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Sample records for iron chelator-treated amphibole

  1. Early Onset of Atypical Proliferative Lesions in the Lungs of a Libby Amphibole (LA) Exposed Rat Model of Cardiovascular Disease-Associated Iron Overlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Miners and residents of Libby, Montana have increased incidences of asbestos-related diseases associated with exposure to amphibole contaminated vermiculite. Amphiboles have been shown to bind endogenous iron and modulate fiber induced inflammatory response. We hypoth...

  2. Multistage amphiboles from the Galinge iron skarn deposit in Qiman Tagh, western China: evidence of igneous rocks replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Feng, C.-Y.; Zhu, Y.-F.; Mao, J.-W.; Zhao, Y.-M.; Li, D.-X.

    2017-02-01

    Amphiboles from the Galinge skarn deposit, the largest iron (Fe) polymetallic skarn deposit in the Qiman Tagh metallogenic belt (western China), were formed by multistage fluid-rock interactions. Mineral analysis of the various amphiboles suggest that they were formed by the replacement of mafic to intermediate igneous rocks. The two alteration phases have formed three generations of compositionally distinct amphiboles: Amp-I: Ferro-edenitic hornblende (FE); Amp-II: Deep bluish-green magnesian-hastingsite (MH); Amp-III: Light greenish-beige ferro-actinolite (FA). The Amp-I preserves the primary igneous amphibole composition, and was subsequently replaced by Amp-II. The amphibole Cl content markedly increases from the FE (0.176 - 0.582 wt.%) to the MH (0.894 - 3.161 wt.%), and abruptly drops in the FA (0.017 - 0.039 wt.%). The Cl-rich MH contains the lowest concentration of Si [5.64 - 6.28 atoms per formula unit (apfu)], and the highest (K + Na) values (0.72 - 1.06 apfu) in the amphibole A-site with a high K/(K + Na) of 0.491 to 0.429. Both Mg and Fe contents of the MH and FA vary widely, possibly due to the interactions of magma-derived hydrothermal fluids with the basaltic / andesitic host rocks.

  3. Multistage amphiboles from the Galinge iron skarn deposit in Qiman Tagh, western China: evidence of igneous rocks replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Feng, C.-Y.; Zhu, Y.-F.; Mao, J.-W.; Zhao, Y.-M.; Li, D.-X.

    2016-08-01

    Amphiboles from the Galinge skarn deposit, the largest iron (Fe) polymetallic skarn deposit in the Qiman Tagh metallogenic belt (western China), were formed by multistage fluid-rock interactions. Mineral analysis of the various amphiboles suggest that they were formed by the replacement of mafic to intermediate igneous rocks. The two alteration phases have formed three generations of compositionally distinct amphiboles: Amp-I: Ferro-edenitic hornblende (FE); Amp-II: Deep bluish-green magnesian-hastingsite (MH); Amp-III: Light greenish-beige ferro-actinolite (FA). The Amp-I preserves the primary igneous amphibole composition, and was subsequently replaced by Amp-II. The amphibole Cl content markedly increases from the FE (0.176 - 0.582 wt.%) to the MH (0.894 - 3.161 wt.%), and abruptly drops in the FA (0.017 - 0.039 wt.%). The Cl-rich MH contains the lowest concentration of Si [5.64 - 6.28 atoms per formula unit (apfu)], and the highest (K + Na) values (0.72 - 1.06 apfu) in the amphibole A-site with a high K/(K + Na) of 0.491 to 0.429. Both Mg and Fe contents of the MH and FA vary widely, possibly due to the interactions of magma-derived hydrothermal fluids with the basaltic / andesitic host rocks. Formation of the Cl-rich MH may have been associated with the early high-temperature and high-saline hydrothermal fluids, meanwhile the Cl-poor FA may have formed from later low-temperature and low-saline hydrothermal fluids. The MH plays an important role for consuming Cl carried by hydrothermal fluids. The Cl-rich fluids may have mobilized some elements, such as Fe, Al, Mg, Ca and Ti from the host rocks. Considerable amounts of Ti, Al, Mg and Fe were incorporated into the sphene and Fe-Ti oxides that coexist with the MH.

  4. The role of iron in Libby amphibole-induced acute lung injury and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannahan, Jonathan H; Ghio, Andrew J; Schladweiler, Mette C; McGee, John K; Richards, Judy H; Gavett, Stephen H; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2011-05-01

    Complexation of host iron (Fe) on the surface of inhaled asbestos fibers has been postulated to cause oxidative stress contributing to in vivo pulmonary injury and inflammation. We examined the role of Fe in Libby amphibole (LA; mean length 4.99 µm ± 4.53 and width 0.28 µm ± 0.19) asbestos-induced inflammogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. LA contained acid-leachable Fe and silicon. In a cell-free media containing FeCl(3), LA bound #17 µg of Fe/mg of fiber and increased reactive oxygen species generation #3.5 fold, which was reduced by deferoxamine (DEF) treatment. In BEAS-2B cells exposure to LA, LA loaded with Fe (FeLA), or LA with DEF did not increase HO-1 or ferritin mRNA expression. LA increased IL-8 expression, which was reduced by Fe loading but increased by DEF. To determine the role of Fe in LA-induced lung injury in vivo, spontaneously hypertensive rats were exposed intratracheally to either saline (300 µL), DEF (1 mg), FeCl(3) (21 µg), LA (0.5 mg), FeLA (0.5 mg), or LA + DEF (0.5 mg). LA caused BALF neutrophils to increase 24 h post-exposure. Loading of Fe on LA but not chelation slightly decreased neutrophilic influx (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). At 4 h post-exposure, LA-induced lung expression of MIP-2 was reduced in rats exposed to FeLA but increased by LA + DEF (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). Ferritin mRNA was elevated in rats exposed to FeLA compared to LA. In conclusion, the acute inflammatory response to respirable fibers and particles may be inhibited in the presence of surface-complexed or cellular bioavailable Fe. Cell and tissue Fe-overload conditions may influence the pulmonary injury and inflammation caused by fibers.

  5. Stoichiometry-based estimates of ferric iron in calcic, sodic-calcic and sodic amphiboles: a comparison of various methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualda Guilherme A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An important drawback of the electron microprobe is its inability to quantify Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in routine work. Although these ratios can be calculated, there is no unique criterion that can be applied to all amphiboles. Using a large data set of calcic, sodic-calcic, and sodic amphibole analysis from A-type granites and syenites from southern Brazil, weassess the choices made by the method of Schumacher (1997, Canadian Mineralogist, 35: 238-246, which uses the average between selected maximum and minimum estimates. Maximum estimates selected most frequently are: 13 cations excluding Ca, Na, and K (13eCNK - 66%; sum of Si and Al equal to 8 (8SiAl - 17%; 15 cations excluding K (15eK - 8%. These selections are appropriate based on crystallochemical considerations. Minimum estimates are mostly all iron as Fe2+ (all Fe2 - 71%, and are clearly inadequate. Hence, maximum estimates should better approximate the actual values. To test this, complete analyses were selected from the literature, and calculated and measured values were compared. 13eCNK and maximum estimates are precise and accurate (concordance correlation coefficient- r c " 0.85. As expected, averages yield poor estimates (r c = 0.56. We recommend, thus, that maximum estimates be used for calcic, sodic-calcic, and sodic amphiboles.

  6. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  7. SUBCHRONIC PULMONARY PATHOLOGY, IRON-OVERLOAD AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVITY AFTER LIBBY AMPHIBOLE EXPOSURE IN RAT MODELS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Surface-available iron (Fe) is proposed to contribute to asbestos-induced toxicity through the production of reactive oxygen species.Objective: Our goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that rat models of cardiovascular disease with coexistent Fe overload would be incre...

  8. Origin of SNC kaersutitic amphibole: Experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Heine, Bruce; Johnson, Marie

    1987-01-01

    The SNC meteorites, a group of cumulus textured, fine grained diabases, pyroxenites, and dunites, appear to have crystallized at relatively shallow depths on the same SNC parent body. Hydrous minerals generally are not present among the cumulus and intercumulus minerals in these meteorites except for some iddingsite alteration of olivine. The presence of hydrous magmatic amphibole in the SNC melt inclusions indicates that crystallization of the melt inclusions had to take place at significant pressure, probably greater than 1 kb based on previous amphibole stability data. If experimental data for kaersutite amphibole were to be obtained, it should be possible to estimate this pressure more precisely then previously, and to estimate the volatile (H2O) content of the parent magma. At this point, the factors controlling the chemistry and stability of high TiO2, kaersutitic amphiboles are not known. In an attempt to determine the factors which control the stability and chemistry of TiO2-rich amphibole, data was refined and extrapolated from four experimental studies of amphibole-melt equilibria recently completed. At the same time, hypothermal experiments were performed on a composition considered to be an early melt in the Shergotty magma liquid line of descent. The latter experiments were an attempt to reproduce crystallization of the amphibole-bearing melt inclusions.

  9. WinAmphcal: A Windows program for the IMA-04 amphibole classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Fuat

    2007-01-01

    A Microsoft© Visual Basic (6.0) program, called WinAmphcal, has been developed to calculate structural formulae of both wet-chemical and microprobe-derived amphibole analyses. On the basis of the standard International Mineralogical Association (IMA-04) classification procedure, WinAmphcal classifies amphibole analyses into five groups and then determines a specific amphibole name with prefixes and modifiers. This software is developed to predict cation site allocations at the different structural positions as well as to estimate stoichiometric Fe3+ and H2O contents from microprobe analyses. If Fe2O3 content is unknown, the program calculates ferric iron content on the basis of the minimum Fe3+ (15eNK) and maximum (13eCNK) criteria considering the site assignments and stoichiometric constraints. Other user-defined calculation and normalization factors can also be carried out by current software for the process of amphibole chemical analyses. Using the charge-balance method, WinAmphcal permits the user to determine the Mn2+ and Mn3+ states from Mn3+-rich microprobe-derived sodic amphiboles. WinAmphcal stores all the calculated results in an Excel file. Hence output of the program can also be displayed and processed by any other software for general data manipulation and graphing purposes.

  10. Pressure and temperature variation of octahedral Na and tetrahedral Al in amphiboles in metamafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. M.; Lei, J.

    2013-12-01

    The sodium content in the M4 site of amphibole (BNa) was calibrated by Brown (1977, J Petrol, 18, 53-72) in a study that continues to be highly cited to this day. This study, based on empirical observations of amphibole compositional changes in the presence of the buffering assemblage plagioclase, chlorite, epidote, iron oxide, and water, demonstrated a systematic variation in the BNa and tetrahedral Al (TAl) content with pressure. Recent experimental work in this lab aimed at defining the extent of miscibility along the tremolite-glaucophane and hornblende-glaucophane joins in the Na2O-CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O system has provided some additional information on the cation mixing along these joins. These joins also serve as the chemically-simplified framework of the BNa versus TAl correlation reported by Brown (1977). There are now sufficient, though still a bare minimum, of experimentally-confirmed mixing data for sodium-rich amphiboles to test this correlation and for quantifying the pressure-temperature (P-T) dependence of amphibole compositions in metamafic rocks relevant to subduction zones. From experimental results obtained over the range of 500-800°C, 1.5-2.0 GPa, and using a variety of amphibole synthesis and re-equilibration methods, the following set of asymmetric formalism (ASF) macroscopic interaction and mixing parameters have been derived that can be used with THERMOCALC dataset 55: Wtrgl = 70 kJ, Wglts = Wtrts =20 kJ, α(tr) = 1.0, α(ts) = 1.2, and α(gl) = 0.52. Using a fixed MORB bulk composition, the composition of amphiboles within the P-T stability field of the buffering assemblage were calculated for the above chemical system with FeO added (i.e., NCFMASH) over the range of 0.2 - 2.0 GPa and 400 - 700°C. The following main observations can be made. First, the empirical amphibole compositions at low TAl and high BNa contents are well modeled by the miscibility gap in the amphibole ternary sub-system tremolite

  11. Elasticity of calcium and calcium-sodium amphiboles

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    Brown, J. Michael; Abramson, Evan H.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of single-crystal elastic moduli under ambient conditions are reported for nine calcium to calcium-sodium amphiboles that lie in the composition range of common crustal constituents. Velocities of body and surface acoustic waves measured by Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering (ISLS) were inverted to determine the 13 moduli characterizing these monoclinic samples. Moduli show a consistent pattern: C33 > C22 > C11 and C23 > C12 > C13 and C44 > C55 ∼ C66 and for the uniquely monoclinic moduli, |C35| ≫ C46 ∼ |C25| > |C15| ∼ 0. Most of the compositionally-induced variance of moduli is associated with aluminum and iron content. Seven moduli (C11C12C13C22C44C55C66) increase with increasing aluminum while all diagonal moduli decrease with increasing iron. Three moduli (C11, C13 and C44) increase with increasing sodium and potassium occupancy in A-sites. The uniquely monoclinic moduli (C15C25 and C35) have no significant compositional dependence. Moduli associated with the a∗ direction (C11C12C13C55 and C66) are substantially smaller than values associated with structurally and chemically related clinopyroxenes. Other moduli are more similar for both inosilicates. The isotropically averaged adiabatic bulk modulus does not vary with iron content but increases with aluminum content from 85 GPa for tremolite to 99 GPa for pargasite. Increasing iron reduces while increasing aluminum increases the isotropic shear modulus which ranges from 47 GPa for ferro-actinolite to 64 GPa for pargasite. These results exhibit far greater anisotropy and higher velocities than apparent in earlier work. Quasi-longitudinal velocities are as fast as ∼9 km/s and (intermediate between the a∗- and c-axes) are as slow as ∼6 km/s. Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging based on prior single crystal moduli resulted in calculated rock velocities lower than laboratory measurements, leading to adoption of the (higher velocity) Voigt bound. Thus, former uses of the upper Voigt bound can

  12. Amphibole ceramics: conceptual development and preliminary experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauf, R.J.

