry. Thus, the Deccan bole beds are a good analog for the phyllosilicates layers on Mars and by studying the chemistry, mineralogy and spectral properties of the Deccan bole beds, we can link their formation and alteration processes to those of martian phyllosilicates. This will provide a clearer understanding of the environmental conditions on Mars at the time of the phyllosilicates

  8. 维氏体铁基氨合成催化剂动力学分析%Analysis on Ammonia Synthesis over Wustite-Based Iron Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小年; 刘化章; 岑亚青; 胡樟能

    2003-01-01

    Wiistite-based catalyst for ammonia synthesis exhibits extremely high activity and easy to reductionunder a wide range of conditions. The reaction kinetics of ammonia synthesis can be illustrated perfectly by boththe classical Temkin-Pyzhev and modified Temkin equations with optimized α of 0.5. The pre-exponent factors andactivation energies at the pressures of 8.0 and 15.0MPa are respectively ko = 1.09 × 1015, 7.35 × 1014 Pa0.5.s-1,and E = 156.6, 155.5kJ@mol-1 derived from the classical Temkin-Phyzhev equation, as well as ko = 2.45 × 1014,1.83 × 1014pa0.5.s-1, and E = 147.7, 147.2kJ.mol-1 derived from the modified Temkin equation. Although thedegree of reduction under isothermal condition is primarily dependent upon temperature, low pressure seems to beimperative for reduction under high temperature and low space velocity to be considered as a high activity catalyst.The reduction behavior with dry feed gas can be illustrated perfectly by the shrinking-sphere-particle model, bywhich the reduction-rate constants of 4248exp (-71680/RT) and 644exp (-87260/RT) were obtained for the powder(0.045-0.054 mm) and irregular shape (nominal diameter 3.17 mm) catalysts respectively. The significant effect ofparticle size on reduction rate was observed, therefore, it is important to take into account the influence of particlesize on reduction for the optimization of reduction process in industry.

  9. Evidence For Regional-scale Alteration Fronts On Mars: Extent, Stratigraphy, And Mineralogy Of Phyllosilicates Around Mawrth Vallis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe Dobrea, Eldar Z.; Bishop, J. L.; McKeown, N. K.; Fu, R.; Rossi, C.; Swayze, G.; Michalski, J. R.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J.; Mustard, J. F.; Mustard, J. F.; Arvidson, R.; Morris, R. V.; Murchie, S.; Murchie, S.; Malaret, E.; Hash, C.; CRISM Team

    2008-09-01

    The largest exposure of phyllosilicates on Mars occurs on the highland plains around Mawrth Vallis. This exposure is known to extend almost continuously for about 300 km southward from the edge of the dichotomy boundary, covering an area greater than 200 x 300 km over an elevation range of 2000 m ([1],[2],[3],[4]). At least three different types of hydrated phyllosilicates (Fe/Mg- and Al-phyllosilicates), as well as examples of hydrated silica (e.g., opal-A, hydrated glass), have been identified in OMEGA and CRISM data[1]. These hydrated units are generally associated with layered, indurated light-toned outcrops with complex spatial and stratigraphic relationships, and are unconformably overlain by a darker, indurated, more heavily cratered unit[3]. Recent studies of the light-toned layered units show a mineralogical stratigraphy: the Fe/Mg phyllosilicate-bearing units are overlaying by the Al-phyllosilicate-bearing units, which are in turn overlain by a dark-toned, spectrally unremarkable capping unit ([4],[5],[6]). We have used CRISM, CTX, and HiRISE data to perform a regional study of the distribution of phyllosilicates in the Arabia Terra region, and have found that the same assemblages of hydrous minerals and stratigraphic relationships observed around Mawrth Vallis occur in many erosional windows throughout a 1000x1000 km region, regardless of elevation. The distribution and observed mineralogical relationships suggests that these secondary minerals were not deposited in a basin, but may rather be the product of alteration of primary minerals to Fe/Mg phyllosilicates with subsequent near-surface leaching to Al-bearing phyllosilicates and hydrated silica phases in hydrothermal, pedogenic, or diagenetic settings. [1] Poulet et al. (2005) Nature 438, 632-627 [2] Noe Dobrea and Michalski (2006) AGU Fall 2006, #P23D-0091 [3] Michalski and Noe Dobrea(2007) Geology,35, pp. 951-954 [4] Loizeau D. et al. (2007) JGR, 112 (E8) [5] Bishop et al. (2008) Science , in press

  10. Comparative adsorption of CO2 by mono-, di-, and triamino-organofunctionalized magnesium phyllosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Karine O; Pastore, Heloise O

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide adsorbents, constituted by organofunctionalized magnesium phyllosilicates, were produced using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AMPTS), N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]-ethylenediamine (TMSPEDA), N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]-diethylenetriamine (TMSPETA), and tetraethoxyorthosilane (TEOS) as silicon sources with N/Si ratios of 1, 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25, by conventional and microwave heating. Adsorption studies were performed using TGA and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) methods. The results showed that the best temperatures for adsorption were 41, 45, and 90 °C, when magnesium phyllosilicate functionalized with TMSPETA, TMSPEDA, and AMPTS, respectively, were used as adsorbents. Using TPD technique, the maximum efficiency was found to be between 0.285 and 0.899 for 100% AMPTS and 33.33% TMSPETA, obtained by conventional heating. Adsorption efficiency of the materials prepared by conventional method is higher than those obtained using microwave as heating source, except for 100% AMPTS. Desorption kinetics of CO2, described using Avrami's model, show that the CO2 desorption rate constant is in the range from 0.130 to 0.178 min(-1), similar to the values for CO2 desorption from monoetamolamine-functionalized TiO2 and Li4SiO4 but in a narrower range of values.

  11. Palladium nanoparticles bonded to two-dimensional iron oxide graphene nanosheets: a synergistic and highly reusable catalyst for the Tsuji-Trost reaction in water and air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Huo, Xing; Li, Tianrong; Yang, Zhengyin; Xi, Pinxian; Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Baodui

    2014-09-01

    Low cost, high activity and selectivity, convenient separation, and increased reusability are the main requirements for noble-metal-nanocatalyst-catalyzed reactions. Despite tremendous efforts, developing noble-metal nanocatalysts to meet the above requirements remains a significant challenge. Here we present a general strategy for the preparation of strongly coupled Fe(3)O(4) and palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) to graphene sheets by employing polyethyleneimine as the coupling linker. Transmission electron microscopic images show that Pd and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles are highly dispersed on the graphene surface, and the mean particle size of Pd is around 3 nm. This nanocatalyst exhibits synergistic catalysis by Pd nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and a tertiary amine of polyethyleneimine (Pd/Fe(3)O(4)/PEI/rGO) for the Tsuji-Trost reaction in water and air. For example, the reaction of ethyl acetoacetate with allyl ethyl carbonate afforded the allylated product in more than 99 % isolated yield, and the turnover frequency reached 2200 h(-1). The yield of allylated products was 66 % for Pd/rGO without polyethyleneimine. The catalyst could be readily recycled by a magnet and reused more than 30 times without appreciable loss of activity. In addition, only about 7.5 % of Pd species leached off after 20 cycles, thus rendering this catalyst safer for the environment.

  12. Hydroxylation of benzene to phenol over magnetic recyclable nanostructured CuFe mixed-oxide catalyst

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgwane, PR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A highly active and magnetically recyclable nanostructured copper–iron oxide (CuFe) catalyst has been synthesized for hydroxylation of benzene to phenol under mild reaction conditions. The obtained catalytic results were correlated with the catalyst...

  13. Technology of Iron Carbide Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bahgat

    2006-01-01

    Iron carbides are very promising metallurgical products and can be used for steelmaking process, where it plays as an alternative raw material with significant economic advantages. Also it has many other applications,e.g. catalysts, magnets, sensors. The present review investigates the different properties and uses of the iron carbides. The commercial production and the different varieties for the iron carbides synthesis (gaseous carburization, mechanochemical synthesis, laser pyrolysis, plasma pyrolysis, chemical vapor deposition and ion implantation) were reviewed. Also the effect of different factors on the carburization process like gas composition, raw material, temperature, reaction time, catalyst presence and sulfur addition was indicated.

  14. Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Phyllosilicate Minerals at Reduced Pressures: A Mineral Database for the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. B.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Golden, D. C.; Boynton, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    Reduced pressure thermal analysis measurements of the phyllosilicates kaolinite and nontronite were taken to observe the effect of pressure on their thermal curves. This is part of the database for the TEGA instrument. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Catalytic ozonation of organic pollutants from bio-treated dyeing and finishing wastewater using recycled waste iron shavings as a catalyst: Removal and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin; Ma, Luming; Chen, Yunlu; Cheng, Yunqin; Liu, Yan; Zha, Xiaosong

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic ozonation of organic pollutants from actual bio-treated dyeing and finishing wastewater (BDFW) with iron shavings was investigated. Catalytic ozonation effectively removed organic pollutants at initial pH values of 7.18-7.52, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) level decreased from 142 to 70 mg·L(-1) with a discharge limitation of 80 mg·L(-1). A total of 100% and 42% of the proteins and polysaccharides, respectively, were removed with a decrease in their contribution to the soluble COD from 76% to 41%. Among the 218 organic species detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, 58, 77, 79 and 4 species were completely removed, partially removed, increased and newly generated, respectively. Species including textile auxiliaries and dye intermediates were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The inhibitory effect decreased from 51% to 33%, suggesting a reduction in the acute toxicity. The enhanced effect was due to hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation, co-precipitation and oxidation by other oxidants. The proteins were removed by OH oxidation (6%), by direct ozonation, co-precipitation and oxidation by other oxidants (94%). The corresponding values for polysaccharides were 21% and 21%, respectively. In addition, the iron shavings behaved well in successive runs. These results indicated that the process was favorable for engineering applications for removal of organic pollutants from BDFW.

  16. Evidence for low-grade metamorphism, hydrothermal alteration, and diagenesis on mars from phyllosilicate mineral assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, B.L.; Mustard, J.F.; Clark, R.N.; Swayze, G.A.; Murchie, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced spatial and spectral resolution provided by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has led to the discovery of numerous hydrated silicate minerals on Mars, particularly in the ancient, cratered crust comprising the southern highlands. Phases recently identified using visible/near-infrared spectra include: smectite, chlorite, prehnite, high-charge phyllosilicates (illite or muscovite), the zeolite analcime, opaline silica, and serpentine. Some mineral assemblages represent the products of aqueous alteration at elevated temperatures. Geologic occurrences of these mineral assemblages are described using examples from west of the Isidis basin near the Nili Fossae and with reference to differences in implied temperature, fluid composition, and starting materials during alteration. The alteration minerals are not distributed homogeneously. Rather, certain craters host distinctive alteration assemblages: (1) prehnite-chlorite-silica, (2) analcime-silica-Fe,Mg-smectite-chlorite, (3) chlorite-illite (muscovite), and (4) serpentine, which furthermore has been found in bedrock units. These assemblages contrast with the prevalence of solely Fe,Mg-smectites in most phyllosilicate-bearing terrains on Mars, and they represent materials altered at depth then exposed by cratering. Of the minerals found to date, prehnite provides the clearest evidence for subsurface, hydrothermal/metamorphic alteration, as it forms only under highly restricted conditions (T = 200 400??C). Multiple mechanisms exist for forming the other individual minerals; however, the most likely formation mechanisms for the characteristic mineralogic assemblages observed are, for (1) and (2), low- grade metamorphism or hydrothermal (400??C has not been found.

  17. Catalyst mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Rosen, Brian A.

    2017-02-14

    Catalysts that include at least one catalytically active element and one helper catalyst can be used to increase the rate or lower the overpotential of chemical reactions. The helper catalyst can simultaneously act as a director molecule, suppressing undesired reactions and thus increasing selectivity toward the desired reaction. These catalysts can be useful for a variety of chemical reactions including, in particular, the electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2 or formic acid. The catalysts can also suppress H.sub.2 evolution, permitting electrochemical cell operation at potentials below RHE. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts are also disclosed, including processes to produce CO, OH.sup.-, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, O.sub.2, H.sub.2, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  18. 铁基催化剂对将军庙煤低压直接液化性能影响%Effect of Iron-based Catalysts on Direct Liquefaction Performance of Coal From Jiangjunmiao, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海龙; 廖玲

    2015-01-01

    以将军庙煤为研究对象,催化剂用量按活性金属元素计为3%(wtCoaldaf)、反应温度T=420℃、反应时间τ=75 min、溶煤比S/C=2/1和氢初压PH2=6.5 MPa条件下,首先,以油产率为目标,Fe2O3为主催化剂,S为助催化剂,通过考察S/Fe对煤样直接液化性能的影响,确定了最佳S/Fe=1/1。其次,在S/Fe为1/1和上述反应条件下,考察了一系列铁基催化剂对煤样液化性能的影响。结果表明,以油产率为目标,其活性由高到低为:Fe2O3/S>油溶性Fe3O4/S >油溶性Fe3O4(中试)/S >飞灰/S >纳米Fe3O4/S>黄铁矿/Fe2O3>油酸铁/S > FeSO4/S> Fe(NO3)3/S>β-FeOOH/S >FeCl3/S >还原铁粉/S >FeS。最后,将Fe2O3/S与MoO3/S、FeSO4/S与NiSO4/S和CoSO4/S分别进行了比较。结果表明:Fe2O3/S比MoO3/S更能促进沥青质向油的转化;FeSO4/S与NiSO4/S和CoSO4/S三者油产率相差甚小,均约67%。故此,Fe2O3/S的催化活性最好。%The research objectwasthe coal from Jiangjunmiao. First of all,takingoil yield as the target and Fe2O3as the maincatalyst and S as the sub-catalyst, the best S/Fe=1∶1wasconfirmedby investigating the effect of S/Fe on direct liquefaction performanceof coal sample under the reaction conditions of catalysts 3%( wt), 420℃,reaction time 75 min, solvent/coal=2/1 and H2initial pressure 6.5 MPa. Theneffect of a series of iron-based catalysts on liquefaction performanceof coal sample under S/Fe=1/1andotheraboveconditionswas investigated. The results showthat:the rank ordering of the activity of catalysts according to the oil yield is Fe2O3/S>oil-soluble Fe3O4/S > oil-soluble(pilot plant) Fe3O4/S >fly ash/S >nanometer Fe3O4/S>pyrite/Fe2O3>oleic acid iron/S > FeSO4/S> Fe(NO3)3/S > β-FeOOH/S>FeCl3/S >iron powder/S >FeS. At last,Fe2O3/S and MoO3/S, FeSO4/S and NiSO4/S and CoSO4/Swererespectively compared. Theresults show that:Fe2O3/S can more promote theconversionof asphaltene to oil than MoO3/S;thegap of the oil yieldsamong FeSO4/S

  19. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  20. Iron loading effects in Fe/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR catalysts: nature of the Fe-ions and structure-function relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Zheng, Yang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Wang, Yilin; Walter, Eric D.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2016-05-06

    Using a traditional aqueous solution ion-exchange method under a protecting atmosphere of N2, a series of Fe/SSZ-13 catalysts with various Fe loadings were synthesized. UV-Vis, EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopies, coupled with temperature programmed reduction and desorption techniques, were used to probe the nature of the Fe sites. The major monomeric and dimeric Fe species are extra-framework [Fe(OH)2]+ and [HO-Fe-O-Fe-OH]2+. Larger oligomers with unknown nuclearity, poorly crystallized Fe2O3 particles, together with isolated Fe2+ ions, are minor Fe-containing moieties. Reaction rate and Fe loading correlations suggest that isolated Fe3+ ions are the active sites for standard SCR while the dimeric sites are the active centers for NO oxidation. NH3 oxidation, on the other hand, is catalyzed by sites with higher nuclearity. A low-temperature standard SCR reaction network is proposed that includes redox cycling of both monomeric and dimeric Fe species, for SCR and NO2 generation, respectively. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  1. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared...... by onepot sol–gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD and NH3-TPD. Initial SCR activities of 8 out of 9 catalysts showed higher NO conversion at least at one temperature in the temperature range 300–500 ◦C compared to the conventional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. After potassium poisoning (100......–130 µmol of K/g of catalyst) the relative drop in SCR activity and acidity was lower for all the alternative catalysts compared to the industrial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Furthermore, Cu/MOR and Nano-V2O5/Sul-TiO2 catalysts showed 8–16 times higher SCR activities than the conventional even after high...

  2. Efficient and stable photo-oxidation of water by a bismuth vanadate photoanode coupled with an iron oxyhydroxide oxygen evolution catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabold, Jason A; Choi, Kyoung-Shin

    2012-02-01

    BiVO(4) films were prepared by a simple electrodeposition and annealing procedure and studied as oxygen evolving photoanodes for application in a water splitting photoelectrochemical cell. The resulting BiVO(4) electrodes maintained considerable photocurrent for photo-oxidation of sulfite, but generated significantly reduced photocurrent for photo-oxidation of water to oxygen, also decaying over time, suggesting that the photoelectrochemical performance of BiVO(4) for water oxidation is mainly limited by its poor catalytic ablity to oxidize water. In order to improve the water oxidation kinetics of the BiVO(4) electrode, a layer of FeOOH was placed on the BiVO(4) surface as an oxygen evolution catalyst using a new photodeposition route. The resulting BiVO(4)/FeOOH photoanode exhibitied significantly improved photocurrent and stability for photo-oxidation of water, which is one of the best among all oxide-based phoatoanode systems reported to date. In particular, the BiVO(4)/FeOOH photoanode showed an outstanding performance in the low bias region (i.e., E < 0.8 V vs RHE), which is critical in determining the overall operating current density when assembling a complete p-n photoelectrochemical diode cell. The photocurrent-to-O(2) conversion efficiency of the BiVO(4)/FeOOH photoanode is ca. 96%, confirming that the photogenerated holes in the BiVO(4)/FeOOH photoanode are indeed excusively used for O(2) evolution.

  3. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  4. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...

  5. Compositional study of the putative chloride-bearing materials with OMEGA/MEx data and implications on their relationship with phyllosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesch, O.; Poulet, F.; Vincendon, M.; Hiesinger, H.; Erkeling, G.; Reiss, D.; Bibring, J.

