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Sample records for iron iii biliverdin

  1. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  2. Moessbauer study of iron(III) salicylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahesh, K; Sharma, N D; Gupta, D C [Kurukshetra Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics; Puri, D M [Kurukshetra Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1979-07-01

    Moessbauer infrared and magnetic studies of different basic salicylates of iron(III) are reported. Comparison of observed isomer shift and quadrupole splitting with the earlier work allows to assign the trinuclear chain structure to the complexes wherein the central iron atom in the chain is considered to be octahedrally coordinated in case of salicylate and 4-aminosalicylate derivatives, and pentacoordinated for the thiosalicylate with the terminal iron atom in tetrahedral symmetry. The Moessbauer parameters and ..mu..sub(eff)-value indicate the high spin state of the central iron atom and low spin state for the terminal ones.

  3. Magnetic interactions in iron (III) porphyrin chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, J.; Subramanian, Japyesan; Fuhrhop, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Intermolecular exchange interactions in iron(III) porphyrin chlorides (porphyrin = OEP, proto, TPP) have been studied by X-ray structure, EPR and magnetic susceptibility studies. The crystal structure of Fe(III)OEP-Cl was found to be different from that of the other two. Different types of exchange broadened EPR-spectra are obtained which are attributable to the arrangement in the crystals. The EPR results correlate well with magnetic susceptibility data. (orig.) [de

  4. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 2. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate. Mallayan Palaniandavar Kusalendiran Visvaganesan.

  5. Sorption of trace amounts of gallium (III) on iron (III) oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Music, S; Gessner, M; Wolf, R H.H. [Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been studied as a function of pH. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of traces of gallium(III) by iron(III) oxide. The influence of surface active substances and of complexing agents on the sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been also studied.

  6. Sorption of trace amounts of gallium (III) on iron (III) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been studied as a function of pH. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of traces of gallium(III) by iron(III) oxide. The influence of surface active substances and of complexing agents on the sorption of trace amounts of gallium(III) on iron(III) oxide has been also studied. (orig.) [de

  7. Toxicological studies and antimicrobial properties of some Iron(III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two iron(III) complexes of Ciprofloxacin were synthesized by reaction of the ligand with iron(III) chloride hexahydrate in different solutions. The nature of bonding of the ligands and the structure of the isolated metal complexes were elucidated on the basis of their physical and spectroscopic studies. The infrared spectra ...

  8. Sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) hydroxide and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) hydroxide and oxide has been studied as a function of pH. The mechanism of sorption is discussed. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of small or trace amounts of europium(III) by iron(III) hydroxide and oxide. The influence of complexing agents (EDTA, oxalate, tartrate and 5-sulfosalicylic acid) on the sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) oxide has also been studied. (author)

  9. Direct antioxidant properties of bilirubin andbiliverdin. Is there a role for biliverdin reductase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eJansen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling events are involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and represent a major contribution to vascular regulation. Molecular signaling is highly dependent on reactive oxygen species. But depending on the amount of ROS production it might have toxic or protective effects. Despite a large number of negative outcomes in large clinical trials (e.g. HOPE, HOPE-TOO, antioxidant molecules and agents are important players to influence the critical balance between production and elimination of RONS. However, chronic systemic antioxidant therapy lacks clinical efficacy, probably by interfering with important physiological redox signaling pathways. Therefore, it may be a much more promising attempt to induce intrinsic antioxidant pathways in order to increase the antioxidants not systemically but at the place of oxidative stress and complications. Among others, heme oxygenase (HO has been shown to be important for attenuating the overall production of ROS in a broad range of disease states through its ability to degrade heme and to produce carbon monoxide (CO, biliverdin/bilirubin, and the release of free iron with subsequent ferritin induction. With the present review we would like to highlight the important antioxidant role of the heme oxygenase system and especially discuss the contribution of the biliverdin, bilirubin and biliverdin reductase to these beneficial effects. The bilierdin reductase was reported to confer an antioxidant redox amplification cycle by which low, physiological bilirubin concentrations confer potent antioxidant protection via recycling of biliverdin from oxidized bilirubin by the biliverdin reductase, linking this sink for oxidants to the NADPH pool. To date the existence and role of this antioxidant redox cycle is still under debate and we present and discuss the pros and cons as well as our own findings on this topic.

  10. The role of biliverdin reductase in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the effects of biliverdin and bilirubin have been studied extensively, and an inhibitory effect of bile pigments in cancer progression has been proposed. In this study we focused on the effects of biliverdin reductase, the enzyme that converts biliverdin to bilirubin, in colorectal cancer. For in vitro experiments we used a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and transfected it with an expression construct of shRNA specific for biliverdin reductase, to create cells with stable knock-down of enzyme expression. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the CASY model TT cell counting device. Western blot protein analysis was performed to study intracellular signaling cascades. Samples of human colorectal cancer were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. We were able to confirm the antiproliferative effects of bile pigments on cancer cells in vitro. However, this effect was attenuated in biliverdin reductase knock down cells. ERK and Akt activation seen under biliverdin and bilirubin treatment was also reduced in biliverdin reductase deficient cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer showed elevated biliverdin reductase levels. High enzyme expression was associated with lower overall and disease free patient survival. We conclude that BVR is required for bile pigment mediated effects regarding cancer cell proliferation and modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. The role of BVR overexpression in vivo and its exact influence on cancer progression and patient survival need to be further investigated. (author) [de

  11. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    hydroxide planar layer were preserved during the oxidation, as shown by FTIR spectroscopy. The high positive charge in the hydroxide layer produced by the oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III) is partially compensated by the deprotonation of hydroxy groups, as shown by X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy...... between the alkyl chains of the intercalated dodecanoate anions play a crucial role in stabilizing the structure and hindering the collapse of the iron(II)–iron(III) (hydr)oxide structure during oxidation. This is the first report describing the formation of a stable planar layered octahedral iron......(III) (hydr)oxide. oxGRC12 shows promise as a sorbent and host for hydrophobic reagents, and as a possible source of single planar layers of iron(III) (hydr)oxide....

  12. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  13. Study of Ascorbic Acid as Iron(III Reducing Agent for Spectrophotometric Iron Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antesar Elmagirbi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of ascorbic acid as a reducing agent for iron(III has been investigated in order to obtain an alternative carcinogenic reducing agent, hydroxylamine, used in spectrophotometric standard method based on the formation of a red-orange complex of Fe(II-o-phenanthroline. The study was optimised with regards to ascorbic acid concentration as well as pH solution. The results showed that ascorbic acid showed maximum capacity as reducing agent of iron(III under concentration of 4.46.10-4 M and pH solution of 1-4.Under these conditions, ascorbic acid reduced iron(III proportionally and performed similarly to that of hydroxylamine.  The method gave result to linear calibration over the range of 0.2-2 mg/L withhigh accuracy of 97 % and relative standard deviation of less than 2 %. This method was successfully applied to assay iron speciation in water samples.

  14. Toxicological studies and antimicrobial properties of some Iron(III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-17

    Dec 17, 2007 ... Two iron(III) complexes of Ciprofloxacin were synthesized by reaction of the ... The infrared spectra suggest that two classes of compounds were obtained: molecular complex in .... Soluble in H2O, MeOH, EtOH; Mol. cond.

  15. Iron(III) citrate speciation in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andre M N; Kong, XiaoLe; Parkin, Mark C; Cammack, Richard; Hider, Robert C

    2009-10-28

    Citrate is an iron chelator and it has been shown to be the major iron ligand in the xylem sap of plants. Furthermore, citrate has been demonstrated to be an important ligand for the non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) pool occurring in the plasma of individuals suffering from iron-overload. However, ferric citrate chemistry is complicated and a definitive description of its aqueous speciation at neutral pH remains elusive. X-Ray crystallography data indicates that the alcohol function of citrate (Cit4-) is involved in Fe(III) coordination and that deprotonation of this functional group occurs upon complex formation. The inability to include this deprotonation in the affinity constant calculations has been a major source of divergence between various reports of iron(III)-citrate affinity constants. However the recent determination of the alcoholic pKa of citric acid (H4Cit) renders the reassessment of the ferric citrate system possible. The aqueous speciation of ferric citrate has been investigated by mass spectrometry and EPR spectroscopy. It was observed that the most relevant species are a monoiron dicitrate species and dinuclear and trinuclear oligomeric complexes, the relative concentration of which depends on the solution pH value and the iron : citric acid molar ratio. Spectrophotometric titration was utilized for affinity constant determination and the formation constant for the biologically relevant [Fe(Cit)2]5- is reported for the first time.

  16. Organic iron (III) complexing ligands during an iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Takeda, Shigenobu; Nishioka, Jun; Obata, Hajime; Furuya, Ken; Johnson, William Keith; Wong, C. S.

    2008-06-01

    Complexation of iron (III) with natural organic ligands was investigated during a mesoscale iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific (SEEDS II). After the iron infusions, ligand concentrations increased rapidly with subsequent decreases. While the increases of ligands might have been partly influenced by amorphous iron colloids formation (12-29%), most in-situ increases were attributable to the Dilution of the fertilized patch may have contributed to the rapid decreases of the ligands. During the bloom decline, ligand concentration increased again, and the high concentrations persisted for 10 days. The conditional stability constant was not different between inside and outside of the fertilized patch. These results suggest that the chemical speciation of the released iron was strongly affected by formation of the ligands; the production of ligands observed during the bloom decline will strongly impact the iron cycle and bioavailability in the surface water.

  17. Kinetic Study of Iron (III) Salicyl Hydroxamate Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, K.; Ashiq, U.; Ara, R.; Kazmi, R.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of Salicylhydroxamic acid iron (III) complexes were studied at different pH. The reaction at pH 8 and 6 between iron nitrate and salicylhydroxamic acid is very fast and reddish brown colour with iron at 425 nm appears within seconds i.e. within mixing time. The concentration of salicylhydroxamic acid was 20-80 times higher than the concentration of iron (III) solution in order to fulfill pseudo first order conditions. The reddish brown colour appears within mixing time and further change in colour was very slow and observed at 425 nm wave length. The rate constant at pH 8 is 0.1886 sec and at pH 6 is 1.472 sec. The sharp appearance of colour is due to formation of 1:1 and 1:2 complexes while the observed slow change in colour may be due to rearrangement of salicylhydroxamic acid from bidentate to tridentate or it may be due to the formation of 1:3 complex. In the next set of reactions the 1:1 complex of salicylhydroxamic acid iron (III) was prepared by mixing iron (III) and salicylhydroxamic acid in 1:1 mole ratio and then the formation of 1:2 complex was observed at pH 5, 4.5 and 4. The concentration of salicylhydroxamic acid solution was 2-10 times higher than the 1:1 complex of salicylhydroxamic acid iron (III) complex. The observed reactions were very fast and were not truly a first order reaction. The rate constant is 24.85 sec at pH 4.5 and 16.98 sec at pH4. The reaction of 1:1 complex with salicylhydroxamic acid at pH3 was very fast. The lamda max of iron complex is 500 nm and of final mixture is 476 nm. The reaction was assumed to be reversible. The absorbance of both species at a particular wavelength is additive. Using this property the equilibrium constant was calculated which was not constant at different ratios of 1:1 complex and salicylhydroxamic acid, which further indicate the possibility of rearrangement reaction. (author)

  18. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  19. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  20. Biomimetic oxidation of piperine and piplartine catalyzed by iron(III) and manganese(III) porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaab, Estela Hanauer; Crotti, Antonio Eduardo Miller; Iamamoto, Yassuko; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Lotufo, Letícia Veras Costa; Lopes, Norberto Peporine

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic metalloporphyrins, in the presence of monooxygen donors, are known to mimetize various reactions of cytochrome P450 enzymes systems in the oxidation of drugs and natural products. The oxidation of piperine and piplartine by iodosylbenzene using iron(III) and manganese(III) porphyrins yielded mono- and dihydroxylated products, respectively. Piplartine showed to be a more reactive substrate towards the catalysts tested. The structures of the oxidation products were proposed based on electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

  1. An isoelectronic NO dioxygenase reaction using a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex and nitrosonium ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Atsutoshi; Han, Jung Eun; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-02-18

    Reaction of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex, [Fe(III)(14-TMC)(O2)](+), with NO(+), a transformation which is essentially isoelectronic with that for nitric oxide dioxygenases [Fe(III)(O2˙(-)) + NO], affords an iron(IV)-oxo complex, [Fe(IV)(14-TMC)(O)](2+), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), followed by conversion to an iron(III)-nitrato complex, [Fe(III)(14-TMC)(NO3)(F)](+).

  2. An isoelectronic NO dioxygenase reaction using a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex and nitrosonium ion†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Atsutoshi; Han, Jung Eun; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-01-01

    Reaction of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(O2)]+, with NO+, a transformation which is essentially isoelectronic with that for nitric oxide dioxygenases [Fe(III)(O2•−) + NO], affords an iron(IV)-oxo complex, [FeIV(14-TMC)(O)]2+, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), followed by conversion to an iron(III)-nitrato complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(NO3)(F)]+. PMID:24394960

  3. An isoelectronic NO dioxygenase reaction using a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex and nitrosonium ion†

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Atsutoshi; Han, Jung Eun; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-01-01

    Reaction of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(O2)]+, with NO+, a transformation which is essentially isoelectronic with that for nitric oxide dioxygenases [Fe(III)(O2•−) + NO], affords an iron(IV)-oxo complex, [FeIV(14-TMC)(O)]2+, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), followed by conversion to an iron(III)-nitrato complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(NO3)(F)]+.

  4. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  5. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III)-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshiko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Takashi; Namba, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) and the uptake of iron(II) by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III). Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III)-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III)-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III) complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems to diverse

  6. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Murata

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III to iron(II and the uptake of iron(II by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III. Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems

  7. Precipitation of iron (III) using magnesium oxide in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban-Bocardo, P. A.; Ferreira-Rocha, S. D.

    2006-01-01

    A process for iron (III) removal by hydroxide precipitation from and acid synthetic inorganic effluent using magnesium oxide as an alternative precipitant agent in a fluidized bed was developed. An acid synthetic inorganic effluent containing 100 and 200 mg/l of ferric ions (pH=1.0) was continuously fed up to the acrylic column (30 cm high and 2 cm diameter) during 180 minutes. Magnesium oxide pulp (3% v/v) was injected at the beginning of the experiment in order to allow the iron hydroxides precipitation. The concentration and pH profiles agreed in their curves, while the pH profile rose,the concentration profile decreased and a high percentage of iron removal /higher to 99%) was reached. Extremely low iron concentrations have been reached, thus permitting to attend to the environmental standard of 10.0 mg/l for discharge of effluent containing ferric ions established by the law DN 10/86 of COPAM (Conselho de Politica Ambiental do Estado de Minas Gerais-Brazil). (Author)

  8. Spin-crossover behavior of polymeric iron(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yonezo; Miyamoto, Makoto; Takashima, Yoshimasa; Oshio, Hiroaki

    1989-01-01

    Polymeric spin-crossover iron(III) complexes possessing poly(4-vinylpyridine), poly(N-vinylimidazole) or poly(octylmethacrylate-co-4-vinylpyridine) as ligand are prepared. In this experience enriched 57 Fe was used to get strong Moessbauer absorption. The enriched behavior of the complexes were examined by magnetic susceptibilities measurement, and Moessbauer and esr spectroscopies. Some of them show spin-state behavior over a wide range of temperature. Some of them show rapid spin-state interexchange compared to the Moessbauer time scale and others not. Spin-crossover behavior of polymeric complexes is characterized of wide spin-state transition temperature range

  9. Application of sorption method on hydroxides for purification of some reactive from iron(III) markings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhmonberdiev, A.D.; Khamidov, B.O.

    1986-01-01

    The method of purification of solutions of citric acid, tartaric acid and their salts, potassium hydroxide, potassium nitrate and chloride, sodium perchlorate from iron (III) impurities by means of sorption method on zirconium hydroxide is elaborated. The control of iron(III) content in solutions is conducted by inversion voltammetry method with mercury-graphite electrode. It is defined that complete sorption of iron (III) ions achieves at ph =4÷14.

  10. Heterobimetallic gadolinium(III)-iron(III) complex of DTPA-bis(3-hydroxytyramide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N.; Kimpe, Kristof; Binnemans, Koen

    2004-01-01

    A derivative of diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid (DTPA), carrying two catechol functional groups has been synthesised by the reaction between DTPA-bis(anhydride) and 3-hydroxytyramine (dopamine). The ligand DTPA-bis(3-hydroxytyramide), [DTPA(HTA) 2 ], is able to form stable heterobimetallic complexes with gadolinium(III) and iron(III) ions. The gadolinium(III) occupies the internal coordination cage of DTPA formed by three nitrogens, two carboxylate and two amide oxygens, while the [Fe(NTA)(H 2 O) 2 ] (nitrilotriacetic acid, NTA) binds to catechol units by the substitution of two water ligands. The formation of polymeric species was avoided by using the tripodal NTA ligand. The heterobimetallic complex was characterised by means of visible absorption spectroscopy, electron spray ionisation-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

  11. Separation of valence forms of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation with iron(III) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of 9.62·10 -5 M of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) with iron hydroxide in 1 M potassium nitrate and potassium chloride was investigated in relation to the pH of the medium. Experimental data on the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) with iron(III) hydroxide made it possible to determine the region of practically complete concentration of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) (pH = 3-6.5). The results from spectrophotometric investigations, calculated data on the distribution of the hydroxocationic forms of chromium(III) and the anions of chromium(IV), and their sorption by iron-(III) hydroxide made it possible to characterize the sorbability of the cationic and anionic forms of chromium in various degrees of oxidation. On this basis a method was developed for the separation of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation on iron(III) hydroxide and their separation from the iron(III) hydroxide support

  12. Nanoparticulate iron(III) oxo-hydroxide delivers safe iron that is well absorbed and utilised in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Dora I.A.; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F.A.; Faria, Nuno; Poots, Lynsey K.; Tagmount, Mani A.; Aslam, Mohamad F.; Frazer, David M.; Vulpe, Chris D.; Anderson, Gregory J.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder worldwide with substantial impact on health and economy. Current treatments predominantly rely on soluble iron which adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. We have developed organic acid-modified Fe(III) oxo-hydroxide nanomaterials, here termed nano Fe(III), as alternative safe iron delivery agents. Nano Fe(III) absorption in humans correlated with serum iron increase (P solubility. The most promising preparation (iron hydroxide adipate tartrate: IHAT) showed ~80% relative bioavailability to Fe(II) sulfate in humans and, in a rodent model, IHAT was equivalent to Fe(II) sulfate at repleting haemoglobin. Furthermore, IHAT did not accumulate in the intestinal mucosa and, unlike Fe(II) sulfate, promoted a beneficial microbiota. In cellular models, IHAT was 14-fold less toxic than Fe(II) sulfate/ascorbate. Nano Fe(III) manifests minimal acute intestinal toxicity in cellular and murine models and shows efficacy at treating iron deficiency anaemia. From the Clinical Editor This paper reports the development of novel nano-Fe(III) formulations, with the goal of achieving a magnitude less intestinal toxicity and excellent bioavailability in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Out of the tested preparations, iron hydroxide adipate tartrate met the above criteria, and may become an important tool in addressing this common condition. PMID:24983890

  13. The preparation of magnetite from iron(III) and iron(II) salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, D.L.

    1980-10-01

    Methods are described for the preparation of magnetite from iron(III) and iron(II) salt solutions at temperatures between 295 to 373 K. The effect of the reagent concentration, a chelating agent and different alkali-metal cations on the formation of magnetite has been investigated. The magnetite samples have been examined by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by determination of the point of zero charge. A review of previous work on the preparation of magnetite in an aqueous environment is also included. This work is relevant to the corrosion processes which can occur in the water coolant circuits of nuclear reactors. (author)

  14. Measuring marine iron(III) complexes by CLE-AdSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Iron(iii) speciation data, as determined by competitive ligand exchange?adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdSV), is reconsidered in the light of the kinetic features of the measurement. The very large stability constants reported for iron(iii) in marine ecosystems are shown to be possibly due to

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex has been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order with respect to iron(III) and glycine. An increase in (phenanthroline) increases the rate, while increase in [H+] decreases the rate. Hence it can be inferred that the ...

  16. Mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)-1,10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)–1,10- phenanthroline complex have been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order each in iron(III) and methionine. Increase in [phenanthroline] increases the rate while increase in [HClO4] decreases it. While the reactive species ...

  17. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The rate of oxygenation depends on the solvent and the. Lewis acidity of iron(III) ... has been achieved by non-heme iron enzymes and their ..... oxygen atoms of nitrate ion (figure 3). ... enhanced covalency of iron-catecholate interaction and.

  18. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  19. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  20. Effect of iron(III) ion on moso bamboo pyrolysis under microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing; Li, Xiangqian; Wang, Zhaoyu; Bi, Yanhong; Yang, Rongling; Zhang, Jinfeng; Luo, Hongzhen; Niu, Miaomiao; Qi, Bo; Lu, Chen

    2017-11-01

    The effect of iron(III) ion on microwave pyrolysis of moso bamboo was investigated. Hydrofluoric acid washing was used as a pilot process to demineralize moso bamboo in order to eliminate the influences of the other inorganics contained in moso bamboo itself. The results indicated that the addition of iron(III) ion increased the maximal reaction temperatures under microwave condition dependent on the amount of the added iron(III) ion. The production of the non-condensable gases was promoted by the addition of iron(III) ion mainly at the expense of liquid products. Iron(III) ion exhibited the positive effect for syngas production and inhibited the formation of CO 2 and CH 4 . The formation of Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 was found during microwave pyrolysis and the mechanism of the two metallic oxides formation was described in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microbial dissimilatory iron(III) reduction: Studies on the mechanism and on processes of environmental relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Jahn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Many microbes are able to respire aerobically oxygen or anaerobically other electron acceptors for example sulphate, nitrate, manganese(IV) or Fe(III). As iron minerals are widespread in nature, dissimilatory iron(III) reduction by different microorganisms is a very important process of anaerobic respiration. The general goal of this work was to improve the knowledge of processes, in which iron-reducing microbes are said to play an important role. For this purpose, in one part the focus wa...

  2. Self-assembled Targeting of Cancer Cells by Iron(III)-doped, Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, K.K. Pohaku; Sandoval, S.; Cortes-Mateos, M. J.; Alfaro, J.G.; Kummel, A. C.; Trogler, W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Iron(III)-doped silica nanoshells are shown to possess an in vitro cell-receptor mediated targeting functionality for endocytosis. Compared to plain silica nanoparticles, iron enriched ones are shown to be target-specific, a property that makes them potentially better vehicles for applications, such as drug delivery and tumor imaging, by making them more selective and thereby reducing the nanoparticle dose. Iron(III) in the nanoshells can interact with endogenous transferrin, a serum protein ...

  3. Iron (III) oxyhydroxide in isopropyl alcohol preparation, characterization and solvothermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, E.L.C.N.; Jafelicci Junior, M.

    1989-01-01

    Iron (III) nitrate hydrolysis was carried out in isopropyl alcohol solution by an aqueous amonia gas stream resulting in iron (III) oxyhydroxide sol. It has been investigated in this work the solvothermal treatment of this colloidal system at 120 0 C and 24 hours. Iron (III) oxyhydroxide freshly obtained and solvothermally treated. Samples were dryed by lyophilization. Products obtained were characterized by the following techniques: spectrophotometric iron analysis by 1,10-orthophenantroline complexation method, powder X-ray diffraction, vibrational infrared spectra and differential thermal analysis. After solvothermal treatment resulting product was crystallized into hematite, while freshly iron (III) oxyhydroxide was non crystalline. Both of them are very active powder, showing high water adsorption [pt

  4. Investigation of iron(III) complex with crown-porphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, Denis A., E-mail: pankratov@radio.chem.msu.ru; Dolzhenko, Vladimir D. [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Stukan, Reonald A. [Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Al Ansari, Yana F.; Savinkina, Elena V. [Lomonosov Moscow State Academy of Fine Chemical Technology (Russian Federation); Kiselev, Yury M. [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    Iron complex of 5-(4-(((4 Prime -hydroxy-benzo-15-crown-5)-5 Prime -yl)diazo)phenyl)-10,15, 20-triphenylporphyrin was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and EPR. Two Fe sites were identified; they give two differing signals, doublet and wide absorption in a large velocity interval. EPR spectra of solutions of the complex in chloroform at room temperature also show two signals with g = 2.064, A{sub Fe} = 0.032 cm{sup - 1}; g = 2.015, A{sub Fe} = 0.0034 cm{sup - 1}. The doublet asymmetry is studied vs. temperature and normal angle to the sample plane and gamma-beam. The isomer shift {delta} in the doublet varies from 0.25 to 0.41 mm/s in the 360-5 K temperature range, whereas quadruple splitting value is constant, {Delta} {approx} 0.65 mm/s. The relax absorption may be described as a wide singlet ({delta} = 0.30- 0.44 mm/s and {Gamma} = 2.83-3.38 mm/s); its relative area strongly depends on temperature. According to {delta}, both signals are assigned to Fe(III)

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of alkylammonium iron(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katada, M.; Kozawa, S.; Nakajima, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Alkylammonium iron(III) complexes, [(n-C n H 2n+1 )mNH 4-m ] 3 [Fe(CN) 6 ] were prepared and studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, XRD, and DSC. In the complexes with m=2, the temperature dependences of the area intensity of Moessbauer are correlated to the motion of alkyl chains. The temperature dependence of the complex with n=4 was linear and smaller than that of other complexes. Especially in the complex with n=6, the deviation from the linear was the largest in the complexes observed. This result is attributed to the structural difference of the complex. The complexes with n≥8 consist of two-dimensional layer structure. The temperature dependence of the area intensity was similar to each other. This means that the motion of alkyl chain in these complexes are almost the same. The values of quadrupole splitting for the complexes were larger those that of the complexes (m=1). This indicates that the form of [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- ion is affected by the differences of the number of alkyl groups. (author)

  6. N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide for detection of iron(III) by photoluminescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Javad; Manteghian, Mehrdad; Badiei, Alireza; Ueda, Hiroshi; Javanbakht, Mehran

    2016-02-01

    An N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide nanolayer was synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Detection of iron(III) based on photoluminescence spectroscopy was investigated. The N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide was shown to specifically interact with iron (III), compared with other cationic trace elements including potassium (I), sodium (I), calcium (II), chromium (III), zinc (II), cobalt (II), copper (II), magnesium (II), manganese (II), and molybdenum (VI). The quenching effect of iron (III) on the luminescence emission of N-butylamine functionalized graphene oxide layer was used to detect iron (III). The limit of detection (2.8 × 10(-6)  M) and limit of quantitation (2.9 × 10(-5)  M) were obtained under optimal conditions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  8. Effect of treatment with single total-dose intravenous iron versus daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose on moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 Fausta Chioma Emegoakor,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,2 Leonard Ogbonna Ajah,1 Jude Anazoeze Madu,3 Hyginus Uzo Ezegwui,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, 3Department of Haematology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, Enugu State University, Enugu, Nigeria Background: Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional cause of anemia in pregnancy and is often responsible for puerperal anemia. Puerperal anemia can impair postpartum maternal and neonatal well-being. Objective: To determine the effect of treatment of moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia using a single intravenous total-dose iron dextran versus daily single dose oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose. Methodology: A randomized controlled study in which postpartum women with moderate iron-deficiency anemia were randomized into treatment with either a single total-dose intravenous iron dextran or with daily single doses of oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets for 6 weeks. Effects on hemoglobin concentration using either method were compared at 6 weeks postpartum. Analysis was per protocol using SPSS version 17 for windows. P-values ≤0.05 were considered significant. Results: Two hundred eighty-four women were recruited for the study: 142 women received single total dose intravenous infusion of iron dextran while 142 received daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets. Approximately 84.0% (237/282 completed the study and were analyzed including 81% (115/142 of those randomized to injectable iron therapy compared to 85.9% (122/142 of those randomized to oral treatment. The proportions of women who had attained hemoglobin concentration of at least 10 g/dL by the 6 weeks postpartum visit did not differ

  9. Reply to Comments on Measuring marine iron(III) complexes by CLE-AdSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2005-01-01

    The interpretation of CLE-AdSV based iron(iii) speciation data for marine waters has been called into question in light of the kinetic features of the measurement. The implications of the re-think may have consequences for understanding iron biogeochemistry and its impact on ecosystem functioning.

  10. Spectrophotometric determination of iron (III) in tap water using 8 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-14

    Nov 14, 2011 ... Beers law was obeyed in the range of 1 to 14 ug/ml Fe3+. The recovery was between 98.60 ... Federal and state regulations limit the iron content of drinking water to <1 ppm, though iron is easily .... weighed and dissolved in chloroform in a 100 ml volumetric flask and made up to the mark with chloroform.

  11. Adsorption studies of iron(III) on chitin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of particle size and dosage of the adsorbant, contact time, initial concentration of the adsorbate and tem- perature were experimentally ... Adsorption; chitin; variable parameters; fraction of adsorption; temperature effect. 1. Introduction. Iron is one of the ... about the presence of iron in drinking water is its ob- jectionable taste.

  12. Isolation of microorganisms involved in reduction of crystalline iron(III) oxides in natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Itoh, Hideomi; Narihiro, Takashi; Oikawa, Azusa; Suzuki, Kiyofumi; Ogata, Atsushi; Friedrich, Michael W; Conrad, Ralf; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of crystalline Fe(III) oxides is one of the most important electron sinks for organic compound oxidation in natural environments. Yet the limited number of isolates makes it difficult to understand the physiology and ecological impact of the microorganisms involved. Here, two-stage cultivation was implemented to selectively enrich and isolate crystalline iron(III) oxide reducing microorganisms in soils and sediments. Firstly, iron reducers were enriched and other untargeted eutrophs were depleted by 2-years successive culture on a crystalline ferric iron oxide (i.e., goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, or magnetite) as electron acceptor. Fifty-eight out of 136 incubation conditions allowed the continued existence of microorganisms as confirmed by PCR amplification. High-throughput Illumina sequencing and clone library analysis based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that the enrichment cultures on each of the ferric iron oxides contained bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria (mainly Geobacteraceae), followed by Firmicutes and Chloroflexi, which also comprised most of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified. Venn diagrams indicated that the core OTUs enriched with all of the iron oxides were dominant in the Geobacteraceae while each type of iron oxides supplemented selectively enriched specific OTUs in the other phylogenetic groups. Secondly, 38 enrichment cultures including novel microorganisms were transferred to soluble-iron(III) containing media in order to stimulate the proliferation of the enriched iron reducers. Through extinction dilution-culture and single colony isolation, six strains within the Deltaproteobacteria were finally obtained; five strains belonged to the genus Geobacter and one strain to Pelobacter. The 16S rRNA genes of these isolates were 94.8-98.1% identical in sequence to cultured relatives. All the isolates were able to grow on acetate and ferric iron but their physiological characteristics differed considerably in

  13. Arsenic removal with iron(II) and iron(III) in waters with high silicate and phosphate concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Linda C; Hug, Stephan J; Ruettimann, Thomas; Billah, Morsaline; Khan, Abdul Wahab; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic removal by passive treatment, in which naturally present Fe(II) is oxidized by aeration and the forming iron(III) (hydr)oxides precipitate with adsorbed arsenic, is the simplest conceivable water treatment option. However, competing anions and low iron concentrations often require additional iron. Application of Fe(II) instead of the usually applied Fe(III) is shown to be advantageous, as oxidation of Fe(II) by dissolved oxygen causes partial oxidation of As(III) and iron(III) (hydr)oxides formed from Fe(II) have higher sorption capacities. In simulated groundwater (8.2 mM HCO3(-), 2.5 mM Ca2+, 1.6 mM Mg2+, 30 mg/L Si, 3 mg/L P, 500 ppb As(III), or As(V), pH 7.0 +/- 0.1), addition of Fe(II) clearly leads to better As removal than Fe(III). Multiple additions of Fe(II) further improved the removal of As(II). A competitive coprecipitation model that considers As(III) oxidation explains the observed results and allows the estimation of arsenic removal under different conditions. Lowering 500 microg/L As(III) to below 50 microg/L As(tot) in filtered water required > 80 mg/L Fe(III), 50-55 mg/L Fe(II) in one single addition, and 20-25 mg/L in multiple additions. With As(V), 10-12 mg/L Fe(II) and 15-18 mg/L Fe(III) was required. In the absence of Si and P, removal efficiencies for Fe(II) and Fe(III) were similar: 30-40 mg/L was required for As(II), and 2.0-2.5 mg/L was required for As(V). In a field study with 22 tubewells in Bangladesh, passive treatment efficiently removed phosphate, but iron contents were generally too low for efficient arsenic removal.

  14. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Mechanism of Intradiol Catechol Dioxygenation by Non-Heme Iron(III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Quesne, Matthew G; Weckhuysen, Bert M; de Visser, Sam P; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2014-01-01

    Catechol intradiol dioxygenation is a unique reaction catalyzed by iron-dependent enzymes and non-heme iron(III) complexes. The mechanism by which these systems activate dioxygen in this important metabolic process remains controversial. Using a combination of kinetic measurements and computational modelling of multiple iron(III) catecholato complexes, we have elucidated the catechol cleavage mechanism and show that oxygen binds the iron center by partial dissociation of the substrate from the iron complex. The iron(III) superoxide complex that is formed subsequently attacks the carbon atom of the substrate by a rate-determining C=O bond formation step. PMID:25322920

  15. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-01-01

    The syntheses of nanosize magnetite particles by wet-chemical oxidation of Fe 2+ have been extensively investigated. In the present investigation the nanosize magnetite particles were synthesised without using the Fe(II) precursor. This was achieved by γ-irradiation of water-in-oil microemulsion containing only the Fe(III) precursor. The corresponding phase transformations were monitored. Microemulsions (pH ∼ 12.5) were γ-irradiated at a relatively high dose rate of ∼22 kGy/h. Upon 1 h of γ-irradiation the XRD pattern of the precipitate showed goethite and unidentified low-intensity peaks. Upon 6 h of γ-irradiation, reductive conditions were achieved and substoichiometric magnetite (∼Fe 2.71 O 4 ) particles with insignificant amount of goethite particles found in the precipitate. Hydrated electrons (e aq - ), organic radicals and hydrogen gas as radiolytic products were responsible for the reductive dissolution of iron oxide in the microemulsion and the reduction Fe 3+ → Fe 2+ . Upon 18 h of γ-irradiation the precipitate exhibited dual behaviour, it was a more oxidised product than the precipitate obtained after 6 h of γ-irradiation, but it contained magnetite particles in a more reduced form (∼Fe 2.93 O 4 ). It was presumed that the reduction and oxidation processes existed as concurrent competitive processes in the microemulsion. After 18 h of γ-irradiation the pH of the medium shifted from the alkaline to the acidic range. The high dose rate of ∼22 kGy/h was directly responsible for this shift to the acidic range. At a slightly acidic pH a further reduction of Fe 3+ → Fe 2+ resulted in the formation of more stoichiometric magnetite particles, whereas the oxidation conditions in the acidic medium permitted the oxidation Fe 2+ → Fe 3+ . The Fe 3+ was much less soluble in the acidic medium and it hydrolysed and recrystallised as goethite. The γ-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure

  16. Disproportionation of hydroxylamine by water-soluble iron(III) porphyrinate compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Sara E; Amorebieta, Valentín T; Gutiérrez, María M; Olabe, José A; Doctorovich, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    The reactions of hydroxylamine (HA) with several water-soluble iron(III) porphyrinate compounds, namely iron(III) meso-tetrakis-(N-ethylpyridinium-2yl)-porphyrinate ([Fe(III)(TEPyP)](5+)), iron(III) meso-tetrakis-(4-sulphonatophenyl)-porphyrinate ([Fe(III)(TPPS)](3-)), and microperoxidase 11 ([Fe(III)(MP11)]) were studied for different [Fe(III)(Porph)]/[HA] ratios, under anaerobic conditions at neutral pH. Efficient catalytic processes leading to the disproportionation of HA by these iron(III) porphyrinates were evidenced for the first time. As a common feature, only N(2) and N(2)O were found as gaseous, nitrogen-containing oxidation products, while NH(3) was the unique reduced species detected. Different N(2)/N(2)O ratios obtained with these three porphyrinates strongly suggest distinctive mechanistic scenarios: while [Fe(III)(TEPyP)](5+) and [Fe(III)(MP11)] formed unknown steady-state porphyrinic intermediates in the presence of HA, [Fe(III)(TPPS)](3-) led to the well characterized soluble intermediate, [Fe(II)(TPPS)NO](4-). Free-radical formation was only evidenced for [Fe(III)(TEPyP)](5+), as a consequence of a metal centered reduction. We discuss the catalytic pathways of HA disproportionation on the basis of the distribution of gaseous products, free radicals formation, the nature of porphyrinic intermediates, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox potential, the coordinating capabilities of each complex, and the kinetic analysis. The absence of NO(2)(-) revealed either that no HAO-like activity was operative under our reaction conditions, or that NO(2)(-), if formed, was consumed in the reaction milieu.

  17. Interactions between Biliverdin, Oxidative Damage, and Spleen Morphology after Simulated Aggressive Encounters in Veiled Chameleons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Butler

    Full Text Available Stressors frequently increase oxidative damage--unless organisms simultaneously mount effective antioxidant responses. One putative mitigative mechanism is the use of biliverdin, an antioxidant produced in the spleen during erythrocyte degradation. We hypothesized that both wild and captive-bred male veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus, which are highly aggressive to conspecifics, would respond to agonistic displays with increased levels of oxidative damage, but that increased levels of biliverdin would limit this increase. We found that even just visual exposure to a potential combatant resulted in decreased body mass during the subsequent 48-hour period, but that hematocrit, biliverdin concentration in the bile, relative spleen size, and oxidative damage in plasma, liver, and spleen were unaffected. Contrary to our predictions, we found that individuals with smaller spleens exhibited greater decreases in hematocrit and higher bile biliverdin concentrations, suggesting a revision to the idea of spleen-dependent erythrocyte processing. Interestingly, individuals with larger spleens had reduced oxidative damage in both the liver and spleen, demonstrating the spleen's importance in modulating oxidative damage. We also uncovered differences in spleen size and oxidative damage between wild and captive-bred chameleons, highlighting environmentally dependent differences in oxidative physiology. Lastly, we found no relationship between oxidative damage and biliverdin concentration, calling into question biliverdin's antioxidant role in this species.

  18. Iron(III) complexes of certain tetradentate phenolate ligands as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    non-heme iron enzymes, which catalyse the oxidative cleavage of catechols to cis, cis-muconic acids with the incorporation of ... nature of heterocyclic rings of the ligands and the methyl substituents on them regulate the electronic spectral features .... and simple substitution reactions.19,21 The complexes of [H2(L5)] and ...

  19. Thermodynamics of complex formation of natural iron(III)porphyrins with neutral ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, Nataliya Sh.; Yakubov, Sergey P.; Vyugin, Anatoly I.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2003-01-01

    Calorimetric titrations in benzene and chloroform at 298.15 K have been performed to give the complexes stability constants and the thermodynamic parameters for the complex formation of nature iron(III)porphyrins with pyridine. Stoichimetry of the complexes formed has been determined. It has been found that the thermodynamic parameters obtained depend on nature of peripheral substituents of the porphyrins. The estimation of the influence of Cl - and Ac - ions on the processes studied has been carried out. Using thermodynamic analysis method, the crystallsolvates of nature iron(III)porphyrins with benzene have been studied. Stoichiometry, thermal and energetic stability of the π-π-complexes formed have been determined. The data obtained have been used to the estimate solvent effect on the thermodynamic parameters of axial coordination of pyridine on the iron(III)porphyrins in benzene

  20. Interactions between iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex and commonly used medications / laboratory studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Felix; Canclini, Camillo; Geisser, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Simple iron salts, such as iron sulphate, often interact with food and other medications reducing bioavailability and tolerability. Iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex (IPC, Maltofer) provides a soluble form of non-ionic iron, making it an ideal form of oral iron supplementation. The physicochemical properties of IPC predict a low potential for interactions. The effects of co-administration with aluminium hydroxide (CAS 21645-51-2), acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2), bromazepam (CAS 1812-30-2), calcium acetate (CAS 62-54-4), calcium carbonate (CAS 471-34-1), auranofin (CAS 34031-32-8), magnesium-L-aspartate hydrochloride (CAS 28184-71-6), methyldopa sesquihydrate (CAS 41372-08-1), paracetamol (CAS 103-90-2), penicillamine (CAS 52-67-5), sulfasalazine (CAS 599-79-1), tetracycline hydrochloride (CAS 64-75-5), calcium phosphate (CAS 7757-93-9) in combination with vitamin D3 (CAS 67-97-0), and a multi-vitamin preparation were tested in rats fed an iron-deficient diet. Uptake of iron from radiolabelled IPC with and without concomitant medications was compared. None of the medicines tested had a significant effect on iron uptake. Iron-59 retrieval from blood and major storage organs was 64-76% for IPC alone compared with 59-85% following co-administration with other medications. It is concluded that, under normal clinical conditions, IPC does not interact with these medications.

  1. Competition of dipositive metal ions for Fe (III) binding sites in chelation therapy of Iron Load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehmani, Fouzia S.

    2005-01-01

    Iron overload is a condition in which excessive iron deposited in the liver, kidney and spleen of human beings in the patients of beta thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Instead of its importance iron could be toxic when in excess, it damages the tissues. For the treatment of iron overload, a drug desferrioxamine mesylate has been used. It is linear trihydroxamic acid, a natural siderophore produced by streptomyces which removes the extra iron from body. Salicylhydroxamate type siderphore. In present research salicylhydroxamate was used for the complexation with dipositive metal ions which are available in biological environments such as Mn (II), Co (II), Ni (II) and Cu (II). The aim of our work was to study the competition reactions between Fe (III) and other dipositive ions; to calculate the thermodynamic data of chelation of these metal ions complexes with hydroxamate by computer program and comparison with hydroxamate complexes. (author)

  2. The hydrolysis of iron(III) and iron(ll) ions between 25 deg C and 375 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Derek

    1971-11-15

    Some data on the stabilities of the known iron (III) and iron (II) ions are presented, that have been obtained in a theoretical study of the iron-water system at temperatures up to the critical temperature. In this study, estimates of the stability constants of the various ions in dilute solution have been made by a method based on the equations of classical thermodynamics and empirical equations for the change with temperature of ionic heat capacity. The data indicate that hydrolysis increases so rapidly with temperature that the Fe+3 - ion is practically non-existent above about 150 deg C and, except in very acid solutions, the Fe+2 - ion is a relatively minor constituent above about 250 deg C. The most stable of the ions over a wide range of conditions are probably Fe(OH){sub 2}+ , Fe(OH)+ and HFeO{sub 2}-

  3. Sulphate analysis in uranium leach iron(III) chloride solutions by inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirdosh, I.; Lakhani, S.; Yunus, M.Z.M.

    1993-01-01

    Inductively coupled Argon Plasma Spectrometry is used for the indirect determination of sulphate in iron(III) chloride leach solution of Elliot Lake uranium ores via addition of a known amount of barium ions and analyzing for excess of barium. The ore contains ∼ 7 wt% pyrite, FeS 2 , as the major mineral which oxidizes to generate sulphate during leaching with Fe(III). The effects of pH, the concentrations of Fe(III) and chloride ions and for presence of ethanol in the test samples on the accuracy of analysis are studied. It is found that unlike the Rhodizonate method, removal of iron(III) from or addition of ethanol to the test sample prior to analysis are not required. Linear calibration curves are obtained. (author)

  4. Microbial Reducibility of Fe(III Phases Associated with the Genesis of Iron Ore Caves in the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceth W. Parker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The iron mining regions of Brazil contain thousands of “iron ore caves” (IOCs that form within Fe(III-rich deposits. The mechanisms by which these IOCs form remain unclear, but the reductive dissolution of Fe(III (hydroxides by Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB could provide a microbiological mechanism for their formation. We evaluated the susceptibility of Fe(III deposits associated with these caves to reduction by the FeRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to test this hypothesis. Canga, an Fe(III-rich duricrust, contained poorly crystalline Fe(III phases that were more susceptible to reduction than the Fe(III (predominantly hematite associated with banded iron formation (BIF, iron ore, and mine spoil. In all cases, the addition of a humic acid analogue enhanced Fe(III reduction, presumably by shuttling electrons from S. oneidensis to Fe(III phases. The particle size and quartz-Si content of the solids appeared to exert control on the rate and extent of Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis, with more bioreduction of Fe(III associated with solid phases containing more quartz. Our results provide evidence that IOCs may be formed by the activities of Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB, and the rate of this formation is dependent on the physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Fe(III phases of the surrounding rock.

  5. Studies of. gamma. -ray irradiation effects on tris(. beta. -diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) coordination compounds by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Y.; Endo, K.; Sano, H. (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    Both absorption Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements on tris(..beta..-diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) compounds indicate that ligands which have phenyl group as a substituent are more stable to ..gamma..-ray radiolysis, in accordance with previous results of emission Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of /sup 57/Co-labelled tris (..beta..-diketonato)cobalt(III) compounds.

  6. Arene activation by a nonheme iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex: pathways leading to phenol and ketone products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faponle, Abayomi S; Banse, Frédéric; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-07-01

    Iron(III)-hydroperoxo complexes are found in various nonheme iron enzymes as catalytic cycle intermediates; however, little is known on their catalytic properties. The recent work of Banse and co-workers on a biomimetic nonheme iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex provided evidence of its involvement in reactivity with arenes. This contrasts the behavior of heme iron(III)-hydroperoxo complexes that are known to be sluggish oxidants. To gain insight into the reaction mechanism of the biomimetic iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex with arenes, we performed a computational (density functional theory) study. The calculations show that iron(III)-hydroperoxo reacts with substrates via low free energies of activation that should be accessible at room temperature. Moreover, a dominant ketone reaction product is observed as primary products rather than the thermodynamically more stable phenols. These product distributions are analyzed and the calculations show that charge interaction between the iron(III)-hydroxo group and the substrate in the intermediate state pushes the transferring proton to the meta-carbon atom of the substrate and guides the selectivity of ketone formation. These studies show that the relative ratio of ketone versus phenol as primary products can be affected by external interactions of the oxidant with the substrate. Moreover, iron(III)-hydroperoxo complexes are shown to selectively give ketone products, whereas iron(IV)-oxo complexes will react with arenes to form phenols instead.

  7. Mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phenanthroline complex have been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order each in iron(III) and methionine. Increase in [phenanthroline] increases the rate while increase in [HClO4] decreases it. While the reactive species of the ...

