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Sample records for iron doped babal

  1. Ferromagnetic properties of manganese doped iron silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Reyes, Angel; Fonseca, Luis F.; Sabirianov, Renat

    We report the synthesis of high quality Iron silicide (FeSi) nanowires via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The materials exhibits excellent magnetic response at room temperature, especially when doped with manganese showing values of 2.0 X 10-04 emu for the FexMnySi nanowires. SEM and TEM characterization indicates that the synthesized nanowires have a diameter of approximately 80nm. MFM measurements present a clear description of the magnetic domains when the nanowires are doped with manganese. Electron Diffraction and XRD measurements confirms that the nanowires are single crystal forming a simple cubic structure with space group P213. First-principle calculations were performed on (111) FeSi surface using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). The exchange correlations were treated under the Ceperley-Alder (CA) local density approximation (LDA). The Brillouin Zone was sampled with 8x8x1 k-point grid. A total magnetic moment of about 10 μB was obtained for three different surface configuration in which the Iron atom nearest to the surface present the higher magnetization. To study the effect of Mn doping, Fe atom was replaced for a Mn. Stronger magnetization is presented when the Mn atom is close to the surface. The exchange coupling constant have been evaluated calculating the energy difference between the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic configurations.

  2. Iron solubility in highly boron-doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugo, S.A.; McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Hurley, D.L.; Weber, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    We have directly measured the solubility of iron in high and low boron-doped silicon using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Iron solubilities were measured at 800, 900, 1000, and 1100thinsp degree C in silicon doped with either 1.5x10 19 or 6.5x10 14 thinspboronthinspatoms/cm 3 . We have measured a greater iron solubility in high boron-doped silicon as compared to low boron-doped silicon, however, the degree of enhancement is lower than anticipated at temperatures >800thinsp degree C. The decreased enhancement is explained by a shift in the iron donor energy level towards the valence band at elevated temperatures. Based on this data, we have calculated the position of the iron donor level in the silicon band gap at elevated temperatures. We incorporate the iron energy level shift in calculations of iron solubility in silicon over a wide range of temperatures and boron-doping levels, providing a means to accurately predict iron segregation between high and low boron-doped silicon. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  3. Effect of iron doping on Y-Ba-Cu-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Halim Shaari; Mansor Hashim; Sidek Hj Abd Aziz; Laily Rafiah Abdullah

    1991-01-01

    Study on the effect of iron doping at different values of doping percentage (0.00< x<0.06) and hence the influence of magnetic iron on Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor has been carried out. The conventional technique of sintering is used in preparing the ceramic materials. The crystal structure and their lattice parameters are determined from X-ray diffraction measurements. Observation on the dependence of resistance on temperature is made between room temperature to the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, using four-probe techniques. Magnetisation properties namely the Meissner Effect is also observed by levitating a small piece of permanent magnet on the cooled sample. The X-ray diffraction data show that the phase transitions have been observed; from orthorhombic to tetragonal when the iron doping exceeded ∼0.02. Transition temperature, Tc decrease from ∼87.7K to ∼83K. Meissner Effect is observed for sample doped up to 2% only

  4. Iron porphyrins doped sol-gel glasses: a chemometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacco, Herica C.; Vidoto, Ednalva A.; Nascimento, Otaciro R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the optimized conditions for preparation of iron porphyrin-template doped silica Fe PDS-template) obtained by the sol-gel process. The following porphyrins (Fe P) were used: Fe TFPP Cl, Fe TDCSPP(Na) 4 Cl and Fe TCPP(Na) 4 Cl. Pyridine or 4-phenylimidazole was used as template. The variables that present significant influence on iron porphyrin loading on xerogel were identified and the values that maximize the iron porphyrin loading on xerogel were established . The variables (Solvent volume, fractional factorial design in two levels, 2 5-1 type, generating 16 total experiments for each Fe P studied. (author)

  5. Iron porphyrins doped sol-gel glasses: a chemometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacco, Herica C.; Vidoto, Ednalva A.; Nascimento, Otaciro R. [Soap Paulo Univ (USP), Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Biazzotto, Juliana C.; Serra, Osvaldo A.; Iamamoto, Yassuko [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Mello, Cesar A.; Oliveira, Daniela C. de [Universidade de Franca , SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the optimized conditions for preparation of iron porphyrin-template doped silica Fe (PDS-template) obtained by the sol-gel process. The following porphyrins (Fe P) were used: Fe TFPP Cl, Fe TDCSPP(Na){sub 4}Cl and Fe TCPP(Na){sub 4} Cl. Pyridine or 4-phenylimidazole was used as template. The variables that present significant influence on iron porphyrin loading on xerogel were identified and the values that maximize the iron porphyrin loading on xerogel were established. The variables Solvent volume, fractional factorial design in two levels, 2{sup 5-1} type, generating 16 total experiments for each Fe P studied. (author)

  6. Characterization of pure and copper-doped iron tartrate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Single crystal growth of pure and copper-doped iron tartrate crystals bearing composition Cu Fe(1−) C4H4O6 · H2O, where = 0, 0.07, 0.06, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, is achieved using gel technique. The elemental analysis has been done using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) spectrum. The characterization studies ...

  7. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  8. Sonochemically synthesized iron-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles: Influence of precursor composition on characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Anirban; Maitra, Saikat; Ghosh, Sobhan; Chakrabarti, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sonochemical synthesis of iron-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles. • Green synthesis without alkali at room temperature. • Characterization by UV–vis spectroscopy, FESEM, XRD and EDX. • Influence of precursor composition on characteristics. • Composition and characteristics are correlated. - Abstract: Iron-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized sonochemically from aqueous acetyl acetonate precursors of different proportions. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized with UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and microscopy. Influences of precursor mixture on the characteristics have been examined and modeled. Linear correlations have been proposed between dopant dosing, extent of doping and band gap energy. Experimental data corroborated with the proposed models.

  9. Influence of iron doping on tetravalent nickel content in catalytic oxygen evolving films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nancy; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Hadt, Ryan G.; Hayes, Dugan; Kempa, Thomas J.; von Cube, Felix; Bell, David C.; Chen, Lin X.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2017-01-30

    Iron doping of nickel oxide films results in enhanced activity for promoting the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Whereas this enhanced activity has been ascribed to a unique iron site within the nickel oxide matrix, we show here that Fe doping influences the Ni valency. The percent of Fe3+ doping promotes the formation of formal Ni4+, which in turn directly correlates with an enhanced activity of the catalyst in promoting OER. The role of Fe3+ is consistent with its behavior as a superior Lewis acid.

  10. Self-assembled Targeting of Cancer Cells by Iron(III)-doped, Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, K.K. Pohaku; Sandoval, S.; Cortes-Mateos, M. J.; Alfaro, J.G.; Kummel, A. C.; Trogler, W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Iron(III)-doped silica nanoshells are shown to possess an in vitro cell-receptor mediated targeting functionality for endocytosis. Compared to plain silica nanoparticles, iron enriched ones are shown to be target-specific, a property that makes them potentially better vehicles for applications, such as drug delivery and tumor imaging, by making them more selective and thereby reducing the nanoparticle dose. Iron(III) in the nanoshells can interact with endogenous transferrin, a serum protein ...

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of Boron-Doped Iron Oxides for the Photocatalytic Degradation of Atrazine under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic degradation of atrazine by boron-doped iron oxides under visible light irradiation was investigated. In this work, boron-doped goethite and hematite were successfully prepared by sol-gel method with trimethylborate as boron precursor. The powders were characterized by XRD, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, and porosimetry analysis. The results showed that boron doping could influence the crystal structure, enlarge the BET surface area, improve light absorption ability, and narrow their band-gap energy. The photocatalytic activity of B-doped iron oxides was evaluated in the degradation of atrazine under the visible light irradiation, and B-doped iron oxides showed higher atrazine degradation rate than that of pristine iron oxides. Particularly, B-doped goethite exhibited better photocatalytic activity than B-doped hematite.

  12. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  13. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  14. Effect of Al doping on phase formation and thermal stability of iron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayal, Akhil [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Gupta, Mukul, E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Pandey, Nidhi [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Gupta, Ajay [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001 (India); Horisberger, Michael [Laboratory for Developments and Methods, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Stahn, Jochen [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-11-25

    In the present work, we systematically studied the effect of Al doping on the phase formation of iron nitride (Fe–N) thin films. Fe–N thin films with different concentration of Al (Al = 0, 2, 3, 6, and 12 at.%) were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering by varying the nitrogen partial pressure between 0 and 100%. The structural and magnetic properties of the films were studied using x-ray diffraction and polarized neutron reflectivity. It was observed that at the lowest doping level (2 at.% of Al), nitrogen rich non-magnetic Fe–N phase gets formed at a lower nitrogen partial pressure as compared to the un-doped sample. Interestingly, we observed that as Al doping is increased beyond 3 at.%, nitrogen rich non-magnetic Fe–N phase appears at higher nitrogen partial pressure as compared to un-doped sample. The thermal stability of films were also investigated. Un-doped Fe–N films deposited at 10% nitrogen partial pressure possess poor thermal stability. Doping of Al at 2 at.% improves it marginally, whereas, for 3, 6 and 12 at.% Al doping, it shows significant improvement. The obtained results have been explained in terms of thermodynamics of Fe–N and Al–N. - Highlights: • Doping effects of Al on Fe–N phase formation is studied. • Phase formation shows a non-monotonic behavior with Al doping. • Low doping levels of Al enhance and high levels retard the nitridation process. • Al doping beyond 3 at.% improve thermal stability of Fe–N films.

  15. Superior lithium adsorption and required magnetic separation behavior of iron-doped lithium ion-sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shulei; Zheng, Shili; Wang, Zheming; Cui, Wenwen; Zhang, Hailin; Yang, Liangrong; Zhang, Yi; Li, Ping

    2018-01-01

    The recent research on adsorption-based lithium recovery from lithium-containing solutions has been centred on adsorption capacity and separation of lithium ion-sieves powder from solutions. Herein, an effective iron-doped lithium titanium oxide (Fe-doped Li2TiO3) was synthesized by Fe-doping via solid state reactions followed by acid treatment to form iron-doped lithium ion-sieves (Fe/Ti-x(H)). The resulting solid powder displays both superior adsorption capacity of lithium and high separation efficiency of the adsorbent from the solutions. SEM imaging and BET surface area measurement results showed that at Fe doping levels x0.15, Fe-doping led to grain shrinkage as compared to Li2TiO3 and at the same time the BET surface area increased. The Fe/Ti-0.15(H) exhibited saturated magnetization values of 13.76 emu g-1, allowing effective separation of the material from solid suspensions through the use of a magnet. Consecutive magnetic separation results suggested that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) powders could be applied at large-scale and continuously removed from LiOH solutions with separation efficiency of 96% or better. Lithium adsorption studies indicated that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of Fe/Ti-0.15(H) in LiOH 2 solutions (1.8 g L-1 Li, pH 12) reached 53.3 mg g-1 within 24 h, which was higher than that of pristine Li2TiO3 (50.5 mg g-1) without Fe doping. Competitive adsorption and regeneration results indicated that the Fe/Ti-0.15(H) possessed a high selectivity for Li with facile regeneration. Therefore, it could be expected that the iron-doped lithium ion-sieves have practical applicability potential for large scale lithium extraction and recovery from lithium-bearing solutions.

  16. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-06-26

    Chromium (Cr) forms a solid solution with iron (Fe) lattice when doped in core-shell iron -iron oxide nanocluster (NC) and shows a mixed phase of sigma (σ) FeCr and bcc Fe. The Cr dopant affects heavily the magnetization and magnetic reversal process, and causes the hysteresis loop to shrink near the zero field axis. Dramatic transformation happens from dipolar interaction (0 at. % Cr) to strong exchange interaction (8 at. % of Cr) is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M plot, and is explained by a water-melon model of core-shell NC system.

  17. Mössbauer studies of iron doped poly(methyl methacrylate) before ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mössbauer studies of iron doped poly(methyl methacrylate) before and after ion beam modification. D R S SOMAYAJULU, C N MURTHY†, D K AWASTHI‡, N V PATEL and M SARKAR. Physics Department, Faculty of Science, MS University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002, India. †Applied Chemistry Department, Faculty ...

  18. Galvanomagnetic properties and electronic structure of iron-doped PbTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skipetrov, E. P., E-mail: skip@mig.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Faculty of Materials Science, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kruleveckaya, O. V.; Skipetrova, L. A. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Knotko, A. V. [Faculty of Materials Science, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E. [Institute of Materials Science Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Chernivtsy 58001 (Ukraine)

    2015-11-21

    We synthesize an iron-doped PbTe single-crystal ingot and investigate the phase composition and distribution of the iron impurity along the ingot as well as galvanomagnetic properties in weak magnetic fields (4.2 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K, B ≤ 0.07 T) of Pb{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}Te alloys. We find microscopic inclusions enriched with iron and regions with a chemical composition close to FeTe in the heavily doped samples, while the iron impurity content in the main phase rises only slightly along the length of the ingot reaching the impurity solubility limit at approximately 0.6 mol. %. Samples from the initial and the middle parts of the ingot are characterized by p-type metal conductivity. An increase of the iron impurity content leads to a decrease in the free hole concentration and to a stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters due to the pinning of the Fermi level by the iron resonant impurity level E{sub Fe} lying under the bottom of the valence band (E{sub v} − E{sub Fe} ≈ 16 meV). In the samples from the end of the ingot, a p-n inversion of the conductivity type and an increase of the free electron concentration along the ingot are revealed despite the impurity solubility limit being reached. The kinetics of changes of charge carrier concentration and of the Fermi energy along the ingot is analyzed in the framework of the six-band Dimmock dispersion relation. A model is proposed for the electronic structure rearrangement of Pb{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}Te with doping, which may also be used for PbTe doped with other transition metals.

  19. Effect of iron doping concentration on magnetic properties of ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prashant K.; Dutta, Ranu K.; Pandey, Avinash C.; Layek, Samar; Verma, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    The ZnO:Fe nanoparticles of mean size 3-10 nm were synthesized at room temperature by simple co-precipitation method. The crystallite structure, morphology and size estimation were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The wurtzite structure of ZnO gradually degrades with the increasing Fe doping concentration. The magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles of ZnO with varying Fe doping concentration was investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Initially these nanoparticles showed strong ferromagnetic behavior, however at higher doping percentage of Fe, the ferromagnetic behavior was suppressed and paramagnetic nature was observed. The enhanced antiferromagnetic interaction between neighboring Fe-Fe ions suppressed the ferromagnetism at higher doping concentrations of Fe. Room-temperature Moessbauer spectroscopy investigation showed Fe 3+ nature of the iron atom in ZnO matrix.

  20. Enhanced Manifold of States Achieved in Heterostructures of Iron Selenide and Boron-Doped Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cantatore

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced superconductivity is sought by employing heterostructures composed of boron-doped graphene and iron selenide. Build-up of a composite manifold of near-degenerate noninteracting states formed by coupling top-of-valence-band states of FeSe to bottom-of-conduction-band states of boron-doped graphene is demonstrated. Intra- and intersubsystem excitons are explored by means of density functional theory in order to articulate a normal state from which superconductivity may emerge. The results are discussed in the context of electron correlation in general and multi-band superconductivity in particular.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    OpenAIRE

    Edelman , Irina; Ivanova , Oxana; Ivantsov , Ruslan; Velikanov , D.; Zabluda , V.; Zubavichus , Y.; Veligzhanin , A.; Zaikovskiy , V.; Stepanov , S.; Artemenko , Alla; Curély , Jacques; Kliava , Janis

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge struct...

  2. Optical Analysis of Iron-Doped Lead Sulfide Thin Films for Opto-Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambara Kumar, K. N.; Khadeer Pasha, S. K.; Deshmukh, Kalim; Chidambaram, K.; Shakil Muhammad, G.

    Iron-doped lead sulfide thin films were deposited on glass substrates using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method (SILAR) at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the film shows a well formed crystalline thin film with face-centered cubic structure along the preferential orientation (1 1 1). The lattice constant is determined using Nelson Riley plots. Using X-ray broadening, the crystallite size is determined by Scherrer formula. Morphology of the thin film was studied using a scanning electron microscope. The optical properties of the film were investigated using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. We observed an increase in the optical band gap from 2.45 to 3.03eV after doping iron in the lead sulfide thin film. The cutoff wavelength lies in the visible region, and hence the grown thin films can be used for optoelectronic and sensor applications. The results from the photoluminescence study show the emission at 500-720nm. The vibrating sample magnetometer measurements confirmed that the lead sulfide thin film becomes weakly ferromagnetic material after doping with iron.

  3. The secret behind the success of doping nickel oxyhydroxide with iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelsky, Vicky; Toroker, Maytal Caspary

    2017-03-15

    Discovering better catalysts for water splitting is the holy grail of the renewable energy field. One of the most successful water oxidation catalysts is nickel oxyhydroxide (NiOOH), which is chemically active only as a result of doping with Fe. In order to shed light on how Fe improves efficiency, we perform Density Functional Theory +U (DFT+U) calculations of water oxidation reaction intermediates of Fe substitutional doped NiOOH. The results are analyzed while considering the presence of vacancies that we use as probes to test the effect of adding charge to the surface. We find that the smaller electronegativity of the Fe dopant relative to Ni allows the dopant to have several possible oxidation states with less energy penalty. As a result, the presence of vacancies which alters local oxidation states does not affect the low overpotential of Fe-doped NiOOH. We conclude that the secret to the success of doping NiOOH with iron is the ability of iron to easily change oxidation states, which is critical during the chemical reaction of water oxidation.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Holmium-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Bloemen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rare earth atoms exhibit several interesting properties, for example, large magnetic moments and luminescence. Introducing these atoms into a different matrix can lead to a material that shows multiple interesting effects. Holmium atoms were incorporated into an iron oxide nanoparticle and the concentration of the dopant atom was changed in order to determine its influence on the host crystal. Its magnetic and magneto-optical properties were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry and Faraday rotation measurements. The luminescent characteristics of the material, in solution and incorporated in a polymer thin film, were probed by fluorescence experiments.

  5. Site preference of rare earth doping in palladium-iron-arsenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuerzer, Christine; Schulz, Anne; Johrendt, Dirk [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The solid solutions (Ca{sub 1-y}RE{sub y}Fe{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x}As){sub 10}Pd{sub z}As{sub 8} with RE = La, Ce, and Pr were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction with subsequent Rietveld refinements [(CaFeAs){sub 10}Pt{sub 3}As{sub 8}-type structure (''1038 type''), P anti 1, Z = 1]. Substitution levels (Ca/RE, Fe/Pd, and Pd/□) obtained from Rietveld refinements coincide well with the nominal values according to EDS and the linear courses of the lattice parameters as expected from the ionic radii. The RE atoms favor the one out of five calcium sites, which is eightfold coordinated by arsenic. This leads to significant stabilization of the structure, and especially prevents palladium over-doping in the iron-arsenide layers as observed in the pristine compound (CaFe{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x}As){sub 10}Pd{sub z}As{sub 8}. While the stabilization energy is estimated to about 40 kJ.mol{sup -1} by electronic structure calculations, the reason for the diminished Fe/Pd substitution through RE doping is still not yet understood. We suggest that the electrons transferred from RE{sup 3+} to the (Fe{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x})As layer makes higher palladium concentrations unfavorable. Anyway the reduced palladium doping enables superconductivity with critical temperatures up to 20 K (onset) in the RE doped Pd1038 samples, which could not be obtained earlier due to palladium over-doping in the active iron-arsenide layers. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Iron Oxide Doped Alumina-Zirconia Nanoparticle Synthesis by Liquid Flame Spray from Metal Organic Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha-Pekka Nikkanen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The liquid flame spray (LFS method was used to make iron oxide doped alumina-zirconia nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were generated using a turbulent, high-temperature (Tmax⁡∼3000 K H2-O2 flame. The precursors were aluminium-isopropoxide, zirconium-n-propoxide, and ferrocene in xylene solution. The solution was atomized into micron-sized droplets by high velocity H2 flow and introduced into the flame where nanoparticles were formed. The particle morphology, size, phase, and chemical composition were determined by TEM, XRD, XPS, and N2-adsorption measurements. The collected particulate material consists of micron-sized aggregates with nanosized primary particles. In both doped and undoped samples, tetragonal phase of zirconia was detected in room temperature while alumina was found to be noncrystalline. In the doped powder, Fe was oxidized to Fe2O3. The primary particle size of collected sample was approximately from 6 nm to 40 nm. Doping was observed to increase the specific surface area of the powder from 39 m2/g to 47 m2/g.

  7. Nitrogen-doped graphene-wrapped iron nanofragments for high-performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Yeol [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Photo-Electronic Hybrid Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Na Young [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Fuel Cell Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Yun [Chungbuk National University, Department of Environmental Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee-Young [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Fuel Cell Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Soo [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Photo-Electronic Hybrid Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Joon Kwon, S. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Nanophotonics Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Dong-Hee [Chungbuk National University, Department of Environmental Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Bong, Ki Wan [Korea University, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Son, Jeong Gon, E-mail: jgson@kist.re.kr [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Photo-Electronic Hybrid Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Young, E-mail: jinykim@kist.re.kr [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Fuel Cell Research Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Transition metals, such as iron (Fe)- or cobalt (Co)-based nanomaterials, are promising electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells due to their high theoretical activity and low cost. However, a major challenge to using these metals in place of precious metal catalysts for ORR is their low efficiency and poor stability, thus new concepts and strategies should be needed to address this issue. Here, we report a hybrid aciniform nanostructures of Fe nanofragments embedded in thin nitrogen (N)-doped graphene (Fe@N-G) layers via a heat treatment of graphene oxide-wrapped iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) microparticles with melamine. The heat treatment leads to transformation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} microparticles to nanosized zero-valent Fe fragments and formation of core-shell structures of Fe nanofragments and N-doped graphene layers. Thin N-doped graphene layers massively promote electron transfer from the encapsulated metals to the graphene surface, which efficiently optimizes the electronic structure of the graphene surface and thereby triggers ORR activity at the graphene surface. With the synergistic effect arising from the N-doped graphene and Fe nanoparticles with porous aciniform nanostructures, the Fe@N-G hybrid catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity, which was evidenced by high E{sub 1/2} of 0.82 V, onset potential of 0.93 V, and limiting current density of 4.8 mA cm{sup −2} indicating 4-electron ORR, and even exceeds the catalytic stability of the commercial Pt catalyst.

  8. Iron Oxide Doped Alumina-Zirconia Nanoparticle Synthesis by Liquid Flame Spray from Metal Organic Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Juha-Pekka Nikkanen; Helmi Keskinen; Mikko Aromaa; Mikael Järn; Tomi Kanerva; Erkki Levänen; Jyrki M. Mäkelä; Tapio Mäntylä

    2008-01-01

    The liquid flame spray (LFS) method was used to make iron oxide doped alumina-zirconia nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were generated using a turbulent, high-temperature (Tmax⁡∼3000 K) H2-O2 flame. The precursors were aluminium-isopropoxide, zirconium-n-propoxide, and ferrocene in xylene solution. The solution was atomized into micron-sized droplets by high velocity H2 flow and introduced into the flame where nanoparticles were formed. The particle morphology, size, phase, and chemical compositi...

  9. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia

    KAUST Repository

    Casula, Maria F.

    2016-06-10

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  10. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia

    KAUST Repository

    Casula, Maria F.; Conca, Erika; Bakaimi, Ioanna; Sathya, Ayyappan; Materia, Maria Elena; Casu, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea; Sogne, Elisa; Pellegrino, Teresa; Kanaras, Antonios G.

    2016-01-01

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  11. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of iron doped TiO2 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Rohini; Gogate, Parag R

    2018-01-01

    The present work deals with synthesis of Fe (III) doped TiO 2 catalyst using the ultrasound assisted approach and conventional sol-gel approach with an objective of establishing the process intensification benefits. Effect of operating parameters such as Fe doping, type of solvent, solvent to precursor ratio and initial temperature has been investigated to get the best catalyst with minimum particle size. Comparison of the catalysts obtained using the conventional and ultrasound assisted approach under the optimized conditions has been performed using the characterization techniques like DLS, XRD, BET, SEM, EDS, TEM, FTIR and UV-Vis band gap analysis. It was established that catalyst synthesized by ultrasound assisted approach under optimized conditions of 0.4mol% doping, irradiation time of 60min, propan-2-ol as the solvent with the solvent to precursor ratio as 10 and initial temperature of 30°C was the best one with minimum particle size as 99nm and surface area as 49.41m 2 /g. SEM analysis, XRD analysis as well as the TEM analysis also confirmed the superiority of the catalyst obtained using ultrasound assisted approach as compared to the conventional approach. EDS analysis also confirmed the presence of 4.05mol% of Fe element in the sample of 0.4mol% iron doped TiO 2 . UV-Vis band gap results showed the reduction in band gap from 3.2eV to 2.9eV. Photocatalytic experiments performed to check the activity also confirmed that ultrasonically synthesized Fe doped TiO 2 catalyst resulted in a higher degradation of Acid Blue 80 as 38% while the conventionally synthesized catalyst resulted in a degradation of 31.1%. Overall, the work has clearly established importance of ultrasound in giving better catalyst characteristics as well as activity for degradation of the Acid Blue 80 dye. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of iron deficiency on anisotropy and ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in Bi-doped LiZn ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bi-doped LiZn ferrites with different iron deficiencies were fabricated by a conventional ceramic method. Anisotropy constant (K1 was calculated and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR linewidth (ΔH was investigated. Crystalline anisotropy broadening linewidth (ΔHa and porosity broadening linewidth (ΔHp were derived by an approximate calculation based on dipolar narrowing theory, which play a significant role in contributions to FMR linewidth and occupy more than 90 % of ΔH. Physical and static magnetic properties of LiZn ferrite with iron deficiency are presented, which supports a decline in linewidths with increasing iron deficiency. Iron deficiency makes K1, ΔHa and ΔHp reduce. The results also show that ΔHp is the majority of contributions to ΔH in Bi-doped LiZn ferrite and densification is an effective method to decrease ΔH.

  13. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-08-01

    Cr-doped core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles (NPs) containing 0, 2, 5, and 8 at.% of Cr dopant were synthesized via a nanocluster deposition system and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. We observed the formation of a σ-FeCr phase in 2 at.% of Cr doping in core-shell NPs. This is unique since it was reported in the past that the σ-phase forms above 20 at.% of Cr. The large coercive field and exchange bias are ascribed to the antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 layer formed with the Fe-oxide shell, which also acts as a passivation layer to decrease the Fe-oxide shell thickness. The additional σ-phase in the core and/or Cr2O3 in the shell cause the hysteresis loop to appear tight waisted near the zero-field axis. The exchange interaction competes with the dipolar interaction with the increase of σ-FeCr grains in the Fe-core. The interaction reversal has been observed in 8 at.% of Cr. The observed reversal mechanism is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M value, and is supported by a theoretical watermelon model based on the core-shell nanostructure system.

  14. Iron doping of lithium niobate by thermal diffusion from thin film: study of the treatment effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciampolillo, Maria Vittoria; Zaltron, Annamaria; Bazzan, Marco; Argiolas, Nicola; Sada, Cinzia [Universita di Padova (Italy); CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Padova (Italy); Mignoni, Sabrina; Fontana, Marc [Universite de Metz et Supelec, Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques, Photoniques et Systemes, UMR CNRS 7132, Metz (France)

    2011-07-15

    Thermal diffusion from thin film is one of the most widespread approaches to prepare iron doped regions in lithium niobate with limited size for photorefractive applications. In this work, we investigate the doping process with the aim of determining the best process conditions giving a doped region with the characteristics required for photorefractive applications. Six samples were prepared by changing the atmosphere employed in the diffusion treatment in order to obtain different combination of diffusion profiles and reduction degrees and also to check the effect of employing a wet atmosphere. The compositional, optical, and structural properties are then extensively characterized by combining Secondary ion Mass Spectrometry, UV, visible and IR spectrophotometry, High Resolution X-Rays Diffraction, and Micro-Raman Spectroscopy. Moreover, the sample topography was checked by Atomic Force Microscopy. An analysis of all our data shows that the best results are obtained performing a double step process, i.e. diffusion in oxidizing atmosphere and subsequent reduction at lower temperature in an hydrogen-containing atmosphere. (orig.)