    2011-12-01

    Daytime infrared images of the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) have been used to infer the presence of hundreds occurrences of chloride salts distributed throughout the southern highlands of Mars (Osterloo et al. 2008, 2010). We used NIR OMEGA data to characterize the surface composition of all putative chloride-bearing deposits and their surrounding terrains. Our systematic survey shows that none of the deposits is associated with signatures of sulfates. The deposits preferentially exhibit low albedo (medium albedo of 0.2-0.25. The spectral ratio technique applied to the deposits exhibiting pyroxene and blank signatures reveals a lack of absorptions and a blue slope in the 1-2.6 μm range, also reported by Murchie et al. (2009) and Glotch et al. (2011). For a few dozens of sites, we identified the presence of Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates in proximity to the chloride deposits, with some juxtaposed or even superimposed. We classified the chloride/phyllosilicates association in two groups. 1) Phyllosilicates exposed in small eroded terrains with distinct thermophysical properties from the surrounding terrain materials. These deposits are representative of the phyllosilicate-bearing outcrops that are commonly found in the ancient (pre-)Noachian plains and show no relationship with the chloride terrains. 2) Of special interest are the juxtaposed/superimposed phyllosilicates/chlorides deposits found exclusively in the intercrater plains of the northwestern Terra Sirenum region. In these rare occurrences, the phyllosilicate signatures correspond to a high standing rugged material overlying an anhydrous basement; this setting is rather unique and distinct from the common setting of phyllosilicates-bearing exposures of the ancient crust and those of extensive phyllosilicates-rich regions such as Mawrth Vallis and Nili Fossae. The spectral signatures are consistent with Fe/Mg smectites, with vermiculite and smectite-chlorite mixed-layer clays providing the

  6. Effect of microwave hydrothermal treatment for iron-based catalyst on its selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3%铁基催化剂的微波水热处理对其SCR脱硝性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊志波; 金晶; 路春美; 郭东旭; 张信莉

    2014-01-01

    利用微波对共沉淀制备的铁铈钛复合氧化物催化剂前驱体进行水热处理,探讨了微波水热处理对铁基催化剂低温 SCR 脱硝性能的优化;并对微波水热处理条件的影响进行了正交分析。结果表明:对铁基催化剂前驱体进行微波水热处理,可提高其低温 SCR 脱硝性能,使其脱硝温度窗口向低温偏移;且微波水热处理的低温优化效果与催化剂中Fe/Ti摩尔比密切相关,Fe/Ti摩尔比越小,微波水热处理的低温优化越强;微波加热方式和微波辐射时间会影响微波水热处理对铁基催化剂SCR脱硝性能的低温优化;在相同微波辐射时间条件下,当P30逐渐变为P80,微波水热处理对铁基催化剂低温SCR脱硝的促进作用降低;在P30条件下,微波辐射15min使铁基催化剂具有最佳低温SCR脱硝活性。%Microwave was used to hydrothermally treat the precursors of iron-cerium-titanium mixed oxide catalysts prepared by co-precipitation.The optimization of microwave hydrothermal treatment on the low-temperature NH3-SCR activity over iron-based catalyst were investigated in a fixed-bed quartz tube reactor,and the influences of microwave hydrothermal treatment conditions were also studied through the orthogonal experiment.The results indicated that microwave hydrothermal treatment could improved the low-temperature NH3-SCR activity of iron-based catalyst,and made its reactive SCR temperature window shift to the low-temperature region.Meanwhile,the promotional effect of microwave hydrothermal treatment on low-temperature NH3-SCR activity is closely related to the molar ratio of Fe and Ti in the mixed oxide catalyst.When the molar ratio of Fe and Ti is smaller,the promotion of microwave hydrothermal treatment is higher.The microwave heating method and the microwave radiation time played an important role on the promotion of low-temperature NH3-SCR activity over iron-based catalyst.Under the same microwave radiation time

  7. Chemical models for martian weathering profiles: Insights into formation of layered phyllosilicate and sulfate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical chemical models for water-basalt interaction have been used to constrain the formation of stratified mineralogical sequences of Noachian clay-bearing rocks exposed in the Mawrth Vallis region and in other places on cratered martian highlands. The numerical approaches are based on calculations of water-rock type chemical equilibria and models which include rates of mineral dissolution. Results show that the observed clay-bearing sequences could have formed through downward percolation and neutralization of acidic H2SO4-HCl solutions. A formation of weathering profiles by slightly acidic fluids equilibrated with current atmospheric CO2 requires large volumes of water and is inconsistent with observations. Weathering by solutions equilibrated with putative dense CO2 atmospheres leads to consumption of CO2 to abundant carbonates which are not observed in clay stratigraphies. Weathering by H2SO4-HCl solutions leads to formation of amorphous silica, Al-rich clays, ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, and minor titanium oxide and alunite at the top of weathering profiles. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates, Ca sulfates, zeolites, and minor carbonates precipitate from neutral and alkaline solutions at depth. Acidic weathering causes leaching of Na, Mg, and Ca from upper layers and accumulation of Mg-Na-Ca sulfate-chloride solutions at depth. Neutral MgSO4 type solutions dominate in middle parts of weathering profiles and could occur in deeper layers owing to incomplete alteration of Ca minerals and a limited trapping of Ca to sulfates. Although salts are not abundant in the Noachian geological formations, the results suggest the formation of Noachian salty solutions and their accumulation at depth. A partial freezing and migration of alteration solutions could have separated sulfate-rich compositions from low-temperature chloride brines and contributed to the observed diversity of salt deposits. A Hesperian remobilization and release of subsurface MgSO4 type solutions into newly

  8. Heterogeneous Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dakka, J.; Sheldon, R.A.; Sanderson, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of GB 2309655 (A) Heterogeneous catalysts comprising one or more metal compounds selected from the group consisting of tin, molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium and selenium compounds deposited on the surface of a silicalite are provided. Preferably Sn(IV) and/or Mo(VI) are employed. The cat

  9. Iron encapsulated within pod-like carbon nanotubes for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dehui; Yu, Liang; Chen, Xiaoqi; Wang, Guoxiong; Jin, Li; Pan, Xiulian; Deng, Jiao; Sun, Gongquan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-01-01

    Chainmail for catalysts: a catalyst with iron nanoparticles confined inside pea-pod-like carbon nanotubes exhibits a high activity and remarkable stability as a cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), even in presence of SO(2). The approach offers a new route to electro- and heterogeneous catalysts for harsh conditions.

  10. Magnetic characterization of Fe nanoparticles dispersed in phyllosilicate type silicon oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagredo, V [Lab. de Magnetismo, Fac. de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pena, O [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226, Universite de Rennes 1, 35042, Rennes (France); Torres, T E [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Loaiza-Gil, A; Villarroel, M; Cruz, M de la; J, Balbuena, E-mail: sagredo@ula.v [Lab. de Cinetica y Catalisis, Fac. de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    We present the magnetic properties of silica-supported metal (Fe,catalyst) nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation of metal nitrate in ammonia-based medium. Our goal is the study of possible metal-support interactions in the nanoporous catalyst. The temperature dependence of the magnetization for all samples display spin-glass like behavior below c.a. 11-12 K, with clear Curie-Weiss dependence in the high-temperature regime. Spin-glass-like behavior was inferred from dynamic AC susceptibility data after analyzing the frequency-dependence of the in-phase component {chi}'(f) by the expression W = {Delta}T{sub f}/[T{sub f} {Delta}log(f)] = 3.0 x 10{sup -3}. We found that the magnetic behavior of the catalyst is drastically affected by the existence of interactions between the metal and the support.

  11. Reorientation mechanisms of phyllosilicates in the mudstone-to-slate transition at Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nei-Che; Peacor, Donald R.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    1995-03-01

    The mudstone-to-slate transition of the Martinsburg Formation at Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania, was re-examined using a new transmission-mode X-ray texture goniometer, supplemented by SEM, XRD, and optical studies. Three mesoscopic zones are recognized in the outcrop: (I) mudstone, (II) transition, and (III) slate zone. In the mudstone zone, the mica basal planes are parallel to bedding whereas the preferred orientation of the chlorite basal planes is up to 30° shallower than bedding. The angular difference between chlorite and mica decreases towards the transition zone, becoming subparallel at ca. 50 m from the contact with the overlying Shawangunk Formation. In the transition zone, the preferred orientations of both mica and chlorite are intermediate to bedding and cleavage orientations, which is consistent with mechanical reorientation of phyllosilicates. This is supported by a decrease in March strain with a minimum at ca. 95 m from the contact for both mica and chlorite. SEM observations similarly show the importance of grain rotation in large detrital grains. In the slate zone, both chlorite and mica orientations are parallel to cleavage. Chlorite and mica in the cleavage orientation of the slate zone have high Fe contents, whereas low-Fe mica and Mg > Fe chlorite dominate in the mudstone and transition zone, which indicates that dissolution-neocrystallization is the dominant mechanism in the slate zone. Thus, mechanical rotation of large detrital grains is important in the early stages of cleavage development, with dissolution—neocrystallization occurring at all stages and becoming dominant in the more evolved stages.

  12. ORGANIC/INORGANIC SUPPORT FOR IMMOBILIZING IRON ( Ⅲ )ACETYLACETONATE AND BIS(IMINO) PYRIDYL LIGAND CATALYST SYSTEM FOR ETHYLENE POLYMERIZATION%无机/有机复合载体负载乙酰丙酮铁/双亚胺基吡啶催化剂及其乙烯聚合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晶; 历伟; 蒋斌波; 王靖岱; 阳永荣

    2012-01-01

    采用溶胶-凝胶法,将苯乙烯-丙烯酸共聚物( PSA)包覆于955 Davison硅胶上得到无机/有机复合微球载体,并在2,6-二[1-(2-异丙基苯基亚胺基)乙基]吡啶/Fe(acac)3均相催化剂中浸渍后得到负载型双亚胺基吡啶铁催化剂.该催化剂在生产高结晶度(72%)聚乙烯的同时,还能生产一定量的α-烯烃.考察了不同膜材料以及聚合条件(不同助催化剂,压力,温度,Al/Fe摩尔比)对聚合活性以及聚合产物性能的影响,发现温度对聚合产物的α-烯烃与聚乙烯的质量比影响最大,助催化剂类型既影响催化剂的活性,也对最终产物的性质有着很大的影响.氯化镁处理的PSA作为膜材料时,负载2,6-二[1-(2-异丙基苯基亚胺基)乙基]吡啶/Fe(acac)3所得到聚乙烯分子量较低(Mw=11.9×104),结晶度较大(72%),熔融指数MI较高(2.35 g/10min),可作为双峰聚乙烯中的低分子量部分加以利用.%An organic/inorganic support of immobilizing catalysts for ethylene polymerization was devised. The composition of the hybrid catalyst is as following: styrene and acrylic copolymer ( PSA ) is the organic part for binding iron ( HI ) acetylacetonate and bis( imino)pyridyl ligand catalyst,and Si02(Davison 955 silical gel) is the inorganic part. The inorganic part is coated by the organic part (PSA) by sol-gel method. The catalyst could produce not only high crystallinity (72% ) polyethylene, but also or-olefin. We considered the impact of different membrane materials and polymerization conditions (different cocatalyst,pressure,temperature,Al/Fe molar ratio) to the polymerization activity and properties of polymers and found that temperature had the greatest impact to the weight ratio of oligomer to PE. Because of the poor thermal stability of catalyst, the catalytic activity significantly attenuated with increasing temperature. When pressure increased, catalytic activity would increase too. The relationship of pressure and catalytic

  13. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    James, D W

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including coba...

  14. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...... meaningful for everyone. The exhibited works are designed by SANAA, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, James Corner Field Operation, JBMC Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Atelier Bow-Wow, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, COBE, Transform, BIG, Topotek1, Superflex, and by visual artist Jane Maria Petersen....

  15. Stability of phyllosilicates in Ca(OH){sub 2} solution: Influence of layer nature, octahedral occupation, presence of tetrahedral Al and degree of crystallinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovani, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica (CSIC-US) Avda. Americo Vespucio, s/n. 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Escudero, A. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitaet Bayreuth, Bayeruth 95440 (Germany); Alba, M.D. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica (CSIC-US) Avda. Americo Vespucio, s/n. 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Becerro, A.I., E-mail: anieto@icmse.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica (CSIC-US) Avda. Americo Vespucio, s/n. 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive investigation of the interaction of layered silicates with Ca(OH){sub 2} in hydrothermal conditions. The study is intended to evaluate the stability of the clay buffer in radioactive waste repositories, at the intermediate stages of concrete leaching, when the pH is controlled by the dissolution of portlandite. The influence of layer nature, octahedral occupation, presence of tetrahedral Al and degree of crystallinity will be assessed by analysing the behaviour of a set of well-selected phyllosilicates and using the combined capabilities of {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS-NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDX. The results show that the main factor affecting the stability of the clay is the octahedral occupation, so that trioctahedral phyllosilicates are much more stable than dioctahedral ones. The nature and expandability of the layer does not seem to much influence the stability of the clay, so that a 2:1 expandable phyllosilicate shows the same stability as a chemically analogous 1:1 non-expandable phyllosilicate. However other factors like the poor crystallinity of the starting material or the presence of Al in the tetrahedral sheet of trioctahedral phyllosilicates weaken the clay structure in alkaline conditions and favour the transformation towards other phases.

  16. Synthesis and applications of nano-structured iron oxides/hydroxides

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... for their applications as catalytic materials, wastewater treatment adsorbents, ... This review outlines the work being carried out on synthesis of iron oxides in ... iron oxides, synthesis, catalysts, magnetic properties, biomedical application

  17. Elemental Composition and Geochemical Characteristics of Iron-Manganese Nodules in Main Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Wen-Feng; LIU Fan; LI Yong-Hua; HU Hong-Qing; HUANG Qiao-Yun

    2006-01-01

    Elemental composition and geochemical characteristics of iron-manganese nodules from nine main soils in China were studied by chemical and multivariate statistical analyses to better understand the reactions and functions of ironmanganese nodules in soils and sediment. Compared to the corresponding soils, Mn, Ba, Cd, Co and Pb had strong accumulation, Ni had moderate accumulation, while Ca, Cu, Fe, Na, P, Sr and Zn accumulated to a minor degree in the iron-manganese nodules. In contrast, Si, Al, K, Mg and Ti were reduced in the iron-manganese nodules. The contents of Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were positively and significantly correlated with that of MnO2 in the iron-manganese nodules, while the contents of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were positively and significantly correlated with that of Fe2O3 in soils. Based on a principle component analysis, the elements of iron-manganese nodules were divided into four groups: 1)Mn, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb and Zn that were associated with Mn oxides, 2) Fe, Cr and P that were associated with Fe oxides, 3) Si, K, and Mg that were included in the elemental composition of phyllosilicate, and 4) Ca, Na, Al and Ti that existed in todorokite, birnessite, lithiophorite and phyllosilicate. It was suggested that accumulation, mineralization and specific adsorption were involved in the formation processes of soil iron-manganese nodules.

  18. On the role of phyllosilicates on fault lubrication: Insight from micro- and nanostructural investigations on talc friction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutareaud, Sébastien; Hirose, Takehiro; Andréani, Muriel; Pec, Matej; Calugaru, Dan-Gabriel; Boullier, Anne-Marie; Doan, Mai-Linh

    2012-08-01

    Exposures of mature faults at the Earth's surface show that in the shallow crust some of co-seismic slip occurs within a narrow phyllosilicate-rich gouge material. Mechanical behavior of phyllosilicates sheared at seismic slip-velocities remains a complex issue as suggested by the experimental and theoretical studies reported so far. Talc represents a simple case for common phyllosilicates in natural faults and therefore we chose talc as an analogue to better understand the mechanical behavior of clay-rich mature crustal faults. We present a series of high-velocity friction experiments conducted on talc at 1.31 m s-1 and normal stresses of 0.3-1.8 MPa for wet and dry conditions. At 1 MPa normal stress, both wet and dry experiments show a slip-weakening behavior, however, with a higher decreasing rate in wet conditions. Dynamic shear stress evolves from a peak value of 0.24-0.52 MPa down to a residual state value of 0.08-0.18 MPa in wet conditions, and from a peak value of 0.46-1.17 MPa down to a residual state value of 0.12-0.62 MPa in dry conditions. Based on a detailed microstructural analysis down to the nanoscale, we propose thermal-pressurization as a possible slip-weakening mechanism for wet conditions. On the contrary, in dry conditions the long-lasting weakening is interpreted to be due to a combination of i) progressive disappearance of geometrical incompatibilities, ii) solid lubrication of talc lamellae, and iii) powder lubrication by nanometric aggregates. We conclude that initial gouge humid conditions and inherited fabric from past sliding may have large influence on the slip-weakening for subsequent slip.

  19. Correlation between Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity and composition of catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbarao Duvvuri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of monometallic and bimetallic cobalt and iron nanoparticles supported on alumina. The catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. Samples were characterized using temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, CO-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM-EDX and N2-adsorption analysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/CO = 2 v/v and space velocity, SV = 12L/g.h. The physicochemical properties and the FTS activity of the bimetallic catalysts were analyzed and compared with those of monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts at similar operating conditions. H2-TPR analysis of cobalt catalyst indicated three temperature regions at 506°C (low, 650°C (medium and 731°C (high. The incorporation of iron up to 30% into cobalt catalysts increased the reduction, CO chemisorption and number of cobalt active sites of the catalyst while an opposite trend was observed for the iron-riched bimetallic catalysts. The CO conversion was 6.3% and 4.6%, over the monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts, respectively. Bimetallic catalysts enhanced the CO conversion. Amongst the catalysts studied, bimetallic catalyst with the composition of 70Co30Fe showed the highest CO conversion (8.1% while exhibiting the same product selectivity as that of monometallic Co catalyst. Monometallic iron catalyst showed the lowest selectivity for C5+ hydrocarbons (1.6%.

  20. An investigation of the coordination number of Ni 2+ in nickel bearing phyllosilicates using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor-Tejedor, M. Isabel; Anderson, Marc A.; Herbillon, Adrien J.

    1983-11-01

    Visible region reflectance spectroscopy and nonlinear regression analysis of spectral data have been used to present qualitative and semiquantitative evidence that some tetrahedral Ni 2+ is present in all six phyllosilicates examined. Highly crystalline willemseite and chrysotile, poorly crystalline nepouite as well as two natural minerals, and a mixture of poorly crystalline nepouite and nickel hydroxide all showed the presence of tetrahedral Ni 2+ as well as octahedral nickel. Chemical analysis of willemseite confirmed quantitatively the presence of excess Ni lending further support for the presence of tetrahedral nickel.

  1. Characterizing the Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Phases Found by MSL Using Laboratory XRD and EGA Measurements of Natural and Synthetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Bish, David L.; Bristow, Thomas; Archer, Paul Douglas; Blake, David; Achilles, Cherie; Ming, Douglas W.; Vaniman, David; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed on the Peace Vallis alluvial fan in Gale crater on August 5, 2012. A primary mission science objective is to search for past habitable environments, and, in particular, to assess the role of past water. Identifying the minerals and mineraloids that result from aqueous alteration at Gale crater is essential for understanding past aqueous processes at the MSL landing site and hence for interpreting the site's potential habitability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument and evolved gas analyses (EGA) from the SAM instrument have helped the MSL science team identify phases that resulted from aqueous processes: phyllosilicates and amorphous phases were measure in two drill samples (John Klein and Cumberland) obtained from the Sheepbed Member, Yellowknife Bay Fm., which is believed to represent a fluvial-lacustrine environment. A third set of analyses was obtained from scoop samples from the Rocknest sand shadow. Chemical data from the APXS instrument have helped constrain the chemical compositions of these secondary phases and suggest that the phyllosilicate component is Mg-enriched and the amorphous component is Fe-enriched, relatively Si-poor, and S- and H-bearing. To refine the phyllosilicate and amorphous components in the samples measured by MSL, we measured XRD and EGA data for a variety of relevant natural terrestrial phyllosilicates and synthetic mineraloids in laboratory testbeds of the CheMin and SAM instruments. Specifically, Mg-saturated smectites and vermiculites were measured with XRD at low relative humidity to understand the behavior of the 001 reflections under Mars-like conditions. Our laboratory XRD measurements suggest that interlayer cation composition affects the hydration state of swelling clays at low RH and, thus, the 001 peak positions. XRD patterns of synthetic amorphous materials, including allophane, ferrihydrite, and hisingerite were used in full-pattern fitting (FULLPAT) models to help

  2. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Serum Iron; Serum Fe Formal name: Iron, serum Related tests: Ferritin ; TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Reticulocyte Count ; Zinc Protoporphyrin ; Iron Tests ; Soluble Transferrin Receptor ... I should know? How is it used? Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) , and/or ...

  3. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the projects as case studies, which contribute with strategic knowledge rather than generalizing from average considerations. These are ‘strategic projects’ where we have looked for the specific and the particular (Flyvbjerg 1991). According to the case studies, we use the case study method developed by Bent......’ interpretations and architectural strategies are included in the analyses. This implies that there is a large variation of empirical knowledge about the selected problems. That is the reason why we give a short introduction to the exact use of approaches and methods in the beginning of each case study. Based...... in experience? Which design qualities do the best examples of architecture as urban catalysts have, and how can we as citizens, politicians and professionals use knowledge about this in the development of our cities as good places to live? We wish to throw light on these key questions through case studies...

  4. Exploring the potential of phyllosilicate minerals as potassium fertilizers using sodium tetraphenylboron and intensive cropping with perennial ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Wang, Huoyan; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Zijun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-03-18

    In response to addressing potassium (K) deficiency in soil and decreasing agricultural production costs, the potential of K-bearing phyllosilicate minerals that can be directly used as an alternative K source has been investigated using sodium tetraphenylboron (NaTPB) extraction and an intensive cropping experiment. The results showed that the critical value of K-release rate and leaf K concentration was 3.30 g kg(-1) h(-1) and 30.64 g (kg dry matter)(-1), respectively under the experimental conditions. According to this critical value, the maximum amount of released K that could be utilized by a plant with no K deficiency symptoms was from biotite (27.80 g kg(-1)) and vermiculite (5.58 g kg(-1)), followed by illite, smectite and muscovite with 2.76, 0.88 and 0.49 g kg(-1), respectively. Ryegrass grown on phlogopite showed K deficiency symptoms during the overall growth period. It is concluded that biotite and vermiculite can be directly applied as a promising and sustainable alternative to the use of classical K fertilizers, illite can be utilized in combination with soluble K fertilizers, whereas muscovite, phlogopite and smectite may not be suitable for plant growth. Further field experiments are needed to assess the use of these phyllosilicate minerals as sources of K fertilizer.