  8. NO2-induced synthesis of nitrato-iron(III) porphyrin with diverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    found serendipitously in the reaction of [Fe(4-Me-TPP)Cl] with nitrous acid, which ... Nitric oxide and its derivatives nitrite and nitrate ion ... oxide.2 Nitrate is produced in heme proteins from oxi- ... and nitrogen assimilation.4 Iron nitrate(III) porphyrins ... one-pot method.15 ... of the compound was determined based on the lack.

  9. Stabilization through precipitation in a system of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Y.M.; Velikov, K.P.; Kegel, W.K.

    2012-01-01

    The ionic strength of a solution decreases during the precipitation of an insoluble salt, which can cause an initially unstable colloidal system to stabilize during its formation. We show this effect in the precipitation and aging of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate, where we observe two distinct

  10. Moessbauer studies of iron(III)-(indole-3-alkanoic acids) systems in frozen aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Szilagyi, P.A.; Vertes, A.; Kamnev, A.A.; Sharma, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    Moessbauer investigations of iron(III) salts in aqueous solutions in the presence of indole-3-alkanoic acid ligands are described. The measurements showed two parallel reactions between the ligands and ferric ions: a complex formation and a redox process. The oxidation process takes place in the ligands, and a part of Fe 3+ is reduced to Fe 2+ . (author)

  11. Complexation equilibria and spectrophotometric determination of iron(III) with 1-amino-4-hydroxyanthraquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Bakr, M S; Sedaira, H; Hashem, E Y

    1994-10-01

    The complex equilibria of iron(III) with 1-amino-4-hydroxyanthraquinone (AMHA) were studied spectrophotometrically in 40% (v/v) ethanol and an ionic strength of 0.1M (NaClO(4)). The complexation reactions were demonstrated and characterized using graphical logarithmic analysis of the absorbance-pH graphs. A simple, rapid, selective and sensitive method for the spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of Fe(III) is developed based on the formation of Fe(AMHA) complex at pH 2.5 (lambda(max) = 640 nm, epsilon approximately = 2.1 x 10(4) L. mol(-1) . cm(-1)) in the presence of a large number of foreign ions. Interferences caused by palladium(II) was masked by the addition of cyanide ions. The method has been applied to the determination of iron in some synthetic samples and polymetallic iron ores.

  12. Neodymium Recovery by Chitosan/Iron(III Hydroxide [ChiFer(III] Sorbent Material: Batch and Column Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hary Demey

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A low cost composite material was synthesized for neodymium recovery from dilute aqueous solutions. The in-situ production of the composite containing chitosan and iron(III hydroxide (ChiFer(III was improved and the results were compared with raw chitosan particles. The sorbent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analyses (SEM-EDX. The equilibrium studies were performed using firstly a batch system, and secondly a continuous system. The sorption isotherms were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips models; experimental data was better described with the Langmuir equation and the maximum sorption capacity was 13.8 mg g-1 at pH 4. The introduction of iron into the biopolymer matrix increases by four times the sorption uptake of the chitosan; the individual sorption capacity of iron (into the composite was calculated as 30.9 mg Nd/g Fe. The experimental results of the columns were fitted adequately using the Thomas model. As an approach to Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets effluents, a synthetic dilute effluent was simulated at pH 4, in order to evaluate the selectivity of the sorbent material; the overshooting of boron in the column system confirmed the higher selectivity toward neodymium ions. The elution step was carried out using MilliQ-water with the pH set to 3.5 (dilute HCl solution.

  13. Reactivity of tris(acetylacetonato) iron(III) with tridentate [ONO] donor Schiff base as an access to newer mixed-ligand iron(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Chira R.; Goswami, Pankaj; Pramanik, Harun A. R.; Paul, Pradip C.; Mondal, Paritosh

    2011-05-01

    Two new mixed-ligand iron(III) complexes, [Fe(L n)(acac)(C 2H 5OH)] incorporating coordinated ethanol from the reaction solvent were accessed from the reaction of [Fe(acac) 3] with [ONO] donor dibasic tridentate unsymmetrical Schiff base ligands derived from condensation of 2-hydroxy-1-napthaldehyde with 2-aminophenol (H 2L 1) or 2-aminobenzoic acid (H 2L 2). The thermal study (TGA-DTA) provided evidence for weakly bound ethanol which is readily substituted by neutral N-donor molecule imidazole, benzimidazole or pyridine to produce an array of newer complexes, [Fe(L n)(acac)X] ( n = 1, 2; X = Im, Bim, Py). The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, UV-vis, solution electrical conductivity, FAB mass, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements ( μeff ˜ 5.8 B.M.) are consistent with spin-free octahedral iron(III) complexes. Cyclic voltammetry of ethanol complexes revealed a quasi-reversible one electron redox response (Δ Ep > 100 mV) for the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple. Low half wave redox potential ( E1/2) values suggested easy redox susceptibility. The ground state geometries of the ethanol and imidazole complexes have been ascertained to be distorted octahedral by density functional theory using DMol3 program at BLYP/DNP level.

  14. Nanocrystalline Axially Bridged Iron Phthalocyanine Polymeric Conductor: (μ-Thiocyanato(phthalocyaninatoiron(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiza Shimizu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skewered Iron(III phthalocyanine conducting polymer can be constructed with the utilization of axial thiocyanato ligands ((μ-thiocyanato(phthalocyaninatoiron(III; (FeIII(Pc(SCNn thereby creating additional avenues for electron transport through a linear SCN bridge, apart from the intermolecular π-π orbital overlap between the Pc molecules. In this paper, we report on the conversion of bulk FeIII(Pc(SCNn polymeric organic conductor into crystalline nanostructures through horizontal vapor phase growth process. The needle-like nanostructures are deemed to provide more ordered and, thus, more π-π interactive interskewer FeIII(Pc(SCNn polymer orientation, resulting in a twofold increase of its electrical conductivity per materials density unit.

  15. Stabilization of structure in near-infrared fluorescent proteins by binding of biliverdin chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Bublikov, G. S.; Kuznetsova, I. M.; Verkhusha, V. V.; Turoverov, K. K.

    2017-07-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes and their mutants with different location of Cys residues, which able to bind a biliverdin chromophore, or without these Cys residues were studied using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, NIR fluorescence and circular dichroism. It was shown that a covalent binding of the biliverdin chromophore to a Cys residue via thioether group substantially stabilizes the spatial structure of NIR FPs. The stability of the protein structure and the chromophore association strength strongly depends on the location of Cys residues and decreases in the following order: a protein with Cys residues in both domains, a protein with Cys in PAS domains, and a protein with Cys in GAF domains. NIR FPs without Cys residues capable to covalently attach biliverdin have the lowest stability, comparable to NIR FP apoforms.

  16. Differences and Comparisons of the Properties and Reactivities of Iron(III)–hydroperoxo Complexes with Saturated Coordination Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faponle, Abayomi S; Quesne, Matthew G; Sastri, Chivukula V; Banse, Frédéric; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-01-01

    Heme and nonheme monoxygenases and dioxygenases catalyze important oxygen atom transfer reactions to substrates in the body. It is now well established that the cytochrome P450 enzymes react through the formation of a high-valent iron(IV)–oxo heme cation radical. Its precursor in the catalytic cycle, the iron(III)–hydroperoxo complex, was tested for catalytic activity and found to be a sluggish oxidant of hydroxylation, epoxidation and sulfoxidation reactions. In a recent twist of events, evidence has emerged of several nonheme iron(III)–hydroperoxo complexes that appear to react with substrates via oxygen atom transfer processes. Although it was not clear from these studies whether the iron(III)–hydroperoxo reacted directly with substrates or that an initial O–O bond cleavage preceded the reaction. Clearly, the catalytic activity of heme and nonheme iron(III)–hydroperoxo complexes is substantially different, but the origins of this are still poorly understood and warrant a detailed analysis. In this work, an extensive computational analysis of aromatic hydroxylation by biomimetic nonheme and heme iron systems is presented, starting from an iron(III)–hydroperoxo complex with pentadentate ligand system (L52). Direct C–O bond formation by an iron(III)–hydroperoxo complex is investigated, as well as the initial heterolytic and homolytic bond cleavage of the hydroperoxo group. The calculations show that [(L52)FeIII(OOH)]2+ should be able to initiate an aromatic hydroxylation process, although a low-energy homolytic cleavage pathway is only slightly higher in energy. A detailed valence bond and thermochemical analysis rationalizes the differences in chemical reactivity of heme and nonheme iron(III)–hydroperoxo and show that the main reason for this particular nonheme complex to be reactive comes from the fact that they homolytically split the O–O bond, whereas a heterolytic O–O bond breaking in heme iron(III)–hydroperoxo is found. PMID:25399782

  17. Multisensor system for determination of iron(II), iron(III) and uranium(VI) in complex solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legin, A.V.; Seleznev, B.L.; Rudnitskaya, A.M.; Vlasov, Yu.G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is the development and analytical evaluation of a multisensor system for determination of low content of iron(II), iron(III) and uranium(VI) in complex aqueous media. Sensor array included sensors on the basis of chalcogenide vitreous materials with redox and ionic cross-sensitivities, crystalline silver sulphide electrode, noble metal electrodes Pt, Au, Ag and redox sensor on the basis of oxide glass. Potentiometric measurements have been taken in a conventional electrochemical cell vs. a standard Ag/AgCl reference electrode. All measurements have been taken at room temperature. Calibration solutions contained UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 in concentration range 10 -6 -1,610 -5 mol/L, K 3 Fe(CN) 6 and K 4 Fe(CN) 6 or FeSO 4 (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and FeCl 3 , with the ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration from 100:1 to 1:100, the total concentration of Fe was 10 -4 and 10 -5 mol/L. All solutions have been made on the background electrolyte of calcium and magnesium chlorides and sulphates with the fixed content of 5-27 mmol/L of each component which is a typical one for groundwater or mining water. Sensor potentials have been processed by a back-propagation artificial neural net. Average error of determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) is about 20 %, of uranium(VI) - 40 %. It was found that sensitivity of the sensor array to iron and uranium is irrespective of the chemical form of these species

  18. Liquid-liquid extraction of iron (III) from Ouenza iron ore leach liquor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of several parameters, such as contact time, HCl concentration, TBP concentration and chloride inorganic salt (KCl) concentration on the efficiency of extraction of iron was examined at 19±2°C. It was found that, for 2 min 3M TBP in presence of 5M HCl and 2 M KCl solutions led to a high yiel of extraction (98.57 ...

  19. Structure and Magnetic Properties of a Dodecanuclear Twisted-Ring Iron(III) Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneschi, Andrea; Cornia, Andrea; Fabretti, Antonio C; Gatteschi, Dante

    1999-05-03

    An unprecedented nonplanar structure characterizes the complex [Fe(OCH 3 ) 2 (dbm)] 12 (on the left in the picture), which contains the largest cyclic ferric cluster yet reported with chemically equivalent bridging units. It is made up of twelve high-spin, antiferromagnetically coupled iron(III) centers and neatly reacts with Na I or Li I templates in organic solution to give hexairon(III) coronates (right). Fe=•, O=○, NaI or LiI=• Hdbm=dibenzoylmethane. © 1999 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  20. Glycine buffered synthesis of layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides (green rusts)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao; Huang, Lizhi; Pedersen, Emil Bjerglund

    2017-01-01

    Layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) are efficient reducing agents against oxidizing contaminants such as chromate, nitrate, selenite, and nitroaromatic compounds and chlorinated solvents. In this study, we adopted a buffered precipitation approach where glycine (GLY) was used...

  1. Identification and Spectroscopic Characterization of Nonheme Iron(III) Hypochlorite Intermediates**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Angelone, Davide; Quesne, Matthew G; Padamati, Sandeep K; Gómez, Laura; Hage, Ronald; Costas, Miquel; Browne, Wesley R; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-01-01

    FeIII–hypohalite complexes have been implicated in a wide range of important enzyme-catalyzed halogenation reactions including the biosynthesis of natural products and antibiotics and post-translational modification of proteins. The absence of spectroscopic data on such species precludes their identification. Herein, we report the generation and spectroscopic characterization of nonheme FeIII–hypohalite intermediates of possible relevance to iron halogenases. We show that FeIII-OCl polypyridylamine complexes can be sufficiently stable at room temperature to be characterized by UV/Vis absorption, resonance Raman and EPR spectroscopies, and cryo-ESIMS. DFT methods rationalize the pathways to the formation of the FeIII-OCl, and ultimately FeIV=O, species and provide indirect evidence for a short-lived FeII-OCl intermediate. The species observed and the pathways involved offer insight into and, importantly, a spectroscopic database for the investigation of iron halogenases. PMID:25663379

  2. Ion-Selective Electrode for the Determination of Iron(III in Vitamin Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Marcos Fernando de S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A coated graphite-epoxy ion-selective electrode for iron(III, based on the ion-pair formed between [Fe(citrate2]3- and the tricaprylylmethylammonium cation (Aliquat 336 in a poly(vinylchloride (PVC matrix has been constructed. A thin membrane film of this ion-pair, dibutylphthalate (DBPh in PVC was deposited directly onto a Perspex® tube, which contained a graphite-epoxy conductor substrate. The coating solution was prepared by dissolving 30% (w/w of PVC in 10 mL of tetrahydrofuran following addition of 65% (w/w DBPh and 5% (w/w of the ionic pair. The effect of pH, citrate concentration and some cations on the electrode response has been investigated. The E(mV vs. log [Fe(citrate2]3- electrode response was linear for iron(III concentration from 1.0 x 10-3 mol/L to 1.0 x 10-1 mol/L in 1.0 mol/L citrate medium, with a slope of 19.3 ± 0.5 mV/decade and a useful lifetime of at least six months (more than 800 determinations for each polymeric membrane used. The detection limit was 7.5 x 10-4 mol/L and the relative standard deviation was less than 3% for a solution containing 5.0 x 10-3 mol/L of iron(III (n = 10. The application of this electrode for iron(III determination in samples of vitamin formulations is described. The results obtained with this procedure are in close agreement with those obtained using AA spectrophotometry (r = 0.9999.

  3. Radiochemical study of the sorption of iodate ions on iron(III) hydroxide precipitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Sipalo-Zuljevic, J.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The sorption of iodate ions on iron(III) hydroxide in dependence on the pH, the aging time of the precipitate and the duration of the contact between the sorbate and the sorbent have been studied. Na 131 IO 3 was used as a radioactive indicator. The sorption mechanism has been discussed in terms of electrostatic and ion-exchange processes at the solid/liquid interface. (author)

  4. Iron(II) and Iron(III) Spin Crossover: Toward an Optimal Density Functional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siig, Oliver S; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin crossover (SCO) plays a major role in biochemistry, catalysis, materials, and emerging technologies such as molecular electronics and sensors, and thus accurate prediction and design of SCO systems is of high priority. However, the main tool for this purpose, density functional theory (DFT......), is very sensitive to applied methodology. The most abundant SCO systems are Fe(II) and Fe(III) systems. Even with average good agreement, a functional may be significantly more accurate for Fe(II) or Fe(III) systems, preventing balanced study of SCO candidates of both types. The present work investigates....../precise, inaccurate/imprecise) are observed. More generally, our work illustrates the importance not only of overall accuracy but also of balanced accuracy for systems likely to occur in context....

  5. Reactivity of catecholamine-driven Fenton reaction and its relationships with iron(III) speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Victoria; Henríquez, Adolfo; Freer, Juanita; Contreras, David

    2015-03-01

    Fenton reaction is the main source of free radicals in biological systems. The reactivity of this reaction can be modified by several factors, among these iron ligands are important. Catecholamine (dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine) are able to form Fe(III) complexes whose extension in the coordination number depends upon the pH. Fe(III)-catecholamine complexes have been related with the development of several pathologies. In this work, the ability of catecholamines to enhance the oxidative degradation of an organic substrate (veratryl alcohol, VA) through Fenton and Fenton-like reactions was studied. The initial VA degradation rate at different pH values and its relationship to the different iron species present in solution were determined. Furthermore, the oxidative degradation of VA after 24 hours of reaction and its main oxidation products were also determined. The catecholamine-driven Fenton and Fenton-like systems showed higher VA degradation compared to unmodified Fenton or Fenton-like systems, which also showed an increase in the oxidation state of the VA degradation product. All of this oxidative degradation takes place at pH values lower than 5.50, where the primarily responsible species would be the Fe(III) mono-complex. The presence of Fe(III) mono-complex is essential in the ability of catecholamines to increase the oxidative capacity of Fenton systems.

  6. Detection of the electronic structure of iron-(iii)-oxo oligomers forming in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Robert; Kraffert, Katrin; Kabelitz, Anke; Pohl, Marvin N; Kraehnert, Ralph; Emmerling, Franziska; Winter, Bernd

    2017-12-13

    The nature of the small iron-oxo oligomers in iron-(iii) aqueous solutions has a determining effect on the chemical processes that govern the formation of nanoparticles in aqueous phase. Here we report on a liquid-jet photoelectron-spectroscopy experiment for the investigation of the electronic structure of the occurring iron-oxo oligomers in FeCl 3 aqueous solutions. The only iron species in the as-prepared 0.75 M solution are Fe 3+ monomers. Addition of NaOH initiates Fe 3+ hydrolysis which is followed by the formation of iron-oxo oligomers. At small enough NaOH concentrations, corresponding to approximately [OH]/[Fe] = 0.2-0.25 ratio, the iron oligomers can be stabilized for several hours without engaging in further aggregation. Here, we apply a combination of non-resonant as well as iron 2p and oxygen 1s resonant photoelectron spectroscopy from a liquid microjet to detect the electronic structure of the occurring species. Specifically, the oxygen 1s partial electron yield X-ray absorption (PEY-XA) spectra are found to exhibit a peak well below the onset of liquid water and OH - (aq) absorption. The iron 2p absorption gives rise to signal centered between the main absorption bands typical for aqueous Fe 3+ . Absorption bands in both PEY-XA spectra are found to correlate with an enhanced photoelectron peak near 20 eV binding energy, which demonstrates the sensitivity of resonant photoelectron (RPE) spectroscopy to mixing between iron and ligand orbitals. These various signals from the iron-oxo oligomers exhibit maximum intensity at [OH]/[Fe] = 0.25 ratio. For the same ratio, we observe changes in the pH as well as in complementary Raman spectra, which can be assigned to the transition from monomeric to oligomeric species. At approximately [OH]/[Fe] = 0.3 we begin to observe particles larger than 1 nm in radius, detected by small-angle X-ray scattering.

  7. Manganese associated nanoparticles agglomerate of iron(III) oxide: synthesis, characterization and arsenic(III) sorption behavior with mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kaushik; Maity, Arjun; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2010-12-15

    Three samples of manganese associated hydrous iron(III) oxide (MNHFO), prepared by incinerating metal hydroxide precipitate at T (± 5)=90, 300 and 600°C, showed increase of crystalline nature in XRD patterns with decreasing As(III) removal percentages. TEM images showed the increase of crystallinity from sample-1 (MNHFO-1) to sample-3 (MNHFO-3). Dimensions (nm) of particles estimated were 5.0, 7.0 and 97.5. Optimization of pH indicated that MNHFO-1 could remove aqueous As(III) efficiently at pH between 3.0 and 7.0. Kinetic and equilibrium data of reactions under the experimental conditions described the pseudo-second order and the Langmuir isotherm equations very well, respectively. The Langmuir capacity (q(m)) estimated was 691.04 mmol kg(-1). The values of enthalpy, Gibb's free energy and entropy changes (ΔH(0)=+23.23 kJ mol(-1), ΔG(0)=-3.43 to -7.20 kJ mol(-1) at T=283-323K, ΔS(0)=+0.094 kJ mol(-1)K(-1)) suggested that the reaction was endothermic, spontaneous and took place with increasing entropy. The As(III) sorbed by MNHFO-1 underwent surface oxidation to As(V), and evidences appeared from the XPS and FTIR investigations. MNHFO-1 packed column (internal diameter: 1.0 cm, height: 3.7 cm) filtered 11.5 dm(3) groundwater (105 μg As dm(-3)) with reducing arsenic concentration to ≤ 10 μg dm(-3). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Mechanism of Intradiol Catechol Dioxygenation by Non- Heme Iron(III) Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Quesne, Matthew G.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; de Visser, Sam P.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Catechol intradiol dioxygenation is a unique reaction catalyzed by iron-dependent enzymes and nonheme iron(III) complexes. The mechanism by which these systems activate dioxygen in this important metabolic process remains controversial. Using a combination of kinetic measurements and computational

  9. Adsorption characteristics of As(III) from aqueous solution on iron oxide coated cement (IOCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Sanghamitra; Gupta, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater with arsenic is a serious health hazard, which calls for proper treatment before its use as drinking water. The objective of the present study is to assess the effectiveness of iron oxide coated cement (IOCC) for As(III) adsorption from aqueous solution. Batch studies were conducted to study As(III) adsorption onto IOCC at ambient temperature as a function of adsorbent dose, pH, contact time, initial arsenic concentration and temperature. Kinetics reveal that the uptake of As(III) ion is very rapid and most of fixation occurs within the first 20 min of contact. The pseudo-second order rate equation successfully described the adsorption kinetics. Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson (R-P), and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models were used to describe the adsorption isotherms at different initial As(III) concentrations and at 30 g l -1 fixed adsorbent dose. The maximum adsorption capacity of IOCC for As(III) determined from the Langmuir isotherm was 0.69 mg g -1 . The mean free energy of adsorption (E) calculated from the D-R isotherm was found to be 2.86 kJ mol -1 which suggests physisorption. Thermodynamic parameters indicate an exothermic nature of adsorption and a spontaneous and favourable process. The results suggest that IOCC can be suitably used for As(III) removal from aqueous solutions

  10. Reductive dehalogenation by layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides and related iron(II) containing solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Weizhao

    In the present PhD project, novel synthesis and modifications of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rusts, GRs) were investigated with focus on improved dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride by using modified green rusts and/or altered reaction conditions. The Ph.D. project has comprised: 1...... sulphate green rust formation by aerial oxidation of FeII or co-precipitation by adding Fe(III) salt to Fe(II). In comparison with traditional green rust synthesis, pure GRs were synthesized in minutes. 2. Enhanced dehalogenation of CT by GR in presence of selected amino acids. In presence of glycine......, chloroform (CF) formation is effectively suppressed: less than 10% of CT is transformed to CF, and more than 90% of dehalogenation products are found to be formic acid and carbon monoxide in presence of 60 mM glycine; while a 80% of CF recovery was obtained without amino acids addition. 3. A “switch...

  11. The sorption of inorganic arsenic on modified sepiolite: Effect of hydrated iron(III-oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nikola I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of inorganic arsenic species, As(III and As(V, from water by sepiolite modified with hydrated iron(III oxide was investigated at 25 °C through batch studies. The influence of the initial pH value, the initial As concentrations, the contact time and types of water on the sorption capacity was investigated. Two types of water were used, deionized and groundwater. The maximal sorption capacity for As(III from deionized water was observed at initial and final pH value 7.0, while the bonding of As(V was observed to be almost pH independent for pH value in the range from 2.0 to 7.0, and the significant decrease in the sorption capacity was observed at pH values above 7.0. The sorption capacity at initial pH 7.0 was about 10 mg gˉ1 for As(III and 4.2 mg gˉ1 for As(V in deionized water. The capacity in groundwater was decreased by 40 % for As(III and by 20 % for As(V. The Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetic model revealed good agreement with the experimental results. The results show that Fe(III-modified sepiolite exhibits significant affinity for arsenic removal and it has a potential for the application in water purification processes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019, III 43009 i TR 37010

  12. Iron-Mediated Homogeneous ICAR ATRP of Methyl Methacrylate under ppm Level Organometallic Catalyst Iron(III Acetylacetonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP is an important polymerization process in polymer synthesis. However, a typical ATRP system has some drawbacks. For example, it needs a large amount of transition metal catalyst, and it is difficult or expensive to remove the metal catalyst residue in products. In order to reduce the amount of catalyst and considering good biocompatibility and low toxicity of the iron catalyst, in this work, we developed a homogeneous polymerization system of initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP with just a ppm level of iron catalyst. Herein, we used oil-soluble iron (III acetylacetonate (Fe(acac3 as the organometallic catalyst, 1,1′-azobis (cyclohexanecarbonitrile (ACHN with longer half-life period as the thermal initiator, ethyl 2-bromophenylacetate (EBPA as the initiator, triphenylphosphine (PPh3 as the ligand, toluene as the solvent and methyl methacrylate (MMA as the model monomer. The factors related with the polymerization system, such as concentration of Fe(acac3 and ACHN and polymerization kinetics, were investigated in detail at 90 °C. It was found that a polymer with an acceptable molecular weight distribution (Mw/Mn = 1.43 at 45.9% of monomer conversion could be obtained even with 1 ppm of Fe(acac3, making it needless to remove the residual metal in the resultant polymers, which makes such an ICAR ATRP process much more industrially attractive. The “living” features of this polymerization system were further confirmed by chain-extension experiment.

  13. Nitrogen loss from anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to Iron(III) reduction in a riparian zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bangjing; Li, Zhengkui; Qin, Yunbin

    2017-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron(III) reduction (termed Feammox) is a recently discovered pathway of nitrogen cycling. However, little is known about the pathways of N transformation via Feammox process in riparian zones. In this study, evidence for Feammox in riparian zones with or without vegetation cover was demonstrated using isotope tracing technique and high-throughput sequencing technology. The results showed that Feammox could occur in riparian zones, and demonstrated that N 2 directly from Feammox was dominant Feammox pathway. The Feammox rates in vegetated soil samples was 0.32-0.37 mg N kg -1 d -1 , which is higher than that in un-vegetated soil samples (0.20 mg N kg -1 d -1 ). Moreover, the growth of vegetation led to a 4.99-6.41% increase in the abundance of iron reducing bacteria (Anaeromyxobacter, Pseudomonas and Geobacter) and iron reducing bacteria play an essential role in Feammox process. An estimated loss of 23.7-43.9 kg N ha -1 year -1 was associated with Feammox in the examined riparian zone. Overall, the co-occurrence of ammonium oxidation and iron reduction suggest that Feammox can play an essential role in the pathway of nitrogen removal in riparian zones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Formation of environmentally persistent free radical (EPFR) in iron(III) cation-exchanged smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G; Roy, Amitava; dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Dellinger, Barry; Cook, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been found at a number of Superfund sites, with EPFRs being formed via a proposed redox process at ambient environmental conditions. The possibility of such a redox process taking place at ambient environmental conditions is studied utilizing a surrogate soil system of phenol and iron(III)-exchanged calcium montmorillonite clay, Fe(III)CaM. Sorption of phenol by the Fe(III)CaM is demonstrated by Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as evidenced by the peaks between 1345 cm(-1) and 1595 cm(-1), and at lower frequencies between 694 cm(-1) and 806 cm(-1), as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, as shown by an increase in interlayer spacing within Fe(III)CaM. The formation and characterization of the EPFRs is determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing phenoxyl-type radical with a g-factor of 2.0034 and ΔHP-P of 6.1 G at an average concentration of 7.5 × 10(17) spins per g. EPFRs lifetime data are indicative of oxygen and water molecules being responsible for EPFR decay. The change in the oxidation state of the iron redox center is studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, showing that 23% of the Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the XANES results. These findings, when combined with the EPFR concentration data, demonstrate that the stoichiometry of the EPFR formation under the conditions of this study is 1.5 × 10(-2) spins per Fe(II) atom.

  15. Predictive modelling of Fe(III) precipitation in iron removal process for bioleaching circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Pauliina; Ozkaya, Bestamin; Kaksonen, Anna H; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the applicability of three modelling approaches was determined in an effort to describe complex relationships between process parameters and to predict the performance of an integrated process, which consisted of a fluidized bed bioreactor for Fe(3+) regeneration and a gravity settler for precipitative iron removal. Self-organizing maps were used to visually evaluate the associations between variables prior to the comparison of two different modelling methods, the multiple regression modelling and artificial neural network (ANN) modelling, for predicting Fe(III) precipitation. With the ANN model, an excellent match between the predicted and measured data was obtained (R (2) = 0.97). The best-fitting regression model also gave a good fit (R (2) = 0.87). This study demonstrates that ANNs and regression models are robust tools for predicting iron precipitation in the integrated process and can thus be used in the management of such systems.

  16. Sorption of microamount of colloidal silver iodide on hydrated iron(III) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepak, F.; Nova, J.

    1975-01-01

    Sorption of a microamount of colloidal silver iodide labelled with 131 I on hydrated iron/III/ oxide suspension was studied. The sorption dependence upon pH, sorbent amount, and inert electrolyte concentration has revealed that sorption of silver iodide reaches no more than 63%. The sorption lasted one hour during which the maximum value was reached. Desorption time was one hour, as well. Except for measuring the sorption dependence on pH, the sorption pH was 7.0, temperature 24+-2 0 C. (F.G.)

  17. Kinetics and Products of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Iron(II/III)-Bearing Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe-Wong, Claresta; Brown, Gordon E; Maher, Kate

    2017-09-05

    Hexavalent chromium is a water-soluble pollutant, the mobility of which can be controlled by reduction of Cr(VI) to less soluble, environmentally benign Cr(III). Iron(II/III)-bearing clay minerals are widespread potential reductants of Cr(VI), but the kinetics and pathways of Cr(VI) reduction by such clay minerals are poorly understood. We reacted aqueous Cr(VI) with two abiotically reduced clay minerals: an Fe-poor montmorillonite and an Fe-rich nontronite. The effects of ionic strength, pH, total Fe content, and the fraction of reduced structural Fe(II) [Fe(II)/Fe(total)] were examined. The last variable had the largest effect on Cr(VI) reduction kinetics: for both clay minerals, the rate constant of Cr(VI) reduction varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude with Fe(II)/Fe(total) and is described by a linear free energy relationship. Under all conditions examined, Cr and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra show that the main Cr-bearing product is a Cr(III)-hydroxide and that Fe remains in the clay structure after reacting with Cr(VI). This study helps to quantify our understanding of the kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by Fe(II/III)-bearing clay minerals and may improve predictions of Cr(VI) behavior in subsurface environments.

  18. Characterization of a tricationic trigonal bipyramidal iron(IV) cyanide complex, with a very high reduction potential, and its iron(II) and iron(III) congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Jason; Farquhar, Erik R; Guo, Yisong; Cranswick, Matthew A; Ray, Kallol; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2011-04-04

    Currently, there are only a handful of synthetic S = 2 oxoiron(IV) complexes. These serve as models for the high-spin (S = 2) oxoiron(IV) species that have been postulated, and confirmed in several cases, as key intermediates in the catalytic cycles of a variety of nonheme oxygen activating enzymes. The trigonal bipyramidal complex [Fe(IV)(O)(TMG(3)tren)](2+) (1) was both the first S = 2 oxoiron(IV) model complex to be generated in high yield and the first to be crystallographically characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that the TMG(3)tren ligand is also capable of supporting a tricationic cyanoiron(IV) unit, [Fe(IV)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](3+) (4). This complex was generated by electrolytic oxidation of the high-spin (S = 2) iron(II) complex [Fe(II)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](+) (2), via the S = 5/2 complex [Fe(III)(CN)(TMG(3)tren)](2+) (3), the progress of which was conveniently monitored by using UV-vis spectroscopy to follow the growth of bathochromically shifting ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) bands. A combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopies was used to establish that 4 has a S = 0 iron(IV) center. Consistent with its diamagnetic iron(IV) ground state, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of 4 indicated a significant contraction of the iron-donor atom bond lengths, relative to those of the crystallographically characterized complexes 2 and 3. Notably, 4 has an Fe(IV/III) reduction potential of ∼1.4 V vs Fc(+/o), the highest value yet observed for a monoiron complex. The relatively high stability of 4 (t(1/2) in CD(3)CN solution containing 0.1 M KPF(6) at 25 °C ≈ 15 min), as reflected by its high-yield accumulation via slow bulk electrolysis and amenability to (13)C NMR at -40 °C, highlights the ability of the sterically protecting, highly basic peralkylguanidyl donors of the TMG(3)tren ligand to support highly charged high-valent complexes.

  19. Transformation of Nitrate and Toluene in Groundwater by Sulfur Modified Iron(SMI-III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W.; Park, S.; Lim, J.; Hong, U.; Kwon, S.; Kim, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In Korea, nitrate and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene isomers (BTEX) are frequently detected together as ground water contaminants. Therefore, a system simultaneously treating both nitrate (inorganic compound) and BTEX (organic compounds) is required to utilize groundwater as a water resource. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of Sulfur Modified Iron (SMI-III) in treating both nitrate and BTEX contaminated groundwater. Based on XRD (X-Ray Diffraction) analysis, the SMI-III is mainly composed of Fe3O4, S, and Fe. A series of column tests were conducted at three different empty bed contact times (EBCTs) for each compound. During the experiments, removal efficiency for both nitrate and toluene were linearly correlated with EBCT, suggesting that SMI-III have an ability to transform both nitrate and toluene. The concentration of SO42- and oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) were also measured. After exposed to nitrate contaminated groundwater, the composition of SMI-III was changed to Fe2O3, Fe3O4, Fe, and Fe0.95S1.05. The trends of effluent sulfate concentrations were inversely correlated with effluent nitrate concentrations, while the trends of ORP values, having the minimum values of -480 mV, were highly correlated with effluent nitrate concentrations. XRD analysis before and after exposed to nitrate contaminated groundwater, sulfate production, and nitrite detection as a reductive transformation by-product of nitrate suggest that nitrate is reductively transformed by SMI-III. Interestingly, in the toluene experiments, the trends of ORP values were inversely correlated with effluent toluene concentrations, suggesting that probably degrade through oxidation reaction. Consequently, nitrate and toluene probably degrade through reduction and oxidation reaction, respectively and SMI-III could serve as both electron donor and acceptor.

  20. Adsorption Characteristics of Different Adsorbents and Iron(III Salt for Removing As(V from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Ćurko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the adsorption performance of three types of adsorbents for removal of As(V from water: Bayoxide® E33 (granular iron(III oxide, Titansorb® (granular titanium oxide and a suspension of precipitated iron(III hydroxide. Results of As(V adsorption stoichiometry of two commercial adsorbents and precipitated iron(III hydroxide in tap and demineralized water were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm equations, from which adsorption constants and adsorption capacity were calculated. The separation factor RL for the three adsorbents ranged from 0.04 to 0.61, indicating effective adsorption. Precipitated iron(III hydroxide had the greatest, while Titansorb had the lowest capacity to adsorb As(V. Comparison of adsorption from tap or demineralized water showed that Bayoxide and precipitated iron(III hydroxide had higher adsorption capacity in demineralized water, whereas Titansorb showed a slightly higher capacity in tap water. These results provide mechanistic insights into how commonly used adsorbents remove As(V from water.

  1. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Trigger a Spin-Flip in Iron(III) Porphyrin Complexes**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Dipankar; Quesne, Matthew G; de Visser, Sam P; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2015-01-01

    A key step in cytochrome P450 catalysis includes the spin-state crossing from low spin to high spin upon substrate binding and subsequent reduction of the heme. Clearly, a weak perturbation in P450 enzymes triggers a spin-state crossing. However, the origin of the process whereby enzymes reorganize their active site through external perturbations, such as hydrogen bonding, is still poorly understood. We have thus studied the impact of hydrogen-bonding interactions on the electronic structure of a five-coordinate iron(III) octaethyltetraarylporphyrin chloride. The spin state of the metal was found to switch reversibly between high (S=5/2) and intermediate spin (S=3/2) with hydrogen bonding. Our study highlights the possible effects and importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in heme proteins. This is the first example of a synthetic iron(III) complex that can reversibly change its spin state between a high and an intermediate state through weak external perturbations. PMID:26109743

  2. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-04-12

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  3. Fabrication and Application of Iron(III-Oxide Nanoparticle/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite Cone in Microfluidic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chun Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented the fabrication and applications of an iron(III-oxide nanoparticle/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS cone as a component integrated in lab on a chip. The two main functions of this component were to capture magnetic microbeads in the microfluid and to mix two laminar fluids by generating disturbance. The iron(III-oxide nanoparticle/PDMS cone was fabricated by automatic dispensing and magnetic shaping. Three consecutive cones of 300 μm in height were asymmetrically placed along a microchannel of 2 mm in width and 1.1 mm in height. Flow passing the cones was effectively redistributed for Renolds number lower than . Streptavidin-coated magnetic microbeads which were bound with biotin were successfully captured by the composite cones as inspected under fluorescence microscope. The process parameters for fabricating the composite cones were investigated. The fabricated cone in the microchannel could be applied in lab on a chip for bioassay in the future.

  4. A study of the solvent effect on the chemical interaction between ortho-positronium and iron(III)-chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical rate constant (k) between ortho-positronium (o-Ps) and iron(III)-chloride was measured in donor solvents as benzene, acetone, pyridine and ethanol. The minimal k was obtained in benzene and the maximal one in acetone. The minimal k value was explained by the low dispersity of FeCl 3 in benzene, and the high rate of the interaction in acetone was considered to be the result of the presence of monomer and dimer iron(III)-species and of the chloride coordination to iron(III). The probability of Ps formation depended only on the character of the solvent and not on the concentration of the FeCl 3 solute. (author)

  5. Different arsenate and phosphate incorporation effects on the nucleation and growth of iron(III) (Hydr)oxides on quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Chelsea W; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-10-21

    Iron(III) (hydr)oxides play an important role in the geochemical cycling of contaminants in natural and engineered aquatic systems. The ability of iron(III) (hydr)oxides to immobilize contaminants can be related to whether the precipitates form heterogeneously (e.g., at mineral surfaces) or homogeneously in solution. Utilizing grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), we studied heterogeneous iron(III) (hydr)oxide nucleation and growth on quartz substrates for systems containing arsenate and phosphate anions. For the iron(III) only system, the radius of gyration (Rg) of heterogeneously formed precipitates grew from 1.5 to 2.5 (± 1.0) nm within 1 h. For the system containing 10(-5) M arsenate, Rg grew from 3.6 to 6.1 (± 0.5) nm, and for the system containing 10(-5) M phosphate, Rg grew from 2.0 to 4.0 (± 0.2) nm. While the systems containing these oxyanions had more growth, the system containing only iron(III) had the most nucleation events on substrates. Ex situ analyses of homogeneously and heterogeneously formed precipitates indicated that precipitates in the arsenate system had the highest water content and that oxyanions may bridge iron(III) hydroxide polymeric embryos to form a structure similar to ferric arsenate or ferric phosphate. These new findings are important because differences in nucleation and growth rates and particle sizes will impact the number of available reactive sites and the reactivity of newly formed particles toward aqueous contaminants.

  6. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz F, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  7. A Novel Sensor for Monitoring of Iron(III) Ions Based on Porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlascici, Dana; Fagadar-Cosma, Eugenia; Popa, Iuliana; Chiriac, Vlad; Gil-Agusti, Mayte

    2012-01-01

    Three A3B porphyrins with mixed carboxy-, phenoxy-, pyridyl-, and dimethoxy-substituent functionalization on the meso-phenyl groups were obtained by multicomponent synthesis, fully characterized and used as ionophores for preparing PVC-based membrane sensors selective to iron(III). The membranes have an ionophore:PVC:plasticizer composition ratio of 1:33:66. Sodium tetraphenylborate was used as additive (20 mol% relative to ionophore). The performance characteristics (linear concentration range, slope and selectivity) of the sensors were investigated. The best results were obtained for the membrane based on 5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris(4-phenoxyphenyl)-porphyrin plasticized with bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate, in a linear range from 1 × 10−7–1 × 10−1 M with a slope of 21.6 mV/decade. The electrode showed high selectivity with respect to alkaline and heavy metal ions and a response time of 20 s. The influence of pH on the sensor response was studied. The sensor was used for a period of six weeks and the utility has been tested for the quantitative determination of Fe(III) in recovered solutions from spent lithium ion batteries and for the quantitative determination of Fe(III) in tap water samples. PMID:22969395

  8. A novel sensor for monitoring of iron(III) ions based on porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlascici, Dana; Fagadar-Cosma, Eugenia; Popa, Iuliana; Chiriac, Vlad; Gil-Agusti, Mayte

    2012-01-01

    Three A(3)B porphyrins with mixed carboxy-, phenoxy-, pyridyl-, and dimethoxy-substituent functionalization on the meso-phenyl groups were obtained by multicomponent synthesis, fully characterized and used as ionophores for preparing PVC-based membrane sensors selective to iron(III). The membranes have an ionophore:PVC:plasticizer composition ratio of 1:33:66. Sodium tetraphenylborate was used as additive (20 mol% relative to ionophore). The performance characteristics (linear concentration range, slope and selectivity) of the sensors were investigated. The best results were obtained for the membrane based on 5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris(4-phenoxyphenyl)-porphyrin plasticized with bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate, in a linear range from 1 × 10(-7)-1 × 10(-1) M with a slope of 21.6 mV/decade. The electrode showed high selectivity with respect to alkaline and heavy metal ions and a response time of 20 s. The influence of pH on the sensor response was studied. The sensor was used for a period of six weeks and the utility has been tested for the quantitative determination of Fe(III) in recovered solutions from spent lithium ion batteries and for the quantitative determination of Fe(III) in tap water samples.

  9. Determinação de ferro (III em produtos farmacêuticos por titulação fotométrica = Determination of iron (III in pharmaceutical products by photometric titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airton Vicente Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho descreve a montagem de um sistema de titulacao fotometrica simples e de baixo custo para a determinacao de ferro (III em produtos farmaceuticos. O sistema de titulacao fotometrica foi construido utilizando-se a bomba peristaltica de um espectrofotometro convencional. O procedimento e baseado na titulacao de ferro (III com EDTA e acido salicilico como indicador. A absorcao do complexo ferro (III-acido salicilico foi monitorada espectrofotometricamente em 525 nm. O limite de quantificacao foi de 5 ƒÝg de ferro (III. O procedimento de titulacao fotometrica foi aplicado para a determinacao de ferro (III em amostras contendo sulfato ferroso e hidroxido ferrico polimaltosado. O procedimento mostrou sensibilidade, reprodutibilidade e precisao para a utilizacao em analise rotineira de ferro (III em produtos farmaceuticos.This paper describes a simple, precise and low-cost photometrictitration method for iron (III determination in pharmaceutical preparations. The photometric titration system was constructed using the peristaltic pump of a conventional spectrophotometer. The method is based on titration of iron (III with EDTA using salicylic acid as indicator. The absorption of the iron (III-salicylic acid complex wasmonitored spectrophotometrically at 525 nm. The limit of quantification was 5 ƒÝg of iron (III. The photometric titration procedure was applied for the determination of iron (III in samples of ferrous sulfate and ferric hydroxide polymaltose complex. The procedure showed sensibility, reproducibility and accuracy for use as a method for the routine analysis of iron (III in pharmaceutical formulations.

  10. Carbon-13 magnetic relaxation rates or iron (III) complexes of some biogenic amines and parent compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, A.; Monduzzi, M.; Saba, G.

    1980-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation rates (R 1 ) from naturally occuring C-13 F.T. N.M.R. spectra of some catecholamines and parent compounds with Iron(III) at pD = 4 were determined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying their association in aqueous solutions. Complexation was observed only for catecholic ligands. The R 1 values were used to calculate iron-carbon scaled distances, and two complexation models were proposed where the catecholic function binds Fe(III) in the first and second coordination spheres respectively. The latter case was shown to be the consistent with the molecular geometries. (orig.)