  15. Pd- and Ca-doped iron oxide for ethanol vapor sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, G.; Bonavita, A.; Ipsale, S.; Rizzo, G.; Baratto, C.; Faglia, G.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2007-01-01

    Iron oxide thin films doped with Ca and Pd, prepared by a liquid-phase deposition method (LPD) from aqueous solution, have been investigated as potential ethanol gas sensors. SEM and XRD analyses were used to characterize Fe 2 O 3 LPD films. Hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ), having an average crystallite size in the range between 20 and 30 nm, was the only crystalline phase detected on all undoped and doped films. The electrical response towards ethanol (100-500 ppm) has been studied in the temperature range of 300-500 deg. C. Both Ca and Pd promoters have shown a positive effect on the sensitivity of Fe 2 O 3 films at the lower temperature investigated, whereas at higher temperature the undoped Fe 2 O 3 film has shown better performances. The sensing properties of undoped and doped Fe 2 O 3 thin films towards different interfering gases like NO 2 , CO and NH 3 have been also investigated, showing that the selectivity to ethanol benefits of the Ca addition

  16. Enhancing the water oxidation activity of Ni2P nanocatalysts by iron-doping and electrochemical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Guang; He, Dongying; Yao, Rui; Zhao, Yong; Li, Jinping

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A sol-gel method for synthesis of Fe-doping Ni 2 P nanocatalysts was present. •Fe-doping Ni 2 P sample exhibited high OER activity after electrochemical activation. •In situ formed Fe-NiOOH layer on activated Fe-Ni 2 P provided more active OER sites. -- Abstract: In this work, we reported a facile and safe route for synthesis of Ni 2 P nanocatalysts by sol-gel method and demonstrated that the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity of Ni 2 P nanocatalysts can be dramatically enhanced by iron-doping and electrochemical activation. Compared with the fresh Fe-doped Ni 2 P nanocatalysts, a stable Fe-NiOOH layer was formed on the surface of Fe-doped Ni 2 P nanoparticles by electrochemical activation, thus promoting the charge transfer ability and surface electrochemically active sites generation for the electrochemical activated Fe-doped Ni 2 P nanocatalysts, ultimately accounting for the improvement of water oxidation activity, which was evidenced by cyclic voltammograms (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) as well as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) measurements. For water oxidation reaction in 1 M KOH solution, the electrochemical activated Fe-doped Ni 2 P nanocatalysts can attain 10 mA/cm 2 at an overpotential of 292 mV with Tafel slope of 50 mV/dec, which was also much better than that of individual Ni 2 P, Fe 2 P nanocatalysts as well as commercial RuO 2 electrocatalyst. Moreover, long-term stability performance by chronoamperometric and chronopotentiometric tests for the activated Fe-doped Ni 2 P nanocatalysts exhibited no obvious decline within 56 h. It was demonstrated that modulating the OER catalytic activity for metal phosphide by iron-doping and electrochemical activation may provide new opportunities and avenues to engineer high performance electrocatalysts for water splitting.

  17. Soluble Supercapacitors: Large and Reversible Charge Storage in Colloidal Iron-Doped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek, Carl K; Zhou, Dongming; Liu, Hongbin; Li, Xiaosong; Kittilstved, Kevin R; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2018-05-09

    Colloidal ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals have previously been shown to accumulate multiple delocalized conduction-band electrons under chemical, electrochemical, or photochemical reducing conditions, leading to emergent semimetallic characteristics such as quantum plasmon resonances and raising prospects for application in multielectron redox transformations. Here, we demonstrate a dramatic enhancement in the capacitance of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals through aliovalent Fe 3+ -doping. Very high areal and volumetric capacitances (33 μF cm -2 , 233 F cm -3 ) are achieved in Zn 0.99 Fe 0.01 O nanocrystals that rival those of the best supercapacitors used in commercial energy-storage devices. The redox properties of these nanocrystals are probed by potentiometric titration and optical spectroscopy. These data indicate an equilibrium between electron localization by Fe 3+ dopants and electron delocalization within the ZnO conduction band, allowing facile reversible charge storage and removal. As "soluble supercapacitors", colloidal iron-doped ZnO nanocrystals constitute a promising class of solution-processable electronic materials with large charge-storage capacity attractive for future energy-storage applications.

  18. Iron doped fibrous-structured silica nanospheres as efficient catalyst for catalytic ozonation of sulfamethazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhiyong; Wang, Jianlong; Yang, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are ubiquitous pollutants in aquatic environments due to their large production and extensive application. In this paper, the iron doped fibrous-structured silica (KCC-1) nanospheres (Fe-KCC-1) was prepared, characterized, and applied as a catalyst for catalytic ozonation of sulfamethazine (SMT). The effects of ozone dosage, catalyst dosage, and initial concentration of SMT were examined. The experimental results showed that Fe-KCC-1 had large surface area (464.56 m2 g -1 ) and iron particles were well dispersed on the catalyst. The catalyst had high catalytic performance especially for the mineralization of SMT, with mineralization ratio of about 40% in a wide pH range. With addition of Fe-KCC-1, the ozone utilization increased nearly two times than single ozonation. The enhancement of SMT degradation was mainly due to the surface reaction, and the increased mineralization of SMT was due to radical mechanism. Fe-KCC-1 was an efficient catalyst for SMT degradation in catalytic ozonation system.

  19. Aluminum and iron doped graphene for adsorption of methylated arsenic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego, E-mail: dcarriagada@gmail.com; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Quantum chemistry calculations show the ability of aluminum and iron doped graphene for the removal of methylated arsenicals in their trivalent and pentavalent states, with adsorption energies on the range of 1.5–4.2 eV, and high stability in a water environment. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Al and Fe-doped graphene serve as superior materials for adsorption of methylated arsenicals, including thioarsenicals. • Pentavalent arsenicals are adsorbed with higher adsorption energies (up to 4.2 eV) than trivalent arsenicals (up to 1.7 eV). • The adsorption strength is determined by the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant. • The adsorption stability was studied in a water environment and molecular dynamics calculations were performed at 300 K. • Trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed at neutral pH in their neutral and anionic forms, respectively. - Abstract: The ability of Al and Fe-doped graphene for the adsorption of trivalent and pentavalent methylated arsenic compounds was studied by quantum chemistry computations. The adsorption of trivalent methylarsenicals is reached with adsorption energies of 1.5–1.7 eV at neutral conditions; while, adsorption of pentavalent methylarsenicals reaches adsorption energies of 3.3–4.2 eV and 1.2–2.4 eV from neutral to low pH conditions, respectively. Moreover, the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant structure played an important role in the stability of the adsorbent–adsorbate systems, determining the adsorption strength. In addition, the pollutant adsorption appears to be efficient in aqueous environments, with even high stability at ambient temperature; in this regard, it was determined that the trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed in their neutral and anionic forms at neutral pH, respectively. Therefore, Al and Fe-doped graphene are considered as potential future materials for the removal of methylated arsenic

  20. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-02

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers-Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  1. Aluminum and iron doped graphene for adsorption of methylated arsenic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Quantum chemistry calculations show the ability of aluminum and iron doped graphene for the removal of methylated arsenicals in their trivalent and pentavalent states, with adsorption energies on the range of 1.5–4.2 eV, and high stability in a water environment. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Al and Fe-doped graphene serve as superior materials for adsorption of methylated arsenicals, including thioarsenicals. • Pentavalent arsenicals are adsorbed with higher adsorption energies (up to 4.2 eV) than trivalent arsenicals (up to 1.7 eV). • The adsorption strength is determined by the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant. • The adsorption stability was studied in a water environment and molecular dynamics calculations were performed at 300 K. • Trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed at neutral pH in their neutral and anionic forms, respectively. - Abstract: The ability of Al and Fe-doped graphene for the adsorption of trivalent and pentavalent methylated arsenic compounds was studied by quantum chemistry computations. The adsorption of trivalent methylarsenicals is reached with adsorption energies of 1.5–1.7 eV at neutral conditions; while, adsorption of pentavalent methylarsenicals reaches adsorption energies of 3.3–4.2 eV and 1.2–2.4 eV from neutral to low pH conditions, respectively. Moreover, the weakening of the interacting σAs−O bond in the pollutant structure played an important role in the stability of the adsorbent–adsorbate systems, determining the adsorption strength. In addition, the pollutant adsorption appears to be efficient in aqueous environments, with even high stability at ambient temperature; in this regard, it was determined that the trivalent and petavalent forms are mainly adsorbed in their neutral and anionic forms at neutral pH, respectively. Therefore, Al and Fe-doped graphene are considered as potential future materials for the removal of methylated arsenic

  2. Mesoporous TiO2 powders as host matrices for iron nanoparticles. Effect of the preparation procedure and doping with Hf

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dimitrov, M.; Ivanova, R.; Velinov, N.; Henych, Jiří; Slušná, Michaela; Štengl, Václav; Tolasz, Jakub; Mitov, I.; Tsoncheva, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, JUL (2016), s. 56-63 ISSN 2352-507X Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Mesoporous titania * Hafnium doping * Iron modification * Ethyl acetate oxidation * Methanol decomposition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  3. Liquid Phase Plasma Synthesis of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Nitrogen-Doped Activated Carbon Resulting in Nanocomposite for Supercapacitor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heon; Lee, Won-June; Park, Young-Kwon; Ki, Seo Jin; Kim, Byung-Joo; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2018-03-25

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped activated carbon powder were synthesized using an innovative plasma-in-liquid method, called the liquid phase plasma (LPP) method. Nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) was prepared by a primary LPP reaction using an ammonium chloride reactant solution, and an iron oxide/NC composite (IONCC) was prepared by a secondary LPP reaction using an iron chloride reactant solution. The nitrogen component at 3.77 at. % formed uniformly over the activated carbon (AC) surface after a 1 h LPP reaction. Iron oxide nanoparticles, 40~100 nm in size, were impregnated homogeneously over the NC surface after the LPP reaction, and were identified as Fe₃O₄ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. NC and IONCCs exhibited pseudo-capacitive characteristics, and their specific capacitance and cycling stability were superior to those of bare AC. The nitrogen content on the NC surface increased the compatibility and charge transfer rate, and the composites containing iron oxide exhibited a lower equivalent series resistance.

  4. Decreased Dissolution of ZnO by Iron Doping Yields Nanoparticles with Reduced Toxicity in the Rodent Lung and Zebrafish Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Zhao, Yan; Sager, Tina; George, Saji; Pokhrel, Suman; Li, Ning; Schoenfeld, David; Meng, Huan; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Meiying; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Mädler, Lutz; Castranova, Vincent; Lin, Shuo; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn2+ shedding leads to a series of sub-lethal and lethal toxicological responses at cellular level that can be alleviated by iron-doping. Iron-doping changes the particle matrix and slows the rate of particle dissolution. To determine whether iron doping of ZnO also leads to lesser toxic effects in vivo, toxicity studies were performed in rodent and zebrafish models. First, we synthesized a fresh batch of ZnO nanoparticles doped with 1–10 wt % of Fe. These particles were extensively characterized to confirm their doping status, reduced rate of dissolution in an exposure medium and reduced toxicity in a cellular screen. Subsequent studies compared the effects of undoped to doped particles in the rat lung, mouse lung and the zebrafish embryo. The zebrafish studies looked at embryo hatching and mortality rates as well as the generation of morphological defects, while the endpoints in the rodent lung included an assessment of inflammatory cell infiltrates, LDH release and cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Iron doping, similar to the effect of the metal chelator, DTPA, interfered in the inhibitory effects of Zn2+ on zebrafish hatching. In the oropharyngeal aspiration model in the mouse, iron doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts and IL-6 mRNA production. Doped particles also elicited decreased heme oxygenase 1 expression in the murine lung. In the intratracheal instillation studies in the rat, Fe-doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts, LDH and albumin levels. All considered, the above data show that Fe-doping is a possible safe design strategy for preventing ZnO toxicity in animals and the environment. PMID:21250651

  5. Preparation of N-Doped Composite Shell Encapsulated Iron Nanoparticles and Their Magnetic, Adsorptive, and Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caijing Shi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The N-doped composite shell encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CSEINPs were prepared by DC arc discharge under nitrogen at 800°C, using the anode with high Fe content and good homogeneity. The morphology, microstructure, composition, and some properties of the N-doped CSEINPs were characterized by various characterization techniques. The results revealed that the shells of the N-doped CSEINPs were composed of homogeneously amorphous structure containing C, Fe, O, and N elements; the saturation magnetization (Ms and coercivity (Hc of them at room temperature were 130 emu/g and 194 Oe, respectively. Due to the surface structure and the electrostatic interaction, the N-doped CSEINPs are employed to remove methylene blue (MB from the waste solution, and they exhibited high adsorption properties and photocatalytic activity under irradiation of visible light (IVL. The kinetics of adsorption of MB on the N-doped CSEINPs was investigated and the recycling test was carried out. The formation mechanism of the N-doped CSEINPs is discussed briefly.

  6. Structural and Magnetic Properties of Dilute Ca²⁺ Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samar Layek; Rout, K; Mohapatra, M; Anand, S; Verma, H C

    2016-01-01

    Undoped and calcium substituted hematite (α-Fe₂O₃) nanoparticles are synthesized by surfactant-directed co-precipitation and post annealing method. The annealed nanoparticles were found to be in single phase in nature and crystallize in the rhombohedral structure with space group R3c as confirmed by Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Average crystallite sizes are calculated to be 20 to 30 nm and 50 to 60 nm for the nanoparticles annealed at 400 and 600 °C respectively. Mössbauer spectra for all the nanoparticles could be fitted with a sextet corresponding to the single magnetic state of the iron atoms in its Fe³⁺ state in the hematite matrix. The FTIR and Raman spectra of all the samples correspond to specific modes of α-Fe₂O₃. UV-Vis spectra of annealed samples showed broad peaks in the range of 525-630 nm resulting from spin-forbidden ligand field transition together with the spin-flip transition among the 2t₂g states. The estimated band gap energies were in the range of 1.6 to 1.9 eV which are much lower than the reported values for nano hematite. From the room temperature magnetic hysteresis loop measurements, weak ferromagnetic behavior is observed in all undoped and Ca²⁺ doped hematite samples. Morin temperature (T(M)) is calculated to be 257 and 237 K for 1.45% doped samples with particle size 54 and 27 nm respectively. The sample with Ca content of 1.45 wt% when annealed at 400 °C showed that the particles were of different shapes which included both quasi spherical and rod shaped. On annealing the same sample at 600 °C, the nanorods collapsed to form bigger spherical and ellipsoidal particles.

  7. Electronic transport in tungsten and iron-doped tungsten below 1 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uher, C.; Khoshnevisan, M.; Pratt, W.P. Jr.; Bass, J.

    1979-01-01

    The electric resistivity rho and the thermoelectric ratio G have been measured for zone-refined single crystals of both tungsten and iron-doped tungsten from 5 K down to 40 mK. The samples had residual resistance ratios RRR ranging from 1750 to 90,000. The observed behavior is conveniently divided into two classes, ''normal'' and ''anomalous.'' Completely normal behavior was displayed by only three W samples with high RRRs. The Fe-doped W and the remaining W samples contained one or more anomalies. Normal behavior is that which would be expected for W containing impurities with no internal degrees of freedom. In normal behavior rho decreased monotonically with decreasing temperature and was consistent with the equation rho=rho 0 +AT 2 below about 1.5K. In normal behavior, G was positive and constant below about 0.5 K, increased in magnitude as T rose to 4 or 5 K, and then began to decrease, becoming negative above about 7 K. The anomalous class displayed at least one of three anomalies: (1) a minimum in the electrical resistivity, with an approximately logarithmic variation with T at temperatures below the minimum; (2) a positive contribution to G which increased in magnitude with decreasing temperature approximately at T/sup -1/2/ from about 4 K down to at least 0.5 K; and (3) a negative contribution to G which set in at about 0.5 K, varied approximately as log T, and dominated G at the lowest temperatures

  8. Higher Fe{sup 2+}/total Fe ratio in iron doped phosphate glass melted by microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Ashis K., E-mail: ashis@cgcri.res.in [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Sinha, Prasanta K. [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Das, Dipankar [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata 700098 (India); Guha, Chandan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Sen, Ranjan [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Iron doped phosphate glasses prepared using microwave heating and conventional heating under air and reducing atmosphere. • Presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state in all the glasses. • Significant concentrations of iron in the ferrous oxidation state on both octahedral and tetrahedral sites in all the glasses. • Ratio of Fe{sup 2+} with total iron is found higher in microwave prepared glasses in comparison to conventional prepared glasses. - Abstract: Iron doped phosphate glasses containing P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–MgO–ZnO–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were melted using conventional resistance heating and microwave heating in air and under reducing atmosphere. All the glasses were characterised by UV–Vis–NIR spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and wet colorimetry analysis. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed presence of iron predominantly in the ferrous oxidation state on two different sites in all the glasses. The intensity of the ferrous absorption peaks in UV–Vis–NIR spectrum was found to be more in glasses prepared using microwave radiation compared to the glasses prepared in a resistance heating furnace. Thermogravimetric analysis showed increasing weight gain on heating under oxygen atmosphere for glass corroborating higher ratio of FeO/(FeO + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in glass melted by direct microwave heating. Wet chemical analysis also substantiated the finding of higher ratio Fe{sup +2}/ΣFe in microwave melted glasses. It was found that iron redox ratio was highest in the glasses prepared in a microwave furnace under reducing atmosphere.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V. [L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A. [NRC ' Kurchatov Institute,' 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zaikovskiy, V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Stepanov, S. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artemenko, A. [ICMCB, UPR CNRS 9048, 33608 Pessac cedex (France); Curely, J.; Kliava, J. [LOMA, UMR 5798 Universite Bordeaux 1-CNRS, 33405 Talence cedex (France)

    2012-10-15

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe{sup 3+} ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by 'direct' techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curély, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-01-01

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe 3+ ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by “direct” techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curély, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-10-01

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe3+ ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by "direct" techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization studies.

  12. Doping dependence of the anisotropic quasiparticle interference in NaFe(1-x)Co(x)As iron-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Peng; Ruan, Wei; Zhou, Xiaodong; Ye, Cun; Wang, Aifeng; Chen, Xianhui; Lee, Dung-Hai; Wang, Yayu

    2014-03-28

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate the doping dependence of quasiparticle interference (QPI) in NaFe1-xCoxAs iron-based superconductors. The goal is to study the relation between nematic fluctuations and Cooper pairing. In the parent and underdoped compounds, where fourfold rotational symmetry is broken macroscopically, the QPI patterns reveal strong rotational anisotropy. At optimal doping, however, the QPI patterns are always fourfold symmetric. We argue this implies small nematic susceptibility and, hence, insignificant nematic fluctuation in optimally doped iron pnictides. Since TC is the highest this suggests nematic fluctuation is not a prerequistite for strong Cooper pairing.

  13. Modeling radiation damage near grain boundary in helium-doped α-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, C.P. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, X.-Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gao, F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Li, Y.H. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Wang, Y.Q., E-mail: yqwang@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate how ∑3〈110〉(1 2 1) symmetric tilt grain boundary (GB) affects point defects and defect clusters in He-doped α-iron at 300 K in picosecond time scales. Molecular statics calculations are also performed and show that the formation energy is reduced in the GB, and the GB acts as a good sink for point defects, especially for interstitial He and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs). It is observed that the average size of He{sub n}V{sub m} (m > n) clusters becomes smaller in the GB-containing Fe system, where m and n represent the number of vacancies and He atoms in the cluster, respectively. It is also found that the number of He{sub n}V (n = 2, 3) clusters in the GB region decreases, while the number of the HeV clusters increases. The GBs loaded with substitutional or interstitial helium atoms are found to facilitate the growth of helium clusters in the GB region.

  14. Fabrication of iron-doped cobalt oxide nanocomposite films by electrodeposition and application as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingxuan; Wang, Xuemei; Qin, Dongdong; Xue, Zhonghua; Lu, Xiaoquan, E-mail: luxq@nwnu.edu.cn

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • We fabricated the Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofilms for the first time by potentiostatic electrodeposition method. • The Fe was doped homogeneously in the nanofilms by this method. • Among the different concentration ratios of Co{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 2+}, nanofilm with the ratio of 1:5 exhibits the optimal performance in electrochemical properties assessments. • The Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofilms in this work exhibit good electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and appear to be promising cathodic electrocatalyst in alkaline fuel cells. - Abstract: In this work, Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofilms were fabricated by electrodeposition on FTO glass substrates for the first time. The structures of the as-prepared nanofilms were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Characterization results demonstrate that Fe was doped homogeneously in the nanofilms. As the different concentration ratios of Fe{sup 2+}/Co{sup 2+} were explored, nanofilm with the ratio of 1:5 exhibits the optimal performance in electrochemical properties assessments. It is considered that the difference in the catalytic activities for the ORR of the samples may be due to the fact that the joining of iron changed the catalyst surface's electric state and enhanced the acidity of cobalt centers, on the other hand, the doping process probably modified the absorption property of the nanofilms. The experimental results suggest that the Fe-doped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofilms in this work exhibit favorable electrocatalytic activity toward ORR and appear to be promising cathodic electrocatalyst in alkaline fuel cells.

  15. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  16. Structural and photocatalytic properties of iron- and europium-doped TiO2 nanoparticles obtained under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamandescu, L.; Vasiliu, F.; Tarabasanu-Mihaila, D.; Feder, M.; Vlaicu, A.M.; Teodorescu, C.M.; Macovei, D.; Enculescu, I.; Parvulescu, V.; Vasile, E.

    2008-01-01

    Iron- and europium-doped (≤1 at.%) TiO 2 nanoparticles powders have been synthesized by a hydrothermal route at 200 deg. C, starting with TiCl 4 , FeCl 3 .6H 2 O and EuCl 3 .6H 2 O. The structure, morphology and optical peculiarities were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), Moessbauer spectroscopy and UV-vis measurements. The photocatalytic performance was analysed in the photodegradation reaction of phenol. Rietveld refinements of XRD patterns reveal that the as-prepared samples consist in iron- and europium-doped TiO 2 in the tetragonal anatase structural shape, with particle size as low as 15 nm. By means of Moessbauer spectroscopy on both 57 Fe and 151 Eu isotopes as well as by EXAFS analyses, the presence of Fe 3+ and/or Eu 3+ ions in the nanosized powders has been evidenced. It was found that iron and europium ions can substitute for titanium in the anatase structure. From the UV-vis reflection spectra, by using the transformed Kubelka-Munk functions, the band gap energy (E g ) of the hydrothermal samples has been determined in comparison with that of Degussa P-25 photocatalyst. A decrease of E g from 2.9 eV found for Degussa photocatalyst to 2.8 eV for the titania doped with 1 at.% Fe has been evidenced, indicating a valuable absorption shift (∼20 nm) towards visible light region. However, the best photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation reaction of phenol was evidenced for the hydrothermal sample, TiO 2 : 1 at.% Fe, 0.5 at.% Eu, in both UV and visible light regions. The photocatalytic activities of iron-doped and iron-europium-codoped samples are high and practically the same only in visible light. The photocatalytic properties in correlation with the structural and optical peculiarities of the hydrothermal samples are discussed

  17. A new insight to the physical interpretation of activated carbon and iron doped carbon material: sorption affinity towards organic dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana; Ngah, Wan Saime Wan; Mohamed, Norita; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2014-05-01

    To enhance the potential of activated carbon (AC), iron incorporation into the AC surface was examined in the present investigations. Iron doped activated carbon (FeAC) material was synthesized and characterized by using surface area analysis, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The surface area of FeAC (543 m(2)/g) was found to be lower than AC (1043 m(2)/g) as a result of the pores widening due to diffusion of iron particles into the porous AC. Iron uploading on AC surface was confirmed through EDX analysis, showing up to 13.75 wt.% iron on FeAC surface. TPR and TPD profiles revealed the presence of more active sites on FeAC surface. FeAC have shown up to 98% methylene blue (MB) removal from the aqueous media. Thermodynamic parameters indicated the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anomalies in the temperature dependence of Faraday rotation on yttrium iron garnets doped with Sn, Zr, or Sb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Orazio, F.; Giammaria, F.; Lucari, F.

    1991-01-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) measurements on three thin single crystalline samples of yttrium iron garnet doped with Sn, Zr, and Sb as a function of temperature in the near infrared region show a monotonic variation of the magneto-optical signal as the temperature is decreased from 300 to about 50 K. At this point the FR signal levels off. Moreover, the slope of the plot for the sample, doped with Sn, changes sign below this temperature, at particular wavelengths. An explanation of the observed phenomena is given in terms of the energy levels of the Fe 2+ ions in the different sites of the crystal and the temperature dependence of their populations caused by the relative orientation between the local symmetry axis of the specific site and the direction of the sample magnetization. Hysteresis loops of the Faraday rotation as a function of applied magnetic field have been also measured showing the presence of a remanence of the sample magnetization

  19. Polypyrrole–titanium(IV) doped iron(III) oxide nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization with tunable electrical and electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, Debabrata; Ghosh, Arup Kumar; Gupta, Kaushik; De, Amitabha; Sen, Pintu; Duttachowdhury, Ankan; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Synthesis and characterization of polymer nanocomposite based on titanium doped iron(III) oxide. ► Electrical conductivity increased 100 times in composite with respect to polymer. ► Electrochemical capacitance of polymer composites increased with nanooxide content. ► Thermal stability of the polymer enhanced with nano oxide content. -- Abstract: Titanium(IV)-doped synthetic nanostructured iron(III) oxide (NITO) and polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites was fabricated by in situ polymerization using FeCl 3 as initiator. The polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) and pure NITO were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Föurier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, etc. Thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analyses showed the enhancement of thermal stability of PNCs than the pure polymer. Electrical conductivity of the PNCs had increased significantly from 0.793 × 10 −2 S/cm to 0.450 S/cm with respect to the PPy, and that had been explained by 3-dimensional variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanisms. In addition, the specific capacitance of PNCs had increased from 147 F/g to 176 F/g with increasing NITO content than that of pure NITO (26 F/g), presumably due to the growing of mesoporous structure with increasing NITO content in PNCs which reduced the charge transfer resistance significantly.

  20. APTES-Terminated ultrasmall and iron-doped silicon nanoparticles as X-Ray dose enhancer for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stefanie; Wegmann, Marc; Distel, Luitpold V R; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2018-04-15

    Silicon nanoparticles with sizes between were synthesized through wet-chemistry procedures using diverse phase transfer reagents. On the other hand, the preparation of iron-doped silicon nanoparticles was carried out using the precursor Na 4 Si 4 containing 5% Fe. Biocompatibility of all silicon nanoparticle samples was achieved by surface-stabilizing with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. These surface structures provided positive surface charges which facilitated electrostatic binding to the negatively charged biological membranes. The mode of interaction with membranes, being either incorporation or just attachment, was found to depend on the nanoparticle size. The smallest silicon nanoparticles (ca. 1.5 nm) were embedded in the mitochondrial membrane in MCF-7 cells. When interacting with X-rays these silicon nanoparticles were observed to enhance the superoxide formation upon depolarizing the mitochondrial membrane. X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells loaded with the larger silicon nanoparticles was shown to increase the intracellular singlet oxygen generation. The doping of the silicon nanoparticles with iron led to additional production of hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. First-principles study of antimony doping effects on the iron-based superconductor CaFe(SbxAs1−x)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Yuki; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We study antimony doping effects on the iron-based superconductor CaFe(Sb x As 1−x ) 2 by using the first-principles calculation. The calculations reveal that the substitution of a doped antimony atom into As of the chainlike As layers is more stable than that into FeAs layers. This prediction can be checked by experiments. Our results suggest that doping homologous elements into the chainlike As layers, which only exist in the novel 112 system, is responsible for rising up the critical temperature. We discuss antimony doping effects on the electronic structure. It is found that the calculated band structures with and without the antimony doping are similar to each other within our framework. (author)

  2. First-Principles Study of Antimony Doping Effects on the Iron-Based Superconductor CaFe(SbxAs1-x)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuki; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2015-09-01

    We study antimony doping effects on the iron-based superconductor CaFe(SbxAs1-x)2 by using the first-principles calculation. The calculations reveal that the substitution of a doped antimony atom into As of the chainlike As layers is more stable than that into FeAs layers. This prediction can be checked by experiments. Our results suggest that doping homologous elements into the chainlike As layers, which only exist in the novel 112 system, is responsible for rising up the critical temperature. We discuss antimony doping effects on the electronic structure. It is found that the calculated band structures with and without the antimony doping are similar to each other within our framework.

  3. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei, E-mail: jwchen@scu.edu.cn; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin, E-mail: rl.wang@scu.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A hybrid catalyst was prepared via a quite green and simple method to achieve an one-pot synthesis of the N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides. It exhibited comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability and ability to methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C to ORR. - Highlights: • A novel type of hybrid Fe/Co/WC@NC catalysts have been successfully synthesized. • The hybrid catalyst also exhibited better durability and methanol tolerance. • Multiple effective active sites of Fe{sub 3}C, Co{sub 3}C, WC, and NC help to improve catalytic performance. - Abstract: This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe{sub 3}C and Co{sub 3}C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe{sub 3}C, and Co{sub 3}C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  4. Transition from Sign-Reversed to Sign-Preserved Cooper-Pairing Symmetry in Sulfur-Doped Iron Selenide Superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qisi; Park, J T; Feng, Yu; Shen, Yao; Hao, Yiqing; Pan, Bingying; Lynn, J W; Ivanov, A; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, M; Cao, Huibo; Birgeneau, R J; Efremov, D V; Zhao, Jun

    2016-05-13

    An essential step toward elucidating the mechanism of superconductivity is to determine the sign or phase of the superconducting order parameter, as it is closely related to the pairing interaction. In conventional superconductors, the electron-phonon interaction induces attraction between electrons near the Fermi energy and results in a sign-preserved s-wave pairing. For high-temperature superconductors, including cuprates and iron-based superconductors, prevalent weak coupling theories suggest that the electron pairing is mediated by spin fluctuations which lead to repulsive interactions, and therefore that a sign-reversed pairing with an s_{±} or d-wave symmetry is favored. Here, by using magnetic neutron scattering, a phase sensitive probe of the superconducting gap, we report the observation of a transition from the sign-reversed to sign-preserved Cooper-pairing symmetry with insignificant changes in T_{c} in the S-doped iron selenide superconductors K_{x}Fe_{2-y}(Se_{1-z}S_{z})_{2}. We show that a rather sharp magnetic resonant mode well below the superconducting gap (2Δ) in the undoped sample (z=0) is replaced by a broad hump structure above 2Δ under 50% S doping. These results cannot be readily explained by simple spin fluctuation-exchange pairing theories and, therefore, multiple pairing channels are required to describe superconductivity in this system. Our findings may also yield a simple explanation for the sometimes contradictory data on the sign of the superconducting order parameter in iron-based materials.