  5. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  6. Chemiluminescence of iron-chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Toshimasa; Ohno, Osamu; Kotake, Tomohiko; Igarashi, Shukuro

    2005-01-01

    The iron-chlorophyllin complex was found to be chemiluminescent (CL) in an acetonitrile (22%)/water mixed solvent. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, when iron-chlorophyllin was added to the mixed solvent, a sharp CL signal immediately appeared. Also, analysis of the absorption spectra revealed decomposition of iron-chlorophyllin (based on decrease in absorbance at 396 nm), hence iron-chlorophyllin is the CL substance. Moreover, the CL intensity decreased in the presence of potassium thiocyanate (KSCN), indicating that the axial coordinative position of iron-chlorophyllin acts as a point of catalytic activation. In addition, when fluorophores were present with iron-chlorophyllin CL, their CL intensity values were similar to or greater than that of the well-known trichlorophenylperoxalate ester (TCPO) CL. Thus, during the decomposition reaction of iron-chlorophyllin, the latter transfers its energy to the coexisting fluorophores. Moreover, since the decomposed compound in this CL reaction had a fluorescence, it was found that the iron-chlorophyllin also functions as an energy donor. Therefore, the iron-chlorophyllin complex acts not only as a CL substance, but also as a catalyst and energy donor in the reaction.

  7. Removal of H2S from Biogas by Iron (Fe3+ Doped MgO on Ceramic Honeycomb Catalyst using Double Packed Columns System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntima Chungsiriporn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic and corrosive in nature, gas should be safely removed from the biogas streams before subjecting into the fuel cell. Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide was synthesized using sol-gel technique and dip coating process of Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb. XRD and SEM indicate that Fe3+ in Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb catalyst is finely dispersed in the MgO support. Performance of the synthesized Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide on the honeycomb catalyst was examined for hydrogen sulfide (H2S oxidation by double packed column scrubbers. The absorption column was used for H2S scrubbing from biogas by deionized water absorption and catalytic column was used as catalyst bed for degradation of absorbed H2S in scrubbing water. In the catalytic column, counter current flow of the scrubbing water and air through the catalyst pack was performed for H2S oxidation accompany with catalyst regeneration. System capacity for H2S removal from gas stream showed 98% constant along 3 hr testing time at room temperature.

  8. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni and iron (Fe. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR. The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2–5 nm PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g−1 catalyst.

  9. Synthesis of light hydrocarbons over Fe/AC catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jianjun; Zong Zhimin; Wang Taotao; Liu Tong; Wei Xianyong

    2012-01-01

    A series of Fe/AC catalysts for catalytic hydrogenation of CO to light hydrocarbons (LHCs) were prepared by decomposing Fe(CO)5 in an autoclave.The catalysts activities were tested in a high-pressure micro reactor.The results show that both CO conversion and LHCs selectivity were significantly affected by the amount of Fe loaded onto the catalysts.The optimum Fe content was determined to be 10% by weight of the catalyst.Over the corresponding catalyst (i.e.,10% Fe/C catalyst),the conversion of CO and the selectivity of LHC5 were 94.8% and 59.2%,respectively,at 360 ℃.Based on various catalyst characterization techniques,such as XRD,BET and SEM,the catalysts surface areas and pore volume decreased and the smaller particles agglomerated at the edges and corners in the outer region of the support with the increasing Fe content.The agglomerated particles increased greatly when the iron content of the catalyst was higher than 10%.The decrease of catalyst activity can be due to the agglomerated particles.

  10. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to alkenes over partially degraded iron-cobalt complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, R.

    1989-01-01

    Complex-derived iron-cobalt alloy catalysts have been studied under conditions similar to those normally prevailing in industry. Despite reports in the literature indicating unusual selectivities with iron-cobalt alloy catalysts under atmospheric pressure conditions, no deviations from normal select

  11. Impact of iron porphyrin complexes when hydroprocessing algal HTL biocrude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Jacqueline M.; Sudasinghe, Nilusha M.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Anderson, Daniel B.; Billing, Justin M.; Schaub, Tanner M.

    2016-10-01

    We apply Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for direct characterization of iron-porphyrins in hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) biocrude oils derived from two algae: Tetraselmis sp. and cyanobacteria. The ironporphyrin compounds are shown to cause catalyst bed plugging during hydroprocessing due to iron deposition. Inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) was utilized for iron quantitation in the plugged catalyst beds formed through hydroprocessing of the two HTL biocrudes and identifies an enrichment of iron in the upper five centimeters of the catalyst bed for Tetraselmis sp. (Fe=100,728 ppm) and cyanobacteria (Fe=115,450 ppm). Direct infusion FT-ICR MS analysis of the two HTL biocrudes with optimized instrument conditions facilitates rapid screening and identification of iron-porphyrins without prior chromatographic separation. With FT-ICR MS we identify 138 unique iron-porphyrin compounds in the two HTL biocrudes that are structurally similar to metal-porphyrins (e.g. Ni and V) observed in petroleum. No ironporphyrins are observed in the cyanobacteria HTL biocrude after hydroprocessing, which indicates that iron-porphyrin structures in the HTL biocrude are degraded during hydroprocessing. Hydrodemetallization reactions that occur through hydroprocessing of HTL biocrudes could be responsible for the decomposition of iron-porphyrin structures leading to metal deposition in the catalyst bed that result in catalyst deactivation and bed plugging, and must be addressed for effective upgrading of algal HTL biocrudes.

  12. Formation of Zn-rich phyllosilicate, Zn-layered double hydroxide and hydrozincite in contaminated calcareous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquat, Olivier; Voegelin, Andreas; Villard, Andre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2007-10-15

    Recent studies demonstrated that Zn-phyllosilicate- and Zn-layered double hydroxide-type (Zn-LDH) precipitates may form in contaminated soils. However, the influence of soil properties and Zn content on the quantity and type of precipitate forming has not been studied in detail so far. In this work, we determined the speciation of Zn in six carbonate-rich surface soils (pH 6.2 to 7.5) contaminated by aqueous Zn in the runoff from galvanized power line towers (1322 to 30090 mg/kg Zn). Based on 12 bulk and 23 microfocused extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra, the number, type and proportion of Zn species were derived using principal component analysis, target testing, and linear combination fitting. Nearly pure Zn-rich phyllosilicate and Zn-LDH were identified at different locations within a single soil horizon, suggesting that the local availabilities of Al and Si controlled the type of precipitate forming. Hydrozincite was identified on the surfaces of limestone particles that were not in direct contact with the soil clay matrix. With increasing Zn loading of the soils, the percentage of precipitated Zn increased from {approx}20% to {approx}80%, while the precipitate type shifted from Zn-phyllosilicate and/or Zn-LDH at the lowest studied soil Zn contents over predominantly Zn-LDH at intermediate loadings to hydrozincite in extremely contaminated soils. These trends were in agreement with the solubility of Zn in equilibrium with these phases. Sequential extractions showed that large fractions of soil Zn ({approx}30% to {approx}80%) as well as of synthetic Zn-kerolite, Zn-LDH, and hydrozincite spiked into uncontaminated soil were readily extracted by 1 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} followed by 1 M NH{sub 4}-acetate at pH 6.0. Even though the formation of Zn precipitates allows for the retention of Zn in excess to the adsorption capacity of calcareous soils, the long-term immobilization potential of these precipitates is limited.

  13. Effects of bimetallic catalysts on synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as nanoscale energetic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Liu; Yong Zhang; Ruying Li; Xueliang Sun; Hakima Abou-Rachid

    2011-01-01

    Well aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNx-NTs),as energetic materials,are synthesized on a silicon substrate by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) metals are respectively introduced to combine with iron (Fe) to act as a bimetallic co-catalyst layer.Correlations between the composition and shape of the co-catalyst and morphology,size,growth rate and nitrogen doping amount of the synthesized CNx-NTs are investigated by secondary and backscattered electron imaging in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS).Compared to pure iron catalyst.W-Fe co-catalyst can result in lower growth rate,larger diameter and wider size distribution of the CNx-NTs; while incorporation of molybdenum into the iron catalyst layer can reduce the diameter and size distribution of the nanotubes.Compared to the sole iron catalyst,Fe-W catalyst impedes nitrogen doping while Fe-Mo catalyst promotes the incorporation of nitrogen into the nanotubes.The present work indicates that CNx-NTs with modulated size,growth rate and nitrogen doping concentration are expected to be synthesized by tuning the size and composition of co-catalysts,which may find great potential in producing CNx-NTs with controlled structure and properties.

  14. Foundation Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Goralski, Greg

    2010-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to Flash Catalyst for designers with intermediate to advanced skills. It discusses where Catalyst sits within the production process and how it communicates with other programs. It covers all of the features of the Flash Catalyst workspace, teaching you how to create designs from scratch, how to build application designs and add functionality, and how to master the Catalyst/Flex workflow. * Introduces Flash Catalyst * Focuses on production process * Covers the interrelation between Flash Catalyst and Photoshop/Illustrator/Flex/Flash What you'll learn Starting f

  15. Catalyst for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kevin C.

    2010-04-06

    A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst was prepared by slurry coating ZSM-5 zeolite onto a cordierite monolith, then subliming an iron salt onto the zeolite, calcining the monolith, and then dipping the monolith either into an aqueous solution of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate and then calcining, or by similar treatment with separate solutions of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate. The supported catalyst containing iron, manganese, and cerium showed 80 percent conversion at 113 degrees Celsius of a feed gas containing nitrogen oxides having 4 parts NO to one part NO.sub.2, about one equivalent ammonia, and excess oxygen; conversion improved to 94 percent at 147 degrees Celsius. N.sub.2O was not detected (detection limit: 0.6 percent N.sub.2O).

  16. Phase transformation of iron in hydroxyapatite in the activation of n-octane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padayachee, D.; Dasireddy, V. D. B. C., E-mail: dasireddy@gmail.com; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Singh, S.; Friedrich, H. B. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Chemistry and Physics (South Africa)

    2015-04-15

    The phase change of iron modified hydroxyapatite catalysts used in the activation of n-octane has been investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. These catalysts were prepared using a wet impregnation and a co-precipitation technique. Both the catalysts showed the presence of an iron(III) phase. Differences were observed in the reduction behavior of the catalysts, suggesting that their reduction pathway is sensitive to the method of synthesis. This study focused on characterizing the differences in the phasic composition of the catalysts in an attempt to further understand their catalytic performance.

  17. Discovery of technical methanation catalysts based on computational screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Kasper Emil; Kustov, Arkadii

    2007-01-01

    Methanation is a classical reaction in heterogeneous catalysis and significant effort has been put into improving the industrially preferred nickel-based catalysts. Recently, a computational screening study showed that nickel-iron alloys should be more active than the pure nickel catalyst...... and at the same time less expensive. This was previously verified experimentally for pure CO hydrogenation. In this study, the improved activity is also verified for CO2 hydrogenation as well as for simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation....

  18. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  19. 磁性铁钛催化剂的制备及其 NH3选择性催化还原 NO 性能%Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3 over Magnetic Iron-Titanium Mixed Oxide Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武超; 熊志波; 周飞; 白鹏; 金晶; 丁旭春

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic iron-titanium mixed oxide catalysts were prepared through the co-precipitation assisted by microwave-pyrolysis.The influence of Ti doping on the selective catalytic reduction of NOx over iron oxide was investigated,and the crystal phases and microscopic pore structure of iron oxides after the doping of titanium were also studied by XRD (X-ray diffraction)and N2 adsorption-desorption test.The results indicate that a strong crystal phase of α-Fe2 O3 appears within iron oxides prepared through the co-precipitation assisted by microwave-pyrolysis.The addition of titanium can increase the thermal stability of iron oxide,meanwhile,iron-titanium mixed oxide catalysts show the crystal phase of γ-Fe2 O3 and α-Fe2 O3 when the molar ratio of Ti is 0.25.The pore size of iron oxides can be refined,and its Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface and pore volume are increased after the doping of titanium oxide.Thereby its NH3-SCR activity is improved,and the optimum molar ratio of titanium oxide is 0.25 .Under the condition of 60 000/h gas hourly space velocity,more than 90% of NOx conversion can be achieved over Fe0.75 Ti0.25 Oz at the temperature of 275~400 ℃.%利用微波热解辅助共沉淀方法制备磁性铁钛复合氧化物催化剂,探讨了钛掺杂对铁氧化物SCR(选择性催化还原)脱硝活性的影响规律,并借助 XRD(X 射线衍射)、N2吸附研究钛掺杂前后铁氧化物晶相和微观孔隙结构的变化趋势.结果表明:微波热解辅助共沉淀方法制备的单一铁氧化物表现出强烈的α-Fe2 O3晶相,掺杂钛会提高铁氧化物的稳定性;当钛掺杂物质的量比为0.25时,铁钛复合氧化物存在γ-Fe2 O3和α-Fe2 O3两种晶相;钛掺杂可细化铁氧化物孔径,增大其比表面积和比孔容,从而提高其中低温 NH3-SCR 脱硝性能,合适的钛掺杂物质的量比为0.25;在空速比为60000/h 条件下,275~400℃区间 Fe0.75 Ti0.25 Oz

  20. Theoretical Studies of Homogeneous Catalysts Mimicking Nitrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Magistrato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen ‘fixation’ via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N2 to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N2(HIPTN3N with (HIPTN3N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N2. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds.

  1. Catalyst mixture for aromatic hydrocarbon synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minderhoud, J.K.; Huizinga, T.; Sie, S.T.

    1989-06-06

    The present invention is concerned with catalyst mixtures consisting of two catalysts, characterized in that one, which is based on zinc, is capable of catalysing the conversion of a H/sub 2//CO mixture into oxygen-containing organic compounds, and the other is a crystalline iron/boron silicate which, after one hour's calcination in air at 500/sup 0/C, has the following properties: a certain X-ray powder diffraction pattern and, in the formula that represents the composition of the silicate, expressed in moles of the oxides, a SiO/sub 2//Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3 molar ratio that is 20-2000, a SiO/sub 2//B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ molar ratio 50-5000, and a Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3//B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ molar ratio higher than 1.0. Said catalyst mixtures show higher aromatics selectivity in the preparation of hydrocarbon mixtures from H/sub 2//CO mixtures than such a mixture comprising an iron silicate instead of the above iron/boron silicates. 3 tabs.

  2. RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY INTO INDUSTRIAL TURNOVER OF BISMUTH AND MOLYBDENUM FROM DEAD CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology of separate extraction of bismuth and molybdenum from spent catalyst was presented and information on the effectiveness of its use in a composition of comprehensive modifier in the iron-carbon alloy was given.

  3. Pd Close Coupled Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Hua SHI; Mao Chu GONG; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst comprised novel high surface area alumina support was prepared to control emission of automobiles. The results showed that prepared catalyst could satisfy the requirements of a high performance close coupled catalyst for its good catalytic activity at low temperature and good stability at high temperature.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to chiral imidazolidinone as recoverable catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondini, Sara [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Nanotecnologie, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (Italy); Puglisi, Alessandra; Benaglia, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.benaglia@unimi.it; Ramella, Daniela [Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Drago, Carmelo [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare (Italy); Ferretti, Anna M.; Ponti, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.ponti@istm.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Nanotecnologie, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    The immobilization of an ad hoc designed chiral imidazolidin-4-one onto iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is described, to afford MNP-supported MacMillan’s catalyst. Morphological and structural analysis of the materials, during preparation, use, and recycle, has been carried out by transmission electron microscopy. The supported catalyst was tested in the Diels–Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene with cinnamic aldehyde, affording the products in good yields and enantiomeric excesses up to 93 %, comparable to those observed with the non-supported catalyst. Recovery of the chiral catalyst has been successfully performed by simply applying an external magnet to achieve a perfect separation of the MNPs from the reaction product. The recycle of the catalytic system has been also investigated. Noteworthy, this immobilized MacMillan’s catalyst proved to be able to efficiently promote the reaction in pure water.

  5. Towards a full understanding of the nature of Ni(II) species and hydroxyl groups over highly siliceous HZSM-5 zeolite supported nickel catalysts prepared by a deposition-precipitation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-Hui; Chao, Zi-Sheng; He, Hao; Huang, Chen; Liu, Ya-Juan; Yi, Wen-Jun; Wei, Xue-Ling; An, Jun-Fang

    2016-02-14

    Highly siliceous HZSM-5 zeolite supported nickel catalysts prepared by a deposition-precipitation (D-P) method were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), hydrogen temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2-absorption/desorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (27)Al magic-angle nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) techniques. The results showed that the D-P of nickel species occurred predominantly on the internal surface of highly siliceous HZSM-5 zeolite, in which the internal silanol groups located on the hydroxylated mesopores or nanocavities played a key role. During the D-P process, nickel hydroxide was first deposited-precipitated via olation/polymerization of neutral hydroxoaqua nickel species over the HZSM-5 zeolite. With the progress of the D-P process, 1 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate was formed over the HZSM-5 via the hetero-condensation/polymerization between charged hydroxoaqua nickel species and monomer silicic species generated due to the partial dissolution of the HZSM-5 framework. The 1 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate could also be generated via the hydrolytic adsorption of hydroxoaqua nickel species and their subsequent olation condensation. After calcination, the deposited-precipitated nickel hydroxide was decomposed into nickel oxide, while the 1 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate was transformed into 2 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate. According to the above mechanism, Ni(ii) species were present both in the form of nickel oxide and 2 : 1 nickel phyllosilicate, which were mutually separated from each other, being highly dispersed over HZSM-5 zeolite.

  6. APPLICATION OF MAGNETIC CATALYSTS TO THE CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION (CWPO OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER CONTAINING NON BIODEGRADABLE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Munoz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new ferromagnetic -Al2O3-supported iron catalyst has been prepared and its activity and stability have been compared with those of a previous iron-based conventional catalyst and with the traditional homogeneous Fenton process in the oxidation of chlorophenols. The use of solid catalysts improved significantly the efficiency on the use of H2O2, achieving higher mineralization degrees. The magnetic catalyst led to significantly higher oxidation rates than the conventional one due to the presence of both Fe (II and Fe (III. On the other hand, the use of a catalyst with magnetic properties is of interest, since it allows rapid recovery after treatment using a magnetic field. Moreover, it showed a high stability with fairly low iron leaching (<1% upon CWPO runs. An additional clear advantage of this new catalyst is its easy separation and recovery from the reaction medium by applying an external magnetic field.

  7. Study on the preparation and performance of iron-cerium mixed oxide catalyst%铁铈复合氧化物催化剂的制备及其性能研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳召刚; 张蕊; 李梅; 胡艳宏; 王觅堂; 张晓伟

    2016-01-01

    采用改进共沉淀法制备铁铈复合氧化物催化剂,通过 L16(45)正交实验确定最佳工艺条件.研究了不同煅烧温度对催化剂脱硝效率的影响,同时通过XRD、SEM、粒度和比表面积等方法对催化剂进行表征.结果表明,反应终点pH 值是碳酸氢铵-氨水沉淀法制备铁铈催化剂最重要的影响因素,反应温度次之.脱硝实验表明,经400℃焙烧5 h所制备的催化剂,其粒径较小,分布较宽,比表面积较大,SCR 脱硝活性最高,在250℃脱硝活性为93.8%.%The preparation process of catalyst composited with Fe-Ce oxides was studied by improved co-precipi-tation.The optimum conditions were determined by L16 (45 )orthogonal test.The effects of different calcination temperature on SCR of Fe-Ce catalyst were studied,and also the materials were characterized by XRD,SEM, particle size and specific surface area.The results show that the final pH of the reaction is the most important factor for Fe-Ce catalyst precipited from bicarbonate-ammonia system.Reaction temperature is the secondary factor.The denitration experiments showed that catalyst prepared by roasting at 400 ℃ for 5 h with smaller particle size,wider distribution,larger specific surface area and the highest SCR denitration activity.The activi-ty was 9 3 .8% at 2 5 0 ℃.