  11. Chemical state analysis of iron(III) compounds precipitated homogeneously from solutions containing urea by means of Moessbauer spectrometry and x-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujihira, Yusuke; Ohyabu, Matashige; Murakami, Tetsuro; Horie, Tsuyoshi.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical states of iron(III) compounds, precipitated homogeneously by heating the iron(III) salt solution at 363 K in the presence of urea, was studied by means of Moessbauer spectrometry and X-ray diffractometry. The pH-time relation of urea hydrolysis revealed that the precipitation process from homogeneous solution is identical to the hydrolysis of iron(III) ion at pH around 2 under the homogeneous supply of OH - ion, which is generated by hydrolysis of urea. Accordingly, iron(III) oxide hydroxide or similar compounds to the hydrolysis products of iron(III) ion was precipitated by the precipitation from homogeneous solution methods. Akaganeite (β-FeOOH) was crystallized from 0.1 M iron(III) chloride solution. Goethite(α-FeOOH) and hematite(α-Fe 2 O 3 ) was precipitated from 0.1 M iron(III) nitrate solution, vigorous liberation of OH - ion favoring the crystallization of hematite. The addition of chloride ion to the solution resulted in the formation of akaganeite. Basic salt of iron sulfate[NH 4 Fe 3 (OH) 6 (SO 4 ) 2 ] and goethite were formed from 0.1 M iron(III) sulfate solution, the former being obtained in the more moderate condition of the urea hydrolysis ( 363 K). (author)

  12. Moessbauer spectroscopic evidence for iron(III) complexation and reduction in acidic aqueous solutions of indole-3-butyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A.; Kamnev, A.A.; Shchelochkov, A.G.; Medzihradszky-Schweiger, H.; Mink, J.; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest

    2004-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopic studies were carried out in acidic (pH 2.3) 57 Fe III nitrate containing aqueous solutions of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen at various periods of time after mixing the reagents. The data obtained show that in solution in the presence of IBA, iron(III) forms a complex with a dimeric structure characterised by a quadrupole doublet, whereas without IBA under similar conditions iron(III) exhibits a broad spectral feature due to a slow paramagnetic spin relaxation which, at liquid nitrogen temperature, results in a large anomalous line broadening (or, at T = 4.2 K, in a hyperfine magnetic splitting). The spectra of 57 Fe III +IBA solutions, kept at ambient temperature under aerobic conditions for increasing periods of time before freezing, contained a gradually increasing contribution of a component with a higher quadrupole splitting. The Moessbauer parameters for that component are typical for iron(II) aquo complexes, thus showing that under these conditions gradual reduction of iron(III) occurs, so that the majority (85%) of dissolved iron(III) is reduced within 2 days. The Moessbauer parameters for the iron(III)-IBA complex in aqueous solution and in the solid state (separated from the solution by filtration) were found to be similar, which may indicate that the dissolved and solid complexes have the same composition and/or iron(III) coordination environment. For the solid complex, the data of elemental analysis suggest the following composition of the dimer: [L 2 Fe-(OH) 2 -FeL 2 ] (where L is indole-3-butyrate). This structure is also in agreement with the data of infrared spectroscopic study of the complex reported earlier, with the side-chain carboxylic group in indole-3-butyrate as a bidentate ligand. The Moessbauer parameters for the solid 57 Fe III -IBA complex at T = 80 K and its acetone solution rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen were virtually identical, which indicates that the complex retains its

  13. Iron(III) protoporphyrin IX-single-wall carbon nanotubes modified electrodes for hydrogen peroxide and nitrite detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turdean, Graziella L.; Popescu, Ionel Catalin; Curulli, Antonella; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Iron(III) protoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)P), adsorbed either on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) or on hydroxyl-functionalized SWCNT (SWCNT-OH), was incorporated within a Nafion matrix immobilized on the surface of a graphite electrode. From cyclic voltammetric measurements, performed under different experimental conditions (pH and potential scan rate), it was established that the Fe(III)P/Fe(II)P redox couple involves 1e - /1H + . The heterogeneous electron transfer process occurred faster when Fe(III)P was adsorbed on SWCNT-OH (∼11 s -1 ) than on SWCNT (∼4.9 s -1 ). Both the SWCNT-Fe(III)P- and SWCNT-OH-Fe(III)P-modified graphite electrodes exhibit electrocatalytic activity for H 2 O 2 and nitrite reduction. The modified electrodes sensitivities were found varying in the following sequences: S SWCNT-OH-Fe(III)P = 2.45 mA/M ∼ S SWCNT-Fe(III)P = 2.95 mA/M > S Fe(III)P = 1.34 mA/M for H 2 O 2 , and S SWCNT-Fe(III)P = 3.54 mA/M > S Fe(III)P 1.44 mA/M > S SWCNT-OH-Fe(III)P = 0.81 mA/M for NO 2 -

  14. Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of Arsenic(III) at Platinum-Iron(III) Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Nanotube on Glassy Carbon Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Hyun; Hong, Hun Gi

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical detection of As(III) was investigated on a platinum-iron(III) nanoparticles modified multiwalled carbon nanotube on glassy carbon electrode(nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE) in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 . The nanoPt-Fe(III)/ MWCNT/GCE was prepared via continuous potential cycling in the range from .0.8 to 0.7 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), in 0.1 M KCl solution containing 0.9 mM K 2 PtCl 6 and 0.6 mM FeCl 3 . The Pt nanoparticles and iron oxide were co-electrodeposited into the MWCNT-Nafion composite film on GCE. The resulting electrode was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). For the detection of As(III), the nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE showed low detection limit of 10 nM (0.75 ppb) and high sensitivity of 4.76 μAμM -1 , while the World Health Organization's guideline value of arsenic for drinking water is 10 ppb. It is worth to note that the electrode presents no interference from copper ion, which is the most serious interfering species in arsenic detection

  15. Aquachloridobis[5-(2-pyridyl-1H-tetrazolato-κN1]iron(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Fe(C6H4N52Cl(H2O], was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction of FeCl3 with 2-(1H-tetrazol-5-ylpyridine. The iron(III metal centre exhibits a distorted octahedral coordination geometry provided by four N atoms from two bidentate organic ligands, one water O atom and one chloride anion. The pyridine and tetrazole rings are nearly coplanar [dihedral angles = 4.32 (15 and 5.04 (14°]. In the crystal structure, intermolecular O—H...N hydrogen bonds link the complex molecules into a two-dimensional network parallel to (100.

  16. Synthesis, Physicochemical Properties, and Antimicrobial Studies of Iron (III Complexes of Ciprofloxacin, Cloxacillin, and Amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian I. Eze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron (III complexes of ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin, and cloxacillin were synthesized and their aqueous solubility profiles, relative stabilities, and antimicrobial properties were evaluated. The complexes showed improved aqueous solubility when compared to the corresponding ligands. Relative thermal and acid stabilities were determined spectrophotometrically and the results showed that the complexes have enhanced thermal and acid stabilities when compared to the pure ligands. Antimicrobial studies showed that the complexes have decreased activities against most of the tested microorganisms. Ciprofloxacin complex, however, showed almost the same activity as the corresponding ligand. Job’s method of continuous variation suggested 1 : 2 metals to ligand stoichiometry for ciprofloxacin complex but 1 : 1 for cloxacillin complex.

  17. Spin-crossover in an iron(III)-bispidine-alkylperoxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, Jochen; Comba, Peter; Que, Lawrence

    2006-09-04

    The iron(II) complex of a tetradentate bispidine ligand with two tertiary amines and two pyridine groups (L = dimethyl [3,7-dimethyl-9,9'-dihydroxy-2,4-di-(2-pyridyl)-3,7-diazabicyclo nonan-1,5-dicaboxylate]) is oxidized with tert-butyl hydroperoxide to the corresponding end-on tert-butylperoxo complex [Fe(III)(L)(OOtBu)(X)]n+ (X = solvent, anion). UV-vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopy, as a function of the solvent, show that this is a spin-crossover compound. The experimentally observed Raman vibrations for both low-spin and high-spin isomers are in good agreement with those computed by DFT.

  18. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eCoursolle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA, an integral outer membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB and an outer membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC. Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC / mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA / MtrE / OmcA is able to reduce iron(III citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications towards the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production.

  19. Extraction of iron(III) with diphenyl-2-pyridylmethane dissolved in benzene from aqueous chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhail Ahmed; Shamas-Ud-Zuha; Abdul Ghafoor; Ejaz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of extraction has been investigated by partition, slope analysis and loading-ratio data. The results obtained give a picture of the mechanism of extraction of FeCl 4 - ions in relation to the hydration and solvation of the compound extracted. The possible formula of the extracted species is (DPPM)sub(3)Hsub(3)Osup(+)(Hsub(2)O)sub(n)-FeClsub(4)sup(-). In dilute aqueous hydrochloric acid systems the influence of the concentration of a number of salts with cations of different electrical potentials (Ze/r), on iron(III) extraction, has been studied. Splitting of the organic phases occurs at high acid and/or high salt concentrations. The phenomenon is explained on the basis of the variability of the hydration number. Investigations have been made to understand the parameters controlling the extraction of the metal and it is shown that the extraction offers a simple, fast and selective separation method of iron from solutions. (author)

  20. Iron(III Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana L. H. Rebelo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(III fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H2TPFPP and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPPCl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPPCl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H2TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPPCl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(IIIporphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide and green solvent (ethanol. Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  1. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delaire, Caroline; van Genuchten, Case M.; Amrose, Susan E.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2016-01-01

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) is a low-cost process in which Fe(II) generated from an Fe(0) anode reacts with dissolved O2 to form (1) Fe(III) precipitates with an affinity for bacterial cell walls and (2) bactericidal reactive oxidants. Previous work suggests that Fe-EC is a promising treatment

  2. Understanding the role of multiheme cytochromes in iron(III) reduction and arsenic mobilization by Shewanella sp. ANA-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, C.; Duenas, R.; Saltikov, C.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) and of arsenate (As (V)) to arsenite (As (III)) by Fe (III) reducing and As (V) respiring prokaryotes such as the bacterium Shewanella sp. ANA-3 may contribute to arsenic mobilization in aquifers contaminated with arsenic, specifically in places such as Bangladesh. Under oxic conditions As (V) predominates and is often adsorbed onto mineral surfaces such as amorphous ferrihydrite. However, under anoxic conditions As (III) predominates, sorbs to fewer minerals, and has a greater hydrologic mobility compared to As (V). The genetic mechanism underlying arsenic release from subsurface material most likely involves a combination of respiratory gene clusters (e.g. mtr/omc and arr). In this study, we are investigating the genetic pathways underlying arsenic mobilization. We have generated various mutations in the mtr/omc gene cluster, which encodes several outermembrane decaheme c-type cytochromes. Deletions in one mtr/omc gene did not eliminate iron reduction. However, strains carrying multiple gene deletions were greatly impaired in iron reduction abilities. Work is currently underway to generate combinations of iron reduction and arsenate reduction single and double mutants that will be used to investigate microbial mobilization of arsenic in flow-through columns containing As (V)-HFO coated sand. This work will address the importance of arsenate reduction and iron reduction in the mobilization of arsenic.

  3. Influence of dihydroxybenzenes on paracetamol and ciprofloxacin degradation and iron(III) reduction in Fenton processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa E Silva, Beatriz; de Lima Perini, João Angelo; Nogueira, Raquel F Pupo

    2017-03-01

    The degradation of paracetamol (PCT) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) was compared in relation to the generation of dihydroxylated products, Fe(III) reduction and reaction rate in the presence of dihydroxybenzene (DHB) compounds, or under irradiation with free iron (Fe 3+ ) or citrate complex (Fecit) in Fenton or photo-Fenton process. The formation of hydroquinone (HQ) was observed only during PCT degradation in the dark, which increased drastically the rate of PCT degradation, since HQ formed was able to reduce Fe 3+ and contributed to PCT degradation efficiency. When HQ was initially added, PCT and CIP degradation rate in the dark was much higher in comparison to the absence of HQ, due to the higher and faster formation of Fe 2+ at the beginning of reaction. In the absence of HQ, no CIP degradation was observed; however, when HQ was added after 30 min, the degradation rate increased drastically. Ten PCT hydroxylated intermediates were identified in the absence of HQ, which could contribute for Fe(III) reduction and consequently to the degradation in a similar way as HQ. During CIP degradation, only one product of hydroxyl radical attack on benzene ring and substitution of the fluorine atom was identified when HQ was added to the reaction medium.

  4. Thioether-ligated iron(ii) and iron(iii)-hydroperoxo/alkylperoxo complexes with an H-bond donor in the second coordination sphere†

    OpenAIRE

    Widger, Leland R.; Jiang, Yunbo; McQuilken, Alison C.; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Siegler, Maxime A.; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P.; Goldberg, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The non-heme iron complexes, [FeII(N3PySR)(CH3CN)](BF4)2 (1) and [FeII(N3PyamideSR)](BF4)2 (2), afford rare examples of metastable Fe(iii)-OOH and Fe(iii)-OOtBu complexes containing equatorial thioether ligands and a single H-bond donor in the second coordination sphere. These peroxo complexes were characterized by a range of spectroscopic methods and density functional theory studies. The influence of a thioether ligand and of one H-bond donor on the stability and spectroscopic properties of...

  5. Kinetic, spectroscopic and chemical modification study of iron release from transferrin; iron(III) complexation to adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Amino acids other than those that serve as ligands have been found to influence the chemical properties of transferrin iron. The catalytic ability of pyrophosphate to mediate transferrin iron release to a terminal acceptor is largely quenched by modification non-liganded histine groups on the protein. The first order rate constants of iron release for several partially histidine modified protein samples were measured. A statistical method was employed to establish that one non-liganded histidine per metal binding domain was responsible for the reduction in rate constant. These results imply that the iron mediated chelator, pyrophosphate, binds directly to a histidine residue on the protein during the iron release process. EPR spectroscopic results are consistent with this interpretation. Kinetic and amino acid sequence studies of ovotransferrin and lactoferrin, in addition to human serum transferrin, have allowed the tentative assignment of His-207 in the N-terminal domain and His-535 in the C-terminal domain as the groups responsible for the reduction in rate of iron release. The above concepts have been extended to lysine modified transferrin. Complexation of iron(II) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was also studied to gain insight into the nature of iron-ATP species present at physiological pH. 31 P NMR spectra are observed when ATP is presented in large excess

  6. Significance of Iron(II,III) Hydroxycarbonate Green Rust in Arsenic Remediation Using Zerovalent Iron in Laboratory Column Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the corrosion products of zerovalent iron used in three column tests for removing arsenic from water under dynamic flow conditions. Each column test lasted three- to four-months using columns consisting of a 10.3-cm depth of 50 : 50 (w : w, Peerless iron : sand) in t...

  7. Determination of silver in fresh water by atomic absorption spectrometry following flotation preconcentration by iron(III) collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundeva, K.; Stafilov, T. [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, St. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje (Yugoslavia)

    1997-08-01

    Colloid precipitate flotation of silver from fresh water is applied for preconcentration and separation. Optimal conditions using hydrated iron(III) oxide and iron(III) tetramethylenedithiocarbamate as collectors were investigated. Various factors affecting the silver recovery, including collector mass, nature of the supporting electrolyte, pH of the working medium, electrokinetic potential of the collector particle surfaces, type of surfactant, induction time etc., were checked. Within the optimal pH range (5.5-6.5) silver was separated quantitatively (94.9- 100.0%) with 30 mg Fe(III) as collector. The content of silver was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and compared to that from inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The detection limit of silver by the method described is 0.01 {mu}g/L. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  9. Impact of two iron(III) chelators on the iron, cadmium, lead and nickel accumulation in poplar grown under heavy metal stress in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihucz, Victor G; Csog, Árpád; Fodor, Ferenc; Tatár, Enikő; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Luminiţa; Záray, Gyula

    2012-04-15

    Poplar (Populus jacquemontiana var. glauca cv. Kopeczkii) was grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) or Pb(II), and Fe as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations. The present study was designed to compare the accumulation and distribution of Fe, Cd, Ni and Pb within the different plant compartments. Generally, Fe and heavy-metal accumulation were higher by factor 2-7 and 1.6-3.3, respectively, when Fe(III) citrate was used. Iron transport towards the shoot depended on the Fe(III) chelate and, generally, on the heavy metal used. Lead was accumulated only in the root. The amounts of Fe and heavy metals accumulated by poplar were very similar to those of cucumber grown in an identical way, indicating strong Fe uptake regulation of these two Strategy I plants: a cultivar and a woody plant. The Strategy I Fe uptake mechanism (i.e. reducing Fe(III) followed by Fe(II) uptake), together with the Fe(III) chelate form in the nutrient solution had significant effects on Fe and heavy metal uptake. Poplar appears to show phytoremediation potential for Cd and Ni, as their transport towards the shoot was characterized by 51-54% and 26-48% depending on the Fe(III) supply in the nutrient solution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of chemical warfare agents by zero-valent iron nanoparticles and ferrate(VI)/(III) composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zboril, Radek, E-mail: zboril@prfnw.upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Departments of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Andrle, Marek; Oplustil, Frantisek [Military Institute VOP-026 Sternberk, Division in Brno, Rybkova 8, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Machala, Libor; Tucek, Jiri; Filip, Jan; Marusak, Zdenek [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Departments of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Sharma, Virender K., E-mail: vsharma@fit.edu [Chemistry Department, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Center of Ferrate Excellence, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferrate(VI) has been found to be highly efficient to decontaminate chemical warfare agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fast degradation of sulfur mustard, soman and compound VX by ferrate(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles are considerably less efficient in degradation of studied warfare agents compared to ferrate(VI). - Abstract: Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles and a composite containing a mixture of ferrate(VI) and ferrate(III) were prepared by thermal procedures. The phase compositions, valence states of iron, and particle sizes of iron-bearing compounds were determined by combination of X-ray powder diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The applicability of these environmentally friendly iron based materials in treatment of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) has been tested with three representative compounds, sulfur mustard (bis(2-chlorethyl) sulfide, HD), soman ((3,3 Prime -imethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate, GD), and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothiolate (VX). Zero-valent iron, even in the nanodimensional state, had a sluggish reactivity with CWAs, which was also observed in low degrees of CWAs degradation. On the contrary, ferrate(VI)/(III) composite exhibited a high reactivity and complete degradations of CWAs were accomplished. Under the studied conditions, the estimated first-order rate constants ({approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}) with the ferrate(VI)/(III) composite were several orders of magnitude higher than those of spontaneous hydrolysis of CWAs (10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} s{sup -1}). The results demonstrated that the oxidative technology based on application of ferrate(VI) is very promising to decontaminate CWAs.

  11. Treatment of chemical warfare agents by zero-valent iron nanoparticles and ferrate(VI)/(III) composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zboril, Radek; Andrle, Marek; Oplustil, Frantisek; Machala, Libor; Tucek, Jiri; Filip, Jan; Marusak, Zdenek; Sharma, Virender K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ferrate(VI) has been found to be highly efficient to decontaminate chemical warfare agents. ► Fast degradation of sulfur mustard, soman and compound VX by ferrate(VI). ► Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles are considerably less efficient in degradation of studied warfare agents compared to ferrate(VI). - Abstract: Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles and a composite containing a mixture of ferrate(VI) and ferrate(III) were prepared by thermal procedures. The phase compositions, valence states of iron, and particle sizes of iron-bearing compounds were determined by combination of X-ray powder diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The applicability of these environmentally friendly iron based materials in treatment of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) has been tested with three representative compounds, sulfur mustard (bis(2-chlorethyl) sulfide, HD), soman ((3,3′-imethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate, GD), and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothiolate (VX). Zero-valent iron, even in the nanodimensional state, had a sluggish reactivity with CWAs, which was also observed in low degrees of CWAs degradation. On the contrary, ferrate(VI)/(III) composite exhibited a high reactivity and complete degradations of CWAs were accomplished. Under the studied conditions, the estimated first-order rate constants (∼10 −2 s −1 ) with the ferrate(VI)/(III) composite were several orders of magnitude higher than those of spontaneous hydrolysis of CWAs (10 −8 –10 −6 s −1 ). The results demonstrated that the oxidative technology based on application of ferrate(VI) is very promising to decontaminate CWAs.

  12. Determination of stability constants of iron(III and chromium(III-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine mixed complexes by electrophoretic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brij Bhushan Tewari

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stability constants of Fe(III and Cr(III with methyl cysteine and nitrilotriacetate (NTA were determined by paper electrophoretic technique. Beside binary ternary complexes have also been studied, in which nitrilotriacetate and methyl cysteine acts as primary and secondary ligand, respectively. The stability constants of mixed ligand complexes metal (M-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine have been found to be 5.72 plus or minus 0.09 and 5.54 plus or minus 0.11 (log K values for Fe(III and Cr(III complexes, respectively, at 35 oC and ionic strength 0.1 M.

  13. Spin-State-Controlled Photodissociation of Iron(III) Azide to an Iron(V) Nitride Complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andris, E.; Navrátil, R.; Jašík, J.; Sabenya, G.; Costas, M.; Srnec, Martin; Roithová, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 45 (2017), s. 14057-14060 ISSN 1521-3773 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion spectroscopy * Iron(V) nitride * Photodissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  14. Resonance Raman detection of iron-ligand vibrations in cyano(pyridine)(octaethylporphinato)iron(III): Effects of pyridine basicity on the Fe-CN bond strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Tadayuki; Hatano, Keiichiro; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Arata, Yoji

    1988-01-01

    The influence of axial ligand basicity on the bonding of iron(III) in cyano adducts of octaethylporphyrin has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. In a six-coordinate ferric low-spin complex, cyano(pyridine)(octaethylporphinato)iron(III), Fe(OEP)(CN)(py), Raman lines at 449 and 191 cm -1 were assigned to the ν(Fe-CN) and ν(Fe-py) stretching modes, respectively. When pyridine was displaced with its derivatives, py-X, where X = 4-cyano, 3-acetyl, 3-methyl, 4-methyl, 3,4-dimethyl, and 4-dimethylamino, the ν(Fe-CN) stretching frequency was found to decrease in the complex with a high pyridine basicity. It was concluded that the stronger the trans pyridine basicity, the weaker the iron-carbon (cyanide) bond. A clear frequency shift was observed in the ν 4 model, though most of the porphyrin vibrations were insensitive to the ligand substitution. The frequency of the ν 4 mode, which is the C a -N(pyrrole) breathing vibration of the porphyrin skeleton, was found to increase with an increase in pyridine basicity. This is contrary to what was found in ferrous low-spin hemes as CO complexes. The ν 4 shift in the CN complexes was explained in terms of forward π donation; donation of electrons from the porphyrin π orbital to the d π vacancy of the low-spin iron(III) weakened the C a -N(pyrrole) bonds and hence decreased the ν 4 frequency. 32 references, 8 figures

  15. How do operating conditions affect As(III) removal by iron electrocoagulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaire, Caroline; Amrose, Susan; Zhang, Minghui; Hake, James; Gadgil, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) has been shown to effectively remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater at low cost and has the potential to improve access to safe drinking water for millions of people. Understanding how operating conditions, such as the Fe dosage rate and the O 2 recharge rate, affect arsenic removal at different pH values is crucial to maximize the performance of Fe-EC under economic constraints. In this work, we improved upon an existing computational model to investigate the combined effects of pH, Fe dosage rate, and O 2 recharge rate on arsenic removal in Fe-EC. We showed that the impact of the Fe dosage rate strongly depends on pH and on the O 2 recharge rate, which has important practical implications. We identified the process limiting arsenic removal (As(III) oxidation versus As(V) adsorption) at different pH values, which allowed us to interpret the effect of operating conditions on Fe-EC performance. Finally, we assessed the robustness of the trends predicted by the model, which assumes a constant pH, against lab experiments reproducing more realistic conditions where pH is allowed to drift during treatment as a result of equilibration with atmospheric CO 2 . Our results provide a nuanced understanding of how operating conditions impact arsenic removal by Fe-EC and can inform decisions regarding the operation of this technology in a range of groundwaters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystal structures and Moessbauer spectra of spin-crossover iron(III) complexes of quinquedentate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yonezo; Noda, Yosuke; Oshio, Hiroki; Takashima, Yoshimasa; Matsumoto, Naohide

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic properties, Moessbauer spectra and crystal structures of spin-crossover iron(III) complexes with a quinquedentate ligand [FeLX]BPh 4 are reported. X and L denote a unidentate ligand and a quinquedentate ligand, respectively. [Fe(mbpN)(im)]BPh 4 shows spin-crossover behavior in an appropriate organic solvent, and [Fe(mbpN)(lut)]BPh 4 , [Fe(bpN)(py)]BPh 4 and [Fe(salten)X]BPh 4 (X = 4me-py or 2me-im) show spin-crossover behavior in a solid and in an organic solvent. It was found that the ligand field strength of salten was stronger than that of mbpN. The rates of spin-state interexchange in the complexes are as fast as the inverse of the lifetime (1 x 10 -7 s) of the Moessbauer nuclear level. The Moessbauer spectroscopic behavior of [Fe(mbpN)(lut)]BPh 4 and [Fe(bpN)(py)]BPh 4 is different to that of [Fe(salten)X]BPh 4 (X = 4me-py or 2me-im). The difference was ascribed to the different geometrical positions of the corresponding anions. (orig.)

  17. Efficient catalytic cycloalkane oxidation employing a "helmet" phthalocyaninato iron(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth S; Robinson, Jerome R; McCoy, Aaron M; McGaff, Robert W

    2011-06-14

    We have examined the catalytic activity of an iron(III) complex bearing the 14,28-[1,3-diiminoisoindolinato]phthalocyaninato (diiPc) ligand in oxidation reactions with three substrates (cyclohexane, cyclooctane, and indan). This modified metallophthalocyaninato complex serves as an efficient and selective catalyst for the oxidation of cyclohexane and cyclooctane, and to a far lesser extent indan. In the oxidations of cyclohexane and cyclooctane, in which hydrogen peroxide is employed as the oxidant under inert atmosphere, we have observed turnover numbers of 100.9 and 122.2 for cyclohexanol and cyclooctanol, respectively. The catalyst shows strong selectivity for alcohol (vs. ketone) formation, with alcohol to ketone (A/K) ratios of 6.7 and 21.0 for the cyclohexane and cyclooctane oxidations, respectively. Overall yields (alcohol + ketone) were 73% for cyclohexane and 92% for cyclooctane, based upon the total hydrogen peroxide added. In the catalytic oxidation of indan under similar conditions, the TON for 1-indanol was 10.1, with a yield of 12% based upon hydrogen peroxide. No 1-indanone was observed in the product mixture.

  18. Biliverdin reductase: more than a namesake - the reductase, its Peptide fragments, and biliverdin regulate activity of the three classes of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Peter E M; Tudor, Cicerone; Maines, Mahin D

    2012-01-01

    The expanse of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) functions in the cells is arguably unmatched by any single protein. hBVR is a Ser/Thr/Tyr-kinase, a scaffold protein, a transcription factor, and an intracellular transporter of gene regulators. hBVR is an upstream activator of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway and of protein kinase C (PKC) kinases in the two major arms of the pathway. In addition, it is the sole means for generating the antioxidant bilirubin-IXα. hBVR is essential for activation of ERK1/2 kinases by upstream MAPKK-MEK and by PKCδ, as well as the nuclear import and export of ERK1/2. Small fragments of hBVR are potent activators and inhibitors of the ERK kinases and PKCs: as such, they suggest the potential application of BVR-based technology in therapeutic settings. Presently, we have reviewed the function of hBVR in cell signaling with an emphasis on regulation of PKCδ activity.

  19. Biliverdin Reductase: More than a Namesake – The Reductase, Its Peptide Fragments, and Biliverdin Regulate Activity of the Three Classes of Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Tudor, Cicerone; Maines, Mahin. D.

    2012-01-01

    The expanse of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) functions in the cells is arguably unmatched by any single protein. hBVR is a Ser/Thr/Tyr-kinase, a scaffold protein, a transcription factor, and an intracellular transporter of gene regulators. hBVR is an upstream activator of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway and of protein kinase C (PKC) kinases in the two major arms of the pathway. In addition, it is the sole means for generating the antioxidant bilirubin-IXα. hBVR is essential for activation of ERK1/2 kinases by upstream MAPKK-MEK and by PKCδ, as well as the nuclear import and export of ERK1/2. Small fragments of hBVR are potent activators and inhibitors of the ERK kinases and PKCs: as such, they suggest the potential application of BVR-based technology in therapeutic settings. Presently, we have reviewed the function of hBVR in cell signaling with an emphasis on regulation of PKCδ activity. PMID:22419908

  20. Multisensor system for determination of iron(II), iron(III), uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) in complex solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legin, A.V.; Seleznev, B.L.; Rudnitskaya, A.M.; Vlasov, Yu.G.; Tverdokhlebov, S.V.; Mack, B.; Abraham, A.; Arnold, T.; Baraniak, L.; Nitsche, H.

    1999-01-01

    Development and analytical evaluation of a multisensor system based on the principles of 'electronic tongue' for the determination of low contents of uranium(VI), uranium(IV), iron(II) and iron(III) in complex aqueous media have been carried out. A set of 29 different chemical sensors on the basis of all- solid-state crystalline and vitreous materials with enhanced electronic conductivity and redox and ionic cross-sensitivity have been incorporated into the sensor array. Multidimensional data have been processed by pattern recognition methods such as artificial neural networks and partial least squares. It has been demonstrated that Fe(II) and Fe(III) contents in the range from 10 -7 to 10 -4 mol L -1 of total iron concentration can be determined with the average precision of about 25 %. U(VI) and U(IV) contents can been determined with the average precision of 10-40% depending on the concentration. The developed multisensor system can be applied in future for the analysis of mining and borehole waters as well other contaminated natural media, including on-site measurements. (author)

  1. Precipitation of iron (III) using magnesium oxide in fluidized bed; Precipitacion de hierro (III) utilizando oxido de magnesio en lecho fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban-Bocardo, P. A.; Ferreira-Rocha, S. D.

    2006-07-01

    A process for iron (III) removal by hydroxide precipitation from and acid synthetic inorganic effluent using magnesium oxide as an alternative precipitant agent in a fluidized bed was developed. An acid synthetic inorganic effluent containing 100 and 200 mg/l of ferric ions (pH=1.0) was continuously fed up to the acrylic column (30 cm high and 2 cm diameter) during 180 minutes. Magnesium oxide pulp (3% v/v) was injected at the beginning of the experiment in order to allow the iron hydroxides precipitation. The concentration and pH profiles agreed in their curves, while the pH profile rose,the concentration profile decreased and a high percentage of iron removal (higher to 99%) was reached. Extremely low iron concentrations have been reached, thus permitting to attend to the environmental standard of 10.0 mg/l for discharge of effluent containing ferric ions established by the law DN 10/86 of COPAM (Conselho de Politica Ambiental do Estado de Minas Gerais-Brazil). (Author)

  2. Iron(iii) bis(pyrazol-1-yl)acetate based decanuclear metallacycles: synthesis, structure, magnetic properties and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska, Małgorzata J; Bieńko, Alina; Herchel, Radovan; Haukka, Matti; Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Ożarowski, Andrzej; Drabent, Krzysztof; Hung, Chen-Hsiung

    2016-09-27

    The synthesis, structural aspects, magnetic interpretation and theoretical rationalizations for a new member of the ferric wheel family, a decanuclear iron(iii) complex with the formula [Fe 10 (bdtbpza) 10 (μ 2 -OCH 3 ) 20 ] (1), featuring the N,N,O tridentate bis(3,5-di-tert-butylpyrazol-1-yl)acetate ligand, are reported. The influence of the steric effect on both the core geometry and coordination mode is observed. Temperature dependent (2.0-300 K range) magnetic susceptibility studies carried out on complexes 1 established unequivocally antiferromagnetic (AF) interactions between high-spin iron(iii) centers (S = 5/2), leading to a ground state S = 0. The mechanism of AF intramolecular coupling was proved using a broken-symmetry approach within the density functional method at the B3LYP/def2-TZVP(-f)/def2-SVP level of theory.

  3. Extracellular polymeric substances mediate bioleaching/biocorrosion via interfacial processes involving iron(III) ions and acidophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Wolfgang; Gehrke, Tilman

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances seem to play a pivotal role in biocorrosion of metals and bioleaching, biocorrosion of metal sulfides for the winning of precious metals as well as acid rock drainage. For better control of both processes, the structure and function of extracellular polymeric substances of corrosion-causing or leaching bacteria are of crucial importance. Our research focused on the extremophilic bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, because of the "simplicity" and knowledge about the interactions of these bacteria with their substrate/substratum and their environment. For this purpose, the composition of the corresponding extracellular polymeric substances and their functions were analyzed. The extracellular polymeric substances of both species consist mainly of neutral sugars and lipids. The functions of the exopolymers seem to be: (i) to mediate attachment to a (metal) sulfide surface, and (ii) to concentrate iron(III) ions by complexation through uronic acids or other residues at the mineral surface, thus, allowing an oxidative attack on the sulfide. Consequently, dissolution of the metal sulfide is enhanced, which may result in an acceleration of 20- to 100-fold of the bioleaching process over chemical leaching. Experiments were performed to elucidate the importance of the iron(III) ions complexed by extracellular polymeric substances for strain-specific differences in oxidative activity for pyrite. Strains of A. ferrooxidans with a high amount of iron(III) ions in their extracellular polymeric substances possess greater oxidation activity than those with fewer iron(III) ions. These data provide insight into the function of and consequently the advantages that extracellular polymeric substances provide to bacteria. The role of extracellular polymeric substances for attachment under the conditions of a space station and resulting effects like biofouling, biocorrosion, malodorous gases, etc. will be discussed.

  4. Experimental investigation of aluminum complexing with sodium ion and of gallium and iron (III) speciation in natural solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diakonov, Igor

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work is to acquire thermodynamic data on the aqueous complexes forming between sodium and aluminum, gallium and hydroxide, and iron (III) and hydroxide. These data will provide for a better understanding of the transport and distribution of these elements in surface and hydrothermal fluids. Stability constants of the sodium-aluminate complex (Na Al(OH) 4 deg.) were obtained from boehmite solubility measurements at temperatures from 125 to 350 deg. C in alkaline solutions containing from 0.1 to 1 mol/L sodium. Complementary potentiometric measurements were performed with a sodium selective electrode, between 75 and 200 deg C (the potentiometric study was carried out by Gleb Pokrovski). Analyses of these data within the framework of the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) model allowed determination of the HKF parameters for Na Al(OH) 4 deg. and calculation of its thermodynamic properties to 800 deg. C and 5 kb. The results of this work show that Na Al(OH) 4 deg. complex formation increases significantly the solubility of aluminum-bearing minerals and consequently aluminum mobility in hydrothermal fluids. Gallium speciation in surface and hydrothermal fluids is dominated by the negatively charged species, Ga(OH) 4 - . The thermodynamic properties of this species were determined from of OEGaOOH solubility measurements as a function of pH and temperature from 25 to 250 deg. C. In general, the variation of gallium aqueous speciation with pH is similar to that of aluminum other than at temperatures less than 200 deg. C over the pH range 3 - 6. This difference can account for the independent behavior of gallium versus aluminum in numerous low temperature natural systems. The thermodynamic properties of Fe(OH) 3 deg. which dominates the speciation of Fe(III) in surface waters and Fe(OH) 4 - were determined from hematite solubility measurements as a function of pH, oxygen pressure and temperature from 110 to 300 deg. C. The available thermodynamic data on

  5. Applications of inorganic ion exchangers; I-sorption and fixation of some radionuclides in synthetic iron (III)titanate ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Mesalam, M.M.; El-Naggar, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    Iron(III) titanate as inorganic ion exchange material has been synthesized by addition of ferric nitrate solution to titanium tetrachloride (dissolved in 4M HCI) with molar ratio equal to unity. The data obtained proposed that the chemical formula of iron(III) titanate may written either as Fe 1 .3 (TiO). 2h 2 O or Fe(TiO 4 ) 0 .76.1.5H 2 O. The surface area values of unloaded and loaded iron(III) titanate with Cs + , Co 2 + and Eu 3 + ions were measured using BET-technique. The selectiy sequence for sorption of Cs + , Co 2 + and Fu 3 + ions on iron (III) titanate was found to be; Co 2 + > Eu 3 + > Cs + . The leach rate values of Cs + , Co 2 + and Fu 3 + ions from iron (II) titanate heated to 1000 degree C different leachants were determined and shows lower values compared to those obtained from unheated iron (III) titanate (dried at 50 degree C) which elucidate the suitability of iron (III) titanate in fixation of Cs + , Co 2 + and Eu 3 + ions by thermal treatment up to1000 degree.

  6. Investigation of iron(III) reduction and trace metal interferences in the determination of dissolved iron in seawater using flow injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ussher, Simon J. [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Milne, Angela [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Landing, William M. [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Attiq-ur-Rehman, Kakar [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Seguret, Marie J.M.; Holland, Toby [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Achterberg, Eric P. [National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Nabi, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Worsfold, Paul J., E-mail: pworsfold@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-12

    A detailed investigation into the performance of two flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) manifolds (with and without a preconcentration column) for the determination of sub-nanomolar dissolved iron (Fe(II) + Fe(III)), following the reduction of Fe(III) by sulphite, in seawater is described. Kinetic experiments were conducted to examine the efficiency of reduction of inorganic Fe(III) with sulphite under different conditions and a rigorous study of the potential interference caused by other transition metals present in seawater was conducted. Using 100 {mu}M concentrations of sulphite a reduction time of 4 h was sufficient to quantitatively reduce Fe(III) in seawater. Under optimal conditions, cobalt(II) and vanadium(IV)/(III) were the major positive interferences and strategies for their removal are reported. Specifically, cobalt(II) was masked by the addition of dimethylglyoxime to the luminol solution and vanadium(IV) was removed by passing the sample through an 8-hydroxyquinoline column in a low pH carrier stream. Manganese(II) also interfered by suppression of the CL response but this was not significant at typical open ocean concentrations.

  7. Iron sulphide containing hydrodesulfurization catalysts : Mössbauer study of the sulfidibility of alpha-iron(III) oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1988-01-01

    As a first step in the study of the sulphidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst systems the sulphiding of a well-characterized, unsupported model compound, viz. a-Fe2O3(mean particle diameter ca. 50 nm) was investigated using in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy and the temperature-programmed

  8. Chemical Castration Using Iron (III Chloride Hexahydrate (KEBIRI KIMIAWI MENGGUNAKAN FERIKLORIDA HEKSAHIDRAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Fakhrul Ulum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical castration is a method that can be applied easily without any surgical intervention in animals. This study utilized iron (III chloride hexahydrate (FeCl3.6H2O as a new material for chemical castration in mice. Twenty seven adult male mice were divided into five groups: FeCl3 20% (n = 6, FeCl3 10% (n = 6, FeCl3 5.0% (n = 6, FeCl3 2.5% (n = 6, and control NaCl 0.9% (n = 3. A 0.2 mL of NaCl 0.9% or FeCl3 in various concentrations was injected intra-testicularly on each testis of the mice. Post-castration survival rate with LD50 values was obtained at the concentrations between 2.5-5.0% of FeCl3 groups, and 100% mice survived in the control group. The size of testis and concentration of spermatozoa decreased, in contrast with the increased concentration of FeCl3 solution used seven days post-injection compared to the control group. ABSTRAK Kebiri/kastrasi kimiawi secara injeksi intra-testis merupakan metode pengebiriam yang dapat dilakukan dengan mudah tanpa prosedur bedah pada hewan. Penelitian ini memanfaatkan larutan besi (ferri/III klorida (FeCl3 sebagai bahan baru untuk tindakan kebiri kimiawi pada mencit. Mencit jantan dewasa umur lima bulan sebanyak 27 ekor dibagi dalam lima kelompok yaitu FeCl3 20% (n=6, FeCl3 10% (n=6, FeCl3 5,0% (n=6, FeCl3 2,5% (n=6 dan kontrol NaCl 0,9% (n=3. Larutan FeCl3 sebanyak 0,2 mL diinjeksikan secara intra-testikel pada setiap organ testis. Daya hidup pascakebiri injeksi nilai LD 50 diperoleh pada kelompok FeCl3 konsentrasi di antara 2,5-5,0 % dan kelompok kontrol 100 % hidup. Organ testis dalam skrotum mengalami pengecilan ukuran dan konsentrasi spermatozoa mengalami penurunan seiring dengan peningkatan konsentrasi larutan FeCl3 yang digunakan setelah tujuh hari pasca injeksi dibandingkan dengan kontrol.

  9. Novel spin transition between S = 5/2 and S = 3/2 in highly saddled iron(III) porphyrin complexes at extremely low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgo, Yoshiki; Chiba, Yuya; Hashizume, Daisuke; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Ozeki, Tomoji; Nakamura, Mikio

    2006-05-14

    A novel spin transition between S = 5/2 and S = 3/2 has been observed for the first time in five-coordinate, highly saddled iron(III) porphyrinates by EPR and SQUID measurements at extremely low temperatures.

  10. Moessbauer spectroscopic study on valence-detrapping and trapping of mixed-valence trinuclear iron (III, III, II) fluorine-substitute benzoate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Y.; Onaka, S.; Ogiso, R.; Takayama, T.; Takahashi, M.; Nakamoto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Four mixed-valence trinuclear iron(III, III, II) fluorine-substituted benzoate complexes were synthesized; Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 ·CH 2 Cl 2 (1), Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (2), Fe 3 O(2H-C 6 F 4 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (3), and Fe 3 O(4H-C 6 F 4 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 (4). By means of 57 Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, valence-detrapping and trapping phenomena have been investigated for the four mixed-valence complexes. The valence state of three iron ions is trapped at lower temperatures while it is fully detrapped at higher temperatures for 1. Valence detrapping is not observed for 2, 3, and 4 even at room temperature, although Moessbauer spectra for 3 and 4 show a complicated temperature dependence. (author)

  11. Functional Significance of Iron Deficiency. Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    Iron deficiency anemia impairs cognitive performance, physical capacity, and thermoregulation. Recent evidence suggests that these functional impairments are also evident in subclinical nonanemic iron deficiency. Very little is known about the relevance of the latter to the health of blacks, who have been shown to have the highest prevalence of…

  12. Glasses Containing Iron (II, III) Oxides For Immobilization Of Radioactive Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Heo, J.; Xu, K.; Choi, J.K.; Hrma, P.R.; Um, W.

    2011-01-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) has posed serious environmental threats as US Department of Energy's high-level waste. This work reports the vitrification of Re, as surrogate for Tc-99, by iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses, respectively. Iron-phosphate glasses can dissolve Re as high as ∼ 1.2 wt. %, which can become candidate waste forms for Tc-99 disposal, while borosilicate glasses can retain less than 0.1 wt. % of Re due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Vitrification of Re as Tc-99's mimic was investigated using iron-borosilicate and iron-phosphate glasses. The retention of Re in borosilicate glasses was less than 0.1 wt. % and more than 99 wt. % of Re were volatilized due to high melting temperature and long melting duration. Because the retention of Re in iron-phosphate glasses is as high as 1.2 wt. % and the volatilization is reduced down to ∼50 wt. %, iron-phosphate glasses can be one of the glass waste form candidates for Tc (or Re) disposal. The investigations of chemical durability and leaching test of iron-phosphate glasses containing Re are now underway to test the performance of the waste form.

  13. Manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide-graphene magnetic nanocomposite: synthesis, characterization, and application for the arsenic(III)-sorption from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Debabrata; Gupta, Kaushik; Ghosh, Arup Kumar [Presidency University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India); De, Amitabha [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Chemical Science Division (India); Banerjee, Sangam [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Surface Physics Division (India); Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.in [Presidency University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India)

    2012-12-15

    High specific surface area of graphene (GR) has gained special scientific attention in developing magnetic GR nanocomposite aiming to apply for the remediation of diverse environmental problems like point-of-use water purification and simultaneous separation of contaminants applying low external magnetic field (<1.0 T) from ground water. Fabrication of magnetic manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide (Mn{sub x}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 2-x}{sup 3+}O{sub 4}{sup 2-}) (IMBO)-GR nanocomposite is reported by exfoliating the GR layers. Latest microscopic, spectroscopic, powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and superconducting quantum interference device characterizations showed that the material is a magnetic nanocomposite with high specific surface area (280 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) and pore volume (0.3362 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}). Use of this composite for the immobilization of carcinogenic As(III) from water at 300 K and pH {approx}7.0 showed that the nanocomposite has higher binding efficiency with As(III) than the IMBO owing to its high specific surface area. The composite showed almost complete (>99.9 %) As(III) removal ({<=}10 {mu}g L{sup -1}) from water. External magnetic field of 0.3 T efficiently separated the water dispersed composite (0.01 g/10 mL) at room temperature (300 K). Thus, this composite is a promising material which can be used effectively as a potent As(III) immobilizer from the contaminated groundwater (>10 {mu}g L{sup -1}) to improve drinking water quality.

  14. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories: Formation of Iron(III) Thiocyannate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R.

    1997-10-01

    A series of 15 stopped-flow kinetic experiments relating to the formation of iron(III)- thiocyanate at 25.0 °C and I = 1.0 M (NaClO4) is described. A methodology is given whereby solution preparation and data collection are able to be carried out within the time scale of a single laboratory period (3-4 h). Kinetic data are obtained using constant [SCN-], and at three H+ concentrations (0.10, 0.20, 0.30 M) for varying concentrations of Fe3+ (ca. 0.0025 - 0.020 M). Rate data (450 nm) are consistent with rate laws for the forward and reverse reactions: kf = (k1 + k2Ka1/[H+])[Fe3+] and kr = k-1 + k-2Ka2/[H+] respectively, with k1,k-1 corresponding to the rate constants for formation and decay of FeSCN2+, k2, k-2 to the rate constants for formation and decay of the FeSCN(OH)+ ion and Ka1,Ka2 to the acid dissociation constants (coordinated OH2 ionization) of Fe3+ and FeSCN2+. Using literature values for the latter two quantities ( Ka1 = 2.04 x 10-3 M, Ka2 = 6.5 x 10-5 M) allows values for the four rate constants to be obtained. A typical data set is analyzed to give k1 = 109(10) M-1s-1, k-1 = 0.79(0.10) s-1, k2= 8020(800) M-1s-1, k-2 = 2630(230) s-1. Absorbance change data for reaction (DeltaA) follow the expression: DeltaA = Alim.Kf.[Fe3+]/(1 + Kf.[Fe3+]), with Alim corresponding to the absorbance of fully formed FeSCN2+ (i.e. free SCN- absent) and Kf to the formation constant of this complex (value in the example 112(5) M-1, c.f. 138(29) M-1 from the kinetic data).

  15. Adsorption and transformation of selected human-used macrolide antibacterial agents with iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feitosa-Felizzola, Juliana [Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Aix-Marseille Universites-CNRS (UMR 6264), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France); Hanna, Khalil [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, CNRS-Universite Henri Poincare-Nancy 1 (UMR 7564), 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54600 Villers-les-Nancy (France); Chiron, Serge [Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Aix-Marseille Universites-CNRS (UMR 6264), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: serge.chiron@univ-provence.fr

    2009-04-15

    The adsorption/transformation of two members (clarithromycin and roxithromycin) of the macrolide (ML) antibacterial agents on the surface of three environmental subsurface sorbents (clay, iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides) was investigated. The adsorption fitted well to the Freundlich model with a high sorption capacity. Adsorption probably occurred through a surface complexation mechanism and was accompanied by slow degradation of the selected MLs. Transformation proceeded through two parallel pathways: a major pathway was the hydrolysis of the cladinose sugar, and to a lesser extent the hydrolysis of the lactone ring. A minor pathway was the N-dealkylation of the amino sugar. This study indicates that Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of MLs. Such an attenuation route yields a range of intermediates that might retain some of their biological activity. - Iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of macrolide antibacterial agents.

  16. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors with oxygen, nitrate, manganese (IV), iron (III) and sulfate as electron acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Natalie; Page, Declan; Tiehm, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds was examined in long term batch experiments for a period of two and a half years to obtain more insight into the effects of redox conditions. A mix including lipid lowering agents (e.g. clofibric acid, gemfibrozil), analgesics (e.g. diclofenac, naproxen), beta blockers (e.g. atenolol, propranolol), X-ray contrast media (e.g. diatrizoic acid, iomeprol) as well as the antiepileptic carbamazepine and endocrine disruptors (e.g. bisphenol A, 17α-ethinylestradiol) was analyzed in batch tests in the presence of oxygen, nitrate, manganese (IV), iron (III), and sulfate. Out of the 23 selected substances, 14 showed a degradation of > 50% of their initial concentrations under aerobic conditions. The beta blockers propranolol and atenolol and the analgesics pentoxifylline and naproxen showed a removal of > 50% under anaerobic conditions. In particular naproxen proved to be degradable with oxygen and under most anaerobic conditions, i.e. with manganese (IV), iron (III), or sulfate. The natural estrogens estriol, estrone and 17β-estradiol showed complete biodegradation under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions, with a temporary increase of estrone during transformation of estriol and 17β-estradiol. Transformation of 17β-estradiol under Fe(III)-reducing conditions resulted in an increase of estriol as well. Concentrations of clofibric acid, carbamazepine, iopamidol and diatrizoic acid, known for their recalcitrance in the environment, remained unchanged.