  5. A short literature survey on iron and cobalt ion doped TiO2 thin films and photocatalytic activity of these films against fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatlıdil, İlknur; Bacaksız, Emin; Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Breen, Chris; Sökmen, Münevver

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Co or Fe doped TiO 2 thin films were prepared by sol–gel method. ► We obtained lower E g values for Fe-doped and Co-TiO 2 thin films. ► Doping greatly affected the size and shape of the TiO 2 nanoparticles. ► Photocatalytic killing effect of the doped TiO 2 thin films on C. albicans and A. niger was significantly higher than undoped TiO 2 thin film for short exposure periods. - Abstract: In this study, a short recent literature survey which concentrated on the usage of Fe 3+ or Co 2+ ion doped TiO 2 thin films and suspensions were summarized. Additionally, a sol–gel method was used for preparation of the 2% Co or Fe doped TiO 2 thin films. The surface of the prepared materials was characterised using scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and band gap of the films were calculated from the transmission measurements that were taken over the range of 190 and 1100 nm. The E g value was 3.40 eV for the pure TiO 2 , 3.00 eV for the Fe-doped TiO 2 film and 3.25 eV for Co-TiO 2 thin film. Iron or cobalt doping at lower concentration produce more uniformed particles and doping greatly affected the size and shape of the TiO 2 nanoparticles. Photocatalytic killing effect of the 2% Co doped TiO 2 thin film on Candida albicans was significantly higher than Fe doped TiO 2 thin film for short and long exposure periods. Doped thin films were more effective on Aspergillus niger for short exposure periods.

  6. Synthesis of Iron Doped Zeolite Imidazolate Framework-8 and Its Remazol Deep Black RGB Dye Adsorption Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Thi Thanh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite imidazole framework-8 (ZIF-8 and the iron doped ZIF-8 (Fe-ZIF-8 were synthesized by the hydrothermal process. The obtained materials were characteristic of X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscope (SEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. The results showed that the obtained Fe-ZIF-8 possessed the ZIF-8 structure with a large specific area. ZIF-8 and Fe-ZIF-8 were used for the removal of Remazol Deep Black (RDB RGB dye from aqueous solutions. The various factors affecting adsorption such as pH, initial concentration, contact time, and temperature were investigated. The results showed that the introduction of iron into ZIF-8 provided a much larger adsorption capacity and faster adsorption kinetics than ZIF-8 without iron. The electrostatic interaction and π-π interaction between the aromatic rings of the RDB dye and the aromatic imidazolate rings of the adsorbent were responsible for the RDB adsorption. Moreover, the coordination of the nitrogen atoms and oxygen in carboxyl group in RDB molecules with the Fe2+ ions in the ZIF-8 framework played a vital role for the effective removal of RDB from aqueous solution.

  7. Iron-Doped (La,Sr)MnO3 Manganites as Promising Mediators of Self-Controlled Magnetic Nanohyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlapa, Yulia; Kulyk, Mykola; Kalita, Viktor; Polek, Taras; Tovstolytkin, Alexandr; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Solopan, Sergii; Belous, Anatolii

    2016-12-01

    Fe-doped La0.77Sr0.23Mn1 - y Fe y O3 nanoparticles have been synthesized by sol-gel method, and ceramic samples based on them were sintered at 1613 K. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of obtained nanoparticles and ceramic samples have been studied. It has been established that cell volume for nanoparticles increases with growing of iron content, while this dependence displays an opposite trend in the case of ceramic samples. Mössbauer investigations have shown that in all samples, the oxidation state of iron is +3. According to magnetic studies, at room temperature, both nanoparticles and ceramic samples with y ≤ 0.06 display superparamagnetic properties and samples with y ≥ 0.08 are paramagnetic. Magnetic fluids based on La0.77Sr0.23Mn1 - y Fe y O3 nanoparticles and aqua solution of agarose have been prepared. It has been established that heating efficiency of nanoparticles under an alternating magnetic field decreases with growing of iron content.

  8. Observation of a hidden hole-like band approaching the fermi level in K-doped iron selenide superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Terashima, Kensei; Hamada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of the study of iron-based superconductors is to identify the common feature that produces the high critical temperature (T c ). In the early days, based on a weak-coupling viewpoint, the nesting between hole- and electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) leading to the so-called s± state was considered to be one such key feature. However, this theory has faced a serious challenge ever since the discovery of alkali-metal-doped FeSe (AFS) superconductors, in which only electron-like FSs with a nodeless superconducting gap are observed. Several theories have been proposed, but a consistent understanding is yet to be achieved. Here we show experimentally that a hole-like band exists in K x Fe 2-y Se 2 , which presumably forms a hole-like Fermi surface. The present study suggests that AFS can be categorized in the same group as iron arsenides with both hole- and electron-like FSs present. This result provides a foundation for a comprehensive understanding of the superconductivity in iron-based superconductors. (author)

  9. Iron-containing N-doped carbon electrocatalysts for the cogeneration of hydroxylamine and electricity in a H-2-NO fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daems, Nick; Sheng, Xia; Alvarez-Gallego, Yolanda; Vankelecom, Ivo F. J.; Pescarmona, Paolo P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-containing N-doped carbon materials were investigated as electrocatalysts for the cogeneration of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and electricity in a H-2-NO fuel cell. This electrochemical route for the production of hydroxylamine is a greener alternative to the present industrial synthesis, because it

  10. Effect of iron doping on structural and optical properties of TiO2 thin film by sol–gel routed spin coating technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Lourduraj

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of iron (Fe-doped titanium dioxide (Fe:TiO2 were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique and further calcined at 450∘C. The structural and optical properties of Fe-doped TiO2 thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis and atomic force microscopic (AFM techniques. The XRD results confirm the nanostructured TiO2 thin films having crystalline nature with anatase phase. The characterization results show that the calcined thin films having high crystallinity and the effect of iron substitution lead to decreased crystallinity. The SEM investigations of Fe-doped TiO2 films also gave evidence that the films were continuous spherical shaped particles with a nanometric range of grain size and film was porous in nature. AFM analysis establishes that the uniformity of the TiO2 thin film with average roughness values. The optical measurements show that the films having high transparency in the visible region and the optical band gap energy of Fe-doped TiO2 film with iron (Fe decrease with increase in iron content. These important requirements for the Fe:TiO2 films are to be used as window layers in solar cells.

  11. High-resolution structural characterization and magnetic properties of epitaxial Ce-doped yttrium iron garnet thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Vikram Singh, Amit; Rastogi, Ankur; Gazquez, Jaume; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Mishra, Rohan; Gupta, Arunava

    2017-07-01

    Thin films of magnetic garnet materials, e.g. yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, YIG), are useful for a variety of applications including microwave integrated circuits and spintronics. Substitution of rare earth ions, such as cerium, is known to enhance the magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) as compared to pure YIG. Thin films of Ce0.75Y2.25Fe5O12 (Ce:YIG) have been grown using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique and their crystal structure examined using high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Homogeneous substitution of Ce in YIG, without oxidation to form a separate CeO2 phase, can be realized in a narrow process window with resulting enhancement of the MOKE signal. The thermally generated signal due to spin Seebeck effect for the optimally doped Ce:YIG films has also been investigated.

  12. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  13. Selective Oxidation Using Flame Aerosol Synthesized Iron and Vanadium-Doped Nano-TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Min Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective photocatalytic oxidation of 1-phenyl ethanol to acetophenone using titanium dioxide (TiO2 raw and doped with Fe or V, prepared by flame aerosol deposition method, was investigated. The effects of metal doping on crystal phase and morphology of the synthesized nanostructured TiO2 were analyzed using XRD, TEM, Raman spectroscopy, and BET nitrogen adsorbed surface area measurement. The increase in the concentration of V and Fe reduced the crystalline structure and the anatase-to-rutile ratios of the synthesized TiO2. Synthesized TiO2 became fine amorphous powder as the Fe and V concentrations were increased to 3 and 5%, respectively. Doping V and Fe to TiO2 synthesized by the flame aerosol increased photocatalytic activity by 6 folds and 2.5 folds, respectively, compared to that of pure TiO2. It was found that an optimal doping concentration for Fe and V were 0.5% and 3%, respectively. The type and concentration of the metal dopants and the method used to add the dopant to the TiO2 are critical parameters for enhancing the activity of the resulting photocatalyst. The effects of solvents on the photocatalytic reaction were also investigated by using both water and acetonitrile as the reaction medium.

  14. Thermopower, electrical and Hall conductivity of undoped and doped iron disilicide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, A; Behr, G; Griessmann, H; Teichert, S; Lange, H

    1997-07-01

    The electrical transport properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} single crystals have been investigated in dependence on the purity of the source material and on doping with 3d transition metals. The transport properties included are electrical conductivity, Hall conductivity and thermopower mainly in the temperature range from 4K to 300K. The single crystals have been prepared by chemical transport reaction in a closed system with iodine as transport agent. In undoped single crystals prepared with 5N Fe both electrical conductivity and thermopower depend on the composition within the homogeneity range of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} which is explained by different intrinsic defects at the Si-rich and Fe-rich phase boundaries. In both undoped and doped single crystals impurity band conduction is observed at low temperatures but above 100K extrinsic behavior determined by shallow impurity states. The thermopower shows between 100K and 200K a significant phonon drag contribution which depends on intrinsic defects and additional doping. The Hall resistivity is considered mainly with respect to an anomalous contribution found in p-type and n-type single crystals and thin films. In addition doped single crystals show at temperatures below about 130K an hysteresis of the Hall voltage. These results make former mobility data uncertain. Comparison will be made between the transport properties of single crystals and polycrystalline material.

  15. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  16. T1-T2 dual-modal MRI of brain gliomas using PEGylated Gd-doped iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ning; Gu, Wei; Wang, Hao; Deng, Yunlong; Shi, Xin; Ye, Ling

    2014-03-01

    To overcome the negative contrast limitations of iron oxide-based contrast agents and to improve the biocompatibility of Gd-chelate contrast agents, PEGylated Gd-doped iron oxide (PEG-GdIO) NPs as a T1-T2 dual-modal contrast agent were synthesized by the polyol method. The transverse relaxivity (r2) and longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of PEG-GdIO were determined to be 66.9 and 65.9 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively. The high r1 value and low r2/r1 ratio make PEG-GdIO NPs suitable as a T1-T2 dual-modal contrast agent. The in vivo MRI demonstrated a brighter contrast enhancement in T1-weighted image and a simultaneous darken effect in T2-weighted MR image compared to the pre-contrast image in the region of glioma. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of PEG-GdIO NPs was confirmed by the in vitro MTT cytotoxicity and in vivo histological analyses (H&E). Therefore, PEG-GdIO NPs hold great potential in T1-T2 dual-modal imaging for the diagnosis of brain glioma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adsorption of Acid Yellow-73 and Direct Violet-51 Dyes from Textile Wastewater by Using Iron Doped Corncob Charcoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba Baqar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of synthetic dyes in textile industry wastewater lead to deterioration of precious fresh water resources, making the need to remove dyes crucial for environmental protection. Recently, different techniques have been employed to remove these dyes from water resources. Among them, biosorption has gained tremendous popularity due to its eco-friendly nature and inexpensive method. In this study, the removal potential of two acid dyes, i.e. yellow-73 and direct violet-51, was assessed from textile effluent samples using iron modified corncob charcoal. The adsorption efficiency ranged between 93.93 ­ 97.96 % and 92.2 - 95.4 % for acid yellow-73 and direct violet-51, respectively. Furthermore, study highlights optimum parameters for successful adsorption of these dyes, such as stirring time (numbers, pH (numbers, temperature (numbers, and adsorbent dosage (numbers. Keeping in consideration these findings, we recommend the use of Iron Doped Corncob Charcoal (IDCC as a low-cost, efficient alternative for wastewater treatment, primarily minimizing the detrimental effects of hazardous dyes.

  18. Electronic properties and surface reactivity of SrO-terminated SrTiO3 and SrO-terminated iron-doped SrTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staykov, Aleksandar; Tellez, Helena; Druce, John; Wu, Ji; Ishihara, Tatsumi; Kilner, John

    2018-01-01

    Surface reactivity and near-surface electronic properties of SrO-terminated SrTiO 3 and iron doped SrTiO 3 were studied with first principle methods. We have investigated the density of states (DOS) of bulk SrTiO 3 and compared it to DOS of iron-doped SrTiO 3 with different oxidation states of iron corresponding to varying oxygen vacancy content within the bulk material. The obtained bulk DOS was compared to near-surface DOS, i.e. surface states, for both SrO-terminated surface of SrTiO 3 and iron-doped SrTiO 3 . Electron density plots and electron density distribution through the entire slab models were investigated in order to understand the origin of surface electrons that can participate in oxygen reduction reaction. Furthermore, we have compared oxygen reduction reactions at elevated temperatures for SrO surfaces with and without oxygen vacancies. Our calculations demonstrate that the conduction band, which is formed mainly by the d-states of Ti, and Fe-induced states within the band gap of SrTiO 3 , are accessible only on TiO 2 terminated SrTiO 3 surface while the SrO-terminated surface introduces a tunneling barrier for the electrons populating the conductance band. First principle molecular dynamics demonstrated that at elevated temperatures the surface oxygen vacancies are essential for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  19. Electrical and magnetic behavior of iron doped nickel titanate (Fe{sup 3+}/NiTiO{sub 3}) magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenin, Nayagam; Karthik, Arumugam; Sridharpanday, Mathu; Selvam, Mohanraj; Srither, Saturappan Ravisekaran; Arunmetha, Sundarmoorthy; Paramasivam, Palanisamy; Rajendran, Venkatachalam, E-mail: veerajendran@gmail.com

    2016-01-01

    Iron doped nickel titanate (Fe{sup 3+}/NiTiO{sub 3}) ferromagnetic nanoparticles with different concentrations of Fe (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mol) were synthesized using precipitation route with precursor source such as nickel nitrate and iron nitrate solutions. The prepared magnetic nanopowders were investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, vibrating sample magnetometer, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to explore the structural, ferromagnetic, and dielectric properties. The obtained XRD pattern shows formation of iron doped nickel titanate in orthorhombic structure. The crystallite size ranges from 57 to 21 nm and specific surface area ranges from 11 to 137 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. The hysteresis loops of nanomagnetic materials show ferromagnetic behavior with higher magnitude of coercivity (H{sub c}) 867–462 Oe. The impedance analysis of ferromagnetic materials explores the ferro-dielectric behavior with enhanced properties of Fe{sup 3+}/NiTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles at higher Fe content. - Highlights: • Iron doped nickel titanate magnetic nanoparticles. • Ferromagnetic magnetism behavior with higher magnitude of coercivity. • Dielectric behavior of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with increase of Fe content.

  20. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  1. Small-angle neutron scattering investigations of Co-doped iron oxide nanoparticles. Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creanga, Dorina; Balasoiu, Maria; Soloviov, Dmitro; Balasoiu-Gaina, Alexandra-Maria; Puscasu, Emil; Lupu, Nicoleta; Stan, Cristina

    2018-03-01

    Preliminary small-angle neutron scattering investigations on aqueous suspensions of several cobalt doped ferrites (CoxFe3-xO4, x=0; 0.5; 1) nanoparticles prepared by chemical co-precipitation method, are reported. The measurements were accomplished at the YuMO instrument in function at the IBR-2 reactor. Results of intermediary data treatment are presented and discussed.

  2. Doping dependence of spin fluctuations and electron correlations in iron pnictides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ikeda, H.; Arita, R.; Kuneš, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), 024508/1-024508/6 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : iron pnicitdes * dynamic spin susceptibility * fluctuation-exchange approximation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2010 http://prb.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v82/i2/e024508

  3. Iron, nitrogen and silicon doped diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Sekhar C.; Pong, W.F.; Papakonstantinou, P.

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), valence band photoemission (VB-PES) and Raman spectroscopy results show that the incorporation of nitrogen in pulsed laser deposited diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films, reverts the sp"3 network to sp"2 as evidenced by an increase of the sp"2 cluster and I_D/I_G ratio in C K-edge XANES and Raman spectra respectively which reduces the hardness/Young's modulus into the film network. Si-doped DLC film deposited in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process reduces the sp"2 cluster and I_D/I_G ratio that causes the decrease of hardness/Young's modulus of the film structure. The Fe-doped DLC films deposited by dip coating technique increase the hardness/Young's modulus with an increase of sp"3-content in DLC film structure. - Highlights: • Fe, N and Si doped DLC films deposited by dip, PLD and PECVD methods respectively • DLC:Fe thin films have higher hardness/Young's modulus than DLC:N(:Si) thin films. • sp"3 and sp"2 contents are estimated from C K-edge XANES and VB-PES measurements.

  4. Iron, nitrogen and silicon doped diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), valence band photoemission (VB-PES) and Raman spectroscopy results show that the incorporation of nitrogen in pulsed laser deposited diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films, reverts the sp{sup 3} network to sp{sup 2} as evidenced by an increase of the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio in C K-edge XANES and Raman spectra respectively which reduces the hardness/Young's modulus into the film network. Si-doped DLC film deposited in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process reduces the sp{sup 2} cluster and I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio that causes the decrease of hardness/Young's modulus of the film structure. The Fe-doped DLC films deposited by dip coating technique increase the hardness/Young's modulus with an increase of sp{sup 3}-content in DLC film structure. - Highlights: • Fe, N and Si doped DLC films deposited by dip, PLD and PECVD methods respectively • DLC:Fe thin films have higher hardness/Young's modulus than DLC:N(:Si) thin films. • sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} contents are estimated from C K-edge XANES and VB-PES measurements.

  5. TECHNOLOGIES OF DOPING OF CAST IRON THROUGH THE SLAG PHASE WITH USING OF THE SPENT NICKEL- AND COPPER-CONTAINING CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Provorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have defined the regularities of the doping of cast iron through the slag phase of nickel and copper due to the waste catalysts using a carbonaceous reducing agent. We have justified the need to use the cast iron chips as a seed in the composition of the slag mixture. We have defined the dependence of the degree of extraction of nickel or copper from spent catalyst on the amount of the catalyst, on the basicity of the slag mixture, on the temperature and time of melting.

  6. Thin film deposition and characterization of pure and iron-doped electron-beam evaporated tungsten oxide for gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfamichael, Tuquabo, E-mail: t.tesfamichael@qut.edu.a [Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering, School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Arita, Masashi [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita-14, Nishi-9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0814 (Japan); Bostrom, Thor [Faculty of Science and Technology, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Bell, John [Centre for Built Environment and Engineering Research, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2010-06-30

    Pure tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) and iron-doped (10 at.%) tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}:Fe) nanostructured thin films were prepared using a dual crucible Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) technique. The films were deposited at room temperature under high vacuum onto glass as well as alumina substrates and post-heat treated at 300 {sup o}C for 1 h. Using Raman spectroscopy the as-deposited WO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3}:Fe films were found to be amorphous, however their crystallinity increased after annealing. The estimated surface roughness of the films was similar (of the order of 3 nm) to that determined using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). As observed by AFM, the WO{sub 3}:Fe film appeared to have a more compact surface as compared to the more porous WO{sub 3} film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the elemental stoichiometry of the tungsten oxide films was consistent with WO{sub 3}. A slight difference in optical band gap energies was found between the as-deposited WO{sub 3} (3.22 eV) and WO{sub 3}:Fe (3.12 eV) films. The differences in the band gap energies of the annealed films were significantly higher, having values of 3.12 eV and 2.61 eV for the WO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3}:Fe films respectively. The heat treated films were investigated for gas sensing applications using noise spectroscopy. It was found that doping of Fe to WO{sub 3} produced gas selectivity but a reduced gas sensitivity as compared to the WO{sub 3} sensor.

  7. A short literature survey on iron and cobalt ion doped TiO{sub 2} thin films and photocatalytic activity of these films against fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I dil, Ilknur [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Bacaks Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, Emin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Buruk, Celal Kurtulus [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Breen, Chris [Materials and Engineering Research Institution, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Soekmen, Muenevver, E-mail: msokmen@ktu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co or Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films were prepared by sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained lower E{sub g} values for Fe-doped and Co-TiO{sub 2} thin films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping greatly affected the size and shape of the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic killing effect of the doped TiO{sub 2} thin films on C. albicans and A. niger was significantly higher than undoped TiO{sub 2} thin film for short exposure periods. - Abstract: In this study, a short recent literature survey which concentrated on the usage of Fe{sup 3+} or Co{sup 2+} ion doped TiO{sub 2} thin films and suspensions were summarized. Additionally, a sol-gel method was used for preparation of the 2% Co or Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin films. The surface of the prepared materials was characterised using scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and band gap of the films were calculated from the transmission measurements that were taken over the range of 190 and 1100 nm. The E{sub g} value was 3.40 eV for the pure TiO{sub 2}, 3.00 eV for the Fe-doped TiO{sub 2} film and 3.25 eV for Co-TiO{sub 2} thin film. Iron or cobalt doping at lower concentration produce more uniformed particles and doping greatly affected the size and shape of the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Photocatalytic killing effect of the 2% Co doped TiO{sub 2} thin film on Candida albicans was significantly higher than Fe doped TiO{sub 2} thin film for short and long exposure periods. Doped thin films were more effective on Aspergillus niger for short exposure periods.

  8. Effects of disorder on the intrinsically hole-doped iron-based superconductor KC a2F e4A s4F2 by cobalt substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Junichi; Iimura, Soshi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the effects of cobalt substitution on the transport and electronic properties of the recently discovered iron-based superconductor KC a2F e4A s4F2 , with Tc=33 K , are reported. This material is an unusual superconductor showing intrinsic hole conduction (0.25 holes /F e2 + ). Upon doping of Co, the Tc of KC a2(Fe1-xC ox) 4A s4F2 gradually decreased, and bulk superconductivity disappeared when x ≥0.25 . Conversion of the primary carrier from p type to n type upon Co-doping was clearly confirmed by Hall measurements, and our results are consistent with the change in the calculated Fermi surface. Nevertheless, neither spin density wave (SDW) nor an orthorhombic phase, which are commonly observed for nondoped iron-based superconductors, was observed in the nondoped or electron-doped samples. The electron count in the 3 d orbitals and structural parameters were compared with those of other iron-based superconductors to show that the physical properties can be primarily ascribed to the effects of disorder.

  9. Magnetic and structural properties of Zn-doped yttrium iron garnet nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Garcia, R.; Delgado, A.; Guerra, Y.; Farias, B.V.M.; Martinez, D. [Pos Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Skovroinski, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Galembeck, A. [Pos Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Padron-Hernandez, E. [Pos Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Zn-doped YIG was prepared using the sol-gel method with TGA measurements showing the phase formation between 900 and 1000 C. XRD analysis showed close to 1100 C the formation of Franklinite phase, coexisting with the cubic YIG. Y{sub 3}(Fe{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12} samples with different Zn concentrations (x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, and 0.05) were prepared and analyzed for a magnetic study. A decrease in magnetic moment of the samples was confirmed on increasing the concentration of Zn ions. This decrease is due to the substitution of Fe ions by Zn. This also confirmed the results of XRD showing the linear increase in the lattice parameter. Fittings by Bloch's law shows results compared with those already reported in the literature. The exponent and constant for the Bloch law presented similar values to those reported for YIG doped with other ions. We obtained the parameter α ∝10{sup -6} K{sup -n} with n close to 1.9 for all samples. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Properties of iron-doped multicrystalline silicon grown by the float-zone technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciszek, T.F.; Wang, T.H.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.; Matson, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Multicrystalline Fe-doped Si ingots were float-zoned from high-purity feed rods. Fe was introduced by pill-doping, which gives uniform impurity content for small segregation coefficients (k {approximately} 10{sup {minus}5} for Fe in Si). Fe concentrations were calculated from the initial weight of the Fe pill, the molten zone geomet and the growth parameters. Values in the range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 16} atoms/cm{sup 3} were targeted. No additional electrically active dopants were introduced. Minority charge carrier lifetime (via YAG-laser-excited, 430-MHz ultra-high-frequency-coupled, photoconductive decay) was measured on the ingots, and wafers were cut to examine grain structure and electron-beam-induced current response of grain boundaries. Observed lifetimes decreased monotonically with increasing Fe content for similar grain sizes (from {approximately}10 {mu}s to 2 {mu}s for < 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 2} grains, from {approximately}30 {mu}s to 2 {mu}s for {approximately}5 x 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 2} grains, and from {approximately}300 {mu}s to 2 {mu}s for > 10{sup {minus}2} cm{sup 2} grains) as the Fe content increased to 1 {times} 10{sup 16} atoms/cm{sup 3}.

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE RESONANCE LOSSES IN SILICON-DOPED YTTRIUM-IRON GARNET (YIG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, D. J.; Tocci, L.

    1967-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic resonance linewidth of silicon-doped YIG, measured as a function of temperature at 13.4 kMHz, is found to show a pronounced peak at 105°C. The anisotropic behavior of this peak is in good agreement with the four-level valence-exchange model proposed by Clogston. The model yields...... for the electron ordering energy a value 5 × 10-4 eV which agrees closely with the energy deduced from magnetic anneal studies. The activation energy for electron transfer (0.25 eV) is virtually identical with values reported in investigations of electrical conductivity and acoustic loss. ©1967 The American...

  12. Electronic and optical properties of antiferromagnetic iron doped NiO - A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John E.; Twagirayezu, Fidele; Scolfaro, Luisa M.; Borges, Pablo D.; Geerts, Wilhelmus J.

    2017-05-01

    Antiferromagnetic NiO is a candidate for next generation high-speed and scaled RRAM devices. Here, electronic and optical properties of antiferromagnetic NiO: Fe 25% in the rock salt structure are studied and compared to intrinsic NiO. From density of states and complex dielectric function analysis, the first optical transition is found to be at lower frequency than intrinsic NiO due to an Fe impurity level being the valence band maximum. The resulting effects on refractive index, reflectivity, absorption, optical conductivity and loss function for Fe-doped NiO are compared to those of intrinsic NiO, and notable differences are analyzed. The electronic component of the static dielectric constant of NiO: Fe 25% is calculated to be about 2% less than that of intrinsic NiO.

  13. Speciation-dependent studies on removal of arsenic by iron-doped calcium alginate beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Anupam; Nayak, Dalia; Lahiri, Susanta

    2007-01-01

    This work aims to study the differential attitude of Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) beads towards As(III) and As(V) compounds so that speciation-dependent environmentally sustainable methodologies can be developed for removal of arsenic from contaminated water. Throughout the experiment, 76 As has been used as precursor of stable arsenic. The affinity of As(V) towards the Fe-CA beads is greater than that of As(III). Removal efficiency of Fe-CA beads for As(V) increases with increasing number of beads and longer shaking times. At pH 3, 30 Fe-CA beads remove As(V) completely from a solution containing 20 mg kg -1 As(V). The technique has been successfully applied to the ground water collected from an arsenic-contaminated area

  14. Numerical and Experimental Study of Optoelectronic Trapping on Iron-Doped Lithium Niobate Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Gazzetto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OET are a promising technique for the realization of reconfigurable systems suitable to trap and manipulate microparticles. In particular, dielectrophoretic (DEP forces produced by OET represent a valid alternative to micro-fabricated metal electrodes, as strong and spatially reconfigurable electrical fields can be induced in a photoconductive layer by means of light-driven phenomena. In this paper we report, and compare with the experimental data, the results obtained by analyzing the spatial configurations of the DEP-forces produced by a 532 nm laser beam, with Gaussian intensity distribution, impinging on a Fe-doped Lithium Niobate substrate. Furthermore, we also present a promising preliminary result for water-droplets trapping, which could open the way to the application of this technique to biological samples manipulation.

  15. Effect of Sn doping on the room temperature magnetodielectric properties of yttrium iron garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhizhi; Chen, Fu; Li, Junnan; Feng, Zekun; Nie, Yan, E-mail: nieyan@hust.edu.cn [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-10-21

    The structures, magnetic properties, permittivity spectra, and magnetodielectric (MD) effects of polycrystalline Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5−x}Sn{sub x}O{sub 12} compounds prepared by solid state reactions were systematically investigated. The substitution of Sn{sup 4+} leads to lattice expansion and the donation of excess electrons in ceramics, which affects the concentration of Fe{sup 2+}, space charge, and electric dipole. As a result, as the amount of Sn dopant increases, so does saturation magnetization and permittivity in the low frequency band. The MD coefficient ([ε{sub r}(H) − ε{sub r}(0)]/ε{sub r}(0)) of lightly doped samples (x ≤ 0.05) is negative in the entire frequency band, reaching −2.3% at 350 MHz and 0.6 T for Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 4.95}Sn{sub 0.05}O{sub 12} ceramics. The MD coefficient of heavily doped samples (x > 0.05) is positive in the low frequency band, reaching 0.83% at 10 MHz and 0.6 T for Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 4.925}Sn{sub 0.075}O{sub 12} ceramics, and then decreasing with the increasing frequency, gradually becoming negative in the high frequency band. A detailed explanation is provided based on the origin of permittivity. This study provides a new methodology according to which the MD materials may be designed in order to satisfy the requirements of engineering applications.