    1985-08-01

    Certain natural silicate minerals, commonly called jade, are well known for their resistance to brittle fracture. One type of jade, nephrite, is a compacted form of the amphibole mineral series tremolite-actinolite. Nephrite is tough because the naturally acicular crystal habit of these amphibole minerals produces an interwoven fibrous microstructure that impedes crack propagation. Object of this work was to duplicate the fibrous microstructure of nephrite by pulverizing natural tremolite or actinolite and then compacting it by hot pressing to form a dense body. Two other materials were also investigated, namely, clinochrysotile (serpentine asbestos) and synthetic fluor-tremolite. For each material, the milling characteristics and densification were studied. The resulting microstructures were characterized, and fracture toughness was measured for a limited number of samples. The most ''fibrous'' microstructure was obtained by hot pressing clinochrysotile 15 min a 1000/sup 0/C. Actinolite, hot pressed 15 min at 1100/sup 0/C, had a critical fracture toughness K/sub IC/ = 4.5 MPa m/sup 1/2/, which compares favorably with the toughness of nephrite jade (K/sub IC/ = 3.6). Decomposition of tremolite and actinolite to more stable phases occurred to some degree during hot pressing. Results suggest that hot isostatic pressing at high water vapor pressure should yield a dense product without causing amphibole decomposition. 28 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Iron

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    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  14. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  15. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

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    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  16. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  17. Using Pyroxene and Amphibole Compositions to Determine Protolith of Banded Quartz- Amphibole-Pyroxene Rocks on Akilia, Southwest Greenland: a Lithology Suitable for Hosting Earth's Oldest Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, M. M.; Usui, T.; Fedo, C. M.; Whitehouse, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    At ˜ 3.8 Ga in age, Earth's oldest known supracrustal rocks are exposed in SW Greenland and are comprised dominantly of mafic igneous rocks with less common sedimentary units, included banded iron formation (BIF). The great antiquity of the supracrustal rocks and repeated claims for a fossil record makes Greenland one of the prime astrobiological destinations on Earth, however, many primary characteristics of these rocks have been overprinted during multiple high-grade metamorphic events, which results in complex field relationships (e.g., Myers and Crowley, 2000; Whitehouse and Fedo, 2003). One example of this concerns an ˜ 5 m thick lithology dominated by bands of quartz, amphibole, pyroxene interpreted by some as BIF (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Nutman et al., 1997; Dauphas et al., 2004) on Akilia, SW Greenland. Correct identification of these rocks is of the utmost importance because they are reported to contain grains of apatite with 13C- depleted graphite inclusions that have been claimed as evidence for the oldest (> 3800 Mya) life on Earth (Mojzsis et al., 1996; Nutman et al., 1997; McKeegan et al., 2007). We analyzed mafic mineral compositions by electron microprobe from samples collected from a detailed measured section and from sample 92-197, the rock originally claimed to host Earth's oldest chemofossil. Ultramafic rocks from outside the quartz-amphibole-pyroxene (QAP) lithology are dominated by enstatite, anthophyllite, and hornblende and possess bulk trace-element signatures indicative of an igneous origin. Sample AK 38, a band of mixed pyroxene and amphibole that occurs within the QAP unit also has a bulk trace- element composition consistent with an ultramafic protolith, but contains Fe-rich clinopyroxene (Mg# = ˜ 50). AK 38 amphiboles are dominated by actinolite, although a few analyses of anthophyllite point towards an original Mg-rich protolith. Other QAP samples contain Fe-rich clino- and orthopyroxenes, actinolite and hornblende. Magnetite is

  18. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  19. Hydrogen isotope investigation of amphibole and glass in dacite magmas erupted in 1980-1986 and 2005 at Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, S.J.; Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Damph populations in original fresh lava flow surfaces may occur from blending magma domains with different ascent histories in the sub-volcanic environment immediately before eruption. Multi-stage open-system magma degassing operated in each parcel of magma rising toward the surface, whereas the magma below ∼7 km was a relatively closed system, at least to the October 1986 eruption based on the large population of minimally dehydrogenated, rim-free amphibole in the lavas. Magma degassing and possibly H isotope exchange with low-δD fluids around the roof zone may have accompanied the ∼1·5 km upward migration of the 1980 magma body. The low-δDamph (c. –188 to –122‰) oxy-amphibole phenocrysts in lava spines extruded in May 2005 reflect dehydrogenation as ascending viscous magma degassed and crystallized, and fractures that admitted oxygen into the hot solidified lava spine interior facilitated additional iron oxidation.

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Libby Amphibole Asbestos (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has finalized the, Toxicological Review of Libby Amphibole Asbestos: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health.

  1. 77 FR 30528 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Science Advisory Board; Libby Amphibole Asbestos...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... AGENCY Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Science Advisory Board; Libby Amphibole Asbestos... teleconference of the SAB Libby Amphibole Asbestos Panel to discuss the Panel's revised draft review report of EPA's Toxicological Review of Libby Amphibole Asbestos (August 2011 Draft). DATES: The...

  2. [Asbestos substitutes and their biological effects. 2. Synthetic amphiboles--their physico-chemical characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiecek, E; Szczepaniak, M; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Woźniak, H

    1992-01-01

    Metal content in the chemical structure of asbestos and man-made mineral fibres can affect their carcinogenic properties. As the chemical composition (metal content) of man-made silicate substitutes for asbestos can be varied almost at will in the process of their manufacture, the search for potentially least carcinogenic silicates appears to be of utmost importance. This paper presents diffractometric characteristics, dimensional analysis and morphology data for 4 synthetic amphibole fibres with chemical compositions differing from that of natural crocidolite amphibole. Those included the following synthetic amphiboles: Na2Mg6Ge8O22(OH)2; Na2Ni6Si8O22(OH)2; Na2Mg6Si8O22(OH)2; Na2Co6Si8O22(OH)2. The studied amphiboles differed in fibre length and diameter. The magnesium amphibole contained the longest (6.03 microns) fibres, and the nickel amphibole contained the shortest (2.7 microns) fibres, resembling those of crocidolite. The highest content (54.7%) of respirable fibres was found in the magnesium amphibole, and the lowest (15.9%) in the natural crocidolite. The authors suggest that the detected differences in the physical and chemical characteristics of the synthetic amphiboles may affect their biological properties.

  3. In vitro determinants of asbestos fiber toxicity: effect on the relative toxicity of Libby amphibole in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kelly E; Cook, Philip M; Gavett, Stephen H; Dailey, Lisa A; Mahoney, Ron K; Ghio, Andrew J; Roggli, Victor L; Devlin, Robert B

    2014-01-08

    An abnormally high incidence of lung disease has been observed in the residents of Libby, Montana, which has been attributed to occupational and environmental exposure to fibrous amphiboles originating from a nearby contaminated vermiculite mine. The composition of Libby amphibole (LA) is complex and minimal toxicity data are available. In this study, we conduct a comparative particle toxicity analysis of LA compared with standard reference asbestiform amphibole samples. Primary human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) were exposed to two different LA samples as well as standard amphibole reference samples. Analysis of the samples included a complete particle size distribution analysis, calculation of surface area by electron microscopy and by gas adsorption and quantification of surface-conjugated iron and hydroxyl radical production by the fibers. Interleukin-8 mRNA levels were quantified by qRT-PCR to measure relative pro-inflammatory response induced in HAEC in response to amphibole fiber exposure. The relative contribution of key physicochemical determinants on the observed pro-inflammatory response were also evaluated. The RTI amosite reference sample contained the longest fibers and demonstrated the greatest potency at increasing IL-8 transcript levels when evaluated on an equal mass basis. The two LA samples and the UICC amosite reference sample consisted of similar particle numbers per milligram as well as similar particle size distributions and induced comparable levels of IL-8 mRNA. A strong correlation was observed between the elongated particle (aspect ratio ≥3:1) dose metrics of length and external surface area. Expression of the IL-8 data with respect to either of these metrics eliminated the differential response between the RTI amosite sample and the other samples that was observed when HAEC were exposed on an equal mass basis. On an equal mass basis, LA is as potent as the UICC amosite reference sample at inducing a pro-inflammatory response in HAEC

  4. 76 FR 80368 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Science Advisory Board Libby Amphibole Asbestos Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... the Science Advisory Board Libby Amphibole Asbestos Review Panel AGENCY: Environmental Protection... draft Toxicological Review of Libby Amphibole Asbestos (August 2011). DATES: The meeting will be held on... Amphibole Asbestos (August 2011). The SAB panel will comply with the provisions of FACA and all...

  5. High-Mg andesites petrogenesis by amphibole crystallization and ultramafic crust assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepolo, M.; Tribuzio, R.; Langone, A.

    2009-12-01

    Mafic and ultramafic intrusives with high-Mg andesite (HMA) affinity are occasionally found in collisional settings. These amphibole-rich rocks preserve chemical and textural heterogeneities that are important records of the petrogenetic processes occurring in the deep portions of the arc crust. New insights on the origin of HMA are inferred from the Tertiary amphibole-rich ultramafic intrusives of the southern Adamello batholith (Italian Alps). These rocks consist of large amphibole grains with brown cores (Ti-pargasite) that progressively grade through brownish green (Mg-hornblende) and light green (edenite) rims. Brown amphibole has inclusions of olivine and clinopyroxene (±spinel) with irregular boundaries indicating disequilibrium with the host amphibole. Amphibole shows a marked chemical zoning. In particular, a decrease in Ti, HREE coupled to an increase in Mg, Ni, LREE, Th and U from the core to the rim is observed. Calculated equilibrium liquids for amphibole cores may be related to island arc basalts. On the other hand, liquids in equilibrium with amphibole rims share many compositional similarities to HMA (e.g. low HREE, strong LREE/HREE fractionation, high Th and U). According to the current knowledge of Amph/LD, a fractional crystallization process driven by amphibole may explain most of the observed elemental variations. However, the increase from core to rim of highly compatible elements in amphibole such as MgO and Ni contrasts with closed system fractional crystallization. The assimilation/resorption of olivine is considered the most efficient mechanism to supply or buffer MgO and Ni in the evolving system during amphibole crystallization. The textural disequilibrium of olivine with the host amphibole supports this process. In addition, clusters of olivine with triple junctions (Fo up to 85 mol%) and minor cpx were found in ultramafic rocks of the same complex. They probably represent fragments of older dunites/wehrlites dismembered by the

  6. Optical Spectra and Color Nature of Lithium Amphiboles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Konovalenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical absorption spectra of two lithium amphiboles of the pedrisite group from rare-metal peg-matites of the Sangilen rare-metal province in the southeastern part of Tyva have been studied. One of them – a limit magnesian fluoro-sodium pedrisite of yellow-green color – was taken from the rocks hosting pegmatites, and another one – fluoro-sodium ferro-pedrisite of violet-blue color – was taken from pegmatites as such. It has been demonstrated that the color of the yellow-green mineral is associated with absorption bands of Cr3+ ions in the octahedral coordination. Absorption bands of Cr3+ ions in the spectrum of fluoro-sodium pedrisite are formed by a transmission window in the yellow-green region of the spectrum. Therefore, the color of this sample is yellow-green. The color of violet-blue pedrisite is de-fined by intensive absorption bands of charge transfer Fe2+ → Fe3+ 550, 680 nm. Very strong absorption bands of 550 and 680 nm are formed by a transmission window in the violet-blue region of the spectrum. Thus, the color of ferro-pedrisite is violet-blue.

  7. Voluminous arc dacites as amphibole reaction-boundary liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, Dawnika; Sisson, Thomas W.; Hankins, William B.

    2017-01-01

    (liquid + hbl + opx + cpx + plg + oxides) reduces the variance, so liquids are restricted to dacite–granodiorite–tonalite compositions. Higher-K dacites than the Yn would also saturate with biotite, further limiting their compositional diversity. Theoretical evaluation of the energetics of peritectic melting of pargasitic amphiboles indicates that melting and crystallization of amphibole occur abruptly, proximal to amphibole’s high-temperature stability limit, which causes the system to dwell thermally under the conditions that produce dacitic compositions. This process may account for the compositional homogeneity of dacites, granodiorites, and tonalites in arc settings, but their relative mobility compared to rhyolitic/granitic liquids likely accounts for their greater abundance.