  17. Adsorption and transformation of selected human-used macrolide antibacterial agents with iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feitosa-Felizzola, Juliana; Hanna, Khalil; Chiron, Serge

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption/transformation of two members (clarithromycin and roxithromycin) of the macrolide (ML) antibacterial agents on the surface of three environmental subsurface sorbents (clay, iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides) was investigated. The adsorption fitted well to the Freundlich model with a high sorption capacity. Adsorption probably occurred through a surface complexation mechanism and was accompanied by slow degradation of the selected MLs. Transformation proceeded through two parallel pathways: a major pathway was the hydrolysis of the cladinose sugar, and to a lesser extent the hydrolysis of the lactone ring. A minor pathway was the N-dealkylation of the amino sugar. This study indicates that Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of MLs. Such an attenuation route yields a range of intermediates that might retain some of their biological activity. - Iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of macrolide antibacterial agents

  18. Effect of Iron Fe (II and Fe (III in a Binary System Evaluated Bioluminescent Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sorokina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of iron ions Fe2+ and Fe3+ on the bioluminescent recombinant strain of Escherichia coli in a single-component and binary system. Found that for the bacteria E. coli Fe3+ ions are more toxic than Fe2+. Under the combined effect of iron toxicity increases, the percentage of luminescence quenching increases, but the value is much less than the sum of the indicator for the Fe2+ and Fe3+. The biological effect of insertion of iron is not proportional to their content in the mixture.

  19. Economically attractive route for the preparation of high quality magnetic nanoparticles by the thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Fernando B; Couto, Ricardo A; Kiyohara, Pedro K; Machado, Giovanna; Masunaga, Sueli H; Jardim, Renato F; Rossi, Liane M

    2017-03-17

    The thermal decomposition (TD) methods are among the most successful in obtaining magnetic nanoparticles with a high degree of control of size and narrow particle size distribution. Here we investigated the TD of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid, oleylamine, and a series of alcohols in order to disclose their role and also investigate economically attractive alternatives for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles without compromising their size and shape control. We have found that some affordable and reasonably less priced alcohols, such as 1,2-octanediol and cyclohexanol, may replace the commonly used and expensive 1,2-hexadecanediol, providing an economically attractive route for the synthesis of high quality magnetic nanoparticles. The relative cost for the preparation of Fe 3 O 4 NPs is reduced to only 21% and 9% of the original cost when using 1,2-octanediol and cyclohexanol, respectively.

  20. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems; Sorcion de samario en fosfatos de hierro (II) y (III) en sistemas acuosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz F, J C

    2006-07-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  1. Solvent free oxidation of primary alcohols and diols using thymine iron(III) catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hunaiti, Afnan; Niemi, Teemu; Sibaouih, Ahlam; Pihko, Petri; Leskelä, Markku; Repo, Timo

    2010-12-28

    In this study, we developed an efficient and selective iron-based catalyst system for the synthesis of ketones from secondary alcohols and carboxylic acids from primary alcohol. In situ generated iron catalyst of thymine-1-acetate (THA) and FeCl(3) under solvent-free condition exhibits high activity. As an example, 1-octanol and 2-octanol were oxidized to 1-octanoic acid and 2-octanone with 89% and 98% yields respectively.

  2. The Efficiency of Strontium-90 Desorption Using Iron (III) Solutions in the Decontamination Process of Radioactive Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Vladimirovna Cheremisina; Vasiliy Sergeev; Varvara Alabusheva; Alexander Fedorov; Alexandra Iliyna

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation on the estimated efficiency of iron (III) chloride solutions in the decontamination process of radioactive soils with 90 Sr, according to kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the desorption process. The specific 90 Sr radioactivity of soil samples was (3.9±0.3)·104 Bq·g. The adsorption isotherms of Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ are described with the Langmuir equation. The values of Gibbs energy G0298 = -4.65 kJ·mol -1 and equilibrium ion exchange constant ...

  3. Potassium iron(III)hexacyanoferrate(II) supported on polymethylmethacrylate ion-exchanger for removal of strontium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, S.; Ashraf Chaudhry, M.; Mazhar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Potassium iron(III)hexacyanoferrate(II) supported on poly metylmethacrylate has been synthesized and investigated for the strontium(II) removal from HNO 3 and HCl solutions. The ion exchange material characterized by different techniques and found to be stable in 1.0-4.0 M HNO 3 solutions, has been used to elaborate different parameters related to ion exchange and sorption processes involved. The data collected suggested its use to undertake removal of Sr(II) from more acidic active waste solutions. Thus the material synthesized had been adjudged to present better chances of application for Sr(II) removal as compared to other such materials. (author)

  4. Analysis of the structure of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate ultrathin fibers modified with iron (III) complex with tetraphenylporphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Karpova, S. G.; Lobanov, A. V.; Tyubaeva, P. M.; Artemov, N. S.; Iordansky, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    In the treatment of many infectious diseases and cancer, transdermal systems based on solid polymer matrices or gels containing functional substances with antiseptic (antibacterial) properties are often used. One of the most promising types of matrices with antiseptic properties are the ones of nano- and microfiber-bonded cloth obtained by electrospinning based on biopolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The present work investigates the effects of iron (III) complex with tetraphenylporphyrin and the influence on the geometry, crystalline order and molecular dynamics in the intercrystalline (amorphous phase) of ultrathin PHB fibers.

  5. Adsorção de arsênio(V pela quitosana ferro - III reticulada Asorption of arsenic (V by crosslinked iron-III-chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathyane Fagundes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of As(V by a crosslinked iron(III-chitosan adsorbent was evaluated under various conditions. The adsorption capacity of CH-FeCL was around 54 mg/g of As(V. The kinetics of adsorption obeys a pseudo-first-order model with rate constants equal to 0.022, 0.028, and 0.033 min-1 at 15, 25 and 35 ºC respectively. Adsorption data were well described by the Langmuir model, although they could be modeled also by the Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The maximum adsorption capacity, calculated with the Langmuir model, was 127 mg g-1 of As(V. The inhibition by competing anions is dependant on their kind and valence.

  6. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Chih-Ta; Huang, Kai-Yu

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20 V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30 V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  7. Iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex on polyallylamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: immobilization, direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hailing; Cui, Yanyun; Li, Pan; Zhou, Yiming; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Tang, Yawen; Chen, Yu; Lu, Tianhong

    2013-05-07

    A nonenzymatic iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Fe(III)-DETPA) complex based amperometric sensor for the analytical determination of hydrogen peroxide was developed. By combining the electrostatic interaction between the Fe(III)-DETPA complex and polyallylamine (PAH) functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as well as the ionotropic crosslinking interaction between PAH and ethylenediamine-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP), the electroactive Fe(III)-DETPA complex was successfully incorporated within the MWCNT matrix, and firmly immobilized on the Au substrate electrode. The fabricated electrochemical sensor was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical methods. The influences of solution pH and ionic strength on the electrochemical sensor were investigated. The prepared electrochemical sensor had a fast response to hydrogen peroxide (<3 s) and an excellent linear range of concentration from 1.25 × 10(-8) to 4.75 × 10(-3) M with a detection limit of 6.3 × 10(-9) M under the optimum conditions.

  8. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Wei-Lung, E-mail: wlchou0388@hotmail.com [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chih-Ta [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan Hsien 717, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kai-Yu [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20 V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30 V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  9. Mussel-Inspired Protein Nanoparticles Containing Iron(III)-DOPA Complexes for pH-Responsive Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Jin; Cheong, Hogyun; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-06-15

    A novel bioinspired strategy for protein nanoparticle (NP) synthesis to achieve pH-responsive drug release exploits the pH-dependent changes in the coordination stoichiometry of iron(III)-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) complexes, which play a major cross-linking role in mussel byssal threads. Doxorubicin-loaded polymeric NPs that are based on Fe(III)-DOPA complexation were thus synthesized with a DOPA-modified recombinant mussel adhesive protein through a co-electrospraying process. The release of doxorubicin was found to be predominantly governed by a change in the structure of the Fe(III)-DOPA complexes induced by an acidic pH value. It was also demonstrated that the fabricated NPs exhibited effective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells through efficient cellular uptake and cytosolic release. Therefore, it is anticipated that Fe(III)-DOPA complexation can be successfully utilized as a new design principle for pH-responsive NPs for diverse controlled drug-delivery applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. STABILITY: AN INVESTIGATION OF AS(III)/AS(V) STABILITY IN IRON RICH DRINKING WATER MATRICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic in drinking water is predominantly inorganic arsenic. The two oxidation states of inorganic arsenic are As(III)(pKa=9.3) and As(V)(pKa2=6.9). The distribution of As(III) and AS(V) in a water is dependent on the redox potential of the water. The actual distribution can ...

  11. Influence of weak magnetic field and tartrate on the oxidation and sequestration of Sb(III) by zerovalent iron: Batch and semi-continuous flow study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peng; Sun, Yuankui; Qiao, Junlian; Lo, Irene M C; Guan, Xiaohong

    2018-02-05

    The influence of weak magnetic field (WMF) and tartrate on the oxidation and sequestration of Sb(III) by zerovalent iron (ZVI) was investigated with batch and semi-continuous reactors. The species analysis of antinomy in aqueous solution and solid precipitates implied that both Sb(III) adsorption preceding its conversion to Sb(V) in solid phase and Sb(III) oxidation to Sb(V) preceding its adsorption in aqueous phase occurred in the process of Sb(III) sequestration by ZVI. The application of WMF greatly increased the rate constants of Sb tot (total Sb) and Sb(III) disappearance during Sb(III)-tartrate and uncomplexed-Sb(III) sequestration by ZVI. The enhancing effect of WMF was primarily due to the accelerated ZVI corrosion in the presence of WMF, as evidenced by the influence of WMF on the change of solution and solid properties with reaction. However, tartrate greatly retarded Sb removal by ZVI. It was because tartrate inhibited ZVI corrosion, competed with Sb(III) and Sb(V) for the active surface sites, increased the negative surface charge of the generated iron (hydr)oxides due to its adsorption, and formed soluble complexes with Fe(III). The positive effect of WMF on Sb(III)-tartrate and uncomplexed-Sb(III) removal by ZVI was also verified with a magnetic semi-continuous reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  13. Polypyrrole–titanium(IV) doped iron(III) oxide nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization with tunable electrical and electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, Debabrata; Ghosh, Arup Kumar; Gupta, Kaushik; De, Amitabha; Sen, Pintu; Duttachowdhury, Ankan; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Synthesis and characterization of polymer nanocomposite based on titanium doped iron(III) oxide. ► Electrical conductivity increased 100 times in composite with respect to polymer. ► Electrochemical capacitance of polymer composites increased with nanooxide content. ► Thermal stability of the polymer enhanced with nano oxide content. -- Abstract: Titanium(IV)-doped synthetic nanostructured iron(III) oxide (NITO) and polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites was fabricated by in situ polymerization using FeCl 3 as initiator. The polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) and pure NITO were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Föurier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc. Thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analyses showed the enhancement of thermal stability of PNCs than the pure polymer. Electrical conductivity of the PNCs had increased significantly from 0.793 × 10 −2 S/cm to 0.450 S/cm with respect to the PPy, and that had been explained by 3-dimensional variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanisms. In addition, the specific capacitance of PNCs had increased from 147 F/g to 176 F/g with increasing NITO content than that of pure NITO (26 F/g), presumably due to the growing of mesoporous structure with increasing NITO content in PNCs which reduced the charge transfer resistance significantly.

  14. The Efficiency of Strontium-90 Desorption Using Iron (III Solutions in the Decontamination Process of Radioactive Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Cheremisina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the investigation on the estimated efficiency of iron (III chloride solutions in the decontamination process of radioactive soils with 90 Sr, according to kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the desorption process. The specific 90 Sr radioactivity of soil samples was (3.9±0.3·104 Bq·g. The adsorption isotherms of Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ are described with the Langmuir equation. The values of Gibbs energy G0298 = -4.65 kJ·mol -1 and equilibrium ion exchange constant Keq = 6,5 confirm the hypothesis of strontium removal from soils with iron (III cations. The effectiveness of the method is substantiated by experimental and calculated results of this study samples of radioactive soils are deactivated in 90% after 9.5 hours, whereas the kinetic constant is 6.77·10 s -1 . The suggested method of soil cleanup with 0.2 M Fe 3+ solutions is optimal and complies with the environmental requirements.

  15. Reverse osmosis membrane composition, structure and performance modification by bisulphite, iron(III), bromide and chlorite exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, O; Gibert, O; Cortina, J L

    2016-10-15

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane exposure to bisulphite, chlorite, bromide and iron(III) was assessed in terms of membrane composition, structure and performance. Membrane composition was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and membrane performance was assessed by water and chloride permeation, using a modified version of the solution-diffusion model. Iron(III) dosage in presence of bisulphite led to an autooxidation of the latter, probably generating free radicals which damaged the membrane. It comprised a significant raise in chloride passage (chloride permeation coefficient increased 5.3-5.1 fold compared to the virgin membrane under the conditions studied) rapidly. No major differences in terms of water permeability and membrane composition were observed. Nevertheless, an increase in the size of the network pores, and a raise in the fraction of aggregate pores of the polyamide (PA) layer were identified, but no amide bond cleavage was observed. These structural changes were therefore, in accordance with the transport properties observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of reduction of iron(iii) kojic acid complex by hydroquinone and l-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.; Perviaz, M.; Kazmi, S.A.; Johnson, A.S.; Offiong, O.E.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of pH on the kinetics of reduction of iron(III) kojic acid complex by hydroquinone (H/sub 2/Q) and L-cysteine (L-Cys) was studied in the pH range of 2.34 - 4.03 for H/sub 2/Q and 3.04 - 5.5 for L-cysteine at ionic strength of 0.5 M and at 35 degree C. The pseudo-first order rate constants for the reduction of Fe(KA)3 by L-cysteine and hydroquinone increase linearly with increasing reductant concentration, indicating first-order kinetics in reductant concentration. However, whereas the rate of reduction by H2Q increases with increasing pH, an opposite trend was observed in the case of reduction by L-cysteine. Plausible rate laws and mechanisms have been proposed in line with these observations. Activation parameters (delta H no and delta S no) were evaluated for the reduction of iron (III) kojic acid complex by cysteine and the values obtained are 35.25 kJmol-1, -141.4 JK-1mol-1 and 28.14 kJmol-1 , 161.2 JK-1mol-1 for pH 4.5 and 3.52 respectively. (author)

  17. Iron (III Ion Sensor Based on the Seedless Grown ZnO Nanorods in 3 Dimensions Using Nickel Foam Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Ali Abbasi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the seedless, highly aligned and vertical ZnO nanorods in 3 dimensions (3D were grown on the nickel foam substrate. The seedless grown ZnO nanorods were characterised by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. The characterised seedless ZnO nanorods in 3D on nickel foam were highly dense, perpendicular to substrate, grown along the (002 crystal plane, and also composed of single crystal. In addition to this, these seedless ZnO nanorods were functionalized with trans-dinitro-dibenzo-18-6 crown ether, a selective iron (III ion ionophore, along with other components of membrane composition such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC, 2-nitopentylphenyl ether as plasticizer (NPPE, and tetrabutyl ammonium tetraphenylborate (TBATPB as conductivity increaser. The sensor electrode has shown high linearity with a wide range of detection of iron (III ion concentrations from 0.005 mM to 100 mM. The low limit of detection of the proposed ion selective electrode was found to be 0.001 mM. The proposed sensor also described high storage stability, selectivity, reproducibility, and repeatability and a quick response time of less than 10 s.

  18. A highly sensitive amperometric sensor for oxygen based on iron(II) tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine and iron(III) tetra-(N-methyl-pyridyl)-porphyrin multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Juliana C.; Luz, Rita C.S.; Damos, Flavio S.; Tanaka, Auro A.; Kubota, Lauro T.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a highly sensitive sensor for oxygen is proposed using a glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with alternated layers of iron(II) tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine (FeTsPc) and iron(III) tetra-(N-methyl-pyridyl)-porphyrin (FeT4MPyP). The modified electrode showed excellent catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction. The reduction potential of the oxygen was shifted about 330 mV toward less negative values with this modified electrode, presenting a peak current much higher than those observed on a bare GC electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments indicated that the oxygen reduction reaction involves 4 electrons with a heterogenous rate constant (k obs ) of 3 x 10 5 mol -1 L s -1 . A linear response range from 0.2 up to 6.4 mg L -1 , with a sensitivity of 4.12 μA L mg -1 (or 20.65 μA cm -2 L mg -1 ) and a detection limit of 0.06 mg L -1 were obtained with this sensor. The repeatability of the proposed sensor, evaluated in terms of relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 2.0% for 10 measurements of a solution of 6.4 mg L -1 oxygen. The sensor was applied to determine oxygen in pond and tap water samples showing to be a promising tool for this purpose

  19. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  20. Facile and reversible formation of iron(III)-oxo-cerium(IV) adducts from nonheme oxoiron(IV) complexes and cerium(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Rasheed, Waqas; Klein, Johannes E.M.N.; Que, Lawrence Jr. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Metals in Biocatalysis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) or Ce{sup IV}(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} is often used in artificial water oxidation and generally considered to be an outer-sphere oxidant. Herein we report the spectroscopic and crystallographic characterization of [(N4Py)Fe{sup III}-O-Ce{sup IV}(OH{sub 2})(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup +} (3), a complex obtained from the reaction of [(N4Py)Fe{sup II}(NCMe)]{sup 2+} with 2 equiv CAN or [(N4Py)Fe{sup IV}=O]{sup 2+} (2) with Ce{sup III}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in MeCN. Surprisingly, the formation of 3 is reversible, the position of the equilibrium being dependent on the MeCN/water ratio of the solvent. These results suggest that the Fe{sup IV} and Ce{sup IV} centers have comparable reduction potentials. Moreover, the equilibrium entails a change in iron spin state, from S=1 Fe{sup IV} in 2 to S=5/2 in 3, which is found to be facile despite the formal spin-forbidden nature of this process. This observation suggests that Fe{sup IV}=O complexes may avail of reaction pathways involving multiple spin states having little or no barrier. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Microbial removal of Fe(III) impurities from clay using dissimilatory iron reducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Y; Cho, K S; Ryu, H W; Chang, Y K

    1999-01-01

    Fe(III) impurities, which detract refractoriness and whiteness from porcelain and pottery, could be biologically removed from low-quality clay by indigenous dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. Insoluble Fe(III) in clay particles was leached out as soluble Fe(II), and the Fe(III) reduction reaction was coupled to the oxidation of sugars such as glucose, maltose and sucrose. A maximum removal of 44-45% was obtained when the relative amount of sugar was 5% (w/w; sugar/clay). By the microbial treatment, the whiteness of the clay was increased from 63.20 to 79.64, whereas the redness was clearly decreased from 13.47 to 3.55.

  2. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.

    2014-06-25

    The effects of calcium on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of As(III) and As(V) onto iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were investigated through batch experiments, rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT) and kinetics modelling. Batch experiments showed that at calcium concentrations≤20 mg/L, high As(III) and As(V) removal efficiencies by IOCS and GFH are achieved at pH 6. An increase of the calcium concentration to 40 and 80 mg/L reversed this trend, giving higher removal efficiencies at higher pH (8). The adsorption capacities of IOCS and GFH at an equilibrium arsenic concentration of 10 g/L were found to be between 2.0 and 3.1 mg/g for synthetic water without calcium and between 2.8 and 5.3 mg/g when 80 mg/L of calcium was present at the studied pH values. After 10 hours of filter run in RSSCT, approximately 1000 empty bed volumes, the ratios of C/Co for As(V) were 26% and 18% for calcium-free model water; and only 1% and 0.2% after addition of 80 mg/L of Ca for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without calcium addition, and moves to the second-reaction-order kinetics when calcium is added. Based on the intraparticle diffusion model, the main controlling mechanism for As(III) adsorption is intraparticle diffusion, while surface diffusion contributes greatly to the adsorption of As(V).

  3. Investigation of the interaction of iron(III) complexes with dAMP by ESI-MS, MALDI-MS and potentiometric titration: insights into synthetic nuclease behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Christiane; Oliveira Moreira, Rafaela; Lube, Leonardo M; Horn, Adolfo; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Sherrod, Stacy; Russell, David H

    2010-06-07

    We report herein the characterization by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS), matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI-MS) and potentiometric titration of three iron(III) compounds: [Fe(III)(HPClNOL)Cl2]·NO3 (1), [Cl(HPClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(HPClNOL)Cl]·Cl2·H2O (2) and [(SO4)(HPClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(HPClNOL)(SO4)]·6H2O (3), where HPClNOL= 1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol). Despite the fact that the compounds have distinct structures in solid state and non-buffered solution, all compounds present similar ESI and MALDI mass spectra in a buffered medium (pH 7.0). At this pH, the species [(PClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(PClNOL)](2+) (m/z 354) was observed for all the compounds under investigation. Potentiometric titration confirms a similar behavior for all compounds, indicating that the dihydroxo form [(OH)(HPClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(HPClNOL)(OH)](2+) is the major species at pH 7.0, for all the compounds. The products of the interaction between compounds (1), (2) and (3) and dAMP (2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate) in a buffered medium (pH 7.0) were identified by MALDI-MS/MS. The fragmentation data obtained by MS/MS allow one to identify the nature of the interaction between the iron(III) compounds and dAMP, revealing the direct interaction between the iron center and phosphate groups.

  4. Scientific Opinion on the safety of the complexation product of sodium tartrate and iron(III) chloride as a food additive

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The complexation product of sodium tartrates and iron(III) chloride (Fe mTA) is proposed for use as an anti-caking agent, only in salt or its substitutes, with a maximum use level of 106 mg Fe mTA/kg salt. Fe mTA can be expected to dissociate into its constituent iron(III) and tartrate components upon ingestion. Studies in rats demonstrated that up to 90 % of ingested DL-tartrate or tartaric acid were absorbed, studies in humans suggested that only 20 % of an ingested dose of tartaric acid we...

  5. Transport of surface-modified iron nanoparticle in porous media and application to arsenic(III) remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, Sushil Raj; Nepal, Dhriti; Manning, Bruce; Choi, Heechul

    2007-01-01

    The surface-modified iron nanoparticles (S-INP) were synthesized, characterized and tested for the remediation of arsenite (As(III)), a well known toxic groundwater contaminant of concern. The S-INP material was fully dispersed in the aqueous phase with a particle size distribution of 2-10 nm estimated from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that an Fe(III) oxide surface film was present on S-INP in addition to the bulk zero-valent Fe 0 oxidation state. Transport of S-INP through porous media packed in 10 cm length column showed particle breakthroughs of 22.1, 47.4 and 60 pore volumes in glass beads, unbaked sand, and baked sand, respectively. Un-modified INP was immobile and aggregated on porous media surfaces in the column inlet area. Results using S-INP pretreated 10 cm sand-packed columns containing ∼2 g of S-INP showed that 100 % of As(III) was removed from influent solutions (flow rate 1.8 mL min -1 ) containing 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 mg L -1 As(III) for 9, 7 and 4 days providing 23.3, 20.7 and 10.4 L of arsenic free water, respectively. In addition, it was found that 100% of As(III) in 0.5 mg/L solution (flow rate 1.8 mL min -1 ) was removed by S-INP pretreated 50 cm sand packed column containing 12 g of S-INP for more than 2.5 months providing 194.4 L of arsenic free water. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed S-INP had transformed to elongated, rod-like shaped corrosion product particles after reaction with As(III) in the presence of sand. These results suggest that S-INP has great potential to be used as a mobile, injectable reactive material for in-situ sandy groundwater aquifer treatment of As(III)

  6. Identification and Spectroscopic Characterization of Nonheme Iron(III) Hypochlorite Intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Angelone, Davide; Quesne, Matthew G.; Padamati, Sandeep K.; Gomez, Laura; Hage, Ronald; Costas, Miquel; Browne, Wesley R.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-III-hypohalite complexes have been implicated in a wide range of important enzyme-catalyzed halogenation reactions including the biosynthesis of natural products and antibiotics and post-translational modification of proteins. The absence of spectroscopic data on such species precludes their

  7. Directing a Non-Heme Iron(III)-Hydroperoxide Species on a Trifurcated Reactivity Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Lauritsen, Frants R.; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    The reactivity of [FeIII(tpena)]2+ (tpena=N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetate) as a catalyst for oxidation reactions depends on its ratio to the terminal oxidant H2O2 and presence or absence of sacrificial substrates. The outcome can be switched between: 1)catalysed H2O2...

  8. Lithium, rubidium and cesium ion removal using potassium iron(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) supported on polymethylmethacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabana Taj; Din Muhammad; Ashraf Chaudhry, M.; Muhammad Mazhar

    2011-01-01

    Potassium iron(III) hexacyanoferrate(II) supported on poly methyl methacrylate, has been developed and investigated for the removal of lithium, rubidium and cesium ions. The material is capable of sorbing maximum quantities of these ions from 5.0, 2.5 and 4.5 M HNO 3 solutions respectively. Sorption studies, conducted individually for each metal ion, under optimized conditions, demonstrated that it was predominantly physisorption in the case of lithium ion while shifting to chemisorption with increasing ionic size. Distribution coefficient (K d ) values followed the order Cs + > Rb + > Li + at low concentrations of metal ions. Following these findings Cs + can preferably be removed from 1.5 to 5 M HNO 3 nuclear waste solutions. (author)

  9. Eggshell Biliverdin and Protoporphyrin Pigments in a Songbird: Are They Derived from Erythrocytes, Blood Plasma, or the Shell Gland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Rita; Boross, Nóra; Hámori, Susanne; Neuberger, Eszter; Nyiri, Zoltán

    Biliverdin and protoporphyrin pigments are deposited into the eggshell when the developing egg is in the shell gland. However, the site of synthesis of eggshell pigments is still uncertain, although it may influence the possible costs and potential functions of eggshell coloration in avian species. Eggshell pigments may be derived from red blood cells or be produced in other organs and then transferred to the shell gland, or they may be synthesized de novo in the shell gland. We studied in the canary (Serinus canaria) whether eggshell blue-green and brown pigmentations are associated with experimentally elevated anemia, female hematocrit level, immature erythrocyte percentage, and feces and plasma pigment levels during egg laying to find out the possible origin of eggshell pigments. We found no significant effects of hematocrit level or experimentally elevated anemia on intensity of eggshell blue-green and brown pigmentations; therefore, we consider it less likely that eggshell pigments are derived from erythrocytes. In addition, we found no significant associations between female feces biliverdin concentration during egg laying and intensity of eggshell blue-green pigmentation, suggesting that eggshell biliverdin may not originate from the spleen or liver. We found a negative association between plasma and feces protoporphyrin concentrations during egg laying and eggshell brown chroma. This result suggests that an increased production of protoporphyrin in the liver, which could have elevated plasma and feces protoporphyrin concentrations, could inhibit eggshell protoporphyrin pigmentation, probably through affecting enzymatic activities. We suggest that both pigments are produced de novo in the shell gland in the canary, but circulating pigment levels may influence shell gland pigment synthesis, thus connecting the physiological status of the female to eggshell coloration.

  10. Spin dynamics in mesoscopic size magnetic systems: A 1HNMR study in rings of iron (III) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Borsa, F.; Cornia, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two magnetic molecular clusters containing almost coplanar rings of iron (III) ions with spinS=5/2 have been investigated by 1 H NMR and relaxation measurements. The first system, which will be referred to as Fe6, is a molecule of general formula [NaFe 6 (OCH 3 ) 12 (C 17 O 4 H 15 ) 6 ] + ClO 4 - or [NaFe 6 (OCH 3 ) 12 (C 15 H 11 O 2 ) 6 ] + ClO 4 - or [LiFe 6 (OCH 3 ) 12 (C 15 H 11 O 2 ) 6 ] + ClO 4 - while the second type of ring, denoted Fe10, corresponds to the molecule [Fe 10 (OCH 3 ) 20 (C 2 H 2 O 2 Cl) 10 ]. The 1 H NMR linewidth is broadened by the nuclear dipolar interaction and by the dipolar coupling of the protons with the iron (III) paramagnetic moment. It is found that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, T 1 -1 , of the proton is a sensitive probe of the Fe spin dynamics. In both clusters, T 1 -1 decreases with decreasing temperatures from room temperature, goes through a peak just below about 30 K in Fe6 and 10 K in Fe10, and it drops exponentially to very small values at helium temperature. The temperature dependence of the relaxation rate is discussed in terms of the fluctuations of the local spins within the allowed total spin configurations in the framework of the weak collision theory to describe the nuclear relaxation. We use the calculated energy levels for the Fe6 ring based on a Heisenberg Hamiltonian and the value of J obtained from the fit of the magnetic susceptibility to describe semiquantitatively the behavior of T 1 -1 vs T. The exponential drop of T 1 -1 at low temperature is consistent with a nonmagnetic singlet ground state separated by an energy gap from the first excited triplet state. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Moessbauer effect study of iron(III)-inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulaba, A. [Technikon Witwatersrand, Metallurgy Department (South Africa); Kiremire, E. [University of the Witwatersrand, Chemistry Department (South Africa); Pollak, H. [University of the Witwatersrand, Physics Department (South Africa); Boeyens, J. [University of the Witwatersrand, Chemistry Department (South Africa)

    1999-09-15

    A new complex, [Fe(acac)L{sub 2}], bearing inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand (L{sup -}) was recently synthesised for biological studies. It proved to be biologically active against African sleeping sickness, plasmodium falciparum (malaria), leishmaniasis and chaga disease causative agents. Three ESR well resolved peaks indicated the presence of a free (unpaired) and chemically active electron in the complex. The structural complex ferric iron was found at the centre of two electric gradient whose the biggest is suggested to be initiated by the unpaired charge. No distinction between different cis isomers could be made.

  12. Moessbauer effect study of iron(III)-inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulaba, A.; Kiremire, E.; Pollak, H.; Boeyens, J.

    1999-01-01

    A new complex, [Fe(acac)L 2 ], bearing inidazolidine nitroxyl-free radical ligand (L - ) was recently synthesised for biological studies. It proved to be biologically active against African sleeping sickness, plasmodium falciparum (malaria), leishmaniasis and chaga disease causative agents. Three ESR well resolved peaks indicated the presence of a free (unpaired) and chemically active electron in the complex. The structural complex ferric iron was found at the centre of two electric gradient whose the biggest is suggested to be initiated by the unpaired charge. No distinction between different cis isomers could be made

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of ethionamide in pharmaceuticals using Folin–Ciocalteu reagent and iron(III-ferricyanide as chromogenic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib A.S. Qarah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of ethionamide (ETM in pure drug and tablets. The first method is based on the reduction of Folin–Ciocalteu (F–C reagent by ETM in sodium carbonate medium to form a blue coloured complex, which was measured at 760 nm (Molybdenum–tungsten blue method. In the second method (Prussian blue method, iron(III was reduced to iron(II by ETM in HCl medium, in which iron(II was complexed with ferricyanide, and the resulting Prussian blue was also measured at 760 nm. The absorbance measured in each case was related to the ETM concentration. The experimental conditions were carefully studied and optimised. Beer's law was obeyed in concentration ranges of 1–40 μg/ml and 0.2–4.0 μg/ml with the Molybdenum-tungsten blue method and the Prussian blue method, respectively, with corresponding molar absorptivity values of 5.72 × 103 and 3.18 × 104 l/(mol·cm. The limits of detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ were 0.09 and 0.27 μg/ml for the Molybdenum-tungsten blue method and 0.01 and 0.04 μg/ml for the Prussian blue method. Within-day and between-day relative standard deviations (%RSD at three different concentration levels were <3%, and the respective relative errors (%RE were ≤2%, implying good accuracy and precision of the methods. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the determination of ETM in bulk powder and tablets, and the results demonstrated that the methods were as accurate and precise as the official method.

  14. Impurity effect of iron(III) on the growth of potassium sulfate crystal in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Noriaki; Katagiri, Ken-ichi; Yokota, Masaaki; Sato, Akira; Yashiro, Hitoshi; Itai, Kazuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Growth rates of the {1 1 0} faces of a potassium sulfate crystal were measured in a flow cell in the presence of traces of impurity Fe(III) (up to 2 ppm) over the range of pH=2.5-6.0. The growth rate was significantly suppressed by the impurity. The effect became stronger as the impurity concentration was increased and at pH5 it finally disappeared completely. The concentration and supersaturation effects on the impurity action were reasonably explained with a model proposed by Kubota and Mullin [J. Crystal Growth, 152 (1995) 203]. The surface coverage of the active sites by Fe(III) is estimated to increase linearly on increasing its concentration in solution in the range examined by growth experiments. The impurity effectiveness factor is confirmed to increase inversely proportional to the supersaturation as predicted by the model. Apart from the discussion based on the model, the pH effect on the impurity action is qualitatively explained by assuming that the first hydrolysis product of aqua Fe(III) complex compound, [Fe(H 2O) 5(OH)] 2+, is both growth suppression and adsorption active, but the second hydrolysis product, [Fe(H 2O) 4(OH) 2] +, is only adsorption active.

  15. The Effect of Temperature and Ionic Strength on the Oxidation of Iodide by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Kinetic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory exercise has recently been reported in which the students use the initial rates method based on the clock reaction approach to deduce the rate law and propose a reaction mechanism for the oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions. The same approach is used in the exercise proposed herein; the students determine the dependence of the…

  16. Mononuclear nonheme iron(III) complexes that show superoxide dismutase-like activity and antioxidant effects against menadione-mediated oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Yutaka; Iwamoto, Yuji; Kashida, Akihiro; Kodera, Masahito

    2015-05-21

    This communication describes the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of mononuclear iron(III) complexes with pentadentate monocarboxylamido ligands. The SOD activity can be controlled by the electronic nature of the substituent group on the ligand. The nitro-substituted complex showed clear cytoprotective activity against menadione-mediated oxidative stress in cultured cells.

  17. Impact of Microcystis aeruginosa Exudate on the Formation and Reactivity of Iron Oxide Particles Following Fe(II) and Fe(III) Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shikha; Wang, Kai; Waite, T David

    2017-05-16

    Impact of the organic exudate secreted by a toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa on the formation, aggregation, and reactivity of iron oxides that are formed on addition of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts to a solution of the exudate is investigated in this study. The exudate has a stabilizing effect on the particles formed with decreased aggregation rate and increased critical coagulant concentration required for diffusion-limited aggregation to occur. These results suggest that the presence of algal exudates from Microcystis aeruginosa may significantly influence particle aggregation both in natural water bodies where Fe(II) oxidation results in oxide formation and in water treatment where Fe(III) salts are commonly added to aid particle growth and contaminant capture. The exudate also affects the reactivity of iron oxide particles formed with exudate coated particles undergoing faster dissolution than bare iron oxide particles. This has implications to iron availability, especially where algae procure iron via dissolution of iron oxide particles as a result of either reaction with reducing moieties, light-mediated ligand to metal charge transfer and/or reaction with siderophores. The increased reactivity of exudate coated particles is attributed, for the most part, to the smaller size of these particles, higher surface area and increased accessibility of surface sites.

  18. SYNTHESIS OF N- ACETONITRIL AND N- ETHYLAMINE- 3- HYDROXYPYRIDINONES AS IRON (III CHELATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. SAGHAEI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The need of iron-chelating agents as orally active alternatives to desferal for the treatment of iron overload in thalassaemic patients, has stimulated considerable research efforts in the synthesis of new metal chelators. One of the member of hydroxypyridinones (2,3- dimethyl-3- hydroxypyridinones has so far received the most attention. This compound is rapidly glucuronidated into a non-chelating metabolite, which partly explains why high doses of the compound has to be used in order to achieve negative balance. This metabolic behavior has led the medicinal chemists to design compounds such as N-hydroxyalkyl derivatives which do not undergo extensive metabolism. The objective of the present work was to further synthesis and design new derivatives of hydroxypyridinones (N- acetonitril and N-ethylamine derivatives Methods. The synthesis route involves the benzylation of hydroxyl group of maltol (ethyl maltol using benzyl chloride conversion of the benazylated maltol (ethyl maltol to the N-acetonitril bezylated pyridinone derivatives by introducing the aminoacetonitril in pyridine solvent and cleavage of benzyl group by hydrogenation method or using the bromodimethyl borane to form the N-acetonitril or N- ethylamine- 3- hydroxypyridinones respectively.
    Results. In this work three final compounds such as 1- (2- aminoethyl- 2- methyl- 3-hydroxypyridin- 4- one, 1- (2- aminoethyl- 2- ethyl- 3- hydroxypyridin-4- one and 1- cyanomethyl -2- methyl- 3- hydroxypyridin- 4- one were synthesized.
    Discussion. Identification and structural elucidation of compounds were achieved by IH NMR and Mass spectra, elemental analysis and through physical constants. The biological effects of compounds will be studied in the near future.

  19. Speciation of iron (II) and (III) by using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaman, Mehmet; Kaya, Gokce

    2005-01-01

    A method for speciation, preconcentration and separation of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in different matrices was developed using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry. PAN as complexing reagent for Fe 2+ and chloroform as organic solvent were used. The complex of Fe 2+ -PAN was extracted into chloroform phase in the pH range of 0.75-4.0 and Fe 3+ remains in water phase in the pH range 0.75-1.25. The optimum conditions for maximum recovery of Fe 2+ and minimum recovery of Fe 3+ were determined as pH = 1, the stirring time of 20 min, the PAN amount of 0.5 mg and chloroform volume of 8 mL. The developed method was applied to the determination of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in tea infusion, fruit juice, cola and pekmez. It is seen that there is high bioavailable iron (Fe 2+ ) in pekmez. The developed method is sensitive, simple and need the shorter time in comparison with other similar studies

  20. As(III) and As(V) sorption on iron-modified non-pyrolyzed and pyrolyzed biomass from Petroselinum crispum (parsley).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cedillo, M J; Olguín, M T; Fall, C; Colin-Cruz, A

    2013-03-15

    The sorption of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions onto iron-modified Petroselinum crispum (PCFe) and iron-modified carbonaceous material from the pyrolysis of P. crispum (PCTTFe) was investigated. The modified sorbents were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. The sorbent elemental composition was determined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The principal functional groups from the sorbents were determined with FT-IR. The specific surfaces and points of zero charge (pzc) of the materials were also determined. As(III) and As(V) sorption onto the modified sorbents were performed in a batch system. After the sorption process, the As content in the liquid and solid phases was determined with atomic absorption and neutron activation analyses, respectively. After the arsenic sorption processes, the desorption of Fe from PCFe and PCTTFe was verified with atomic absorption spectrometry. The morphology of PC changed after iron modification. The specific area and pzc differed significantly between the iron-modified non-pyrolyzed and pyrolyzed P. crispum. The kinetics of the arsenite and arsenate sorption processes were described with a pseudo-second-order model. The Langmuir-Freundlich model provided the isotherms with the best fit. Less than 0.02% of the Fe was desorbed from the PCFe and PCTTFe after the As(III) and As(V) sorption processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis, iron(III) complexation properties, molecular dynamics simulations and P. aeruginosa siderophore-like activity of two pyoverdine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonietti, Viviane; Boudesocque, Stéphanie; Dupont, Laurent; Farvacques, Natacha; Cézard, Christine; Da Nascimento, Sophie; Raimbert, Jean-François; Socrier, Larissa; Robin, Thierry-Johann; Morandat, Sandrine; El Kirat, Karim; Mullié, Catherine; Sonnet, Pascal

    2017-09-08

    P. aeruginosa ranks among the top five organisms causing nosocomial infections. Among the many novel strategies for developing new therapeutics against infection, targeting iron uptake mechanism seems promising as P. aeruginosa needs iron for its growth and survival. To scavenge iron, the bacterium produces siderophores possessing a very high affinity towards Fe(III) ions such as pyoverdines. In this work, we decided to study two pyoverdine analogs, aPvd2 and aPvd3, structurally close to the endogen pyoverdine. The pFe constants calculated with the values of formation showed a high affinity of aPvd3 towards Fe(III). Molecular dynamics calculations demonstrated that aPvd3-Fe forms with Fe(III) stable 1:1 complexes in water, whereas aPvd2 does not. Only aPvd3 is able to increase the bacterial growth and represents thus an alternative to pyoverdine for iron acquisition by the bacterium. The aPvd2-3 interaction studies with a lipid membrane indicated that they were unable to interact and to cross the plasma membrane of bacteria by passive diffusion. Consequently, the penetration of aPvd3 is ruled by a transport membrane protein. These results showed that aPvd3 may be used to inhibit pyoverdine uptake or to promote the accumulation and release of antibiotics into the cell following a Trojan horse strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase III randomized trial comparing intravenous to oral iron in patients with cancer-related iron deficiency anemia not on erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Banavali, Shripad D; Gupta, Sudeep; Parikh, Purvish M; Marfatia, Shalaka; Punatar, Sachin; More, Sucheta; Goud, Supriya; Nakti, Dipti; Prabhash, Kumar

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to find the optimal route of iron supplementation in patients with malignancy and iron deficiency (true or functional) anemia not receiving erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA). Adult patients with malignancy requiring chemotherapy, hemoglobin (Hb) 10% were randomized to intravenous (IV) iron sucrose or oral ferrous sulfate. The primary endpoint was change in Hb from baseline to 6 weeks. Secondary endpoints included blood transfusion, quality of life (QoL), toxicity, response and overall survival. A total of 192 patients were enrolled over 5 years: 98 on IV arm and 94 on oral arm. Median age was 51 years; over 95% patients had solid tumors. The mean absolute increase in Hb at 6 weeks was 0.11 g/dL (standard deviation [SD]: 1.48) in IV arm and -0.16 g/dL (SD: 1.36) in oral arm, P = 0.23. Twenty-three percent patients on IV iron and 18% patients on oral iron had a rise in Hb of ≥1 g/dL at 6 weeks, P = 0.45. Thirteen patients (13.3%) on the IV iron arm and 14 patients (14.9%) on the oral arm required blood transfusion, P = 1.0. Gastrointestinal toxicity (any grade) developed in 41% patients on IV iron and 44% patients on oral iron, P = 1.0. 5 patients on IV iron and none on oral iron had hypersensitivity, P = 0.06. QoL was not significantly different between the two arms. IV iron was not superior to oral iron in patients with malignancy on chemotherapy and iron deficiency anemia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Pharmacokinetic and in vivo evaluation of a self-assembled gadolinium(III)-iron(II) contrast agent with high relaxivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N; Vander Elst, Luce; Kimpe, Kristof; Laurent, Sophie; Burtéa, Carmen; Chen, Feng; Van Deun, Rik; Ni, Yicheng; Muller, Robert N; Binnemans, Koen

    2006-01-01

    A high-molecular weight tetrametallic supramolecular complex [(Ln-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- (Ln = Gd, Eu, La) has been obtained upon self-assembly around one iron(II) ion of three 1,10-phenantroline-based molecules substituted in 5'-position with the polyaminocarboxylate diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N',N'-pentaacetate, DTPA-phen(4-). The ICP-MS measurements indicated that the lanthanide:iron ratio is 3:1. Photoluminescence spectra of [Eu-DTPA-phen](-) and of [(Eu-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- are nearly identical, implying that the first coordination sphere of the lanthanide(III) ion has not been changed upon coordination of phenantroline unit to iron(II) ion. NMRD measurements revealed that at 20 MHz and 310 K the relaxivity of the [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- is equal to 9.5 +/- 0.3 s(-1) mM(-1) of Gd (28.5 s(-1) per millimole per liter of complex) which is significantly higher than that for Gd-DTPA (3.9 s(-1) mM(-1)). The pharmacokinetic parameters of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- in rats indicate that the elimination of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- is significantly slower than that of Gd-DTPA and is correlated with a reduced volume of distribution. The low volume of distribution and the longer elimination time (T(e1/2)) suggest that the agent is confined to the blood compartment, so it could have an important potential as a blood pool contrast agent. The biodistribution profile of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- 2 h after injection indicates significantly higher concentrations of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- as compared with Gd-DTPA in kidney, liver, lungs, heart and spleen. The images obtained on rats by MR angiography show the enhancement of the abdominal blood vessels. The signal intensity reaches a maximum of 55% at 7 min post-contrast and remains around 25% after 90 min. MRI-histomorphological correlation studies of [Gd-DTPA-phen]- and [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- showed that both agents displayed potent contrast enhancement in organs including the liver. The necrosis avidity tests indicated that, in contrast to the [Gd

  4. A phase III study of the efficacy and safety of a novel iron-based phosphate binder in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floege, Jürgen; Covic, Adrian C; Ketteler, Markus; Rastogi, Anjay; Chong, Edward M F; Gaillard, Sylvain; Lisk, Laura J; Sprague, Stuart M

    2014-09-01

    Efficacy of PA21 (sucroferric oxyhydroxide), a novel calcium-free polynuclear iron(III)-oxyhydroxide phosphate binder, was compared with that of sevelamer carbonate in an open-label, randomized, active-controlled phase III study. Seven hundred and seven hemo- and peritoneal dialysis patients with hyperphosphatemia received PA21 1.0-3.0 g per day and 348 received sevelamer 4.8-14.4 g per day for an 8-week dose titration, followed by 4 weeks without dose change, and then 12 weeks maintenance. Serum phosphorus reductions at week 12 were -0.71 mmol/l (PA21) and -0.79 mmol/l (sevelamer), demonstrating non-inferiority of, on average, three tablets of PA21 vs. eight of sevelamer. Efficacy was maintained to week 24. Non-adherence was 15.1% (PA21) vs. 21.3% (sevelamer). The percentage of patients that reported at least one treatment-emergent adverse event was 83.2% with PA21 and 76.1% with sevelamer. A higher proportion of patients withdrew owing to treatment-emergent adverse events with PA21 (15.7%) vs. sevelamer (6.6%). Mild, transient diarrhea, discolored feces, and hyperphosphatemia were more frequent with PA21; nausea and constipation were more frequent with sevelamer. After 24 weeks, 99 hemodialysis patients on PA21 were re-randomized into a 3-week superiority analysis of PA21 maintenance dose in 50 patients vs. low dose (250 mg per day (ineffective control)) in 49 patients. The PA21 maintenance dose was superior to the low dose in maintaining serum phosphorus control. Thus, PA21 was effective in lowering serum phosphorus in dialysis patients, with similar efficacy to sevelamer carbonate, a lower pill burden, and better adherence.