  16. Origin of the non-monotonic variance of Tc in the 1111 iron based superconductors with isovalent doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Hidetomo; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental investigations of the isovalent doping iron-based superconductors LaFe(AsxP1-x)O1-yFy and NdFe(AsxP1-x)O1-yFy, we theoretically study the correlation between the local lattice structure, the Fermi surface, the spin fluctuation-mediated superconductivity, and the composition ratio. In the phosphides, the dXZ and dYZ orbitals barely hybridize around the Γ point to give rise to two intersecting ellipse shape Fermi surfaces. As the arsenic content increases and the Fe-As-Fe bond angle is reduced, the hybridization increases, so that the two bands are mixed to result in concentric inner and outer Fermi surfaces, and the orbital character gradually changes to dxz and dyz, where x–y axes are rotated by 45 degrees from X–Y. This makes the orbital matching between the electron and hole Fermi surfaces better and enhances the spin fluctuation within the dxz/yz orbitals. On the other hand, the hybridization splits the two bands, resulting in a more dispersive inner band. Hence, there is a trade-off between the density of states and the orbital matching, thereby locally maximizing the dxz/yz spin fluctuation and superconductivity in the intermediate regime of As/P ratio. The consistency with the experiment strongly indicate the importance of the spin fluctuation played in this series of superconductors. PMID:26073071

  17. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaliyamoorthy Venkatesan,1 Dhanakotti Rajan Babu,1 Mane Prabhu Kavya Bai,2 Ravi Supriya,2 Radhakrishnan Vidya,2 Saminathan Madeswaran,1 Pandurangan Anandan,3 Mukannan Arivanandhan,3 Yasuhiro Hayakawa3 1School of Advanced Sciences, 2School of Bio Sciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India; 3Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan Abstract: Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311 of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed. Keywords: cytotoxicity, HR-TEM, magnetic nanoparticles, VSM 

  18. Characterization and spectroscopic studies of multi-component calcium zinc bismuth phosphate glass ceramics doped with iron ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A. Suneel; Narendrudu, T.; Suresh, S.; Ram, G. Chinna; Rao, M. V. Sambasiva; Tirupataiah, Ch.; Rao, D. Krishna

    2018-04-01

    Glass ceramics with the composition 10CaF2-20ZnO-(15-x)Bi2O3-55P2O5:x Fe2O3(0≤x≤2.5) were synthesized by melt-quenching technique and heat treatment. These glass ceramics were characterized by XRD and SEM. Spectroscopic studies such as optical absorption, EPR were also carried out on these glass ceramics. From the absorption spectra the observed bands around 438 and 660nm are the octahedral transitions of Fe3+ (d5) ions and another band at about 536 nm is the tetrahedral transition of Fe3+ (d5) ions. The absorption spectrum also consist of a band around 991 nm and is attributed to the octahedral transition of Fe2+ ions. The EPR spectra of the prepared glass ceramics have exhibited two resonance signals one at g1=4.32 and another signal at g2=2.008. The observed decrease in band gap energy up to 2 mol% Fe2O3 doped glass ceramics is an evidence for the change of environment around iron ions and ligands from more covalent to less covalent (ionic) and induces higher concentration of NBOs which causes the depolymerization of the glass ceramic network.

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Kaliyamoorthy; Rajan Babu, Dhanakotti; Kavya Bai, Mane Prabhu; Supriya, Ravi; Vidya, Radhakrishnan; Madeswaran, Saminathan; Anandan, Pandurangan; Arivanandhan, Mukannan; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311) of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed.

  20. The improvement of boron-doped diamond anode system in electrochemical degradation of p-nitrophenol by zero-valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiuping; Ni Jinren

    2011-01-01

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes are promising anode materials in electrochemical treatment of wastewaters containing bio-refractory organic compounds due to their strong oxidation capability and remarkable corrosion stability. In order to further improve the performance of BDD anode system, electrochemical degradation of p-nitrophenol were initially investigated at the BDD anode in the presence of zero-valent iron (ZVI). The results showed that under acidic condition, the performance of BDD anode system containing zero-valent iron (BDD-ZVI system) could be improved with the joint actions of electrochemical oxidation at the BDD anode (39.1%), Fenton's reaction (28.5%), oxidation–reduction at zero-valent iron (17.8%) and coagulation of iron hydroxides (14.6%). Moreover, it was found that under alkaline condition the performance of BDD-ZVI system was significantly enhanced, mainly due to the accelerated release of Fe(II) ions from ZVI and the enhanced oxidation of Fe(II) ions. The dissolved oxygen concentration was significantly reduced by reduction at the cathode, and consequently zero-valent iron corroded to Fe(II) ions in anaerobic highly alkaline environments. Furthermore, the oxidation of released Fe(II) ions to Fe(III) ions and high-valent iron species (e.g., FeO 2+ , FeO 4 2− ) was enhanced by direct electrochemical oxidation at BDD anode.

  1. Iron and Nitrogen doped Titania an Overview of Function and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasap, M.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium dioxide is an exceptional material, featuring high transparency in the visible-IR range, high photo activity and superhidrophilicity, physical and chemical stability, low cost, non-toxicity. It is mostly applied in selective oxidation and reduction of an organic and organic materials, photovoltaics, photocatalytic sterilization, and sensors. Upon illumination of the TiO 2 surface with UV photons having energies in excess of 3.0 - 3.2 eV, electron-hole pairs are generated by interband transitions. The charge carriers migrate to the surface and react with the adsorbed water and oxygen, the -OH radicals thus formed being responsible for the highly enhanced chemical reactions with other adsorbates. To extend the amount of usable solar energy involved in TiO 2 surface catalyse, shifting the absorption edge towards the blue range of the visible spectrum (λ≥390-450 nm), several means have been proposed (attaching various organic dyes to the surface, reduction by hydrogenation, doping with various anions/cations etc.), each means with specific advantages and drawbacks. The most important restriction in all cases is the need to keep the lower limit of the conduction band non altered by band gap narrowing. Adequate doping of the titania materials may result in high-efficiency stable photocatalytic materials, sensitive enough to be photo-activated by low-level indoor light sources. We report here some of our latest results in preparing and characterizing Fe:TiO 2 and N:TiO-2 thin films using the RF magnetron sputtering and distinct growth conditions (pellet and discharge gas mixing, respectively). The as-deposited Fe:TiO 2 films, 300 nm thick, had a Fe/Ti concentration ratio ranging between 0.0% and 0.9%. While the low Fe-content samples were amorphous, an anatase Fe-rich nanophase dispersed in the amorphous phase was present in the high-content Fe films. Crystalline anatase and rutile nanodomains have been found in the nitrogen-containing titania films, with the

  2. A highly efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction: phosphorus and nitrogen co-doped hierarchically ordered porous carbon derived from an iron-functionalized polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chengwei; Zhong, Hexiang; Li, Xianfeng; Yao, Lan; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-01-01

    Heteroatom-doped carbon materials have shown respectable activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. However, the performances of these materials are not satisfactory for energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells. Here, we demonstrate a new type of phosphorus and nitrogen co-doped hierarchically ordered porous carbon (PNHOPC) derived from an iron-functionalized mesoporous polymer through an evaporation-induced self-assembly process that simultaneously combines the carbonization and nitrogen doping processes. The soft template and the nitrogen doping process facilitate the formation of the hierarchically ordered structure for the PNHOPC. The catalyst possesses a large surface area (1118 cm2 g-1) and a pore volume of 1.14 cm3 g-1. Notably, it exhibits excellent ORR catalytic performance, superior stability and methanol tolerance in acidic electrolytes, thus making the catalyst promising for fuel cells. The correlations between the unique pore structure and the nitrogen and phosphorus configuration of the catalysts with high catalytic activity are thoroughly investigated.Heteroatom-doped carbon materials have shown respectable activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. However, the performances of these materials are not satisfactory for energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells. Here, we demonstrate a new type of phosphorus and nitrogen co-doped hierarchically ordered porous carbon (PNHOPC) derived from an iron-functionalized mesoporous polymer through an evaporation-induced self-assembly process that simultaneously combines the carbonization and nitrogen doping processes. The soft template and the nitrogen doping process facilitate the formation of the hierarchically ordered structure for the PNHOPC. The catalyst possesses a large surface area (1118 cm2 g-1) and a pore volume of 1.14 cm3 g-1. Notably, it exhibits excellent ORR catalytic performance, superior stability and methanol tolerance in acidic

  3. Study of the recrystallization mechanisms of ultra-high purity iron doped with carbon, manganese and phosphorus; Etude des mecanismes de recristallisation dans le fer de ultra-haute purete dope en carbone, manganese et phosphore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesne, L.

    2000-07-04

    High purity steels have the potential to improve deep drawing properties for automotive applications. Understanding the influence of the chemical composition on the recrystallization mechanisms and on texture development should help to improve their properties. We have studied the influence of 10 ppm of carbon, 1000 ppm of manganese and 120 ppm of phosphorus on the recrystallization mechanisms of ultra-high purity iron (UHP iron > 99.997%). For this purpose we used 4 materials: one undoped (UHP), one doped with C, one doped with C, Mn and one doped With C, Mn, P. In order to restrict grain coarsening in the hot strips, hot rolling was performed in the ferritic region, in one pass of 80% thickness reduction. The hot bands were then fully recrystallized but exhibited non-isotropic textures, with in particular an intense Goss [110]<001> component for the doped materials. The hot-bands were subsequently cold rolled down to a thickness of 0.8 mm corresponding to a thickness reduction of 80%, and then continuously annealed at 10 deg. C/s. The recrystallization kinetics are delayed with the addition of doping elements. In particular, the incubation time for nucleation is shifted towards higher temperatures while the recrystallization velocity increases. The textures of the fully recrystallized materials exhibit a strong Goss component prejudicial for deep drawing properties. We have established that this component can only appear if coarse grains and carbon in solid solution were simultaneously present in the material before deformation. Characterisation of the cold deformed state enabled us to evaluate the energy stored during deformation as a function of the material composition and the grain orientation: - the overall stored energy increases with the doping elements content. - the stored energy in the {gamma} fibre grains is greater than in the {alpha} fibre grains: 30 J/mol for the {gamma} fibre instead of 5 J/mol for the {alpha} fibre, in the undoped UHP iron. In the

  4. Dielectric properties of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped barium iron niobate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjoom, Kachaporn [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Sri Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok, 10400 (Thailand); Pengpat, Kamonpan; Eitssayeam, Sukum; Tunkasiri, Tawee [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200 (Thailand); Rujijanagul, Gobwute [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Sri Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok, 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-08-15

    Ga-doped BaFe{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}){sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}) ceramics were fabricated and their properties were investigated. All ceramics showed perovskite structure with cubic symmetry and the solubility of Ga in BFN ceramics had a limit at x = 0.2. Examination of the dielectric spectra indicated that all ceramic samples presented high dielectric constants that were frequency dependent. The x = 0.2 ceramic showed a very high dielectric constant (ε{sub r} > 240 000 at 1 kHz) while the x = 0.4 sample exhibited high thermal stability of dielectric constant with low loss tangent from room temperature (RT) to 100 C with ε{sub r} > 28 000 (at 1 kHz) when compared to other samples. By using a complex impedance analysis technique, bulk grain, grain boundary, and electrode response were found to affect the dielectric behavior that could be related to the Maxwell-Wagner polarization mechanism. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Dielectric properties of Ga2O3-doped barium iron niobate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjoom, Kachaporn; Pengpat, Kamonpan; Eitssayeam, Sukum; Tunkasiri, Tawee; Rujijanagul, Gobwute

    2014-01-01

    Ga-doped BaFe 0.5 Nb 0.5 O 3 (Ba(Fe 1-x Ga x ) 0.5 Nb 0.5 O 3 ) ceramics were fabricated and their properties were investigated. All ceramics showed perovskite structure with cubic symmetry and the solubility of Ga in BFN ceramics had a limit at x = 0.2. Examination of the dielectric spectra indicated that all ceramic samples presented high dielectric constants that were frequency dependent. The x = 0.2 ceramic showed a very high dielectric constant (ε r > 240 000 at 1 kHz) while the x = 0.4 sample exhibited high thermal stability of dielectric constant with low loss tangent from room temperature (RT) to 100 C with ε r > 28 000 (at 1 kHz) when compared to other samples. By using a complex impedance analysis technique, bulk grain, grain boundary, and electrode response were found to affect the dielectric behavior that could be related to the Maxwell-Wagner polarization mechanism. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Iron-doped nickel oxide nanocrystals as highly efficient electrocatalysts for alkaline water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominykh, Ksenia; Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Sicklinger, Johannes; Stefanic, Goran; Döblinger, Markus; Müller, Alexander; Pokharel, Aneil; Böcklein, Sebastian; Scheu, Christina; Bein, Thomas; Fattakhova-Rohlfing, Dina

    2015-05-26

    Efficient electrochemical water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is considered a promising technology to overcome our dependency on fossil fuels. Searching for novel catalytic materials for electrochemical oxygen generation is essential for improving the total efficiency of water splitting processes. We report the synthesis, structural characterization, and electrochemical performance in the oxygen evolution reaction of Fe-doped NiO nanocrystals. The facile solvothermal synthesis in tert-butanol leads to the formation of ultrasmall crystalline and highly dispersible FexNi1-xO nanoparticles with dopant concentrations of up to 20%. The increase in Fe content is accompanied by a decrease in particle size, resulting in nonagglomerated nanocrystals of 1.5-3.8 nm in size. The Fe content and composition of the nanoparticles are determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, while Mössbauer and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analyses reveal a substitutional incorporation of Fe(III) into the NiO rock salt structure. The excellent dispersibility of the nanoparticles in ethanol allows for the preparation of homogeneous ca. 8 nm thin films with a smooth surface on various substrates. The turnover frequencies (TOF) of these films could be precisely calculated using a quartz crystal microbalance. Fe0.1Ni0.9O was found to have the highest electrocatalytic water oxidation activity in basic media with a TOF of 1.9 s(-1) at the overpotential of 300 mV. The current density of 10 mA cm(-2) is reached at an overpotential of 297 mV with a Tafel slope of 37 mV dec(-1). The extremely high catalytic activity, facile preparation, and low cost of the single crystalline FexNi1-xO nanoparticles make them very promising catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction.

  7. Spectroscopic and thermal properties of Sm3+ doped iron lead bismuthate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, P.; Yadav, A.; Dahiya, M. S.; Vishal, Rohit, Agarwal, A.; Khasa, S.

    2018-05-01

    The results of the structural, physical, thermal and electrical properties of the glass compositions xFe2O3•(100-x)(3Bi2O3•PbO)• Sm2O3(1 mol%) where x=0, 1, 5, 10, 12, 15 mol% prepared via melt quench technique were studied. The synthesized compositions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The IR study reveals that present system is build up with lead in tetrahedral coordination and bismuth in trigonal as well as octahedral coordination. Density and molar volume have been calculated using Archimedes principle, and the variation in their values has been correlated with structural changes in the glass matrix based on the IR study. The variation in the characteristic temperatures (glass transition temperature Tg, crystallization temperature Tp and melting temperature Tm) with different heating rate and change in the composition of iron oxide were analyzed and reported in the present study.

  8. Bromate Removal from Water Using Doped Iron Nanoparticles on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (CNTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasem Zeino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The raw carbon nanotubes (CNTs were prepared by the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method. The raw carbon nanotubes were functionalized, impregnated with iron nanoparticles, and characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The three types of these multiwalled carbon nanotubes were applied as adsorbents for the removal of bromate from drinking water. The effects of the pH, the concentration of BrO3- anion, the adsorbent dose, the contact time, and the coanions on the adsorption process have been investigated. The results concluded that the highest adsorption capacities were 0.3460 and 0.3220 mg/g through using CNTs-Fe and raw CNTs, respectively, at the same conditions. The results showed that the CNTs-Fe gives higher adsorption capacity compared with the raw CNTs and the functionalized CNTs. The presence of nitrate (NO3- in the solution decreases the adsorption capacity of all CNTs compared with chloride (Cl- associated with pH adjustment caused by nitric acid or hydrochloric acid, respectively. However, the adsorption of all MWNCTs types increases as the pH of solution decreases.

  9. Direct observation of multivalent states and 4 f →3 d charge transfer in Ce-doped yttrium iron garnet thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasili, H. B.; Casals, B.; Cichelero, R.; Macià, F.; Geshev, J.; Gargiani, P.; Valvidares, M.; Herrero-Martin, J.; Pellegrin, E.; Fontcuberta, J.; Herranz, G.

    2017-07-01

    Due to their large magneto-optic responses, rare-earth-doped yttrium iron garnets, Y3F e5O12 (YIG), are highly regarded for their potential in photonics and magnonics. Here, we consider the case of Ce-doped YIG (Ce-YIG) thin films, in which substitutional C e3 + ions are magnetic because of their 4 f1 ground state. In order to elucidate the impact of Ce substitution on the magnetization of YIG, we have carried out soft x-ray spectroscopy measurements on Ce-YIG films. In particular, we have used the element specificity of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism to extract the individual magnetization curves linked to Ce and Fe ions. Our results show that Ce doping triggers a selective charge transfer from Ce to the Fe tetrahedral sites in the YIG structure. This, in turn, causes a disruption of the electronic and magnetic properties of the parent compound, reducing the exchange coupling between the Ce and Fe magnetic moments and causing atypical magnetic behavior. Our work is relevant for understanding magnetism in rare-earth-doped YIG and, eventually, may enable a quantitative evaluation of the magneto-optical properties of rare-earth incorporation into YIG.

  10. One step aqueous solution preparation of nanosize iron-doped tin oxide from SnO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melghit, Khaled [Chemistry Department, College of Science, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123, Sultan Qaboos University (Oman)]. E-mail: melghit@squ.edu.om; Bouziane, Khalid [Physics Department, College of Science, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123, Sultan Qaboos University (Oman)

    2006-03-15

    Nanosized iron-doped tin oxide solid solution was prepared by mixing tin oxide gel SnO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O with a boiling solution of iron nitrate. The XRD data of the as-prepared and annealed sample at 773 K show that the patterns are indexed to the rutile phase without any trace of an extra phase. SEM and TEM results performed on different selected area of the samples reveal a homogeneous composition of 8 at.% of Fe content and a size of about 2 nm of the particles. The particles size was found to increase slightly with temperature; about 7 nm after 24 h at 773 K. Structural and magnetic results seem to indicate that Fe{sup 3+} substitute for Sn{sup 4+} on the as-prepared sample. The system presents some weak ferromagnetic character at room temperature.

  11. Characteristics and optical properties of iron ion (Fe{sup 3+})-doped titanium oxide thin films prepared by a sol-gel spin coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.C. [Faculty of Fragrance and Cosmetics, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, H.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National United University, 1 Lein-Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miao-Li 36003, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hjlin@nuu.edu.tw; Yang, T.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National United University, 1 Lein-Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miao-Li 36003, Taiwan (China)

    2009-04-03

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films doping of various iron ion (Fe{sup 3+}) concentrations have been prepared on a glass substrate by the sol-gel spin coating process. Characteristics and optical properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films doping of various Fe content were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The crystalline phase of TiO{sub 2} thin films comprised only the anatase TiO{sub 2}, but the crystallinity decreased when the Fe{sup 3+} content increased from 0 to 25.0 wt%. During the Fe{sup 3+} addition to 25.0 wt%, the phase of TiO{sub 2} thin film still maintained the amorphous state. The absorption edge of TiO{sub 2} thin films shifted towards longer wavelengths (i.e. red shifted) from 355 to 415 nm when the Fe{sup 3+}-doped concentration increased from 0 to 25.0 wt%. The values of the refractive index (n), and extinction coefficient (k), decreased with an increasing Fe{sup 3+} content. Moreover, the band-gap energy of TiO{sub 2} thin films also decreased from 3.29 to 2.83 eV with an increase in the Fe{sup 3+} content from 0 to 25.0 wt%.

  12. Disruptive chemical doping in a ferritin-based iron oxide nanoparticle to decrease r2 and enhance detection with T1-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Beeman, Scott C; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Bennett, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic doping was used to create flexible, paramagnetic nanoparticle contrast agents for in vivo molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with low transverse relaxivity (r2). Most nanoparticle contrast agents formed from superparamagnetic metal oxides are developed with high r2. While sensitive, they can have limited in vivo detection due to a number of constraints with T2 or T2*-weighted imaging. T1-weighted imaging is often preferred for molecular MRI, but most T1-shortening agents are small chelates with low metal payload or are nanoparticles that also shorten T2 and limit the range of concentrations detectable with T1-weighting. Here we used tungsten and iron deposition to form doped iron oxide crystals inside the apoferritin cavity to form a WFe nanoparticle with a disordered crystal and un-coupled atomic magnetic moments. The atomic magnetic moments were thus localized, resulting in a principally paramagnetic nanoparticle. The WFe nanoparticles had no coercivity or saturation magnetization at 5 K and sweeping up to ± 20,000 Oe, while native ferritin had a coercivity of 3000 Oe and saturation at ± 20,000 Oe. This tungsten-iron crystal paramagnetism resulted in an increased WFe particle longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4870 mm(-1) s(-1) and a reduced transverse relaxivity (r2) of 9076 mm(-1) s(-1) compared with native ferritin. The accumulation of the particles was detected with T1-weighted MRI in concentrations from 20 to 400 nm in vivo, both injected in the rat brain and targeted to the rat kidney glomerulus. The WFe apoferritin nanoparticles were not cytotoxic up to 700 nm particle concentrations, making them potentially important for targeted molecular MRI. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Fabrication of mesoporous iron (Fe) doped copper sulfide (CuS) nanocomposite in the presence of a cationic surfactant via mild hydrothermal method for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. William; Ramesh, P. S.; Geetha, D.

    2018-02-01

    We report fabrication of mesoporous Fe doped CuS nanocomposites with uniform mesoporous spherical structures via a mild hydrothermal method employing copper nitrate trihydrate (Cu (NO3).3H2O), Thiourea (Tu,Sc(NH2)2 and Iron tri nitrate (Fe(No3)3) as initial materials with cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylamoniame bromide (CTAB) as stabilizer/size controller and Ethylene glycol as solvent at 130 °C temperature. The products were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX, TEM, FTIR and UV analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra confirmed the Fe doped CuS nanocomposites which are crystalline in nature. EDX and XRD pattern confirmed that the product is hexagonal CuS phase. Fe doped spherical structure of CuS with grain size of 21 nm was confirmed by XRD pattern. Fe doping was identified by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results revealed the occurrence of active functional groups required for the reduction of copper ions. Studies showed that after a definite time relining on the chosen copper source, the obtained Fe-CuS nanocomposite shows a tendency towards self-assembly and creating mesoporous like nano and submicro structures by TEM/SAED. The achievable mechanism of producing this nanocomposite was primarily discussed. The electrochemical study confirms the pseudocapacitive nature of the CuS and Fe-CuS electrodes. The CuS and Fe-CuS electrode shows a specific capacitance of about 328.26 and 516.39 Fg-1 at a scan rate of 5 mVs-1. As the electrode in a supercapacitor, the mesoporous nanostructured Fe-CuS shows excellent capacitance characteristics.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and performance in arsenic removal of iron-doped activated carbons prepared by impregnation with Fe(III) and Fe(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, G.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Furdin, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, G.; Ballinas, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic removal from natural well water from the state of Chihuahua (Mexico) is investigated by adsorption using a commercial activated carbon (AC). The latter is used as such, or after oxidation by several chemicals in aqueous solution: nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulphate. Raw and oxidised activated carbons are fully characterised (elementary analysis, surface chemistry, pore texture parameters, pH ZC , and TEM observation). Adsorption of As is measured in the aforementioned water, containing ca. 300 ppb of arsenic: removal of As is poor with the raw AC, and only the most oxidised carbons exhibit higher performances. By contrast, iron-doped ACs are much more efficient for that purpose, though their As uptake strongly depends on their preparation conditions: a number of samples were synthesised by impregnation of raw and oxidised ACs with HCl aqueous solutions of either FeCl 3 or FeCl 2 at various concentrations and various pH. It is shown that iron(II) chloride is better for obtaining high iron contents in the resultant ACs (up to 8.34 wt.%), leading to high As uptake, close to 0.036 mg As/g C. In these conditions, 100% of the As initially present in the natural well water is removed, as soon as the Fe content of the adsorbent is higher than 2 wt.%.

  15. In vivo magnetic resonance and fluorescence dual imaging of tumor sites by using dye-doped silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Haeyun; Lee, Chaedong; Nam, Gi-Eun; Quan, Bo; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Yoo, Jung Sun; Piao, Yuanzhe

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty in delineating tumor is a major obstacle for better outcomes in cancer treatment of patients. The use of single-imaging modality is often limited by inadequate sensitivity and resolution. Here, we present the synthesis and the use of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles coated with fluorescent silica nano-shells for fluorescence and magnetic resonance dual imaging of tumor. The as-synthesized core–shell nanoparticles were designed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis via simultaneous tumor imaging with dual imaging modalities by a single injection of contrast agent. The iron oxide nanocrystals (∼11 nm) were coated with Rhodamine B isothiocyanate-doped silica shells via reverse microemulsion method. Then, the core–shell nanoparticles (∼54 nm) were analyzed to confirm their size distribution by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic laser scattering. Photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the fluorescent property of the dye-doped silica shell-coated nanoparticles. The cellular compatibility of the as-prepared nanoparticles was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay and the potential as a dual-imaging contrast agent was verified by in vivo fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. The experimental results show that the uniform-sized core–shell nanoparticles are highly water dispersible and the cellular toxicity of the nanoparticles is negligible. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrates the capability of the developed nanoparticles to selectively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention effects and ex vivo tissue analysis was corroborated this. Through in vitro phantom test, the core/shell nanoparticles showed a T2 relaxation time comparable to Feridex ® with smaller size, indicating that the as-made nanoparticles are suitable for imaging tumor. This new dual-modality-nanoparticle approach has promised for enabling more accurate tumor imaging.

  16. In vivo magnetic resonance and fluorescence dual imaging of tumor sites by using dye-doped silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Haeyun; Lee, Chaedong [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Gi-Eun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Quan, Bo [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyuck Jae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jung Sun [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Smart Humanity Convergence Center (Korea, Republic of); Piao, Yuanzhe, E-mail: parkat9@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty in delineating tumor is a major obstacle for better outcomes in cancer treatment of patients. The use of single-imaging modality is often limited by inadequate sensitivity and resolution. Here, we present the synthesis and the use of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles coated with fluorescent silica nano-shells for fluorescence and magnetic resonance dual imaging of tumor. The as-synthesized core–shell nanoparticles were designed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis via simultaneous tumor imaging with dual imaging modalities by a single injection of contrast agent. The iron oxide nanocrystals (∼11 nm) were coated with Rhodamine B isothiocyanate-doped silica shells via reverse microemulsion method. Then, the core–shell nanoparticles (∼54 nm) were analyzed to confirm their size distribution by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic laser scattering. Photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the fluorescent property of the dye-doped silica shell-coated nanoparticles. The cellular compatibility of the as-prepared nanoparticles was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay and the potential as a dual-imaging contrast agent was verified by in vivo fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. The experimental results show that the uniform-sized core–shell nanoparticles are highly water dispersible and the cellular toxicity of the nanoparticles is negligible. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrates the capability of the developed nanoparticles to selectively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention effects and ex vivo tissue analysis was corroborated this. Through in vitro phantom test, the core/shell nanoparticles showed a T2 relaxation time comparable to Feridex{sup ®} with smaller size, indicating that the as-made nanoparticles are suitable for imaging tumor. This new dual-modality-nanoparticle approach has promised for enabling more accurate tumor imaging.

  17. Influences of the iron ion (Fe3+)-doping on structural and optical properties of nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films prepared by sol-gel spin coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Naceur, J.; Mechiakh, R.; Bousbih, F.; Chtourou, R.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) thin films doping of various iron ion (Fe 3+ ) concentrations were deposited on silicon (Si) (100) and quartz substrates by sol-gel Spin Coating technique followed by a thermal treatment at 600 deg. C. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties, as a function of the doping, have been studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Raman, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE). XRD and Raman analyzes of our thin films show that the crystalline phase of TiO 2 thin films comprised only the anatase TiO 2 , but the crystallinity decreased when the Fe 3+ content increased from 0% to 20%. During the Fe 3+ addition to 20%, the phase of TiO 2 thin film still maintained the amorphous state. The grain size calculated from XRD patterns varies from 29.3 to 22.6 nm. The complex index and the optical band gap (E g ) of the films were determined by the spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis. We have found that the optical band gap decreased with an increasing Fe 3+ content.