  8. Characteristics of asbestiform and non-asbestiform calcic amphiboles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorling, Maria; Zussman, Jack

    1987-12-01

    In terms of morphology there are four major types of calcic amphibole; massive, prismatic, finely acicular and asbestos. Representatives of each of these types have been examined by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Massive specimens (nephrite) consist of randomly oriented clusters of fine, roughly lath-shaped, sub-microscopic crystals; within each cluster the lath lengths ( z) are approximately aligned but neighbouring laths are rotated with respect to one another. Finely acicular specimens ("byssolites") have well-formed crystals bounded mainly by {110} (100) and (010) faces and characteristically have striations parallel to their lengths. Asbestiform varieties range from finer (flexible) to coarser (more brittle) specimens and many specimens contain a mixture of fine and coarse fibrils. The fibrils in a bundle are aligned parallel to z but are in a range of azimuthal orientations. It is inferred that they are formed by multiple independent nucleation and growth parallel to z rather than through parting or cleavage on {110} planes. (100) defect or twin planes, or on (010) planar defects. The {110} cleavage in amphiboles is well reported but (100) features are rarely mentioned in the literature. Our observations reveal the importance of (100) as a cleavage or parting as well as the tendency in nephrites, byssolites and asbestos towards a lath-like (parallel to z) morphology with flattening on (100). In the latter varieties therefore, the y-direction is that of second fastest crystal growth, after z. When subjected to moderate grinding, the comminution of asbestos fibres proceeds more by separation of fibrils and less by fracturing to shorter lengths as compared with prismatic and byssolite specimens. Prolonged grinding does, however, shorten lengths of even the least brittle asbestos. Transmission electron microscopy revealed extensive sub-grain boundaries and dislocation

  9. An experimental study of amphibole stability in low-pressure granitic magmas and a revised Al-in-hornblende geobarometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, E. J. F.; Blundy, J. D.; Tattitch, B. C.; Cooper, F. J.; Brooker, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report new experimental data on the composition of magmatic amphiboles synthesised from a variety of granite (sensu lato) bulk compositions at near-solidus temperatures and pressures of 0.8-10 kbar. The total aluminium content (Altot) of the synthetic calcic amphiboles varies systematically with pressure ( P), although the relationship is nonlinear at low pressures (barometer expression is comparable to the precision with which near-solidus amphibole rim composition can be characterised.

  10. Amphibole-rich intrusive mafic and ultramafic rocks in arc settings: implications for the H2O budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepolo, M.; Langone, A.; Morishita, T.; Esna-Ashari, A.; Tribuzio, R.

    2011-12-01

    Although amphibole is rarely a phenocryst of arc lavas, many intermediate and silicic magmas in arc settings are considered residual after cryptic amphibole crystallization at mid-low crustal levels (e.g., Davidson et al., 2007). Amphibole-rich mafic and ultramafic intrusive rocks (hornblendites, amphibole-gabbros to amphibole-diorites) are reported worldwide in orogenic settings. These amphibole-rich plutonics could be the "hidden" amphibole reservoir invoked in the arc crust. They usually possess chemical and textural heterogeneities recording the magmatic processes occurring in the mid to low crust (e.g., Tiepolo et al., 2011). Being amphibole-rich, these intrusive rocks are an important source of information on the possible role played by amphibole in arc magma petrogenesis. In particular, for the capability of amphibole to incorporate H2O and elements with a marked affinity for the fluid phase, these rocks are also useful to track the origin and evolution of subduction related fluids. We present here geochemical and geochronologic data on amphibole-rich ultramafic intrusive rocks from different localities worldwide: i) Alpine Orogen (Adamello Batholith and Bregell intrusions); ii) Ross Orogen (Husky Ridge intrusion - Antarctica); iv) Japan Arc (Shikanoshima Island intrusion); v) Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Central Iran (Aligoordaz granitoid complex). The coupling of textural information, micro-chemical data and "in situ" zircon geochronology has allowed us to show that these ultramafic intrusive rocks share striking petrologic and geochemical similarities. They are thus the expression of a common magmatic activity that is independent from the age and from the local geological setting and thus related to a specific petrogenetic process. Amphibole-rich mafic and ultramafic intrusive rocks are retained a common feature of collisional-systems worldwide. Amphibole is thus expected to play a major role in the differentiation of arc magmas and in particular in the H2O

  11. Amphibole megacrysts as a probe into the deep plumbing system of Merapi volcano, Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stefan T. M.; Troll, Valentin R.; Weis, Franz A.; Dallai, Luigi; Chadwick, Jane P.; Schulz, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Amphibole has been discussed to potentially represent an important phase during early chemical evolution of arc magmas, but is not commonly observed in eruptive arc rocks. Here, we present an in-depth study of metastable calcic amphibole megacrysts in basaltic andesites of Merapi volcano, Indonesia. Radiogenic Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the amphibole megacrysts overlap with the host rock range, indicating that they represent antecrysts to the host magmas rather than xenocrysts. Amphibole-based barometry suggests that the megacrysts crystallised at pressures of >500 MPa, i.e., in the mid- to lower crust beneath Merapi. Rare-earth element concentrations, in turn, require the absence of magmatic garnet in the Merapi feeding system and, therefore, place an uppermost limit for the pressure of amphibole crystallisation at ca. 800 MPa. The host magmas of the megacrysts seem to have fractionated significant amounts of amphibole and/or clinopyroxene, because of their low Dy/Yb ratios relative to the estimated compositions of the parent magmas to the megacrysts. The megacrysts' parent magmas at depth may thus have evolved by amphibole fractionation, in line with apparently coupled variations of trace element ratios in the megacrysts, such as e.g., decreasing Zr/Hf with Dy/Yb. Moreover, the Th/U ratios of the amphibole megacrysts decrease with increasing Dy/Yb and are lower than Th/U ratios in the basaltic andesite host rocks. Uranium in the megacrysts' parent magmas, therefore, may have occurred predominantly in the tetravalent state, suggesting that magmatic fO2 in the Merapi plumbing system increased from below the FMQ buffer in the mid-to-lower crust to 0.6-2.2 log units above it in the near surface environment. In addition, some of the amphibole megacrysts experienced dehydrogenation (H2 loss) and/or dehydration (H2O loss), as recorded by their variable H2O contents and D/ H and Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios, and the release of these volatile species into the shallow plumbing

  12. The contribution of amphibole from deep arc crust to the silicate Earth's Nb budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepolo, Massimo; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    The continental crust (CC) and the depleted mantle (DM) are generally assumed to be complementary reservoirs within the Earth. However, the mixture between CC and upper mantle does not generate the Nb/Ta and Nb/La ratios of chondrites. A reservoir with superchondritic ratios for Nb/Ta and Nb/La is thus required in the Earth's system. The occurrence of a hidden amphibole reservoir in the lower arc crust has been recently proposed. This, coupled with the capability of calcic amphibole to give rise to a superchondritic Nb/Ta and Nb/La reservoir, led us to determine to what extent amphibole-rich ultramafic rocks can account for the Nb (and Nb/Ta, Nb/La as well) imbalance on Earth. We have considered lower crust mafic and ultramafic amphibole-rich intrusive rocks from collisional settings worldwide. Because CC is considered to have primarily formed in collisional setting these rocks are important for its genetic model. We modeled Nb, Ta and La contents of the hidden Nb reservoir by mass balance calculations between continental crust, depleted mantle and primitive mantle. Modeling shows that amphibole-rich mafic lower crust can solve the so-called Nb paradox if large volumes of materials are supposed to be returned into the mantle during the Earth's history. A possible mechanism is recycling, particularly in Precambrian times, of eclogites that underwent pre-eclogitic melting in the amphibolite facies field and then recrystallized under eclogite-facies conditions.

  13. Origin and evolution of rare amphibole-bearing mantle peridotites from Wilcza Góra (SW Poland), Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Grégoire, Michel; Kukuła, Anna; Wojtulek, Piotr Marian

    2017-08-01

    and changing composition (and that of the crystallizing clinopyroxene and amphibole) as it differentiated chromatographically from Groups B to A. Enrichment in carbonatite component occurred in the further parts of a chromatographic column. Group B peridotites closest to the source of the metasomatic agent were percolated by an iron-rich melt. The latter, aside from crystallizing clinopyroxene and amphibole, caused Fe-enrichment in the host harzburgite. Such a metasomatic history is typical for the lithospheric mantle located beneath the northern margin of the Bohemian Massif, but Wilcza Góra is the only locality, where activity of a hydrous metasomatic agent is recorded. Thus, the lithospheric mantle in this area was affected by mafic silicate metasomatic agents of variable compositions.

  14. Crystal chemistry of amphiboles: implications for oxygen fugacity and water activity in lithospheric mantle beneath Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadiman, C.; Nazzareni, S.; Coltorti, M.; Comodi, P.; Giuli, G.; Faccini, B.

    2014-03-01

    Amphibole is the hydrous metasomatic phase in spinel-bearing mantle xenoliths from Baker Rocks, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. It occurs in veins or in disseminated form in spinel lherzolites. Both types derive from reaction between metasomatic melts and the pristine paragenesis of the continental lithospheric mantle beneath Northern Victoria Land. To determine the effective role of water circulation during the metasomatic process and amphibole formation, six amphibole samples were fully characterized. Accurate determination of the site population and the state of dehydrogenation in each of these amphiboles was carried out using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe and secondary ion mass spectroscopy on the same single crystal. The Fe3+/ΣFe ratio was determined by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy on amphibole powder. The degree of dehydrogenation determined by SIMS is 0.870-0.994 O3(O2-) a.p.f.u., primary and ascribed to the Ti-oxy component of the amphibole, as indicated by atom site populations; post-crystallization H loss is negligible. Estimates of aH2O (0.014-0.054) were determined from the dehydration equilibrium among end-member components assuming that amphiboles are in equilibrium with the anhydrous peridotitic phases. A difference up to 58 % in determination of aH2O can be introduced if the chemical formula of the amphiboles is calculated based on 23 O a.p.f.u. without knowing the effective amount of dehydrogenation. The oxygen fugacity of the Baker Rocks amphibole-bearing mantle xenoliths calculated based upon the dissociation constant of water (by oxy-amphibole equilibrium) is between -2.52 and -1.32 log units below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. These results are systematically lower and in a narrow range of values relative to those obtained from anhydrous olivine-orthopyroxene-spinel equilibria ( fO2 between -1.98 and -0.30 log units). A comparative evaluation of the two methods suggests that when amphibole

  15. Petrological mapping of Volcanic Plumbing Systems using amphiboles in mixed intermediate magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Balázs; Harangi, SzZabolcs; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Mason, Paul R. D.

    2016-04-01

    Petrological mapping of volcanic plumbing systems (VPS) is essential to understand the magma evolution and to interpret geophysical signals of monitored volcanoes. The mapping includes the determination of the compositions of magmas feed the system and their storage depths. Intermediate magmas are usually formed by magma mixing a processes that mask the real compositional variation of magmas feed the VPS. However phenocrysts can preserve this information in their chemical stratigraphy. Amphibole can be a powerful tool in these studies because it can incorporate petrogenetically important trace elements primarily controlled by the coexisting melt composition, additionally the major element composition can be used to calculate pressure. We studied the zoning, texture and major and trace element composition of amphiboles from the Ciomadul, a late pleistocen dacite volcano. The erupted dacites contain abundant amphibole phenocrysts. Amphibole coexist with all of the rock forming minerals (e.g. with quartz or with olivine) indicating their diverse origin. The amphiboles show large major element compositional variation (e.g. Al2O3: 6-15 wt%) accompanied with large variation in trace element (e.g. Cr: 10-3000 ppm, Sr: 55-855 ppm, Eu/Eu*: 0.62-1.19) even in a single sample or single crystal and they represent antecryst (reworked) and phenocryst (in situ crystallized) populations. Such a large compositional variation of amphiboles is commonly observed at andesite-dacite arc volcanoes. Hornblendes (antecryst1) have low Al, Mg/Fe, and negative Eu-anomaly; they equilibrated with rhyolitic melt at near-solidus temperature. Antecryst2 is represented by Cr-, Mg-rich amphiboles; they can contain Cr-spinel inclusions suggesting near-liquidus crystallization from primitive mafic melts. Phenocrysts show large compositional variation sample by sample that is different from the antecrysts suggesting variable pre-eruptive conditions. The antecrysts are derived from a stratified (mafic

  16. Amphiboles and their host rocks in the high-grade metamorphic Precambrin of Rogaland/Vest-Agder, Sw. Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.G.C.

    1978-01-01

    In the high-grade metamorphic Precambrian of the Sirdal-¢rsdal area, Rogaland/Vest-Agder,south-west Norway, the Ca-amphiboles show a change in pleochroic colours, not only with changes in metamorphic grade, but also to some extend in bulk composition. A regional study was performed on the amphiboles

  17. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  18. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  19. Persistent Effects of Libby Amphibole and Amosite Asbestos Following Subchronic Inhalation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Human exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) asbestos increases risk of lung cancer, mesothelioma, and non-malignant respiratory disease. This study evaluated potency and time course effects of LA and positive control amosite (AM) asbestos fibers in male F344 rats following...