  8. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  9. Iron, growth, and the global epidemic of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Iron is an essential nutrient utilized in almost every aspect of cell function and its availability has previously limited life. Those same properties which allow iron to function as a catalyst in the reactions of life also present a threat via generation of oxygen-ba...

  10. Iron, growth, and the global epidemic of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Iron is an essential nutrient utilized in almost every aspect of cell function and its availability has previously limited life. Those same properties which allow iron to function as a catalyst in the reactions of life also present a threat via generation of oxygen-ba...

  11. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  12. The synthesis and characterization of iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tyler

    Nanoparticle synthesis has garnered attention for technological applications for catalysts, industrial processing, and medical applications. The size ranges for these is in the particles nanostructural domain. Pure iron nanoparticles have been of particular interest for their reactivity and relative biological inertness. Applications include cancer treatment and carrying medicine to a relevant site. Unfortunately, because of their reactivity, pure iron nanoparticles have been difficult to study. This is because of their accelerated tendency to form oxides in air, due to the increased surface area to volume ratio. Using synthesis processes with polyphenols or long chain amines, air stable iron nanoparticles have been produced with a diameter size range of ~ 2 to about ~10 nm, but apparently have transformed due to internal pressure and crystallographic defects to the FCC phase. The FCC crystals have been seen to form icosahedral and decahedral shapes. This size is within the range for use as a catalyst for the growth of both carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes as well for biomedical applications. The advantages of these kinds of catalysts are that nanotube growth can be for the first time separated from the catalyst formation. Additionally, the catalyst size can be preselected for a certain size nanotube to grow. In summary: (1) we found the size distributions of nanoparticles for various synthesis processes, (2) we discovered the right size range for growth of nanotubes from the iron nanoparticles, (3) the nanoparticles are under a very high internal pressure, (4) the nanoparticles are in the FCC phase, (5) they appear to be in icosahedral and decahedral structures, (6) they undergo room temperature twinning, (7) the FCC crystals are distorted due to carbon in octahedral sites, (8) the iron nanoparticles are stable in air, (9) adding small amounts of copper make the iron nanoparticles smaller.

  13. Catalyst support effects on hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Waiz; Spreafico, Clelia; Kleibert, Armin; Gobrecht, Jens; Vandevondele, Joost; Ekinci, Yasin; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen spillover is the surface migration of activated hydrogen atoms from a metal catalyst particle, on which they are generated, onto the catalyst support. The phenomenon has been much studied and its occurrence on reducible supports such as titanium oxide is established, yet questions remain about whether hydrogen spillover can take place on nonreducible supports such as aluminium oxide. Here we use the enhanced precision of top-down nanofabrication to prepare controlled and precisely tunable model systems that allow us to quantify the efficiency and spatial extent of hydrogen spillover on both reducible and nonreducible supports. We place multiple pairs of iron oxide and platinum nanoparticles on titanium oxide and aluminium oxide supports, varying the distance between the pairs from zero to 45 nanometres with a precision of one nanometre. We then observe the extent of the reduction of the iron oxide particles by hydrogen atoms generated on the platinum using single-particle in situ X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy applied simultaneously to all particle pairs. The data, in conjunction with density functional theory calculations, reveal fast hydrogen spillover on titanium oxide that reduces remote iron oxide nanoparticles via coupled proton-electron transfer. In contrast, spillover on aluminium oxide is mediated by three-coordinated aluminium centres that also interact with water and that give rise to hydrogen mobility competing with hydrogen desorption; this results in hydrogen spillover about ten orders of magnitude slower than on titanium oxide and restricted to very short distances from the platinum particle. We anticipate that these observations will improve our understanding of hydrogen storage and catalytic reactions involving hydrogen, and that our approach to creating and probing model catalyst systems will provide opportunities for studying the origin of synergistic effects in supported catalysts that combine multiple functionalities.

  14. 净化黄磷尾气中铁基高温水汽变换催化剂中毒机理%Poisoning Mechanism of Iron-Based High Temperature Catalyst in Water-Gas Shift Reaction of Purified Yellow Phosphorous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田森林; 杨玲菲; 宁平

    2011-01-01

    根据非均相反应体系的热力学有关理论,分析了高温水汽变换温度范围(623~803 K)内B112型铁基水汽变换催化剂在净化黄磷尾气气氛下受磷化氢、砷化氢、氟化氢和硫化氢作用而中毒可能发生的化学反应及产物,讨论了铁基高温变换催化剂的中毒机理.结果表明:磷酸盐、砷酸盐、硫酸盐、单质硫和积炭主要造成催化剂的暂时性中毒;磷铁化合物、砷铁化合物、氟铁化合物和硫铁化合物主要造成催化剂的永久性中毒.在一氧化碳变换气氛下,氮气不参与中毒反应,一氧化碳、二氧化碳、水蒸气和氧气都参与催化剂毒物与活性组分间的中毒反应,从而为催化剂中毒提供了条件,其中氧气会明显加快催化剂中毒.由热力学分析催化剂的中毒程度由强至弱为PH3,H2S,AsH3,HF.%The possible chemical reactions and products in the process of the iron-based high temperature water-gas shift catalyst B112 poisoned by PH3, AsH3, HF and H2S in the water-gas shift reaction of purified yellow phosphorous at 623-803 K was analyzed by the thermodynamics of heterogeneous reactions and the poisoning mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the phosphate, arsenate, sulfate, sulfur and carbon deposit led to the catalyst temporary poisoning, FeP, FeP2, Fe2P, Fe3P, FeAs, FeAs2, FeF3, FeF2, Fe2S3, FeS2, Fe7Sg and FeS led to the catalyst permanent poisoning. In the water-gas shift process, N2 did not participate in toxic reactions, while CO, CO2, H2O and O2 participated poisoning reactions and provided conditions for catalyst poisoning, especially, O2 could speed up the catalyst poisoning. Based on the thermodynamic analysis, the toxicities for the water-gas shift catalyst from strong to weak was as follows:PH3, H2S, AsH3, HF.

  15. 磁场强化流化床铁基SCR脱硝的物理与化学效应%Physical and Chemical Effects by Magnetic Fields for the Enhancement of De-NOx by SCR on Iron-Based Catalyst in a Fluidized Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚桂焕; 梁辉; 归柯庭

    2012-01-01

    研究了磁场对流化床铁基SCR脱硝的物理、化学作用。其物理作用体现在磁场抑制和消除流化床中的气泡,增加气固接触效率,从而增强流化床磁性Fe203催化剂SCR脱硝的传递效率。其化学作用可归结为:1)颗粒磁化产生的边界效应使顺磁性NO受Faraday力的推动,增强了NO在磁性Fe203催化剂表面的化学吸附;2)亚铁磁性铁基催化剂和磁场的协同作用,促进了反磁性反应物向顺磁性产物的磁状态转变和反应中电子的迁移,促进了NH3在磁性Fe(III)基上的活化;3)磁场影响自由基反应体系的有序性,促进自由基NH2与NO的反应。%Physical effects and chemical effects yielded by magnetic fields on SCR of NO over the magnetic Fe2O3 catalyst were investigated. The physical effects are reflected in the enhancement of physical transfer by magnetic fields for SCR of NO on magnetic Fe2O3 catalyst in a magnetically fluidized bed (MFB). Magnetic fields can check and eliminate bubbles in the fluidized bed. Therefore, magnetic fields can improve gas-solid contact efficiency, and then promote the transport efficiency for SCR of NO on magnetic Fe2O3 catalyst in the fluidized bed. The chemical effects are summarized as following: 1) The boundary effect, due to the magnetization of ferrimagnetic catalyst particle by uniform magnetic fields, results in Faraday force on the paramagnetic NO molecule and yields NO movement to the particle surface. Therefore, magnetic fields increase the NO chemisorption on the surface of magnetic Fe2O3 catalyst; 2) The synergy of magnetic fields and ferromagnetic iron-based catalyst can boost transforming antimagnetic reactant into paramagnetic products, and electronic transport in the reaction, thus enhancing the activation of NH3 on the magnetic Fe (III) site; 3) Magnetic fields can alert the order of free radical reaction system, thereby promoting the free radicals reaction between NH

  16. The Compositional Evolution of the Phyllosilicates in the Lateritic Profile of the Catalão I Ultramafic Alkaline-carbonatitic Complex (GO)

    OpenAIRE

    Rogério Guitarrari Azzone; Excelso Ruberti

    2010-01-01

    The compositional evolution of the phyllosilicates in the lateritic profile of the Catalão I ultramafic alkaline-carbonatiticcomplex (GO) is proposed in this work based on petrographic and X-ray diffraction analysis, as well as, chemical compositionobtained by WDS electron microprobe. The micaceous minerals found in unweathered rocks are classified as phlogopites(with different parageneses) and tetraferriphlogopites (metasomatic products). In the levels of altered rocks and isalteriticsaproli...

  17. PGM-free Fe-N-C catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: Catalyst layer design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stariha, Sarah; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Workman, Michael J.; Serov, Alexey; Mckinney, Sam; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the morphology of platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) catalyst layers for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and compares catalytic performance via polarization curves. Three different nitrogen-rich organic precursors are used to prepare the catalysts. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, the porosity, Euler number (pore connectivity), overall roughness, solid phase size and pore size are calculated for catalyst surfaces and volumes. Catalytic activity is determined using membrane electrode assembly (MEA) testing. It is found that the dominant factor in MEA performance is transport limitations. Through the 2D and 3D metrics it is concluded that pore connectivity has the biggest effect on transport performance.

  18. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  19. Effects of catalyst precursors on carbon nanowires by using ethanol catalytic combustion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jin; ZOU Xiao-ping; LI Fei; ZHANG Hong-dan; REN Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    Iron nitrate,nickel nitrate and cobalt nitrate were used as catalyst precursors to study their effects on carbon nanowires synthesized by ethanol catalytic combustion (ECC) process. The as-grown carbon nanowires were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that relatively uniform nanowires will be formed when the catalyst precursor is iron nitrate:while helical structure or disordered structure will be formed when the catalyst precursor is nickel nitrate or cobalt nitrate.

  20. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  1. Chlorination of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained on the Different Metal Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Pełech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a chlorination method is proposed for simultaneous purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes, thus increasing their ability to use. Carbon nanotubes were obtained by CVD method through ethylene decomposition on the nanocrystalline iron or cobalt or bimetallic iron-cobalt catalysts. The effects of temperature (50, 250, and 450°C in the case of carbon nanotubes obtained on the Fe-Co catalyst and type of catalyst (Fe, Co, Fe/Co on the effectiveness of the treatment and functionalization were tested. The phase composition of the samples was determined using the X-ray diffraction method. The quantitative analysis of metal impurity content was validated by means of the thermogravimetric analysis. Using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS analysis, and also Mohr titration method, the presence of chlorine species on the surface of chlorinated samples was confirmed.

  2. Resin Catalyst Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Asaoka

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction: What are resin catalyst hybrids? There are typically two types of resin catalyst. One is acidic resin which representative is polystyrene sulfonic acid. The other is basic resin which is availed as metal complex support. The objective items of this study on resin catalyst are consisting of pellet hybrid, equilibrium hybrid and function hybrid of acid and base,as shown in Fig. 1[1-5].

  3. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan, Song; Kirby, S.; Schmidt, E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to explore bimetallic dispersed catalysts for more efficient coal liquefaction. Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting various aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. This paper describes recent results on (1) hydrodeoxygenation of O-containing polycyclic model compounds using novel organometallic catalyst precursors; and (2) activity and selectivity of dispersed Fe catalysts from organometallic and inorganic precursors for hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl) bibenzyl. The results showed that some iron containing catalysts have higher activity in the sulfur-free form, contrary to conventional wisdom. Adding sulfur to Fe precursors with Cp-ligands decreased the activity of the resulting catalyst. This is in distinct contrast to the cases with iron pentacarbonyl and superfine Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where S addition increased their catalytic activity substantially. A positive correlation between sulfur addition and increased activity can be seen, but a reversed trend between Fe cluster size and hydrocracking conversion could be observed, for carbonyl-type Fe precursors. It is apparent that the activity and selectivity of Fe catalysts for NMBB conversion depends strongly on both the type of ligand environment, the oxidation state and the number of intermetal bonds in the molecular precursor.

  4. Surface Structure and Catalytic Performance of Ni-Fe Catalyst for Low-Temperature CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanhui Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts 16NixFe/Al2O3 (x is 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method and the catalytic performance for the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG from CO hydrogenation in slurry-bed reactor were studied. The catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, UV-Vis DRS, H2-TPR, CO-TPD, and XPS, and the results showed that the introduction of iron improved the dispersion of Ni species, weakened the interaction between Ni species and support and decreased the reduction temperature and that catalyst formed Ni-Fe alloy when the content of iron exceeded 2%. Experimental results revealed that the addition of iron to the catalyst can effectively improve the catalytic performance of low-temperature CO methanation. Catalyst 16Ni4Fe/Al2O3 with the iron content of 4% exhibited the best catalytic performance, the conversion of CO and the yield of CH4 reached 97.2% and 84.9%, respectively, and the high catalytic performance of Ni-Fe catalyst was related to the property of formed Ni-Fe alloy. Further increase of iron content led to enhancing the water gas shift reaction.

  5. Dye degradation by green heterogeneous Fenton catalysts prepared in presence of Camellia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Samira S F; Carvalho, Nakédia M F

    2017-02-01

    This work describes the synthesis and characterization of supported green iron catalysts, prepared with Camellia sinensis tea extract, and their application in heterogeneous Fenton degradation of pollutant dyes. The influence of the catalyst synthesis conditions in the iron and organic content were investigated by X-ray fluorescence and thermogravimetric analyses. Irregular, chain-like nanoparticles, in the size range of 20-100 nm, capped by polyphenolic natural compounds, were visualized by TEM micrographs. TEM-EDS revealed a high iron content in the nanoparticles as well as a high carbon content all over the catalyst surface, indicating the coverage by the polyphenolic compounds of the tea. X-ray powder diffraction revealed the amorphous nature of the nanoparticles, tentatively ascribed to iron(II)/(III) oxides and oxohydroxides composites. The Fenton degradation of different dyes was successfully accomplished, leading to complete decolourization in less than 3 h of reaction. Influence of hydrogen peroxide concentration, catalyst dosage, pH, temperature and catalyst support, were investigated. The catalysts prepared with black tea over silica furnished the higher iron contents and were the most actives for dye degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of different catalysts and development of a new catalyst for the reduction of CO2 to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschekalinskij, Alexander; Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    We present an evaluation of different catalysts, methods and parameters for the catalytic reduction of CO2 for 14C-AMS graphite targets for radiocarbon measurement at the Physical Institute of the University Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany. Currently 10 μm iron powder is used as a catalyst to reduce carbon dioxide to graphite following our standard protocol. An optimal catalyst should provide a short reduction time, no additional fractionation effects, a good reduction yield, lack sintering and should not contain any amounts of both "dead" and "modern" carbon. Seven purchasable catalysts have been evaluated regarding this criteria. Further, the method using zinc and titanium hydride instead of hydrogen gas and the water-trap has been applied to our system and the effect of the water-trap temperature on the reduction time has been tested. A self-made catalyst was produced using aluminum oxide impregnated with iron nitrate. The results of this study indicate three good catalysts and show the success of the applied methods on standard samples like Ox II and Alfa graphite.

  7. Effect of Chlorine precursor in surface and cataytic properties of Fe/TiO2 Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Titania-supported iron (1wt%) catalysts were prepared by the sol-gel method using different gelation pH (3 and 9), metal precursors (FeCl2 and FeCl3) and calcination temperatures (873 and 1073K). Characterization data of calcined catalysts revealed that in all samples the dominant iron species is Fe3+ and the crystalline phase of the TiO2 substrate depends on the gelation pH and the metal precursor used. It was found that in the Fe/TiO2 ex-FeCl3 samples an important part of the iron ions beca...

  8. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  9. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  10. Models of the iron-only hydrogenase: a comparison of chelate and bridge isomers of Fe2(CO)4{Ph2PN(R)PPh2}(μ-pdt) as proton-reduction catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shishir; Hogarth, Graeme; Hollingsworth, Nathan; Holt, Katherine B; Richards, Idris; Richmond, Michael G; Sanchez, Ben E; Unwin, David

    2013-05-21

    Reactions of Fe2(CO)6(μ-pdt) (pdt = SCH2CH2CH2S) with aminodiphosphines Ph2PN(R)PPh2 (R = allyl, (i)Pr, (i)Bu, p-tolyl, H) have been carried out under different conditions. At room temperature in MeCN with added Me3NO·2H2O, dibasal chelate complexes Fe2(CO)4{κ(2)-Ph2PN(R)PPh2}(μ-pdt) are formed, while in refluxing toluene bridge isomers Fe2(CO)4{μ-Ph2PN(R)PPh2}(μ-pdt) are the major products. Separate studies have shown that chelate complexes convert to the bridge isomers at higher temperatures. Two pairs of bridge and chelate isomers (R = allyl, (i)Pr) have been crystallographically characterised together with Fe2(CO)4{μ-Ph2PN(H)PPh2}(μ-pdt). Chelate complexes adopt the dibasal diphosphine arrangement in the solid state and exhibit very small P-Fe-P bite-angles, while the bridge complexes adopt the expected cisoid dibasal geometry. Density functional calculations have been carried out on the chelate and bridge isomers of the model compound Fe2(CO)4{Ph2PN(Me)PPh2}(μ-pdt) and reveal that the bridge isomer is thermodynamically favourable relative to the chelate isomers that are isoenergetic. The HOMO in each of the three isomers exhibits significant metal-metal bonding character, supporting a site-specific protonation of the iron-iron bond upon treatment with acid. Addition of HBF4·Et2O to the Fe2(CO)4{κ(2)-Ph2PN(allyl)PPh2}(μ-pdt) results in the clean formation of the corresponding dibasal hydride complex [Fe2(CO)4{κ(2)-Ph2PN(allyl)PPh2}(μ-H)(μ-pdt)][BF4], with spectroscopic measurements revealing the intermediate formation of a basal-apical isomer. A crystallographic study reveals that there are only very small metric changes upon protonation. In contrast, the bridge isomers react more slowly to form unstable species that cannot be isolated. Electrochemical and electrocatalysis studies have been carried out on the isomers of Fe2(CO)4{Ph2PN(allyl)PPh2}(μ-pdt). Electron accession is predicted to occur at an orbital that is anti-bonding with respect to

  11. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2006-06-30

    Catalysis is the key fundamental ingredient to convert elemental mercury in coal-fired power stations into its oxidized forms that are more easily captured by sorbents, ESPs, baghouses, and wet scrubbers, whether the catalyst be unburned carbon (UBC) in the ash or vanadium pentoxide in SCR catalysts. This project has investigated several different types of catalysts that enhance mercury oxidation in several different ways. The stated objective of this project in the Statement of Objectives included testing duct-injection catalysts, catalyst-sorbent hybrids, and coated low-pressure-drop screens. Several different types of catalysts were considered for duct injection, including different forms of iron and carbon. Duct-injection catalysts would have to be inexpensive catalysts, as they would not be recycled. Iron and calcium had been shown to catalyze mercury oxidation in published bench-scale tests. However, as determined from results of an on-going EPRI/EPA project at Southern Research, while iron and calcium did catalyze mercury oxidation, the activity of these catalysts was orders of magnitude below that of carbon and had little impact in the short residence times available for duct-injected catalysts or catalyst-sorbent hybrids. In fact, the only catalyst found to be effective enough for duct injection was carbon, which is also used to capture mercury and remove it from the flue gas. It was discovered that carbon itself is an effective catalyst-sorbent hybrid. Bench-scale carbon-catalyst tests were conducted, to obtain kinetic rates of mercury adsorption (a key step in the catalytic oxidation of mercury by carbon) for different forms of carbon. All carbon types investigated behaved in a similar manner with respect to mercury sorption, including the effect of temperature and chlorine concentration. Activated carbon was more effective at adsorbing mercury than carbon black and unburned carbon (UBC), because their internal surface area of activated carbon was

  12. Research on preparation of iron doped TiO2-SBA-1 5 catalyst and photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange%铁掺杂TiO2-SBA-15催化剂制备及光催化降解甲基橙研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐玲; 王丽丽; 刘建华; 吕茂萍

    2016-01-01

    采用溶胶-凝胶法,将TiO2负载到介孔分子筛 SBA-15上,再通过 FeCl3浸渍的方法,将不同量的铁掺杂到TiO2-SBA-15上.通过 FT-IR、XRD、N2吸附-脱附和 TEM等手段对铁掺杂TiO2-SBA-15催化剂进行表征.结果表明:负载TiO2后的 SBA-15依然为高度有序的二维六方结构,比表面积略有减小,说明 SBA-15的孔道结构有利于 TiO2的分散.掺铁后的TiO2-SBA-15的结构改变不大,且TiO2晶形仍为锐钛矿型.最后以光催化降解甲基橙探究不同铁掺杂量的TiO2-SBA-15催化活性.结果表明:铁离子掺杂量为0.035%(质量分数),紫外光照射200 min时,甲基橙降解率达最高值98.2%.%By sol-gel method TiO2 is loaded on mesoporous molecular sieve SBA-1 5 .The catalysts which have different contents of iron,are obtained by impregnating FeCl3 onto TiO2-SBA-1 5 .The catalysts are characterized by FT-IR,XRD,N2 adsorption-desorption and TEM.The characterization results indicate that the TiO2 loaded SBA-1 5 still has highly ordered 2-dimensional hexagonal structure and the BET surface area is slightly decreased,which demonstrate that the channel of SBA-1 5 is beneficial to the scatter of the TiO2 .The structure of TiO2-SBA-1 5 has not changed too much after doping with iron.The crystalline form of TiO2 is still anatase.The catalytic activity of iron doped TiO2-SBA-15 is investigated by photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange.The photo-catalysis results reveal that when the doped content of iron is 0.035% (the mass fraction)and UV radiation time is 200 min,the degradation rate can reach maximum of 98.2%.