  18. Three-dimensional iron, nitrogen-doped carbon foams as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yanjiao; Wang, Hui; Feng, Hanqing; Ji, Shan; Mao, Xuefeng; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three-dimentional Fe, N-doped carbon foams prepared by two steps exhibited comparable catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction to commercial Pt/C due to the unique structure and the synergistic effect of Fe and N atoms. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional Fe, N-doped carbon foam (3D-CF) were prepared. • 3D-CF exhibits comparable catalytic activity to Pt/C for oxygen reduction reaction. • The enhanced activity of 3D-CF results of its unique structure. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) Fe, N-doped carbon foams (3D-CF) as efficient cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution are reported. The 3D-CF exhibit interconnected hierarchical pore structure. In addition, Fe, N-doped carbon without porous strucuture (Fe-N-C) and 3D N-doped carbon without Fe (3D-CF’) are prepared to verify the electrocatalytic activity of 3D-CF. The electrocatalytic performance of as-prepared 3D-CF for ORR shows that the onset potential on 3D-CF electrode positively shifts about 41 mV than those of 3D-CF’ and Fe-N-C respectively. In addition, the onset potential on 3D-CF electrode for ORR is about 27 mV more negative than that on commercial Pt/C electrode. 3D-CF also show better methanol tolerance and durability than commercial Pt/C catalyst. These results show that to synthesize 3D hierarchical pores with high specific surface area is an efficient way to improve the ORR performance

  19. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Iron Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Jun; Fu, Yao

    2016-06-08

    Iron-based heterogeneous catalysts, which were generally prepared by pyrolysis of iron complexes on supports at elevated temperature, were found to be capable of catalyzing the transfer hydrogenation of furfural (FF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA). The effects of metal precursor, nitrogen precursor, pyrolysis temperature, and support on catalytic performance were examined thoroughly, and a comprehensive study of the reaction parameters was also performed. The highest selectivity of FFA reached 83.0 % with a FF conversion of 91.6 % under the optimal reaction condition. Catalyst characterization suggested that iron cations coordinated by pyridinic nitrogen functionalities were responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity. The iron catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity for five runs, and the destruction of the nitrogen-iron species, the presence of crystallized Fe2 O3 phase, and the pore structure change were the main reasons for catalyst deactivation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Influence of different synthesis approach on doping behavior of silver nanoparticles onto the iron oxide-silica coreshell surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mahmed, N.; Jiang, H.; Heczko, Oleg; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2012), s. 1-15 ISSN 1388-0764 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : stroble method * silver nanoparticles * iron oxide * amourphous silica Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.175, year: 2012

  1. The effect of Ce doping on the structure, surface morphology and magnetic properties of Dy doped-yttrium iron garnet films prepared by a sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsad, A.Z.; Ibrahim, N.B., E-mail: baayah@ukm.edu.my

    2016-07-15

    Cerium substitute Y{sub 2.8−x}Dy{sub 0.2}Ce{sub x}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (x=0, 0.2, 0.25, 0.3, 0.35) films have been prepared on quartz substrates by a simple sol–gel method and followed by a spin-coating technique. The crystalline structures, surface and magnetic properties of the films has been investigated by an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD analysis revealed that the films have garnet structure. The lattice parameter increased as Ce content was increased up to 0.25 due to the Ce{sup 3+} ions completely substituted for Y{sup 3+} ions. For films x≥0.3, the lattice parameter decreased. The FESEM results showed that the average grains were small, ranging from 11 to 14 nm and the thickness of films increased with the increment of Ce contents. VSM results for both in and out-plane magnetic measurement showed the film with x=0 has the highest saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) values. With the increment of Ce contents, the M{sub s} of films decreased due to the substitution of Ce{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} ions in the c-site. For films x≥0.3 the reduction of M{sub s} values was due to the presence of CeO{sub 2} in the film. The films with x=0–0.25 exhibited increases in H{sub c} values. The improvement of coercivity value, small grain size and high crystalline structure of film with x=0.25 has a potential to be used in magneto optical (MO) memory storage applications. - Highlights: • Ce-doped Y{sub 2.8−x}Dy{sub 0.2}Ce{sub x}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} films were prepared by the sol–gel method. • The solubility limit of Ce{sup 3+} ions in the film was x=0.25. • The average grain size ranging from 11 to 14 nm with the increment of Ce doping. • Increasing Ce contents degrades the saturation of magnetization of films. • Increasing Ce contents improve the coercivity of films.

  2. Effect of metallic iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 doped with a radioactive alpha emitter in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jegou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Jouan, Gauthier; Peuget, Sylvain; Martin, Christelle

    2017-12-01

    In the hypothesis of direct disposal of spent fuel in a geological nuclear waste repository, interactions between the fuel mainly composed of UO2 and its environment must be understood. The dissolution rate of the UO2 matrix, which depends on the redox conditions on the fuel surface, will have a major impact on the release of radionuclides into the environment. The reducing conditions expected for a geological disposal situation would appear to be favorable as regards the solubility and stability of the UO2 matrix, but may be disturbed on the surface of irradiated fuel. In particular, the local redox conditions will result from a competition between the radiolysis effects of water under alpha irradiation (simultaneously producing oxidizing species like H2O2, hydrogen peroxide, and reducing species like H2, hydrogen) and those of redox active species from the environment. In particular, Fe2+, a strongly reducing aqueous species coming from the corrosion of the iron canister or from the host rock, could influence the dissolution of the fuel matrix. The effect of iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 was thus investigated under the conditions of the French disposal site, a Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation chosen by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), here tested under alpha irradiation. For this study, UO2 fuel pellets doped with a radioactive alpha emitter (238/239Pu) were leached in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater (representative of the French waste disposal site groundwater) in the presence of a metallic iron foil to simulate the steel canister. The pellets had varying levels of alpha activity, in order to modulate the concentrations of species produced by water radiolysis on the surface and to simulate the activity of aged spent fuel after 50 and 10,000 years of alpha radioactivity decay. The experimental data showed that whatever the sample alpha radioactivity, the presence of iron inhibits the oxidizing dissolution of

  3. Paramagnetic iron-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with improved metal sorption properties. A bioorganic substrates-mediated synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, D Fabio; Magnacca, Giuliana; Malandrino, Mery; Rubert, Aldo; Montoneri, Enzo; Celi, Luisella; Bianco Prevot, Alessandra; Gonzalez, Mónica C

    2014-03-26

    This paper describes the synthesis of paramegnetic iron-containing hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and their increased Cu(2+) sorbent capacity when using Ca(2+) complexes of soluble bioorganic substrates from urban wastes as synthesis precursors. A thorough characterization of the particles by TEM, XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, specific surface area, TGA, XPS, and DLS indicates that loss of crystallinity, a higher specific area, an increased surface oxygen content, and formation of surface iron phases strongly enhance Cu(2+) adsorption capacity of hydroxyapatite-based materials. However, the major effect of the surface and morphologycal modifications is the size diminution of the aggregates formed in aqueous solutions leading to an increased effective surface available for Cu(2+) adsorption. Maximum sorption values of 550-850 mg Cu(2+) per gram of particles suspended in an aqueous solution at pH 7 were determined, almost 10 times the maximum values observed for hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspensions under the same conditions.

  4. Structure and thermal stability of nanostructured iron-doped zirconia prepared by high-energy ball milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Mørup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    % alpha-Fe2O3. The unit-cell volume of the cubic ZrO2 phase decreases with increasing iron content. During heating hte cubic-to-tetragonal transition occurs at approximately 827 degrees C and the tetragonal-to-monoclinic transition seems to be absent at temperatures below 950 degrees C. During cooling...... the tetragonal-to-monoclinic transition occurs at 900-1100 degrees C....

  5. Effect of iron doping on the magnetic properties of TbMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, T.-C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: taichun_han@yahoo.com.tw; Lin, Jauyn Grace [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China) and Center for Nanostorage Research, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jglin@ccms.ntu.edu.tw

    2007-03-15

    We synthesized a series of TbFe{sub x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 5} (0{<=}x{<=}0.2) samples and studied the effect of the Fe-doping on their magnetic properties. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate a pure orthorhombic structure with space group Pbam for all the samples. Based on the data of temperature- and field-dependent magnetization, M(T) and M(H) curves, it is found that the magnetic moment enhances with increase in the Fe-content in TbMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. With increase in the Fe-content from 0 to 0.2, the magnetic moment increases progressively from 0.014 to 0.030 {mu} {sub Bohr} p.f.u. at room temperature (RT). Particularly for the TbFe{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 1.8}O{sub 5} sample, a current-voltage curve displays a nonlinear behavior at RT. If a strong coupling between magnetic moment and electric polarization exists, the Fe-doped sample may have a higher polarization/ferroelectric effect, which should be a great advantage for the future application of the spintronics devices.

  6. Iron insertion and hematite segregation on Fe-doped TiO2 nanoparticles obtained from sol-gel and hydrothermal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Reginaldo da S; Faria, Guilherme A; Giles, Carlos; Leite, Carlos A P; Barbosa, Herbert de S; Arruda, Marco A Z; Longo, Claudia

    2012-10-24

    Iron-doped TiO(2) (Fe:TiO(2)) nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel method (with Fe/Ti molar ratio corresponding to 1, 3, and 5%), followed by hydrothermal treatment, drying, and annealing. A similar methodology was used to synthesize TiO(2) and α-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles. For comparison, a mixture hematite/titania, with Fe/Ti = 4% was also investigated. Characterization of the samples using Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data revealed that TiO(2) consisted of 82% anatase and 18% brookite; for Fe:TiO(2), brookite increased to 30% and hematite was also identified (0.5, 1.0, and 1.2 wt % for samples prepared with 1, 3, and 5% of Fe/Ti). For hematite/titania mixture, Fe/Ti was estimated as 4.4%, indicating the Rietveld method reliability for estimation of phase composition. Because the band gap energy, estimated as 3.2 eV for TiO(2), gradually ranged from 3.0 to 2.7 eV with increasing Fe content at Fe:TiO(2), it can be assumed that a Fe fraction was also inserted as dopant in the TiO(2) lattice. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra obtained for the Ti K-edge and Fe K-edge indicated that absorbing Fe occupied a Ti site in the TiO(2) lattice, but hematite features were not observed. Hematite particles also could not be identified in the images obtained by transmission electron microscopy, in spite of iron identification by elemental mapping, suggesting that hematite can be segregated at the grain boundaries of Fe:TiO(2).

  7. Comparison of iron and copper doped manganese cobalt spinel oxides as protective coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Belma; Molin, Sebastian; Wiik, Kjell; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2017-12-01

    MnCo2O4, MnCo1.7Cu0.3O4 and MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 are investigated as coatings for corrosion protection of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cell stacks. Electrophoretic deposition is used to deposit the coatings on Crofer 22 APU alloy. All three coating materials reduce the parabolic oxidation rate in air at 900 °C and 800 °C. At 700 °C there is no significant difference in oxidation rate between coated samples and uncoated pre-oxidized Crofer 22 APU. The cross-scale area specific resistance (ASR) is measured in air at 800 °C using La0.85Sr0.1Mn1.1O3 (LSM) contact plates to simulate the interaction with the cathode in a SOFC stack. All coated samples have three times lower ASR than uncoated Crofer 22 APU after 4370 h aging. The ASR increase with time is lowest with the MnCo2O4 coating, followed by the MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 and MnCo1.7Cu0.3O4 coatings. LSM plates contacted to uncoated Crofer 22 APU contain significant amounts of Cr after aging, while all three coatings effectively prevent Cr diffusion into the LSM. A complex Cr-rich reaction layer develops at the coating-alloy interface during oxidation. Cu and Fe doping reduce the extent of this reaction layer at 900 °C, while at 800 °C the effect of doping is insignificant.

  8. Room temperature ferromagnetism of iron-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods synthesized by a low temperature method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melghit, Khaled [Chemistry Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123 (Oman)], E-mail: melghit@squ.edu.om; Bouziane, Khalid [Physics Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khodh 123 (Oman)

    2008-04-03

    Nanorods of Fe-TiO{sub 2} were synthesized at 100 deg. C and room pressure by mixing titanium oxide wet gel TiO{sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O with a boiling solution of iron nitrate. The results of EDAX, performed on different selected area of the sample, revealed a homogeneous composition of about 3 at% Fe. Electron diffraction and XRD measurements show that the as-prepared Fe-TiO{sub 2} and annealed one at 550 deg. C have both a single rutile structure with no indication about the presence of a secondary phase. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that both as-prepared Fe-TiO{sub 2} and annealed one at 550 deg. C have nanorod-shape with dimensions length by diameter of about 60 x 5 nm and 52 x 12 nm, respectively. Magnetization measurements show that both samples present a nonzero remanence and a coercivity of 108 and 120 Oe, respectively. At higher temperature, 850 deg. C, Fe-TiO{sub 2} decomposes to rutile TiO{sub 2} and new iron-titanate phase.

  9. Low-field microwave absorption and magnetoresistance in iron nanostructures grown by electrodeposition on n-type lightly doped silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, J.F. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa-UFV, Departamento de Física, 36570-900 Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Universidade de Brasília-UnB, Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, 70910-900 Brasília, DF (Brazil); Figueiredo, L.C. [Universidade de Brasília-UnB, Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, 70910-900 Brasília, DF (Brazil); Mendes, J.B.S. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa-UFV, Departamento de Física, 36570-900 Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Morais, P.C. [Universidade de Brasília-UnB, Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, 70910-900 Brasília, DF (Brazil); Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Automation, 430074 Wuhan (China); Araujo, C.I.L. de., E-mail: dearaujo@ufv.br [Universidade de Brasília-UnB, Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, 70910-900 Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigate magnetic properties, surface morphology and crystal structure in iron nanoclusters electrodeposited on lightly doped (100) n-type silicon substrates. Our goal is to investigate the spin injection and detection in the Fe/Si lateral structures. The samples obtained under electric percolation were characterized by magnetoresistive and magnetic resonance measurements with cycling the sweeping applied field in order to understand the spin dynamics in the as-produced samples. The observed hysteresis in the magnetic resonance spectra, plus the presence of a broad peak in the non-saturated regime confirming the low field microwave absorption (LFMA), were correlated to the peaks and slopes found in the magnetoresistance curves. The results suggest long range spin injection and detection in low resistive silicon and the magnetic resonance technique is herein introduced as a promising tool for analysis of electric contactless magnetoresistive samples. - Highlights: • Electrodeposition of Fe nanostructures on high resistive silicon substrates. • Spin polarized current among clusters through Si suggested by isotropic magnetoresistance. • Low field microwave absorption arising from the sample shape anisotropy. • Contactless magnetoresistive device characterization by resonance measurements.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and enhanced photocatalytic activity of iron oxide/carbon nanotube/Ag-doped TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques Neto, José O.; Bellato, Carlos R.; Souza, Carlos H.F. de; Silva, Renê C. da; Rocha, Pablo A., E-mail: bellato@ufv.br [Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV), MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    A novel magnetically recoverable catalyst (Fe/MWCNT/TiO{sub 2}-Ag) was prepared in this study by a process that involves few steps. Titanium dioxide doped with silver and iron oxide was deposited on support of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). The synthesized catalysts were characterized by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). Phenol in aqueous solution (50 mg L{sup -1}) was used as a model compound for evaluation of UV-Vis (filter cut off for λ > 300 nm) photocatalytic activity. The composite catalyst has a high photocatalytic activity, destroying ca. 100% of phenol and removing 85% of total organic carbon in an aqueous solution after 180 min. The Fe/MWCNT/TiO{sub 2}-Ag catalyst remained stable, presenting an 8% decrease in phenol degradation efficiency after ten consecutive photocatalytic cycles. (author)

  11. Synthesis and application of iron and zinc doped biochar for removal of p-nitrophenol in wastewater and assessment of the influence of co-existed Pb(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pei; Tang, Lin; Wei, Xue; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yaoyu; Deng, Yaocheng; Wang, Jingjing; Xie, Zhihong; Fang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Iron and zinc doped biochar was developed with larger specific surface area, new generated hydroxyl groups, and beneficial magnetism compared with pristine biochar. • Fe/Zn-biochar presented good performance both for PNP and Pb(II) adsorption as well as their simultaneous removal. • Mechanism of the enhanced adsorption for low concentrations of co-existing PNP and Pb(II) was proposed. - Abstract: The modification of biochar as a low-cost adsorbent is essential to improve its surface properties and shows great potential in water decontamination. The iron and zinc doped sawdust biochar (Fe/Zn-biochar) with large apparent surface area (518.54 m 2 /g) proposed in this work showed good performance for p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal compared with the pristine biochar (P-biochar), iron doped biochar (Fe-biochar) and zinc doped biochar (Zn-biochar) respectively. The batch experiments turned out that Fe/Zn-biochar exhibited larger PNP adsorption capacity under acidic pH solution, and the ionic strength had slightly negative impact on PNP adsorption. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms were discussed, and the experimental data fitted well the Pseudo-second-order equation and Langmuir model. The thermodynamic study indicated that the PNP adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. Furthermore, the simultaneous removal for PNP and Pb(II) by Fe/Zn-biochar was investigated. It implied that the adsorption of PNP and Pb(II) at their low concentration might be enhanced by the complexing-bridging mechanism of PNP and Pb(II) ascribing to the affinity between PNP and hydrophobic sites, in addition to the affinity between Pb(II) and oxygen-containing hydrophilic sites on Fe/Zn-biochar surface. However, the predominated competition between PNP and Pb(II) at their high concentrations with Fe/Zn-biochar suppressed their adsorption.

  12. Synthesis and application of iron and zinc doped biochar for removal of p-nitrophenol in wastewater and assessment of the influence of co-existed Pb(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Tang, Lin, E-mail: tanglin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Wei, Xue [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Zeng, Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Zhou, Yaoyu [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Deng, Yaocheng; Wang, Jingjing; Xie, Zhihong; Fang, Wei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Iron and zinc doped biochar was developed with larger specific surface area, new generated hydroxyl groups, and beneficial magnetism compared with pristine biochar. • Fe/Zn-biochar presented good performance both for PNP and Pb(II) adsorption as well as their simultaneous removal. • Mechanism of the enhanced adsorption for low concentrations of co-existing PNP and Pb(II) was proposed. - Abstract: The modification of biochar as a low-cost adsorbent is essential to improve its surface properties and shows great potential in water decontamination. The iron and zinc doped sawdust biochar (Fe/Zn-biochar) with large apparent surface area (518.54 m{sup 2}/g) proposed in this work showed good performance for p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal compared with the pristine biochar (P-biochar), iron doped biochar (Fe-biochar) and zinc doped biochar (Zn-biochar) respectively. The batch experiments turned out that Fe/Zn-biochar exhibited larger PNP adsorption capacity under acidic pH solution, and the ionic strength had slightly negative impact on PNP adsorption. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms were discussed, and the experimental data fitted well the Pseudo-second-order equation and Langmuir model. The thermodynamic study indicated that the PNP adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. Furthermore, the simultaneous removal for PNP and Pb(II) by Fe/Zn-biochar was investigated. It implied that the adsorption of PNP and Pb(II) at their low concentration might be enhanced by the complexing-bridging mechanism of PNP and Pb(II) ascribing to the affinity between PNP and hydrophobic sites, in addition to the affinity between Pb(II) and oxygen-containing hydrophilic sites on Fe/Zn-biochar surface. However, the predominated competition between PNP and Pb(II) at their high concentrations with Fe/Zn-biochar suppressed their adsorption.

  13. Comparison of iron and copper doped manganese cobalt spinel oxides as protective coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talic, Belma; Molin, Sebastian; Wiik, Kjell

    2017-01-01

    MnCo2O4, MnCo1.7Cu0.3O4 and MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 are investigated as coatings for corrosion protection of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cell stacks. Electrophoretic deposition is used to deposit the coatings on Crofer 22 APU alloy. All three coating materials reduce the parabolic oxidation...... rate in air at 900 °C and 800 °C. At 700 °C there is no significant difference in oxidation rate between coated samples and uncoated pre-oxidized Crofer 22 APU. The cross-scale area specific resistance (ASR) is measured in air at 800 °C using La0.85Sr0.1Mn1.1O3 (LSM) contact plates to simulate...... contain significant amounts of Cr after aging, while all three coatings effectively prevent Cr diffusion into the LSM. A complex Cr-rich reaction layer develops at the coating-alloy interface during oxidation. Cu and Fe doping reduce the extent of this reaction layer at 900 °C, while at 800 °C the effect...

  14. Effect of cobalt doping on crystallinity, stability, magnetic and optical properties of magnetic iron oxide nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjum, Safia; Tufail, Rabia; Rashid, Khalid; Zia, Rehana; Riaz, S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The stability of Co x Fe (2-x) O 3 nanoparticles enhances. • Energy losses increases. • Anisotropy of NP is high. - Abstract: This paper is dedicated to investigate the effect of Co 2+ ions in magnetite Fe 3 O 4 nano-particles with stoichiometric formula Co x Fe 3-x O 4 where (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.15) prepared by co-precipitation method. The structural, thermal, morphological, magnetic and optical properties of magnetite and Co 2+ doped magnetite nanoparticles have been carried out using X-ray Diffractometer, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Themogravimetric Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and UV–Vis Spectrometer (UV–Vis) respectively. Structural analysis verified the formation of single phase inverse spinel cubic structure with decrease in lattice parameters due to increase in cobalt content. FTIR analysis confirms the single phase of Co x Fe 3-x O 4 nanoparticles with the major band at 887 cm −1 , which might be due to the stretching vibrations of metal-oxide bond. The DSC results corroborate the finding of an increase in the maghemite to hematite phase transition temperature with increase in Co 2+ content. The decrease in enthalpy with increase in Co 2+ concentration attributed to the fact that the degree of conversion from maghemite to hematite decrease which shows that the stability increases with increasing Co 2+ content in B-site of Fe 3 O 4 structure. SEM analysis demonstrated the formation of spherical shaped nanoparticles with least agglomeration. The magnetic measurements enlighten that the coercivity and anisotropy of Co x Fe 3-x O 4 nanoparticles are significantly increased. From UV–Vis analysis it is revealed that band gap energy increases with decreasing particle size. This result has a great interest for magnetic fluid hyperthermia application (MPH).

  15. Studies performed on neutron-irradiated copper-doped iron specimens by means of neutron small-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, M.

    1978-01-01

    By means of neutron small-angle scattering precipitation arising from heat-treatment and reactor irradiation in copper-alloyed iron specimens were studied. Copper content varried between 0 and 1.5%, irradiation temperature between 310 and 563K. The specimens had been cooled from the melt partly fast, partly slowely. By taking account of magnetic scattering and by investigating the azimuthal dependence of the total scattering it became possible to distinguish between copper precipitations and vacancy agglomerates. The most obvious effect in the slowly cooled specimens after irradiation with 2-10 19 fast neutrons per cm 2 at a temperature of 563 K is the existence of copper agglomerates with diameters of the order of magnitude of 5nm. Precipitation already occurs to a much lesser extent by the influence of temperature alone. Fast cooling from the melt or low irradiation temperature reduce precipitation during reactor irradiation. Moreover, there are indications on the formation of vacancy accumulations and dislocation rings, the latter especially in the fast cooled specimens. (orig.) [de

  16. Effects of Yttrium and Iron co-doping on the high temperature thermoelectric properties of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+δ}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, NingYu, E-mail: niwu@dtu.dk; Van Nong, Ngo; Pryds, Nini; Linderoth, Søren

    2015-07-25

    Highlights: • The Fe and Fe/Y doping at the Co- and Ca-sites of Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+δ} were investigated. • The rising ρ by Y doping can be mitigated by the coupled Fe doping. • The increased Seebeck coefficient by Y doping can be maintained in co-doped system. • The co-doped system leads to an improvement of the thermoelectric performance. • The co-doped system may preserve the merits from each component doping. - Abstract: A series of Y and Fe co-doped Ca{sub 3−x}Y{sub x}Co{sub 4−y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 9+δ} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.3, 0 ⩽ y ⩽ 0.1) samples synthesized by auto-combustion reaction and followed by a spark plasma sintering (SPS) processing with the effects of Fe and Y doping on the high temperature (RT to 800 °C) thermoelectric properties were systematically investigated. For the Fe-doped system (x = 0, y ⩽ 0.1), the electrical resistivity (ρ) decreased over the whole measured temperature range, while the Seebeck coefficient (S) remained almost the same. For the co-doped system, at any fixed Fe doping content, both ρ and S tended to increase with increasing Y dopants, however, the effect is more substantial on ρ than on S, particularly in the low temperature regime. In contrast to ρ and S, the in-plane thermal conductivity (κ) is only slightly influenced by Y and Fe substitutions. Among all the investigated samples, the co-doped sample with x = 0.1 and y = 0.03 showed a decrease of ρ, enhanced power factor over the measured temperature range, and improved ZT at 800 °C as compared to un-doped Ca{sub 3}Co{sub 4}O{sub 9+δ}.

  17. Effect of cobalt doping on crystallinity, stability, magnetic and optical properties of magnetic iron oxide nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjum, Safia, E-mail: safia_anjum@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore (Pakistan); Tufail, Rabia [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, Khalid [PCSIR Laboratories Lahore (Pakistan); Zia, Rehana [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore (Pakistan); Riaz, S. [Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The stability of Co{sub x}Fe{sub (2-x)}O{sub 3} nanoparticles enhances. • Energy losses increases. • Anisotropy of NP is high. - Abstract: This paper is dedicated to investigate the effect of Co{sup 2+} ions in magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nano-particles with stoichiometric formula Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} where (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.15) prepared by co-precipitation method. The structural, thermal, morphological, magnetic and optical properties of magnetite and Co{sup 2+} doped magnetite nanoparticles have been carried out using X-ray Diffractometer, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Themogravimetric Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and UV–Vis Spectrometer (UV–Vis) respectively. Structural analysis verified the formation of single phase inverse spinel cubic structure with decrease in lattice parameters due to increase in cobalt content. FTIR analysis confirms the single phase of Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with the major band at 887 cm{sup −1}, which might be due to the stretching vibrations of metal-oxide bond. The DSC results corroborate the finding of an increase in the maghemite to hematite phase transition temperature with increase in Co{sup 2+} content. The decrease in enthalpy with increase in Co{sup 2+} concentration attributed to the fact that the degree of conversion from maghemite to hematite decrease which shows that the stability increases with increasing Co{sup 2+} content in B-site of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure. SEM analysis demonstrated the formation of spherical shaped nanoparticles with least agglomeration. The magnetic measurements enlighten that the coercivity and anisotropy of Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are significantly increased. From UV–Vis analysis it is revealed that band gap energy increases with decreasing particle size. This result has a great interest for magnetic fluid hyperthermia application (MPH).

  18. Evolution of magnetic and superconducting phases with doping and pressure in the underdoped iron-arsenide superconductor Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassinger, Elena [Universite de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Max Planck Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Gredat, Gregory; Valade, Fabrice; Rene de Cotret, Samuel; Juneau-Fecteau, Alexandre; Reid, Jean-Philippe; Doiron-Leyraud, Nicolas [Universite de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Kim, H.; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa (United States); Shen, B.; Wen, H.H. [Nanjing University (China); Taillefer, Louis [Universite de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The electrical resistivity ρ of the iron-arsenide superconductor Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} was measured in applied pressures up to 2.75 GPa for seven underdoped samples. Six of them are antiferromagnetic at P = 0 with 0.16 < x < 0.24 and one is non-magnetic with x = 0.26. The stripe-like antiferromagnetic ordering temperature T{sub N}, detected as a sharp anomaly in ρ(T), decreases linearly with pressure. For every magnetic sample a second phase appears with pressure at a lower temperature T{sub 0}, which rises with pressure. The critical pressure above which this phase appears decreases with doping going to zero for x = 0.24 just below the critical doping for the magnetic phase. This behaviour is reminiscent of the second magnetic phase appearing in Ba{sub 0.76}Na{sub 0.24}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} where the tetragonal symmetry is restored in favour of the scenario in which the nematic order in the iron pnictides is of magnetic origin.

  19. Iron doped SnO{sub 2}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites synthesized by sol-gel and precipitation method for metronidazole antibiotic degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Shilpi [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); Tyagi, Inderjeet [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, 247667 (India); Gupta, Vinod Kumar, E-mail: vinodg@uj.ac.za [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); Sohrabi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Sanaz [Department of Chemistry, Shahr-e-Qods Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golikand, Ahmad Nozad, E-mail: anozad@aeoi.org.ir [Department of Chemistry, Shahr-e-Qods Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jaber Research Laboratory, NSTRI, P.O. Box: 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhri, Ali, E-mail: ali.fakhri88@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elites Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    Sol-gel and precipitation reaction methods were used to synthesize Un-doped and Fe-doped SnO{sub 2}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites under UV light; the synthesized nanocomposites were applied for the photocatalytic degradation of metronidazole antibiotic. The developed photo catalyst was well characterized using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), UV–Visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Effective parameters such as pH, photocatalyst dose and contact time was optimized and well investigated. From the obtained facts it is clear that the 98.3% of MTZ was degraded with in 15 min, pH 6 and 0.1 g catalyst when the Fe molar ratio was 1:1 at %. As compared to results obtained from un-doped SnO{sub 2}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites Fe doped SnO{sub 2}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites possess greater photocatalytic efficiency. - Graphical abstract: Surface textural and morphological presentation. - Highlights: • Un-doped and Fe-doped SnO{sub 2}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposites were applied as photocatalyst. • The nanocomposites exhibited photocatalytic property under UV light. • The maximum degradation was observed for Fe-doped SnO{sub 2}/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} (1:1) photocatalyst. • 0.1 g photocatalyst is sufficient to carry out 98.3% degradation of MTZ.

  20. Propriedades texturais e catalíticas de óxidos de ferro contendo cromo e cobre Textural and catalytic properties of chromium and copper-doped iron oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluce Oliveira da Guarda Souza

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromium and copper-doped hematites were prepared with the aim of studying the synergistic effect of these dopants on the textural and on the catalytic properties of the iron oxides towards the high temperature shift reaction. It was found that the most active catalysts were those with the highest amount of copper. They had the Fe(II/Fe(III ratio near the stoichiometric value of magnetite, the highest surface areas under the reactional atmosphere and the greatest tendency to produce the active form; they also were poorly crystalline solids. The best performance was shown by the catalyst with Fe/Cu=10, heated at 300ºC. It can thus be concluded that copper acts both as textural and structural promoter in these catalysts.