  5. Iron(III) and manganese(II) substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: Characterization and cytotoxicity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yan; Nam, C T; Ooi, C P

    2009-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) is the main inorganic component of natural bones and can bond to bone directly in vivo. Thus HA is widely used as coating material on bone implants due to its good osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. Metal ions doped HA have been used as catalyst or absorbents since the ion exchange method has introduced new properties in HA which are inherent to the metal ions. For example, Mn 2+ ions have the potential to increase cell adhesion while Fe 3+ ions have magnetic properties. Here, Fe(III) substituted hydroxyapatite (Fe-HA) and Mn(II) substituted hydroxyapatite (Mn-HA) were produced by wet chemical method coupled with ion exchange mechanism. Compared with pure HA, the colour of both Fe-HA and Mn-HA nanoparticles changed from white to brown and pink respectively. The intensity of the colours increased with increasing substitution concentrations. XRD patterns showed that all samples were single phased HA while the FTIR spectra revealed all samples possessed the characteristic phosphate and hydroxyl adsorption bands of HA. However, undesired adsorption bands of carbonate substitution (B-type carbonated HA) and H 2 O were also detected, which was reasonable since the wet chemical method was used in the synthesis of these nanoparticles. FESEM images showed all samples were elongated spheroids with small size distribution and of around 70 nm, regardless of metal ion substitution concentrations. EDX spectra showed the presence of Fe and Mn and ICP-AES results revealed all metal ion substituted HA were non-stoichiometric (Ca/P atomic ratio deviates from 1.67). Fe-HA nanoparticles were paramagnetic and the magnetic susceptibility increased with the increase of Fe content. Based on the extraction assay for cytotoxicity test, both Fe-HA and Mn-HA displayed non-cytotoxicity to osteoblast.

  6. Molecular-level spectroscopic investigations of the complexation and photodegradation of catechol to/by iron(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abadleh, Hind; Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Situm, Arthur; Slikboer, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  7. Theoretical analysis of the binding of iron(III) protoporphyrin IX to 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone via DFT-D3, MEP, QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkungli, Nyiang Kennet; Ghogomu, Julius Numbonui

    2017-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazones display diverse pharmacological properties, including antimalarial activities. Their pharmacological activities have been studied in depth, but little of this research has focused on their antimalarial mode of action. To elucidate this antimalarial mechanism, we investigated the nature of the interactions between iron(III) protoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)PPIX) and the thione-thiol tautomers of 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (MAPTSC). Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3), the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), the noncovalent interaction (NCI) index, the electron localization function (ELF), the localized orbital locator (LOL), and thermodynamic calculations were employed in this work. Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding is expected to inhibit hemozoin formation, thereby preventing Fe(III)PPIX detoxification in plasmodia. Preliminary studies geared toward the identification of atomic binding sites in the thione-thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were carried out using molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) maps and conceptual DFT-based local reactivity indices. The thionic sulfur and the 2 N-azomethine nitrogen/thiol sulfur of, respectively, the thione and thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were identified as the most favorable nucleophilic sites for electrophilic attack. The negative values of the computed Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding energies, enthalpies, and Gibbs free energies are indicative of the existence and stability of Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes. MAPTSC-Fe(III) coordinate bonds and strong hydrogen bonds (N-H···O) between the NH 2 group in MAPTSC and the C=O group in one propionate side chain of Fe(III)PPIX are crucial to Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding. QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL analyses revealed a subtle interplay of weak noncovalent interactions dominated by dispersive-like van der Waals interactions between Fe(III)PPIX and MAPTSC that stabilize the Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of iron (II and III) phosphates by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy of high vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz F, J.C.; Solis M, L.; Garcia R, G.; Romero G, E.T.

    2002-01-01

    The XRD and Sem techniques for determining the mineralogical and structural composition of iron II and III phosphates have been used. The mineralogical and structural composition of the materials revealed that they are the ferrous phosphate and the ferric phosphate. The contribution of the synthesis and characterization of these phosphates is that they can be used as components in the geological barriers capable to avoiding the dispersion from the hazardous radioactive materials to the environment. (Author)

  9. The first iron(III) complexes with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: Magnetic, spectroscopic (IR, ES+ MS, NMR, Fe-57 Mossbauer), theoretical, and biological activity studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Popa, Igor; Čajan, Michal; Zbořil, R.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Mikulík, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 4 (2010), s. 405-417 ISSN 0162-0134 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0512; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Iron(III) complexes * 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy * CDK inhibition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.317, year: 2010

  10. From dihydrated iron(III) phosphate to monohydrated ammonium-iron(II) phosphate: Solvothermal reaction mediated by acetone-urea mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, Belen F., E-mail: mbafernandez@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Trobajo, Camino [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Pique, Carmen [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Blanco, Jesus A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    By reaction between synthetic phosphosiderite FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, urea (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO, and acetone (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, we report a novel solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, is also described. The obtained product is a function of the reaction time and the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture, and the existence of structural memory in the dissolution-precipitation processes is discussed. Below 25 K, NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O behaves magnetically in a complex way, because both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic signals are superimposed, suggesting the existence of a canting of iron(II) magnetic moments. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O is presented. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} as a function of the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture and the reaction time, is also described. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solvothermal synthesis of NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O from an Fe(III) phosphate: reduction process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of two intermediate metastable phases: phase diagram. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal decomposition in two steps: mass loss of both water and ammonia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic behaviour: AF+constant spontaneous magnetization.

  11. Obstruction of photoinduced electron transfer from excited porphyrin to graphene oxide: a fluorescence turn-on sensing platform for iron (III ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong De Liu

    Full Text Available A comparative research of the assembly of different porphyrin molecules on graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (RGO was carried out, respectively. Despite the cationic porphyrin molecules can be assembled onto the surfaces of graphene sheets, including GO and RGO, to form complexes through electrostatic and π-π stacking interactions, the more obvious fluorescence quenching and the larger red-shift of the Soret band of porphyrin molecule in RGO-bound states were observed than those in GO-bound states, due to the difference of molecular flattening in degree. Further, more interesting finding was that the complexes formed between cationic porphyrin and GO, rather than RGO sheets, can facilitate the incorporation of iron (III ions into the porphyrin moieties, due to the presence of the oxygen-contained groups at the basal plane of GO sheets served as auxiliary coordination units, which can high-efficiently obstruct the electron transfer from excited porphyrin to GO sheets and result in the occurrence of fluorescence restoration. Thus, a fluorescence sensing platform has been developed for iron (III ions detection in this contribution by using the porphyrin/GO nanohybrids as an optical probe, and our present one exhibited rapid and sensitive responses and high selectivity toward iron (III ions.

  12. Sorption of Am(III) on attapulgite/iron oxide magnetic composites. Effect of pH, ionic strength and humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, T.; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, Jiangxi; Fan, Q.H.; Wu, W.S.; Lanzhou Univ., Gansu; Liu, S.P.; Pan, D.Q.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Li, P.

    2012-01-01

    Attapulgite/iron oxide magnetic (ATP/IOM) composites was prepared, and the sorption behavior of Am(III) on that composites was studied as a function of pH, ionic strength, the solid-to-liquid ratio (m/V), contact time, and the concentration of Am(III) under ambient conditions using batch technique. The time to achieve the sorption equilibrium was less than 5 h. The sorption of Am(III) on ATP/IOM composites was strongly affected by pH and ionic strength. Though ion exchange reaction contributed to Am(III) sorption over low pH range and low ionic strength, the sorption was mainly dominated by surface complexion (i.e., outer- and/or inner-sphere complexes) in the whole observed pH range. In the presence of humic acid (HA), the sorption edge of Am(III) on ATP/IOM composites obviously shifted to lower pH; but Am(III) sorption gradually became weak after pH exceeded 4, which may be mainly in terms of the soluble complexes of HA-Am(III). (orig.)

  13. Cloud point extraction of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives and Triton X-100 and determination of 10(-7)moldm(-3) level iron(III) in riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Akira; Ito, Hiromi; Kanai, Chikako; Imura, Hisanori; Ohashi, Kousaburo

    2005-01-30

    The cloud point extraction behavior of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives (HA) such as 8-quinolinol (HQ), 2-methyl-8-quinolinol (HMQ), 5-butyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(4)Q), 5-hexyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(6)Q), and 2-methyl-5-octyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HMO(8)Q) and Triton X-100 solution was investigated. Iron(III) was extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 1.70-5.44. Above pH 4.0, more than 95% of iron(III) was extracted with HQ, HMQ, and HMO(8)Q. Vanadium(V) was also extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 2.07-5.00, and the extractability increased in the following order of HMQ HQ cloud point extraction was applied to the determination of iron(III) in the riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. When 1.25 x 10(-3)M HMQ and 1% (v/v) Triton X-100 were used, the found values showed a good agreement with the certified ones within the 2% of the R.S.D. Moreover, the effect of an alkyl group on the solubility of 5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol and 2-methyl-5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol in 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 at 25 degrees C was also investigated.

  14. Abrupt spin transition with thermal hysteresis of iron(III) complex [Fe(III)(Him)2(hapen)]AsF6 (Him = imidazole, H2hapen = N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyacetophenylidene)ethylenediamine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinami, Takeshi; Koike, Masataka; Matsumoto, Naohide; Sunatsuki, Yukinari; Okazawa, Atsushi; Kojima, Norimichi

    2014-02-17

    The solvent-free spin crossover iron(III) complex [Fe(III)(Him)2(hapen)]AsF6 (Him = imidazole, H2hapen = N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyacetophenylidene)ethylenediamine), exhibiting thermal hysteresis, was synthesized and characterized. The Fe(III) ion has an octahedral coordination geometry, with N2O2 donor atoms of the planar tetradentate ligand (hapen) and two nitrogen atoms of two imidazoles at the axial positions. One of two imidazoles is hydrogen-bonded to the phenoxo oxygen atom of hapen of the adjacent unit to give a hydrogen-bonded one-dimensional chain, while the other imidazole group is free from hydrogen bonding. The temperature dependencies of the magnetic susceptibilities and Mössbauer spectra revealed an abrupt spin transition between the high-spin (S = 5/2) and low-spin (S = 1/2) states, with thermal hysteresis.

  15. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaire, Caroline; van Genuchten, Case M; Amrose, Susan E; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2016-10-15

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) is a low-cost process in which Fe(II) generated from an Fe(0) anode reacts with dissolved O2 to form (1) Fe(III) precipitates with an affinity for bacterial cell walls and (2) bactericidal reactive oxidants. Previous work suggests that Fe-EC is a promising treatment option for groundwater containing arsenic and bacterial contamination. However, the mechanisms of bacteria attenuation and the impact of major groundwater ions are not well understood. In this work, using the model indicator Escherichia coli (E. coli), we show that physical removal via enmeshment in EC precipitate flocs is the primary process of bacteria attenuation in the presence of HCO3(-), which significantly inhibits inactivation, possibly due to a reduction in the lifetime of reactive oxidants. We demonstrate that the adhesion of EC precipitates to cell walls, which results in bacteria encapsulation in flocs, is driven primarily by interactions between EC precipitates and phosphate functional groups on bacteria surfaces. In single solute electrolytes, both P (0.4 mM) and Ca/Mg (1-13 mM) inhibited the adhesion of EC precipitates to bacterial cell walls, whereas Si (0.4 mM) and ionic strength (2-200 mM) did not impact E. coli attenuation. Interestingly, P (0.4 mM) did not affect E. coli attenuation in electrolytes containing Ca/Mg, consistent with bivalent cation bridging between bacterial phosphate groups and inorganic P sorbed to EC precipitates. Finally, we found that EC precipitate adhesion is largely independent of cell wall composition, consistent with comparable densities of phosphate functional groups on Gram-positive and Gram-negative cells. Our results are critical to predict the performance of Fe-EC to eliminate bacterial contaminants from waters with diverse chemical compositions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Organic Substances on the Efficiency of Fe(Ii to Fe(Iii Oxidation and Removal of Iron Compounds from Groundwater in the Sedimentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupińska Izabela

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems with iron removal from groundwater is organic matter. The article presents the experiments involved groundwater samples with a high concentration of total iron - amounting to 7.20 mgFe/dm3 and an increased amount of organic substances (TOC from 5.50 to 7.50 mgC/dm3. The water samples examined differed in terms of the value of the ratio of the TOC concentration and the concentration of total iron (D. It was concluded that with increase in the coexistence ratio of organic substances and total iron in water (D = [TOC]/[Fetot], efficiency of Fe(II to Fe(III oxidization with dissolved oxygen decreased, while the oxidation time was increasing. This rule was not demonstrated for potassium manganate (VII when used as an oxidizing agent. The application of potassium manganate (VII for oxidation of Fe(II ions produced the better results in terms of total iron concentration reduction in the sedimentation process than the oxidation with dissolved oxygen.

  17. Effect of Organic Substances on the Efficiency of Fe(Ii) to Fe(Iii) Oxidation and Removal of Iron Compounds from Groundwater in the Sedimentation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupińska, Izabela

    2017-09-01

    One of the problems with iron removal from groundwater is organic matter. The article presents the experiments involved groundwater samples with a high concentration of total iron - amounting to 7.20 mgFe/dm3 and an increased amount of organic substances (TOC from 5.50 to 7.50 mgC/dm3). The water samples examined differed in terms of the value of the ratio of the TOC concentration and the concentration of total iron (D). It was concluded that with increase in the coexistence ratio of organic substances and total iron in water (D = [TOC]/[Fetot]), efficiency of Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidization with dissolved oxygen decreased, while the oxidation time was increasing. This rule was not demonstrated for potassium manganate (VII) when used as an oxidizing agent. The application of potassium manganate (VII) for oxidation of Fe(II) ions produced the better results in terms of total iron concentration reduction in the sedimentation process than the oxidation with dissolved oxygen.

  18. Nonanuclear Spin-Crossover Complex Containing Iron(II) and Iron(III) Based on a 2,6-Bis(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine Ligand Functionalized with a Carboxylate Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhervé, Alexandre; Recio-Carretero, María José; López-Jordà, Maurici; Clemente-Juan, Juan Modesto; Canet-Ferrer, Josep; Cantarero, Andrés; Clemente-León, Miguel; Coronado, Eugenio

    2016-09-19

    The synthesis and magnetostructural characterization of [Fe(III)3(μ3-O)(H2O)3[Fe(II)(bppCOOH)(bppCOO)]6](ClO4)13·(CH3)2CO)6·(solvate) (2) are reported. This compound is obtained as a secondary product during synthesis of the mononuclear complex [Fe(II)(bppCOOH)2](ClO4)2 (1). The single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure of 2 shows that it contains the nonanuclear cluster of the formula [Fe(III)3(μ3-O)(H2O)3[Fe(II)(bppCOOH)(bppCOO)]6](13+), which is formed by a central Fe(III)3O core coordinated to six partially deprotonated [Fe(II)(bppCOOH)(bppCOO)](+) complexes. Raman spectroscopy studies on single crystals of 1 and 2 have been performed to elucidate the spin and oxidation states of iron in 2. These studies and magnetic characterization indicate that most of the iron(II) complexes of 2 remain in the low-spin (LS) state and present a gradual and incomplete spin crossover above 300 K. On the other hand, the Fe(III) trimer shows the expected antiferromagnetic behavior. From the structural point of view, 2 represents the first example in which bppCOO(-) acts as a bridging ligand, thus forming a polynuclear magnetic complex.

  19. The role of order-disorder transitions in the quest for molecular multiferroics: structural and magnetic neutron studies of a mixed valence iron(II)-iron(III) formate framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Fabelo, Oscar; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J Alberto; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Mason, Sax A; Pardo, Emilio; Lloret, Francesc; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Bu, Xian-He; Simonet, Virginie; Colin, Claire V; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Juan

    2012-12-05

    Neutron diffraction studies have been carried out to shed light on the unprecedented order-disorder phase transition (ca. 155 K) observed in the mixed-valence iron(II)-iron(III) formate framework compound [NH(2)(CH(3))(2)](n)[Fe(III)Fe(II)(HCOO)(6)](n). The crystal structure at 220 K was first determined from Laue diffraction data, then a second refinement at 175 K and the crystal structure determination in the low temperature phase at 45 K were done with data from the monochromatic high resolution single crystal diffractometer D19. The 45 K nuclear structure reveals that the phase transition is associated with the order-disorder of the dimethylammonium counterion that is weakly anchored in the cavities of the [Fe(III)Fe(II)(HCOO)(6)](n) framework. In the low-temperature phase, a change in space group from P31c to R3c occurs, involving a tripling of the c-axis due to the ordering of the dimethylammonium counterion. The occurrence of this nuclear phase transition is associated with an electric transition, from paraelectric to antiferroelectric. A combination of powder and single crystal neutron diffraction measurements below the magnetic order transition (ca. 37 K) has been used to determine unequivocally the magnetic structure of this Néel N-Type ferrimagnet, proving that the ferrimagnetic behavior is due to a noncompensation of the different Fe(II) and Fe(III) magnetic moments.

  20. Coumarin-Based Fluorescent Probes for Dual Recognition of Copper(II and Iron(III Ions and Their Application in Bio-Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpo García-Beltrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two new coumarin-based “turn-off” fluorescent probes, (E-3-((3,4-dihydroxybenzylideneamino-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS1 and (E-3-((2,4-dihydroxybenzylideneamino-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS2, were synthesized and their detection of copper(II and iron(III ions was studied. Results show that both compounds are highly selective for Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions over other metal ions. However, BS2 is detected directly, while detection of BS1 involves a hydrolysis reaction to regenerate 3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin (3 and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, of which 3 is able to react with copper(II or iron(III ions. The interaction between the tested compounds and copper or iron ions is associated with a large fluorescence decrease, showing detection limits of ca. 10−5 M. Preliminary studies employing epifluorescence microscopy demonstrate that Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions can be imaged in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the tested probes.

  1. Determinação de ferro (III em produtos farmacêuticos por titulação fotométrica - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v33i1.8034 Determination of iron (III in pharmaceutical products by photometric titration - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v33i1.8034

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Luís Beltrame

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho descreve a montagem de um sistema de titulação fotométrica simples e de baixo custo para a determinação de ferro (III em produtos farmacêuticos. O sistema de titulação fotométrica foi construído utilizando-se a bomba peristáltica de um espectrofotômetro convencional. O procedimento é baseado na titulação de ferro (III com EDTA e ácido salicílico como indicador. A absorção do complexo ferro (III-ácido salicílico foi monitorada espectrofotometricamente em 525 nm. O limite de quantificação foi de 5 µg de ferro (III. O procedimento de titulação fotométrica foi aplicado para a determinação de ferro (III em amostras contendo sulfato ferroso e hidróxido férrico polimaltosado. O procedimento mostrou sensibilidade, reprodutibilidade e precisão para a utilização em análise rotineira de ferro (III em produtos farmacêuticos.This paper describes a simple, precise and low-cost photometric titration method for iron (III determination in pharmaceutical preparations. The photometric titration system was constructed using the peristaltic pump of a conventional spectrophotometer. The method is based on titration of iron (III with EDTA using salicylic acid as indicator. The absorption of the iron (III-salicylic acid complex was monitored spectrophotometrically at 525 nm. The limit of quantification was 5 µg of iron (III. The photometric titration procedure was applied for the determination of iron (III in samples of ferrous sulfate and ferric hydroxide polymaltose complex. The procedure showed sensibility, reproducibility and accuracy for use as a method for the routine analysis of iron (III in pharmaceutical formulations.

  2. Flashphotolysis investigations of the influence of the ionic strength on the kinetics of energy transfer reactions. Investigation of the reaction of Tb(III)- and Eu(III)-trisdipicolinate with different charged iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorle, A.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes are especially important as labels for the investigation of biological substances. The rare earths are employed as probes and are often able to substitute more expensive radioactive labels. The kinetic investigations of the reactions of Tb(III)- and Eu(III)-trisdipicolinate (charge: 3**-) with different charged iron complexes as quenchers (charge: 3 - , 1 - , 2 + ) (solvent: H 2 O) at varying ionic strength give results that can help to find out more details about how the intermolecular energy transfer takes place. By creating a Stern-Volmer plot one can get the rate constant of the luminescent quenching: Plotting the rate constants of quenching taken from the timeresolved flashphotolysis measurement (y-axis) versus the concentration of the quencher (x-axis) the resulting slope equals a rate constant k 2 of 2 nd order. (author)

  3. Alternating ring-opening copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide with phthalic anhydride catalyzed by iron(III) salen complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mundil, R.; Hošťálek, Z.; Šeděnková, Ivana; Merna, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2015), s. 161-166 ISSN 1598-5032 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyesters * iron salen complexes * catalysis Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2015

  4. Oxidation of dibenzothiophene as a model substrate for the removal of organic sulphur from fossil fuels by iron(III ions generated from pyrite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR P. BESKOSKI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Within this paper a new idea for the removal of organically bonded sulphur from fossil fuels is discussed. Dibenzothiophene (DBT was used as a model compound of organicmolecules containing sulphur. This form of (biodesulphurization was performed by an indirect mechanism in which iron(III ions generated from pyrite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans performed the abiotic oxidation. The obtained reaction products, dibenzothiopene sulfoxide and dibenzothiophene sulfone, are more soluble in water than the basic substrate and the obtained results confirmed the basic hypothesis and give the posibility of continuing the experiments related to application of this (biodesulphurization process.

  5. Reductive reactivity of iron(III) oxides in the east china sea sediments: characterization by selective extraction and kinetic dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Jin; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Huang, Xiang-Li

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Fe(III) oxides in gravity-core sediments collected from the East China Sea inner shelf were quantified by using three selective extractions (acidic hydroxylamine, acidic oxalate, bicarbonate-citrate buffered sodium dithionite). Also the reactivity of Fe(III) oxides in the sediments was characterized by kinetic dissolution using ascorbic acid as reductant at pH 3.0 and 7.5 in combination with the reactive continuum model. Three parameters derived from the kinetic method: m 0 (theoretical initial amount of ascorbate-reducible Fe(III) oxides), k' (rate constant) and γ (heterogeneity of reactivity), enable a quantitative characterization of Fe(III) oxide reactivity in a standardized way. Amorphous Fe(III) oxides quantified by acidic hydroxylamine extraction were quickly consumed in the uppermost layer during early diagenesis but were not depleted over the upper 100 cm depth. The total amounts of amorphous and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides are highly available for efficient buffering of dissolved sulfide. As indicated by the m 0, k' and γ, the surface sediments always have the maximum content, reactivity and heterogeneity of reactive Fe(III) oxides, while the three parameters simultaneously downcore decrease, much more quickly in the upper layer than at depth. Albeit being within a small range (within one order of magnitude) of the initial rates among sediments at different depths, incongruent dissolution could result in huge discrepancies of the later dissolution rates due to differentiating heterogeneity, which cannot be revealed by selective extraction. A strong linear correlation of the m 0 at pH 3.0 with the dithionite-extractable Fe(III) suggests that the m 0 may represent Fe(III) oxide assemblages spanning amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Maximum microbially available Fe(III) predicted by the m 0 at pH 7.5 may include both amorphous and a fraction of other less reactive Fe(III) phases.

  6. Study on competitive adsorption mechanism among oxyacid-type heavy metals in co-existing system: Removal of aqueous As(V), Cr(III) and As(III) using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs) as adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sen; Lian, Cheng; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Lili; Lin, Kuangfei

    2017-11-01

    The adsorption and co-adsorption of As(V), Cr(VI) and As(III) onto the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs) surface were investigated comprehensively to clarify the competitive processes. The results reflected that the MIONPs had remarkable preferential adsorption to As(V) compared with Cr(VI) and As(III). And it was determined, relying on the analysis of heavy metals variations on the MIONPs surface at different co-adsorption stages using FTIR and XPS, that the inner-sphere complexation made vital contribution to the preferential adsorption for As(V), corresponding with the replacement experiments where As(V) could grab extensively active sites on the MIONPs pre-occupied by As(III) or Cr(V) uniaxially. The desorption processes displayed that the strongest affinity between the MIONPs and As(V) where As(III) and Cr(VI) were more inclined to wash out. It is wish to provide a helpful direction with this study for the wastewater treatment involving multiple oxyacid-type heavy metals using MIONPs as adsorbents.

  7. Manganese-incorporated iron(III) oxide–graphene magnetic nanocomposite: synthesis, characterization, and application for the arsenic(III)-sorption from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, Debabrata; Gupta, Kaushik; Ghosh, Arup Kumar; De, Amitabha; Banerjee, Sangam; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2012-01-01

    High specific surface area of graphene (GR) has gained special scientific attention in developing magnetic GR nanocomposite aiming to apply for the remediation of diverse environmental problems like point-of-use water purification and simultaneous separation of contaminants applying low external magnetic field ( x 2+ Fe 2−x 3+ O 4 2− ) (IMBO)–GR nanocomposite is reported by exfoliating the GR layers. Latest microscopic, spectroscopic, powder X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, and superconducting quantum interference device characterizations showed that the material is a magnetic nanocomposite with high specific surface area (280 m 2 g −1 ) and pore volume (0.3362 cm 3 g −1 ). Use of this composite for the immobilization of carcinogenic As(III) from water at 300 K and pH ∼7.0 showed that the nanocomposite has higher binding efficiency with As(III) than the IMBO owing to its high specific surface area. The composite showed almost complete (>99.9 %) As(III) removal (≤10 μg L −1 ) from water. External magnetic field of 0.3 T efficiently separated the water dispersed composite (0.01 g/10 mL) at room temperature (300 K). Thus, this composite is a promising material which can be used effectively as a potent As(III) immobilizer from the contaminated groundwater (>10 μg L −1 ) to improve drinking water quality.

  8. Modification of glassy carbon electrode with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and iron(III)-porphyrin film: Application to chlorate, bromate and iodate detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, Abdollah; MamKhezri, Hussein; Hallaj, Rahman; Zandi, Shiva

    2007-01-01

    In this study, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) is evaluated as a transducer, stabilizer and immobilization matrix for the construction of amperometric sensor based on iron-porphyrin. 5,10,15,20-Tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine iron(III) chloride (Fe(III)P) adsorbed on MWCNTs immobilized on the surface of glassy carbon electrode. Cyclic voltammograms of the Fe(III)P-incorporated-MWCNTs indicate a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox couple with surface confined characteristics at wide pH range (2-12). The surface coverage (Γ) and charge transfer rate constant (k s ) of Fe(III)P immobilized on MWCNTs were 7.68 x 10 -9 mol cm -2 and 1.8 s -1 , respectively, indicating high loading ability of MWCNTs for Fe(III)P and great facilitation of the electron transfer between Fe(III)P and carbon nanotubes immobilized on the electrode surface. Modified electrodes exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction of ClO 3 - , IO 3 - and BrO 3 - in acidic solutions. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction of bromate, chlorate and iodate were 6.8 x 10 3 , 7.4 x 10 3 and 4.8 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 , respectively. The hydrodynamic amperometry of rotating-modified electrode at constant potential versus reference electrode was used for detection of bromate, chlorate and iodate. The detection limit, linear calibration range and sensitivity for chlorate, bromate and iodate detections were 0.5 μM, 2 μM to 1 mM, 8.4 nA/μM, 0.6 μM, 2 μM to 0.15 mM, 11 nA/μM, and 2.5 μM, 10 μM to 4 mM and 1.5 nA/μM, respectively. Excellent electrochemical reversibility of the redox couple, good reproducibility, high stability, low detection limit, long life time, fast amperometric response time, wide linear concentration range, technical simplicity and possibility of rapid preparation are great advantages of this sensor. The obtained results show promising practical application of the Fe(III)P-MWCNTs-modified electrode as an amperometric sensor for chlorate, iodate and

  9. Modification of glassy carbon electrode with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and iron(III)-porphyrin film: Application to chlorate, bromate and iodate detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Center of University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir; MamKhezri, Hussein [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zandi, Shiva [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Kurdistan Medical University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-06-10

    In this study, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) is evaluated as a transducer, stabilizer and immobilization matrix for the construction of amperometric sensor based on iron-porphyrin. 5,10,15,20-Tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine iron(III) chloride (Fe(III)P) adsorbed on MWCNTs immobilized on the surface of glassy carbon electrode. Cyclic voltammograms of the Fe(III)P-incorporated-MWCNTs indicate a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox couple with surface confined characteristics at wide pH range (2-12). The surface coverage ({gamma}) and charge transfer rate constant (k {sub s}) of Fe(III)P immobilized on MWCNTs were 7.68 x 10{sup -9} mol cm{sup -2} and 1.8 s{sup -1}, respectively, indicating high loading ability of MWCNTs for Fe(III)P and great facilitation of the electron transfer between Fe(III)P and carbon nanotubes immobilized on the electrode surface. Modified electrodes exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction of ClO{sub 3} {sup -}, IO{sub 3} {sup -} and BrO{sub 3} {sup -} in acidic solutions. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction of bromate, chlorate and iodate were 6.8 x 10{sup 3}, 7.4 x 10{sup 3} and 4.8 x 10{sup 2} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The hydrodynamic amperometry of rotating-modified electrode at constant potential versus reference electrode was used for detection of bromate, chlorate and iodate. The detection limit, linear calibration range and sensitivity for chlorate, bromate and iodate detections were 0.5 {mu}M, 2 {mu}M to 1 mM, 8.4 nA/{mu}M, 0.6 {mu}M, 2 {mu}M to 0.15 mM, 11 nA/{mu}M, and 2.5 {mu}M, 10 {mu}M to 4 mM and 1.5 nA/{mu}M, respectively. Excellent electrochemical reversibility of the redox couple, good reproducibility, high stability, low detection limit, long life time, fast amperometric response time, wide linear concentration range, technical simplicity and possibility of rapid preparation are great advantages of this sensor. The obtained results show promising practical

  10. Coprecipitation of arsenate with metal oxides. 3. Nature, mineralogy, and reactivity of iron(III)-aluminum precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Antonio; Pigna, Massimo; Del Gaudio, Stefania; Cozzolino, Vincenza; Banerjee, Dipanjan

    2009-03-01

    Coprecipitation involving arsenic with aluminum or iron has been studied because this technique is considered particularly efficient for removal of this toxic element from polluted waters. Coprecipitation of arsenic with mixed iron-aluminum solutions has received scant attention. In this work we studied (i)the mineralogy, surface properties, and chemical composition of mixed iron-aluminum oxides formed at initial Fe/Al molar ratio of 1.0 in the absence or presence of arsenate [As/ Fe+Al molar ratio (R) of 0, 0.01, or 0.1] and at pH 4.0, 7.0, and 10.0 and aged for 30 and 210 days at 50 degrees C and (ii) the removal of arsenate from the coprecipitates after addition of phosphate. The amounts of short-range ordered precipitates (ferrihydrite, aluminous ferrihydrite and/or poorly crystalline boehmite) were greater than those found in iron and aluminum systems (studied in previous works), due to the capacity of both aluminum and arsenate to retard or inhibitthe transformation of the initially formed precipitates into well-crystallized oxides (gibbsite, bayerite, and hematite). As a consequence, the surface areas of the iron-aluminum oxides formed in the absence or presence of arsenate were usually much larger than those of aluminum or iron oxides formed under the same conditions. Arsenate was found to be associated mainly into short-range ordered materials. Chemical composition of all samples was affected by pH, initial R, and aging. Phosphate sorption was facilitated by the presence of short-range ordered materials, mainly those richer in aluminum, but was inhibited by arsenate present in the samples. The quantities of arsenate replaced by phosphate, expressed as percentages of its total amount present in the samples, were particularly low, ranging from 10% to 26%. A comparison of the desorption of arsenate by phosphate from aluminum-arsenate and iron-arsenate (studied in previous works) and iron-aluminum-arsenate coprecipitates evidenced that phosphate has a greater

  11. Analytical applications of N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acids towards chromium (VI), copper (II), iron (III) and uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhadir, A. Y. F.

    2001-05-01

    Two aliphatic hydroxamic acids were prepared; N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid, by the reaction of β-phenylhydroxylamine and p-tolyl hydroxylamine with n-butyryl chloride. The acids were identified by: their melting points, characteristic reactions with acidic solutions of vanadium (V) and iron (III), infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen content and molecular weight determination. The extractability of these acids towards Cr (VI), Cu (II), Fe (III) and U (VI) were investigated at different pH values and molar acid concentrations. N-phenyl-n- butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.80%) for Cr (VI) at 4 M H 2 SO 4 , (83.25%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (99.17%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.76%) at 4 M HNO 3 for U (VI) respectively. N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.40%) for Cr (VI)at 4 M H 2 SO 4 , (81.30%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (92.80%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.64%) for U (VI) at 4 M HNO 3 , respectively. The ratios of the metal to ligands were determined by job method (continuous variation method) and were found to be 1:2 for Cr (VI) and U (VI). (Author)

  12. Analytical applications of N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acids towards chromium (VI), copper (II), iron (III) and uranium (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkhadir, A Y. F. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2001-05-01

    Two aliphatic hydroxamic acids were prepared; N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid, by the reaction of {beta}-phenylhydroxylamine and p-tolyl hydroxylamine with n-butyryl chloride. The acids were identified by: their melting points, characteristic reactions with acidic solutions of vanadium (V) and iron (III), infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen content and molecular weight determination. The extractability of these acids towards Cr (VI), Cu (II), Fe (III) and U (VI) were investigated at different pH values and molar acid concentrations. N-phenyl-n- butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.80%) for Cr (VI) at 4 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, (83.25%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (99.17%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.76%) at 4 M HNO{sub 3} for U (VI) respectively. N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.40%) for Cr (VI)at 4 M H{sub 2} SO{sub 4}, (81.30%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (92.80%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.64%) for U (VI) at 4 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively. The ratios of the metal to ligands were determined by job method (continuous variation method) and were found to be 1:2 for Cr (VI) and U (VI). (Author)

  13. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.; Petruševski, Branislav; Lens, Piet Nl L; Amy, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without

  14. Biogenic Fe(III) minerals lower the efficiency of iron-mineral based commercial filter systems for arsenic removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Susanne; Muehe, Eva M.; Posth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are affected by As (arsenic) contaminated groundwater. Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides sorb As efficiently and are therefore used in water purification filters. Commercial filters containing abiogenic Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides (GEH) showed varying As removal, and it was unclear...

  15. Synthesis of linear alkylbenzene sulphonate intercalated iron(II) iron(III) hydroxide sulphate (green rust) and adsorption of carbon tetrachloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayala Luis, Karina Barbara; Kaldor, D.K.; Bender Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    ) into the interlayer space of synthetic sulphate green rust, GR . Mössbauer analysis of GRLAS indicates that the structure of the organo-GR is very similar to SO4 that of the initial GR with regard to the FeII/FeIII ratio and local coordination of Fe atoms. X-ray SO4 diffraction demonstrates that the GRLAS formed...

  16. Structure of short-range-ordered iron(III)-precipitates formed by iron(II) oxidation in water containing phosphate, silicate, and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegelin, A.; Frommer, J.; Vantelon, D.; Kaegi, R.; Hug, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The oxidation of Fe(II) in water leads to the formation of Fe(III)-precipitates that strongly affect the fate of nutrients and contaminants in natural and engineered systems. Examples include the cycling of As in rice fields irrigated with As-rich groundwater or the treatment of drinking water for As removal. Knowledge of the types of Fe(III)-precipitates forming in such systems is essential for the quantitative modeling of nutrient and contaminant dynamics and for the optimization of water purification techniques on the basis of a mechanistic understanding of the relevant biogeochemical processes. In this study, we investigated the local coordination of Fe, P, and Ca in Fe(III)-precipitates formed by aeration of synthetic Fe(II)-containing groundwater with variable composition (pH 7, 2-30 mg/L Fe(II), 2-20 mg/L phosphate-P, 2-20 mg/L silicate-Si, 8 mM Na-bicarbonate or 2.5 mM Ca-&1.5 mM Mg-bicarbonate). After 4 hours of oxidation, Fe(III)-precipitates were collected on 0.2 µm nylon filters and dried. The precipitates were analyzed by Fe K-edge EXAFS (XAS beamline, ANKA, Germany) and by P and Ca K-edge XANES spectroscopy (LUCIA beamline, SLS, Switzerland). The Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that local Fe coordination in the precipitates systematically shifted with water composition. As long as water contained P, mainly short-range-ordered Fe(III)-phosphate formed (with molar P/Fe ~0.5). In the absence of P, Fe(III) precipitated as hydrous ferric oxide at high Si/Fe>0.5, as ferrihydrite at intermediate Si/Fe, and mainly as lepidocrocite at Si/Fe<0.2. Analysis of the EXAFS by shell-fitting indicated that Fe(III)-phosphates mainly contained mono- or oligomeric (edge- or corner-sharing) Fe and that the linkage between neighboring Fe(III)-octahedra changed from predominantly edge-sharing in Si-rich hydrous ferric oxide to edge- and corner-sharing in ferrihydrite. Electron microscopic data showed that changes in local precipitate structure were systematically

  17. Ferrous Iron Oxidation under Varying pO2 Levels: The Effect of Fe(III)/Al(III) Oxide Minerals and Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Thompson, Aaron

    2018-01-16

    Abiotic Fe(II) oxidation by O 2 commonly occurs in the presence of mineral sorbents and organic matter (OM) in soils and sediments; however, this tertiary system has rarely been studied. Therefore, we examined the impacts of mineral surfaces (goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 ) and organic matter [Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA)] on Fe(II) oxidation rates and the resulting Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides under 21 and 1% pO 2 at pH 6. We tracked Fe dynamics by adding 57 Fe(II) to 56 Fe-labeled goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 and characterized the resulting solids using 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. We found Fe(II) oxidation was slower at low pO 2 and resulted in higher-crystallinity Fe(III) phases. Relative to oxidation of Fe(II) (aq) alone, both goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 surfaces increased Fe(II) oxidation rates regardless of pO 2 levels, with goethite being the stronger catalyst. Goethite surfaces promoted the formation of crystalline goethite, while γ-Al 2 O 3 favored nano/small particle or disordered goethite and some lepidocrocite; oxidation of Fe(II) aq alone favored lepidocrocite. SRFA reduced oxidation rates in all treatments except the mineral-free systems at 21% pO 2 , and SRFA decreased Fe(III) phase crystallinity, facilitating low-crystalline ferrihydrite in the absence of mineral sorbents, low-crystalline lepidocrocite in the presence of γ-Al 2 O 3 , but either crystalline goethite or ferrihydrite when goethite was present. This work highlights that the oxidation rate, the types of mineral surfaces, and OM control Fe(III) precipitate composition.

  18. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxides Efficiently Catalyzed by Thioether-Triphenolate Bimetallic Iron(III) Complexes: Catalyst Structure-Reactivity Relationship and Mechanistic DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Della Monica, Francesco; Vummaleti, Sai V. C.; Buonerba, Antonio; Nisi, Assunta De; Monari, Magda; Milione, Stefano; Grassi, Alfonso; Cavallo, Luigi; Capacchione, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    A series of dinuclear iron(III)I complexes supported by thioether-triphenolate ligands have been prepared to attain highly Lewis acidic catalysts. In combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) they are highly active catalysts in the synthesis of cyclic organic carbonates through the coupling of carbon dioxide to epoxides with the highest initial turnover frequencies reported to date for the conversion of propylene oxide to propylene carbonate for iron-based catalysts (5200h-1; 120°C, 2MPa, 1h). In particular, these complexes are shown to be highly selective catalysts for the coupling of carbon dioxide to internal oxiranes affording the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yield and with retention of the initial stereochemical configuration. A density functional theory (DFT) investigation provides a rational for the relative high activity found for these Fe(III) complexes, showing the fundamental role of the hemilabile sulfur atom in the ligand skeleton to promote reactivity. Notably, in spite of the dinuclear nature of the catalyst precursor only one metal center is involved in the catalytic cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Spectroscopic, potentiometric and theoretical studies on the binding properties of a novel tripodal polycatechol-imine ligand towards iron(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, B. K.; Sahoo, Suban K.; Baral, Minati

    2008-12-01

    A novel multidentate tripodal ligand, cis, cis-1,3,5-tris[(2,3-dihydroxybenzylidene)aminomethyl]cyclohexane (TDBAC, L) containing one catechol unit in each arms of a tripodal amine, cis, cis-1,3,5-tris(aminomethyl)cyclohexane was investigated as a chelator for iron(III) through potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods in an aqueous medium of 0.1N ionic strength and 25 ± 1 °C as well as in ethanol by continuous variation method. From pH metric in water, three protonation constants characterized for the three-hydroxyl groups of the catechol units at ortho were used as input data to evaluate the stability constants of the complexes. Formation of monomeric complexes FeLH 3, FeLH 2, FeLH and FeL were depicted. In ethanol, formation of complexes FeL, Fe 2L and Fe 3L were characterized. Structures of the complexes were explained by using the experimental evidences and predicted through molecular modeling calculations. The ligand showed potential to coordinate iron(III) through three imine nitrogens and three catecholic oxygens at ortho to form a tris(iminocatecholate) type complex.

  20. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxides Efficiently Catalyzed by Thioether-Triphenolate Bimetallic Iron(III) Complexes: Catalyst Structure-Reactivity Relationship and Mechanistic DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Della Monica, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    A series of dinuclear iron(III)I complexes supported by thioether-triphenolate ligands have been prepared to attain highly Lewis acidic catalysts. In combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) they are highly active catalysts in the synthesis of cyclic organic carbonates through the coupling of carbon dioxide to epoxides with the highest initial turnover frequencies reported to date for the conversion of propylene oxide to propylene carbonate for iron-based catalysts (5200h-1; 120°C, 2MPa, 1h). In particular, these complexes are shown to be highly selective catalysts for the coupling of carbon dioxide to internal oxiranes affording the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yield and with retention of the initial stereochemical configuration. A density functional theory (DFT) investigation provides a rational for the relative high activity found for these Fe(III) complexes, showing the fundamental role of the hemilabile sulfur atom in the ligand skeleton to promote reactivity. Notably, in spite of the dinuclear nature of the catalyst precursor only one metal center is involved in the catalytic cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Utilization of subsurface microbial electrochemical systems to elucidate the mechanisms of competition between methanogenesis and microbial iron(III)/humic acid reduction in Arctic peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E. S.; Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Angenent, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    High-latitude peat soils are a major carbon reservoir, and there is growing concern that previously dormant carbon from this reservoir could be released to the atmosphere as a result of continued climate change. Microbial processes, such as methanogenesis and carbon dioxide production via iron(III) or humic acid reduction, are at the heart of the carbon cycle in Arctic peat soils [1]. A deeper understanding of the factors governing microbial dominance in these soils is crucial for predicting the effects of continued climate change. In previous years, we have demonstrated the viability of a potentiostatically-controlled subsurface microbial electrochemical system-based biosensor that measures microbial respiration via exocellular electron transfer [2]. This system utilizes a graphite working electrode poised at 0.1 V NHE to mimic ferric iron and humic acid compounds. Microbes that would normally utilize these compounds as electron acceptors donate electrons to the electrode instead. The resulting current is a measure of microbial respiration with the electrode and is recorded with respect to time. Here, we examine the mechanistic relationship between methanogenesis and iron(III)- or humic acid-reduction by using these same microbial-three electrode systems to provide an inexhaustible source of alternate electron acceptor to microbes in these soils. Chamber-based carbon dioxide and methane fluxes were measured from soil collars with and without microbial three-electrode systems over a period of four weeks. In addition, in some collars we simulated increased fermentation by applying acetate treatments to understand possible effects of continued climate change on microbial processes in these carbon-rich soils. The results from this work aim to increase our fundamental understanding of competition between electron acceptors, and will provide valuable data for climate modeling scenarios. 1. Lipson, D.A., et al., Reduction of iron (III) and humic substances plays a major

  2. Synthesis and biological activity of acetates of copper (II and iron (III for the control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica V. Nardeli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to the synthesis of basic acetates of Cu (II and Fe(III against larvae of Aedes aegypti and Gram negative and Gram positive. The transition metal ions Cu (II and Fe (III have bactericidal activity and are toxic to Aedes aegypti larvae in the eggs and larval stages of initial, precludes the eggs hatch and slow reproductive cycle of the insect. The theme investigates the importance of carboxyl groups in complex formation, transport and cellular internalization of the toxic ions. It is known that the bactericide or insecticide activity is due to metal ions and Cu (IIor Fe (III.

  3. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As{sup III}) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, Y., E-mail: yiannisgeorgiou@hotmail.com [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Mouzourakis, E., E-mail: emouzou@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bourlinos, A.B., E-mail: bourlino@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Zboril, R., E-mail: radek.zboril@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Chemistry and Experimental Physics, Palacky University in Olomouc, 77146 (Czech Republic); Karakassides, M.A., E-mail: mkarakas@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Douvalis, A.P., E-mail: adouval@uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Bakas, Th., E-mail: tbakas@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece); Deligiannakis, Y., E-mail: ideligia@cc.uoi.gr [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 45110 (Greece)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Novel hybrid based on carbon nitride and iron nanoparticles (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe). • gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe superior As{sup III} sorbent(76.5 mg g{sup −1}). • Surface complexation modeling of As{sup III} adsorption. • Dual mode EPR,monitoring of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} evolution. - Abstract: A novel hybrid material (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10 nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20–100 nm). {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O{sub 2}. The as-prepared gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe bears Fe{sup 2+} and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O{sub 2}, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As{sup III} uptake capacity of 76.5 mg g{sup −1}, i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC{sub 3}N{sub 4}-rFe is a superior As{sup III} sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11–36 mg g{sup −1}). The present results demonstrate that the gC{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity.

  4. Can iron plaque affect Sb(III) and Sb(V) uptake by plants under hydroponic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Ying; Lenz, Markus; Lenz, Markus; Schulin, Rainer; Tandy, Susan

    2018-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) contamination of soils is of concern due to h uman activities such as recycling of Sb containing Pb acid batteries, shooting and mining. However Sb uptake by plants is poorly documented, especially when plants are growing on waterlogged soils and iron plaques form on their roots. The

  5. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit, E-mail: suranjit@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara, 390002, Gujarat (India); Gandhi, Pooja, E-mail: poojagandhi.3090@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Sciences, Ashok and Rita Patel Institute of Integrated Study and Research in Biotechnology and Allied Sciences (ARIBAS), New Vallabh Vidyanagar, Anand, Gujarat, 388121 (India); Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal, E-mail: k.selvaraj@ncl.res.in [Nano and Computational Materials Lab, Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Pune, 411008 (India)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Colloidal GnIP synthesised using extract of Mint leaves were entrapped in chitosan beads. • GnIP loaded beads were employed for removal of As ions, showed excellent removal efficiency. • Iron and chitosan are cost effective materials hence can be a good adsorbent for removal of arsenic. - Abstract: The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV–vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core–shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like -NH, -C=O, -C=N and -C=C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water.