  20. Effects of Libby amphibole asbestos exposure on two rat models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological data suggests that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing vermiculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our goal was to determine wh...

  1. SUBCHRONIC INHALATION EXPOSURE OF RATS TO LIBBY AMPHIBOLE AND AMOSITE ASBESTOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) is associated with significant increases in asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma. To support biological potency assessment and dosimetry model development, a subchronic nose-only inhalation exposure study (6 hr/d, 5 d/wk, 13 wk) was conducted...

  2. Molecular engineering of a fluorescent bioprobe for sensitive and selective detection of amphibole asbestos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenori Ishida

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy-based affinity assay could enable highly sensitive and selective detection of airborne asbestos, an inorganic environmental pollutant that can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer. We have selected an Escherichia coli histone-like nucleoid structuring protein, H-NS, as a promising candidate for an amphibole asbestos bioprobe. H-NS has high affinity to amphibole asbestos, but also binds to an increasingly common asbestos substitute, wollastonite. To develop a highly specific Bioprobe for amphibole asbestos, we first identified a specific but low-affinity amosite-binding sequence by slicing H-NS into several fragments. Second, we constructed a streptavidin tetramer complex displaying four amosite-binding fragments, resulting in the 250-fold increase in the probe affinity as compared to the single fragment. The tetramer probe had sufficient affinity and specificity for detecting all the five types of asbestos in the amphibole group, and could be used to distinguish them from wollastonite. In order to clarify the binding mechanism and identify the amino acid residues contributing to the probe's affinity to amosite fibers, we constructed a number of shorter and substituted peptides. We found that the probable binding mechanism is electrostatic interaction, with positively charged side chains of lysine residues being primarily responsible for the probe's affinity to asbestos.

  3. SUBCHRONIC INHALATION EXPOSURE OF RATS TO LIBBY AMPHIBOLE AND AMOSITE ASBESTOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) is associated with significant increases in asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma. To support biological potency assessment and dosimetry model development, a subchronic nose-only inhalation exposure study (6 hr/d, 5 d/wk, 13 wk) was conducted...

  4. The petrology of a six amphibole association: a record of metasomatic processes in the jadeitite area in northwestern Myanmar (Burma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, G.; Tropper, P.; Cui, W.

    2003-04-01

    In the Myanmar jadeitite area of Pharkan, amphibole felses occur between jadeitites and serpentinized dunites. These amphibole felses were found to contain the six amphibole species magnesiokatophorite (Mg-kat), nyböite (Nyb), eckermannite (Eck), glaucophane (Gln), richterite (Rich) and winchite (Win). In most samples, the two main amphibole species Mg-kat and Eck coexist with amphiboles containing variable amounts of components of the remaining four species, as well as with jadeite (Jd), omphacite (Omp) and kosmochlor (Ko). However, zoned porphyroblasts with Mg-kat in the core, Nyb in the inner rims and Eck in the outer rims also occur. The analytical data on such zoned amphiboles reveal that the chemistry changes from core to inner rim by virtue of the substitution NaAlCa-1Mg-1 (glaucophane vector), and from the inner to the outer rim along MgSiAl-1Al-1 (tschermak vector). The overall substitution from core to outer rim is, therefore, along NaSiCa-1Al-1 (plagioclase vector). Within Eck, three groups can be distinguished based on the Si-content: Eck coexisting with Nyb has low Si contents of Win and Gln, whereas the three subsets of C contain high Na amphiboles (Eck, Nyb, high Na-Mg-kats). Textural observations indicate three stages of sodic and sodic calcic amphibole growth: stage 1: amphiboles of group A (Mg-kat + Rich), stage 2: amphiboles of groups C2 (Nyb + Eck with Si 7.6 a.p.f.u. + Gln + Win). Textural observations suggest amphibole formation during fluid infiltration in the contact zone between the jadeitite bodies and the surrounding peridotite under high pressure conditions (>1.0 GPa) and rather low temperatures of about 250--370^oC. The compositional trends within the amphiboles and phase equilibrium constraints between amphibole and coexisting pyroxene solid solutions indicate two growth episodes: increasing pressures from stage 1 to stage 2 lead to the formation of Nyb from Mg-kat and subsequently decreasing pressure lead to the formation of stage 3

  5. Vermiculite worker mortality: estimated effects of occupational exposure to Libby amphibole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Theodore C; Antao, Vinicius C; Bove, Frank J

    2010-05-01

    To examine the relationship between cumulative fiber exposure (CFE) and mortality in a retrospective cohort study of vermiculite workers exposed to Libby amphibole (n = 1862). Extended Cox regression was used to estimate the hazards associated with CFE as a time-dependent covariate of multiple-cause mortality. The Cox models for mesothelioma, asbestosis, lung cancer, and non-malignant respiratory disease were significant with rate ratios that increased monotonically with CFE. The model for deaths due to cardiovascular disease was also significant (rate ratio for CFE > or =44.0 f/cc-y vs CFE and mortality from asbestos-related causes. The finding of an association between CFE and cardiovascular mortality suggests persons exposed to Libby amphibole should be monitored for this outcome.

  6. Phlogopite and K-amphibole in the upper mantle: Implication for magma genesis in subduction zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Akira; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    High-pressure phase relations have been examined for phlogopite + diopside with and without enstatite under vapor absent conditions in the pressure range of 5 to 13 GPa and in the temperature range of 1,000 to 1,300C. Phlogopite in these systems can be stable up to 6-7 GPa and decomposes through pressure-dependent reactions to crystallize phases including potassic amphibole. The experimental results suggest that phlogopite, which is one of main hydrous phases in the downdragged hydrated peridotite at the base of mantle wedge, plays an important role in the formation of magmas at the backarc side of a volcanic arc. The existence of potassic amphibole at higher pressure regions may imply the involvement of subduction component in magma generation in the region far away from the trench axis.

  7. Sumas Mountain chrysotile induces greater lung fibrosis in Fischer 344 rats than Libby amphibole, El Dorado tremolite, and Ontario ferroactinolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physical properties of different types of asbestos may strongly affect health outcomes in exposed individuals. This study was designed to provide understanding of the comparative toxicity of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) fibers including Libby amphibole (LA), Sumas Moun...

  8. Amphiboles from the kyanite-garnet amphibolite in the Tonaru metagabbro mass, Sambagawa metamorphic belt, central Shikoku, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    カビール, エムデイ ファズレー; 高須, 晃; 松浦, 弘明; 蔵谷, 樹

    2016-01-01

    The Tonaru metagabbro mass occurs as a large lenticular body in the highest-grade (oligoclase-biotite zone) portions of the Sambagawa schists in the Besshi district. The Tonaru mass consists of diopside amphibolite and garnet-epidote amphibolite accompanied by small amounts of eclogite and marble. Kyanite-garnet amphibolites from the Tonaru metagabbro mass are composed of amphibole (calcic-amphibole; magnesiohornblende, actinolite, tremolite and tschermakite), zoisite, kyanite, garnet, phengi...

  9. An Excel spreadsheet to classify chemical analyses of amphiboles following the IMA 2012 recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locock, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet has been programmed to assist with classification of chemical analyses of orthorhombic and monoclinic amphiboles following the 2012 nomenclature recommended by the International Mineralogical Association. The spreadsheet is intended for use only with compositional data (wt% oxides and halogens, rather than atomic proportions) and provides options for the estimation of Fe3+/ΣFe and Mn3+/ΣMn ratios and OH content. Various cation normalization schemes can be automatically or manually selected. For each analysis, the output includes the group, subgroup (or B-occupancy for the oxo-amphiboles), and species name including any mandatory chemical prefixes, along with a formula based on 24 anions. The formula results can be exported in a form suitable for the AMPH2012 program. Prefixes related to space groups (proto-) and suffixes (-P21/m) are not assigned in the spreadsheet. Large data sets (up to 200 analyses at a time) can be accommodated by the spreadsheet, which is accompanied by results calculated for more than 650 amphibole analyses taken from the literature.

  10. The amphiboles of the REE-rich A-type peralkaline Strange Lake pluton - fingerprints of magma evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Karin; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; van Hinsberg, Vincent J.

    2017-09-01

    Major and trace element compositions of amphibole in igneous environments commonly reflect evolving magma compositions. In this study, we use the amphibole-group minerals from the Strange Lake, REE-enriched peralkaline granitic pluton to gain insights into the evolution of the magma. This 1240 Ma old pluton consists of two main intrusive facies, an early hypersolvus granite, which occurs as separate northern and southern intrusions, and a more evolved transsolvus granite. In the hypersolvus granite the amphibole is a late interstitial phase, whereas in the transsolvus granite, it is present as phenocrysts. The amphibole compositions vary from calcic-sodic (ferro-ferri-katophorite) in the southern hypersolvus granite to sodic (arfvedsonite, ferro-ferri-leakeite) in the other, more evolved granitic units. High Na, Si, Li, and low Al and Ca concentrations in the amphibole phenocrysts of the transsolvus granite indicate formation from a more evolved magma compared to the hypersolvus granite, despite the fact that these crystals formed early. We interpret the increasing Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in the amphibole of the hypersolvus granite to reflect crystal chemical effects (Na/Ca-ratio) and increasingly oxidizing conditions in the magma, whereas in the phenocrysts of the transsolvus granite, the increasing ratio was the product of increasing proportions of F- and OH- in the melt. The amphiboles of all the granite units have elevated Nb, Zr, Hf and REE concentrations compared to the bulk rock, suggesting that these elements are compatible in amphibole. By contrast the much lower Ti concentration was due to saturation of the magma in sodium-titanosilicates. The amphibole REE concentrations vary greatly among the granite units. Amphibole of the southern and northern hypersolvus granite contains 0.16 and 0.07 wt.% ∑ REE + Y, on average, respectively, and in the transsolvus granite, the average ∑ REE content is only 0.01 wt.%, despite the more evolved nature of its host

  11. Amphibole equilibria as monitors of P-T path and process in the exhumation of HP/UHP terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, David; Airaghi, Laura; Czertowicz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in modelling and the development of refined activity-composition relations allow the calculation of phase diagrams involving complex mineral solid solutions, such as calcic, sodic-calcic and sodic amphiboles (e.g. Diener et al., 2007, J metamorphic Geol.). Amphiboles are commonly found in eclogite facies metabasites, and formed at different metamorphic stages. Such rocks commonly show complex reaction microstructures that reveal their history. The focus in this contribution is on two distinct amphibole types: coarse, post-peak matrix amphibole, and amphibole involved in symplectitic microstructures replacing omphacite. These studies serve as a test of the current activity models and calculation approaches, but more importantly as a framework for understanding the processes and P-T path during exhumation of subducted terranes. Examples are taken from the Western Gneiss Complex of Norway and from the Kaghan Valley (Pakistan), but are more generally applicable to crustal blocks that have exhumed through the P-T 'window' in which comparable petrological features develop. The microstructural types of interest here are: broad irregular interstitial amphibole grains, which commonly merge with a coarse spongy intergrowth of amphibole with quartz and/or albite (most likely replacing omphacite); and a fine-grained symplectite of low-Na clinopyroxene with sodic plagioclase and minor hornblende invading omphacite. Many specimens show these varieties as a sequence, inferred to reflect decreasing pressure (and ultimately, temperature). Amphibole compositions cover a wide range: the most sodic occur in large interstitial grains and fall near the junction of the winchite, barroisite and taramite fields of the IMA classification; they trend towards a pargasitic hornblende, still with significant glaucophane component; spongy amphiboles typically lie on a trend towards lower glaucophane component; symplectite amphibole is generally a common hornblende on a typical

  12. Biological in vitro and in vivo responses of chrysotile versus amphiboles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignon, J; Jaurand, M C

    1983-09-01

    Although all commercial forms of asbestos have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in animals, so far epidemiological data are controversial concerning what asbestos types are the most carcinogenic and fibrogenic in humans. In order to understand the early cellular events induced by fibrous particles, different in vitro studies (hemolysis, release of enzymes by macrophages, assays on cell culture systems) have been carried out in several laboratories; most of these studies have shown that cell and subcellular in vitro responses were different depending on fiber types: chrysotile versus amphiboles. This presentation compares the results of different laboratories with our data obtained by using a model which modifies the chemistry of the fibers by acid treatment. The acid-leached chrysotile and acid-treated amphibole fibers showed different biological responses in several in vitro systems used in comparison to unleached fibers. These differences in the in vitro reactivity were related to the chemical state of the fibers and might explain the differences in their effects in animals after intrapleural injection as assessed by the percentage of mesothelioma, the latency period, the survival time and the degree of pleural fibrosis. The carcinogenic effect of the fibers is discussed in relation of their in vitro inflammatory or cytotoxic responses.