  1. Influences of the iron ion (Fe{sup 3+})-doping on structural and optical properties of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} thin films prepared by sol-gel spin coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Naceur, J. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique de Semi-conducteurs et de Nanostructures, Centre de Recherche des Sciences et Technologies de l' Energie, BP.95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Mechiakh, R., E-mail: raouf_mechiakh@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique de Semi-conducteurs et de Nanostructures, Centre de Recherche des Sciences et Technologies de l' Energie, BP.95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Departement de Medecine, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Hadj Lakhdar, Batna (Algeria); Bousbih, F.; Chtourou, R. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique de Semi-conducteurs et de Nanostructures, Centre de Recherche des Sciences et Technologies de l' Energie, BP.95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2011-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films doping of various iron ion (Fe{sup 3+}) concentrations were deposited on silicon (Si) (100) and quartz substrates by sol-gel Spin Coating technique followed by a thermal treatment at 600 deg. C. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties, as a function of the doping, have been studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Raman, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE). XRD and Raman analyzes of our thin films show that the crystalline phase of TiO{sub 2} thin films comprised only the anatase TiO{sub 2}, but the crystallinity decreased when the Fe{sup 3+} content increased from 0% to 20%. During the Fe{sup 3+} addition to 20%, the phase of TiO{sub 2} thin film still maintained the amorphous state. The grain size calculated from XRD patterns varies from 29.3 to 22.6 nm. The complex index and the optical band gap (E{sub g}) of the films were determined by the spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis. We have found that the optical band gap decreased with an increasing Fe{sup 3+} content.

  2. Efficient charge carriers induced by extra outer-shell electrons in iron-pnictides: a comparison between Ni- and Co-doped CaFeAsF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min; Yu Yi; Tan Shun; Zhang Yuheng; Zhang Changjin; Zhang Lei; Qu Zhe; Ling Langsheng; Xi, Chuanying

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the difference between CaFe 1-x Ni x AsF and CaFe 1-x Co x AsF systems has been carried out by measuring the efficient charge carrier concentration, the valence states and the superconducting phase diagram. It is found that at the same doping level, Ni doping introduces nearly twice the number of charge carriers as Co doping. However, x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements reveal that the valence state of Fe in both systems is close to 2, indicating that there is no valence mismatch. We suggest that the charge carriers in CaFe 1-x M x AsF (M=transition metal elements) are not induced by valence mismatch but come from the difference in the number of outer-shell electrons. We also suggest that with Ni and Co doping, the systems change from a multi-band material in the underdoped regions to a single-band state in the overdoped regions.

  3. Influence of γ-radiation on the D.C. conductivity of poly(3-hexadecylthiophene) doped with iron trichloride in an atmosphere of organic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cik, G.; Szabo, L.; Merasicky, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of γ-radiation on the d.c. conductivity of poly(3-hexadecylthiophene) (PHDT) doped with FeCl 3 in chloroform, toluene, ethanol and nitrobenzene atmospheres has been studied. A different course of d.c. conductivity changes taking place in the atmosphere of solvent vapors (chloroform, toluene) and precipitants (ethanol, nitrobenzene) has been found. The character of changes can be influenced by polymer cross-linking initiated by γ-radiation. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs

  4. N-doping of organic semiconductors by bis-metallosandwich compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Stephen; Qi, Yabing; Kahn, Antoine; Marder, Seth; Kim, Sang Bok; Mohapatra, Swagat K.; Guo, Song

    2016-01-05

    The various inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to the field of methods for n-doping organic semiconductors with certain bis-metallosandwich compounds, the doped compositions produced, and the uses of the doped compositions in organic electronic devices. Metals can be manganese, rhenium, iron, ruthenium, osmium, rhodium, or iridium. Stable and efficient doping can be achieved.

  5. Synthesis of Sub-2 nm Iron-Doped NiSe2 Nanowires and Their Surface-Confined Oxidation for Oxygen Evolution Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chao; Hu, Shaojin; Zheng, Xusheng; Gao, Min-Rui; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Shi, Lei; Gao, Qiang; Zheng, Xiao; Chu, Wangsheng; Yao, Hong-Bin; Zhu, Junfa; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2018-04-03

    Ultrathin nanostructures are attractive for diverse applications owing to their unique properties compared to their bulk materials. Transition-metal chalcogenides are promising electrocatalysts, yet it remains difficult to make ultrathin structures (sub-2 nm), and the realization of their chemical doping is even more challenging. Herein we describe a soft-template mediated colloidal synthesis of Fe-doped NiSe 2 ultrathin nanowires (UNWs) with diameter down to 1.7 nm. The synergistic interplay between oleylamine and 1-dodecanethiol is crucial to yield these UNWs. The in situ formed amorphous hydroxide layers that is confined to the surface of the ultrathin scaffolds enable efficient oxygen evolution electrocatalysis. The UNWs exhibit a very low overpotential of 268 mV at 10 mA cm -2 in 0.1 m KOH, as well as remarkable long-term stability, representing one of the most efficient noble-metal-free catalysts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Enhanced In Vivo Bone and Blood Vessel Formation by Iron Oxide and Silica Doped 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Banerjee, Dishary; Robertson, Samuel; Vahabzadeh, Sahar

    2018-05-04

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics show significant promise towards bone graft applications because of the compositional similarity to inorganic materials of bone. With 3D printing, it is possible to create ceramic implants that closely mimic the geometry of human bone and can be custom-designed for unusual injuries or anatomical sites. The objective of the study was to optimize the 3D-printing parameters for the fabrication of scaffolds, with complex geometry, made from synthesized tricalcium phosphate (TCP) powder. This study was also intended to elucidate the mechanical and biological effects of the addition of Fe +3 and Si +4 in TCP implants in a rat distal femur model for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Doped with Fe +3 and Si +4 TCP scaffolds with 3D interconnected channels were fabricated to provide channels for micronutrients delivery and improved cell-material interactions through bioactive fixation. Addition of Fe +3 into TCP enhanced early-stage new bone formation by increasing type I collagen production. Neovascularization was observed in the Si +4 doped samples after 12 weeks. These findings emphasize that the additive manufacturing of scaffolds with complex geometry from synthesized ceramic powder with modified chemistry is feasible and may serve as a potential candidate to introduce angiogenic and osteogenic properties to CaPs, leading to accelerated bone defect healing.

  7. Superconducting instabilities and quasipartical interference in the LiFeAs and Co-doped NaFeAs iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenfeld, Dustin; Ahn, Felix; Eremin, Ilya [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Borisenko, Sergey [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State Research, IFW-Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We analyze and compare the structure of the pairing interaction and superconducting gaps in LiFeAs and Co-doped NaFeAs by using the ten-orbital tight-binding model, derived from ab initio LDA calculations with hopping parameters extracted from the fit to ARPES experiments. We discuss the phase diagram and experimental probes to determine the structure of the superconducting gap in these systems with special emphasis on the quasiparticle interference, computed using the T-matrix approximation. In particular, we analyze how the superconducting state with opposite sign of the gaps on the two inner hole pockets in LiFeAs evolve upon changing the parameters towards NaFeAs compound.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of anionic/nonionic surfactant-interceded iron-doped TiO{sub 2} to enhance sorbent/photo-catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ajit; Lee, Byeong-Kyu, E-mail: bklee@ulsan.ac.kr

    2015-09-15

    We investigated the synthesis, characterization, and application of surfactant-interceded Fe nanoparticle-doped TiO{sub 2} (TiO{sub 2}/Fe-S1 and TiO{sub 2}/Fe-S2) that were used as adsorbents and photo-catalysts for the removal of As(V) ions from aqueous media. Two types of surfactant (anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate), S1 and non-ionic (Triton X-100), S2) were used to obtain the separation and mono-dispersion of Fe(III) ions in the reaction solution. The nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and elemental mapping analysis before and after As(V) removal. The Langmuir capacities (q{sub e}, mg/g) of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100 interceded nanocomposites (TiO{sub 2}/Fe-S1 and TiO{sub 2}/Fe-S2, respectively) for arsenic removal were determined to be 65.79 and 50.76 mg/g, respectively, in aqueous media with As(V) concentration ranges of 0–10 mg/L at pH 6.5. - Highlights: • Fe(III) doped TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite was prepared with surfactant. • Anionic surfactant SDS enhanced the transfer of Fe(III) ions to TiO{sub 2}. • Surfactant-interceded nanocomposite enhanced As(V) removal. • Arsenic removal efficiency was as follows: dark phase>visible phase>UV region.

  9. Microstructure and transport properties of [0 0 1]-tilt bicrystal grain boundaries in iron pnictide superconductor, cobalt-doped BaFe2As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Katase, Takayoshi; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Tsukamoto, Akira; Kamiya, Toshio; Tanabe, Keiichi; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Relationships between microstructure and transport properties of bicrystal grain boundary (BGB) junctions were studied in cobalt-doped BaFe 2 As 2 (BaFe 2 As 2 :Co) epitaxial films grown on [0 0 1]-tilt bicrystal substrates of MgO and (La, Sr)(Al, Ta)O 3 with misorientation angles θ GB = 3–45°. The θ GB of BaFe 2 As 2 :Co BGBs were exactly transferred from those of the bicrystal substrates. No segregation of impurities was detected at the BGB junction interfaces, and the chemical compositions of the BGBs were uniform and the same as those in the bulk film regions. A transition from a strongly-coupled GB behavior to a weak-link behavior was observed in current density–voltage characteristics under self-field around θ GB ∼ 9°. The critical current density decreased from (1.2–1.6) × 10 6 A/cm 2 of the intragrain transport to (0.7–1.1) × 10 5 A/cm 2 of θ GB = 45° because supercurrent becomes more governed by Josephson current with increasing θ GB .

  10. Airplane dopes and doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  11. Silicon doped InP as an alternative plasmonic material for mid-infrared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee; Han, Li; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-doped InP is grown on top of semiinsulating iron-doped and sulfur-doped InP substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE), and the growth parameters are adjusted to obtain various free carrier concentrations from 1.05×1019 cm-3 up to 3.28×1019 cm-3. Midinfrared (IR) reflection...

  12. Doping droops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Aditi; Chaturvedi, Harish; Kalra, Juhi; Kalra, Sudhanshu

    2007-01-01

    Drug abuse is a major concern in the athletic world. The misconception among athletes and their coaches is that when an athlete breaks a record it is due to some "magic ingredient" and not because of training, hard work, mental attitude and championship performance. The personal motivation to win in competitive sports has been intensified by national, political, professional and economic incentives. Under this increased pressure athletes have turned to finding this "magic ingredient". Athlete turns to mechanical (exercise, massage), nutritional (vitamins, minerals), pharmacological (medicines) or gene therapies to have an edge over other players. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has already asked scientists to help find ways to prevent gene therapy from becoming the newest form of doping. The safety of the life of athletes is compromised with all forms of doping techniques, be it a side effect of a drug or a new technique of gene doping.

  13. Temperature dependence of nitrogen solubility in iron base multicomponent melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.M.; Koval'chuk, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Method for calculating temperature dependence of nitrogen solubility in iron base multicomponent melts is suggested. Application areas of existing methods were determined and advantages of the new method for calculating nitrogen solubility in multicomponent-doped iron melts (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo, Fe-Ni-Cr-Mn, Fe-Mo-V) at 1773-2073 K are shown

  14. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  16. Gene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisma, H J; de Hon, O

    2006-04-01

    Together with the rapidly increasing knowledge on genetic therapies as a promising new branch of regular medicine, the issue has arisen whether these techniques might be abused in the field of sports. Previous experiences have shown that drugs that are still in the experimental phases of research may find their way into the athletic world. Both the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) have expressed concerns about this possibility. As a result, the method of gene doping has been included in the list of prohibited classes of substances and prohibited methods. This review addresses the possible ways in which knowledge gained in the field of genetic therapies may be misused in elite sports. Many genes are readily available which may potentially have an effect on athletic performance. The sporting world will eventually be faced with the phenomena of gene doping to improve athletic performance. A combination of developing detection methods based on gene arrays or proteomics and a clear education program on the associated risks seems to be the most promising preventive method to counteract the possible application of gene doping.

  17. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  18. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  19. Removal of H2S from Biogas by Iron (Fe3+ Doped MgO on Ceramic Honeycomb Catalyst using Double Packed Columns System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntima Chungsiriporn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic and corrosive in nature, gas should be safely removed from the biogas streams before subjecting into the fuel cell. Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide was synthesized using sol-gel technique and dip coating process of Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb. XRD and SEM indicate that Fe3+ in Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb catalyst is finely dispersed in the MgO support. Performance of the synthesized Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide on the honeycomb catalyst was examined for hydrogen sulfide (H2S oxidation by double packed column scrubbers. The absorption column was used for H2S scrubbing from biogas by deionized water absorption and catalytic column was used as catalyst bed for degradation of absorbed H2S in scrubbing water. In the catalytic column, counter current flow of the scrubbing water and air through the catalyst pack was performed for H2S oxidation accompany with catalyst regeneration. System capacity for H2S removal from gas stream showed 98% constant along 3 hr testing time at room temperature.

  20. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, Yulia, E-mail: yukolubaeva@mail.ru; Shugurov, Vladimir, E-mail: shugurov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); Petrikova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elizmarkova@yahoo.com [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Seksenalina, Malika, E-mail: sportmiss@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, Olga, E-mail: ivaov@mail.ru; Ikonnikova, Irina, E-mail: irinaikonnikova@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Kunitsyna, Tatyana, E-mail: kma11061990@mail.ru; Vlasov, Victor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, Anatoliy, E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yuriy, E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  1. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  4. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  12. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  15. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  17. Photoacoustic investigation of doped InP using open cell configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, S.D.; Vallabhan, C.P.G.; Heck, M.J.R.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V.P.N.

    2002-01-01

    An open cell photoacoustic (PA) configuration was employed to evaluate the thermal diffusivity of intrinsic InP as well as InP doped with tin and iron. Thermal diffusivity data were evaluated from variation of phase of PA signal as a function of modulation frequency. In doped samples, we observe a

  18. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  20. Second order magnetic phase transition and scaling analysis in iron doped manganite La0.7Ca0.3Mn1−xFexO3 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginting, Dianta; Nanto, Dwi; Denny, Yus Rama; Tarigan, Kontan; Hadi, Syamsul; Ihsan, Mohammad; Rhyee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated magnetic properties of La 0.7 Ca 0.3 Mn 1−x Fe x O 3 (x=0.09 and 0.11) compounds in terms of isothermal magnetization analysis and scaling behavior with various critical exponents. From the Landau theory of magnetic phase transition, we found that the paramagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition in La 0.7 Ca 0.3 Mn 1−x Fe x O 3 (x=0.09 and 0.11) compounds is the type of second order magnetic transition (SOMT), which contrary to the first order magnetic transition (FOMT) for low Fe-doped compounds (x<0.09) in previous reports. When we investigate the critical behavior of the compounds near T=T c by the modified Arrott plot, Kouvel–Fisher plots, and critical isothermal analysis, the estimated critical exponents β, γ, and δ are in between the theoretically predicted values for three-dimensional Heisenberg and mean-field interaction models. It is noteworthy that the scaling relations are obeyed in terms of renormalization magnetization m=ε −β M(H,ε) and renormalized field h=|ε| β+γ H. Temperature-dependent effective exponents β eff and γ eff correspond to the ones of disordered ferromagnets. It is shown that the magnetic state of the compounds is not fully described by the conventional localized-spin interaction model because the ferromagnetic interaction has itinerant character by increasing Fe-doping concentration. - Highlights: • The ferromagnetic phase transition is of second order in La 0.7 Ca 0.3 Mn 1−x Fe x O 3 . • The critical exponents are in between the 3D Heisenberg and mean-field models. • The ferromagnetic interaction becomes more itinerant by Fe-doping

  1. Unified Phase Diagram for Iron-Based Superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanhong; Liu, Zhaoyu; Xie, Tao; Zhang, Wenliang; Gong, Dongliang; Hu, Ding; Ma, Xiaoyan; Li, Chunhong; Zhao, Lingxiao; Lin, Lifang; Xu, Zhuang; Tan, Guotai; Chen, Genfu; Meng, Zi Yang; Yang, Yi-Feng; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang

    2017-10-13

    High-temperature superconductivity is closely adjacent to a long-range antiferromagnet, which is called a parent compound. In cuprates, all parent compounds are alike and carrier doping leads to superconductivity, so a unified phase diagram can be drawn. However, the properties of parent compounds for iron-based superconductors show significant diversity and both carrier and isovalent dopings can cause superconductivity, which casts doubt on the idea that there exists a unified phase diagram for them. Here we show that the ordered moments in a variety of iron pnictides are inversely proportional to the effective Curie constants of their nematic susceptibility. This unexpected scaling behavior suggests that the magnetic ground states of iron pnictides can be achieved by tuning the strength of nematic fluctuations. Therefore, a unified phase diagram can be established where superconductivity emerges from a hypothetical parent compound with a large ordered moment but weak nematic fluctuations, which suggests that iron-based superconductors are strongly correlated electron systems.

  2. Unified Phase Diagram for Iron-Based Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanhong; Liu, Zhaoyu; Xie, Tao; Zhang, Wenliang; Gong, Dongliang; Hu, Ding; Ma, Xiaoyan; Li, Chunhong; Zhao, Lingxiao; Lin, Lifang; Xu, Zhuang; Tan, Guotai; Chen, Genfu; Meng, Zi Yang; Yang, Yi-feng; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang

    2017-10-01

    High-temperature superconductivity is closely adjacent to a long-range antiferromagnet, which is called a parent compound. In cuprates, all parent compounds are alike and carrier doping leads to superconductivity, so a unified phase diagram can be drawn. However, the properties of parent compounds for iron-based superconductors show significant diversity and both carrier and isovalent dopings can cause superconductivity, which casts doubt on the idea that there exists a unified phase diagram for them. Here we show that the ordered moments in a variety of iron pnictides are inversely proportional to the effective Curie constants of their nematic susceptibility. This unexpected scaling behavior suggests that the magnetic ground states of iron pnictides can be achieved by tuning the strength of nematic fluctuations. Therefore, a unified phase diagram can be established where superconductivity emerges from a hypothetical parent compound with a large ordered moment but weak nematic fluctuations, which suggests that iron-based superconductors are strongly correlated electron systems.

  3. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  4. Comparison of two Q-switched lasers and a short-pulse erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser for treatment of cosmetic tattoos containing titanium and iron in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Chen; Huang, Chuen-Lin; Yang, An-Hang; Chen, Chih-Kang; Lee, Shao-Chen; Leu, Fur-Jiang

    2010-11-01

    Cosmetic tattoos contain titanium and ferric oxide and darken through reduction after Q-switched laser irradiation. The optimal treatment for removing these pigments remains unknown. To compare the effects of two Q-switched lasers and a short-pulse erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (SP Er:YAG) laser to remove cosmetic tattoos in an animal model. Rats were tattooed using white, flesh-colored, and brown inks (4 bands of each color) on their backs. For each color, one band was left untreated, and one each was treated with a Q-switched neodymium-doped YAG laser, a Q-switched alexandrite laser, and a SP Er:YAG laser every 3 weeks until the pigments were clear. The two Q-switched lasers were equally effective; all three pigments darkened initially and then resolved gradually. Up to 20, 18, and 10 sessions were required to remove white, flesh-colored, and brown tattoos, respectively. Only six sessions were required with the SP Er:YAG laser. Minimal scarring was observed with all lasers. Skin biopsies confirmed pigment granule fragmentation after Q-switched laser treatment and a decrease in the amount of pigment after SP Er:YAG laser treatment. The SP Er:YAG laser was superior to the Q-switched lasers for removing cosmetic tattoos. © 2010 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  5. Second order magnetic phase transition and scaling analysis in iron doped manganite La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginting, Dianta [Department of Applied Physics and Institute of Natural Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Yong-in 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nanto, Dwi [Physics Education, Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University, Jakarta 15412 (Indonesia); Denny, Yus Rama [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Banten 42435 (Indonesia); Tarigan, Kontan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mercu Buana University, Jakarta-Barat, Jakarta 11650 (Indonesia); Hadi, Syamsul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State Polytechnic of Malang, East Java 65100 (Indonesia); Ihsan, Mohammad [PSTBM-BATAN, Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang Selatan, Banten 15314 (Indonesia); Institute of Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522 (Australia); Rhyee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsrhyee@khu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Institute of Natural Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Yong-in 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    We investigated magnetic properties of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0.09 and 0.11) compounds in terms of isothermal magnetization analysis and scaling behavior with various critical exponents. From the Landau theory of magnetic phase transition, we found that the paramagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0.09 and 0.11) compounds is the type of second order magnetic transition (SOMT), which contrary to the first order magnetic transition (FOMT) for low Fe-doped compounds (x<0.09) in previous reports. When we investigate the critical behavior of the compounds near T=T{sub c} by the modified Arrott plot, Kouvel–Fisher plots, and critical isothermal analysis, the estimated critical exponents β, γ, and δ are in between the theoretically predicted values for three-dimensional Heisenberg and mean-field interaction models. It is noteworthy that the scaling relations are obeyed in terms of renormalization magnetization m=ε{sup −β}M(H,ε) and renormalized field h=|ε|{sup β+γ}H. Temperature-dependent effective exponents β{sub eff} and γ{sub eff} correspond to the ones of disordered ferromagnets. It is shown that the magnetic state of the compounds is not fully described by the conventional localized-spin interaction model because the ferromagnetic interaction has itinerant character by increasing Fe-doping concentration. - Highlights: • The ferromagnetic phase transition is of second order in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3}. • The critical exponents are in between the 3D Heisenberg and mean-field models. • The ferromagnetic interaction becomes more itinerant by Fe-doping.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  9. Structural properties of pure and Fe-doped Yb films prepared by vapor condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Ayala, C., E-mail: chachi@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, P.O.B. 14-149, Lima 14 (Peru); Passamani, E.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória 29075-910, ES (Brazil); Suguihiro, N.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil); Litterst, F.J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil); Institut für Physik der Kondensierten Materie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Baggio Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Ytterbium and iron-doped ytterbium films were prepared by vapor quenching on Kapton substrates at room temperature. Structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to study the microstructure of pure and iron-doped films and thereby to understand the effects induced by iron incorporation. A coexistence of face centered cubic and hexagonal close packed-like structures was observed, the cubic-type structure being the dominant contribution. There is an apparent thickness dependence of the cubic/hexagonal relative ratios in the case of pure ytterbium. Iron-clusters induce a crystalline texture effect, but do not influence the cubic/hexagonal volume fraction. A schematic model is proposed for the microstructure of un-doped and iron-doped films including the cubic- and hexagonal-like structures, as well as the iron distribution in the ytterbium matrix. - Highlights: • Pure and Fe-doped Yb films have been prepared by vapor condensation. • Coexistence of fcc- and hcp-type structures was observed. • No oxide phases have been detected. • Fe-clustering does not affect the fcc/hcp ratio, but favors a crystalline texture. • A schematic model is proposed to describe microscopically the microstructure.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ... and lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... delivery or giving birth to a baby with low birth weight In people with chronic conditions, iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  19. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amount of iron, and medical conditions that make it hard for your body to absorb iron from ... hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy ... sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  7. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark ... choose nonmeat sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  11. Irradiation effects detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy in iron complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladriere, J.

    1998-01-01

    The nature and the extent of the 60 Co gamma radiolysis of several iron coordination compounds have been analysed by Moessbauer absorption spectroscopy. The comparison of the radiolytic yields with the after effects observed by Moessbauer emission spectroscopy in similar 57 Co-doped compounds, supports the self-radiolysis model

  12. Doped Organic Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüssem, Björn; Keum, Chang-Min; Kasemann, Daniel; Naab, Ben; Bao, Zhenan; Leo, Karl

    2016-11-23

    Organic field-effect transistors hold the promise of enabling low-cost and flexible electronics. Following its success in organic optoelectronics, the organic doping technology is also used increasingly in organic field-effect transistors. Doping not only increases device performance, but it also provides a way to fine-control the transistor behavior, to develop new transistor concepts, and even improve the stability of organic transistors. This Review summarizes the latest progress made in the understanding of the doping technology and its application to organic transistors. It presents the most successful doping models and an overview of the wide variety of materials used as dopants. Further, the influence of doping on charge transport in the most relevant polycrystalline organic semiconductors is reviewed, and a concise overview on the influence of doping on transistor behavior and performance is given. In particular, recent progress in the understanding of contact doping and channel doping is summarized.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of Fe-doped TiO2 nanostructure photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Van Nghia; Nguyen, Ngoc Khoa Truong; Nguyen, Phi Hung

    2011-01-01

    Fe-doped TiO 2 catalyst was prepared by the hydrothermal method. The resulting nanopowders were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman and UV-visible spectroscopies. The photocatalytic activity of the Fe-doped TiO 2 was tested by decomposition of methylene orange with a concentration of 10 mg l −1 in aqueous solution. The obtained results showed that methylene orange was significantly degraded after irradiation for 90 min under a halogen lamp and sunlight. The doping effect on the photocatalytic activity of the iron-doped catalyst samples are discussed

  14. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  16. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  17. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  18. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  1. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  2. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ... iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  5. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  6. Effect of internal gettering of iron on electrical characteristics of devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talvitie, H.; Haarahiltunen, A.; Savin, H.; Yli-Koski, M.; Asghar, M.I.; Sinkkonen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Different types of gettering treatments were applied to a real device process to evaluate their ability to remove iron contamination from the device layer and improve the electrical characteristics of the devices. NMOS and PMOS transistors and other test structures were manufactured on boron doped, both iron contaminated and uncontaminated Cz silicon wafers with or without gettering treatment. Gettering treatments, which were designed to induce sufficient iron precipitate nucleation in the bulk to ensure iron precipitation, were inserted in the fabrication process after the last high temperature treatment in which the iron solubility was higher than the contamination level. The electrical characteristics of the devices, such as leakage currents, were measured. The applied gettering treatments were found to be inefficient to improve the device performance, possibly due to stronger gettering to heavily doped, ion implantation damaged device layer.

  7. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  8. Correlation effects in the iron pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si Qimiao; Abrahams, Elihu; Dai Jianhui; Zhu Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here, we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, the single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared with the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V 2 O 3 or Se-doped NiS 2 , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analysis, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part of the excitation spectrum. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multiband matrix t-J 1 -J 2 model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

  9. Thermal evolution of exchange interactions in lightly doped barium hexaferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trukhanov, S.V., E-mail: truhanov@ifttp.bas-net.by [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninsky Prospekt, 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); SSPA “Scientific and practical materials research centre of NAS of Belarus”, P. Brovki Str., 19, 220072 Minsk, Belorussia (Belarus); Trukhanov, A.V. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninsky Prospekt, 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); SSPA “Scientific and practical materials research centre of NAS of Belarus”, P. Brovki Str., 19, 220072 Minsk, Belorussia (Belarus); Kostishyn, V.G.; Panina, L.V. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninsky Prospekt, 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Turchenko, V.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie Str., 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Donetsk Institute of Physics and Technology named after A.A. Galkin of the NAS of Ukraine, 72 R.Luxemburg Str., 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Kazakevich, I.S. [SSPA “Scientific and practical materials research centre of NAS of Belarus”, P. Brovki Str., 19, 220072 Minsk, Belorussia (Belarus); Trukhanov, An.V. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninsky Prospekt, 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); SSPA “Scientific and practical materials research centre of NAS of Belarus”, P. Brovki Str., 19, 220072 Minsk, Belorussia (Belarus); Trukhanova, E.L.; Natarov, V.O. [SSPA “Scientific and practical materials research centre of NAS of Belarus”, P. Brovki Str., 19, 220072 Minsk, Belorussia (Belarus); Balagurov, A.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie Str., 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The lightly doped BaFe{sub 12−x}D{sub x}O{sub 19} (D=Al{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}; x=0.1 and 0.3) polycrystalline hexaferrite samples have been investigated by powder neutron diffractometry as well as by vibration sample magnetometry in a wide temperature range from 4 K up to 740 K and in magnetic field up to 14 T to establish the nature of Fe{sup 3+}(Al{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}) – O{sup 2-} - Fe{sup 3+}(Al{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}) indirect exchange interactions. The crystal structure features such as the ionic coordinates and lattice parameters have been defined and Rietveld refined. The Invar effect has been observed in low temperature range below 150 K. It was explained by the thermal oscillation anharmonicity of ions. It is established that the ferrimagnet-paramagnet phase transition is a standard second-order one. From the macroscopic magnetization measurement the Curie temperature and ordered magnetic moment per nominal iron ion are obtained. From the microscopic diffraction measurement the magnetic moments at all the nonequivalent ionic positions and total magnetic moment per iron ion have been obtained at different temperatures down to 4 K. The light diamagnetic doping mechanism and magnetic structure model are proposed. The effect of light diamagnetic doping on nature of Fe{sup 3+}(Al{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}) – O{sup 2-} - Fe{sup 3+}(Al{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}) indirect exchange interactions with temperature increase is discussed. - Highlights: • Crystal structure for lightly doped barium hexaferrites was investigated. • Atomic coordinates and lattice parameters were Rietveld refined. • Magnetic properties for lightly doped barium hexaferrites was investigated. • Magnetic structure for lightly doped barium hexaferrites was investigated. • Magnetic moments at different position and total moment per iron ion were defined.

  10. Doping control in sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overbye, Marie Birch

    2016-01-01

    Doping testing is a key component enforced by anti-doping authorities to detect and deter doping in sport. Policy is developed to protect athletes' right to participate in doping-free sport; and testing is a key tool to secure this right. Accordingly, athletes' responses to anti-doping efforts...... are important. This article explores how the International Standards for Testing, which face different interpretations and challenges when policy is implemented, are perceived by elite athletes. Particularly, this article aims to investigate how elite athletes perceive the functioning of the testing system (i.......e., the efforts of stakeholders involved in testing) in their own sport both nationally and worldwide. Moreover, it seeks to identify whether specific factors such as previous experience of testing and perceived proximity of doping have an impact on athletes' perceptions of the testing system. The study comprises...