  13. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  14. Carbon nanotube patterning with capillary micromolding of catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Ryu, Choonghan; Lee, Sungwoo; Jung, Donggeun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop

    2007-11-01

    Patterning of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber has been achieved by catalyst patterning using capillary micromolding process. Iron acetate catalyst nanoparticles were dissolved in ethanol and mold was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The ethanol solution containing catalyst nanoparticles was filled into the microchannel formed between PDMS mold and Si-wafer by capillary force. The capillary action of different solvents was simulated by commercial CFD-ACE+ simulation code to determine optimal solvents. Simulated result shows that the choice of solvent was critical in this capillary filling process. After the catalyst patterning, MWNT was grown at 700 approximately 800 degrees C by PECVD process using CH4 and Ar gas in a scale of approximately 10 micro-meters in a tubular inductively coupled plasma reactor. Grown CNTs were analyzed by FE-SEM and Raman Spectroscopy.

  15. Conversion of dimethyl ether on zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramova, A.V.; Kulumbegov, R.V.; Khadzhiev, S.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis

    2006-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrocarbons was investigated using zeolite catalyst ZSM-5 type. 2% MexOy - 60% HZVM(analogue of ZSM-5)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Me = Zn, Ga, Fe, Co, V, Ni) catalyst samples have been obtained. The reaction was carried out in a fixed bed reaction set-up at 350-400 C, pressure 3 MPa, gas mix (% vol.): 24 DME, 76 N{sub 2}, WHSV=1300 l/l-{sub kat.}h. Most effective catalysts of DME conversion are pentasil based catalysts with promoter metals zinc, iron and cobalt by totality DME-conversion, gas and liquid hydrocarbon selectivity, ethylene and propylene content in gas. The best work temperatures are 350 and 375 C, thereupon increasing of temperature to 400 C leads to considerable growth of methane in hydrocarbon gas. Liquid hydrocarbons have high content of aromatics and iso-paraffins. Liquid hydrocarbon product is characterized by high octane number (RON) 90-98. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    2001-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the particles.

  17. External Catalyst Breakup Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    14-18 Mesh Catalyst 127 4-12 Hot Gas Thermal Fatigue Test Results for 25-30 Mesh Catalyst 128 4-13 Hot Gas Thermal Aging Test Results 131 - 19 - LISI ...magnitude of the thermal and internal pressure solution3, These solucions siu- Li.L fti’r oir =ztcrii ad the pressure and temperature profiles of

  18. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  19. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  20. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...

  1. Modified iron oxide nanomaterials: Functionalization and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Samira; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd

    2016-10-15

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have aroused the interest of researchers of materials' chemistry due to its exceptional properties such as decent magnetic, electric, catalytic, biocompatibility, and low toxicity. However, these magnetic nanoparticles are predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles, due to its strong anisotropic dipolar interactions, particularly in the aqueous phase, consequently depriving them of dispersibility and particular properties, ultimately degrading their performance. Hence, this review focuses on modified magnetic nanoparticles that are stable, easily synthesized, possess a high surface area and could be facile-separated via magnetic forces, and are of low toxicity and costs for applications such as catalyst/catalyst support, food security, biomedical, and pollutant remediation. - Highlights: • Nanomagnetite is interesting due to its exceptional properties. • Nanomagnetite is predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles. • Modified nanomagnetite are stable, easily synthesized, possess high surface area. • Modified nanomagnetite got applications as catalyst/catalyst support.

  2. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  3. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  4. Biomass gasification in supercritical water: II. Effect of catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanik, Jale; Ebale, Steve; Kruse, Andrea; Saglam, Mehmet; Yueksel, Mithat [Institue for Technical Chemistry, Division of Chemical-Physical Processing, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    In this study, the effect of the type of catalyst on hydrothermal gasification of three specifically chosen samples of natural biomass was investigated. Biomass feedstocks, including lignocellulosic materials (cotton stalk and corncob) and the tannery waste, were gasified in supercritical water by the addition of catalyst. The catalysts used were K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Trona (NaHCO{sub 3}.Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O), red mud (Fe-oxide containing residue from Al-production) and Raney-Ni. The gasification experiments were performed in a batch autoclave at 500 C. The amounts and compositions of the gases and the amounts of water soluble compounds from gasification were determined. The effect of catalysts on gasification varied with the type of biomass. The catalysts significantly increased the hydrogen yield by supporting the water-gas shift reaction and the methane reformation. The gasification activity of Trona was similar to that of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The results indicate that iron based catalysts can also be effective in gasification of biomass. In conclusion, the supercritical water gasification of biomass by addition of red mud and Trona is said to be promising method to produce H{sub 2} from biomass efficiently similar to gasification with commercial alkali catalysts. (author)

  5. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  6. Radiation-Damage Resistance in Phyllosilicate Minerals From First Principles and Implications for Radiocesium and Strontium Retention in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassi, Michel; Rosso, Kevin M.; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Accidental discharges of the hazardous nuclear fission products 137Cs+ and 90Sr2+ into the environment, such as during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident, have repeatedly occurred throughout the nuclear age. Numerous studies of their fate and transport in soils and sediments have demonstrated their strong and selective binding to phyllosilicates such as clay minerals, primarily via cation exchange into interlayer sites. The locally concentrated amounts of these radioactive beta-emitters that can be found in these host minerals raises important questions regarding the long-term interplay and durability of radioisotope-clay association, which is not well known. This study goes beyond the usual short-term focus to address the permanence of radioisotope retention in clay minerals, by developing a general theoretical understanding of their resistance to defect creation. We report ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) calculations of the threshold displacement energy (TDE) of each symmetry-unique atomic specie comprising the unit cell of model vermiculite. The determined TDE values are material specific and radiation independent. We use them to estimate the probability of Frenkel pair creation via direct electron-ion collision, as could be induced by the passage of a high energy electron emitted during the beta-decay of 137Cs, 90Sr and daughter 90Y. For 137Cs and 90Sr, we found that the probability is about 36%, while for 90Y the probability is much higher with about 89%. The long-term retention picture that emerges is that decay will progressively alter the clay interlayer structure and charge, likely leading to delamination of the clay and re-release of residual parent isotopes. Future work examining the effect of Frenkel defect accumulation on the binding energy of parent and daughter radionuclides in the interlayer is thus justifiable, and potentially important for accurate long-term forecasting of radionuclide transport in the environment.

  7. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  8. Cell Wall Targeted in planta Iron Accumulation Enhances Biomass Conversion and Seed Iron Concentration in Arabidopsis and Rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haibing; Wei, Hui; Ma, Guojie; Antunes, Mauricio S.; Vogt, Stefan; Cox, Joseph; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Xiping; Bu, Lintao; Gleber, S. Charlotte; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Makowski, Lee; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin P.; McCann, Maureen C.; Murphy, Angus S.; Peer, Wendy A.

    2016-10-01

    Conversion of nongrain biomass into liquid fuel is a sustainable approach to energy demands as global population increases. Previously, we showed that iron can act as a catalyst to enhance the degradation of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production. However, direct addition of iron catalysts to biomass pretreatment is diffusion-limited, would increase the cost and complexity of biorefinery unit operations and may have deleterious environmental impacts. Here, we show a new strategy for in planta accumulation of iron throughout the volume of the cell wall where iron acts as a catalyst in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. We engineered CBM-IBP fusion polypeptides composed of a carbohydrate-binding module family 11 (CBM11) and an iron-binding peptide (IBP) for secretion into Arabidopsis and rice cell walls. CBM-IBP transformed Arabidopsis and rice plants show significant increases in iron accumulation and biomass conversion compared to respective controls. Further, CBM-IBP rice shows a 35% increase in seed iron concentration and a 40% increase in seed yield in greenhouse experiments. CBM-IBP rice potentially could be used to address iron deficiency, the most common and widespread nutritional disorder according to the World Health Organization.

  9. High catalytic activity and pollutants resistivity using Fe-AAPyr cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cell application

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo Santoro; Alexey Serov; Claudia W. Narvaez Villarrubia; Sarah Stariha; Sofia Babanova; Kateryna Artyushkova; Schuler, Andrew J.; Plamen Atanassov

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, a new generation of innovative non-platinum group metal catalysts based on iron and aminoantipyrine as precursor (Fe-AAPyr) has been utilized in a membraneless single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) running on wastewater. Fe-AAPyr was used as an oxygen reduction catalyst in a passive gas-diffusion cathode and implemented in SCMFC design. This catalyst demonstrated better performance than platinum (Pt) during screening in “clean” conditions (PBS), and no degradation in ...

  10. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  11. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  12. Comparative study on stability and coke deposition over supported Rh and FePO4 catalysts for oxy-bromination of methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronghe; Lin; Yunjie; Ding; Runqin; Wang

    2014-01-01

    Rhodium- and iron phosphate-based catalysts are by far the most promising catalysts for oxy-bromination of methane(OBM) reaction. However, most literature reported either Rh- or FePO4-based catalysts, and the results were rarely studied in a uniform environmental condition. In this report, comparative study was conducted on silica- and silicon carbide-supported rhodium and iron phosphate catalysts with the main focuses on stability performance and coke deposition. The catalytic results demonstrated that the stability of both Rh- and FePO4-based catalysts was greatly influenced by the supports used, and silicon carbide-supported catalysts showed much better anti-coking ability as compared with silica-supported ones. Temperature-programmed oxidation over the used catalysts further indicated that the coke formation mechanisms were completely different between silica-supported rhodium and iron phosphate catalysts. While cokes might be caused by condensation of CH2Br2over supported iron phosphate, methane decomposition might be the reason for coke formation over silica-supported rhodium catalyst. These findings might pave the way for designing highly efficient and stable catalysts of the OBM reaction.

  13. Effect of incorporation manner of Zr promoter on precipitated ironbased catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao-jian; MA Hong-fang; ZHANG Hai-tao; YING Wei-yong; FANG Ding-ye

    2012-01-01

    The promotional effects of Zr on the structure,reduction,carburization and catalytic behavior of precipitated iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts were investigated.The catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption,temperature-programmed reduction (TPR),and M(o)ssbauer effect spectroscopy (MES) techniques.As revealed by N2 physisorption,Zr decreased the BET surface area and pore volume of the catalyst.The results of TPR and MES show that Zr suppresses the reduction and carburization of Fe catalysts because of the interaction between Fe and Zr.The FTS reaction results indicate that Zr decreases the FTS activity of Fe catalysts but improves the catalysts' stability.In addition,Zr promoter restraines the formation of light hydrocarbons (methane and C2~C4) and shifts the production distribution to the heavy hydrocarbons.

  14. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  15. The Compositional Evolution of the Phyllosilicates in the Lateritic Profile of the Catalão I Ultramafic Alkaline-carbonatitic Complex (GO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Guitarrari Azzone

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The compositional evolution of the phyllosilicates in the lateritic profile of the Catalão I ultramafic alkaline-carbonatiticcomplex (GO is proposed in this work based on petrographic and X-ray diffraction analysis, as well as, chemical compositionobtained by WDS electron microprobe. The micaceous minerals found in unweathered rocks are classified as phlogopites(with different parageneses and tetraferriphlogopites (metasomatic products. In the levels of altered rocks and isalteriticsaprolite, the phyllosilicates derived from micas are vermiculite and regular interstratified phlogopite-vermiculite (whichformation and characteristics are similar to hydrobiotite, characterizing a main vermiculitization process in this profile.Subordinately, in the upper portions and punctual areas of isalteritic saprolite, the alteration of the vermiculitized phlogopitegenerates smectitic products, which are characterized mainly by the occurrence of expansible regular interstratified mineraland even smectite. Kaolinite occurs on the top of the isalteritic saprolite and on the alloteritic level. The evolution sequenceof the phyllosilicates in the weathering profile of the Catalão I complex presents the following formation order: phlogopite,interstratified phlogopite-vermiculite, vermiculite, smectitic products (expansible interstratified minerals of local occurrence, smectite and kaolinite, of which, the last two are probably associated to supergene processes. This sequence is compatible with the most recent theories for the formation of clay minerals in soils. The main differences between the phlogopites and their products ofvermiculitic alteration are related to a significant decrease of K+ and oxidation of Fe2+, characteristic changes of the vermiculitizationprocess. In the specific case of vermiculites, the interlayer site is filled mainly by Mg2+. In addition to that, the presence of interstratified minerals (intermediate alteration products is a key

  16. POLYMERIZATION OF ETHYLENE WITH UNSYMMETRIC 2,6-BIS(IMINO)PYRIDINE IRON(Ⅱ) COMPLEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Ma; Wen-hua Sun; Zi-long Li; Chang-xing Shao; You-liang Hu

    2002-01-01

    An unsymmetric 2,6-bis(imino)pyridine iron(Ⅱ) complex 1' was synthesized. The relationship between catalyst structure and its activity in ethylene polymerization is discussed. The kinetic behavior of ethylene polymerization and the effects of polymerization conditions such as temperature, aluminum/iron molar ratio on the activity of catalyst and the characteristics of polyethylene were reported. The unsymmetric catalyst 1' has a good catalytic performance of 3.47 ×106 gPE @ mol-1 @ Fe @ h-1 at 40℃ with aluminum/iron molar ratio = 2500. A dependence of catalyst activity on the methylaluminoxane (MAO) concentration and reaction temperature was found. The molecular weight (MW) of polyethylene with broad dispersity is about 104-105 g/mol. The melting temperature and branching of polyethylenes vary with changing reaction temperature and aluminum/iron molar ratio.

  17. Relationship Between Iron Valence States of Serpentine in CM Chondrites and Their Aqueous Alteration Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Zolensky, M.; Satake, W.; Le, L.

    2012-01-01

    The 0.6-0.7 micron absorption band observed for C-type asteroids is caused by the presence of Fe(3+) in phyllosilicates . Because Fe-bearing phyllosilicates, especially serpentine, are the most dominant product of aqueous alteration in the most abundant carbonaceous chondrites, CM chondrites, it is important to understand the crystal chemistry of serpentine in CM chondrites to better understand spectral features of C-type asteroids. CM chondrites show variable degrees of aqueous alteration, which should be related to iron valences in serpentine. It is predicted that the Fe(3+)/Sum of (Fe) ratios of serpentine in CM chondrites decrease as alteration proceeds by Si and Fe(3+) substitutions from end-member cronstedtite to serpentine, which should be apparent in the absorption intensity of the 0.6-0.7 micron band from C-type asteroids. In fact, the JAXA Hayabusa 2 target (C-type asteroid: 1993 JU3) exhibits heterogeneous spectral features (0.7 micron absorption band disappears by rotation). From these points of view, we have analyzed iron valences of matrix serpentine in several CM chondrites which span the entire observed range of aqueous alteration using Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (SR-XANES). In this abstract we discuss the relationship between obtained Fe(3+)/Sum of (Fe) ratios and alteration degrees by adding new data to our previous studies

  18. Comparison study of catalyst nanoparticle formation and carbon nanotube growth: Support effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyu; Luo, Zhiquan; Li, Bin; Ho, Paul S.; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li; Bryan, Eugene N.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2007-06-01

    A comparison study has been conducted on the formation of catalyst nanoparticles on a high surface tension metal and low surface tension oxide for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Silicon dioxide (SiO2) and tantalum have been deposited as supporting layers before deposition of a thin layer of iron catalyst. Iron nanoparticles were formed after thermal annealing. It was found that densities, size distributions, and morphologies of iron nanoparticles were distinctly different on the two supporting layers. In particular, iron nanoparticles revealed a Volmer-Weber growth mode on SiO2 and a Stranski-Krastanov mode on tantalum. CCVD growth of CNTs was conducted on iron/tantalum and iron/SiO2. CNT growth on SiO2 exhibited a tip growth mode with a slow growth rate of less than 100nm /min. In contrast, the growth on tantalum followed a base growth mode with a fast growth rate exceeding 1μm/min. For comparison, plasma enhanced CVD was also employed for CNT growth on SiO2 and showed a base growth mode with a growth rate greater than 2μm /min. The enhanced CNT growth rate on tantalum was attributed to the morphologies of iron nanoparticles in combination with the presence of an iron wetting layer. The CNT growth mode was affected by the adhesion between the catalyst and support as well as CVD process.

  19. Characterizing the Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Phases Found by MSL Using Laboratory XRD and EGA Measurements of Natural and Synthetic Materials (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Chipera, S.; Bish, D. L.; Bristow, T.; Archer, P. D.; Blake, D.; Achilles, C.; Ming, D. W.; Vaniman, D.; Crisp, J. A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Downs, R.; Farmer, J. D.; Morookian, J.; Morrison, S.; Sarrazin, P.; Spanovich, N.; Treiman, A. H.; Yen, A. S.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed on the Peace Vallis alluvial fan in Gale crater on August 5, 2012. A primary mission science objective is to search for past habitable environments, and, in particular, to assess the role of past water. Identifying the minerals and mineraloids that result from aqueous alteration at Gale crater is essential for understanding past aqueous processes at the MSL landing site and hence for interpreting the site's potential habitability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument and evolved gas analyses (EGA) from the SAM instrument have helped the MSL science team identify phases that resulted from aqueous processes: phyllosilicates and amorphous phases were measure in two drill samples (John Klein and Cumberland) obtained from the Sheepbed Member, Yellowknife Bay Fm., which is believed to represent a fluvial-lacustrine environment. A third set of analyses was obtained from scoop samples from the Rocknest sand shadow. Chemical data from the APXS instrument have helped constrain the chemical compositions of these secondary phases and suggest that the phyllosilicate component is Mg-enriched and the amorphous component is Fe-enriched, relatively Si-poor, and S- and H-bearing. To refine the phyllosilicate and amorphous components in the samples measured by MSL, we measured XRD and EGA data for a variety of relevant natural terrestrial phyllosilicates and synthetic mineraloids in laboratory testbeds of the CheMin and SAM instruments. Specifically, Mg-saturated smectites and vermiculites were measured with XRD at low relative humidity to understand the behavior of the 001 reflections under Mars-like conditions. Our laboratory XRD measurements suggest that interlayer cation composition affects the hydration state of swelling clays at low RH and, thus, the 001 peak positions. XRD patterns of synthetic amorphous materials, including allophane, ferrihydrite, and hisingerite were used in full-pattern fitting (FULLPAT) models to help

  20. Improvement of barrier properties of a hybrid sol-gel coating by incorporation of synthetic talc-like phyllosilicates for corrosion protection of a carbon steel

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Sol-gel coatings for corrosion protection of metals are a good alternative to toxic chromate treatments. The present work focussed on the incorporation of inorganic fillers in a sol-gel coating to improve the barrier properties of the film. Talc-like phyllosilicates obtained by hydrothermal synthesis at 160°C, 260°C and 350°C, called T160, T260 and T350 respectively, were selected as inorganic fillers. The synthetic materials showed talc lamellar structure but, in cont...