  6. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Gandhi, Pooja; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Colloidal GnIP synthesised using extract of Mint leaves were entrapped in chitosan beads. • GnIP loaded beads were employed for removal of As ions, showed excellent removal efficiency. • Iron and chitosan are cost effective materials hence can be a good adsorbent for removal of arsenic. - Abstract: The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV–vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core–shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like -NH, -C=O, -C=N and -C=C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water

  7. Oxidative Debromination and Degradation of Tetrabromo-bisphenol A by a Functionalized Silica-Supported Iron(III-tetrakis(p-sulfonatophenylporphyrin Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Fukushima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA, a commonly used brominated flame retardant, also functions as an endocrine disruptor. Thus, the degradation of TBBPA has attracted considerable interest among the scientific community. Iron(III-porphyrin complexes are generally regarded as “green” catalysts and have been reported to catalyze the efficient degradation and dehalogenation of halogenated phenols in environmental wastewaters. However, they are quickly deactivated due to self-degradation in the presence of an oxygen donor, such as KHSO5. In the present study, an iron(III-tetrakis (p-sulfonatophenyl-porphyrin (FeTPPS was immobilized on imidazole-modified silica (FeTPPS/IPS via coordination of the Fe(III with the nitrogen atom in imidazole to suppress self-degradation and thus enhance the catalyst reusability. The oxidative degradation and debromination of TBBPA and the influence of humic acid (HA, a major component in leachates, on the oxidation of TBBPA was investigated. More than 95% of the TBBPA was degraded in the pH range from 3 to 8 in the absence of HA, while the optimal pH for the reaction was at pH 8 in the presence of HA. Although the rate of degradation was decreased in the presence of HA, over 95% of the TBBPA was degraded within 12 h in the presence of 28 mg-C L−1 of HA. At pH 8, the FeTPPS/IPS catalyst could be reused up to 10 times without any detectable loss of activity for TBBPA for degradation and debromination, even in the presence of HA.

  8. Avaliação da eficácia do uso intravenoso de sacarato de hidróxido de ferro III no tratamento de pacientes adultos com anemia ferropriva Evaluation of the efficacy of intravenous iron III-hydroxide saccharate for treating adult patients with iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Cançado

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a eficácia do uso intravenoso de sacarato de hidróxido de ferro III no tratamento de pacientes adultos com anemia ferropriva. No período de janeiro de 2003 a dezembro de 2005, estudamos cinqüenta pacientes com anemia ferropriva que apresentaram intolerância e/ou resposta inadequada ao tratamento com ferro por via oral e/ou valor de hemoglobina inferior a 7,0 g/dL. Os principais exames laboratoriais realizados foram: hemograma completo, contagem de reticulócitos, ferro sérico, capacidade total de ligação de ferro e ferritina sérica. Os pacientes receberam uma dose semanal de 200 mg de sacarato de hidróxido de ferro III diluído em 250 mL de soro fisiológico a 0,9%, administrado por via intravenosa em trinta minutos. O tratamento foi realizado até a obtenção do valor de hemoglobina igual ou maior que 12,0 g/dL para mulheres e 13,0 g/dL para homens, ou até a administração da dose total de ferro parenteral recomendada para cada paciente. A idade mediana dos cinqüenta pacientes estudados foi de 45 anos, variando entre 28 e 76 anos; quarenta (80,0% eram do sexo feminino. A causa mais comum de anemia ferropriva no sexo feminino foi sangramento uterino anormal observado em 25/40 pacientes (62,5% e, no sexo masculino, gastrectomia parcial em 7/10 (70,0%. Vinte e quatro (48,0% pacientes foram incluídos nesse estudo por falta de resposta à terapia com ferro oral, 22 (44,0% por intolerância ao ferro oral e quatro (8,0% por hemoglobina The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous iron III-hydroxide saccharate to treat adult patients with iron deficiency anemia. Between January 2003 and December 2005 we studied 50 patients with iron deficiency anemia who presented intolerance or inadequate response to oral iron therapy, or hemoglobin level < 7 g/dL. The main laboratory tests performed were: complete blood cell count, reticulocyte count, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity

  9. The ground states of iron(III) porphines: role of entropy-enthalpy compensation, Fermi correlation, dispersion, and zero-point energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2011-10-01

    Porphyrins are much studied due to their biochemical relevance and many applications. The density functional TPSSh has previously accurately described the energy of close-lying electronic states of transition metal systems such as porphyrins. However, a recent study questioned this conclusion based on calculations of five iron(III) porphines. Here, we compute the geometries of 80 different electronic configurations and the free energies of the most stable configurations with the functionals TPSSh, TPSS, and B3LYP. Zero-point energies and entropy favor high-spin by ~4kJ/mol and 0-10kJ/mol, respectively. When these effects are included, and all electronic configurations are evaluated, TPSSh correctly predicts the spin of all the four difficult phenylporphine cases and is within the lower bound of uncertainty of any known theoretical method for the fifth, iron(III) chloroporphine. Dispersion computed with DFT-D3 favors low-spin by 3-53kJ/mol (TPSSh) or 4-15kJ/mol (B3LYP) due to the attractive r(-6) term and the shorter distances in low-spin. The very large and diverse corrections from TPSS and TPSSh seem less consistent with the similarity of the systems than when calculated from B3LYP. If the functional-specific corrections are used, B3LYP and TPSSh are of equal accuracy, and TPSS is much worse, whereas if the physically reasonable B3LYP-computed dispersion effect is used for all functionals, TPSSh is accurate for all systems. B3LYP is significantly more accurate when dispersion is added, confirming previous results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Environmental application of millimetre-scale sponge iron (s-Fe{sup 0}) particles (III): The effect of surface silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yongming [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); South China Subcenter of State Environmental Dioxin Monitoring Center, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Innovative Laboratory for Environmental Functional Materials and Environmental Applications of Microwave Irradiation, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Yu, Yunjiang, E-mail: yuyunjiang@scies.org [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Innovative Laboratory for Environmental Functional Materials and Environmental Applications of Microwave Irradiation, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Zhang, Sukun [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Liu, Runlong [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Innovative Laboratory for Environmental Functional Materials and Environmental Applications of Microwave Irradiation, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Fu, Jianping; Han, Jinglei; Fang, Jiande [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Dionysiou, Dionysios D., E-mail: dionysios.d.dionysiou@uc.edu [Environmental Engineering and Science Program, Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering (DBCEE), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Direct reductive deposition reaction achieves surfaced decoration of s-Fe{sup 0} particles. • Ag{sup 0}-s-Fe{sup 0} displays similar removal efficiency of PCP as compared to bimetal of nZVI. • Ag{sup 0}-s-Fe{sup 0} can be utilized under mild reaction condition compared to bimetal of nZVI. • The catalytic mechanism over Ag{sup 0}-s-Fe{sup 0} under US condition is elucidated. - Abstract: To enhance the dechlorination reactivity of millimetric sponge iron (s-Fe{sup 0}), a facile one-pot method was used to decorate s-Fe{sup 0} with Ag{sup +} ions under ambient conditions. The results recorded by X-ray diffraction patterns, X-ray photoelectron spectra and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the growth of Ag{sup 0} was dominated primarily by (1 1 1) plane with a mean length of ∼20 nm. The roles of Ag{sup 0} loading, catalyst dosage, particle size, initial pH and contaminant concentration were assessed during the removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP). Catalyst recyclability was also studied. The results revealed that 3–5 mm s-Fe{sup 0} particles with 5 wt% Ag{sup 0} loading exhibited the best performance with a dose of 3.0 g per 60 mL PCP solution. In addition, the dechlorination of PCP followed two-step, pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics, and Ag{sup 0}-s-Fe{sup 0} was advantageous compared with bimetals of nanoscale zero-valent iron, iron power and iron flakes. The dechlorination mechanism of PCP over Ag{sup 0}-s-Fe{sup 0} was attributed to the surface Ag{sup 0} decoration, which catalyzed the formation of reactive hydrogen atoms for indirect reaction, and the direct electron transfer via Fe–Ag{sup 0} galvanic cells for direct reaction. This suggests that Ag-based bimetals of s-Fe{sup 0} have great potential in the pretreatment of organic halogen compounds in aqueous solution.

  11. Selective Iron(III ion uptake using CuO-TiO2 nanostructure by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Mohammed M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CuO-TiO2 nanosheets (NSs, a kind of nanomaterials is one of the most attracting class of transition doped semiconductor materials due to its interesting and important optical, electrical, and structural properties and has many technical applications, such as in metal ions detection, photocatalysis, Chemi-sensors, bio-sensors, solar cells and so on. In this paper the synthesis of CuO-TiO2 nanosheets by the wet-chemically technique is reported. Methods CuO-TiO2 NSs were prepared by a wet-chemical process using reducing agents in alkaline medium and characterized by UV/vis., FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM etc. Results The structural and optical evaluation of synthesized NSs were measured by XRD pattern, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and UV–vis spectroscopy, respectively which confirmed that the obtained NSs are well-crystalline CuO-TiO2 and possessing good optical properties. The morphological analysis of CuO-TiO2 NSs was executed by FE-SEM, which confirmed that the doped products were sheet-shaped and growth in large quantity. Here, the analytical efficiency of the NSs was applied for a selective adsorption of iron(III ion prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The selectivity of NSs towards various metal ions, including Au(III, Cd(II, Co(II, Cr(III, Fe(III, Pd(II, and Zn(II was analyzed. Conclusions Based on the selectivity study, it was confirmed that the selectivity of doped NSs phase was the most towards Fe(III ion. The static adsorption capacity for Fe(III was calculated to be 110.06 mgg−1. Results from adsorption isotherm also verified that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer-adsorption onto a surface containing a finite number of CuO-TiO2 NSs adsorption sites.

  12. Interaction of human biliverdin reductase with Akt/protein kinase B and phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase 1 regulates glycogen synthase kinase 3 activity: a novel mechanism of Akt activation

    OpenAIRE

    Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Heimiller, Chelsea; Maines, Mahin D.

    2016-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase A (BVR) and Akt isozymes have overlapping pleiotropic functions in the insulin/PI3K/MAPK pathway. Human BVR (hBVR) also reduces the hemeoxygenase activity product biliverdin to bilirubin and is directly activated by insulin receptor kinase (IRK). Akt isoenzymes (Akt1–3) are downstream of IRK and are activated by phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) phosphorylating T308 before S473 autophosphorylation. Akt (RxRxxSF) and PDK1 (RFxFPxFS) binding motifs are present ...

  13. After-Effects of the Cobalt-57-Iron-57 Electron-Capture Reaction in Hexacyanocobaltate (III) Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Jørgen Folkvard; Siekierska, K.E.; Olsen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Isomorphous hexacyanocobaltate(III) complexes with the bivalent metal cations Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ have been labelled with 57Co and used as Mössbauer sources. Whilst the spectrum of the complex Fe3[57Co(CN)6]2 can be resolved into a single line corresponding to the ion Fe II...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of μ-hydroxido- and μ-polycarboxylato-bridged iron(III complexes with 2,2’-bipyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Four novel polymeric iron(III complexes with 2,2’-bipyridine (bipy and different aromatic polycarboxylato ligands as anions of phthalic (pht, isophthalic (ipht, terephthalic (tpht and pyromellitic (pyr acid were synthesized by ligand exchange reaction. The complexes were characterized by elemental and TG/DSC analysis, FTIR and diffuse reflectance UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Based on analytical and spectral data the formulae of the complexes are {[Fe4(bipy2 (H2O2(OH6(pht3]•2H2O}n (1, {[Fe4(bipy2(Hipht2(ipht2(OH6]•4H2O}n (2, {[Fe4(bipy2(Htpht2(OH6(tpht2]•4H2O}n (3 and {[Fe4(bipy(H2O8(OH4 (pyr2]•H2O}n (4. All complexes are red brown and low-spin with a distorted octahedral geometry and FeO6 or FeN2O4 chromophore. Polycarboxylato ligands have a bridging role in all cases, whereas monodentate COO groups are present in 2 and 3, bridging and chelate COO groups are established in 1 and 4. The thermal behaviour of 1-4 was investigated in detail and the molar dehydration enthalpies were calculated. According to the all those results, the structural formulae of the complexes 1-4 were proposed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45007

  15. Biogenic uraninite precipitation and its reoxidation by iron(III) (hydr)oxides: A reaction modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, Nicolas F.; Issarangkun, Montarat; Stewart, Brandy D.; Sevinç Şengör, S.; Belding, Eileen; Ginn, Tim R.; Peyton, Brent M.; Sani, Rajesh K.

    2011-08-01

    One option for immobilizing uranium present in subsurface contaminated groundwater is in situ bioremediation, whereby dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and/or sulfate-reducing bacteria are stimulated to catalyze the reduction of soluble U(VI) and precipitate it as uraninite (UO 2). This is typically accomplished by amending groundwater with an organic electron donor. It has been shown, however, that once the electron donor is entirely consumed, Fe(III) (hydr)oxides can reoxidize biogenically produced UO 2, thus potentially impeding cleanup efforts. On the basis of published experiments showing that such reoxidation takes place even under highly reducing conditions (e.g., sulfate-reducing conditions), thermodynamic and kinetic constraints affecting this reoxidation are examined using multicomponent biogeochemical simulations, with particular focus on the role of sulfide and Fe(II) in solution. The solubility of UO 2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are presented, and the effect of nanoscale particle size on stability is discussed. Thermodynamically, sulfide is preferentially oxidized by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, compared to biogenic UO 2, and for this reason the relative rates of sulfide and UO 2 oxidation play a key role on whether or not UO 2 reoxidizes. The amount of Fe(II) in solution is another important factor, with the precipitation of Fe(II) minerals lowering the Fe +2 activity in solution and increasing the potential for both sulfide and UO 2 reoxidation. The greater (and unintuitive) UO 2 reoxidation by hematite compared to ferrihydrite previously reported in some experiments can be explained by the exhaustion of this mineral from reaction with sulfide. Simulations also confirm previous studies suggesting that carbonate produced by the degradation of organic electron donors used for bioreduction may significantly increase the potential for UO 2 reoxidation through formation of uranyl carbonate aqueous complexes.

  16. Nanostructured iron(III)-copper(II) binary oxide: a novel adsorbent for enhanced arsenic removal from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaosheng; Ren, Zongming; Zhang, Xiwang; Chen, Jing

    2013-08-01

    To obtain a highly efficient and low-cost adsorbent for arsenic removal from water, a novel nanostructured Fe-Cu binary oxide was synthesized via a facile co-precipitation method. Various techniques including BET surface area measurement, powder XRD, SEM, and XPS were used to characterize the synthetic Fe-Cu binary oxide. It showed that the oxide was poorly crystalline, 2-line ferrihydrite-like and was aggregated with many nanosized particles. Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate adsorption kinetics, adsorption isotherms, pH adsorption edge and regeneration of spent adsorbent. The results indicated that the Fe-Cu binary oxide with a Cu: Fe molar ratio of 1:2 had excellent performance in removing both As(V) and As(III) from water, and the maximal adsorption capacities for As(V) and As(III) were 82.7 and 122.3 mg/g at pH 7.0, respectively. The values are favorable, compared to those reported in the literature using other adsorbents. The coexisting sulfate and carbonate had no significant effect on arsenic removal. However, the presence of phosphate obviously inhibited the arsenic removal, especially at high concentrations. Moreover, the Fe-Cu binary oxide could be readily regenerated using NaOH solution and be repeatedly used. The Fe-Cu binary oxide could be a promising adsorbent for both As(V) and As(III) removal because of its excellent performance, facile and low-cost synthesis process, and easy regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystal structure of octakis(4-methoxypyridinium bis(4-methoxypyridine-κNtetrakis(thiocyanato-κNferrate(III bis[(4-methoxypyridine-κNpentakis(thiocyanato-κNferrate(III] hexakis(thiocyanato-κNferrate(III with iron in three different octahedral coordination environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksej Jochim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title salt, (C6H8NO8[Fe(NCS4(C6H7NO2][Fe(NCS5(C6H7NO]2[Fe(NCS6], comprises three negatively charged octahedral FeIII complexes with different coordination environments in which the FeIII atoms are coordinated by a different number of thiocyanate anions and 4-methoxypyridine ligands. Charge balance is achieved by 4-methoxypyridinium cations. The asymmetric unit consists of three FeIII cations, one of which is located on a centre of inversion, one on a twofold rotation axis and one in a general position, and ten thiocyanate anions, two 4-methoxypyridine ligands and 4-methoxypyridinium cations (one of which is disordered over two sets of sites. Beside to Coulombic interactions between organic cations and the ferrate(III anions, weak N—H...S hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the pyridinium N—H groups of the cations and the thiocyanate S atoms of the complex anions are mainly responsible for the cohesion of the crystal structure.

  18. The effect of iridium(III) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehula, Stjepko, E-mail: krehul@irb.hr [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Music, Svetozar [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-03-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the precipitation of iron oxides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-FeOOH caused significant changes in the microstructural properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} caused an increase in the Morin transition temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} ions caused a phase transformation {alpha}-(Fe,Ir)OOH {yields} {alpha}-(Fe,Ir){sub 2}O{sub 3} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + Ir{sup 0}. - Abstract: The effect of the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. The presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions in the precipitation system strongly influenced the phase composition, magnetic, structural and morphological properties of obtained samples. The formation of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) along with {alpha}-FeOOH in the first stage of hydrothermal treatment and the transformation of {alpha}-FeOOH and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) by a longer hydrothermal treatment was caused by the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-FeOOH brought about changes in unit-cell dimensions, crystallinity, particle size and shape, hyperfine magnetic field and infrared bands positions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} led to an increase in the temperature of the Morin transition; Moessbauer spectroscopy showed the presence of

  19. Spectroscopic studies on two mono nuclear iron (III) complexes derived from a schiff base and an azodye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mini, S., E-mail: sadasivan.v@gmail.com; Sadasivan, V., E-mail: sadasivan.v@gmail.com [University College, M G Road, Palayam, Thiruvananthapuram 695 034 Kerala (India); Meena, S. S., E-mail: ssingh@barc.gov.in; Bhatt, Pramod, E-mail: ssingh@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Two new mono nuclear Fe(III) complexes of an azodye (ANSN) and a Schiff base (FAHP) are reported. The azodye is prepared by coupling diazotized 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulphonicacid with 2-naphthol and the Schiff base is prepared by condensing 2-amino-3-hydroxy pyridine with furfural. The complexes were synthesized by the reaction of FeCl{sub 3}Ðœ‡2H{sub 2}O with respective ligands. They were characterized on the basis of elemental analysis and spectral studies like IR, NMR, Electronic and M.ssbauer. Magnetic susceptibility and Molar conductance of complexes at room temperature were studied. Based on the spectroscopic evidences and other analytical data the complexes are formulated as[Fe(ANSN)Cl(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] and [Fe(FAHP)Cl{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].

  20. Spectroscopic studies on two mono nuclear iron (III) complexes derived from a schiff base and an azodye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mini, S.; Sadasivan, V.; Meena, S. S.; Bhatt, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Two new mono nuclear Fe(III) complexes of an azodye (ANSN) and a Schiff base (FAHP) are reported. The azodye is prepared by coupling diazotized 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulphonicacid with 2-naphthol and the Schiff base is prepared by condensing 2-amino-3-hydroxy pyridine with furfural. The complexes were synthesized by the reaction of FeCl 3 Ðœ‡2H 2 O with respective ligands. They were characterized on the basis of elemental analysis and spectral studies like IR, NMR, Electronic and M.ssbauer. Magnetic susceptibility and Molar conductance of complexes at room temperature were studied. Based on the spectroscopic evidences and other analytical data the complexes are formulated as[Fe(ANSN)Cl(H 2 O) 2 ] and [Fe(FAHP)Cl 2 (H 2 O) 2

  1. LiFePO4 Nanostructures Fabricated from Iron(III) Phosphate (FePO4 x 2H2O) by Hydrothermal Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Viswanathan S; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2015-01-01

    Electrode materials having nanometer scale dimensions are expected to have property enhancements due to enhanced surface area and mass/charge transport kinetics. This is particularly relevant to intrinsically low electronically conductive materials such as lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4), which is of recent research interest as a high performance intercalation electrode material for Li-ion batteries. Many of the reported works on LiFePO4 synthesis are unattractive either due to the high cost of raw materials or due to the complex synthesis technique. In this direction, synthesis of LiFePO4 directly from inexpensive FePO4 shows promise.The present study reports LiFePO4 nanostructures prepared from iron (III) phosphate (FePO4 x 2H2O) by precipitation-hydrothermal method. The sintered powder was characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and Electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Two synthesis methods, viz. bulk synthesis and anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template-assisted synthesis are reported. By bulk synthesis, micro-sized particles having peculiar surface nanostructuring were formed at precipitation pH of 6.0 to 7.5 whereas typical nanosized LiFePO4 resulted at pH ≥ 8.0. An in-situ precipitation strategy inside the pores of AAO utilizing the spin coating was utilized for the AAO-template-assisted synthesis. The template with pores filled with the precipitate was subsequently subjected to hydrothermal process and high temperature sintering to fabricate compact rod-like structures.

  2. Characterization of heme oxygenase and biliverdin reductase gene expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Basal expression and response to pro-oxidant exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holowiecki, Andrew; O'Shields, Britton; Jenny, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    While heme is an important cofactor for numerous proteins, it is highly toxic in its unbound form and can perpetuate the formation of reactive oxygen species. Heme oxygenase enzymes (HMOX1 and HMOX2) degrade heme into biliverdin and carbon monoxide, with biliverdin subsequently being converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase (BVRa or BVRb). As a result of the teleost-specific genome duplication event, zebrafish have paralogs of hmox1 (hmox1a and hmox1b) and hmox2 (hmox2a and hmox2b). Expression of all four hmox paralogs and two bvr isoforms were measured in adult tissues (gill, brain and liver) and sexually dimorphic differences were observed, most notably in the basal expression of hmox1a, hmox2a, hmox2b and bvrb in liver samples. hmox1a, hmox2a and hmox2b were significantly induced in male liver tissues in response to 96 h cadmium exposure (20 μM). hmox2a and hmox2b were significantly induced in male brain samples, but only hmox2a was significantly reduced in male gill samples in response to the 96 h cadmium exposure. hmox paralogs displayed significantly different levels of basal expression in most adult tissues, as well as during zebrafish development (24 to 120 hpf). Furthermore, hmox1a, hmox1b and bvrb were significantly induced in zebrafish eleutheroembryos in response to multiple pro-oxidants (cadmium, hemin and tert-butylhydroquinone). Knockdown of Nrf2a, a transcriptional regulator of hmox1a, was demonstrated to inhibit the Cd-mediated induction of hmox1b and bvrb. These results demonstrate distinct mechanisms of hmox and bvr transcriptional regulation in zebrafish, providing initial evidence of the partitioning of function of the hmox paralogs. - Highlights: • hmox1a, hmox2a, hmox2b and bvrb are sexually dimorphic in expression. • hmox paralogs were induced in adult tissues by cadmium exposure. • hmox1a, hmox1b and bvrb were induced by multiple pro-oxidants zebrafish embryos. • Differential expression of zebrafish hmox paralogs suggest

  3. Characterization of heme oxygenase and biliverdin reductase gene expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Basal expression and response to pro-oxidant exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holowiecki, Andrew [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Molecular Cardiovascular Biology Division and Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH (United States); O' Shields, Britton [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Jenny, Matthew J., E-mail: mjjenny@ua.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    While heme is an important cofactor for numerous proteins, it is highly toxic in its unbound form and can perpetuate the formation of reactive oxygen species. Heme oxygenase enzymes (HMOX1 and HMOX2) degrade heme into biliverdin and carbon monoxide, with biliverdin subsequently being converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase (BVRa or BVRb). As a result of the teleost-specific genome duplication event, zebrafish have paralogs of hmox1 (hmox1a and hmox1b) and hmox2 (hmox2a and hmox2b). Expression of all four hmox paralogs and two bvr isoforms were measured in adult tissues (gill, brain and liver) and sexually dimorphic differences were observed, most notably in the basal expression of hmox1a, hmox2a, hmox2b and bvrb in liver samples. hmox1a, hmox2a and hmox2b were significantly induced in male liver tissues in response to 96 h cadmium exposure (20 μM). hmox2a and hmox2b were significantly induced in male brain samples, but only hmox2a was significantly reduced in male gill samples in response to the 96 h cadmium exposure. hmox paralogs displayed significantly different levels of basal expression in most adult tissues, as well as during zebrafish development (24 to 120 hpf). Furthermore, hmox1a, hmox1b and bvrb were significantly induced in zebrafish eleutheroembryos in response to multiple pro-oxidants (cadmium, hemin and tert-butylhydroquinone). Knockdown of Nrf2a, a transcriptional regulator of hmox1a, was demonstrated to inhibit the Cd-mediated induction of hmox1b and bvrb. These results demonstrate distinct mechanisms of hmox and bvr transcriptional regulation in zebrafish, providing initial evidence of the partitioning of function of the hmox paralogs. - Highlights: • hmox1a, hmox2a, hmox2b and bvrb are sexually dimorphic in expression. • hmox paralogs were induced in adult tissues by cadmium exposure. • hmox1a, hmox1b and bvrb were induced by multiple pro-oxidants zebrafish embryos. • Differential expression of zebrafish hmox paralogs suggest

  4. Biosorption of copper(II), lead(II), iron(III) and cobalt(II) on Bacillus sphaericus-loaded Diaion SP-850 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Usta, Canan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The biosorption of copper(II), lead(II), iron(III) and cobalt(II) on Bacillus sphaericus-loaded Diaion SP-850 resin for preconcentration-separation of them have been investigated. The sorbed analytes on biosorbent were eluted by using 1 mol L -1 HCl and analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of analytical parameters including amounts of pH, B. sphaericus, sample volume etc. on the quantitative recoveries of analytes were investigated. The effects of alkaline, earth alkaline ions and some metal ions on the retentions of the analytes on the biosorbent were also examined. Separation and preconcentration of Cu, Pb, Fe and Co ions from real samples was achieved quantitatively. The detection limits by 3 sigma for analyte ions were in the range of 0.20-0.75 μg L -1 for aqueous samples and in the range of 2.5-9.4 ng g -1 for solid samples. The validation of the procedure was performed by the analysis of the certified standard reference materials (NRCC-SLRS 4 Riverine Water, SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07605 Tea). The presented method was applied to the determination of analyte ions in green tea, black tea, cultivated mushroom, boiled wheat, rice and soil samples with successfully results

  5. Preparation and characterization of iron(III) {sup 99}Mo-molybdate(VI) gels for the assessment of {sup 99m}Tc elution performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Mahmoud; Fasih, Tharwat W.; El-Absy, Mohamed A. [Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2018-04-01

    New iron(III) {sup 99}Mo-molybdate(VI) gels (Fe{sup 99}Mo) of high Mo content were prepared by the precipitation/filtration method. {sup 99}Mo-MoO{sub 3} dissolved in NaOH was added to aqueous solutions of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} at Mo/Fe mole fractions ∝2.21 and 1.99 with continuous stirring at ambient room temperature. Two different Fe{sup 99}Mo were precipitated from the mixed solutions adjusted at pH 2 and 4.7. The amount of water of hydration increased with the increasing the gel settling time and pH of the mixed solution. The matrices were characterized by radiometric, XRD, SEM, XRF, FT-IR, TGA, and DTA measurements. Small chromatographic columns of 2.0 g Fe{sup 99}Mo containing ≥800 mg Mo tagged with 740 MBq {sup 99}Mo were eluted with 5 mL saline solution. Highly reproducible {sup 99m}Tc elution indices suitable for preparation of {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators were achieved from generator supported with 0.5 g Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} filter. Elution performance of {sup 99m}Tc radionuclide was highly dependent on the gel structural properties.

  6. Surface-Sensitive and Bulk Studies on the Complexation and Photosensitized Degradation of Catechol by Iron(III) as a Model for Multicomponent Aerosol Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abadleh, H. A.; Tofan-Lazar, J.; Situm, A.; Ruffolo, J.; Slikboer, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  7. Preparation and characterization of iron(III) 99Mo-molybdate(VI) gels for the assessment of 99mTc elution performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mahmoud; Fasih, Tharwat W.; El-Absy, Mohamed A.

    2018-01-01

    New iron(III) 99 Mo-molybdate(VI) gels (Fe 99 Mo) of high Mo content were prepared by the precipitation/filtration method. 99 Mo-MoO 3 dissolved in NaOH was added to aqueous solutions of Fe(NO 3 ) 3 at Mo/Fe mole fractions ∝2.21 and 1.99 with continuous stirring at ambient room temperature. Two different Fe 99 Mo were precipitated from the mixed solutions adjusted at pH 2 and 4.7. The amount of water of hydration increased with the increasing the gel settling time and pH of the mixed solution. The matrices were characterized by radiometric, XRD, SEM, XRF, FT-IR, TGA, and DTA measurements. Small chromatographic columns of 2.0 g Fe 99 Mo containing ≥800 mg Mo tagged with 740 MBq 99 Mo were eluted with 5 mL saline solution. Highly reproducible 99m Tc elution indices suitable for preparation of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators were achieved from generator supported with 0.5 g Al 2 O 3 filter. Elution performance of 99m Tc radionuclide was highly dependent on the gel structural properties.

  8. The ground states of iron(III) porphines: Role of entropy–enthalpy compensation, Fermi correlation, dispersion, and zero-point energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2011-01-01

    on calculations of five iron(III) porphines. Here, we compute the geometries of 80 different electronic configurations and the free energies of the most stable configurations with the functionals TPSSh, TPSS, and B3LYP. Zero-point energies and entropy favor high-spin by ~4kJ/mol and 0–10kJ/mol, respectively. When...... favors low-spin by 3–53kJ/mol (TPSSh) or 4–15kJ/mol (B3LYP) due to the attractive r−6 term and the shorter distances in low-spin. The very large and diverse corrections from TPSS and TPSSh seem less consistent with the similarity of the systems than when calculated from B3LYP. If the functional......-specific corrections are used, B3LYP and TPSSh are of equal accuracy, and TPSS is much worse, whereas if the physically reasonable B3LYP-computed dispersion effect is used for all functionals, TPSSh is accurate for all systems. B3LYP is significantly more accurate when dispersion is added, confirming previous results....

  9. Sorption of Hg(II and Pb(II Ions on Chitosan-Iron(III from Aqueous Solutions: Single and Binary Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Lapo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the study of mercury Hg(II and lead Pb(II removal in single and binary component systems into easily prepared chitosan-iron(III bio-composite beads. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and point of zero charge (pHpzc analysis were carried out. The experimental set covered pH study, single and competitive equilibrium, kinetics, chloride and sulfate effects as well as sorption–desorption cycles. In single systems, the Langmuir nonlinear model fitted the experimental data better than the Freundlich and Sips equations. The sorbent material has more affinity to Hg(II rather than Pb(II ions, the maximum sorption capacities were 1.8 mmol·g−1 and 0.56 mmol·g−1 for Hg(II and Pb(II, respectively. The binary systems data were adjusted with competitive Langmuir isotherm model. The presence of sulfate ions in the multicomponent system [Hg(II-Pb(II] had a lesser impact on the sorption efficiency than did chloride ions, however, the presence of chloride ions improves the selectivity towards Hg(II ions. The bio-based material showed good recovery performance of metal ions along three sorption–desorption cycles.

  10. Atomic data from the IRON Project. XXXII. On the accuracy of the effective collision strength for the electron impact excitation of the quadrupole transition in AR III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galavís, M. E.; Mendoza, C.; Zeippen, C. J.

    1998-12-01

    Since te[Burgess et al. (1997)]{bur97} have recently questioned the accuracy of the effective collision strength calculated in the IRON Project for the electron impact excitation of the 3ssp23p sp4 \\ sp1 D -sp1 S quadrupole transition in Ar iii, an extended R-matrix calculation has been performed for this transition. The original 24-state target model was maintained, but the energy regime was increased to 100 Ryd. It is shown that in order to ensure convergence of the partial wave expansion at such energies, it is necessary to take into account partial collision strengths up to L=30 and to ``top-up'' with a geometric series procedure. By comparing effective collision strengths, it is found that the differences from the original calculation are not greater than 25% around the upper end of the common temperature range and that they are much smaller than 20% over most of it. This is consistent with the accuracy rating (20%) previously assigned to transitions in this low ionisation system. Also the present high-temperature limit agrees fairly well (15%) with the Coulomb-Born limit estimated by Burgess et al., thus confirming our previous accuracy rating. It appears that Burgess et al., in their data assessment, have overextended the low-energy behaviour of our reduced effective collision strength to obtain an extrapolated high-temperature limit that appeared to be in error by a factor of 2.

  11. Photo-mediated optimized synthesis of silver nanoparticles for the selective detection of Iron(III), antibacterial and antioxidant activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vijay, E-mail: vijuevs@gmail.com [Nano Material Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005, U.P. (India); Mohan, Sweta; Singh, Devendra K. [Nano Material Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005, U.P. (India); Verma, Devendra K. [School of Biochemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005, U.P. (India); Singh, Vikas Kumar [Nano Material Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005, U.P. (India); Hasan, Syed Hadi, E-mail: shhasan.apc@itbhu.ac.in [Nano Material Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi 221005, U.P. (India)

    2017-02-01

    NPs within second. • No external energy supply and instrumental support was required for AgNPs synthesis. • Colorimetric detection of Fe (III), antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of AgNPs was evaluated. • The suspension of the AgNPs was found to be stable for > 9 months.

  12. Colorimetric Determination of the Iron(III)-Thiocyanate Reaction Equilibrium Constant with Calibration and Equilibrium Solutions Prepared in a Cuvette by Sequential Additions of One Reagent to the Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Barlag, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The well-known colorimetric determination of the equilibrium constant of the iron(III-thiocyanate complex is simplified by preparing solutions in a cuvette. For the calibration plot, 0.10 mL increments of 0.00100 M KSCN are added to 4.00 mL of 0.200 M Fe(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 3], and for the equilibrium solutions, 0.50 mL increments of…

  13. Efficiency of a new strategy involving a new class of natural hetero-ligand iron(III) chelates (Fe(III)-NHL) to improve fruit tree growth in alkaline/calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Marta; Ortuño, María F; Pérez-Sarmiento, Francisco; Bacaicoa, Eva; Baigorri, Roberto; Conejero, Wenceslao; Torrecillas, Arturo; García-Mina, José M

    2012-12-01

    Iron (Fe) chlorosis is a serious problem affecting the yield and quality of numerous crops and fruit trees cultivated in alkaline/calcareous soils. This paper describes the efficiency of a new class of natural hetero-ligand Fe(III) chelates (Fe-NHL) to provide available Fe for chlorotic lemon trees grown in alkaline/calcareous soils. These chelates involve the participation in the reaction system of a partially humified lignin-based natural polymer and citric acid. First results showed that Fe-NHL was adsorbed on the soil matrix while maintaining available Fe for plants in alkaline/calcareous solution. The effects of using three different sources as Fe fertilisers were also compared: two Fe-NHL formulations (NHL1, containing 100% of Fe as Fe-NHL, and NHL2, containing 80% of Fe as Fe-NHL and 20% of Fe as Fe-ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis-(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (Fe-EDDHA)) and Fe-EDDHA. Both Fe-NHL formulations increased fruit yield without negative effects on fruit quality in comparison with Fe-EDDHA. In the absence of the Fe-starter fraction (NHL1), trees seemed to optimise Fe assimilation and translocation from Fe-NHL, directing it to those parts of the plant more involved in development. The field assays confirmed that Fe-NHL-based fertilisers are able to provide Fe to chlorotic trees, with results comparable to Fe-EDDHA. Besides, this would imply a more sustainable and less expensive remediation than synthetic chelates. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Aqua complex of iron(III) and 5-chloro-3-(2-(4,4-dimethyl-2,6-dioxocyclohexylidene)hydrazinyl)-2-hydroxybenzenesulfonate: Structure and catalytic activity in Henry reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudov, Kamran T.; Kopylovich, Maximilian N.; Haukka, Matti; Mahmudova, Gunay S.; Esmaeila, Espandi F.; Chyragov, Famil M.; Pombeiro, Armando J. L.

    2013-09-01

    A water-soluble iron(III) complex [Fe(H2O)3(L)]·5H2O (1) was prepared by reaction of iron(III) chloride with 5-chloro-3-(2-(4,4-dimethyl-2,6-dioxocyclohexylidene)hydrazinyl)-2-hydroxy-benzenesulfonic acid (H3L). The complex was characterized by IR, 1H NMR and ESI-MS spectroscopies, elemental and X-ray crystal structural analyses. The coordination environment of the central iron(III) is a distorted octahedron, three sites being occupied by L3- ligand, which chelates in O,N,O fashion, while three other sites are filled with the water molecules. The uncoordinated water molecules are held in the channels of the overall 3D supramolecular structure by the carbonyl and sulfonyl groups of L3- and the ligated waters. Apart from the multiple hydrogen bonds, an intermolecular charge-assisted O···Cl halogen bonding with 3.044 Å distance was described. 1 acts as an effective catalyst in the Henry reaction producing nitroaldols from nitroethane and various aldehydes with yields up to 90% and threo/erythro diastereoselectivity ranging from 3:1 to 1:1.

  15. Iron(III-salophene: an organometallic compound with selective cytotoxic and anti-proliferative properties in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo S Lange

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this pioneer study to the biological activity of organometallic compound Iron(III-salophene (Fe-SP the specific effects of Fe-SP on viability, morphology, proliferation, and cell-cycle progression on platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines were investigated.Fe-SP displayed selective cytotoxicity against SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 (ovarian epithelial adenocarcinoma cell lines at concentrations between 100 nM and 1 microM, while the viability of HeLa cells (epithelial cervix adenocarcinoma or primary lung or skin fibroblasts was not affected. SKOV-3 cells in contrast to fibroblasts after treatment with Fe-SP revealed apparent hallmarks of apoptosis including densely stained nuclear granular bodies within fragmented nuclei, highly condensed chromatin and chromatin fragmentation. Fe-SP treatment led to the activation of markers of the extrinsic (Caspase-8 and intrinsic (Caspase-9 pathway of apoptosis as well as of executioner Caspase-3 while PARP-1 was deactivated. Fe-SP exerted effects as an anti-proliferative agent with an IC(50 value of 300 nM and caused delayed progression of cells through S-phase phase of the cell cycle resulting in a complete S-phase arrest. When intra-peritoneally applied to rats Fe-SP did not show any systemic toxicity at concentrations that in preliminary trials were determined to be chemotherapeutic relevant doses in a rat ovarian cancer cell model.The present report suggests that Fe-SP is a potent growth-suppressing agent in vitro for cell lines derived from ovarian cancer and a potential therapeutic drug to treat such tumors in vivo.

  16. Heteroleptic and Homoleptic Iron(III Spin-Crossover Complexes; Effects of Ligand Substituents and Intermolecular Interactions between Co-Cation/Anion and the Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasinee Phonsri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The structural and magnetic properties of a range of new iron(III bis-tridentate Schiff base complexes are described with emphasis on how intermolecular structural interactions influence spin states and spin crossover (SCO in these d5 materials. Three pairs of complexes were investigated. The first pair are the neutral, heteroleptic complexes [Fe(3-OMe-SalEen(thsa] 1 and [Fe(3-MeOSalEen(3-EtOthsa] 2, where 3-R-HSalEen = (E-2-(((2-(ethylaminoethyliminomethyl-6-R-phenol and 3-R-H2thsa = thiosemicarbazone-3-R-salicylaldimine. They display spin transitions above room temperature. However, 2 shows incomplete and gradual change, while SCO in 1 is complete and more abrupt. Lower cooperativity in 2 is ascribed to the lack of π–π interactions, compared to 1. The second pair, cationic species [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]NO3 3 and [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]Cl 4 differ only in the counter-anion. They show partial SCO above room temperature with 3 displaying a sharp transition at 343 K. Weak hydrogen bonds from cation to Cl− probably lead to weaker cooperativity in 4. The last pair, CsH2O[Fe(3-MeO-thsa2] 5 and Cs(H2O2[Fe(5-NO2-thsa2] 6, are anionic homoleptic chelates that have different substituents on the salicylaldiminate rings of thsa2−. The Cs cations bond to O atoms of water and the ligands, in unusual ways thus forming attractive 1D and 3D networks in 5 and 6, respectively, and 5 remains HS (high spin at all temperatures while 6 remains LS (low spin. Comparisons are made to other literature examples of Cs salts of [Fe(5-R-thsa2]− (R = H and Br.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of iron (II and III) phosphates by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy of high vacuum; Sintesis y caracterizacion de fosfatos de hierro (II, III) por difraccion de rayos X y microscopia electronica de barrido de alto vacio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz F, J.C.; Solis M, L.; Garcia R, G.; Romero G, E.T. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The XRD and Sem techniques for determining the mineralogical and structural composition of iron II and III phosphates have been used. The mineralogical and structural composition of the materials revealed that they are the ferrous phosphate and the ferric phosphate. The contribution of the synthesis and characterization of these phosphates is that they can be used as components in the geological barriers capable to avoiding the dispersion from the hazardous radioactive materials to the environment. (Author)

  18. Photoconversion and fluorescence properties of a red/green-type cyanobacteriochrome AM1_C0023g2 that binds not only phycocyanobilin but also biliverdin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji eFushimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs are distantly related to the red/far-red responsive phytochromes. Red/green-type CBCRs are widely distributed among various cyanobacteria. The red/green-type CBCRs covalently bind phycocyanobilin (PCB and show red/green reversible photoconversion. Recent studies revealed that some red/green-type CBCRs from chlorophyll d-bearing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina covalently bind not only PCB but also biliverdin (BV. The BV-binding CBCRs show far-red/orange reversible photoconversion. Here, we identified another CBCR (AM1_C0023g2 from A. marina that also covalently binds not only PCB but also BV with high binding efficiencies, although BV chromophore is unstable in the presence of urea. Replacement of Ser334 with Gly resulted in significant improvement in the yield of the BV-binding holoprotein, thereby ensuring that the mutant protein is a fine platform for future development of optogenetic switches. We also succeeded in detecting near-infrared fluorescence from mammalian cells harboring PCB-binding AM1_C0023g2 whose fluorescence quantum yield is 3.0%. Here the PCB-binding holoprotein is shown as a platform for future development of fluorescent probes.

  19. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Shuang; Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin; Zhu, Daling

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway

  20. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Shasha [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China); Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Zhu, Daling, E-mail: dalingz@yahoo.com [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway.

  1. Iron metal production in silicate melts through the direct reduction of Fe/II/ by Ti/III/, Cr/II/, and Eu/II/. [in lunar basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, H. D.; Balazs, G. B.; Shaffer, A. P.; Jamison, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    The production of metallic iron in silicate melts by chemical reactions of Ti(3+), Cr(2+), and Eu(2+) with Fe(2+) is demonstrated under experimental conditions in a simplified basaltic liquid. These reactions form a basis for interpreting the role of isochemical valency exchange models in explanations for the reduced nature of lunar basalts. The redox couples are individually investigated in the silicate melt to ascertain reference redox ratios that are independent of mutual interactions. These studies also provide calibrations of spectral absorptions of the Fe(2+) and Ti(2+) species in these glasses. Subsequent spectrophotometric analyses of Fe(2+) and Ti(2+) in glasses doped with both iron and titanium and of Fe(2+) in glasses doped with either iron and chromium or iron and europium ascertain the degree of mutual interactions in these dual-doped glasses.

  2. Synthesis of iron oxides nanoparticles with very high saturation magnetization form TEA-Fe(III) complex via electrochemical deposition for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrouby, Mahmoud; Abdel-Mawgoud, A. M.; El-Rahman, Rehab Abd

    2017-11-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of magnetic iron oxides nanoparticles with very high saturation magnetization to be qualified for supercapacitor applications using, a simple electrodeposition technique. It is found that the electrochemical reduction process depends on concentration, temperature, deposition potential and the scan rate of potential. The nature of electrodeposition process has been characterized via voltammetric and chronoamperometric techniques. The morphology of the electrodeposits has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure and phase content of these investigated electrodeposits have been examined and calculated. The obtained iron oxides show a high saturation magnetization (Ms) of about 229 emu g-1. The data exhibited a relation between Ms of electrodeposited iron oxide and specific capacitance. This relation exhibits that the highest Ms value of electrodeposited iron oxides gives also highest specific capacitance of about 725 Fg-1. Moreover, the electrodeposited iron oxides exhibit a very good stability. The new characteristics of the electro synthesized iron oxides at our optimized conditions, strongly qualify them as a valuable material for high-performance supercapacitor applications.

  3. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III...

  4. Enhanced abiotic and biotic contributions to dechlorination of pentachlorophenol during Fe(III) reduction by an iron-reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); He, Yan, E-mail: yhe2006@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Feng, Xiaoli [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liang, Luyi [Experiment Teaching Center for Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Jianming, E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Brookes, Philip C.; Wu, Jianjun [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-03-01

    A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium, Clostridium beijerinckii Z, was isolated from glucose amended paddy slurries, and shown to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP). Fifty percent of added PCP was removed by C. beijerinckii Z alone, which increased to 83% in the presence of both C. beijerinckii Z and ferrihydrite after 11 days of incubation. Without C. beijerinckii Z, the surface-bound Fe(II) also abiotically dechlorinated more than 40% of the added PCP. This indicated that the biotic dechlorination by C. beijerinckii Z is a dominant process causing PCP transformation through anaerobic dechlorination, and that the dechlorination rates can be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). A biochemical electron transfer coupling process between sorbed Fe(II) produced by C. beijerinckii Z and reductive dehalogenation is a possible mechanism. This finding increases our knowledge of the role of Fe(III) reducing genera of Clostridium in dechlorinating halogenated organic pollutants, such as PCP, in anaerobic paddy soils. - Highlights: • A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z was isolated and could dechlorinate pentachlorophenol. • Anaerobic transformation of PCP by C. beijerinckii Z could be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). • Biochemical electron transfer coupling between Fe redox cycling and reductive dechlorination was the mechanism involved. • The finding increases our knowledge of Clostridium sp. regarding their multiple functions for dechlorinating pollutants.