  11. The Anti-Doping Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willick, Stuart E; Miller, Geoffrey D; Eichner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Historical reports of doping in sports date as far back as the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The anti-doping community considers doping in sports to be cheating and a violation of the spirit of sport. During the past century, there has been an increasing awareness of the extent of doping in sports and the health risks of doping. In response, the anti-doping movement has endeavored to educate athletes and others about the health risks of doping and promote a level playing field. Doping control is now undertaken in most countries around the world and at most elite sports competitions. As athletes have found new ways to dope, however, the anti-doping community has endeavored to strengthen its educational and deterrence efforts. It is incumbent upon sports medicine professionals to understand the health risks of doping and all doping control processes. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic study of Fe-doped CdSe nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sayantani; Banerjee, Sourish; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles of pure and iron (50 %) doped cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been synthesized by soft chemical route. EDAX analysis supports the inclusion of Fe into CdSe nanoparticles. The average particle size of pure and doped CdSe is found to be ∼50 nm from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Magnetization of the samples are measured under the field cooled (FC) and zero field cooled (ZFC) modes in the temperature range from 5K to 300K applying a magnetic field of 500Oe. Field dependent magnetization (M-H) measurement indicates presence of room temperature (RT) paramagnetism and low temperature (5K) ferromagnetism of the sample.

  13. Moessbauer study of the local environment of the iron implanted in glassy AgAsS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, E.A.; Vlasov, Yu.G.; Dravin, V.A.; Semenov, V.G.

    1987-01-01

    Local environment of iron implanted into glassy AgAsS 2 or introduced into this glass in the course of synthesis is investigated. It is shown that chemical forms of iron stabilization are similar in both cases, however, concentrational relations of various forms differ sufficiently. The main doped glass spectrum component (85-88% of the total area) represents a quadrupole iron doublet (2) in glass in tetrahedral sulfide environment. In implanted sample spectra contributions from iron (2) in glass and from amorphous iron disulfide are comparable. Concentrational differences are probably linked with high rates of glass implanted area hardening

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend changes to help you meet the recommended daily amount of iron. If you ... stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron levels, your doctor may ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... less Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... lose blood, you lose iron. Certain conditions or medicines can cause blood loss and lead to iron- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments ... improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. ... red blood cells on hand, their bodies can store iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  10. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  11. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. Certain ... domestic small businesses that have strong potential for technology commercialization through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron ...

  19. To dope or not to dope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overbye, Marie Birch; Knudsen, Mette Lykke; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

    2013-01-01

    tAim: This study aims to examine the circumstances which athletes say affect their (hypothetical) consid-erations of whether to dope or not and explore the differences between athletes of different gender, ageand sport type.Methods: 645 elite athletes (mean age: 22.12; response rate: 43%) represe......tAim: This study aims to examine the circumstances which athletes say affect their (hypothetical) consid-erations of whether to dope or not and explore the differences between athletes of different gender, ageand sport type.Methods: 645 elite athletes (mean age: 22.12; response rate: 43......%) representing 40 sports completed aweb-based questionnaire. Participants were asked to imagine themselves in a situation in which theyhad to decide whether to dope or not to dope and then evaluate how different circumstances would affecttheir decisions.Results: Multiple circumstances had an effect on athletes......’ hypothetical decisions. The most effective deter-rents were related to legal and social sanctions, side-effects and moral considerations. Female athletesand younger athletes evaluated more reasons as deterrents than older, male athletes. When confrontedwith incentives to dope, the type of sport was often...

  20. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  1. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  9. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  10. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  11. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bleeding or other abnormalities, such as growths or cancer of the lining of the colon. For this test, a ... that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  14. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  3. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency isn't corrected, it can lead to iron-deficiency anemia (a decrease in the number of red blood ... Parents Kids Teens Anemia Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegetarianism Menstrual Problems Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ... cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  6. Doped graphene supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok Kumar, Nanjundan; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-12-01

    Heteroatom-doped graphitic frameworks have received great attention in energy research, since doping endows graphitic structures with a wide spectrum of properties, especially critical for electrochemical supercapacitors, which tend to complement or compete with the current lithium-ion battery technology/devices. This article reviews the latest developments in the chemical modification/doping strategies of graphene and highlights the versatility of such heteroatom-doped graphitic structures. Their role as supercapacitor electrodes is discussed in detail. This review is specifically focused on the concept of material synthesis, techniques for electrode fabrication and metrics of performance, predominantly covering the last four years. Challenges and insights into the future research and perspectives on the development of novel electrode architectures for electrochemical supercapacitors based on doped graphene are also discussed.

  7. Doped graphene supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Heteroatom-doped graphitic frameworks have received great attention in energy research, since doping endows graphitic structures with a wide spectrum of properties, especially critical for electrochemical supercapacitors, which tend to complement or compete with the current lithium-ion battery technology/devices. This article reviews the latest developments in the chemical modification/doping strategies of graphene and highlights the versatility of such heteroatom-doped graphitic structures. Their role as supercapacitor electrodes is discussed in detail. This review is specifically focused on the concept of material synthesis, techniques for electrode fabrication and metrics of performance, predominantly covering the last four years. Challenges and insights into the future research and perspectives on the development of novel electrode architectures for electrochemical supercapacitors based on doped graphene are also discussed. (topical review)

  8. Health-enhancing doping controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2010-01-01

    Editorial published at International Network of Humanistic Doping Research (INHDR) website: http://www.doping.au.dk/en/online-resources/editorials/......Editorial published at International Network of Humanistic Doping Research (INHDR) website: http://www.doping.au.dk/en/online-resources/editorials/...

  9. Study of the magnetic disaccommodation in La doped YIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, C.; Hernandez-Gomez, P.; Francisco, C. de; Munoz, J.M.; Alejos, O.; Gonzalez Arias, A.; Perdigao, J.M.; Ferreira, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    The relaxation of the initial magnetic permeability of La doped yttrium iron garnet (YIG) samples with nominal composition Y 3-x La x Fe 5 O 12 (0 2 atmosphere when the La content is at least of 0.3. These results have been interpreted in terms of the formation of a secondary perovskite phase when the La solubility limit is reached. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Gene doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Mehmet; Ozer Unal, Durisehvar

    2004-01-01

    Gene or cell doping is defined by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance". New research in genetics and genomics will be used not only to diagnose and treat disease, but also to attempt to enhance human performance. In recent years, gene therapy has shown progress and positive results that have highlighted the potential misuse of this technology and the debate of 'gene doping'. Gene therapies developed for the treatment of diseases such as anaemia (the gene for erythropoietin), muscular dystrophy (the gene for insulin-like growth factor-1) and peripheral vascular diseases (the gene for vascular endothelial growth factor) are potential doping methods. With progress in gene technology, many other genes with this potential will be discovered. For this reason, it is important to develop timely legal regulations and to research the field of gene doping in order to develop methods of detection. To protect the health of athletes and to ensure equal competitive conditions, the International Olympic Committee, WADA and International Sports Federations have accepted performance-enhancing substances and methods as being doping, and have forbidden them. Nevertheless, the desire to win causes athletes to misuse these drugs and methods. This paper reviews the current status of gene doping and candidate performance enhancement genes, and also the use of gene therapy in sports medicine and ethics of genetic enhancement. Copyright 2004 Adis Data Information BV

  11. Doping of organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luessem, B.; Riede, M.; Leo, K. [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    The understanding and applications of organic semiconductors have shown remarkable progress in recent years. This material class has been developed from being a lab curiosity to the basis of first successful products as small organic LED (OLED) displays; other areas of application such as OLED lighting and organic photovoltaics are on the verge of broad commercialization. Organic semiconductors are superior to inorganic ones for low-cost and large-area optoelectronics due to their flexibility, easy deposition, and broad variety, making tailor-made materials possible. However, electrical doping of organic semiconductors, i.e. the controlled adjustment of Fermi level that has been extremely important to the success of inorganic semiconductors, is still in its infancy. This review will discuss recent work on both fundamental principles and applications of doping, focused primarily to doping of evaporated organic layers with molecular dopants. Recently, both p- and n-type molecular dopants have been developed that lead to efficient and stable doping of organic thin films. Due to doping, the conductivity of the doped layers increases several orders of magnitude and allows for quasi-Ohmic contacts between organic layers and metal electrodes. Besides reducing voltage losses, doping thus also gives design freedom in terms of transport layer thickness and electrode choice. The use of doping in applications like OLEDs and organic solar cells is highlighted in this review. Overall, controlled molecular doping can be considered as key enabling technology for many different organic device types that can lead to significant improvements in efficiencies and lifetimes. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Doping of organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luessem, B.; Riede, M.; Leo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The understanding and applications of organic semiconductors have shown remarkable progress in recent years. This material class has been developed from being a lab curiosity to the basis of first successful products as small organic LED (OLED) displays; other areas of application such as OLED lighting and organic photovoltaics are on the verge of broad commercialization. Organic semiconductors are superior to inorganic ones for low-cost and large-area optoelectronics due to their flexibility, easy deposition, and broad variety, making tailor-made materials possible. However, electrical doping of organic semiconductors, i.e. the controlled adjustment of Fermi level that has been extremely important to the success of inorganic semiconductors, is still in its infancy. This review will discuss recent work on both fundamental principles and applications of doping, focused primarily to doping of evaporated organic layers with molecular dopants. Recently, both p- and n-type molecular dopants have been developed that lead to efficient and stable doping of organic thin films. Due to doping, the conductivity of the doped layers increases several orders of magnitude and allows for quasi-Ohmic contacts between organic layers and metal electrodes. Besides reducing voltage losses, doping thus also gives design freedom in terms of transport layer thickness and electrode choice. The use of doping in applications like OLEDs and organic solar cells is highlighted in this review. Overall, controlled molecular doping can be considered as key enabling technology for many different organic device types that can lead to significant improvements in efficiencies and lifetimes. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Low resistivity contact to iron-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanatar, Makariy; Prozorov, Ruslan; Ni, Ni; Bud& #x27; ko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

    2013-05-28

    Method of making a low resistivity electrical connection between an electrical conductor and an iron pnictide superconductor involves connecting the electrical conductor and superconductor using a tin or tin-based material therebetween, such as using a tin or tin-based solder. The superconductor can be based on doped AFe.sub.2As.sub.2, where A can be Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu or combinations thereof for purposes of illustration only.

  14. Equation for calculation of nitrogen solubility in iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarin, Yu.M.; Grigorenko, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Equation for calculating nitrogen solubility in multicomponent iron melts in a wide range of partial pressures (1-1600 kPa), of doping component concentrations and temperatures (1773-2373 K) is proposed. Comparative analysis of experimental and calculated values of nitrogen solubility has demonstrated a principle possibility of applying the equation proposed for evaluating absorption ability to nitrogen of industrial nitrogen containing steels and ferroalloys subjected to melting or remelting in plasma or other melting devices

  15. Optical measurements on iron pnictides containing Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, David; Baumgartner, Andreas; Merz, Johannes; Zapf, Sina; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Aswartham, Saicharan [University of Kentucky, Lexington (United States); Wurmehl, Sabine [IFW, Dresden (Germany); Jiao, Wen-He; Cao, Guang-Han [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-07-01

    The interplay of magnetism with superconductivity is a fascinating, highly debated field of research and many questions still remain unsolved. Members of the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family are a perfectly suited playground for investigations concerning this topic, due to the peculiarity of strong local magnetism of the europium (T{sub N}∼ 20K), which is a unique feature among the 122 iron pnictides. Optical studies of the parent compound have already revealed that the spin density wave formation deviates from the other 122 pnictides. To get more insight into the superconducting properties of the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family we carried out an optical study on differently doped samples. We compare Eu(Fe{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} where electron doping takes place directly in the conducting iron layer, with EuFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} which corresponds to isovalent substitution at atomic positions out of the Fe-plane. The influence of the Eu is furthermore investigated by placing data we obtained on Ba{sub 0.6}Eu{sub 0.4}(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} in juxtaposition to the already highly investigated pure Ba analogue.

  16. The effect of electron and hole doping on the thermoelectric properties of shandite-type Co3Sn2S2

    OpenAIRE

    Mangelis, Panagiotis; Vaqueiro, Paz; Jumas, Jean-Claude; da Silva, Ivan; Smith, Ronald I; Powell, Anthony V

    2017-01-01

    Electron and hole doping in Co3Sn2S2, through chemical substitution of cobalt by the neighbouring elements, nickel and iron, affects both the structure and thermoelectric properties. Electron doping to form Co3-xNixSn2S2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) results in an expansion of the kagome layer and materials become increasingly metallic as cobalt is substituted. Conversely, hole doping in Co3-xFexSn2S2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) leads to a transition from metallic to n-type semiconducting behaviour at x = 0.5. Iron substitu...

  17. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ(T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s ± scenario for the whole doping range.

  18. Molecular adsorption of hydrogen peroxide on N- and Fe-doped titania nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Afshan, E-mail: amohajeri@shirazu.ac.ir; Dashti, Nasimeh Lari

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The stability and electronic properties of N/Fe-doped (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters with n = 5,6 were studied. • The adsorption H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the surface of doped clusters has been investigated. • This is the first report of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} adsorption onto the (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} cluster in the presence of metal and non-metal dopants. • The effect of N and Fe dopants on interaction strength was studied. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (titania) nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for photocatalytic applications such as the decomposition and adsorption of pollutant and undesirable compound in air and waste water. In this context, the present article reports the molecular adsorption of hydrogen peroxide on the surface of doped titania clusters. Density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the structures and electronic properties of two nanoscale (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters (n = 5,6) modified by nitrogen and iron dopants. The relative stability of all possible N-doped and Fe-doped isomers has been compared with each other and with the parent cluster. It was found that the Fe-doped clusters are in general more stable than the N-doped counterparts. Moreover, after N/Fe doping an enhanced in the magnetization of the clusters is observed. In the second part, we have investigated different modes of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} adsorption on the lowest-energy isomers of doped clusters. In almost all the cases, the adsorptions on the doped clusters are found to be less exothermic than on the corresponding undoped parent cluster. Our results highlight the essential role of charge transfer into the interaction between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and doped (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters, especially for Fe-doped clusters.

  19. Borazino-Doped Polyphenylenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Davide; Fasano, Francesco; Najjari, Btissam; Demitri, Nicola; Bonifazi, Davide

    2017-04-19

    The divergent synthesis of two series of borazino-doped polyphenylenes, in which one or more aryl units are replaced by borazine rings, is reported for the first time, taking advantage of the decarbonylative [4 + 2] Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction between ethynyl and tetraphenylcyclopentadienone derivatives. Because of the possibility of functionalizing the borazine core with different groups on the aryl substituents at the N and B atoms of the borazino core, we have prepared borazino-doped polyphenylenes featuring different doping dosages and orientations. To achieve this, two molecular modules were prepared: a core and a branching unit. Depending on the chemical natures of the central aromatic module and the reactive group, each covalent combination of the modules yields one exclusive doping pattern. By means of this approach, three- and hexa-branched hybrid polyphenylenes featuring controlled orientations and dosages of the doping B 3 N 3 rings have been prepared. Detailed photophysical investigations showed that as the doping dosage is increased, the strong luminescent signal is progressively reduced. This suggests that the presence of the B 3 N 3 rings engages additional deactivation pathways, possibly involving excited states with an increasing charge-separated character that are restricted in the full-carbon analogues. Notably, a strong effect of the orientational doping on the fluorescence quantum yield was observed for those hybrid polyphenylene structures featuring low doping dosages. Finally, we showed that Cu-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is also chemically compatible with the BN core, further endorsing the inorganic benzene as a versatile aromatic scaffold for engineering of molecular materials with tailored and exploitable optoelectronic properties.

  20. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  1. Characterization of pure and copper-doped iron tartrate crystals ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FTIR), .... rotational and vibrational energy levels of the ground electronic energy state. ..... Vidyalaya College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore, India for the timely help ... Head, Marketing, Pricol Castings Ltd., Coimbatore for the support during the ...

  2. Iron-Doped Zinc Selenide: Spectroscopy and Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    pulsed and CW platforms have been continuously tuned across the whole gain bandwidth of Cr:ZnSe using dispersive tuning elements [9, 13, 14]. Lasers...induced fluorescence studies of the upper state manifold of Fe:ZnSe. 3.2 Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscoscopy of Fe:ZnSe A Cryo Industries of...that temperature was recorded to provide a basis for calculation of the spectral distribution of gain. The recorded spectrum was black- body

  3. On the role of Fe ions on magnetic properties of doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolea, F.; Grecu, M. N.; Kuncser, V.; Constantinescu, S. Gr.; Ghica, D.

    2015-04-01

    The role of iron doping on magnetic properties of hydrothermal anatase TiO2:57Fe (0-1 at. %) nanoparticles is investigated by combining superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry with Mössbauer and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques. The results on both as-prepared and thermally treated samples in reduced air atmosphere reveal complexity of magnetic interactions, in connection to certain iron ion electron configurations and defects (oxygen vacancies, F-center, and Ti3+ ions). The distribution of iron ions is predominantly at nanoparticle surface layers. Formation of weak ferromagnetic domains up to 380 K is mainly related to defects, supporting the bound magnetic polaron model.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  5. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–. Langalata iron ore ...... sure to sea water. Uranium in these samples varies ..... Ce oxidation and removal (Elderfield and Greaves. 1982; De Baar et ...

  6. Magnetic properties of Fe-doped organic-inorganic nanohybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, N. J. O.; Amaral, V. S.; Carlos, L. D.; de Zea Bermudez, V.

    2003-05-01

    We present a magnetic study of Fe-doped diureasils (siloxane-based networks to which poly(ethylene oxide)-based chains are grafted by urea cross linkages doped with Fe(II) or Fe(III) ions. Structural studies show that the Fe(II) ions interact mainly with the organic chain, whereas the incorporation of Fe(III) leads to the formation of iron-based nanoclusters, with radius increasing from 20 to 40 Å. Fe(II)-doped samples behave as simple paramagnets, with μeff=5.32μB. Fe(III)-doped hybrids present antiferromagnetic interactions, with TN increasing with Fe(III) concentration up to 13.6 K for 6% doping. Thermal irreversibility was observed below ˜40 K and is stronger for higher concentrations. The coercive fields (HC) are of the order of 1000 Oe at 5 K. Hysteresis cycles are shifted to negative fields, revealing the presence of exchange anisotropy interactions with exchange fields (HE) of the order of 100 Oe. Both fields decrease rapidly with increasing temperature. We analyze this behavior in terms of the contribution of surface spin disorder to exchange anisotropy.

  7. Structural, Optical, and Electronic Characterization of Fe-Doped Alumina Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiba, Zein K.; Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr; Wahba, Adel Maher; Imam, N. G.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of iron doping on the structural, optical, and electronic properties of doped alumina have been studied. Single-phase iron-doped alumina Al2- x Fe x O3 ( x = 0.00 to 0.30) nanoparticles were synthesized via citrate-precursor method. Formation of single-phase hexagonal corundum structure with no other separate phases was demonstrated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The effects of iron doping on the α-Al2O3 structural parameters, viz. atomic coordinates, lattice parameters, crystallite size, and microstrain, were estimated from XRD data by applying the Rietveld profile fitting method. Transmission electron microscopy further confirmed the nanosize nature of the prepared samples with size ranging from 12 nm to 83 nm. The electronic band structure was investigated using density functional theory calculations to explain the decrease in the energy gap of Al2- x Fe x O3 as the amount of Fe was increased. The colored emission peaks in the visible region (blue, red, violet) of the electromagnetic spectrum obtained for the Fe-doped α-Al2O3 nanoparticles suggest their potential application as ceramic nanopigments.

  8. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of mesoporous nanocrystalline Fe-doped titanium dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Mohd; Merzougui, Belabbes A.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Hakeem, Abbas Saeed; Yamani, Zain Hassan; Bahnemann, Detlef W.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of mesoporous nanocrystalline iron-doped titania following the sol-gel method is presented in this work. Samples with various molar ratios (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20%) of Fe to Ti were prepared. The particle size was found

  9. Effect of Fe Doping by Thermal in-Diffusion on the Defect Structure of Lithium Niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignoni, S; Zaltron, A; Ciampolillo, M V; Bazzan, M; Argiolas, N; Sada, C; Fontana, M D, E-mail: zaltronam@padova.infm.it

    2010-11-15

    In this work we investigate the iron incorporation in thermally diffused Fe doped LN, by combining two experimental techniques, i.e. micro-Raman spectroscopy and proton induced X rays emission. Our results point out that in substituting for Li, Fe ions induces a decrease of Nb{sub Li} antisite defects and rearrangement of the Nb sublattice.

  10. Iron from nanocompounds containing iron and zinc is highly bioavailable in rats without tissue accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Florentine M; Arnold, Myrtha; Hilbe, Monika; Teleki, Alexandra; Knijnenburg, Jesper T N; Ehrensperger, Felix; Hurrell, Richard F; Pratsinis, Sotiris E; Langhans, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2010-05-01

    Effective iron fortification of foods is difficult, because water-soluble compounds that are well absorbed, such as ferrous sulphate (FeSO(4)), often cause unacceptable changes in the colour or taste of foods. Poorly water-soluble compounds, on the other hand, cause fewer sensory changes, but are not well absorbed. Here, we show that poorly water-soluble nanosized Fe and Fe/Zn compounds (specific surface area approximately 190 m(2) g(-1)) made by scalable flame aerosol technology have in vivo iron bioavailability in rats comparable to FeSO(4) and cause less colour change in reactive food matrices than conventional iron fortificants. The addition of Zn to FePO(4) and Mg to Fe/Zn oxide increases Fe absorption from the compounds, and doping with Mg also improves their colour. After feeding rats with nanostructured iron-containing compounds, no stainable Fe was detected in their gut wall, gut-associated lymphatics or other tissues, suggesting no adverse effects. Nanosizing of poorly water-soluble Fe compounds sharply increases their absorption and nutritional value.

  11. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, T

    2018-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy with a hypochromic microcytic anaemia, refractory to oral iron treatment. After exclusion of dietary and gastrointestinal causes of iron deficiency, a genetic cause for iron deficiency was confirmed by finding two mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, consistent with a diagnosis of iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA).

  12. Sanctions for doping in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandarić Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Top-level sport imposes new and more demanding physical and psychological pressures, and the desire for competing, winning and selfassertion leads athletes into temptation to use prohibited substances in order to achieve the best possible results. Regardless of the fact that the adverse consequences of prohibited substances are well-known, prestige and the need to dominate sports arenas have led to their use in sports. Doping is one of the biggest issues in sport today, and the fight against it is a strategic objective on both global and national levels. World Anti-Doping Agency, the International Olympic Committee, international sports federations, national anti-doping agencies, national sports federations, as well as governments and their repressive apparatuses are all involved in the fight against doping in sport. This paper points to a different etymology and phenomenology of doping, the beginnings of doping in sport, sports doping scandals as well as the most important international instruments regulating this issue. Also, there is a special reference in this paper to the criminal and misdemeanor sanctions for doping in sport. In Serbia doping in sport is prohibited by the Law on Prevention of Doping in Sports which came into force in 2005 and which prescribes the measures and activities aimed at prevention of doping in sport. In this context, the law provides for the following three criminal offenses: use of doping substances, facilitating the use of doping substances, and unauthorized production and putting on traffic of doping substances. In addition, aiming at curbing the abuse of doping this law also provides for two violations. More frequent and repetitive doping scandals indicate that doping despite long-standing sanctions is still present in sports, which suggests that sanctions alone have not given satisfactory results so far.

  13. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Samar; Verma, H C

    2013-03-01

    The pure and Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles of the series Cu(1-x)Fe(x)O (x = 0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08) were successfully prepared by a simple low temperature sol-gel method using metal nitrates and citric acid. Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction data showed that all the samples were single phase crystallized in monoclinic structure of space group C2/c with average crystallite size of about 25 nm and unit cell volume decreases with increasing iron doping concentration. TEM micrograph showed nearly spherical shaped agglomerated particles of 4% Fe-doped CuO with average diameter 26 nm. Pure CuO showed weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature with coercive field of 67 Oe. The ferromagnetic properties were greatly enhanced with Fe-doping in the CuO matrix. All the doped samples showed ferromagnetism at room temperature with a noticeable coercive field. Saturation magnetization increases with increasing Fe-doping, becomes highest for 4% doping then decreases for further doping which confirms that the ferromagnetism in these nanoparticles are intrinsic and are not resulting from any impurity phases. The ZFC and FC branches of the temperature dependent magnetization (measured in the range of 10-350 K by SQUID magnetometer) look like typical ferromagnetic nanoparticles and indicates that the ferromagnetic Curie temperature is above 350 K.

  14. Highly improved sensibility and selectivity ethanol sensor of mesoporous Fe-doped NiO nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. Q.; Wei, J. Q.; Xu, J. C.; Jin, H. X.; Jin, D. F.; Peng, X. L.; Hong, B.; Li, J.; Yang, Y. T.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, Xinqing

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, nickel oxides (NiO) and iron (Fe)-doped NiO nanowires (NWs) with the various doping content (from 1 to 9 at%) were synthesized by using SBA-15 templates with the nanocasting method. All samples were synthesized in the same conditions and exhibited the same mesoporous-structures, uniform diameter, and defects. Mesoporous-structures with high surface area created more active sites for the adsorption of oxygen on the surface of all samples, resulting in the smaller surface resistance in air. The impurity energy levels from the donor Fe-doping provided electrons to neutralize the holes of p-type Fe-doped NiO NWs, which greatly enhanced the total resistance. The comparative gas-sensing study between NiO NWs and Fe-doped NiO NWs indicated that the high-valence donor Fe-doping obviously improved the ethanol sensitivity and selectivity for Fe-doped NiO NWs. And Ni0.94Fe0.06O1.03 NWs sensor presented the highest sensitivity of 14.30 toward ethanol gas at 320 °C for the high-valence metal-doping.

  15. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. Universal doping evolution of the superconducting gap anisotropy in single crystals of electron-doped Ba(Fe1‑x Rh x )2As2 from London penetration depth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, M. A.; Martin, C.; Blomberg, E. C.; Ni, Ni; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Prozorov, R.

    2018-06-01

    Doping evolution of the superconducting gap anisotropy was studied in single crystals of 4d-electron doped Ba(Fe1‑x Rh x )2As2 using tunnel diode resonator measurements of the temperature variation of the London penetration depth . Single crystals with doping levels representative of an underdoped regime x  =  0.039 ( K), close to optimal doping x  =  0.057 ( K) and overdoped x  =  0.079 ( K) and x  =  0.131( K) were studied. Superconducting energy gap anisotropy was characterized by the exponent, n, by fitting the data to the power-law, . The exponent n varies non-monotonically with x, increasing to a maximum n  =  2.5 for x  =  0.079 and rapidly decreasing towards overdoped compositions to 1.6 for x  =  0.131. This behavior is qualitatively similar to the doping evolution of the superconducting gap anisotropy in other iron pnictides, including hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe2As2 and 3d-electron-doped Ba(Fe,Co)2As2 superconductors, finding a full gap near optimal doping and strong anisotropy toward the ends of the superconducting dome in the T-x phase diagram. The normalized superfluid density in an optimally Rh-doped sample is almost identical to the temperature-dependence in the optimally doped Ba(Fe,Co)2As2 samples. Our study supports the universal superconducting gap variation with doping and pairing at least in iron based superconductors of the BaFe2As2 family.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your ... very young red blood cells. Peripheral smear to see if your red blood ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is the most common treatment ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect ... in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored Cardiovascular Health Study ...

  7. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those ... environments Children who have lead in ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  16. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  2. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... age, sex, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  7. Observation of an electron band above the Fermi level in FeTe0.55Se0.45 from in-situ surface doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P.; Ma, J.; Qian, T.; Richard, P.; Ding, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y.-M.; Fedorov, A. V.; Denlinger, J. D.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    We used in-situ potassium (K) evaporation to dope the surface of the iron-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . The systematic study of the bands near the Fermi level confirms that electrons are doped into the system, allowing us to tune the Fermi level of this material and to access otherwise unoccupied electronic states. In particular, we observe an electron band located above the Fermi level before doping that shares similarities with a small three-dimensional pocket observed in the cousin, heavily electron-doped KFe 2−x Se 2 compound.

  8. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  9. Iron metal production in silicate melts through the direct reduction of Fe/II/ by Ti/III/, Cr/II/, and Eu/II/. [in lunar basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, H. D.; Balazs, G. B.; Shaffer, A. P.; Jamison, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    The production of metallic iron in silicate melts by chemical reactions of Ti(3+), Cr(2+), and Eu(2+) with Fe(2+) is demonstrated under experimental conditions in a simplified basaltic liquid. These reactions form a basis for interpreting the role of isochemical valency exchange models in explanations for the reduced nature of lunar basalts. The redox couples are individually investigated in the silicate melt to ascertain reference redox ratios that are independent of mutual interactions. These studies also provide calibrations of spectral absorptions of the Fe(2+) and Ti(2+) species in these glasses. Subsequent spectrophotometric analyses of Fe(2+) and Ti(2+) in glasses doped with both iron and titanium and of Fe(2+) in glasses doped with either iron and chromium or iron and europium ascertain the degree of mutual interactions in these dual-doped glasses.