  1. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  2. Catalysts for converting syngas into liquid hydrocarbons and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Yan, Qiangu; Batchelor, William

    2016-03-15

    The presently-disclosed subject matter includes methods for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas. In some embodiments the syngas is obtained from biomass and/or comprises a relatively high amount of nitrogen and/or carbon dioxide. In some embodiments the present methods can convert syngas into liquid hydrocarbons through a one-stage process. Also provided are catalysts for producing liquid hydrocarbons from syngas, wherein the catalysts include a base material, a transition metal, and a promoter. In some embodiments the base material includes a zeolite-iron material or a cobalt-molybdenum carbide material. In still further embodiments the promoter can include an alkali metal.

  3. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  4. Effects of FeO{sub x}, CoO{sub x}, and NiO catalysts and calcination temperatures on the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes through chemical vapor deposition of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, S.-M. [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, S.P.S. Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Chai, S.-P. [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, S.P.S. Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); School of Engineering, Monash University, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, 46150 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Liu, W.-W. [School of Materials Science and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, S.P.S. Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Rahman [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, S.P.S. Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)], E-mail: chrahman@eng.usm.my

    2009-05-27

    The oxides of cobalt, iron, and nickel catalysts were tested in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane in synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). All catalysts used in this study were prepared using impregnation method and calcined at temperatures ranging from 300 to 850 deg. C. The catalyst samples after CVD of methane were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM study elucidates that iron oxide serves as an effective catalyst for growing SWNTs. The presence of SWNTs on the catalyst was confirmed in the Raman study.

  5. New Catalysts for ROMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Berke; C. Frech; A. Lhamazares; O. Blacque; H.W. Schmalle; C. Adlhart; P. Chen

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) is based on the olefin metathesis reaction, which requires transition metal catalysts. Mainly molybdenum, tungsten and ruthenium based catalysts have up to now been used. The "in-between" metal rhenium was only rarely applied in olefin metathesis reactions, and not at all in ROMP processes.We have found that cationic phosphine substituted dinitrosyl rhenium complexes[1]1a and 1b effectively catalyze ROMP of norbonene, dicyclopentadiene and of cyclooctene. See Fig. 1.

  6. Modified iron oxide nanomaterials: Functionalization and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Samira; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have aroused the interest of researchers of materials' chemistry due to its exceptional properties such as decent magnetic, electric, catalytic, biocompatibility, and low toxicity. However, these magnetic nanoparticles are predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles, due to its strong anisotropic dipolar interactions, particularly in the aqueous phase, consequently depriving them of dispersibility and particular properties, ultimately degrading their performance. Hence, this review focuses on modified magnetic nanoparticles that are stable, easily synthesized, possess a high surface area and could be facile-separated via magnetic forces, and are of low toxicity and costs for applications such as catalyst/catalyst support, food security, biomedical, and pollutant remediation.

  7. OXIDATION OF FINE CHEMICALS BY IRON BASED AND METAL-FREE CATALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hunaiti, Afnan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation by using transition metal complexes offers attractive opportunities for industrial applications following environmentally benign manufacturing processes. However, the number of such catalytic methods has substantially decreased. In this thesis, we developed and utilized three iron based catalysts (FeIII/thymine-1-acetic acid, FeIII/Phenanthroline, and FeII/Nmethylimidazole) and one organic catalysts (1,2-Di(1-naphthyl)-1,2-ethanediamine (NEDA)). The iron/THA catal...

  8. Solar degradation of 5-amino-6-methyl-2-benzimidazolone by TiO{sub 2} and iron (III) catalyst with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2} as electron acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarria, V.; Peringer, P.; Pulgarin, C. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland). Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology; Caceres, J.; Blanco, J.; Malato, S. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Tabernas (Spain)

    2004-05-01

    Wastewater containing mainly 5-amino-6-methyl-2-benzimidazolone (AMBI), used in the manufacture of dyes, was characterized as bio-recalcitrant by means of different biodegradability tests. In order to enhance the biodegradability of this important pollutant, solar photocatalytic degradation methods were explored. The systems light/TiO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}, light/TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, light/Fe{sup 3+}/O{sub 2} and lightFe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were compared under direct sunlight at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (Spain), using a Compound Parabolic Collector (CPC). The iron photo-assisted systems exhibited the most interesting behaviour, from the kinetic and engineering points of view, especially if their combination (as pre-treatment) with a biological process is considered. To compare the efficiency of these systems, the evolution of the following parameters were studied: (a) the dissolved organic carbon and initial compound concentration, (b) the toxicity, and (c) the biodegradability of treated solution. At lab scale, using a solar lamp, the degradation rate of the system light/Fe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was two times higher than the system light/Fe{sup 3+}/O{sub 2} but this last system does not need H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition, improving the economical requirements of the system. (author)

  9. Solar degradation of 5-amino-6-methyl-2-benzimidazolone by TiO{sub 2} and iron(III) catalyst with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2} as electron acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarria, Victor; Peringer, Paul; Caceres, Julia; Blanco, Julian; Malato, Sixto; Pulgarin, Cesar

    2004-05-01

    Wastewater containing mainly 5-amino-6-methyl-2-benzimidazolone (AMBI), used in the manufacture of dyes, was characterized as bio-recalcitrant by means of different biodegradability tests. In order to enhance the biodegradability of this important pollutant, solar photocatalytic degradation methods were explored. The systems light/TiO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}, light/TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, light/Fe{sup 3+}/O{sub 2} and light/Fe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were compared under direct sunlight at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (Spain), using a Compound Parabolic Collector (CPC). The iron photo-assisted systems exhibited the most interesting behaviour, from the kinetic and engineering points of view, especially if their combination (as pre-treatment) with a biological process is considered. To compare the efficiency of these systems, the evolution of the following parameters were studied: (a) the dissolved organic carbon and initial compound concentration, (b) the toxicity, and (c) the biodegradability of treated solution. At lab scale, using a solar lamp, the degradation rate of the system light/Fe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was two times higher than the system light/Fe{sup 3+}/O{sub 2} but this last system does not need H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition, improving the economical requirements of the system.

  10. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  11. Mechanistic Insights into Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Asymmetric Iron Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Jessica

    Our group has been focused on replacing toxic and expensive precious metal catalysts with iron for the synthesis of enantiopure compounds for industrial applications. During an investigation into the mechanism of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation with our first generation iron-(P-N-N-P) catalysts we found substantial evidence for zero-valent iron nanoparticles coated in chiral ligand acting as the active site. Extensive experimental and computational experiments were undertaken which included NMR, DFT, reaction profile analysis, substoichiometric poisoning, electron microscope imaging, XPS and multiphasic analysis, all of which supported the fact that NPs were the active species in catalysis. Reversibility of this asymmetric reaction on the nanoparticle surface was then probed using oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols, yielding modest enantiopurity and high turnover frequencies (TOF) for a range of aromatic alcohols. Efficient dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane for hydrogen evolution and the formation of B-N oligomers was also shown using the NP system, yielding highly active systems, with a maximum TOF of 3.66 H2/s-1 . We have also begun to focus on the development of iron catalysts for asymmetric direct hydrogenation of ketones using hydrogen gas. New chiral iron-(P-N-P) catalysts were developed and shown to be quite active and selective for a wide range of substrates. Mechanistic investigations primarily using NMR and DFT indicated that a highly active trans-dihydride species was being formed during catalyst activation. Lastly, a new library of chiral P-N-P and P-NH-P ligands were developed, as well as their corresponding iron complexes, some of which show promise for the development of future generations of active asymmetric direct hydrogenation catalysts.

  12. A Step into an eco-Compatible Future: Iron- and Cobalt-catalyzed Borrowing Hydrogen Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Adrien; Rodriguez, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Living on borrowed hydrogen: Recent developments in iron- and cobalt-catalyzed borrowing hydrogen have shown that economically reliable catalysts can be used in this type of waste-free reactions. By using well-defined inexpensive catalysts, known reactions can now be run efficiently without the necessary use of noble metals; however, in addition new types of reactivity can also be discovered.

  13. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to iron dextran injection; any other iron injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other ...

  14. Heterogeneous biomimetic catalysis using iron porphyrin for cyclohexane oxidation promoted by chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guan; Liu, Yao; Cai, Jing Li; Chen, Xiang Feng; Zhao, Shu Kai; Guo, Yong An; Wei, Su Juan; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates how ligands modulate metalloporphyrin activity with the goal of producing a practical biomimetic catalyst for use in the chemical industry. We immobilized iron porphyrinate [iron-tetrakis-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrin; Fe(III) (TPPS)] on powdered chitosan (pd-CTS) to form an immobilized catalyst Fe(III) (TPPS)/pd-CTS, which was characterized using modern spectroscopic techniques and used for catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane with O2. Amino coordination to iron porphyrin in Fe(III) (TPPS)/pd-CTS altered the electron cloud density around the iron cation, probably by reducing the activation energy of Fe(III) (TPPS) and raising the reactivity of the iron ion catalytic center, thereby improving the catalytic efficiency. One milligram of Fe(III) (TPPS) catalyst can be reused three times for the oxidation reaction to yield an average of 22.9 mol% of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol.

  15. A novel method for fabrication of Fe catalyst used for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Z Karimi; J Vahdati-Khaki; S M Zebarjad; I A Bataev; A G Bannov

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been grown by decomposition of propane over a nanocamposite catalyst by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The catalyst was prepared from an aluminum/iron oxide/graphite mixture milled in a high-energy ball-milling equipment. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out in order to investigate the catalyst and synthesized CNTs. The results show that iron nanoparticles are produced in an alumina and ball-milled graphite matrix. This produced nanocomposite is used as a catalyst to synthesize CNTs via CVD successfully. The yield of CNTs formation was greatly influenced by the milling time and deposition temperature.

  16. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Effects of Active Metals, Catalyst Supports, and Metal Loading Percentage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wen Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of active metals, catalyst supports, and metal loading percentage on the formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were studied. In particular, iron, cobalt, and nickel were investigated for SWNTs synthesis. Iron was found to grow better-quality SWNTs compared to cobalt and nickel. To study the effect of catalyst supports, magnesium oxide, silicon oxide, and aluminium oxide were chosen for iron. Among the studied supports, MgO was identified to be a suitable support for iron as it produced SWNTs with better graphitisation determined by Raman analysis. Increasing the iron loading decreased the quality of SWNTs due to extensive agglomeration of the iron particles. Thus, lower metal loading percentage is preferred to grow better-quality SWNTs with uniform diameters.

  17. Study on Diameter Controlled Growth of Carbon Nanotubes by LaAl1-xFexO3 Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Feng; WANG Hong-juan

    2005-01-01

    A series of LaAl1-xFexO3 catalysts prepared with lanthanum nitrate, aluminium nitrate and iron nitrate was investigated in catalytical syntheses of carbon nanotubes with high yields and purity. The properties of carbon nanotubes prepared by the method of CVD(chemical vapor deposition) with n-hexane as the carbon resource were studied and it was shown that the diameter of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by the molar ratio of iron to aluminum in the catalysts and that the diameter of carbon nanotubes changes a little with the decrease of the iron content in the catalysts. From the TEM pictures of carbon nanotubes, it can be found that the LaAl1-xFexO3 catalysts have a significant influence on the wall thickness of the carbon nanotubes, whereas they have little influence on the inner diameter of the carbon nanotubes.

  18. Catalyst and method for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kevin C.

    2008-05-27

    A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst was prepared by slurry coating ZSM-5 zeolite onto a cordierite monolith, then subliming an iron salt onto the zeolite, calcining the monolith, and then dipping the monolith either into an aqueous solution of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate and then calcining, or by similar treatment with separate solutions of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate. The supported catalyst containing iron, manganese, and cerium showed 80 percent conversion at 113 degrees Celsius of a feed gas containing nitrogen oxides having 4 parts NO to one part NO.sub.2, about one equivalent ammonia, and excess oxygen; conversion improved to 94 percent at 147 degrees Celsius. N.sub.2O was not detected (detection limit: 0.6 percent N.sub.2O).

  19. PREPARATION OF MESOPOROUS CARBON BY CARBON DIOXIDE ACTIVATION WITH CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Z.Shen; A.H.Lu; J.T.Zheng

    2002-01-01

    A mesoporous activated carbon (AC) can be successfully prepared by catalytic activa-tion with carbon dioxide. For iron oxide as catalyst, there were two regions of mesoporesize distribution, i.e. 2-5nm and 30-70nm. When copper oxide or magnesium oxidecoexisted with iron oxide as composite catalyst, the content of pores with sizes of 2-5nm was decreased, while the pores with 30 70nm were increased significantly. Forcomparison, AC reactivated by carbon dioxide directly was also investigated. It wasshown that the size of mesopores of the resulting AC concentrated in 2-5nm with lessvolume. The adsorption of Congo red was tested to evaluate the property of the result-ing AC. Furthermore, the factors affecting pore size distribution and the possibility ofmesopore formation were discussed.

  20. Real catalysis on single crystalline model catalysts with in-situ reactivity measurement

    OpenAIRE

    O. Shekhah; Ranke, W.; Schlögl, R.

    2003-01-01

    The pressure and materials gap between reactivity studies in UHV and real catalysis can only be overcome by application of in-situ methods for catalyst characterization and/or activity measurements under realistic pressure and temperature conditions. As a model reaction we study the economically important catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) to styrene (St) [1]. The technical catalyst consists of potassium-promoted iron oxides. We use single crystalline epitaxial layers of Fe2O3, Fe...

  1. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization.

  2. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used ... fewer red blood cells. The red blood cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron- ...

  4. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  5. Catalytic ozonation of sulfamethazine antibiotics using Ce0.1Fe0.9OOH: Catalyst preparation and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhiyong; Yang, Qi; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxyhydroxides (FeOOH) are common crystalline forms of iron which play an important role in catalysis through a series of reduction-oxidation reactions. In this paper, Ce substituted goethite (Ce0.1Fe0.9OOH) was prepared by isomorphous substitution method, characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM-EDS, FTIR, and used for the catalytic ozonation of sulfamethazine (SMT). The results showed that the catalyst can significantly enhance the mineralization of SMT, and more than 42.1% SMT were mineralized in the presence of the catalyst, which is 1.74 times higher than ozonation alone. Moreover, with addition of catalyst, more ozone was dissolved into solution. The solution pH decreased due to small-molecule organic acids formation. The catalytic activity decreased slightly during the repeated batch experiments, due to the corrosion of the catalyst and the adsorption of the residual intermediates on the catalyst surface.

  6. Extraction of Nanosized Cobalt Sulfide from Spent Hydrocracking Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Kosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes used for the extraction of metals (Co, Mo, and Al from spent hydrotreating catalysts were investigated in this study. A detailed mechanism of the metal extraction process is described. Additionally, a simulation study was performed to understand the sulfidizing mechanism. The suggested separation procedure was effective and achieved an extraction of approximately 80–90%. In addition, the sulfidization mechanism was identified. This sulfidizing process for Co was found to involve an intermediate, the structure of which was proposed. This proposed intermediate was confirmed through simulations. Moreover, the activities of the spent and the regenerated catalyst were examined in the cracking of toluene. The modification of the spent catalyst through the use of different iron oxide loadings improved the catalytic activity.

  7. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation catalysts obtained from coal mineral matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kindtoken H. D.; Hamrin, Jr., Charles E.

    1982-01-01

    A hydrotreating catalyst is prepared from coal mineral matter obtained by low temperature ashing coals of relatively low bassanite content by the steps of: (a) depositing on the low temperature ash 0.25-3 grams of an iron or nickel salt in water per gram of ash and drying a resulting slurry; (b) crushing and sizing a resulting solid; and (c) heating the thus-sized solid powder in hydrogen.

  8. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  9. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yuting; Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong; Kong, Lingjun; Descorme, Claude

    2014-07-15

    A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pHPZC, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120°C under 0.9MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  10. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    be used as solid acid catalysts but can also be used as a size-selective matrix. It was shown that it is possible to encapsulate 1-2 nm sized gold nanoparticles by silicalite-1 or ZSM-5 zeolite crystals thereby forming a sintering-stable and substrate size-selective oxidation catalyst. After carrying out...... calcination experiments, both in situ and ex situ indicated that the gold nanoparticles embedded in the crystals were highly stable towards sintering. The catalytic tests proved that the embedded gold nanoparticles were active in selective aldehyde oxidation and were only accessible through the micropores...

  11. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...... and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...

  12. Aerogel derived catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  13. Olefin metathesis catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S.G.; Banks, R.L.

    1986-05-20

    A process is described for preparing a disproportionation catalyst comprising admixing a catalytically effective amount of a calcined and activated catalyst consisting essentially of at least one metal oxide selected from molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide and a support containing a major proportion of silica or alumina with a promoting amount of a methylating agent selected from the group consisting of dimethyl sulfate, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethyloxonium tetrafluorborate, methyl iodide, and methyl bromide, and subjecting same to inert atmospheric conditions for the methylating agent to promote the activity of the calcined molybdenum and tungsten oxides for the disproportionation of olefins.

  14. 高分散Fe-N-C氧还原反应电催化剂及其在直接甲醇燃料电池中的应用%A Fe-N-C catalyst with highly dispersed iron in carbon for oxygen reduction reaction and its application in direct methanol fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷领峥; 姜鲁华; 李旭宁; 金具涛; 王军虎; 孙公权

    2016-01-01

    Exploring non‐precious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is essential for fuel cells and metal–air batteries. Herein, we report a Fe‐N‐C catalyst possessing a high specific surface area (1501 m2/g) and uniformly dispersed iron within a carbon matrix prepared via a two‐step pyrolysis process. The Fe‐N‐C catalyst exhibits excellent ORR activity in 0.1 mol/L NaOH electrolyte (onset potential, Eo=1.08 V and half wave potential, E1/2=0.88 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode) and 0.1 mol/L HClO4 electrolyte (Eo=0.85 V and E1/2=0.75 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode). The direct methanol fuel cells employing Fe‐N‐C as the cathodic catalyst displayed promising per‐formance with a maximum power density of 33 mW/cm2 in alkaline media and 47 mW/cm2 in acidic media. The detailed investigation on the composition–structure–performance relationship by X‐ray diffraction, X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy suggests that Fe‐N4, together with graphitic‐N and pyridinic‐N are the active ORR components. The promising direct methanol fuel cell performance displayed by the Fe‐N‐C catalyst is related to the intrinsic high catalytic activity, and critically for this application, to the high methanol tolerance.%氧还原反应(ORR)是燃料电池和金属空气电池等洁净发电装置中阴极的主要反应,该反应动力学过程慢,电化学极化严重. Pt基电催化剂具有较好的ORR活性,然而Pt资源有限、价格昂贵,研制高活性、低成本的代Pt电催化剂意义重大.经过几十年的探索,研究者发现将含有C, N和Fe等元素的前体进行高温热处理得到的Fe-N-C电催化剂对ORR具有良好的活性,然而在高温热解过程中Fe容易发生聚集而形成大块颗粒,导致Fe的利用率不高,影响了电催化剂的ORR活性.  本文分别以聚吡咯和乙二胺四乙酸二钠(EDTA-2Na)为C和N的前驱体,利用高温热解形成的富含微孔

  15. Plasma breaking of thin films into nano-sized catalysts for carbon nanotube synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J.S.; Umeda, K.; Uchino, K.; Nakashima, H.; Muraoka, K

    2003-07-15

    Iron thin films deposited by pulse laser deposition (PLD) were broken into uniform nano-sized catalysts by plasma bombardment for carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis. Size distributions of broken catalysts were obtained in terms of plasma discharge conditions. Vertically arranged high-density (10{sup 13} per m{sup 2}) CNTs were synthesized using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MP-CVD) system and the gas mixture of N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} on optimally broken catalysts with few carbonaceous particles on a large area Si substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) were used to evaluate the obtained CNTs.