  5. Enhanced abiotic and biotic contributions to dechlorination of pentachlorophenol during Fe(III) reduction by an iron-reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yan; He, Yan; Feng, Xiaoli; Liang, Luyi; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C.; Wu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium, Clostridium beijerinckii Z, was isolated from glucose amended paddy slurries, and shown to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP). Fifty percent of added PCP was removed by C. beijerinckii Z alone, which increased to 83% in the presence of both C. beijerinckii Z and ferrihydrite after 11 days of incubation. Without C. beijerinckii Z, the surface-bound Fe(II) also abiotically dechlorinated more than 40% of the added PCP. This indicated that the biotic dechlorination by C. beijerinckii Z is a dominant process causing PCP transformation through anaerobic dechlorination, and that the dechlorination rates can be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). A biochemical electron transfer coupling process between sorbed Fe(II) produced by C. beijerinckii Z and reductive dehalogenation is a possible mechanism. This finding increases our knowledge of the role of Fe(III) reducing genera of Clostridium in dechlorinating halogenated organic pollutants, such as PCP, in anaerobic paddy soils. - Highlights: • A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z was isolated and could dechlorinate pentachlorophenol. • Anaerobic transformation of PCP by C. beijerinckii Z could be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). • Biochemical electron transfer coupling between Fe redox cycling and reductive dechlorination was the mechanism involved. • The finding increases our knowledge of Clostridium sp. regarding their multiple functions for dechlorinating pollutants

  6. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles: synthesis by thermal decomposition of iron(III) glucuronate and application in magnetic resonance imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patsula, Vitalii; Kosinová, L.; Lovrić, M.; Ferhatovic Hamzic, L.; Rabyk, Mariia; Konefal, Rafal; Paruzel, Aleksandra; Šlouf, Miroslav; Herynek, V.; Gajović, S.; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2016), s. 7238-7247 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14318; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316120 - GLOWBRAIN Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : superparamagnetic * nanoparticles * iron oxide Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.504, year: 2016

  7. Synthesis, characterization and performance in arsenic removal of iron-doped activated carbons prepared by impregnation with Fe(III) and Fe(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, G.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Furdin, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, G.; Ballinas, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic removal from natural well water from the state of Chihuahua (Mexico) is investigated by adsorption using a commercial activated carbon (AC). The latter is used as such, or after oxidation by several chemicals in aqueous solution: nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulphate. Raw and oxidised activated carbons are fully characterised (elementary analysis, surface chemistry, pore texture parameters, pH ZC , and TEM observation). Adsorption of As is measured in the aforementioned water, containing ca. 300 ppb of arsenic: removal of As is poor with the raw AC, and only the most oxidised carbons exhibit higher performances. By contrast, iron-doped ACs are much more efficient for that purpose, though their As uptake strongly depends on their preparation conditions: a number of samples were synthesised by impregnation of raw and oxidised ACs with HCl aqueous solutions of either FeCl 3 or FeCl 2 at various concentrations and various pH. It is shown that iron(II) chloride is better for obtaining high iron contents in the resultant ACs (up to 8.34 wt.%), leading to high As uptake, close to 0.036 mg As/g C. In these conditions, 100% of the As initially present in the natural well water is removed, as soon as the Fe content of the adsorbent is higher than 2 wt.%.

  8. Understanding of the mode of action of Fe(III)-EDDHA as iron chlorosis corrector based on its photochemical and redox behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Pellico, Daniel; Ramírez-López, Pedro; Mancheño, María J; Romano, Santiago; de la Torre, María C; Sierra, Miguel A

    2005-10-07

    The very low reduction potential of the chelate Fe(III)-EDDHA (EDDHA = ethylenediamine N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy)phenylacetic acid) makes it unreactive in photochemically or chemically induced electron transfer processes. The lack of reactivity of this complex toward light invalidates photodegradation as an alternative mechanism for environmental elimination. However, in spite of its low reduction potential, the biological reduction of Fe(III)-EDDHA is very effective. Based on electrochemical measurements, it is proposed that Fe(III)-EDDHA itself is not the substrate of the enzyme ferric chelate reductase. Likely, at the more acidic pH in the vicinity of the roots, the ferric chelate in a closed form (FeL-) could generate a vacant coordination site that leads to an open hexacoordinate species (FeHL) where the reduction of the metal by the enzyme takes place.

  9. Crystal structure of a sodium, zinc and iron(III-based non-stoichiometric phosphate with an alluaudite-like structure: Na1.67Zn1.67Fe1.33(PO43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Khmiyas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The new title compound, disodium dizinc iron(III tris(phosphate, Na1.67Zn1.67Fe1.33(PO43, which belongs to the alluaudite family, has been synthesized by solid-state reactions. In this structure, all atoms are in general positions except for four, which are located on special positions of the C2/c space group. This structure is characterized by cation substitutional disorder at two sites, one situated on the special position 4e (2 and the other on the general position 8f. The 4e site is partially occupied by Na+ [0.332 (3], whereas the 8f site is entirely filled by a mixture of Fe and Zn. The full-occupancy sodium and zinc atoms are located at the Wyckoff positions on the inversion center 4a (-1 and on the twofold rotation axis 4e, respectively. Refinement of the occupancy ratios, bond-valence analysis and the electrical neutrality requirement of the structure lead to the given composition for the title compound. The three-dimensional framework of this structure consists of kinked chains of edge-sharing octahedra stacked parallel to [10-1]. The chains are formed by a succession of trimers based on [ZnO6] octahedra and the mixed-cation FeIII/ZnII [(Fe/ZnO6] octahedra [FeIII:ZnIII ratio 0.668 (3/0.332 (3]. Continuous chains are held together by PO4 phosphate groups, forming polyhedral sheets perpendicular to [010]. The stacked sheets delimit two types of tunnels parallel to the c axis in which the sodium cations are located. Each Na+ cation is coordinated by eight O atoms. The disorder of Na in the tunnel might presage ionic mobility for this material.

  10. Ammonium iron(III phosphate(V fluoride, (NH40.5[(NH40.375K0.125]FePO4F, with ammonium partially substituted by potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, ammonium potassium iron(III phosphate fluoride, (NH40.875K0.125FePO4F, is built from zigzag chains ∞1{[FeO4F2]7−}, with Fe3+ in a distorted octahedral coordination, extending along both the [011] and [0overline{1}1] directions. These chains are made up of alternating trans-[FeO4F2] and cis-[FeO4F2] octahedra via shared F-atom corners, and are linked by PO4 tetrahedra, resulting in an open-framework structure with channels along the [010] and [100] directions. There are two crystallographically independent ammonium sites: one in the [010] channels and the other, partially substituted by K+ ions, in the [100] channels. The ammonium in the [010] channels is fixed to the framework via eight hydrogen bonds (six N—H...O and two N—H...F.

  11. Valence-delocalization of the mixed-valence oxo-centered trinuclear iron propionates [FeIII2FeIIO(C2H5CO2)6(py)3[npy; n = 0, 1.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, Tadahiro; Katada, Motomi; Kawata, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Susumu; Sano, Hirotoshi; Konno, Michiko

    1994-01-01

    Mixed-valence trinuclear iron propionates [Fe III 2 Fe II O(C 2 H 5 CO 2 ) 6 (py) 3 [npy, where n = 0, 1.5, were synthesized and the structure of the pyridine-solvated complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Moessbauer spectra of the solvated propionate complex showed a temperature-dependent mixed-valence state related to phase transitions, reaching an almost delocalized valence state at room temperature. On the other hand, the non-solvated propionate showed a remarkable change of the spectral shape related to a phase transition, remaining in a localized valence state at higher temperatures up to room temperature. (orig.)

  12. Iron(III) phthalocyanine supported on a spongin scaffold as an advanced photocatalyst in a highly efficient removal process of halophenols and bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Małgorzata; Żółtowska-Aksamitowska, Sonia; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Ehrlich, Hermann; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2018-04-05

    This study investigated for the first time the degradation of phenol, chlorophenol, fluorophenol and bisphenol A (BPA) by the novel iron phthalocyanine/spongin hybrid material under various process conditions: hydrogen peroxide and UV irradiation. The heterogeneous catalyst, iron phthalocyanine/spongin (SFe), was produced by an adsorption process. The product obtained was investigated by a variety of spectroscopic techniques - X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 13 C NMR) - as well as elemental and thermal analysis. The study confirmed the stable immobilization of the dye on the biopolymer. The results demonstrate that the degradation of phenols and BPA followed pseudo-second-order kinetics under different experimental conditions. The synergy of SFe, H 2 O 2 and UV was found to produce a significant increase in the removal efficiency and resulted in complete removal of contaminants in a short time of 1 h. The reaction products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and possible degradation pathways were proposed, featuring a series of steps including cleavage of CC bonds and oxidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Hernández Anzaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H2O2 oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto, (meso, (deuteroporphyrinato (picdien]Fe(III complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III quantum mixed spin (qms ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1–3 + guaiacol + H2O2 → oxidation guaiacol products. The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III and H2O2, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0–4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III family with the ligand picdien [N,N’-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, 1H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  14. Monitoring corrosion and corrosion control of iron in HCl by non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series - Part III. Immersion time effects and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, M.A.; Arida, H.A.; Kandemirli, Fatma; Saracoglu, Murat; Arslan, Taner; Basaran, Murat A.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Research highlights: → The inhibition effect of TX-100, TX-165 and TX-305 on iron corrosion in 1.0 M HCl was studied. → TX-305 inhibited iron corrosion more effectively than TX-100 and TX-165. → In most cases, inhibition efficiency increased with time during the first 60 min of immersion, then decreased. → Calculated quantum chemical parameters confirmed the experimental inhibition efficiencies of the tested surfactants. - Abstract: The inhibition performance of three selected non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series, namely TRITONX-100 (TX-100), TRITON-X-165 (TX-165) and TRITON-X-305 (TX-305), on the corrosion of iron was studied in 1.0 M HCl solutions as a function of inhibitor concentration (0.01-0.20 g L -1 ) and immersion time (0.0-8 h) at 298 K. Measurements were conducted based on Tafel polarization, LPR and impedance studies. At high frequencies, the impedance spectrum showed a depressed capacitive loop in the complex impedance plane, whose diameter is a function of the immersion time and the type and concentration of the introduced surfactant. In all cases, an inductive loop was observed in the low frequency and this could be attributed to the adsorption behavior. The inhibition efficiency increased with immersion time, reached a maximum and then decreased. This was attributed to the orientation change of adsorbed surfactant molecules. TX-305 inhibited iron corrosion more effectively than TX-100 and TX-165. The frontier orbital energies, the energy gap between frontier orbitals, dipole moments (μ), charges on the C and O atoms, the polarizabilities, and the quantum chemical descriptors were calculated. The quantum chemical calculation results inferred that for the HOMO representing the condensed Fukui function for an electrophilic attack (f k + ), the contributions belong to the phenyl group and the oxygen atom attached to the phenyl group for each tested surfactant. Quantitative structure

  15. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To gain better insight into the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals from the solution phase thermal decomposition of iron (III) oleate complex, different reaction conditions including time, heating ramp, as well as concentrations of iron oleate precursor and oleic acid ligand were systematically varied and the resulting ...

  16. The fate of aniline after a photo-fenton reaction in an aqueous system containing iron(III), humic acid, and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Masami; Tatsumi, Kenji; Morimoto, Kengo

    2000-05-15

    The degradation of aniline (ArNH{sub 2}) was facilitated by light irradiation ({lambda} > 370 nm) of an aqueous solution, which contained Fe(III), humic acid(HA), and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The consumption of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) was consistent with the degradation of ArNH{sub 2} via the photo-Fenton reaction, accompanied by the generation of hydroxyl radicals (HO{sm_bullet}). HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture indicated the presence of p-aminophenol, p-hydroquinone, and maleic and fumaric acids and the simultaneous release of NH{sub 4}{sup +} ion. However, the sum of the product concentrations, as determined by HPLC after the reaction, was much smaller than the ArNH{sub 2} concentration added initially. This can be attributed to the majority of the ArNH{sub 2} being incorporated into the polymeric structure in the HA after the reaction. The {sup 15}N NMR and pyrolysis-GC/MS studies indicated that, after the reaction, ArNH{sub 2} formed covalent bonds with quinone and the vinyl carbons in the HA, to form anilino-compounds, such as anilinoquinone and enaminone.

  17. Interaction of human biliverdin reductase with Akt/protein kinase B and phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase 1 regulates glycogen synthase kinase 3 activity: a novel mechanism of Akt activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Gibbs, Peter E M; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Heimiller, Chelsea; Maines, Mahin D

    2016-08-01

    Biliverdin reductase A (BVR) and Akt isozymes have overlapping pleiotropic functions in the insulin/PI3K/MAPK pathway. Human BVR (hBVR) also reduces the hemeoxygenase activity product biliverdin to bilirubin and is directly activated by insulin receptor kinase (IRK). Akt isoenzymes (Akt1-3) are downstream of IRK and are activated by phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) phosphorylating T(308) before S(473) autophosphorylation. Akt (RxRxxSF) and PDK1 (RFxFPxFS) binding motifs are present in hBVR. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) isoforms α/β by Akts inhibits their activity; nonphosphorylated GSK3β inhibits activation of various genes. We examined the role of hBVR in PDK1/Akt1/GSK3 signaling and Akt1 in hBVR phosphorylation. hBVR activates phosphorylation of Akt1 at S(473) independent of hBVR's kinase competency. hBVR and Akt1 coimmunoprecipitated, and in-cell Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and glutathione S-transferase pulldown analyses identified Akt1 pleckstrin homology domain as the interactive domain. hBVR activates phosphorylation of Akt1 at S(473) independent of hBVR's kinase competency. Site-directed mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, and kinetic analyses identified S(230) in hBVR (225)RNRYLSF sequence as the Akt1 target. Underlined amino acids are the essential residues of the signaling motifs. In cells, hBVR-activated Akt1 increased both GSK3α/β and forkhead box of the O class transcription class 3 (FoxO3) phosphorylation and inhibited total GSK3 activity; depletion of hBVR released inhibition and stimulated glucose uptake. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that PDK1 and hBVR interact through hBVR's PDK1 binding (161)RFGFPAFS motif and formation of the PDK1/hBVR/Akt1 complex. sihBVR blocked complex formation. Findings identify hBVR as a previously unknown coactivator of Akt1 and as a key mediator of Akt1/GSK3 pathway, as well as define a key role for hBVR in Akt1 activation by PDK1.-Miralem, T., Lerner

  18. A serials of sandwich-like trinuclear and one-dimensional chain cyanide-bridged iron(III)-copper(II) complexes: Syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingwen; Lan, Wenlong; Ren, Yanjie; Liu, Qingyun; Liu, Hui; Dong, Yunhui; Zhang, Daopeng

    2018-04-01

    Four pyridinecarboxamide trans-dicyanideiron(III) building blocks and one macrocyclic copper(II) compound have been employed to assemble cyanide-bridged heterometallic complexes, resulting in a serials of cyanide-bridged FeIII-CuII complexes with different structure types. The series of complexes can be formulated as: {[Cu(Cyclam)][Fe(bpb)(CN)2]2}·4H2O (1), {{[Cu(Cyclam)][Fe(bpb)(CN)2]}ClO4}n·nH2O (2), and {[Cu(Cyclam)][Fe(bpmb)(CN)2]2}·4H2O (3), {[Cu(Cyclam)][Fe(bpClb)(CN)2]2}·4H2O (4) and {{[Cu(Cyclam)][Fe(bpdmb)(CN)2]}ClO4}n·2nCH3OH (5) (bpb2- = 1,2-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)benzenate, bpmb2- = 1,2-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)-4-methyl-benzenate, bpClb2- = 1,2-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)-4-chloro-benzenate, bpdmb2- = 1,2-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)-4,5-dimethyl-benzenate, Cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). All the complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and structural determination. Single X-ray diffraction analysis shows the similar neutral sandwich-like structures for complexes 1, 3 and 4, in which the two cyano precursors acting as monodentate ligand through one of their two cyanide groups were coordinated face to face to central Cu(II) ion. The complexes 2 and 5 can be structurally characterized as one-dimensional cationic single chain consisting of alternating units of [Cu(Cyclam)]2+ and [Fe(bpb/bpdmb)(CN)2]- with free ClO4- as balanced anion. Investigation over magnetic properties of the whole serials of complexes reveals the antiferromagnetic magnetic coupling between the neighboring cyanide-bridged Fe(III) and Cu(II) ions in complexes 3 and 4 and the ferromagnetic interaction in complexes 1, 2 and 5, respectively.

  19. Selective extraction by dissolvable (nitriloacetic acid-nickel)-layered double hydroxide coupled with reaction with potassium thiocyanate for sensitive detection of iron(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sheng; Chang, Yuepeng; Shen, Wei; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-07-01

    A highly selective method has been proposed for the determination of iron cation (Fe(3+)). (Nitriloacetic acid-nickel)-layered double hydroxide ((NTA-Ni)-LDH) was successfully synthesized and used as dissolvable sorbent in dispersive solid-phase extraction to pre-concentrate and separate Fe(3+) from aqueous phase. Since Fe(3+) has a larger formation constant with NTA compared to Ni(2+), subsequently ion exchange occurred when (NTA-Ni)-LDH was added to the sample solution. The resultant (NTA-Fe)-LDH sol was isolated and transferred in an acidic medium containing potassium thiocyanate (KSCN). Since (NTA-Fe)-LDH could be dissolved in acidic conditions, Fe(3+)was released and reacted with SCN(-) to form an Fe-SCN complex. The resulting product was measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrometry for quantitative detection of Fe(3+). Extraction factors, including sample pH, reaction pH, extraction temperature, extraction time, reaction time and concentration of KSCN were optimized. This method achieved a low limit of detection of 15.2nM and a good linear range from 0.05 to 50μM (r(2)=0.9937). A nearly 18-fold enhancement of signal intensity was achieved after selective extraction. The optimized conditions were validated by applying the method to determine Fe(3+) in seawater samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Generation of Superoxide Radicals by Complex III in Heart Mitochondria and Antioxidant Effect of Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes at Different Partial Pressure of Oxygen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudylina, A L; Ivanova, M V; Shumaev, K B; Ruuge, E K

    2016-01-01

    The EPR spin-trapping technique and EPR-oximetry were used to study generation of superoxide radicals in heart mitochondria isolated from Wistar rats under conditions of variable oxygen concentration. Lithium phthalocyanine and TEMPONE-15N-D16 were chosen to determine oxygen content in a gas-permeable capillary tube containing mitochondria. TIRON was used as a spin trap. We investigated the influence of different oxygen concentrations in incubation mixture and demonstrated that heart mitochondria can generate superoxide in complex III at different partial pressure of oxygen as well as under the conditions of deep hypoxia (partial pressure of oxygen, but the magnitude and kinetic characteristics of the effect depended on the concentration of the drug.

  1. Diammine{N-[2-(hydroxyiminopropionyl]-N′-[2-(oxidoiminopropionyl]propane-1,3-diaminido-κ4N,N′,N′′,N′′′}iron(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Tomyn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Fe(C9H13N4O4(NH32], the FeIII atom, lying on a mirror plane, is coordinated by four N atoms of a triply deprotonated tetradentate N-[2-(hydroxyiminopropionyl]-N′-[2-(oxidoiminopropionyl]propane-1,3-diaminide ligand in the equatorial plane and two N atoms of two ammonia molecules at the axial positions in a distorted octahedral geometry. A short intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond between the cis-disposed oxime O atoms stabilizes the pseudo-macrocyclic configuration of the ligand. In the crystal, molecules are linked by N—H...O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. The ligand has a mirror-plane symmetry. One of the methylene groups of the propane bridge is disordered over two sets of sites with equal occupancy factors.

  2. Sorption of PAHs to humic acid- and iron(III)carbon ate particles by using passive dosing vials for investigating the transport of organic contamination in stormwater runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    ) has been foun d to facilitate transport of organic contaminants and metals in stormwater runoff system s, but little is known about the role of the colloidal fraction including nano-sized particl es (0.001-1 μm). Based on the large specific surface area of colloids and nanosized particles, t heir...... abundance, and knowledge about their facilitated transport of persistent organic polluti on in natural waters, they are likely to diminish the efficiency of engineered treatment sys tems unless appropriately accounted for. In this work organic and inorganic nanosized partic les were investigated......(III)carbo nate particles (22 nm) sorption experiments are ongoing. Based on these results and a literature review, the importance of including particulate fractions for surface water q uality assessment in relation to the WFD will be discussed....

  3. Role of vitamin C transporters and biliverdin reductase in the dual pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant effect of biliary compounds on the placental-fetal unit in cholestasis during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Maria J.; Castano, Beatriz; Jimenez, Silvia; Serrano, Maria A.; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Jose M.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Maternal cholestasis causes oxidative damage to the placental-fetal unit that may challenge the outcome of pregnancy. This has been associated with the accumulation of biliary compounds able to induce oxidative stress. However, other cholephilic compounds such as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and bilirubin have direct anti-oxidant properties. In the present study we investigated whether these compounds exert a protective effect on cholestasis-induced oxidative stress in placenta as compared to maternal and fetal livers, and whether this is due in part to the activation of anti-oxidant mechanisms involving vitamin C uptake and biliverdin/bilirubin recycling. In human placenta (JAr) and liver (HepG2) cells, deoxycholic acid (DCA) similar rates of free radical generation. In JAr (not HepG2), the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability were impaired by low DCA concentrations; this was partly prevented by bilirubin and UDCA. In HepG2, taurocholic acid (TCA) and UDCA up-regulated biliverdin-IXα reductase (BVRα) and the vitamin C transporter SVCT2 (not SVCT1), whereas bilirubin up-regulated both SVCT1 and SVCT2. In JAr, TCA and UDCA up-regulated BVRα, SVCT1 and SVCT2, whereas bilirubin up-regulated only SVCT2. A differential response to these compounds of nuclear receptor expression (SXR, CAR, FXR and SHP) was found in both cell types. When cholestasis was induced in pregnant rats, BVRα, SVCT1 and SVCT2 expression in maternal and fetal livers was stimulated, and this was further enhanced by UDCA treatment. In placenta, only BVRα was up-regulated. In conclusion, bilirubin accumulation and UDCA administration may directly and indirectly protect the placental-fetal unit from maternal cholestasis-induced oxidative stress

  4. Trichlorido[(meth­yl{2-[meth­yl(2-pyridyl­meth­yl)amino]eth­yl}amino)acetonitrile]iron(III) methanol hemisolvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anne; McKenzie, Christine J.; Bond, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, [FeCl3(C12H18N4)]·0.5CH3OH, contains an FeIII ion in a distorted octa­hedral coordination environment. The neutral N,N′,N′′-tridentate ligand adopts a fac coordination mode, and chloride ligands lie trans to each of the three coordinated N atoms. In the crystal, the complexes form columns extending parallel to the approximate local threefold axes of the FeN3Cl3 octa­hedra, and the columns are arranged so that the uncoordinated nitrile groups align in an anti­parallel manner and the pyridyl rings form offset face-to-face arrangements [inter­planar separations = 2.95 (1) and 3.11 (1) Å; centroid–centroid distances = 5.31 (1) and 4.92 (1) Å]. The methanol solvent mol­ecule is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. PMID:21578169

  5. Simultaneous biosynthesis of putrebactin, avaroferrin and bisucaberin by Shewanella putrefaciens and characterisation of complexes with iron(III), molybdenum(VI) or chromium(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Cho Zin; Telfer, Thomas J; Levina, Aviva; Lay, Peter A; Codd, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens grown in medium containing 10mM 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DBO) as an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase and 10mM 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) showed the simultaneous biosynthesis of the macrocyclic dihydroxamic acids: putrebactin (pbH 2 ), avaroferrin (avH 2 ) and bisucaberin (bsH 2 ). The level of DBO did not completely repress the production of endogenous 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) as the native diamine substrate of pbH 2 . The relative concentration of pbH 2 :avH 2 :bsH 2 was 1:2:1, which correlated with the substrate selection of putrescine:cadaverine in a ratio of 1:1. The macrocycles were characterised using LC-MS as free ligands and as 1:1 complexes with Fe(III) of the form [Fe(pb)] + , [Fe(av)] + or [Fe(bs)] + , with labile ancillary ligands in six-coordinate complexes displaced during ESI-MS acquisition; or with Mo(VI) of the form [Mo(O) 2 (pb)], [Mo(O) 2 (av)] or [Mo(O) 2 (bs)]. Chromium(V) complexes of the form [CrO(pb)] + were detected from solutions of Cr(VI) and pbH 2 in DMF using X-band EPR spectroscopy. Supplementation of S. putrefaciens medium with DBO and 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,6-diaminohexane or 1,4-diamino-2(Z)-butene (Z-DBE) resulted only in the biosynthesis of pbH 2 . The work has identified a native system for the simultaneous biosynthesis of a suite of three macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores and highlights both the utility of precursor-directed biosynthesis for expanding the structural diversity of siderophores, and the breadth of their coordination chemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of Atmospheric Processes on the Solubility and Composition of Iron in Saharan Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Amelia F; Feng, Yan; Lai, Barry; Landing, William M; Shelley, Rachel U; Nenes, Athanasios; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Violaki, Kalliopi; Ingall, Ellery D

    2016-07-05

    Aerosol iron was examined in Saharan dust plumes using a combination of iron near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and wet-chemical techniques. Aerosol samples were collected at three sites located in the Mediterranean, the Atlantic, and Bermuda to characterize iron at different atmospheric transport lengths and time scales. Iron(III) oxides were a component of aerosols at all sampling sites and dominated the aerosol iron in Mediterranean samples. In Atlantic samples, iron(II and III) sulfate, iron(III) phosphate, and iron(II) silicates were also contributors to aerosol composition. With increased atmospheric transport time, iron(II) sulfates are found to become more abundant, aerosol iron oxidation state became more reduced, and aerosol acidity increased. Atmospheric processing including acidic reactions and photoreduction likely influence the form of iron minerals and oxidation state in Saharan dust aerosols and contribute to increases in aerosol-iron solubility.

  7. Lymph node metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: MR imaging with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (Sinerem MR) - results of a phase-III multicenter clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.; Viala, J.; Bosq, J.; Vogl, T.; Mack, M.; Casselman, J.; Depondt, M.; Mattelaer, C.; Moulin, G.; Petit, P.; Champsaur, P.; Veillon, F.; Riehm, S.; Dadashitazehozi, Y.; Hermans, R.; de Jaegere, T.; Marchal, G.; Dubrulle, F.; Chevalier, D.; Lemaitre, L.; Kubiak, C.; Helmberger, R.; Halimi, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical usefulness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) MR contrast media (Sinerem, Guerbet Laboratories, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) with precontrast MRI in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using histology as gold standard. Eighty-one previously untreated patients were enrolled in a multicenter phase-III clinical trial. All patients had a noncontrast MR, a Sinerem MR, and surgery within a period of 15 days. The MR exams were analyzed both on site and by two independent radiologists (centralized readers). Correlation between histology and imaging was done per lymph node groups, and per individual lymph nodes when the short axis was ≥10 mm. For individual lymph nodes, Sinerem MR showed a high sensitivity (≥88%) and specificity (≥77%). For lymph node groups, the sensitivity was ≥59% and specificity ≥81%. False-positive results were partially due to inflammatory nodes; false-negative results from the presence of undetected micrometastases. Errors of interpretation were also related to motion and/or susceptibility artifacts and problems of zone assignment. Sinerem MR had a negative predictive value (NPV) ≥90% and a positive predictive value (PPV) ≥51%. The specificity and PPV of Sinerem MR were better than those of precontrast MR. Precontrast MR showed an unexpectedly high sensitivity and NPV which were not increased with Sinerem MR. The potential contribution of Sinerem MR still remains limited by technical problems regarding motion and susceptibility artifacts and spatial resolution. It is also noteworthy that logistical problems, which could reduce the practical value of Sinerem MR, will be minimized in the future since Sinerem MR alone performed as good as the combination of precontrast and Sinerem MR. (orig.)

  8. Lymph node metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: MR imaging with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (Sinerem MR) - results of a phase-III multicenter clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigal, R.; Viala, J.; Bosq, J. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Vogl, T.; Mack, M. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum, Frankfurt Main (Germany); Casselman, J.; Depondt, M.; Mattelaer, C. [Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium); Moulin, G.; Petit, P.; Champsaur, P. [Hopital de la Timone, Marseille (France); Veillon, F.; Riehm, S.; Dadashitazehozi, Y. [Hopital de Hautepierre, Avenue Moliere, 67098 Strasbourg (France); Hermans, R.; de Jaegere, T.; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, KU Leuven, Heerestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dubrulle, F.; Chevalier, D.; Lemaitre, L. [Hopital Huriez, 1 place Verdun, 59037 Lille (France); Kubiak, C.; Helmberger, R.; Halimi, P.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical usefulness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) MR contrast media (Sinerem, Guerbet Laboratories, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) with precontrast MRI in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using histology as gold standard. Eighty-one previously untreated patients were enrolled in a multicenter phase-III clinical trial. All patients had a noncontrast MR, a Sinerem MR, and surgery within a period of 15 days. The MR exams were analyzed both on site and by two independent radiologists (centralized readers). Correlation between histology and imaging was done per lymph node groups, and per individual lymph nodes when the short axis was {>=}10 mm. For individual lymph nodes, Sinerem MR showed a high sensitivity ({>=}88%) and specificity ({>=}77%). For lymph node groups, the sensitivity was {>=}59% and specificity {>=}81%. False-positive results were partially due to inflammatory nodes; false-negative results from the presence of undetected micrometastases. Errors of interpretation were also related to motion and/or susceptibility artifacts and problems of zone assignment. Sinerem MR had a negative predictive value (NPV) {>=}90% and a positive predictive value (PPV) {>=}51%. The specificity and PPV of Sinerem MR were better than those of precontrast MR. Precontrast MR showed an unexpectedly high sensitivity and NPV which were not increased with Sinerem MR. The potential contribution of Sinerem MR still remains limited by technical problems regarding motion and susceptibility artifacts and spatial resolution. It is also noteworthy that logistical problems, which could reduce the practical value of Sinerem MR, will be minimized in the future since Sinerem MR alone performed as good as the combination of precontrast and Sinerem MR. (orig.)

  9. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION OF IRON (III) FROM OUENZA IRON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Nouioua

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... protection of the environment or their recovery for use in the industrial sector [1]. In the extraction .... in Fig.6 with slop value of 3.9 indicating the involvement .... [1] El Bar D, Barket D. Journal of Mining Science, 2015, Vol. 51, N.

  10. Determining Iron Content in Foods by Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment for secondary school chemistry students utilizing the classic reaction between the iron(III) ion and the thiocyanate ion. The experiment also works very well in other chemistry courses as an experience in spectrophotometric analysis. (PVD)

  11. Cellular Studies with UVA Radiation: A Role for Iron (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Pourzand, C.A.; Brown, J.; Hejmadi, V.; Kvam, V.; Ryter, S.; Watkin, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    The UVA (320-380 nm) component of sunlight or sunbeds acts as an oxidising carcinogen and has been clearly implicated in skin cancer. Since UVA radiation interacts with cells by generating active oxygen species, the damaging effects of this radiation will be exacerbated by the presence of catalytically reactive iron in cells. It has now been shown by two independent techniques (dequenching of metal-quenched calcein fluorescence in cells and changes in the binding activity of the iron responsive protein IRPI) that UVA radiation causes an immediate release of 'free' iron in human skin fibroblasts via the proteolysis of ferritin (Ft). Within minutes of exposure to a range of doses of UVA at natural exposure levels, the binding activity of IRP-1, as well as Ft levels, decrease in a dose-dependent manner. It is proposed that the oxidative damage to lysosomes that leads to Ft degradation and the consequent release of potentially harmful 'free' iron to the cytosol might be a major factor in UVA-induced damage to the skin. UVA radiation also breaks down heme-containing proteins in the microsomal membrane to release free heme as an additional photosensitising component. This will provide another source of enhanced free iron in skin cells since constitutive heme oxygenase 2 (in keratinocytes) and UVA-inducible heme oxygenase-1 (in fibroblasts) are likely to break down any free heme to biliverdin and release iron and carbon monoxide in the process. It is postulated that, in skin fibroblasts, this free heme release and the enhanced free iron pools will lead to an adaptive response involving heme oxygenase (with a maximum about 10 h) and ferritin (in 24-48 h) that will scavenge the heme and iron released by subsequent oxidising (UVA) treatments. (author)

  12. Adsorption studies of iron(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adsorption of ferric ions by chitin was studied by the batch equilibration method. The influence of particle size and dosage of the adsorbant, contact time, initial concentration of the adsorbate and temperature were experimentally verified. The effect of anions like chloride, nitrate and sulphate and also of cations like zinc, ...

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Iron(II-Iron(III) Electron-Exchange Reaction in Mixed Solvent Media; Cinetique et Mecanisme de l'Echange d'Electrons entre Fer (II) et Fer (III), dans des Melanges de Solvants; Ikinetika i mekhanizm reaktsii ehlektronnogo obmena zheleza (I) - zheleza (III) v smeshannoj rastvoryayushchej srede; Cinetica y Mecanismo del Intercambio de Electrones Entre Fe{sup II} Y Fe{sup lII} en Mezclas de Disolventes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, R. A. [Arthur D. Little, Inc. Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1965-10-15

    The specific reaction rate constants of theFe{sup II}-Fe{sup III} electron-exchange reaction have been measured at various temperatures, acidities, and ionic strengths in water-acetone, water-methanol, and water-ethanol media. The reaction rate markedly diminishes as the water concentration in the last system decreases, approaching zero as the water concentration approaches zero. The activation energy of the exchange is the same in mixed solvent as in aqueous solution. The effective dielectric constant which the reactants ''see'' continues to be that of pure water even in water-ethanol solutions quite dilute in water. Alterations in composition of the solvation sheath of Fe{sup III} in mixed media are reflected in both electron-exchange and spectroscopic measurements. These findings in mixed solvent media support the water-bridging theory of electron exchange. (author) [French] Les constantes de vitesse specifiques de l'echange d'electrons entre Fe{sup II} et Fe{sup III} ont ete mesurees a differentes temperatures et pour differentes acidites et forces ioniques, dans des melanges d'eau et d'acetone, d'eau et de methanol et d'eau et d'ethanol. Dans le dernier systeme, la vitesse d'echange diminue considerablement a mesure que la concentration en eau decroit, et tend vers zero en meme temps que cette concentration. L'energie d'activation de l'echange est la meme dans un melange de solvants et dans une solution aqueuse. La constante dielectrique effective qui intervient entre les corps reagissants reste celle de l'eau pure, meme dans des solutions concentrees d'ethanol dans l'eau. Les changements de composition de la gaine de solvatation de Fe{sup III} dans les melanges se manifestent a la fois dans les mesures de l'echange d'electrons et dans les mesures spectroscopiques. Ces observations viennent confirmer la theorie de l'echange d'electrons fondee sur le pontage par l'eau. (author) [Spanish] El autor ha medido las constantes de velocidad especificas de la reaccion

  14. (III) chloride

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were possibly higher as volatile solid (VS) degradation increased in all ADs during the dosing period. ... level before it reaches electric generators, gas storage units ..... A disadvantage is the iron consumption by other reactions in the liquid ...

  15. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of iron (III)-based phosphates: Na4NiFe(PO4)3 and Na2Ni2Fe(PO4)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essehli, Rachid; Bali, Brahim El; Benmokhtar, Said; Bouziane, Khalid; Manoun, Bouchaib; Abdalslam, Mouner Ahmed; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A perspective view of the Na 2 Ni 2 Fe(PO 4 ) 3 structure along the [0 0 1] direction. Both compounds seem to exibit antiferromagnetic interactions between magnetic entities at low temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: → Nasicon and Alluaudite compounds, Iron(III)-based phosphates, Crystal structures of Na 4 NiFe(PO 4 ) 3 and Na 2 Ni 2 Fe(PO 4 ) 3 . → Magnetism behaviours of Na 4 NiFe(PO 4 ) 3 and Na 2 Ni 2 Fe(PO 4 ) 3 . → Antiferromagnetism interactions. → Mossbauer spectroscopy. - Abstract: Crystal structures from two new phosphates Na 4 NiFe(PO 4 ) 3 (I) and Na 2 Ni 2 Fe(PO 4 ) 3 (II) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound (I) crystallizes in a rhombohedral system (S. G: R-3c, Z = 6, a = 8.7350(9) A, c = 21.643(4) A, R 1 = 0.041, wR 2 =0.120). Compound (II) crystallizes in a monoclinic system (S. G: C2/c, Z = 4, a = 11.729(7) A, b = 12.433(5) A, c = 6.431(2) A, β = 113.66(4) o , R 1 = 0.043, wR 2 =0.111). The three-dimensional structure of (I) is closely related to the Nasicon structural type, consisting of corner sharing [(Ni/Fe)O 6 ] octahedra and [PO 4 ] tetrahedra forming [NiFe(PO 4 ) 3 ] 4+ units which align in chains along the c-axis. The Na + cations fill up trigonal antiprismatic sites within these chains. The crystal structure of (II) belongs to the alluaudite type. Its open framework results from [Ni 2 O 10 ] units of edge-sharing [NiO 6 ] octahedra, which alternate with [FeO 6 ] octahedra that form infinite chains. Coordination of these chains yields two distinct tunnels in which site Na + . The magnetization data of compound (I) reveal antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions by the onset of deviations from a Curie-Weiss behaviour at low temperature as confirmed by Moessbauer measurements performed at 4.2 K. The corresponding temperature dependence of the reciprocal susceptibility χ -1 follows a typical Curie-Weiss behaviour for T > 105 K. A canted AFM state is proposed for

  16. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  17. In vitro studies on interactions of iron salts and complexes with food-stuffs and medicaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisser, P

    1990-07-01

    It has been shown in the present study that food components such as phytic acid, oxalic acid, tannin, sodium alginate, choline and choline salts, vitamins A, D3 and E, soy oil and soy flour, do not undergo any interactions with iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex (Ferrum Hausmann). Phytic acid, oxalic acid, tannin and sodium alginate, however, react with iron(II) or iron(III)-salts at pH values of 3.0, 5.5 and 8.0, giving rise to iron complexes. Trimethylamine-N-oxide, which is present in fish meal, reacts with iron(II)-sulphate to produce iron(III) reaction products; it does not react with iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex. Special soybean flours show no irreversible adsorption or precipitation with iron(III)-hydroxyide polymaltose complex over the pH range 3.0-8.0, in contrast to iron(II)-sulphate. Antacids containing aluminium hydroxide, talc, ion exchange resins or other unabsorbable, insoluble components absorb iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex in the pH range 3.0-8.0 in a reversible manner, while the strong adsorption or precipitation observed with iron(II)-sulphate at pH 8.0 is irreversible. No interaction was observed between the steroid hormones studied and iron(II)-sulphate or iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex. On the basis of the measured compatibilities, iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex can be administered orally simultaneously with many other drugs, without prejudicing the absorption of iron or of the other drug as is often seen with iron(II) and iron(III) salts.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  19. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  20. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  1. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of iron (III)-based phosphates: Na{sub 4}NiFe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Fe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essehli, Rachid, E-mail: rachid_essehli@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Mineral Solid and Analytical Chemistry ' LCSMA' , Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University Mohamed I, Po. Box 717, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Bali, Brahim El [Laboratory of Mineral Solid and Analytical Chemistry ' LCSMA' , Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University Mohamed I, Po. Box 717, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Benmokhtar, Said [LCMS, Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux Solides, Departement de chimie, Faculte des Sciences Ben M' SIK, Casablanca (Morocco); Bouziane, Khalid [Physics Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, Postal Code 123 Al Khod, Sultanate of Oman (Oman); Manoun, Bouchaib [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, Departement de Chimie, FST Errachidia, University Moulay Ismail, B.P. 509 Boutalamine, Errachidia (Morocco); Abdalslam, Mouner Ahmed [Materials Science, Technical University Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Ehrenberg, Helmut [IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-01-28

    Graphical abstract: A perspective view of the Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Fe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} structure along the [0 0 1] direction. Both compounds seem to exibit antiferromagnetic interactions between magnetic entities at low temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Nasicon and Alluaudite compounds, Iron(III)-based phosphates, Crystal structures of Na{sub 4}NiFe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Fe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. > Magnetism behaviours of Na{sub 4}NiFe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Fe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. > Antiferromagnetism interactions. > Mossbauer spectroscopy. - Abstract: Crystal structures from two new phosphates Na{sub 4}NiFe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (I) and Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Fe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (II) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound (I) crystallizes in a rhombohedral system (S. G: R-3c, Z = 6, a = 8.7350(9) A, c = 21.643(4) A, R{sub 1} = 0.041, wR{sub 2}=0.120). Compound (II) crystallizes in a monoclinic system (S. G: C2/c, Z = 4, a = 11.729(7) A, b = 12.433(5) A, c = 6.431(2) A, {beta} = 113.66(4){sup o}, R{sub 1} = 0.043, wR{sub 2}=0.111). The three-dimensional structure of (I) is closely related to the Nasicon structural type, consisting of corner sharing [(Ni/Fe)O{sub 6}] octahedra and [PO{sub 4}] tetrahedra forming [NiFe(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}]{sup 4+} units which align in chains along the c-axis. The Na{sup +} cations fill up trigonal antiprismatic sites within these chains. The crystal structure of (II) belongs to the alluaudite type. Its open framework results from [Ni{sub 2}O{sub 10}] units of edge-sharing [NiO{sub 6}] octahedra, which alternate with [FeO{sub 6}] octahedra that form infinite chains. Coordination of these chains yields two distinct tunnels in which site Na{sup +}. The magnetization data of compound (I) reveal antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions by the onset of deviations from a Curie-Weiss behaviour at low temperature as confirmed by Moessbauer measurements performed at 4.2 K. The

  2. Synthesis and characterization of iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L1) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H2L2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouEl-Enein, S A; El-Saied, F A; Kasher, T I; El-Wardany, A H

    2007-07-01

    Salicylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(1)) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene-N-anilinoacetohydrazone (H(2)L(2)) and their iron(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by IR, electronic spectra, molar conductivities, magnetic susceptibilities and ESR. Mononuclear complexes are formed with molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 (M:L). The IR studies reveal various modes of chelation. The electronic absorption spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the iron(III), nickel(II) and cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(1) have octahedral geometry. While the cobalt(II) complexes of H(2)L(2) were separated as tetrahedral structure. The copper(II) complexes have square planar stereochemistry. The ESR parameters of the copper(II) complexes at room temperature were calculated. The g values for copper(II) complexes proved that the Cu-O and Cu-N bonds are of high covalency.

  3. The Nature of the intermediates in the reactions of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-microperoxidase-8 with H2O2 : a rapid kinetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primus, J.L.; Grunenwald, S.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Albrecht-Gary, A.M.; Mandon, D.; Veeger, C.

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic studies were performed with microperoxidase-8 (Fe(III)MP-8), the proteolytic breakdown product of horse heart cytochrome c containing an octapeptide linked to an iron protoporphyrin IX. Mn(III) was substituted for Fe(III) in Mn(III)MP-8.The mechanism of formation of the reactive metal-oxo

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Dissolved Silica on the H2O2 Decomposition by Iron(III) and Manganese(IV) Oxides: Implications for H2O2-based In Situ Chemical Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Doyle, Fiona M.; Sedlak, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of H2O2 on iron minerals can generate •OH, a strong oxidant that can transform a wide range of contaminants. This reaction is critical to In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) processes used for soil and groundwater remediation, as well as advanced oxidation processes employed in waste treatment systems. The presence of dissolved silica at concentrations comparable to those encountered in natural waters decreases the reactivity of iron minerals toward H2O2, because silica adsorbs onto the surface of iron minerals and alters catalytic sites. At circumneutral pH values, goethite, amorphous iron oxide, hematite, iron-coated sand and montmorillonite that were pre-equilibrated with 0.05 – 1.5 mM SiO2 were significantly less reactive toward H2O2 decomposition than their original counterparts, with the H2O2 loss rates inversely proportional to the SiO2 concentration. In the goethite/H2O2 system, the overall •OH yield, defined as the percentage of decomposed H2O2 producing •OH, was almost halved in the presence of 1.5 mM SiO2. Dissolved SiO2 also slows the H2O2 decomposition on manganese(IV) oxide. The presence of dissolved SiO2 results in greater persistence of H2O2 in groundwater, lower H2O2 utilization efficiency and should be considered in the design of H2O2-based treatment systems. PMID:22129132

  5. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  8. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  16. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  19. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  20. Iron and Arsenic Speciation During As(III) Oxidation by Manganese Oxides in the Presence of Fe(II): Molecular-Level Characterization Using XAFS, Mössbauer, and TEM Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yun [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Livi, Kenneth J. T. [The High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microbeam Facility, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, United States; Xu, Wenqian [Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, New York 11796, United States; Li, Wei [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States; Key Laboratory of Surficial Geochemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046, People’s Republic of China; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States

    2018-01-17

    The redox state and speciation of metalloid arsenic (As) determine its toxicity and mobility. Knowledge of biogeochemical processes influencing the As redox state is therefore important to understand and predict its environmental behavior. Many previous studies examined As(III) oxidation by various Mn-oxides, but little is known the environmental influences (e.g. co-existing ions) on such process. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by a poorly crystalline hexagonal birnessite (δ-MnO2) in the presence of Fe(II) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). As K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis revealed that, at low Fe(II) concentration (100 μM), As(V) was the predominant As species on the solid phase, while at higher Fe(II) concentration (200-1000 μM), both As(III) and As(V) were sorbed on the solid phase. As K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) analysis showed an increasing As-Mn/Fe distance over time, indicating As prefers to bind with the newly formed Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides. As adsorbed on Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides as a bidentate binuclear corner-sharing complex. Both Mössbauer and TEM-EDS investigations demonstrated that the oxidized Fe(III) products formed during Fe(II) oxidation by δ-MnO2 were predominantly ferrihydrite, goethite, and ferric arsenate like compounds. However, Fe EXAFS analysis also suggested the formation of a small amount of lepidocrocite. The Mn K-edge XANES data indicated that As(III) and Fe(II) oxidation occurs as a two electron transfer with δ-MnO2 and the observed Mn(III) is due to conproportionation of surface sorbed Mn(II) with Mn(IV) in δ-MnO2 structure. This study reveals that the mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by δ-MnO2 in the presence of Fe(II) are very complex, involving many simultaneous reactions, and the formation of

  1. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  3. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  5. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  6. Moessbauer investigation of iron uptake in wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, K., E-mail: kkriszti@bolyai.elte.hu [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Kuzmann, E. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Chemical Research Center (Hungary); Fodor, F.; Cseh, E. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Department of Plant Physiology (Hungary); Homonnay, Z.; Vertes, A. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)

    2008-07-15

    Iron uptake and distribution in wheat roots were studied with {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. Plants were grown both in iron sufficient and in iron deficient nutrient solutions. Moessbauer spectra of the frozen iron sufficient roots exhibited three iron(III) components with the typical average Moessbauer parameters of {delta} = 0.50 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 0.43 mm s{sup -1}, {delta} = 0.50 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 0.75 mm s{sup -1} and {delta} = 0.50 mm s{sup -1}, {Delta} = 1.20 mm s{sup -1} at 80 K. These doublets are very similar to those obtained earlier for cucumber [0], which allows us to suppose that iron is stored in a very similar way in different plants. No ferrous iron could be identified in any case, not even in the iron deficient roots, which confirms the mechanism proposed for iron uptake in the graminaceous plants.