  10. Gamma ray interactions with undoped and CuO-doped lithium disilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbatal, H.A.; Mandouh, Z.; Zayed, H.; Marzouk, S.Y.; Elkomy, G.; Hosny, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet-visible absorption of undoped lithium disilicate glass reveals strong UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within raw materials used for the preparation of this glass. Optical absorption of the CuO-doped samples show an extra broad visible band centered at 780 nm and in high CuO contents samples obvious splitting to several component peaks are observed. This characteristic visible absorption of copper-doped samples is correlated with the presence of Cu +2 ions in octahedral coordination with tetragonal distortion. Gamma irradiation of the prepared samples produces radiation-induced defects, which are related to the sharing of host lithium disilicate glass, trace iron impurities and copper iron in their formation. The visible spectrum of the CuO samples shows shielding effect towards successive gamma irradiation.

  11. Role of glutaredoxin 3 in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential mineral nutrient that is tightly regulated through mechanisms involving iron regulatory genes, intracellular storage, and iron recycling. Dysregulation of these mechanisms often results in either excess tissue iron accumulation (overload) or iron deficiency (anemia). Many bioche...

  12. Liver Iron Contents in Rats after Administration of Certain Iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of certain iron compounds on liver iron deposition was ... extra iron probably depends on the type of food prepared, .... main groups. Each main group consisted of 4 subgroups. (8 rats per subgroup) which received the same basic diet but differing amounts of iron of a specific type. Each animal was ...

  13. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-01-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures

  14. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E., E-mail: stephen.russek@nist.gov; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Geiss, Roy H. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Arenholz, Elke [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Idzerda, Yves U. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  15. Anomalous magnetism of superconducting Mg-doped InN film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. Chang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the Meissner effect of Mg-doped InN film with superconducting transition onset temperature Tc,onset of 5 K. Mg-doped InN is magnetically ordered and exhibits a simultaneous first-order magnetic and electric transition near 50 K. Its behavior is similar to that of iron-based superconductors. A strong correlation is proposed to exist between structural distortion and superconductivity when Mg is doped into InN. The suppression of magnetic ordering close to Tc by doping is further demonstrated by anisotropic magnetoresistance and M-H measurements. The findings suggest that the superconducting mechanism in the system may not be conventional BCS.

  16. Iron site location in Fe-diffused lithium niobate crystals by combined RBS-PIXE-NRA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltron, A. [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Argiolas, N., E-mail: nicola.argiolas@unipd.it [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); De Salvador, D.; Bazzan, M. [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ciampolillo, M.V.; Bacci, L.; Sada, C. [University of Padova and CNISM, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    Iron diffused x-cut lithium niobate samples have been studied from a structural point of view by ion beam analysis techniques in channeling conditions. The aim of this work is to determine the most probable position of iron atoms after high temperature diffusion treatment in pure oxygen atmosphere and to verify their location after an additional full reducing annealing at low temperature. The results are compared with the bulk doping case that can be considered the final equilibrium state of the diffusion process. By comparing the iron signal with niobium and lithium counterparts in angular scans along proper crystallographic directions, we demonstrate that iron occupies in any case the lithium site or a very close position regardless of the reduction degree, just as in the case of bulk doped samples.

  17. Effect of alkaline earth metal doping on thermal, optical, magnetic and dielectric properties of BiFeO3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, B; Das, D; Basumallick, A; Bandopadhyay, S K; Vasanthacharya, N Y

    2009-01-01

    Substrate-free pure-phase BiFeO 3 (BFO) nanoparticles doped with alkaline earth metals (Ba, Sr and Ca) have been synthesized by a sol-gel route and their thermal, optical, dielectric and magnetic properties are discussed. The characteristic structural phase transitions of BFO nanoparticles are found to occur at much lower temperatures. A reduction of the Neel temperature has been observed in the doped samples in comparison with the pristine one, whereas the band gap shows a reverse trend. Iron was found to be only in the Fe 3+ valence state in all the doped samples. Magnetoelectric coupling is seen in our samples. Weak ferromagnetism is observed at room temperature in all of the doped and undoped BFO nanoparticles with the largest value of coercive field ∼1.78 kOe and saturation magnetization ∼2.38 emu g -1 for Ba and Ca doped BFO nanoparticles, respectively.

  18. BLOOD DOPING AND RISKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Doping is the way in which athletes misuse of chemicals and other types of medical interventions (eg, blood replacement, try to get ahead in the results of other athletes or their performance at the expense of their own health. The aim of this work is the analysis of blood doping and the display of negative consequences that this way of increasing capabilities brings. Method: The methodological work is done descriptively. Results: Even in 1972 at the Stockholm Institute for gymnastics and sport, first Dr. Bjorn Ekblom started having blood doping. Taken from the blood, athletes through centifuge separating red blood cells from blood plasma, which is after a month of storage in the fridge, every athlete back into the bloodstream. Tests aerobic capacity thereafter showed that the concerned athletes can run longer on average for 25% of the treadmill than before. Discussion: Blood doping carries with it serious risks, excessive amount of red cells “thickens the blood,” increased hematocrit, which reduces the heart’s ability to pump blood to the periphery. All this makes it difficult for blood to flow through blood vessels, and there is a great danger that comes to a halt in the circulation, which can cause cardiac arrest, stroke, pulmonary edema, and other complications that can be fatal.

  19. Doped barium titanate nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    nese doped BaTiO3 ceramics, sintered at 1400°C in air, changes from tetragonal to hexagonal between 0⋅5 and. 1⋅7 mole% of manganese (Langhammer et al 2000). As a driving force of the transformation from the cubic to the hexagonal crystal structure, the influence of the Jahn–. Teller distortion is proposed. The grain ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron- ... donate blood frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View ...

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

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    Full Text Available ... lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron supplements ... warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell your doctor if you have any new ...

  11. Banded Iron Formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R; Konhauser, Kurt O; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Sedimentary deposits of alternating iron-rich (20–40% Fe) and iron-poor, siliceous (40–50% SiO2) mineral layers that primarily precipitated throughout much of the late Archean (2.7–2.5 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.5– 1.8 Ga), but then remerged in the Neoproterozoic (0.8 Ga).......Sedimentary deposits of alternating iron-rich (20–40% Fe) and iron-poor, siliceous (40–50% SiO2) mineral layers that primarily precipitated throughout much of the late Archean (2.7–2.5 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.5– 1.8 Ga), but then remerged in the Neoproterozoic (0.8 Ga)....

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  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ...

  18. Ocean iron fertilization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    In 2009 and 2010, an Indo-German scientific expedition dusted the ocean with iron to stimulate the biological pump that captures atmosphereic carbon dioxide. Two onboard scientists tell the story of this controversial project. Besides raising...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... technology commercialization through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron- ...

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  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual periods, may be ... anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance athletes ...

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ...

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  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help ... has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues to translate current research into improved health for people with iron- ...

  1. Iron and Prochlorococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    including: acid -cleaned filters, filters rinsed with un-amended trace-metal clean seawater, and filters rinsed with the oxalate solution followed by...greatly influenced by the sources of iron to the marine environment, which include riverine input, hydrothermal upwelling, and atmospheric...deposition (Jickells et al, 2005). While the amount of iron introduced to the oceans from riverine and hydrothermal sources is high, precipitation occurs

  2. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  3. Photocatalytic characteristics of single phase Fe-doped anatase TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized with vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz; Bayati, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Anatase TiO 2 /B 12 hybrid nanostructured catalyst was successfully synthesized by sol–gel technique. • The nanoparticle catalyst was doped with iron at several concentrations. • Nanoparticles were characterized in detail by XRD, Raman, TEM, EDS, and spectroscopy techniques. • The formation mechanism and role of point defects on photocatalytic properties were discussed. • A structure-property-processing correlation was established. - Abstract: We report a processing-structure-property correlation in B 12 -anatase titania hybrid catalysts doped with several concentrations of iron. Our results clearly show that low-level iron doping alters structure, defect content, and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO 2 . XRD and Raman studies revealed formation of a single-phase anatase TiO 2 where no iron based segregation in particular iron oxide, was detected. FT-IR spectra clearly confirmed sensitization of TiO 2 nanoparticles with vitamin B 12 . TEM micrographs and diffraction patterns confirmed crystallization of anatase nanoparticles with a radius of 15–20 nm. Both XRD and Raman signals showed a peak shift and a peak broadening which are surmised to originate from creation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancy and titanium interstitial. The doped samples revealed a narrower band gap as compared to undoped samples. Photocatalytic activity of the samples was assessed through measuring the decomposition rate of rhodamine B. It was found that sensitization with vitamin B 12 and Fe-doping significantly enhances the photocatalytic efficiency of the anatase nanoparticles. We also showed that there is an optimum Fe-doping level where the maximum photocatalytic activity is achieved. The boost of photocatalytic activity was qualitatively understood to originate from a more effective use of the light photons, formation of point defects, which enhance the charge separation, higher carrier mobility

  4. Synthesis engineering of iron oxide raspberry-shaped nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, O; Pichon, B P; Ihiawakrim, D; Florea, I; Moldovan, S; Ersen, O; Begin, D; Grenèche, J-M; Lemonnier, S; Barraud, E; Begin-Colin, S

    2017-01-07

    Magnetic porous nanostructures consisting of oriented aggregates of iron oxide nanocrystals display very interesting properties such as a lower oxidation state of magnetite, and enhanced saturation magnetization in comparison with individual nanoparticles of similar sizes and porosity. However, the formation mechanism of these promising nanostructures is not well understood, which hampers the fine tuning of their magnetic properties, for instance by doping them with other elements. Therefore the formation mechanism of porous raspberry shaped nanostructures (RSNs) synthesized by a one-pot polyol solvothermal method has been investigated in detail from the early stages by using a wide panel of characterization techniques, and especially by performing original in situ HR-TEM studies in temperature. A time-resolved study showed the intermediate formation of an amorphous iron alkoxide phase with a plate-like lamellar structure (PLS). Then, the fine investigation of PLS transformation upon heating up to 500 °C confirmed that the synthesis of RSNs involves two iron precursors: the starting one (hydrated iron chlorides) and the in situ formed iron alkoxide precursor which decomposes with time and heating and contributes to the growth step of nanostructures. Such an understanding of the formation mechanism of RSNs is necessary to envision efficient and rational enhancement of their magnetic properties.

  5. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...... anemia....

  6. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidi Gian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice

  7. Spin excitations in hole-overdoped iron-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigane, K; Kihou, K; Fujita, K; Kajimoto, R; Ikeuchi, K; Ji, S; Akimitsu, J; Lee, C H

    2016-09-12

    Understanding the overall features of magnetic excitation is essential for clarifying the mechanism of Cooper pair formation in iron-based superconductors. In particular, clarifying the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity is a central challenge because magnetism may play a key role in their exotic superconductivity. BaFe2As2 is one of ideal systems for such investigation because its superconductivity can be induced in several ways, allowing a comparative examination. Here we report a study on the spin fluctuations of the hole-overdoped iron-based superconductors Ba1-xKxFe2As2 (x = 0.5 and 1.0; Tc = 36 K and 3.4 K, respectively) over the entire Brillouin zone using inelastic neutron scattering. We find that their spin spectra consist of spin wave and chimney-like dispersions. The chimney-like dispersion can be attributed to the itinerant character of magnetism. The band width of the spin wave-like dispersion is almost constant from the non-doped to optimum-doped region, which is followed by a large reduction in the overdoped region. This suggests that the superconductivity is suppressed by the reduction of magnetic exchange couplings, indicating a strong relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in iron-based superconductors.

  8. Magnetic and resonance properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles doped with cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyar, S. V.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Bayukov, O. A.; Balaev, D. A.; Dubrovskii, A. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Ladygina, V. P.; Vorotynov, A. M.; Volochaev, M. N.

    2017-03-01

    Powders of undoped ferrihydrite nanoparticles and ferrihydrite nanoparticles doped with cobalt in the ratio of 5: 1 have been prepared by hydrolysis of 3 d-metal salts. It has been shown using Mössbauer spectroscopy that cobalt is uniformly distributed over characteristic crystal-chemical positions of iron ions. The blocking temperatures of ferrihydrite nanoparticles have been determined. The nanoparticle sizes, magnetizations, surface anisotropy constants, and bulk anisotropy constants have been estimated. The doping of ferrihydrite nanoparticles with cobalt leads to a significant increase in the anisotropy constant of a nanoparticle and to the formation of surface rotational anisotropy with the surface anisotropy constant K u = 1.6 × 10-3 erg/cm2.

  9. Pressure effect on iron based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, S.; Kanagaraj, M.

    2011-01-01

    A tuning of macroscopic thermo dynamical parameters such as temperature, pressure and volume play a crucial role in strongly correlated electron systems especially high T c superconductors, which leads to increasing conductivity as well as effective way of reducing intrinsic magnetic moments. Application of chemical and external pressure exhibits significant increases of critical temperature of recently discovered iron pnictides and chalcogenides superconductors. In this present report, we have investigated hydrostatic pressure effects on resistivity and magnetization of some 1111 type based oxypnictide superconductors such as Co doped CeFeAsO, La 0.8 Th 0.2 FeAsO, Ce 0.6 Y 0.4 FeAsO 0.8 F 0.2 and Yb doped CeFeAsO systems respectively. The initially applied pressure increases the T c and its down to lower value when beyond increasing pressure also has been observed and pressure effects on crystal structure were also discussed. From that all the obtained results reveal that controlling of magnetic instability and structure distortion at higher pressure is a dominant way to further developing of T c of these new ferropnictides compounds. (author)

  10. Photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B dye using Fe doped TiO2 nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhade, Tejal; Banerjee, Indrani

    2018-05-01

    The unique properties of titanium dioxide (TiO2) such as high photo catalytic activity, high chemical stability and low toxicity have made it a suitable photocatalyst in recent decades. The effect of modification of TiO2 with doping of iron on its characteristics and photo catalytic efficiency was studied. The change in band gap energy of TiO2 nanoparticles after doping with Fe has been studied. Significant enhancement in photo catalytic property of TiO2 after Fe doping under light exposure conditions has been investigated. Acute exposure to non-biodegradable Rhodamine B resulted in many health problems like burning of eyes, skin irritation, nasal burning, and chest pain etc. Therefore, degradation of this dye is needed to save environment and animals. Considering the similar radius of Fe3+ and Ti4+ ions (respectively 0.64 Å and 0.68 Å), titanium position in the lattice of TiO2 can be replaced by iron cations easily. The undoped and Fe doped TiO2 nano composites were synthesized by sol-gel method, in which 1.0M% of Fe was doped with TiO2 and then the samples were characterized by using FE-SEM, UV-Visible diffuse spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and FTIR. Photo catalytic degradation of Rhodamine B dye experiment was carried out in visible light range. After 90 min time duration pink colour of dye turned colourless, indicating significant degradation rate with time.

  11. Ego involvement increases doping likelihood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Christopher; Kavussanu, Maria

    2018-08-01

    Achievement goal theory provides a framework to help understand how individuals behave in achievement contexts, such as sport. Evidence concerning the role of motivation in the decision to use banned performance enhancing substances (i.e., doping) is equivocal on this issue. The extant literature shows that dispositional goal orientation has been weakly and inconsistently associated with doping intention and use. It is possible that goal involvement, which describes the situational motivational state, is a stronger determinant of doping intention. Accordingly, the current study used an experimental design to examine the effects of goal involvement, manipulated using direct instructions and reflective writing, on doping likelihood in hypothetical situations in college athletes. The ego-involving goal increased doping likelihood compared to no goal and a task-involving goal. The present findings provide the first evidence that ego involvement can sway the decision to use doping to improve athletic performance.

  12. Genetic doping and health damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Aa; Ravasi, Aa; Farhud, Dd

    2011-01-01

    Use of genetic doping or gene transfer technology will be the newest and the lethal method of doping in future and have some unpleasant consequences for sports, athletes, and outcomes of competitions. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) defines genetic doping as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements, and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance ". The purpose of this review is to consider genetic doping, health damages and risks of new genes if delivered in athletes. This review, which is carried out by reviewing relevant publications, is primarily based on the journals available in GOOGLE, ELSEVIER, PUBMED in fields of genetic technology, and health using a combination of keywords (e.g., genetic doping, genes, exercise, performance, athletes) until July 2010. There are several genes related to sport performance and if they are used, they will have health risks and sever damages such as cancer, autoimmunization, and heart attack.

  13. Oxygen vacancy and Moessbauer parameters of Fe doped tin oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, K.; Mudarra Navarro, A.M.; Errico, L.; Rodriguez Torres, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear what the local environment of Fe ions included in rutile structure is. In order to clarify this point, Moessbauer parameters of 57 Fe doped SnO 2 are compared with the results of ab initio calculation taking into account different configurations of iron and oxygen vacancy in the rutile structure of SnO 2 . Calculations were performed using the LAPW+lo method (Wien2k); RMT x Kmax = 7, A mesh of 50 k-points at IBZ, 2x2x2 super cell of SnO 2 . (J.P.N.)

  14. Doped Parton Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Valerio; Rojo, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Calculations of high-energy processes involving the production of b-quarks are typically performed in two different ways, the massive four-flavour scheme (4FS) and the massless five-flavour scheme (5FS). For processes where the combination of the 4FS and 5FS results into a matched calculation is technically difficult, it is possible to define a hybrid scheme known as the doped scheme, where above the b-quark threshold the strong coupling runs with $n_f=5$, as in the massless calculation, while the DGLAP splitting functions are those of the $n_f=4$ scheme. In this contribution we present NNPDF3.0 PDF sets in this doped scheme, compare them with the corresponding 4FS and 5FS sets, and discuss their relevance for LHC phenomenology.

  15. FTIR spectra and properties of iron borophosphate glasses containing simulated nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qilong; Wang, Fu; Chen, Kuiru; Pan, Sheqi; Zhu, Hanzhen; Lu, Mingwei; Qin, Jianfa

    2015-07-01

    30 wt.% simulated nuclear wastes were successfully immobilized by B2O3-doped iron phosphate base glasses. The structure and thermal stability of the prepared wasteforms were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The subtle structural variations attributed to different B2O3 doping modes have been discussed in detail. The results show that the thermal stability and glass forming tendency of the iron borophosphate glass wasteforms are faintly affected by different B2O3 doping modes. The main structural networks of iron borophosphate glass wasteforms are PO43-, P2O74-, [BO4] groups. Furthermore, for the wasteform prepared by using 10B2O3-36Fe2O3-54P2O5 as base glass, the distributions of Fe-O-P bonds, [BO4], PO43- and P2O74- groups are optimal. In general, the dissolution rate (DR) values of the studied iron borophosphate wasteforms are about 10-8 g cm-2 min-1. The obtained conclusions can offer some useful information for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes using boron contained phosphate glasses.

  16. [Doping and urologic tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, F; Sacco, E; Volpe, A; Gardi, M; Totaro, A; Calarco, A; Racioppi, M; Gulino, G; D'Addessi, A; Bassi, P F

    2010-01-01

    Several substances such as growth hormone (GH), erythropoietin (Epo), and anabolic steroids (AS) are improperly utilized to increase the performance of athletes. Evaluating the potential cancer risk associated with doping agents is difficult since these drugs are often used at very high doses and in combination with other licit or illicit drugs. The GH, via its mediator, the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), is involved in the development and progression of cancer. Animal studies suggested that high levels of GH/IGF-1 increase progression of androgen-independent prostate cancer. Clinical data regarding prostate cancer are mostly based on epidemiological studies or indirect data such as IGF-1 high levels in patients with prostate cancer. Even if experimental studies showed a correlation between Epo and cancer, no clinical data are currently available on cancer development related to Epo as a doping agent. Androgens are involved in prostate carcinogenesis modulating genes that regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Most information on AS is anecdotal (case reports on prostate, kidney and testicular cancers). Prospective epidemiologic studies failed to support the hypothesis that circulating androgens are positively associated with prostate cancer risk. Currently, clinical and epidemiological studies supporting association between doping and urological neoplasias are not available. Nowadays, exposure to doping agents starts more prematurely with a consequent longer exposition period; drugs are often used at very high doses and in combination with other licit or illicit drugs. Due to all these elements it is impossible to predict all the side effects, including cancer; more detailed studies are therefore necessary.

  17. Doping and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    rad av världens främsta idrottsvetare och dopningsexperter hade mött upp för att presentera papers till en intresserad och engagerad publik. Temat för konferensen var "Doping and Public Health", och den aspekten behandlades också; dock tolkade flera presentatörer temat på sina egna vis, och hela...

  18. Incorporation mechanism for doping of metal ions into a passivating film at the lithium/thionyl chloride interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, V. G.; Shikin, V. I.

    1993-05-01

    Effects of iron and titanium ions on corrosion processes of lithium in thionyl chloride electrolytes have been studied. Laws for the growth of the passivating film on the type and concentration of doped ions have been established, and equations for these are suggested. A stepwise mechanism of dopant incorporation into passivating film structure is presented.

  19. Incorporation mechanism for doping of metal ions into a passive film at the lithium/thionyl chloride interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, V.G. (Siberian Inst. of Tech., Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Lab. of Electrochemistry); Shilkin, V.I. (Siberian Inst. of Tech., Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Lab. of Electrochemistry)

    1993-05-01

    Effects of iron and titanium ions on corrosion processes of lithium in thionyl chloride electrolytes have been studied. Laws for the growth of the passivating film on the type and concentration of doped ions have been established, and equations for these are suggested. A stepwise mechanism of dopant incorporation into passivating film structure is presented. (orig.)

  20. Neutron transmutation doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Byung Jin

    2001-09-01

    HE OVERALL STATE OF THE ART RELATED WITH NEUTRON TRANSMUTATION DOPING(NCT) IS SURVEYED. ITEMS RELATED FOR THE REALIZATION OF NTD IN HANARO IS FOCUSED. IN ADDITION TO THE UNIFORM IRRADIATION AND ACHIEVING THE TARGET RESISTIVITY WHICH ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NTD, OTHER ITEMS SUCH AS THE FUNCTION AND ROLE OF NTD, MARKET TREND, QUALITY CONTROL ARE INCLUDED. MEANWHILE THE ONLY ADVANTAGE OF NTD IS ACHIEVING VERY HIGH UNIFORMITY OF DOPING, IT HAS SEVERAL DISADVANTAGES DUE TO THE USE OF NUCLEAR REACTOR. THEREFORE THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY HAS CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO REPLACE NTD, AND THE DEMAND OF NTD HAD BEEN DECREASED A LOT DURING 1990S. AS THE DEMAND FOR LARGE CRYSTAL INCREASES, HOWEVER, THE NTD DEMAND BEGAN TO INCREASE AGAIN FROM 2000. SINCE THE DEMAND FOR THE LARGER CRYSTAL WILL BE CONTINUED IN THE FUTURE, THE ROLE OF NTD WOULD BE NEEDED FOR THE LONGER TIME. IN ORDER TO MITIGATE THIS TREND OF DEMAND, THE REACTOR SHOULD BE CAPABLE OF ACCEPTING LARGE CRYSTAL AND THE EFFORT TO IMPROVE DOPING UNIFORMITY AND TO REDUCE THE COST SHOULD CONTINUED.

  1. An iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopic study of titania-supported iron- and iron-iridium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Jobson, S.

    1992-01-01

    57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy shows that titania-supported iron is reduced by treatment in hydrogen at significantly lower temperatures than corresponding silica- and alumina-supported catalysts. The metallic iron formed under hydrogen at 600deg C is partially converted to carbide by treatment in carbon monoxide and hydrogen. In contrast to its alumina- and silica-supported counterparts, the remainder of the titania-supported iron is unchanged by this gaseous mixture. The 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra of EXAFS show that iron and iridium in the titania-supported iron-iridium catalysts are reduced in hydrogen at even lower temperatures and, after treatment at 600deg C, are predominantly present as the iron-iridium alloy. The treatment of these reduced catalysts in carbon monoxide and hydrogen is shown by Moessbauer spectroscopy and EXAFS to induce the segregation of iron from the iron-iridium alloy and its conversion to iron oxide. (orig.)

  2. Dietary iron intake, iron status, and gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cuilin; Rawal, Shristi

    2017-12-01

    Pregnant women are particularly vulnerable to iron deficiency and related adverse pregnancy outcomes and, as such, are routinely recommended for iron supplementation. Emerging evidence from both animal and population-based studies, however, has raised potential concerns because significant associations have been observed between greater iron stores and disturbances in glucose metabolism, including increased risk of type 2 diabetes among nonpregnant individuals. Yet, the evidence is uncertain regarding the role of iron in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy complication which has short-term and long-term adverse health ramifications for both women and their children. In this review, we critically and systematically evaluate available data examining the risk of GDM associated with dietary iron, iron supplementation, and iron status as measured by blood concentrations of several indicators. We also discuss major methodologic concerns regarding the available epidemiologic studies on iron and GDM. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  4. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  5. Absorption of medicamental iron and iron from food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reizenstein, P.; Carlmark, B.; Ehn, L.; Forsberg, K.; Hoeglund, S.; Terpstra, T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are reviewed for the measurement of iron absorption. The chemical balance method has been almost entirely supplanted by radioisotope methods, which include notably whole-body counting and measurement of incorporation of radioiron into red cells. A survey is also given of the various conditions that influence iron absorption, including chemical form of iron, amount of iron, accompanying diet. Absorption tests must be conducted under relevant conditions. (author)

  6. Iron single crystal growth from a lithium-rich melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, M.; Schumann, H.; Jantz, S. G.; Breitner, F. A.; Leineweber, A.; Jesche, A.

    2018-03-01

    α -Fe single crystals of rhombic dodecahedral habit were grown from a Li84N12Fe∼3 melt. Crystals of several millimeter along a side form at temperatures around T ≈ 800 ° C. Upon further cooling the growth competes with the formation of Fe-doped Li3N. The b.c.c. structure and good sample quality of α -Fe single crystals were confirmed by X-ray and electron diffraction as well as magnetization measurements and chemical analysis. A nitrogen concentration of 90 ppm was detected by means of carrier gas hot extraction. Scanning electron microscopy did not reveal any sign of iron nitride precipitates.

  7. Changes in serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iron is a vital constituent of cells but in excess may be harmful and is associated with a raised risk for some malignant diseases including breast cancer. We aimed to study changes in iron profile in Sudanese females newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: A case- control study in which serum iron, Total ...

  8. Prediction of reducible soil iron content from iron extraction data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Reeven, van J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Soils contain various iron compounds that differ in solubility, reducibility and extractability. Moreover, the contribution of the various iron compounds to total iron (Fe) and total Fe concentrations differs highly among soils. As a result, the total reducible Fe content can also differ among

  9. Mössbauer study of oxide films of Fe-, Sn-, Cr- doped zirconium alloys during corrosion in autoclave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippov, V. P., E-mail: vpfilippov@mephi.ru; Bateev, A. B.; Lauer, Yu. A. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Mössbauer investigations were used to compare iron atom states in oxide films of binary Zr-Fe, ternary Zr-Fe-Cu and quaternary Zr-Fe-Cr-Sn alloys. Oxide films are received in an autoclave at a temperature of 350–360 °C and at pressure of 16.8 MPa. The corrosion process decomposes the intermetallic precipitates in alloys and forms metallic iron with inclusions of chromium atoms α–Fe(Cr), α–Fe(Cu), α–Fe {sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe {sub 3}O{sub 4} compounds. Some iron ions are formed in divalent and in trivalent paramagnetic states. The additional doping influences on corrosion kinetics and concentration of iron compounds and phases formed in oxide films. It was shown the correlation between concentration of iron in different chemical states and corrosion resistance of alloys.

  10. Iron prophylaxis during pregnancy -- how much iron is needed? A randomized dose- response study of 20-80 mg ferrous iron daily in pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Bergholt, Thomas; Eriksen, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.......To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy....

  11. Orientation-dependent low field magnetic anomalies and room-temperature spintronic material – Mn doped ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, SS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available of ferromagnetism, a relatively new phenomenon called “low-field microwave absorption” has been observed in ferromagnetic materials and other various materials such as high temperature superconductors, ferrites, manganites, doped silicate glasses and soft... absorption phenomenon has been observed in ferromagnetic materials and various other materials such as superconductors, ferrites, manganites, semiconductors, doped silicate glasses, in soft materials and recently in iron monosilicides films [41- 46...

  12. Adsorptive Iron Removal from Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron is commonly present in groundwater worldwide. The presence of iron in the water supply is not harmful to human health, however it is undesirable. Bad taste, discoloration, staining, deposition in the distribution system leading to aftergrowth, and incidences of high turbidity are some of the aesthetic and operational problems associated with iron in water supplies. Iron removal from groundwater is, therefore, a major concern for water supply companies using groundwater sources....

  13. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  14. Wear resistance of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  15. Neutron transmutation doped Ge bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.; Palaio, N. P.; Richards, P. L.; Rodder, M.

    1983-01-01

    Some conclusions reached are as follow. Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) of high quality Ge single crystals provides perfect control of doping concentration and uniformity. The resistivity can be tailored to any given bolometer operating temperature down to 0.1 K and probably lower. The excellent uniformity is advantaged for detector array development.

  16. Nonlinear Elasticity of Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0206 NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS Mark Dykman and Kirill Moskovtsev Michigan State University...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7600 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...vibration amplitude. 15. SUBJECT TERMS semiconductors , microresonators, microelectromechanical 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  17. Iron dominated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided

  18. Iron oxides photochemical dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blesa, M.A.; Litter, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    This work was intended to study the light irradiation influence of diverse wave-lengths on iron oxides dissolution in aqueous solutions. The objectives of this work were: the exploration of photochemical processes with the aim of its eventual application in: a) decontamination and chemical cleaning under special conditions; b) materials for solar energy conversion. (Author)

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ages 1 to 3. From ages 4 to 8, children ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) ... We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...