  16. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm were found to effectively produce SWCNTs. We discuss the catalysis of gold and related metals for SWCNT synthesis in comparison with conventional catalysts, such as iron, cobalt, and nickel.

  17. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  18. Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukur, D.B.; Mukesh, D.; Patel, S.A.; Zimmerman, W.H.; Rosynek, M.P. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Kellogg, L.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1990-04-01

    This report describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating improved catalysts for a slurry Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process for converting synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels (gasoline and distillate). The improvements in catalyst performance were sought by studying effects of pretreatment conditions, promoters and binders/supports. A total of 20 different, iron based, catalysts were evaluated in 58 fixed bed reactor tests and 10 slurry reactor tests. The major accomplishments and conclusions are summarized below. The pretreatment conditions (temperature, duration and the nature of reducing gas) have significant effect on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity and stability) during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. One of precipitated unsupported catalysts had hydrocarbon selectivity similar to Mobil`s I-B catalyst in high wax mode operation, and had not experienced any loss in activity during 460 hours of testing under variable process conditions in a slurry reactor. The effect of promoters (copper and potassium) on catalyst performance during FT synthesis has been studied in a systematic way. It was found that potassium promotion increases activities of the FT and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions, the average molecular weight of hydrocarbon products, and suppresses the olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions. The addition of binders/supports (silica or alumina) to precipitated Fe/Cu/K catalysts, decreased their activity but improved their stability and hydrocarbon selectivity. The performance of catalysts of this type was very promising and additional studies are recommended to evaluate their potential for use in commercial slurry reactors.

  19. Performance evaluation of commercial copper chromites as burning rate catalyst for solid propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Faria Diniz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Copper chromites are well known as burning rate catalysts for the combustion of composite solid propellants, used as a source of energy for rocket propulsion. The propellant burning rate depends upon the catalyst characteristics such as chemical composition and specific surface area. In this work, copper chromite samples from different suppliers were characterized by chemical analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy and by surface area measurement (BET. The samples were then evaluated as burning rate catalyst in a typical composite propellant formulation based on HTPB binder, ammonium perchlorate and aluminum. The obtained surface area values are very close to those informed by the catalyst suppliers. The propellant processing as well as its mechanical properties were not substantially affected by the type of catalyst. Some copper chromite catalysts caused an increase in the propellant burning rate in comparison to the iron oxide catalyst. The results show that in addition to the surface area, other parameters like chemical composition, crystalline structure and the presence of impurities might be affecting the catalyst performance. All evaluated copper chromite samples may be used as burning rate catalyst in composite solid propellant formulations, with slight advantages for the SX14, Cu-0202P and Cu-1800P samples, which led to the highest burning rate propellants.

  20. Life Support Catalyst Regeneration Using Ionic Liquids and In Situ Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Karr, Laurel; Paley, Mark S.; Donovan, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen recovery from metabolic carbon dioxide is an enabling capability for long-duration manned space flight. Complete recovery of oxygen (100%) involves the production of solid carbon. Catalytic approaches for this purpose, such as Bosch technology, have been limited in trade analyses due in part to the mass penalty for high catalyst resupply caused by carbon fouling of the iron or nickel catalyst. In an effort to mitigate this challenge, several technology approaches have been proposed. These approaches have included methods to prolong the life of the catalysts by increasing the total carbon mass loading per mass catalyst, methods for simplified catalyst introduction and removal to limit the resupply container mass, methods of using in situ resources, and methods to regenerate catalyst material. Research and development into these methods is ongoing, but only use of in situ resources and/or complete regeneration of catalyst material has the potential to entirely eliminate the need for resupply. The use of ionic liquids provides an opportunity to combine these methods in a technology approach designed to eliminate the need for resupply of oxygen recovery catalyst. Here we describe the results of an initial feasibility study using ionic liquids and in situ resources for life support catalyst regeneration, we discuss the key challenges with the approach, and we propose future efforts to advance the technology.

  1. Híbridos inorgânico-orgânicos derivados da reação de filossicatos com organossilanos Inorganic-organic hybrids derived from the reaction of phyllosilicates with organosilanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gardênnia da Fonseca

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Silylation reactions involving hydroxylated surfaces are an important route for synthesis of new materials that could present selected properties, for application in different areas such as catalysis, chromatography, adsorption and electrochemistry. An overview of many synthetic routes, comprising organosilanes to yield phyllosilicates is now presented.

  2. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, A.H.

    1994-05-31

    The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

  3. MAGNETO-CHEMICAL CHARACTER STUDIES OF NOVEL Fe CATALYSTS FOR COAL LIQUEFACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty A. Akundi; Jian H. Zhang; A.N. Murty; S.V. Naidu

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the present study are: (1) To synthesize iron catalysts: Fe/MoO{sub 3}, and Fe/Co/MoO{sub 3} employing two distinct techniques: Pyrolysis with organic precursors and Co-precipitation of metal nitrates; (2) To investigate the magnetic character of the catalysts before and after exposure to CO and CO+H{sub 2} by (a) Mossbauer study of Iron (b) Zerofield Nuclear Magnetic Resonance study of Cobalt, and (c) Magnetic character of the catalyst composite; (3) To study the IR active surface species of the catalyst while stimulating (CO--Metal, (CO+H{sub 2})--Metal) interactions, by FTIR Spectroscopy; and (4) To analyze the catalytic character (conversion efficiency and product distribution) in both direct and indirect liquefaction Process and (5) To examine the correlations between the magnetic and chemical characteristics. This report presents the results of our investigation on (a) the effect of metal loading (b) the effect of intermetallic ratio and (c) the effect of catalyst preparation procedure on (i) the magnetic character of the catalyst composite (ii) the IR active surface species of the catalyst and (iii) the catalytic yields for three different metal loadings: 5%, 15%, and 25% (nominal) for three distinct intermetallic ratios (Fe/Co = 0.3, 1.5, 3.0).

  4. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  5. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  6. Olefin metathesis and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S. G.; Banks, R. L.

    1985-05-14

    Olefins are converted into other olefins having different numbers of carbon atoms by contact with a catalyst comprising an inorganic refractory oxide support containing at least one of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide and a promoting amount of at least one methylating agent under conditions suitable for the methylating agent compounds to promote the activity of tungsten and molybdenum oxides for the disproportionation reaction.

  7. Deactivation of Oxidation Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Levenspiel (Reference 10) have proposed an equivalent general expression of the form dS _KST (4) dtk to account for deactivation due to catalyst pore...Voorhies, A., IEC, 1954, vol. 37, p. 318. 10. Szepe, S., and 0. Levenspiel , Proc. 4th Europ. Symp. Chem. React. Eng., Pergamon Press, p. 265. 11. U.S

  8. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  9. Direct Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Performance of Iron-Containing SBA-15 for Phenol Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Huan-ling; XU Wen-guo

    2008-01-01

    An iron-containing SBA-15(Fe-SBA-15) has been synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal method under weak acidic conditions. A series of characterizations show nanocomposite materials of iron particles supported over mesostructured materials. The catalytic activity of these iron-containing SBA-15 materials has been tested for the heterogeneous Fenton degradation of phenolic aqueous solutions. The catalytic performance has been monitored in terms of phenol conversion, whereas the catalytic stability was evaluated by catalyst recycle. The influence of concentration of hydrogen peroxide, catalyst loading, catalyst prepared with different Fe/Si molar ratios in the gel and pH values of the solution on phenol conversion has been studied. Achieving a good catalytic performance accompanied with a noteworthy stability, Fe-SBA-15 materials prepared by this method are shown as the successful catalyst for degradation of phenolic aqueous solutions by Fenton process.

  10. Diversity of iron oxidizers in wetland soils revealed by novel 16S rRNA primers targeting Gallionella-related bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Laanbroek, R.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are important catalysts of iron cycling in wetland environments. However, little is known about their diversity and distribution in various environments. The aim of this study was to develop a PCR-DGGE assay enabling the detection of neutrophilic iron oxid

  11. Preparation and characterization of a novel Astragalus membranaceus polysaccharide-iron (III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Xu, Lei; Meng, Yongbin; Liu, Ying; Li, Jian; Zu, Yuangang; Zhu, Minghua

    2016-12-01

    Astragalus membranaceus polysaccharide-iron (III) complex (APS-iron) was synthesized and characterized. Based on single factor and response surface optimization experiments of APS-iron (III) complex synthesis, the optimum conditions of APS-iron (III) complex were obtained as follows: the reaction temperature 89.46°C, pH 8.16, reaction time 46.04min and ratio of catalyst to APS 0.75, respectively. The reaction temperature was the most significant factor, followed by pH, reaction time and the ratio of catalyst to APS in the four reaction parameters. The highest iron content (19.32%) of APS-iron (III) complex was obtained at the optimum conditions, which was characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), antioxidant activities of the APS-iron (III) complex and iron release of APS-iron (III) complex in vitro assay. The results indicated the APS-iron (III) complex had good bioavailability and antioxidant activities in vitro assays. So, it was potential for APS-iron (III) complex as a candidate for iron supplements.

  12. Effect of nanostructured ceria as support for the iron catalysed hydrogenation of CO2 into hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente-Murciano, Laura; Chapman, Robert S L; Narvaez-Dinamarca, Ana; Mattia, Davide; Jones, Matthew D

    2016-06-21

    This paper demonstrates the key role of the property-structure relationship of the support on iron/ceria catalysts on the hydrocarbon selectivity and olefin-to-paraffin ratio for the direct hydrogenation of carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons. The effect is directly related to the reducibility of the different nanostructured ceria supports and their interaction with the iron particles. Herein, we demonstrate that the iron-based catalysts can be modified not only by the addition of promoters, commonly reported in the literature, but also by careful control of the morphology of the ceria support.

  13. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  14. Fe/SiO2 catalysts for the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Guerrero Fajardo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde was analysed with iron catalysts supported on silica prepared by the sol-gel method, leading to obtaining a large support surface area facilitating high dispersion of iron on silica’s amorphous surface. Seven catalysts were prepared; one of them corresponded to the silica support and another five having an iron load 0.1-0.5% in weight. Catalyst 7 (0.5% Fe in weight was prepared with neutral pH control and had the most homogeneous characteristics since it did not present isolated iron species, corroborated by SEM and TEM analysis. The highest BET areas were 1,757 and 993 m2.g-1 for 0.5% Fe catalysts, having an average 36% microporosity and 43% mesoporosity. X-ray diffraction confirmed the catalyst’s amorphous structure. Catalytic activity was carried out with catalyser 7 at atmospheric pressure in a quartz reactor using a CH /0 /N =7.5/1/4 reaction mixture at 400-750°C temperature 4 2 2 range. Reaction products were analysed by gas chromatography with TCD. The heterogeneous catalysts displayed greater methane conversion (but with methanol selectivity whereas homogenous catalyst 7 gave better results regarding formaldehyde. The highest conversion percentage (8.60% mol for catalyser 7 was presented at 650°C. Formaldehyde selectivity was 50% mol in the 600-650°C range and maximum yield (0.31g HCH0/Kg catalyst was found in this range; it was thus considered that 650°C for the reaction was thereby the best operating temperature.

  15. Synthesising Fe-Mo catalysts supported on silica for the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Guerrero Fajardo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde was analysed using iron-molybdenum catalysts supported on silica prepared by the sol-gel method which leads to obtaining a greater surface area and high iron and molybdenum metal dispersion on the si-lica’s amorphous surface. Seven catalysts were prepared, one of them as silica support, another as 0.5% wt iron load without molybdenum and the remaining five having 0.1%-1.0% weight molybdenum and 0.5% wt iron loads. The highest BET areas were 830 and 879 m2.g-1 for catalysts 2 (0.5% Fe - 0% Mo and 4 (0.5% Fe - 0.3% Mo respectively, having 28% average micropo-rosity and 47% average mesoporosity. X-ray diffraction confirmed the catalysts’ amorphous structure. The TPR spectrum showed low hydrogen consumption attributed to the absence of isolated Fe and Mo species. ESCA analysis revealed the same Fe/Mo a-tomic ratio on the catalyst surface as in the bulk preparation. Catalytic activity was carried out at atmospheric pressure, CH4/ O2/N2 = 7.5/1/4 reaction mixture, 400-800°C temperature interval. Catalysts 4 (0.5% Fe - 0.3% Mo, 5 (0.5% Fe - 0.5% Mo and 7 (0.5% Fe - 1.0% Mo displayed greater methane conversion, whereas catalysts 5 (0.5% Fe - 0.5% Mo, 4 (0.5% Fe - 0.3% Mo, 2 (0.5% Fe - 0% Mo and 7 (0.5% Fe - 1.0% Mo gave better formaldehyde product results. The highest conversion per- centage (4.07% mol was presented at 700°C for catalyst 4 (0.5% Fe-0.3% Mo. Formaldehyde yield was 202,0 gHCHO.kg-1 cata.h-1 at this temperature.

  16. Iron-catalysed Negishi coupling of benzyl halides and phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Robin B; Huwe, Michael; Wilkinson, Mark C

    2009-02-01

    Iron-based catalysts containing either 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene or 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane give excellent activity and good selectivity in the Negishi coupling of aryl zinc reagents with a range of benzyl halides and phosphates.

  17. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  18. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  19. Electrochemistry of Simple Organometallic Models of Iron-Iron Hydrogenases in Organic Solvent and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloaguen, Frederic

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic models of the active site of iron-iron hydrogenases are currently the subjects of numerous studies aimed at developing H2-production catalysts based on cheap and abundant materials. In this context, the present report offers an electrochemist's view of the catalysis of proton reduction by simple binuclear iron(I) thiolate complexes. Although these complexes probably do not follow a biocatalytic pathway, we analyze and discuss the interplay between the reduction potential and basicity and how these antagonist properties impact the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer to the metal centers. This question is central to any consideration of the activity at the molecular level of hydrogenases and related enzymes. In a second part, special attention is paid to iron thiolate complexes holding rigid and unsaturated bridging ligands. The complexes that enjoy mild reduction potentials and stabilized reduced forms are promising iron-based catalysts for the photodriven evolution of H2 in organic solvents and, more importantly, in water.

  20. Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to light olefins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V. Udaya S.; Gormley, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalyst and process for making same useful in the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide in which a silicalite support substantially free of aluminum is soaked in an aqueous solution of iron and potassium salts wherein the iron and potassium are present in concentrations such that the dried silicalite has iron present in the range of from about 5 to about 25 percent by weight and has potassium present in an amount not less than about 0.2 percent by weight, and thereafter the silicalite is dried and combined with amorphous silica as a binder for pellets, the catalytic pellets are used to convert synthesis gas to C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 olefins.

  1. Reductive denitrification using zero-valent iron and bimetallic iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Hak; Shinb, Won Sik; Choi, Sang June; Kim, Young-Hun

    2009-08-01

    A study of reductive denitrification of nitrate was conducted. Microscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) and palladium-coated iron (Pd/Fe) were used in the reduction of nitrate with variable pH. The solution pH was controlled by an auto controlling system instead of chemical buffers. Higher reduction rates were achieved with lower pH and lower pH gave the pseudo-first-order kinetics while it was close to the zero-order reaction when the pH of the solution was becoming high and nitrate concentration was higher. As it took several hours to convert intermediates to ammonia completely, the assumption, under which mass loss calculated from the measured ammonia concentration right after the reaction was the mass of nitrogen evolved, could lead to overestimation of the nitrogen selectivity. The current study confirmed that the palladium coating on the iron could increase the nitrogen selectivity, and the Pd/Fe system could also achieve the advantages of coupling of electron source and catalyst with regard to the engineering aspects.

  2. Cell wall targeted in planta iron accumulation enhances biomass conversion and seed iron concentration in Arabidopsis and rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haibing [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Wei, Hui [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Ma, Guojie [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Antunes, Mauricio S. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Vogt, Stefan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL USA; Cox, Joseph [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Zhang, Xiao [Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Liu, Xiping [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Bu, Lintao [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Gleber, S. Charlotte [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL USA; Carpita, Nicholas C. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Makowski, Lee [Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston MA USA; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston MA USA; Himmel, Michael E. [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Tucker, Melvin P. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL USA; McCann, Maureen C. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Murphy, Angus S. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park MD USA; Peer, Wendy A. [Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio), Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Horticulture, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA; Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park MD USA; Department of Environmental Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park MD USA

    2016-04-07

    Conversion of nongrain biomass into liquid fuel is a sustainable approach to energy demands as global population increases. Previously, we showed that iron can act as a catalyst to enhance the degradation of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production. However, direct addition of iron catalysts to biomass pretreatment is diffusion-limited, would increase the cost and complexity of biorefinery unit operations and may have deleterious environmental impacts. Here, we show a new strategy for in planta accumulation of iron throughout the volume of the cell wall where iron acts as a catalyst in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. We engineered CBM-IBP fusion polypeptides composed of a carbohydrate-binding module family 11 (CBM11) and an iron-binding peptide (IBP) for secretion into Arabidopsis and rice cell walls. CBM-IBP transformed Arabidopsis and rice plants show significant increases in iron accumulation and biomass conversion compared to respective controls. Further, CBM-IBP rice shows a 35% increase in seed iron concentration and a 40% increase in seed yield in greenhouse experiments. CBM-IBP rice potentially could be used to address iron deficiency, the most common and widespread nutritional disorder according to the World Health Organization.

  3. Highly Dispersed Pseudo-Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts Synthesized via Inverse Micelle Solutions for the Liquefaction of Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampden-Smith, M.; Kawola, J.S.; Martino, A.; Sault, A.G.; Yamanaka, S.A.

    1999-01-05

    The mission of this project was to use inverse micelle solutions to synthesize nanometer sized metal particles and test the particles as catalysts in the liquefaction of coal and other related reactions. The initial focus of the project was the synthesis of iron based materials in pseudo-homogeneous form. The frost three chapters discuss the synthesis, characterization, and catalyst testing in coal liquefaction and model coal liquefaction reactions of iron based pseudo-homogeneous materials. Later, we became interested in highly dispersed catalysts for coprocessing of coal and plastic waste. Bifunctional catalysts . to hydrogenate the coal and depolymerize the plastic waste are ideal. We began studying, based on our previously devised synthesis strategies, the synthesis of heterogeneous catalysts with a bifunctional nature. In chapter 4, we discuss the fundamental principles in heterogeneous catalysis synthesis with inverse micelle solutions. In chapter 5, we extend the synthesis of chapter 4 to practical systems and use the materials in catalyst testing. Finally in chapter 6, we return to iron and coal liquefaction now studied with the heterogeneous catalysts.

  4. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    was recently challenged and a new structure based on a thin film of Fe3O4(111) on α-Fe2O3(0001) was proposed. The merits of the competing models are discussed. The α-Fe2O3(1 1 bar02) "R-cut" surface is recommended as an excellent prospect for future study given its apparent ease of preparation and its prevalence in nanomaterial. In the latter sections the literature regarding adsorption on iron oxides is reviewed. First, the adsorption of molecules (H2, H2O, CO, CO2, O2, HCOOH, CH3OH, CCl4, CH3I, C6H6, SO2, H2S, ethylbenzene, styrene, and Alq3) is discussed, and an attempt is made to relate this information to the reactions in which iron oxides are utilized as a catalyst (water-gas shift, Fischer-Tropsch, dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene) or catalyst supports (CO oxidation). The known interactions of iron oxide surfaces with metals are described, and it is shown that the behaviour is determined by whether the metal forms a stable ternary phase with the iron oxide. Those that do not, (e.g. Au, Pt, Ag, Pd) prefer to form three-dimensional particles, while the remainder (Ni, Co, Mn, Cr, V, Cu, Ti, Zr, Sn, Li, K, Na, Ca, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ca) incorporate within the oxide lattice. The incorporation temperature scales with the heat of formation of the most stable metal oxide. A particular effort is made to underline the mechanisms responsible for the extraordinary thermal stability of isolated metal adatoms on Fe3O4 surfaces, and the potential application of this model system to understand single atom catalysis and sub-nano cluster catalysis is discussed. The review ends with a brief summary, and a perspective is offered including exciting lines of future research.