  13. The crystal structure and microtwinning of ferro-pedrizite, a new lithium amphibole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, S. M.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Konovalenko, S. I.; Ananyev, S. A.; Chukanov, N. V.; Miroshkina, A. E.

    2015-07-01

    The structure of ferro-pedrizite—a new lithium mineral of the amphibole supergroup—has been studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Fe2+ ions dominate over Mg in the chemical composition of this mineral. The parameters of the monoclinic unit cell are a = 9.3716(4) Å, b = 17.649(1) Å, c = 5.2800(6) Å, and β = 102.22(1)°. The experimental set of intensities contains a large number of significant reflections (~10%), which violate the Clattice. Consideration of pseudomerohedral twinning (matrix [1 0 0/00/-3/4 0]) allowed us to solve and refine the structure within the sp. gr. C2/ m to the final value R = 3.9% in the anisotropic approximation of atomic displacements using 4843 I > 2σ( I). The twin components are found to be 0.681(3)/0.319(3). Twinning has been revealed for the first time in amphiboles of the pedrizite family. The idealized formula of ferro-pedrizite ( Z = 2) is determined as NaLi2(Al2Li)[Si8O22](OH)2.

  14. Amphibole reaction rim textures and mineralogy from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Nature vs. experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henton, S.; Larsen, J. F.; Coombs, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Augustine Volcano forms a small island located in Alaska's Cook Inlet, approximately 180 miles southwest of Anchorage. The 2006 eruption began January 11, 2006, and evolved from an initial phase of explosive activity, through continuous and effusive phases, ending approximately mid-March 2006. We present data on the textural and mineralogical make-up of amphibole reaction rims from 2006 andesites from Augustine. Naturally formed reaction rims are compared to rims formed through decompression and heating experiments. Amphiboles make up less than 1 modal % of most samples. However, variations in composition and texture help to explain pre-and syn-eruptive magma histories. The Augustine 2006 amphiboles contain a mixture of rimmed and unrimmed grains. In order of decreasing abundance (by tally), the dominant phases in reaction rims are orthopyroxene, oxides, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene. Most amphibole reaction rims are between 1- 40 microns in thickness. Thicker rims (> 40 microns) were primarily erupted in the later effusive phase of the eruption. In general, the thickest reactions rims (> 60 microns average thickness) contain coarser individual reaction rim grains (with feret diameters of 15-50 microns). Reaction rims with average thickness of less than 60 microns tend to contain finer reaction rim grains (with feret diameters of 10 microns or less). Some reactions rims show a coarsening of rim grains across the rim, from the amphibole boundary to the glass boundary. Preliminary results show no systematic changes in the aspect ratios of reaction rim grains, either across the rim, or between the different rims. Some rims show a decrease in the An content of plagioclase across the rim, from the amphibole boundary to the glass boundary. Reaction rim textures and mineralogy are complex and suggest that multiple forcing factors (including heating and decompression) were responsible for their formation. This study will compare these natural reaction rims to those formed

  15. Origin of amphibole-rich beach sands from Tila-Mati, Karwar, central-west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mislankar, P.G.; Iyer, S.D.

    The pocket beach at Tila-Mati, Karwar, central west coast of India, is characterised by the occurrence of amphibole-rich (chiefly tremolite-actinolite) coarse sand in the zone of minimal impact of waves and currents. In the total sediment, grain...

  16. Mantle amphibole control on arc and within-plate chemical signatures: Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirkhah, M.; Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Emami, M. H.; McLeod, C.

    2012-04-01

    New analyses of Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province in west Iran shed light on the nature of collision zone magmatism. The rocks are from the Turkish-Iranian plateau within the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Compositions are typically basanite, hawaiite and alkali basalt. Sr-Nd isotope values are close to BSE, which is similar to Quaternary alkali basalts of NW Iran, but distinct from a depleted source melting under Mount Ararat. The chemical signatures suggests variable melting of two distinct sources. One inferred source produced melts with La/Nb from~3.5 to~1.2, which we model as the result of depletion of amphibole during ≤1% melting in the garnet stability field. We infer phlogopite in the source of potassic lavas from Takab. Lithosphere delamination or slab break-off mechanisms for triggering melting are problematic, as the lithosphere is~150-200km thick. It is possible that the negative dT/dP section of the amphibole peridotite solidus was crossed as a result of lithospheric thickening in the collision zone. This explanation is conditional upon the mantle source being weakly hydrated and so only containing a small proportion of amphibole, which can be exhausted during small degrees of partial melting. Our model maybe viable for other magmatic areas within orogenic plateaux, e.g. northern Tibet. Depletion of mantle amphibole may also help explain larger scale transitions from arc to within-plate chemistry in orogens, such as the Palaeogene Arabia-Eurasia system.

  17. In Vitro Dissolution of Libby Amphibole, Amosite Asbestos, and MMVF Using Acid and Synthetic Lung Fluid Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity of inhaled fibers is dependent in part on biopersistence due to changes in size distribution after deposition and clearance in the respiratory tract. To model this in vivo behavior, respirable (PM2.5) Libby amphibole (LA) and amosite asbestos, and a reference material gl...

  18. Amphiboles as indicators of mantle source contamination: Combined evaluation of stable H and O isotope compositions and trace element ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demény, A.; Harangi, S.; Vennemann, T.W.; Casillas, R.; Horváth, P.; Milton, A.J.; Mason, P.R.D.; Ulianov, A.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope and trace element compositions of igneous amphiboles from different tectonic settings (ocean island basalts, intraplate alkaline basalts, subduction-related andesitic complexes) were compiled to help understand the role of fluids and melts in subduction-related mantle metasomatism

  19. Moessbauer study of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratio in amphiboles to search correlation with hydrogen isotope fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waczek, Zsofia [University of Lausanne, Institut de Mineralogie et Geochimie, Anthropole (Switzerland); Kuzmann, Ernoe; Homonnay, Zoltan, E-mail: homonnay@ludens.elte.hu [Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Vennemann, Torsten [University of Lausanne, Institut de Mineralogie et Geochimie, Anthropole (Switzerland)

    2009-04-15

    There is a general lack of understanding of the hydrogen isotope fractionations between different experimental approaches both at higher and at lower temperatures of exchange. The complexity of bonding related with the hydroxyl ion in most hydrous minerals makes theoretical treatments rather difficult. Though some of the differences between experimental findings have recently been shown to be related to pressure effects that influence the hydrogen isotope fractionation properties of water, some other factors may also have significance. One of the major unknowns is the compositional control, especially the Fe-content and effects of variable Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratios on hydrogen isotope fractionations between minerals and fluids (Suzuoki and Epstein, Geochim Cosmochim Acta 40:1229-1240, 1976; Chacko et al. 2001). We have studied a series of amphibole samples by Moessbauer spectroscopy, EPMA and TC-EA-IRMS to examine for possible correlations between D/H fractionation and Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} ratio/total iron content. Our measurements show that this correlation may exist for one particular origin of samples, but local conditions of mineral formation (most probably chemical composition and reactions accompanying the formation of minerals) may be more important in controlling the hydrogen isotope composition of minerals.

  20. An Evaluation of Potential Occupational Exposure to Asbestiform Amphiboles near a Former Vermiculite Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie F. Hart

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphibole asbestos (AA has been detected on the surface of tree bark in forests neighboring an abandoned vermiculite mine near Libby, Montana. In the present study, simulations were performed to assess potential AA exposure associated with United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service (FS occupational activities. Bark samples were collected prior, and personal breathing zone (PBZ and Tyvek clothing wipe samples were collected during and immediately after trials that simulated FS activities. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses revealed AA bark concentrations up to 15 million structures per square centimeter (s/cm2. AA was detected in 25% of the PBZ TEM samples. AA was detected on wipe samples collected from all activities evaluated. This research demonstrates the potential for airborne exposure and transport of AA in the Kootenai National Forest. These findings are especially relevant to those that work in the area and to the general public who may conduct recreational activities.

  1. Behaviour of the new asbestos amphibole fluor-edenite in different lung cell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardile, Venera; Renis, Marcella; Scifo, Christian; Lombardo, Laura; Gulino, Rosario; Mancari, Barbara; Panico, Annamaria

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present research was to determine whether the recently identified and characterized new fibrous amphibole fluoro-edenite may induce a cytopathic response in cultured cells. The final goal was to gain suggestions on the potentiality of fluoro-edenite to be harmful to human beings. Epidemiological studies, in fact, have shown an excess of developing mesothelioma among residents in Biancavilla, a town in eastern Sicily located in the Etna volcanic area. Therefore, we treated human lung fibroblasts, human lung alveolar epithelial cancer cell line A549 and monocyte-macrophage cell line J774 with fluoro-edenite or crocidolite; the latter used as a highly toxic amphibole asbestos reference. Our results show that fluoro-edenite may induce functional modifications and affects some biochemical parameters in tested cell cultures in a concentration and time dependent manner. However, the observed functional modifications induced by fluoro-edenite are generally less dramatic than those induced by crocidolite and more evident on human lung alveolar epithelial cancer cell line A549 with respect to those obtained on human lung fibroblasts or monocyte-macrophage cell line J774. The sequence of the damage is hypothesised to be as follows: at increasing fluoro-edenite concentrations, and/or treatment times, the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could trigger significant DNA damage in cell cultures, concomitantly with drop in cell metabolism and increase in lactic dehydrogenase release. In conclusion, according to our data, fluoro-edenite appears as a probable carcinogenic agent, responsible for the high incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma in Biancavilla.

  2. Chlorine-rich amphibole in deep layered gabbros as evidence for brine/rock interaction in the lower oceanic crust: a microstructural and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, Adriana; Koepke, Juergen; Almeev, Renat; Ildefonse, Benoit; Wolff, Paul Eric

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of amphiboles in the lower oceanic crust indicates the presence of water during rock formation or alteration, either in the parental melt or in reacting hydrothermal fluids. Amphibole-rich high temperature metamorphic veins and magmatic dykes are found in MOR-associated layered olivine gabbros from Wadi Wariyah of the deep palaeocrust of the Sumail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman. These veins contain different types of amphiboles: pargasite, hornblende, actinolite and Cl-rich pargasite. In some cases, amphibole grains are zoned and contain a range of compositions, from pargasite formed at magmatic conditions to Cl-rich pargasite formed at subsolidus conditions. Pargasite and ferropargasite are found containing up to 5 wt% Cl (1.4 a.p.f.u.). This variety of amphibole compositions occurring in layered gabbros evidences a complex history of brine/rock interaction and hydrothermal cooling at the base of the oceanic crust. However, the precise origin of these amphibole- and Cl-rich veins associated to hydrothermal activity is still poorly understood. We investigated the formation of Cl-rich amphibole by means of a microstructural study using EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction) and, in addition, an experimental simulation of hydrothermal processes affecting amphibole formation in gabbro at subsolidus conditions. The microstructural EBSD study on natural gabbro from Oman confirms that the hydrothermally-formed amphiboles (hornblende, actinolite, Cl-pargasite) are epitactic in relation to high-temperature pargasite areas adjacent to them. This implies a coherent process, where magmatic pargasite formed initially was subsequently transformed by a Cl-rich hydrothermal brine and fluid at decreasing temperatures, ranging from the magmatic regime down to greenschist facies. Experiments were performed with a starting material of millimetre-sized pargasite pieces (with Cl content pressure of 200 MPa, and oxygen fugacity of QFM+1. Our experimental results show

  3. Amphibole-melt trace element partitioning of fractionating calc-alkaline magmas in the lower crust: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandedkar, Rohit H.; Hürlimann, Niklaus; Ulmer, Peter; Müntener, Othmar

    2016-09-01

    Amphibole is one of the most important hydrous minerals of the middle and lower continental crust and plays a key role in the formation of intermediate to silica-rich magmas. This study reports a consistent set of amphibole trace element partition coefficients derived from fractional crystallization experiments at 0.7 GPa in a piston cylinder apparatus. Starting materials were doped with trace elements on the 20-40 ppm level and measured using laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS. Amphibole is stable from 1010 to 730 °C and systematically changes its composition from pargasite to magnesiohornblende to cummingtonite, while coexisting liquids vary from andesite to dacite and rhyolite. Amphibole-liquid partition coefficients increase systematically with decreasing temperature and increasing SiO2 in the liquid. Potassium displays an inverse behavior and partitioning decreases with decreasing temperature. Rare earth element (REE) partition coefficients, assumed to occupy the M4 site within the amphibole structure, increase continuously up to one order of magnitude. The calculated lattice parameters, ideal cation radius ( r 0) and Young's modulus ( E) remain nearly constant with decreasing temperature. The high-field strength elements Zr and Hf that occupy the M2 site of the amphibole structure reveal a fivefold increase in partition coefficients with decreasing temperature and constant lattice parameters r 0 and E. Partition coefficients correlate with edenite, tschermaks and cummingtonite exchange vectors indicating that the maximum partition coefficient ( D 0) for an ideal cation radius increases with decreasing edenite component, while the latter decreases linearly with temperature. Regressing Amph/L D Ca against trace elements results in fair to excellent correlations ( r 2 0.55-0.99) providing a predictive tool to implement the trace element partition coefficients in numerical geochemical modeling. Our data result in positive correlations between Amph/L D Nb/Ta and Amph/L D

  4. CRETACEOUS AMPHIBOLE-RICH INTRUSIVES WITH HIGH-MG ANDESITE AFFINITY FROM JAPAN: A PETROLOGICAL AND GEOCHRONOLOGICAL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, A.; Tiepolo, M.; Morishita, T.; Tribuzio, R.