  7. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L −1 for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31–355 μg L −1 for Mn(II) and 0.34–380 μg L −1 for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. - Highlights: • We use synthesized graphene oxide as adsorbent for SPE of Mn(II) and Fe(III) ions. • Adsorption mechanism was investigated by PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface. • Detection limits were 145 and 162 ng L −1 for Mn and Fe, respectively. • The preconcentration factor was 325 and sample flow rate is 8 mL min −1 . • It was successfully applied to the determination of Mn and Fe ions in real samples

  8. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: pourjavid@gmail.com [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sehat, Ali Akbari [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L{sup −1} for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31–355 μg L{sup −1} for Mn(II) and 0.34–380 μg L{sup −1} for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. - Highlights: • We use synthesized graphene oxide as adsorbent for SPE of Mn(II) and Fe(III) ions. • Adsorption mechanism was investigated by PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface. • Detection limits were 145 and 162 ng L{sup −1} for Mn and Fe, respectively. • The preconcentration factor was 325 and sample flow rate is 8 mL min{sup −1}. • It was successfully applied to the determination of Mn and Fe ions in real samples.

  9. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  10. Synthesis and characterization of chromium(III), manganese(II), iron(III), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), cadmium(II) and dioxouranium(VI) complexes of 4(2-pyridyl)-1-(2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde)-3-thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu El-Reash, G.M.; Ibrahim, M.M.; Kenawy; El-Ayaan, Usama; Khattab, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    A few complexes of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and dioxouranium(VI) with 4(2-pyridyl)-1-(2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde)-3-thiosemicarbazone have been synthesised and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, electronic NMR, and magnetic moment data. An octahedral structure is proposed for the Cr(III), Fe(III), Co(II) and Ni(H 3 PBT) 2 Cl 2 .2H 2 O complexes; a tetrahedral structure for the Mn(II) and Ni 2 (PBT)OAc.H 2 0 complexes and a square planar structure for the Cu(II) complexes. The antimicrobial and antifungal activities of H 3 PBT and of its metal(II) complexes are investigated. The results reveal that H 3 PBT exhibits greater antimicrobial activities than its complexes. (author). 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. [Peritoneal fluid iron levels in women with endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Grzegorz; Wertel, Iwona; Tarkowski, Rafał; Kotarski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by a cyclic hemorrhage within the peritoneal cavity. Accumulating data suggests that iron homeostasis in the peritoneal cavity may be disrupted by endometriosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate iron levels in peritoneal fluid (PF) of women with and without endometriosis. Seventy-five women were studied: 50 women with endometriosis and, as a reference group, 25 patients with functional follicle ovarian cysts. Iron concentrations in the PF were measured using a commercially available colorimetric assay kit. Iron concentrations were significantly higher in PF from women with endometriosis as compared to the reference group. Patients with stages III/IV endometriosis had significantly higher PF iron concentrations than women with stages I/II of the disease. Disrupted iron homeostasis in the peritoneal cavity of women with endometriosis plays a role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of a new three-dimensional iron arsenate [C6N4H21][FeIII3(HAsO4)6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Vandavasi Koteswara; Natarajan, Srinivasan

    2006-01-01

    A hydrothermal reaction of a mixture of iron oxalate, arsenic pentoxide, hydrofluoric acid and triethylenetetramine (TETA) at 150deg. C for 48h gives rise to a new iron arsenate [C 6 N 4 H 21 ][Fe 3 (HAsO 4 ) 6 ], I. The structure consists of a network of FeO 6 and AsO 4 building units connected through their vertices giving rise to a new secondary building unit, SBU-5. The SBU-5 units are through their corners forming a three-dimensional structure possessing one-dimensional channels bound by 8-T atoms (T=Fe, As). The formation of SBU-5 units is noteworthy. Variable temperature magnetic studies indicate antiferromagnetic interactions between the Fe centers with T N of 21.9K. Crystal data: M=1156.36, monoclinic, space group=C2/c (no. 15), a=18.422(3)A, b=8.8527(13)A, c=16.169(2)A, β=111.592(2) o , V=2451.9(6)A 3 , Z=8, ρ calc =3.037gcm -3 , μ(Mo Kα)=9.903mm -1 , R 1 =0.0358, wR 2 =0.0763, S=1.140 for 234 parameters

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of growth of iron oxide films by MOCVD ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thermodynamic calculations, using the criterion of minimization of total Gibbs free energy of the system, have been carried out for the metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) process involving the -ketoesterate complex of iron [tris(-butyl-3-oxo-butanoato)iron(III) or Fe(tbob)3] and molecular oxygen.

  14. Polypyridyl iron(II) complexes showing remarkable photocytotoxicity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reported a high spin (S=5/2) ternary iron(III) complex. [Fe(BHA)(L)Cl] of a ... designed low-spin iron(II) complexes as a new class of ..... They were moderately soluble in methanol, ethanol and .... Cell permeable DCFDA on oxidation by cel-.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  18. THE WIDESPREAD OF Fe(III)-REDUCING BACTERIA IN NATURAL ECOSYSTEMS OF ECUADOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashyrev, O B; Govorukha, V M

    2015-01-01

    The widespread of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in natural ecosystems of Ecuador of La Favorita, Tungurahua volcano and Papallacta areas was experimentally proved. High efficiency of microbial precipitation of soluble iron compounds was also demonstrated. Obtained results indicate the potential ability of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to influence the formation of carbon and iron vector fluxes in ecosystems, as well as development of effective biotechnologies of water purification from iron compounds.

  19. Moessbauer study of Fe(III)-reducing sugar complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowiec, S.; Drabent, K.

    1985-01-01

    Iron(III) complexes with glucose, galactose, mannose and lactose were prepared. The Moessbauer and magnetic susceptibility data demonstrate the polymeric structure of the complexes. The thermal behaviour of the Fe(III)-glucose complex was monitored by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (author)

  20. Tris(1,10-phenanthroline-κ2N,N′iron(II bis[(1,10-phenanthroline-κ2N,N′tetrakis(thiocyanato-κNchromate(III] acetonitrile trisolvate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr V. Bon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title heterometallic compound, [Fe(C12H8N23][Cr(NCS4(C12H8N2]2·3CH3CN·H2O or [Fe(Cphen3][Cr(NCS4(phen]2·3CH3CN·H2O, were prepared using the one-pot open-air reaction of iron powder, Reineckes salt and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen in acetonitrile. The asymetric unit consists of an [Fe(phen3]2+ cation, two [Cr(phen(NCS4]− anions, three acetonitrile solvent molecules and a water molecule. The Fe and Cr atoms both show a slightly distorted octahedral FeN6 and CrN6 coordination geometry with adjacent angles in the range 79.67 (12–95.21 (12°. No classical hydrogen bonding involving the water molecule is observed.

  1. Arsenic(V) reduction in relation to Iron(III) transformation and molecular characterization of the structural and functional microbial community in sediments of a basin-fill aquifer in Northern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Babur S; Muruganandam, Subathra; Meng, Xianyu; Sorensen, Darwin L; Dupont, R Ryan; McLean, Joan E

    2014-05-01

    Basin-fill aquifers of the Southwestern United States are associated with elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Many private domestic wells in the Cache Valley Basin, UT, have As concentrations in excess of the U.S. EPA drinking water limit. Thirteen sediment cores were collected from the center of the valley at the depth of the shallow groundwater and were sectioned into layers based on redoxmorphic features. Three of the layers, two from redox transition zones and one from a depletion zone, were used to establish microcosms. Microcosms were treated with groundwater (GW) or groundwater plus glucose (GW+G) to investigate the extent of As reduction in relation to iron (Fe) transformation and characterize the microbial community structure and function by sequencing 16S rRNA and arsenate dissimilatory reductase (arrA) genes. Under the carbon-limited conditions of the GW treatment, As reduction was independent of Fe reduction, despite the abundance of sequences related to Geobacter and Shewanella, genera that include a variety of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. The addition of glucose, an electron donor and carbon source, caused substantial shifts toward domination of the bacterial community by Clostridium-related organisms, and As reduction was correlated with Fe reduction for the sediments from the redox transition zone. The arrA gene sequencing from microcosms at day 54 of incubation showed the presence of 14 unique phylotypes, none of which were related to any previously described arrA gene sequence, suggesting a unique community of dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria in the Cache Valley Basin.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ... and lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... delivery or giving birth to a baby with low birth weight In people with chronic conditions, iron- ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  11. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amount of iron, and medical conditions that make it hard for your body to absorb iron from ... hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy ... sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  19. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark ... choose nonmeat sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  3. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  4. Heterogeneous biomimetic catalysis using iron porphyrin for cyclohexane oxidation promoted by chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guan; Liu, Yao; Cai, Jing Li; Chen, Xiang Feng; Zhao, Shu Kai; Guo, Yong An; Wei, Su Juan; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates how ligands modulate metalloporphyrin activity with the goal of producing a practical biomimetic catalyst for use in the chemical industry. We immobilized iron porphyrinate [iron-tetrakis-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrin; Fe(III) (TPPS)] on powdered chitosan (pd-CTS) to form an immobilized catalyst Fe(III) (TPPS)/pd-CTS, which was characterized using modern spectroscopic techniques and used for catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane with O2. Amino coordination to iron porphyrin in Fe(III) (TPPS)/pd-CTS altered the electron cloud density around the iron cation, probably by reducing the activation energy of Fe(III) (TPPS) and raising the reactivity of the iron ion catalytic center, thereby improving the catalytic efficiency. One milligram of Fe(III) (TPPS) catalyst can be reused three times for the oxidation reaction to yield an average of 22.9 mol% of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  7. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  8. Iron-57 and iridium-193 Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of supported iron-iridium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Jobson, S.

    1988-01-01

    57 Fe and 193 Ir Moessbauer spectroscopy shows that silica- and alumina-supported iron-iridium catalysts formed by calcination in air contain mixtures of small particle iron(III) oxide and iridium(IV) oxide. The iridium dioxide in both supported catalysts is reduced in hydrogen to metallic iridium. The α-Fe 2 O 3 in the silica supported materials is predominantly reduced in hydrogen to an iron-iridium alloy whilst in the alumina-supported catalyst the iron is stabilised by treatment in hydrogen as iron(II). Treatment of a hydrogen-reduced silica-supported iron catalyst in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is accompanied by the formation of iron carbides. Carbide formation is not observed when the iron-iridium catalysts are treated in similar atmospheres. The results from the bimetallic catalysts are discussed in terms of the hydrogenation of associatively adsorbed carbon monoxide and the selectivity of supported iron-iridium catalysts to methanol formation. (orig.)

  9. Iron Deficiency Anaemia in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Pathophysiology and Effect of Oral versus Intravenous Iron Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhossain A. Khalafallah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA is the most common disorder in the world, affecting more than two billion people. The World Health Organization’s global database on anaemia has estimated a prevalence of 14% based on a regression-based analysis. Recent data show that the prevalence of IDA in pregnant women in industrialized countries is 17.4% while the incidence of IDA in developing countries increases significantly up to 56%. Although oral iron supplementation is widely used for the treatment of IDA, not all patients respond adequately to oral iron therapy. This is due to several factors including the side effects of oral iron which lead to poor compliance and lack of efficacy. The side effects, predominantly gastrointestinal discomfort, occur in a large cohort of patients taking oral iron preparations. Previously, the use of intravenous iron had been associated with undesirable and sometimes serious side effects and therefore was underutilised. However, in recent years, new type II and III iron complexes have been developed, which offer better compliance and toleration as well as high efficacy with a good safety profile. In summary, intravenous iron can be used safely for a rapid repletion of iron stores and correction of anaemia during and after pregnancy.

  10. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  11. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...

  12. Reactive oxygen species and associated reactivity of peroxymonosulfate activated by soluble iron species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J; Yu, Miao; Teel, Amy L

    2017-10-01

    The activation of peroxymonosulfate by iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) was compared using nitrobenzene as a hydroxyl radical probe, anisole as a hydroxyl radical+sulfate radical probe, and hexachloroethane as a reductant+nucleophile probe. In addition, activated peroxymonosulfate was investigated for the treatment of the model groundwater contaminants perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The relative activities of hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical in the degradation of the probe compounds and PCE and TCE were isolated using the radical scavengers tert-butanol and isopropanol. Iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA effectively activated peroxymonosulfate to generate hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical, but only a minimal flux of reductants or nucleophiles. Iron (III)-EDTA was a more effective activator than iron (II) and iron (III), and also provided a non-hydroxyl radical, non-sulfate radical degradation pathway. The contribution of sulfate radical relative to hydroxyl radical followed the order of anisole>TCE>PCE >nitrobenzene; i.e., sulfate radical was less dominant in the oxidation of more oxidized target compounds. Sulfate radical is often assumed to be the primary oxidant in activated peroxymonosulfate and persulfate systems, but the results of this research demonstrate that the reactivity of sulfate radical with the target compound must be considered before drawing such a conclusion. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Reactive oxygen species and associated reactivity of peroxymonosulfate activated by soluble iron species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J.; Yu, Miao; Teel, Amy L.

    2017-10-01

    The activation of peroxymonosulfate by iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) was compared using nitrobenzene as a hydroxyl radical probe, anisole as a hydroxyl radical + sulfate radical probe, and hexachloroethane as a reductant + nucleophile probe. In addition, activated peroxymonosulfate was investigated for the treatment of the model groundwater contaminants perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The relative activities of hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical in the degradation of the probe compounds and PCE and TCE were isolated using the radical scavengers tert-butanol and isopropanol. Iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA effectively activated peroxymonosulfate to generate hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical, but only a minimal flux of reductants or nucleophiles. Iron (III)-EDTA was a more effective activator than iron (II) and iron (III), and also provided a non-hydroxyl radical, non-sulfate radical degradation pathway. The contribution of sulfate radical relative to hydroxyl radical followed the order of anisole > > TCE > PCE > > nitrobenzene; i.e., sulfate radical was less dominant in the oxidation of more oxidized target compounds. Sulfate radical is often assumed to be the primary oxidant in activated peroxymonosulfate and persulfate systems, but the results of this research demonstrate that the reactivity of sulfate radical with the target compound must be considered before drawing such a conclusion.

  14. Iron Coordination and Halogen-Bonding Assisted Iodosylbenzene Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Poulsen de Sousa, David; McKenzie, Christine

    catalytic mixtures using soluble terminal oxygen transfer agents. Isolation of a reactive iron-terminal oxidant adduct, an unique Fe(III)-OIPh complex, is facilitated by strong stabilizing supramolecular halogen-bonding. L3-edge XANES suggests +1.6 for the average oxidation state for the iodine atom3......The iron complex of the hexadentate ligand N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylendiamine-N'-acetate (tpena) efficiently catalyzes selective oxidations of electron-rich olefins and sulfides by insoluble iodosylbenzene (PhIO). Surprisingly, these reactions are faster and more selective than homogenous...... in the iron(III)-coordinated PhIO. This represents a reduction of iodine relative to the original “hypervalent” (+3) PhIO. The equivalent of electron density must be removed from the {(tpena)Fe(III)O} moiety, however Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the iron atom is not high valent....

  15. Characterization and quantification of racemic and meso-ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenylacetic) acid/iron (III) by ion-pair ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detector and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasone, Alessandro; Cianci, Giusto; Di Tommaso, Donata; Piaggesi, Alberto; Tagliavini, Emilio; Galletti, Paola; Moretti, Fabio

    2013-03-22

    EDDHSA/Fe is a promising substitute of EDDHA/Fe to fight iron chlorosis. o,o-EDDHSA structure contains two chiral carbons giving the racemic and meso couples of stereoisomers. Ion-pair HPLC and UHPLC-UV/Vis-ESI-MS/MS methods were developed for the determination of racemic and meso-o,o-EDDHSA/Fe in commercial samples of chelates. The lack of a commercial EDDHSA standard was overcome by sulfonation of a commercial available o,o-EDDHA standard and subsequent quantification by (1)H-NMR. Assignment of configurations was carried out starting from racemic and meso-o,o-EDDHA/Fe by direct sulfonation to give the corresponding o,o-EDDHSA/Fe isomers. The performances of these methods were assessed in terms of intra and inter-day precision, linearity and selectivity. The high selectivity and lower detection limit (nanomolar) of the UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method could allow to deepen the knowledge relative to meso and rac-o,o-EDDHSA/Fe interactions with plants, its fate in different soil conditions, its mobility and other environmental aspects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Solar degradation of 5-amino-6-methyl-2-benzimidazolone by TiO2 and iron(III) catalyst with H2O2 and O2 as electron acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarria, Victor; Peringer, Paul; Caceres, Julia; Blanco, Julian; Malato, Sixto; Pulgarin, Cesar

    2004-01-01

    Wastewater containing mainly 5-amino-6-methyl-2-benzimidazolone (AMBI), used in the manufacture of dyes, was characterized as bio-recalcitrant by means of different biodegradability tests. In order to enhance the biodegradability of this important pollutant, solar photocatalytic degradation methods were explored. The systems light/TiO 2 /O 2 , light/TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 , light/Fe 3+ /O 2 and light/Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 were compared under direct sunlight at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (Spain), using a Compound Parabolic Collector (CPC). The iron photo-assisted systems exhibited the most interesting behaviour, from the kinetic and engineering points of view, especially if their combination (as pre-treatment) with a biological process is considered. To compare the efficiency of these systems, the evolution of the following parameters were studied: (a) the dissolved organic carbon and initial compound concentration, (b) the toxicity, and (c) the biodegradability of treated solution. At lab scale, using a solar lamp, the degradation rate of the system light/Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 was two times higher than the system light/Fe 3+ /O 2 but this last system does not need H 2 O 2 addition, improving the economical requirements of the system

  17. Mercury methylation coupled to iron reduction by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Youbin; Zou, Yan; Liu, Xiaohong; Si, Xiongyuan; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-03-01

    Iron reduction and mercury methylation by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB), Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella oneidensis, were studied, and the relationship of mercury methylation coupled to iron reduction was determined. The ability of both bacteria for reducing iron was tested, and Fe(III) reduction occurred with the highest rate when ferric oxyhydroxide was used as a terminal electron acceptor. G. sulfurreducens had proven to mediate the production of methylmercury (MeHg), and a notable increase of MeHg following the addition of inorganic Hg was observed. When the initial concentration of HgCl2 was 500nM, about 177.03nM of MeHg was determined at 8d after G. sulfurreducens inoculation. S. oneidensis was tested negligible for Hg methylation and only 12.06nM of MeHg was determined. Iron reduction could potentially influence Hg methylation rates. The increase in MeHg was consistent with high rate of iron reduction, indicating that Fe(III) reduction stimulated the formation of MeHg. Furthermore, the net MeHg concentration increased at low Fe(III) additions from 1.78 to 3.57mM, and then decreased when the added Fe(III) was high from 7.14 to 17.85mM. The mercury methylation rate was suppressed with high Fe(III) additions, which might have been attributable to mercury complexation and low availability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  20. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ... iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  4. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  5. Effect of iron containing supplements on rats' dental caries progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Ar; Kowsari-Isfahan, R; Rezaiefar, M; Razavi, M; Zeighami, S

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common form of malnutrition in developing countries. Iron containing supplements have been used effectively to solve this problem. In children, because of teeth staining after taking iron drops, parents have the idea that iron drops are the cause of tooth decay; therefore, they limit this vital supplement in their children's diet. Hereby, we evaluate the histologic effect of iron containing supplements on tooth caries in rice rats with cariogenic or non-cariogenic diet. Twelve rats were selected and divided into four groups for this interventional experimental study. Four different types of dietary regimens were used for four months; group A, cariogenic diet with iron containing supplements; group B, cariogenic diet without iron containing supplements; group C, non-cariogenic diet with iron containing supplements; group D, non-cariogenic diet without iron containing supplements. After sacrificing the rats, 20-micron histological sections of their posterior teeth were prepared using the Ground Section method, then they were studied under polarized light microscopy. In order to compare the progression of caries in different samples, the depth of the lesions in the enamel was measured as three grades I, II and III. The mean grade value of A, B, C and D groups were 1.61, 2.61, 1.37 and 1.80, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that significantly fewer caries were seen in the group which had received iron containing supplements and cariogenic diet compared with cariogenic diet without iron supplements (pcariogenic dietary regimen.

  6. Nano-structured iron(III)–cerium(IV) mixed oxide: Synthesis, characterization and arsenic sorption kinetics in the presence of co-existing ions aiming to apply for high arsenic groundwater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Tina; Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.in

    2013-10-15

    Here, we aim to develop an efficient material by eco-friendly green synthetic route that was characterized to be nano-structured. The thermal stability of the sample was well established from the consistent particle size at different temperature and also, from differential thermal analysis. The bimetal mixed oxide contained agglomerated crystalline nano-particles of dimension 10-20 nm, and its empirical composition as FeCe{sub 1.1}O{sub 7.6}. The surface area ( m{sup 2}g{sup -1}), pore volume ( cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}) and maximum pore width (nm) obtained from BET analysis were found to be 104, 0.1316 and 5.68 respectively. Use of this material for estimating arsenic sorption kinetics in presence of some groundwater occurring ions revealed that the pseudo-second order kinetic model is unambiguously the best fit option to describe the nature of the reactions. Groundwater occurring ions exhibit a notable decrease of As(V)-sorption capacity (no other ion > chloride ∼ silicate > sulfate > bicarbonate > phosphate). However, As(III)-sorption capacity of the bimetal mixed oxide was nominally influenced by the presence of the above ions in the reaction system. Rate determining step of arsenic sorption reactions was confirmed to be a multistage process in the presence of the above ions at pH ∼ 7.0 and 30 °C.

  7. Nano-structured iron(III)–cerium(IV) mixed oxide: Synthesis, characterization and arsenic sorption kinetics in the presence of co-existing ions aiming to apply for high arsenic groundwater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Tina; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2013-01-01

    Here, we aim to develop an efficient material by eco-friendly green synthetic route that was characterized to be nano-structured. The thermal stability of the sample was well established from the consistent particle size at different temperature and also, from differential thermal analysis. The bimetal mixed oxide contained agglomerated crystalline nano-particles of dimension 10-20 nm, and its empirical composition as FeCe 1.1 O 7.6 . The surface area ( m 2 g -1 ), pore volume ( cm 3 g -1 ) and maximum pore width (nm) obtained from BET analysis were found to be 104, 0.1316 and 5.68 respectively. Use of this material for estimating arsenic sorption kinetics in presence of some groundwater occurring ions revealed that the pseudo-second order kinetic model is unambiguously the best fit option to describe the nature of the reactions. Groundwater occurring ions exhibit a notable decrease of As(V)-sorption capacity (no other ion > chloride ∼ silicate > sulfate > bicarbonate > phosphate). However, As(III)-sorption capacity of the bimetal mixed oxide was nominally influenced by the presence of the above ions in the reaction system. Rate determining step of arsenic sorption reactions was confirmed to be a multistage process in the presence of the above ions at pH ∼ 7.0 and 30 °C.

  8. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  9. Fenton-like chemistry in water: Oxidation catalysis by Fe(III) and H2O2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, B.; Buda, F.; Baerends, E.J.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of active intermediates from the Fenton-like reagent (a mixture of iron(III) ions and hydrogen peroxide) in aqueous solution has been investigated using static DFT calculations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. We show the spontaneous formation of the iron(III)

  10. Iron minerals formed by dissimilatory iron-and sulfur reducing bacteria studied by Moessbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Nazarova, K. A.; Koksharov, Yu. A.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Greneche, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Zero-field and in-field Moessbauer investigations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements to follow the kinetics of the iron mineral formation by thermophilic dissimilatory anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (strain Z-0001) and anaerobic alkaliphilic bacteria (strain Z-0531) were carried out.

  11. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Various Methods of Iron Deficiency Prevention in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.А. Bielykh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of various methods of iron deficiency prevention in infants. Materials and Methods. Within 30-cluster regional epidemiological study on the prevalence of iodine and iron deficiency in children, we have analyzed the results of screening for anemia in 948 children, carried out questioning of mothers, determined the concentration of iron in breast milk. The effectiveness of preventive measures was assessed by indicators of iron supplementation of the body in 96 children depending on the existing method of iron prophylaxis. Results of the Study. It was found that the use by mother during lactation of iron-containing vitamin-mineral complexes had no effect on the iron content in breast milk. It is proved that administration of iron (III hydroxide polymaltose complex 1 mg/kg/day for 2 months is the most effective way to prevent iron deficiency in children who are exclusively breastfed.

  12. The iron-chelate transporter OsYSL9 plays a role in iron distribution in developing rice grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoura, Takeshi; Sakashita, Emi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Takahashi, Michiko; Aung, May Sann; Masuda, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2017-11-01

    Rice OsYSL9 is a novel transporter for Fe(II)-nicotianamine and Fe(III)-deoxymugineic acid that is responsible for internal iron transport, especially from endosperm to embryo in developing seeds. Metal chelators are essential for safe and efficient metal translocation in plants. Graminaceous plants utilize specific ferric iron chelators, mugineic acid family phytosiderophores, to take up sparingly soluble iron from the soil. Yellow Stripe 1-Like (YSL) family transporters are responsible for transport of metal-phytosiderophores and structurally similar metal-nicotianamine complexes. Among the rice YSL family members (OsYSL) whose functions have not yet been clarified, OsYSL9 belongs to an uncharacterized subgroup containing highly conserved homologs in graminaceous species. In the present report, we showed that OsYSL9 localizes mainly to the plasma membrane and transports both iron(II)-nicotianamine and iron(III)-deoxymugineic acid into the cell. Expression of OsYSL9 was induced in the roots but repressed in the nonjuvenile leaves in response to iron deficiency. In iron-deficient roots, OsYSL9 was induced in the vascular cylinder but not in epidermal cells. Although OsYSL9-knockdown plants did not show a growth defect under iron-sufficient conditions, these plants were more sensitive to iron deficiency in the nonjuvenile stage compared with non-transgenic plants. At the grain-filling stage, OsYSL9 expression was strongly and transiently induced in the scutellum of the embryo and in endosperm cells surrounding the embryo. The iron concentration was decreased in embryos of OsYSL9-knockdown plants but was increased in residual parts of brown seeds. These results suggested that OsYSL9 is involved in iron translocation within plant parts and particularly iron translocation from endosperm to embryo in developing seeds.

  13. Studies on effect of Microbial Iron Chelators on Candida Albican

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehmani, Fouzia S.; Milicent, S.; Zaheer-Uddin

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential for the life of all microbe cells. It generally exists in the oxidized form Fe(III). Even under anaerobic reducing condition the metal appear to be taken up as Fe(III). Thus free-living microorganisms require specific and effective ferric ion transport system to cope with low availability of the metal. In iron deficient environment they produce a low molecular weight specific chelators called siderphores or microbial iron chelators. Siderphores compete for limited supplied of iron. These compounds came out of the cell but can not re-enter without iron due to high affinity of these siderphores often have more than one catechol/hydroxamate functions and are multidentate (usually hexadentate ligands). The aim of the present research is to check the effect of iron chelators, namely gallic acid and salisyl hydroxamate on the growth of Candida albican in vitro. C. albican is the opportunistic paltogen present as the normal flora inside human body. In vivo the growth of C. albican is distributed by the use of antibiotics and immuno suppressers. In cases of iron over-dosage in human being, the patients are treated with certain a-iron chelators. Hence an attempt is made to notice the effect that might be inhibition or enhancement of the organism in vitro. (author)

  14. Iron transport and storage in the coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Andrej; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for all living organisms due to its ubiquitous role in redox and other enzymes, especially in the context of respiration and photosynthesis. The iron uptake and storage systems of terrestrial/higher plants are now reasonably well understood with two basic strategies for iron uptake being distinguished: strategy I plants use a mechanism involving soil acidification and induction of Fe(III)-chelate reductase (ferrireductase) and Fe(II) transporter proteins while strategy II plants have evolved sophisticated systems based on high-affinity, iron specific, binding compounds called phytosiderophores. In contrast, there is little knowledge about the corresponding systems in marine plant-like lineages. Herein we report a study of the iron uptake and storage mechanisms in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Short term radio-iron uptake studies indicate that iron is taken up by Emiliania in a time and concentration dependent manner consistent with an active transport process. Based on inhibitor studies it appears that iron is taken up directly as Fe(iii). However if a reductive step is involved the Fe(II) must not be accessible to the external environment. Upon long term exposure to (57)Fe we have been able, using a combination of Mössbauer and XAS spectroscopies, to identify a single metabolite which displays spectral features similar to the phosphorus-rich mineral core of bacterial and plant ferritins.

  15. Variation and inheritance of iron reductase activity in the roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and association with seed iron accumulation QTL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; Knewtson, Sharon Jb; Astudillo, Carolina; Li, Chee-Ming; Fernandez, Andrea C; Grusak, Michael A

    2010-10-05

    Iron deficiency anemia is a global problem which often affects women and children of developing countries. Strategy I plants, such as common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) take up iron through a process that involves an iron reduction mechanism in their roots; this reduction is required to convert ferric iron to ferrous iron. Root absorbed iron is critical for the iron nutrition of the plant, and for the delivery of iron to the shoot and ultimately the seeds. The objectives of this study were to determine the variability and inheritance for iron reductase activity in a range of genotypes and in a low × high seed iron cross (DOR364 x G19833), to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for this trait, and to assess possible associations with seed iron levels. The experiments were carried out with hydroponically grown plants provided different amounts of iron varying between 0 and 20 μM Fe(III)-EDDHA. The parents, DOR364 and G19833, plus 13 other cultivated or wild beans, were found to differ in iron reductase activity. Based on these initial experiments, two growth conditions (iron limited and iron sufficient) were selected as treatments for evaluating the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred lines. A single major QTL was found for iron reductase activity under iron-limited conditions (1 μM Fe) on linkage group b02 and another major QTL was found under iron sufficient conditions (15 μM Fe) on linkage group b11. Associations between the b11 QTL were found with several QTL for seed iron. Genes conditioning iron reductase activity in iron sufficient bean plants appear to be associated with genes contributing to seed iron accumulation. Markers for bean iron reductase (FRO) homologues were found with in silico mapping based on common bean synteny with soybean and Medicago truncatula on b06 and b07; however, neither locus aligned with the QTL for iron reductase activity. In summary, the QTL for iron reductase activity under iron limited conditions may be useful in

  16. Variation and inheritance of iron reductase activity in the roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and association with seed iron accumulation QTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Andrea C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anemia is a global problem which often affects women and children of developing countries. Strategy I plants, such as common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. take up iron through a process that involves an iron reduction mechanism in their roots; this reduction is required to convert ferric iron to ferrous iron. Root absorbed iron is critical for the iron nutrition of the plant, and for the delivery of iron to the shoot and ultimately the seeds. The objectives of this study were to determine the variability and inheritance for iron reductase activity in a range of genotypes and in a low × high seed iron cross (DOR364 × G19833, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for this trait, and to assess possible associations with seed iron levels. Results The experiments were carried out with hydroponically grown plants provided different amounts of iron varying between 0 and 20 μM Fe(III-EDDHA. The parents, DOR364 and G19833, plus 13 other cultivated or wild beans, were found to differ in iron reductase activity. Based on these initial experiments, two growth conditions (iron limited and iron sufficient were selected as treatments for evaluating the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred lines. A single major QTL was found for iron reductase activity under iron-limited conditions (1 μM Fe on linkage group b02 and another major QTL was found under iron sufficient conditions (15 μM Fe on linkage group b11. Associations between the b11 QTL were found with several QTL for seed iron. Conclusions Genes conditioning iron reductase activity in iron sufficient bean plants appear to be associated with genes contributing to seed iron accumulation. Markers for bean iron reductase (FRO homologues were found with in silico mapping based on common bean synteny with soybean and Medicago truncatula on b06 and b07; however, neither locus aligned with the QTL for iron reductase activity. In summary, the QTL for iron reductase activity

  17. [Effects of iron on azoreduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing-Juan; Xu, Mei-Ying; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The effects of soluble and insoluble Fe(III) on anaerobic azoreduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12 were examined in a series of experiments. Results showed that the effects of iron on anaerobic azoreduction depended on the solubility and concentration of the compounds. Azoreduction was inhibited by insoluble Fe(III) and 0.05-2 mmol/L Fe2 O3 all decelerated the azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth, but the increase in the concentrations of Fe2O3 did not cause an increasing inhibition. Soluble Fe(III) of which concentration less than 0.4 mmol/L enhanced azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth but there was no linear relationship between the concentration of soluble Fe(III) and azoreduction activity. Soluble Fe(III) of which concentration more than 1 mmol/L inhibited azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth and an increasing concentration resulted in an increased inhibition. The inhibition was strengthened under the conditions of limited electron donor. On the other hand, soluble Fe(III) and Fe(II) could relieve the inhibition of azoreduction by dicumarol which blocked quinone cycle. It suggests that in addition to quinone cycle, there is a Fe(III) Fe(II) cycle shuttling electrons in cytoplasmic and periplasmic environment. That is the reason why low concentration of soluble Fe(III) or Fe (II) can enhance azoreduction of S. decolorationis S12. It also indicates that insoluble Fe(III) and high concentration of soluble Fe(III) do compete with azo dye for electrons once it acts as electron acceptor. Thus, when iron and azo dye coexisted, iron could serve as an electron transfer agent or electron competitive inhibitor for anaerobic azoreduction under different conditions. High efficiency of azoreduction can be achieved through controlling the solubility and concentration of irons.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

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  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  14. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  15. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron ...

  3. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  4. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND IRON-DEFICIENT ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Melnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 62 chronic heart failure (CHF patients with iron-deficient anemia (IDA were studied. Standard CHF therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides was accompanied with the correction of iron deficiency by intravenous injection of Venofer and subsequent Ferro-Folgamma prescription (average daily dose of iron 137,75±5mg. After treatment serum iron level increased by 95,5% and hemoglobin level – by 9,8%. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 32,2% and physical activity tolerance – by 47,6%. Before treatment 32 CHF patients with IDA (51,6% had III functional class (FC of CHF according to NYHA and 16 patients (25,8% – IV FC. After treatment I FC was observed in 18 CHF patients (29%, II FC – in 26 patients and only 18 patients demonstrated III FC of CHF.

  5. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND IRON-DEFICIENT ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Melnik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available 62 chronic heart failure (CHF patients with iron-deficient anemia (IDA were studied. Standard CHF therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides was accompanied with the correction of iron deficiency by intravenous injection of Venofer and subsequent Ferro-Folgamma prescription (average daily dose of iron 137,75±5mg. After treatment serum iron level increased by 95,5% and hemoglobin level – by 9,8%. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 32,2% and physical activity tolerance – by 47,6%. Before treatment 32 CHF patients with IDA (51,6% had III functional class (FC of CHF according to NYHA and 16 patients (25,8% – IV FC. After treatment I FC was observed in 18 CHF patients (29%, II FC – in 26 patients and only 18 patients demonstrated III FC of CHF.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  13. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  14. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  15. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding or other abnormalities, such as growths or cancer of the lining of the colon. For this test, a ... that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  18. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  7. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency isn't corrected, it can lead to iron-deficiency anemia (a decrease in the number of red blood ... Parents Kids Teens Anemia Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegetarianism Menstrual Problems Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ... cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  10. Genomic insights into microbial iron oxidation and iron uptake strategies in extremely acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S

    2012-07-01

    This minireview presents recent advances in our understanding of iron oxidation and homeostasis in acidophilic Bacteria and Archaea. These processes influence the flux of metals and nutrients in pristine and man-made acidic environments such as acid mine drainage and industrial bioleaching operations. Acidophiles are also being studied to understand life in extreme conditions and their role in the generation of biomarkers used in the search for evidence of existing or past extra-terrestrial life. Iron oxidation in acidophiles is best understood in the model organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, recent functional genomic analysis of acidophiles is leading to a deeper appreciation of the diversity of acidophilic iron-oxidizing pathways. Although it is too early to paint a detailed picture of the role played by lateral gene transfer in the evolution of iron oxidation, emerging evidence tends to support the view that iron oxidation arose independently more than once in evolution. Acidic environments are generally rich in soluble iron and extreme acidophiles (e.g. the Leptospirillum genus) have considerably fewer iron uptake systems compared with neutrophiles. However, some acidophiles have been shown to grow as high as pH 6 and, in the case of the Acidithiobacillus genus, to have multiple iron uptake systems. This could be an adaption allowing them to respond to different iron concentrations via the use of a multiplicity of different siderophores. Both Leptospirillum spp. and Acidithiobacillus spp. are predicted to synthesize the acid stable citrate siderophore for Fe(III) uptake. In addition, both groups have predicted receptors for siderophores produced by other microorganisms, suggesting that competition for iron occurs influencing the ecophysiology of acidic environments. Little is known about the genetic regulation of iron oxidation and iron uptake in acidophiles, especially how the use of iron as an energy source is balanced with its need to take up

  11. On iron radionuclide interactions and in situ measurement of iron corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puranen, A.; Jonsson, M.; Cui, D.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In performance assessments of hard rock repositories, it is conservatively assumed that waste canisters are breached and that the spent fuel will get into contact with groundwater after 1000 years. When the canister eventually fails to protect HLW from groundwater, dissolved radionuclides from HLW will react with iron canister materials. The reactivity will depend on the conditions in solution and at the iron-water interface. To improve our understanding on the redox chemistry at near field conditions, batch experiments are conducted by contacting polished iron foils with a synthetic groundwater solution containing 10 mM NaCl, 2 mM NaHCO 3 and 5 ppm Se(IV), Se(VI), Tc(VII) and U(VI) in a glove box filled with Ar + 0.03% CO 2 gas mixture. The reaction rates are measured by analysing Se, Tc and U concentrations by ICP-MS. Iron corrosion products formed during the reaction(s) is monitored in-situ by a Layer Raman spectrometer through an optical window. The corrosion potential of the iron foil as well as the Eh and pH values of the bulk solution are recorded continuously during the experiment. The reacted iron foil is embedded with EPOXY resin, and the cross section will be analysed by SEM-EDS and XAS. The preliminary experimental results shows that with the formation of iron green rust FeII 4 FeIII 2 (OH) 12 CO 3 on iron foil, the rates of redox reactions between iron and the negatively charged radionuclides species are increased. The observation is explained by the fact that radionuclide anionic species can be first adsorbed then reduced on the positively charged outer surface of iron green rust. The positive charge is a result of the electrical balance of the negative charges of carbonate contained between the layered iron hydroxides in the green rust. Reduced forms of radionuclides are identified in the iron corrosion products. The results suggest that the formation of iron green rust as a corrosion product on the surface of iron

  12. Absorption of iron in the aged; investigation of mucosal-uptake, mucosal-transfer and retention of a physiological dose of inorganic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, J.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Iron (II) and iron (III) uptake by the mucosal cells, the retention in the body, and the mucosal-transport fraction were studied in 40 healthy people over 65 years old, in 30 young adults and in 20 patients with iron-deficiency. The study was performed with 59 Fe as a tracer and 51 Cr as an inert indicator. The radioactivity was measured with a whole body scanner 24 hours and 24 days after ingestion

  13. Accumulation and distribution of iron, cadmium, lead and nickel in cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing two different chelated iron supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csog, Árpád; Mihucz, Victor G; Tatár, Eniko; Fodor, Ferenc; Virág, István; Majdik, Cornelia; Záray, Gyula

    2011-07-01

    Cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II), and iron supplied as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations, were investigated by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with special emphasis on the determination of iron accumulation and distribution within the different plant compartments (root, stem, cotyledon and leaves). The extent of Cd, Ni and Pb accumulation and distribution were also determined. Generally, iron and heavy-metal contaminant accumulation was higher when Fe(III) citrate was used. The accumulation of nickel and lead was higher by about 20% and 100%, respectively, if the iron supply was Fe(III) citrate. The accumulation of Cd was similar. In the case of Fe(III) citrate, the total amounts of Fe taken up were similar in the control and heavy-metal-treated plants (27-31 μmol/plant). Further, the amounts of iron transported from the root towards the shoot of the control, lead- and nickel-contaminated plants were independent of the iron(III) form. Although Fe mobility could be characterized as being low, its distribution within the shoot was not significantly affected by the heavy metals investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of dust alkalinity in acid mobilization of iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ito

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by acid gases (e.g., SO2, HNO3, N2O5, and HCl may play a key role in the transformation of insoluble iron (Fe in the oxidized or ferric (III form to soluble forms (e.g., Fe(II, inorganic soluble species of Fe(III, and organic complexes of iron. On the other hand, mineral dust particles have a potential of neutralizing the acidic species due to the alkaline buffer ability of carbonate minerals (e.g., CaCO3 and MgCO3. Here we demonstrate the impact of dust alkalinity on the acid mobilization of iron in a three-dimensional aerosol chemistry transport model that includes a mineral dissolution scheme. In our model simulations, most of the alkaline dust minerals cannot be entirely consumed by inorganic acids during the transport across the North Pacific Ocean. As a result, the inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during the long-range transport to the North Pacific Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2% dissolves from hematite in the coarse-mode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. On the other hand, a significant fraction of iron (1–2% dissolves in the fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model quantitatively reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles as suggested by measurements over the Pacific Ocean. It implies that the buffering effect of alkaline content in dust aerosols might help to explain the inverse relationship between aerosol iron solubility and particle size. We also demonstrate that the iron solubility is sensitive to the chemical specification of iron-containing minerals in dust. Compared with the dust sources, soluble iron from combustion sources contributes to a relatively marginal effect for deposition of soluble iron over the North

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III-piperazine-derived complexes encapsulated in zeolite Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio E. Berezuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite-encapsulated complexes have been widely applied in hydrocarbon oxidation catalysis. The "ship-in-a-bottle" encapsulation of iron(III complexes containing piperazine and piperazine-derivative ligands in zeolite-Y is described. The flexible ligand methodology was employed and the efficiency and reproducibility of the procedure was investigated. The catalysts were characterized employing several techniques and the results indicate the presence of coordinated and uncoordinated iron(III ions inside and outside the zeolitic cage.

  16. Role of dust alkalinity in acid mobilization of iron

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ito; Y. Feng

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by acid gases (e.g., SO2, HNO3, N2O5, and HCl) may play a key role in the transformation of insoluble iron (Fe in the oxidized or ferric (III) form) to soluble forms (e.g., Fe(II), inorganic soluble species of Fe(III), and organic complexes of iron). On the other hand, mineral dust particles have a potential of neutralizing the acidic species due to the alkali...

  17. An Empirical Ultraviolet Iron Spectrum Template Applicable to Active Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Wilkes, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Iron emission is often a severe contaminant in optical-ultraviolet spectra of active galaxies. Its presence complicates emission line studies. A viable solution, already successfully applied at optical wavelengths, is to use an empirical iron emission template. We have generated FeII and Fe......III templates for ultraviolet active galaxy spectra based on HST archival 1100 - 3100 A spectra of IZw1. Their application allows fitting and subtraction of the iron emission in active galaxy spectra. This work has shown that in particular CIII] lambda 1909 can be heavily contaminated by other line emission...

  18. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  19. Adrenaline and triiodothyronine modify the iron handling in the freshwater air-breathing fish Anabas testudineus Bloch: role of ferric reductase in iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejitha, V; Peter, M C Subhash

    2013-01-15

    The effects of in vivo adrenaline and triiodothyronine (T(3)) on ferric reductase (FR) activity, a membrane-bound enzyme that reduces Fe(III) to Fe(II) iron, were studied in the organs of climbing perch (Anabas testudineus Bloch). Adrenaline injection (10 ng g(-1)) for 30 min produced significant inhibition of FR activity in the liver and kidney and that suggests a role for this stress hormone in iron acquisition in this fish. Short-term T(3) injection (40 ng g(-1)) reduced FR activity in the gills of fed fish but not in the unfed fish. Similar reduction of FR activity was also obtained in the intestine and kidney of fed fish after T(3) injection. Feeding produced pronounced decline in FR activity in the spleen but T(3) challenge in fed and unfed fish increased its activity in this iron storing organ and that point to the sensitivity of FR system to feeding activity. The in vitro effects of Fe on FR activity in the gill explants of freshwater fish showed correlations of FR with Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and H(+)-ATPase activities. Substantial increase in the FR activity was found in the gill explants incubated with all the tested doses of Fe(II) iron (1.80, 3.59 and 7.18 μM) and Fe(III) iron (1.25, 2.51 and 5.02 μM) and this indicate that FR and Na pump activity are positively correlated. On the contrary, substantial reduction of gill H(+)-ATPase activity was found in the gill explants incubated with Fe(II) iron and Fe(III) iron indicating that perch gills may not require a high acidic microenvironment for the reduction of Fe(III) iron. Accumulation of iron in the gill explants after Fe(III) iron incubation implies a direct relationship between Fe acquisition and FR activity in this tissue. The inverse correlation between FR activity and H(+)-ATPase activity in Fe(II) or Fe(III) loaded gills and the significant positive correlations of FR activity with total [Fe] content in the Fe(III) loaded gills substantiate that FR which shows sensitivity to sodium and proton pumps

  20. Short on long iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polczer, S.

    2000-12-01

    Industry experts agree that without the ability to explore the deeper horizons of North America's supply basins the growing demand for natural gas, which is expected to reach 30 Tcf per year in the United States alone by 2010, will not be reached. At the same time, a recent survey of drilling equipment in Western Canada determined that only 134 rigs were able to drill deeper than 3,050 metres or 9,000 feet, and those able to drill to over 10,000 feet number less than two dozen. Consequently, the lack of 'deeper iron' is limiting exploration in the Deep Basin and the Alberta Foothills. With world natural gas prices close to $8 per gigajoule, and oil prices holding firm at around US$30 per barrel, several drilling companies have come to the conclusion that it is time to increase the depth capacity of their rigs. Accordingly, AKITA/EQUTAK, Bonus, Tekonta, and Command Drilling Corporation, among others, have new rigs rated at 4,000 metres (about 15,000 feet) under construction, with more to come later. Service rig construction is also struggling to keep pace as indicated by Treeline Well Services Inc.'s recent announcement of the completion of its second Class III mobile double-triple service rig rated to 3,700 metres with a 5,000 psi circulating system. This service rig features a 107-foot mast rated to 220,000 lbs, compared to the 96 feet of most double-triple. The extra height gives it a range of versatility to work deeper holes in addition to medium ones. The rig is expected to see extensive service in the gas-prone regions of central Alberta west of Red Deer and Edmonton. 6 photos.