  5. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  6. An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterfield, C.N.; Yates, I.C.; Chanenchuk, C.

    1991-07-01

    The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} to Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240{degrees}C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H{sub 2}/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220{degrees}C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H{sub 2}/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization.

  7. Fluorination process using catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

    1983-08-25

    A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  8. Fluorination process using catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  9. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  10. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  11. Olefin metathesis and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S. G.; Banks, R. L.

    1985-03-12

    Olefins are converted into other olefins having different numbers of carbon atoms by contact with a catalyst comprising an inorganic refractory material containing at least one of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide and a promoting amount of at least one treating agent selected from chlorinated silicon compounds, thionyl chloride, and sulfuryl chloride under conditions suitable for the treating agent to promote the activity of tungsten and molybdenum oxides for the disporoportionation reaction.

  12. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  14. Effect of catalyst preparation on the yield of carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano, E-mail: mescobar@df.uba.a [Dep. Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica, FCEyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Rubiolo, Gerardo [Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av Gral Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Fisico-quimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia (INQUIMAE), CONICET - UBA (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2009-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic iron nanoparticles dispersed in a silica matrix, prepared by sol gel method. In this contribution, variation of gelation condition on catalyst structure and its influence on the yield of carbon nanotubes growth was studied. The precursor utilized were tetraethyl-orthosilicate and iron nitrate. The sols were dried at two different temperatures in air (25 or 80 deg. C) and then treated at 450 deg. C for 10 h. The xerogels were introduced into the chamber and reduced in a hydrogen/nitrogen (10%v/v) atmosphere at 600 deg. C. MWCNTs were formed by deposition of carbon atoms from decomposition of acetylene at 700 deg. C. The system gelled at RT shows a yield of 100% respect to initial catalyst mass whereas the yield of that gelled at 80 deg. C was lower than 10%. Different crystalline phases are observed for both catalysts in each step of the process. Moreover, TPR analysis shows that iron oxide can be efficiently reduced to metallic iron only in the system gelled at room temperature. Carbon nanotubes display a diameter of about 25-40 nm and several micron lengths. The growth mechanism of MWCNTs is base growth mode for both catalysts.

  15. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got ...

  19. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need additional iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ...

  1. Fe-modified HZSM-5 catalysts for ethanol conversion into light olefins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangyin Lu; Yancong Liu; Na Li

    2011-01-01

    A series of Fe/HZSM-5 catalysts with different iron loadings were prepared by impregnation method.Characterization was performed by N2 adsorption-desorption,X-ray diffraction (XRD),NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD),temperature-programmed reduction (TPR),temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis.Iron content in the synthesized samples varied from 1.1 wt% to 20 wt%.The obtained samples have been used for ethanol conversion into light olefins.It was found that the amount of strong acidity at 300-550 ℃ on Fe-modified samples was decreased,going with another new acid site appearance at 550-600 ℃ and that Fe/HZSM-5 catalysts were highly selective towards light olefins,especially the 9FZ sample.In addition,Fe-modified catalysts suppressed the conversion of ethanol to aromatics and paraffins and enhanced their anti-carbon deposit ability.

  2. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Umit S.; Holmgreen, Erik M.; Yung, Matthew M.

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  3. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  4. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O' Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  5. Privileged chiral ligands and catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2011-01-01

    This ultimate ""must have"" and long awaited reference for every chemist working in the field of asymmetric catalysis starts with the core structure of the catalysts, explaining why a certain ligand or catalyst is so successful. It describes in detail the history, the basic structural characteristics, and the applications of these ""privileged catalysts"". A novel concept that gives readers a much deeper insight into the topic.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  7. Behavior of catalyst and mineral matter in coal liquefaction; Sekitan ekika hannochu no kobusshitsu to shokubai no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, K.; Wang, J.; Tomita, A. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Chemical Reaction Science

    1996-10-28

    Mineral matter in coals is important in various senses for coal liquefaction. It is possible that the catalytic activity is affected by the interaction between catalyst and mineral matter. Iron-based catalyst forms pyrrhotite in the process of liquefaction, but the interaction between it and mineral matter is not known in detail. In this study, the interaction between mineral matter and catalyst and the selective reaction between them were investigated. Tanito Harum coal was used for this study. This coal contains a slight amount of siderite and jarosite besides pyrite as iron compounds. Liquefaction samples were obtained from the 1 t/d NEDOL process PSU. The solid deposits in the reactor mainly contained pyrrhotite and quartz. A slight amount of kaolinite was observed, and pyrite was little remained. It was found that the catalyst (pyrrhotite) often coexisted with quartz, clay and calcite. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocoils with Adjustable Morphology using Ni–Fe Layered Double Hydroxides as Catalyst Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Iwasaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon nanocoils (CNCs with adjusted morphologies were synthesized in a one-step catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD process using acetoni‐ trile as the carbon and nitrogen source. The nickel iron oxide/nickel oxide nanocomposites, which were derived from nickel–iron layered double hydroxide (LDH precur‐ sors, were employed as catalysts for the synthesis of CNCs. In this method, precursor-to-catalyst transformation, catalyst activation, formation of CNCs, and nitrogen doping were all performed in situ in a single process. The morphology (coil diameter, coil pitch, and fibre diameter and nitrogen content of the synthesized CNCs was indi‐ vidually adjusted by modulation of the catalyst composi‐ tion and CVD reaction temperature, respectively. The adjustable ranges of the coil diameter, coil pitch, fibre diameter, and nitrogen content were confirmed to be approximately 500±100 nm, 600±100 nm, 100±20 nm, and 1.1±0.3 atom%, respectively.

  9. Does CO poison Fe-based catalysts for ORR?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birry, Laurent; Dodelet, Jean-Pol [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650, boulevard Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Que. (Canada); Zagal, Jose H. [Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-05-15

    Catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared on carbon black (C) using Fe{sup II}phthalocyanine (FePc) and Cl-Fe{sup III}tetramethoxyphenylporphyrin (ClFeTMPP), as Fe precursors with and without a pyrolysis step at 800 C. CO poisoning of the ORR catalytic sites for all these Fe/N/C electrocatalysts was attempted at pH 1 and 13, but to no avail, even if an iron ion is known to occupy the center of the active sites in at least the unpyrolyzed FePc/C or ClFeTMPP/C. The exact nature of the active center of these Fe-based heat-treated catalysts may still be a subject of debate but, in light of the absence of CO poisoning for unpyrolyzed FePc/C and ClFeTMPP/C, resistance to CO poisoning by the heat-treated catalysts cannot be used as evidence that the active center of their catalytic site is devoid of iron. (author)

  10. Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation in a Weak Ligand Field: Leveraging Open Shell First Row Transition Metal Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirik, Paul James

    2017-01-12

    Unique features of Earth abundant transition metal catalysts are reviewed in the context of catalytic carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. Aryl-substituted bis(imino)pyridine iron and cobalt dihalide compounds, when activated with alkyl aluminum reagents, form highly active catalysts for the polymerization of ethylene. Open shell iron and cobalt alkyl complexes have been synthesized that serve as single component olefin polymerization catalysts. Reduced bis(imino)pyridine iron- and cobalt dinitrogen compounds have also been discovered that promote the unique [2+2] cycloaddition of unactivated terminal alkenes. Electronic structure studies support open shell intermediates, a deviation from traditional strong field organometallic compounds that promote catalytic C-C bond formation.

  11. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANO-PARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetala V. Naidu; Upali Siriwardane; Akundi N. Murty

    2004-02-23

    formation of carbides is higher for iron compared to cobalt. In the Fe/Co mixed catalyst, it is observed that the presence of iron enhances the cobalt oxide reduction. Catalyst with mixed metal Fe/Co compositions at 12% nitrate solutions (prepared by sol-gel/oil-drop) showed the best conversion rates for the syngas (CO+H{sub 2}). Nano-particle catalysts on sol-gel prepared mesoporous {gamma}-alumina (particularly the nano-particle metal oxide co-entrapped-sol-gel) showed higher conversion rates compared to conventional catalysts prepared by coprecipitation methods.

  12. An environmentally friendly process for the recovery of valuable metals from spent refinery catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Laura; Fonti, Viviana; Vegliò, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca

    2013-06-01

    The present study dealt with the whole valorization process of exhaust refinery catalysts, including metal extraction by ferric iron leaching and metal recovery by precipitation with sodium hydroxide. In the leaching operation the effects on metal recovery of the concentration and kind of acid, the concentration of catalyst and iron (III) were determined. The best operating conditions were 0.05 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid, 40 g L(-1) iron (III), 10% catalyst concentration; almost complete extraction of nickel and vanadium, and 50%extraction efficiency of aluminium and less than 20% for molybdenum. Sequential precipitation on the leach liquor showed that it was not possible to separate metals through such an approach and a recovery operation by means of a single-stage precipitation at pH 6.5 would simplify the procedures and give a product with an average content of iron (68%), aluminium (13%), vanadium (11%), nickel (6%) and molybdenum (1%) which would be potentially of interest in the iron alloy market. The environmental sustainability of the process was also assessed by means of life cycle assessment and yielded an estimate that the highest impact was in the category of global warming potential with 0.42 kg carbon dioxide per kg recovered metal.

  13. REACTOR FILLED WITH CATALYST MATERIAL, AND CATALYST THEREFOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9521691 (A1) Described is a reactor (1) at least partially filled with catalyst granules (11), which is intended for catalytically reacting at least one gas and at least one liquid with each other. According to the invention the catalyst granules (11) are collected in agglomerates

  14. Red mud as an efficient, stable, and costfree catalyst for COx-free hydrogen production from ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Uzun, Alper; Kurtoğlu, Samira Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Red mud, one of the mostly produced industrial wastes, was converted into a catalyst with exceptionally high and stable performance for hydrogen production from ammonia. Results showed that iron species produced after reduction of the HCl digested red mud were converted into epsilon-Fe2N during the induction period of ammonia decomposition reaction at 700 degrees C. The catalytic performance measurements indicated that the modified red mud catalyst provides a record high hydrogen production r...

  15. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  16. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  17. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  18. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  19. Mechanochemistry, catalysis, and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butyagin, P.Yu.

    1987-07-01

    The physical basis of mechanochemistry and the reasons for the initiation and acceleration of chemical reactions upon the mechanical treatment of solids have been considered. The phenomenon of mechanical catalysis has been described in the example case of the oxidation of CO on oxide surfaces, and the nature of the active sites and the laws governing the mechanically activated chemisorption of gases on cleavage and friction surfaces of solids have been examined. The possibilities of the use of the methods of mechanochemistry in processes used to prepare catalysts have been analyzed in examples of decomposition reactions of inorganic compounds and solid-phase synthesis.

  20. Study on Metallized Reduction and Magnetic Separation of Iron from Fine Particles of High Iron Bauxite Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Gen; Chu, Man-Sheng; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jue

    2017-01-01

    High iron bauxite ore is a typical unmanageable polyparagenetic resource and owns high comprehensive utilization value. Separation of iron from fine particles of high iron bauxite ore by the process of metallized reduction and magnetic dressing was researched systemically. The effect of magnetic field intensity, reduction temperature, reduction time, mole ratio of fixed carbon to reducible oxygen (FC/O) and ore particles size on separation indexes was researched. The results show that, with the conditions of reduction temperature of 1,400 °C, reduction time of 180 min, FC/O of 2.0, ore particle size of -2.0 mm and magnetic field intensity of 40 KA/m, about 89.24 % of the iron could be removed from high iron bauxite ore as metallic iron. Meanwhile, 86.09 % of the aluminum is stayed in non-magnetic fraction as alumina. However, the formation of hercynite (FeAl2O4) limits the reduction rate of iron oxides to metallic iron. The lower reduction conditions and higher recovery ratio of iron could be achieved with adopting ore-coal composite agglomerates or adding catalyst.

  1. The heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction using goethite as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Plata, Guadalupe B Ortiz; Alfano, Orlando M; Cassano, Alberto E

    2010-01-01

    In the present work the degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) used as model compound, applying the Heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction, was studied. Small particles of goethite or iron oxyhydroxide were used as a source of iron. The influence of catalyst loading, radiation intensity and the molar ratio between hydrogen peroxide and contaminant were examined. Improvement by illumination is highly significant. During the progress of 2-CP degradation, the reaction shows an unusual acceleration. This autocatalytic comportment, with stronger tendencies at higher temperatures, implies a completely different behaviour from the one typically expected. The autocatalytic performance is successfully explained by the joint action of two factors: (i) the evolution of the available iron in the homogeneous phase during the course of the reaction and (ii) the autocatalytic contribution of some of the reaction intermediates in the iron cycle. The small iron concentration leaching into the solution is produced by two typical liquid medium - solid goethite surface dissolution processes. A reaction mechanism has been proposed and, in a first stage, parameters have been obtained for the dark reaction. In a second step, the complete data for the irradiated operation were obtained.

  2. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  3. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin (UC)

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  4. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  5. Reduction/reoxidation of a multicomponent molybdate catalyst for propylene ammoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xinying; Yu Guangren [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen Xiaochun [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)], E-mail: buctchenxc@126.com; Wang Yahui [Petrochemical Process Department, Sinopec Engineering Incorporation, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu Changjiang [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2009-03-20

    The reduction/reoxidation mechanism of a multicomponent molybdate catalyst for propylene ammoxidation was studied by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and thermogravimetric analysis methods. XRD and LRS results of the catalysts with various reduced degrees show that catalyst reduction happens in the order: (2) {yields} (3) {yields} (4) {yields} (5), and the lattice oxygen migration range is extended from iron molybdates to cobalt/nickel molybdate. The thermogravimetric analysis results show that the reoxidation of the catalyst is attributed to the replenishment of the bulk lattice oxygen in the lower temperature which is respectively combined with Bi, Fe and Mo, and the replenishment of the surface lattice oxygen in the higher temperature. The favorable reoxidation temperature is found to be around 440 deg. C.

  6. Pyrometallurgical Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Tang, Huimin; Ye, Lei; Ma, Yutian; Rao, Mingjun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    As an important secondary resource with abundant platinum group metals (PGMs), spent catalysts demand recycling for both economic and environmental benefits. This article reviews the main pyrometallurgical processes for PGM recovery from spent catalysts. Existing processes, including smelting, vaporization, and sintering processes, are discussed based in part on a review of the physiochemical characteristics of PGMs in spent catalysts. The smelting technology, which produces a PGM-containing alloy, is significantly influenced by the addition of various collectors, such as lead, copper, iron, matte, or printed circuit board (PCB), considering their chemical affinities for PGMs. The vaporization process can recover PGMs in vapor form at low temperatures (250-700°C), but it suffers high corrosion and potential environmental and health risks as a result of involvement of the hazardous gases, mainly Cl2 and CO. The sintering process serves as a reforming means for recycling of the spent catalysts by in situ reduction of their oxidized PGMs components. Among these processes, the smelting process seems more promising although its overall performance can be further improved by seeking a suitable target-oriented collector and flux, together with proper pretreatment and process intensification using an external field.

  7. Synthesis of High-quality Single- and Double-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Fe/MgO Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran B. Kashi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Fe/MgO catalysts with three different iron contents (5, 10, and 15 wt.% were prepared by three catalyst preparation methods: impregnation, solution combustion synthesis, and co-calcination of metal ni‐ trates. The resulting catalysts were subjected to methane at 900°C in order to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The powders and products were then studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, differential thermal analysis (DTA, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. Formation of MgFe2O4 upon heating the catalysts to 900°C was confirmed by XRD. After the growth step, corresponding peaks of MgFe2O4 disappeared and metallic iron peaks appeared, indicating that MgFe2O4 is the responsible phase for production of iron nanoparticles. HRTEM images showed that the product on the 5 wt.% catalysts was mostly SWNTs and DWNTs with no evidence of carbon nanofi‐ bres or multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the co-calcina‐ tion catalyst. Furthermore, ID/IG ratios obtained from Raman spectra were all below 0.1, except for one sample, showing the good quality of the products.

  8. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity.

  9. Latent catalyst; Senzaisei shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Epoxy resin, an important function material to support such main industries as electric and electronic devices, automobiles, civil engineering, and building construction, is demanded of development of single liquid type resin having excellent quick hardening performance and storage stability. This requirement comes from environmental problems with an intention of saving energies and reducing resin wastes. The Company, using freely its independent phase separation technology that controls molecular structure of catalysts, developed a latent catalyst having excellent storage stability and high-temperature quick hardening performance. Its major features may be summarized as follows: (1) excellent storage stability at room temperature keeping the product stable for 2.5 months or longer (2 days in conventional products); (2) quick hardening performance hardening the resin in seven seconds at 150 degrees C (equivalent to conventional products); and (3) excellent insulation performance of hardened resin at 140 degrees C of 7 times 10 {sup 13} (ohm) (center dot) cm (2 times 10 {sup 12} (ohm) (center dot) cm in conventional products) (translated by NEDO)

  10. Biosignatures of early life in >3.8Ga Banded Iron Formations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Matthew; Papineau, Dominic

    2015-04-01

    Almost all Eoarchean sedimentary rocks have undergone high grade metamorphism. However, small enclaves of Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) from the south-west margin of the Nuvvuagittuq supracrustal belt (NSB-Canada) are now the first candidate Eoarchean BIFs metamorphosed to only around the greenschist facies. Ellipsoidal ribbons of microcrystalline hematite in 1-4 micron chert and chert-hematite rosettes are preserved and largely undeformed, which point to diagenetic structures metamorphosed at low grade facies. Stilpnomelane is common as a prograde mineral in these rocks, which suggests the upper limits of metamorphic conditions where 430-500˚C at 5-6 Kbars; this is reinforced by the presence of ripidolite which is not seen in BIFs subjected to above 500˚C (Miyano & Klein, 1989). The exceptional low metamorphic grade of these Eoarchean rocks has enabled the preservation of diagenetic structures and mineral associations of disordered organic carbon with pyrite, apatite, carbonate and phyllosilicates, thus providing excellent opportunities to search for possible remains of some of the most primitive life. Noteworthy mineral assemblages include microscopic apatite and carbon inclusions in phyllosilicate and layered-pyritiferous, ring structures that contain disordered organic carbon. Raman spectra display broad D and G peaks and lack 2nd-order carbon peaks, which are indicative of disordered carbon, also raman peaks around 1440 cm-1 represent stretching of C-H bonds in the carbonaceous material. Focused ion beam milling and transmission electron microscope analysis of the milled foils reveals the structure and chemistries of these potential biosignatures down to the nanoscale and details the diverse relations of organic carbon in Earth's oldest sedimentary rocks. References Miyano, T. & Klein, C., 1989. Phase equilibria in the system K20 - FeO - MgO - AIzO3 - SiO2 - H20 - CO2 and the stability limit of stilpnomelane in metamorphosed Precambrian iron

  11. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  12. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  13. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  14. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  15. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  16. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  17. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  18. Oxygen reduction reaction at MWCNT-modified nanoscale iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine: remarkable performance over platinum and tolerance toward methanol in alkaline medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fashedemi, OO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A nanoscale iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine (nanoFeTSPc) catalyst obtained by co-ordinating with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and subsequently anchored onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been...

  19. Further investigations into the N-demethylation of oripavine using iron and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Gaik B; Scammells, Peter J

    2011-02-21

    Further investigations into the direct synthesis of N-nororipavine from oripavine using iron powder under non-classical Polonovski conditions have been conducted. The stoichiometry, solvents and iron oxidation rates were found to have a dramatic effect on the rate of N-demethylation as well as product yield. Herein, we also present high-yield access to the N-demethylated product simply by employing stainless steel rather than iron powder as redox catalyst. To our knowledge, this is the first time stainless steel has been used to moderate the redox chemistry of iron in organic synthesis.

  20. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura,Ikuro

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.