    2009-12-01

    High-Mg andesites (HMA) are a group of arc products, usually rich in amphibole, whose origin is still debated. High-Mg diorites (HMD) are intrusive counterparts of HMA and are locally found in exhumed arc sections. In places, HMD are closely associated with ultramafic amphibole-rich rocks and may provide further constrains on the role of amphibole in the origin of HMA and in the petrogenesis of arc related-magmas. Small bodies of Cretaceous amph-rich mafic and ultramafic intrusives with similar petrographic features and HMA affinity (e.g. Kamei et al., 2004) are exhumed together with granitoid rocks along the Japan arc. These rocks, originated during the Cretaceous subduction of the Pacific plate under Asia, give the opportunity to investigate modifications in the composition of melts with HMA affinity as a function of the along-margin position and time. Mafic and ultramafic intrusives were sampled in different localities of the Honshu (NE Japan arc) and Kyushu Island (SW Japan arc). In situ U-Pb zircon geochronology by laser ablation ICPMS was carried out to constrain the time relationships among the different intrusive bodies. U-Pb concordia ages show that the HMD were mostly emplaced from ca. 100 Ma up to 118 Ma. In only one case (Honshu Island) U-Pb concordia ages as young as 70 Ma were obtained. High modal proportions of amphibole (40-60 vol%) with pargasite cores (mg# = 0.66-0.77) characterize all studied samples. In ultramafic rocks (Ol-hornblendites and Cpx-hornblendites), pargasitic amphibole is poikilitic on sub-rounded clinopyroxene (mg# up to 88) and olivine (Fo61-78). In mafic rocks (amph-gabbros and amph-diorites), large amphibole grains are dispersed in a fine-grained matrix defining a porphyritic texture. The matrix consists mainly of Mg-hornblende, plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The cores of pargasitic amphibole from mafic rocks have clinopyroxene inclusions with mg# up to 88, similar to what found in ultramafic rocks. Independently from the age

  5. Exposure to Sumas Mountain chrysotile induces similar gene expression changes as Libby Amphibole but has greater effect on long-term pathology and lung function

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to provide understanding of the toxicity of naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) including Libby amphibole (LA), Sumas Mountain chrysotile (SM), El Dorado Hills tremolite (ED) and Ontario ferroactinolite cleavage fragments (ON). Rat-respirable fractions (aer...

  6. In vitro determinants of asbestos fiber toxicity: Effect on the relative toxicity of Libby Amphibole in pirmary human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background An abnormally high incidence of lung disease has been observed in the residents of Libby, Montana, which has been attributed to occupational and environmental exposure to fibrous amphiboles originating from a nearby contaminated vermiculite mine. The composition of L...

  7. In vitro determinants of asbestos fiber toxicity: Effect on the relative toxicity of Libby Amphibole in pirmary human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background An abnormally high incidence of lung disease has been observed in the residents of Libby, Montana, which has been attributed to occupational and environmental exposure to fibrous amphiboles originating from a nearby contaminated vermiculite mine. The composition of L...

  8. Oxo-amphiboles in mantle xenoliths: evidence for H2O-rich melt interacting with the lithospheric mantle of Harrow Peaks (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, S.; Bonadiman, C.; Biagioni, C.; Comodi, P.; Coltorti, M.; Zucchini, A.; Ottolini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Amphiboles are the most widespread hydrous metasomatic phases in spinel-bearing mantle peridotites from Harrow Peaks (HP), Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica). They occur both in veinlets and disseminated in the peridotite matrix (preferentially associated with clinopyroxene and spinel grains). Four amphibole crystals were investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and micro-Mössbauer spectroscopy; these crystal-chemical data allow to constrain upper mantle conditions during growth of these amphiboles and the role of volatile circulation during metasomatic processes in the Antarctic region. The HP amphiboles have low Mg# values (69.3-84.1), high TiO2 (2.74-5.30 wt%) and FeOtot contents (3.40 to 6.90 wt%). The Fe3+/Fetot ratios are significantly high (0.53-0.66). The W-site is mainly occupied by O2- (0.984-1.187 apfu) plus OH (H2O: 0.70-1.01 wt%) and minor F (0.04-0.24 wt%) and Cl (0.03-0.08 wt%). Consequently, HP amphiboles are actually characterized by a significant oxo component. The aH2O values were calculated at 1.5 GPa by dehydration equilibrium equations written as H2O-buffering equilibria among end-member components of amphibole and coexisting peridotite phases. Three out of four HP amphibole-bearing peridotites have values of aH2O ranging from 0.122 to 0.335; whereas one sample has aH2O remarkably higher (0.782) approaching an ideal H2O basalt solubility. The HP fO2 values, determined by the olivine-spinel-orthopyroxene oxygeobarometer (ΔQFM = -1.77 : +0.01), are remarkably different from those calculated on the basis of the amphibole dehydration equilibrium and the application of the dissociation reaction (ΔQFM = -2.60 : +6.8). The high aH2O and the extremely high fO2 values, determined by the oxy-amphibole equilibrium with respect to the redox conditions recorded by the co-existing anhydrous minerals (close to QFM buffer), revealed that: i) the amphibole

  9. Methodologies for determining the sources, characteristics, distribution, and abundance of asbestiform and nonasbestiform amphibole and serpentine in ambient air and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ann G; Candela, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic and nonanthropogenic (erosion) processes contribute to the continuing presence of asbestos and nonasbestos elongated mineral particles (EMP) of amphibole and serpentine in air and water of urban, rural, and remote environments. The anthropogenic processes include disturbance and deterioration of asbestos-containing materials, mining of amphibole- and serpentine-bearing rock, and disturbance of soils containing amphibole and serpentine. Atmospheric dispersal processes can transport EMP on a global scale. There are many methods of establishing the abundance of EMP in air and water. EMP include cleavage fragments, fibers, asbestos, and other asbestiform minerals, and the methods employed do not critically distinguish among them. The results of most of the protocols are expressed in the common unit of fibers per square centimeter; however, seven different definitions for the term "fiber" are employed and the results are not comparable. The phase-contrast optical method used for occupational monitoring cannot identify particles being measured, and none of the methods distinguish amphibole asbestos from other EMP of amphibole. Measured ambient concentrations of airborne EMP are low, and variance may be high, even for similar environments, yielding data of questionable value for risk assessment. Calculations based on the abundance of amphibole-bearing rock and estimates of asbestos in the conterminous United States suggest that amphibole may be found in 6-10% of the land area; nonanthropogenic erosional processes might produce on the order of 400,000 tons or more of amphibole per year, and approximately 50 g asbestos/km(2)/yr; and the order of magnitude of the likelihood of encountering rock bearing any type of asbestos is approximately 0.0001.

  10. Prevention of disease caused by fluoro-edenite fibrous amphibole: the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Few months after the publication of the monographic section of Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità second issue of 2014 "Health impact of fibres with fluoro-edenitic composition", the carcinogenicity of fluoro-edenite was assessed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC in the frame of Monograph 111. The IARC Working Group concluded that there is sufficient evidence in humans that exposure to fluoroedenite fibrous amphibole causes mesothelioma, and sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Fluoro-edenite was allocated to Group 1 (the agent is carcinogenic to humans. Now, in view of the recent IARC evaluation, preventive action in Biancavilla requires an upgrade. First of all, environmental monitoring has to be further implemented. All operations of house cleaning should be performed employing wet tools, in order to avoid dust-raising. It is very important that environmental and biological monitoring be related to epidemiological surveillance. The recently approved act of the Sicilian Government concerning a plan of health interventions in Biancavilla will favour cooperation between national, regional and local health institutions with the common goal of improving the quality and appropriateness of diagnostic and therapeutics procedures offered by the health services.

  11. Sediment flux in the modern Indus River inferred from the trace element composition of detrital amphibole grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Il; Clift, Peter D.; Layne, Graham; Blum, Joel; Khan, Ali Athar

    2003-08-01

    The drainage basin of the modern Indus River is composed of tectonic blocks that include oceanic arc units in the Indus Suture, reworked components of the Indian Plate and various parts of the former southern margin of Eurasia against which India collided. We investigate how these source units contribute to the modern bedload of the Indus River using the major and trace element composition of single detrital amphibole grains. Sediments from rivers eroding restricted drainage areas were analyzed to characterize the major potential source units. Samples taken at various localities downstream in the main Indus River allow the evolving provenance to be assessed. When coupled with existing bulk sediment Nd isotope data, a basic mass balance for the river can be constructed. The rapidly exhuming Southern Karakoram Metamorphic Complex is the dominant sediment source to the deep-sea Indus Fan. Although the Nanga Parbat Massif, located adjacent to the river's course is also rapidly exhuming, this is not an important source of sediment, probably because of its small area and the tectonic mechanism for its exhumation. The trace element composition of detrital amphibole grains can be a useful provenance indicator, especially in the identification of dominant sources in a complex mixed sediment environment. Trace element ratios Nb/Zr and Ba/Y were identified as being especially useful in discriminating detrital amphibole grains from various sources.

  12. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Serum Iron; Serum Fe Formal name: Iron, serum Related tests: Ferritin ; TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Reticulocyte Count ; Zinc Protoporphyrin ; Iron Tests ; Soluble Transferrin Receptor ... I should know? How is it used? Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) , and/or ...

  13. Magmatic-hydrothermal fluid evolution of the Dalli porphyry Cu-Au deposit; using Amphibole and Plagioclas mineral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houshang Pourkaseb

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The formation of porphyry copper deposits is attributed to the shallow emplacement, and subsequent cooling of the hydrothermal system of porphyritic intrusive rocks (Titley and Bean, 1981. These deposits have usually been developed along the chain of subduction-related volcanic and calc-alkalin batholiths (Sillitoe, 2010. Nevertheless, it is now confirmed that porphyry copper systems can also form in collisional and post collisional settings (Zarasvandi et al., 2015b. Detailed studies on the geochemical features of ore-hosting porphyry Cu-Mo-Au intrusions indicate that they are generally adakitic, water and sulfur- riched, and oxidized (Wang et al., 2014. For example, high oxygen fugacity of magma has decisive role in transmission of copper and gold to the porphyry systems as revealed in (Wang et al., 2014. In this regard, the present work deals with the mineral chemistry of amphibole and plagioclase in the Dalli porphyry Cu-Au deposit. The data is used to achieve the physical and chemical conditions of magma and its impact on mineralization. Moreover, the results of previous studies on the hydrothermal system of the Dalli deposit such as Raman laser spectroscopy and fluid inclusion studies are included for determination of the evolution from magmatic to hydrothermal conditions. Materials and methods In order to correctly characterize the physical and chemical conditions affecting the trend of mineralization, 20 least altered and fractured samples of diorite and quartz-diorite intrusions were chosen from boreholes. Subsequently, 20 thin-polished sections were prepared in the Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. Finally, mineral chemistry of amphibole and plagioclase were determined using electron micro probe analyses (EMPA in the central lab of the Leoben University. Results Amphibole that is one of the the main rock-forming minerals can form in a wide variety of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Accordingly, amphibole chemistry can be

  14. Dynamics of metamorphism processes by the fractal textures analysis of garnets, amphiboles and pyroxenes of Lapland Granulite Belt, Kola Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz A. Huber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available About thousand analyzes of garnet, amphibole and pyroxene crystals from selected samples of amphibolite and granulite rocks from Lapland Granulite Belt in Kandalaksha region (Kola Peninsula has been made. Indicated fractal-box dimension of studied minerals has a good correlation with tectonic zones, lead to a new insight in the dynamics of processes, which has modified the examined region. Fractal-box dimension makes the textural analysis more precise, because it consents for the mathematic and repeated review of crystals topology depending directly on processes which had created them.

  15. Examination of Libby, Montana, Fill Material for Background Levels of Amphibole from the Rainy Creek Complex Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David T.; Langer, William H.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Meeker, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    Natural background levels of Libby-type amphibole in the sediment of the Libby valley in Montana have not, up to this point, been determined. The purpose of this report is to provide the preliminary findings of a study designed by both the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and performed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The study worked to constrain the natural background levels of fibrous amphiboles potentially derived from the nearby Rainy Creek Complex. The material selected for this study was sampled from three localities, two of which are active open-pit sand and gravel mines. Seventy samples were collected in total and examined using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer. All samples contained varying amounts of feldspars, ilmenite, magnetite, quartz, clay minerals, pyroxene minerals, and non-fibrous amphiboles such as tremolite, actinolite, and magnesiohornblende. Of the 70 samples collected, only three had detectable levels of fibrous amphiboles compatible with those found in the rainy creek complex. The maximum concentration, identified here, of the amphiboles potentially from the Rainy Creek Complex is 0.083 percent by weight.

  16. Crystal preferred orientation of amphibole and implications for seismic anisotropy in the crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Haemyeong

    2016-04-01

    Strong seismic anisotropy is often observed in the middle to lower crust and it has been considered to be originated from the crystal preferred orientation (CPO) of anisotropic minerals such as amphibole. Amphibolite is one of the dominant rocks in the middle to lower crust. In this study, crystal preferred orientations of hornblende in amphibolites at Yeoncheon and Chuncheon areas in South Korea were determined by using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)/SEM with HKL Channel 5 software. In Yeoncheon area, hornblende showed two types of CPOs. Type-I CPO is characterized as (100) poles of hornblende aligned subnormal to foliation and [001] axes aligned subparallel to lineation. Type-II CPO is characterized as (100) poles of hornblende aligned subnormal to foliation and (010) poles aligned subparallel to lineation (refer to Ko and Jung, 2015, Nature Communications). In Chuncheon area, three types of CPOs of hornblende were observed. In addition to the type-I and -II CPOs described above, type-III CPO of hornblende was observed in Chuncheon area and it is characterized as (100) poles of hornblende aligned subnormal to foliation and both [001] axes and (010) poles aligned as a girdle subparallel to foliation. Using the observed CPO and the single crystal elastic constant of hornblende, seismic anisotropy of hornblende was calculated. Seismic anisotropy of P-wave was strong in the range of 10.2 - 13.5 %. Seismic anisotropy of S-wave was also strong in the range of 6.9 - 11.2 %. These results show that hornblende deformed in nature can produce a strong CPO, resulting in a strong seismic anisotropy in the middle to lower crust. Taking into account of the CPO of plagioclase in the rock, seismic anisotropies of whole rock turned out to be maximum P-wave anisotropy (Vp) of 9.8% and maximum S-wave anisotropy (Vs) of 8.2%. Therefore, strong seismic anisotropy found in the middle to lower crust in nature can be attributed to the CPO of hornblende in amphibolite.

  17. Nonlinear Modelling of Orthopyroxene and Amphibole Mineral Modes in Orbicules from Fisher Lake CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, D. G.; Fowler, A. D.

    2004-05-01

    Geochemical self-organization or spontaneous patterning, caused by positive feedback between reaction and transport, which creates amplification of any fluctuations in the system, can occur when a system is pushed into a far-from-equilibrium (FFE) state. The patterning is thus a construct of the system that allows the dissipation of those energies that pushed it into the FFE state and not a template forced onto the system by boundary conditions. The Fisher Lake CA orbicules contain plagioclase and orthopyroxene that show characteristics of FFE cooling; for instance, reverse-zoned radiating crystals organized in a highly complex pattern. The decimetre-scale orbicules are surrounded by a homogeneous mosaic of crystals characteristic of near-to-equilibrium (NTE) plutonic cooling environments. Thus the orbicular comb texture is interpreted as the response of a FFE magma toward achieving equilibrium. The innermost shell of an orbicule, containing the largest, most spectacular reverse-zoned branching orthopyroxene crystals, represents the largest step towards NTE. Rapid precipitation of minerals quickly decreased the free energy of the system such that an overshooting occurred, resulting in a chemical oscillation about the equilibrium value, which gradually decreased as the system approached NTE. Evidence of this mechanism is seen in the shell mineral modes of orthopyroxene and amphibole. Initially the oscillations are large and antithetical, i.e. as the amount of one mineral increases the other decreases and vice versa. The amplitudes of the oscillations gradually decrease flattening out to a more constant value or stable state; thus looking much like a damped pendulum. An empirical nonlinear model based on the modified Volterra-Lotka equations models these curves. The modelling demonstrates that pattern formation can occur without a periodic external forcing of the intensive variables of the magmatic system as the magma cools and solidifies. Smooth changes in these

  18. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  19. Electrical Properties of amphiboles from the Kola super deep borehole, Russia, at mantle pressure and temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, G.; Gorbatsevich, Felix

    2012-07-01

    We present here for the first time, the temperature and pressure dependence of the electrical resistivity of ferro-actinolite amphibole from the World's deepest borehole, the Kola super-deep borehole (KSDB) up to the depth of 12.84 km. High-pressure and high-temperature measurements were carried out by using an opposed anvil system up to 700 K and 4 GPa. Ten samples from different depths (from the surface to the deepest 12,890 m) were investigated for their compositional, structural and electrical behaviour. Ferro-actinolite sample exhibits a thermally induced phase transformation to cummingtonite-clinopyroxene—quartz assemblages at 780 K and 0.5 GPa. The transformation temperature is found to be decreasing with the increase of pressure and reaches a value of 680 K at 6.0 GPa. The conductivity activation energy, (determined from the temperature dependence of conductivity) of the ferroactinolite is found to be decreasing from 0.8 eV at 0.5 GPa to 0.30 eV at 6 GPa. The present study indicates that the amphiboles at deeper crustal level is more conducting and bears significance in understanding the physical properties of rocks at the deep continental crust.

  20. Role of iron-mediated free-radical generation in asbestos-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C; Poole, A; Turver, C J; Vann, C

    1987-01-01

    While the in vitro toxicity of mineral fibres is largely determined by the number of long thin fibres present, there are a number of contradictory reports in the literature as to whether the production of oxygen free radicals is also involved and whether the addition of antioxidants or radical scavengers can ameliorate or prevent asbestos-induced cytotoxicity. We report here that crocidolite and other types of amphibole asbestos are less toxic to two cell lines in low oxygen concentrations. The treatment of these fibres with the iron chelator Desferral also reduced the toxicity of the amphiboles. The activity of chrysotile asbestos was not affected by oxygen tension and the cytotoxic effects of Desferral and chrysotile were additive.

  1. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  2. The search for asbestos within the Peter Mitchell Taconite iron ore mine, near Babbitt, Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm; Nolan, Robert P; Nord, Gordon L

    2008-10-01

    Asbestos crystallizes within rock formations undergoing intense deformation characterized by folding, faulting, shearing, and dilation. Some of these conditions have prevailed during formation of the taconite iron ore deposits in the eastern Mesabi Iron Range of Minnesota. This range includes the Peter Mitchell Taconite Mine at Babbitt, Minnesota. The mine pit is over 8 miles long, up to 1 mile wide. Fifty three samples were collected from 30 sites within areas of the pit where faulting, shearing and folding occur and where fibrous minerals might occur. Eight samples from seven collecting sites contain significant amounts of ferroactinolite amphibole that is partially to completely altered to fibrous ferroactinolite. Two samples from two other sites contain ferroactinolite degraded to ropy masses of fibers consisting mostly of ferrian sepiolite as defined by X-ray diffraction and TEM and SEM X-ray spectral analysis. Samples from five other sites contain unaltered amphiboles, however some of these samples also contain a very small number of fiber bundles composed of mixtures of grunerite, ferroactinolite, and ferrian sepiolite. It is proposed that the alteration of the amphiboles was caused by reaction with water-rich acidic fluids that moved through the mine faults and shear zones. The fibrous amphiboles and ferrian sepiolite collected at the Peter Mitchell Mine composes a tiny fraction of one percent of the total rock mass of this taconite deposit; an even a smaller amount of these mineral fragments enter the ambient air during mining and milling. These fibrous minerals thus do not present a significant health hazard to the miners nor to those non-occupationally exposed. No asbestos of any type was found in the mine pit.

  3. Hydrogen isotope investigation of amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in silicic magmas erupted at Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, S.J.; Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratio, water content and Fe3 +/Fe2 + in coexisting amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in volcanic rocks can provide insight into shallow pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic processes such as vesiculation, and lava drainback with mixing into less devolatilized magma that erupts later in a volcanic sequence. We studied four ~ 35 ka and younger eruption sequences (i.e. Kings Creek, Lassen Peak, Chaos Crags, and 1915) at the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), California, where intrusion of crystal-rich silicic magma mushes by mafic magmas is inferred from the varying abundances of mafic magmatic inclusions (MMIs) in the silicic volcanic rocks. Types and relative proportions of reacted and unreacted hydrous phenocryst populations are evaluated with accompanying chemical and H isotope changes. Biotite phenocrysts were more susceptible to rehydration in older vesicular glassy volcanic rocks than coexisting amphibole phenocrysts. Biotite and magnesiohornblende phenocrysts toward the core of the Lassen Peak dome are extensively dehydroxylated and reacted from prolonged exposure to high temperature, low pressure, and higher fO2 conditions from post-emplacement cooling. In silicic volcanic rocks not affected by alteration, biotite phenocrysts are often relatively more dehydroxylated than are magnesiohornblende phenocrysts of similar size; this is likely due to the ca 10 times larger overall bulk H diffusion coefficient in biotite. A simplified model of dehydrogenation in hydrous phenocrysts above reaction closure temperature suggests that eruption and quench of magma ascended to the surface in a few hours is too short a time for substantial H loss from amphibole. In contrast, slowly ascended magma can have extremely dehydrogenated and possibly dehydrated biotite, relatively less dehydrogenated magnesiohornblende and reaction rims on both phases. Eruptive products containing the highest proportions of mottled dehydrogenated crystals could indicate that within a few days

  4. Increased iron export by ferroportin induces restriction of HIV-1 infection in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Namita; Ammosova, Tatiana; Diaz, Sharmin; Lin, Xionghao; Niu, Xiaomei; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Dhawan, Subhash; Oneal, Patricia; Nekhai, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    The low incidence of HIV-1 infection in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro under the conditions of low intracellular iron or heme treatment suggests a potential restriction of HIV-1 infection in SCD. We investigated HIV-1 ex vivo infection of SCD peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and found that HIV-1 replication was inhibited at the level of reverse transcription (RT) and transcription. We observed increased expression of heme and iron-regulated genes, previously shown to inhibit HIV-1, including ferroportin, IKBα, HO-1, p21, and SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). HIV-1 inhibition was less pronounced in hepcidin-treated SCD PBMCs and more pronounced in the iron or iron chelators treated, suggesting a key role of iron metabolism. In SCD PBMCs, labile iron levels were reduced and protein levels of ferroportin, HIF-1α, IKBα, and HO-1 were increased. Hemin treatment induced ferroportin expression and inhibited HIV-1 in THP-1 cells, mimicking the HIV-1 inhibition in SCD PBMCs, especially as hepcidin similarly prevented HIV-1 inhibition. In THP-1 cells with knocked down ferroportin, IKBα, or HO-1 genes but not HIF-1α or p21, HIV-1 was not inhibited by hemin. Activity of SAMHD1-regulatory CDK2 was decreased, and SAMHD1 phosphorylation was reduced in SCD PBMCs and hemin-treated THP-1 cells, suggesting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in SCD. Our findings point to ferroportin as a trigger of HIV-1 restriction in SCD settings, linking reduced intracellular iron levels to the inhibition of CDK2 activity, reduction of SAMHD1 phosphorylation, increased IKBα expression, and inhibition of HIV-1 RT and transcription.

  5. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  6. Evidence for pre-Cretaceous history and partial Neogene (19-9 Ma) reequilibration in the Karakorum (NW Himalayan Syntaxis) from 40Ar- 39Ar amphibole dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Yann; Villa, Igor M.; Guillot, Stéphane; Mahéo, Gweltaz; Pêcher, Arnaud

    2006-09-01

    Amphiboles and a biotite from amphibolites and amphibolitic gneisses of the Karakorum Metamorphic Complex (KMC, NW Himalaya), were dated using the 40Ar/ 39Ar method. Isotope correlations were compared to electron-microprobe analyses. Both Al IV and Al VI contents of amphibole increase from the south near the Shyok Suture Zone to the Dassu-Askole Area in the north, with an increase in metamorphic grade (from anchizone to upper amphibolite facies). In the lower metamorphic zone, discordant age spectra were obtained. They are related to epidote-amphibolite overgrowth of amphibole rims on older (Precambrian to Mesozoic) magmatic cores. In the Shyok Suture Zone Ar/Ar ages of 38-62 Ma are contemporaneous with the emplacement of the Ladakh Batholith granodiorites, while middle Cretaceous magmatic Ar/Ar ages (˜ 120 Ma) are locally preserved in tschermakite relics. In the Southern Karakorum basement, a minimum Ar/Ar age of 651 Ma was preserved, while an age of 208.5±2 Ma was preserved in Panjal Trap-like diorites. At the margin of the domes zone, more recent metamorphism resulted in mineral growth at 20-5 Ma. In the domes zone, amphibole Ar/Ar ages of 17 Ma (Askole) and bimodal age spectra of 15-17 and 9-13 Ma (Dassu) extend towards the east the zone of Neogene amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism known in the Nanga Parbat Syntaxis.

  7. Characterization of Libby, MT amphibole (LA) elongated particles for toxicology studies: Field Collection, sample preparation, dose characterization, and particle counting methods using SEM/EDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 1999, the US EPA and USGS have been studying the chemistry, mineralogy, and morphology of the amphiboles from the Rainy Creek Complex of Libby, MT (LA), following an increased incidence of lung and pleural diseases. LA material collected in 2000 (LA2000) was described in M...

  8. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  9. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  10. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  11. Cristallochimie et réactivité de surface d'amphiboles fibreuses d'intérêt environnemental et sanitaire

    OpenAIRE

    Pacella, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    This work concerns the physico-chemical and structural characterisation of mineral fibres (asbestos) and the comprehension of the chemical and molecular mechanisms which are responsible of the development of human pathologies specific to their inhalation. In particular, in this work we performed a crystallochemical and surface reactivity study of floro-edenite, a natural amphibole of volcanic origin recently discovered in Biancavilla (Sicily, Italy). The properties of this mineral were compar...

  12. Does a Heavy Fe-Isotope Composition of Akilia Quartz-Amphibole-Pyroxene Rocks Necessitate a BIF Origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, M J; Schoenberg, R; Fedo, C M; Kamber, B S

    2015-10-01

    The age and origin of the quartz-amphibole-pyroxene (qap) gneiss from the island of Akilia, southern West Greenland, have been the subject of intense debate since the light C-isotope composition of graphite inclusions in apatite was interpreted to indicate the presence of Earth's earliest biological activity. Although this claim for biogenic relicts has been vigorously challenged, the possibility that the rocks might represent some of Earth's earliest water-lain sediments and, hence, a suitable repository for life remains an open question. While some workers have suggested that the entire sequence represents an originally mafic-ultramafic igneous precursor subsequently modified by metasomatism, quartz injection, high-grade metamorphism, and extreme ductile deformation, others maintain that at least a small part of the sequence retains geochemical characteristics indicative of a chemical sedimentary origin. Fractionated Fe isotopes with δ(56)Fe values similar to those observed in Isua BIF have been reported from high-SiO2 units of qap and used to support a chemical sedimentary protolith for the qap unit. Here, we present new Fe isotope data from all lithologic variants in the qap gneiss on Akilia, including layers of undisputed ultramafic igneous origin. Since the latter require introduction of fractionated Fe into at least part of the qap unit, we argue that Fe isotopes must therefore be treated with considerable caution when used to infer BIF for part or all of the qap protolith.

  13. New Insights into Trace Element Partitioning in Amphibole from Multiple Regression Analysis, with Application to the Magma Plumbing System of Mt. Lamington (Papua New Guinea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Humphreys, M.; Cooper, G.; Davidson, J.; Macpherson, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new multiple regression (MR) analysis of published amphibole-melt trace element partitioning data, with the aim of retrieving robust relationships between amphibole crystal-chemical compositions and trace element partition coefficients (D). We examined experimental data for calcic amphiboles of kaersutite, pargasite, tschermakite (Tsch), magnesiohornblende (MgHbl) and magnesiohastingsite (MgHst) compositions crystallized from basanitic-rhyolitic melts (n = 150). The MR analysis demonstrates the varying significance of amphibole major element components assigned to different crystallographic sites (T, M1-3, M4, A) as independent variables in controlling D, and it allows us to retrieve statistically significant relationships for REE, Y, Rb, Sr, Pb, Ti, Zr, Nb (n > 25, R2 > 0.6, p-value < 0.05). For example, DLREE are controlled by SiT, M1-3 site components and CaM4, whereas DMREE-HREE are controlled solely by M1-3 site components. Our overall results for the REE are supported by application of the lattice strain model (Blundy & Wood, 1994). A significant advantage of our study over previous work linking D to melt polymerization (e.g. Tiepolo et al., 2007) is the ability to reconstruct melt compositions from in situ amphibole compositional analyses and published D data. We applied our MR analysis to Mt. Lamington (PNG), where Mg-Hst in quenched mafic enclaves are juxtaposed with MgHbl-Tsch phenocrysts from andesitic host lavas. The results indicate that MgHbl-Tsch are crystallized from a cool, rhyolitic melt (800-900±50 ºC, 70-77±5 wt % SiO2; Ridolfi & Renzulli 2012) with lower Rb and Sr and higher Pb, relative to a hot, andesitic-dacitic melt (950-1,000±50 ºC; 60-70±5 wt % SiO2) where MgHst are crystallized. REE and Nb contents are similar in both types of melts despite higher REE and Nb in MgHbl-Tsch. Therefore, the REE compositional disparity between MgHst and MgHbl-Tsch is driven by the difference in the DREE, rather than the melt REE

  14. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  15. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to iron dextran injection; any other iron injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other ...

  16. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used ... fewer red blood cells. The red blood cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron- ...

  18. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  19. Mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) in amphibole-bearing granites of the Bintang batholith, Main Range granite province: Evidence for a meta-igneous basement in Western Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Long Xiang; Ghani, Azman A.; Chung, Sun-Lin; Li, Shan; Lai, Yu-Ming; Saidin, Mokhtar; Amir Hassan, Meor H.; Muhammad Ali, Muhammad Afiq; Badruldin, Muhammad Hafifi; Abu Bakar, Ahmad Farid

    2017-08-01

    Mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) with varying sizes are a common occurrence in porphyritic amphibole-bearing granite of the Bintang batholith, which is part of the Main Range granite province. The MMEs of the amphibole-bearing granite are significant as they are related to the I-type granitoids within the Main Range granite province. Petrographic observations indicate the MMEs are mantled with coarse mafic crystals on the rim and contain similar minerals to the host (biotite + plagioclase + K-feldspar + pyroxene + amphibole), but in different proportions. Geochemical analyses indicate the MMEs are shoshonitic with mg# comparable to the granite host. Substantial similarities exist between the MMEs and granite with regards to the normalized rare earth element patterns and trace elements variation diagrams. The MMEs and granite are not completely coeval as the MME zircon U-Pb age (224.3 ± 1.2 Ma) is slightly older than its granite host zircon U-Pb age (216.2 ± 1.0 Ma). The age difference is also observed from the unusual 500 m-long Tiak MME and another amphibole-bearing granite sample from the south of the pluton, which yield 221.8 ± 1.1 Ma and 217.4 ± 1.0 Ma respectively. The oldest inherited zircons found in the MME and granite are 2.0 Ga and 1.3 Ga respectively, while the oldest xenocrystic zircons found in the MME and granite are 2.5 Ga and 1.5 Ga respectively. Identical negative εHf(t) values from zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf analysis for a MME-granite pair indicates the rocks were generated from a similar, ancient source in the basement. Combining the results, we suggest that incongruent melting of an ancient protolith played an important part in the evolution of the MMEs and granite and the MMEs characteristics are best explained as restite. The zircon Hf model age (two-stage) and the I-type peritectic and restitic mineral assemblages in the MMEs further describe the protolith as Early Proterozoic-Late Archean (≈2.5 Ga) meta-igneous rock. This shows the

  20. Order of [6]Ti4+ in a Ti-rich calcium amphibole from Kaersut, Greenland: a combined X-ray and neutron diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Gatta, G.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Oberti, Roberta; Hawthorne, Frank C.

    2016-10-01

    In order to characterize the role of Ti in the crystal structure of calcium amphiboles with high or even dominant oxo-component, the crystal structure of a Ti-rich calcium amphibole from a gabbro at Kaersut, Greenland, has been refined with single-crystal MoKα X-ray intensity data to an R 1(F) index of ~0.025, and with single-crystal Laue neutron intensity data to an R 1(F) index of ~0.053. The crystal used for X-ray structure refinement was characterized by electron- and ion-microprobe analysis. The site populations of the C-group cations Mg, Fe and Ti were calculated from the refined site-scattering values for the M(1), M(2) and M(3) sites derived by both X-ray and neutron diffraction. Ti is distributed among all the three sixfold coordinated M sites, with a strong preference for the M(1) and M(3) sites, where its main role is maintaining electroneutrality at the deprotonated O(3) site. The pattern of distortion of the M(1), M(2) and M(3) octahedra differs from that in F-free deprotonated or partly deprotonated amphiboles, where Ti4+ does not occur at the M(3) site. The neutron structure refinement provides also a clear picture of the environment of the proton, anisotropic displacement behaviour and potential hydrogen-bonding arrangements. A trifurcated hydrogen-bonding configuration has been identified, with two O(6) and one O(7) oxygen atoms as acceptors of weak hydrogen-bonds.

  1. Geological Features of Iron Formations and Associate Rock in Bulunkuole Group, West Kunlun, Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaoyang; Wang, He; Ren, Guangli; Wu, Wenying

    2017-05-01

    West Kunlun is located at northwest part of the Tibetan plateau, and it’s divided into North Kunlun terrane, South Kunlun terrane and Tianshuihai terrane. Bulunkuole Group is located in Tianshuihai terrane, and Taaxi, Yelike, Laobing, Zankan, Mokaer and Jiertiekegou iron deposit was found in this terrane. Those iron deposits are set to the important iron ore mineralization belt of Xinjiang and even China. By investigation the geological features, ore distributions, and mineralization characters; and analyze the electron microprobe of magnetite and pyrite, stable isotope of pyrite, magnetite and anhydrite to discussion the tectonic setting and its genesis analysis iron ore deposit in Blunkuole Group, and establish the metallogenic model in this area. By contrastive analyzing of Taaxi, Yelike Zankan-Mokar iron ore deposits in Bulunkuole Group, it was found that all the iron ore deposit share the similar sedimentary environment. Those deposits have 3 ∼ 4 ore bodies, each get a meter to dozens of meters in width, extend to thousands of meters. The wall rocks are biotite quartz schist and plagioclase amphibole schist, and the two rocks interbed usually. It should be distinguish in the stratigraphic correlation of Bulunkuole Group for the influenced by the magma intrusion, such as granite and felsite porphyry.

  2. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  3. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  4. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  6. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got ...

  10. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need additional iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  13. 40Ar-39Ar and U-Pb ages of metadiorite from the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt: Evidence for Early-Paleozoic magmatic zone and excess argon in amphibole minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Single-grain zircon U-Pb and amphibole 40Ar-39Ar dating have beenconducted on a deformed and metamorphosed diorite in the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt, which intruded into the middle Proterozoic Kuhai Group exposed in the south of Xiangride region, Dulan County, NW Qinghai Province. The zircon gives a concordant U-Pb age of (446.5±9.1) Ma. The amphibole yields Ar plateau age of (488.0±1.2) Ma and an isochronal age of (488.9±5.6) Ma. Age results of both stepwise released Ar and conventional K-Ar analysis are remarkably higher than that of zircon U-Pb, suggesting that the amphibole contains excess argon and the amphibole plateau age cannot be taken as the timing of metamorphism or deformation. The zircon age is interpreted to be crystallization age of the diorite pluton, which suggests that an Early-Paleozoic magmatic zone indeed existed in the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt stretching along the region south to the Golmud, Normuhong and Xiangride.

  14. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  15. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  16. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  17. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  18. Geochemical characteristics of amphibole in the gabbroic rocks of the medial area of the Godzilla Megamullion, Parece Vela Basin, Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigane, Y.; Morishita, T.; Snow, J. E.; Tamura, A.; Michibayashi, K.; Ohara, Y.; Arai, S.

    2011-12-01

    The oceanic core complexes (OCCs) are found on most slow spreading ridges proposed by Escartin et al. (2008), which has been suggested that OCC along a spreading axis represent the megamullion in morphological structure and the oceanic detachment fault in formation process by analogy of continental metamorphic core complex. The Godzilla Megamullion (GM), the largest OCC in the world, is located at the extinct Parece Vela Basin spreading ridge in the Philippine Sea (Ohara et al., 2001). Fault rocks are common on the surface of the GM, indicating the presence of a detachment fault exposed on the seafloor (Harigane et al., 2011). Harigane et al. (2008) reported that the hydrothermal metamorphism occurred retrogressively at the gabbroic rocks during the deformation related to the detachment fault. However, the origins of fluids and the fluid-rock interaction during deformation for the detachment fault are still unsolved. In this study, we present trace element geochemical analyses of amphibole and clinopyroxene of the gabbroic rocks sampled from the medial area of the GM using LA-ICP-MS at Kanazawa University and University of Houston. Most of the gabbroic rocks show a porphyroclastic texture that consist of plagioclase/clinopyroxene porphyroclasts and a fine-grained plagioclase/clinopyroxene/amphibole matrix. The amphibole compositions consist of pargasite and magnesio-hornblende (i.e. brown hornblende) with minor actinolite (i.e. green hornblende). These brown hornblendes have two distinct types in microstructure: bleb type and rim type. The bleb type occurs in the cores of clinopyroxene porphyroclasts and has no evidence of deformation. The rim type occurs as fine grains at the rim of clinopyroxene porphyroclasts. All green hornblende grains show no evidence of deformation and occur at the rim of brown hornblende and clinopyroxene grains. All chondrite-normalized REE patterns of clinopyroxene in the gabbroic rocks are characterized by flat heavy-REE and light

  19. Persistence of fertile and hydrous lithospheric mantle beneath the northwestern Ethiopian plateau: Evidence from modal, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of amphibole-bearing mantle xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Melesse; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Aulbach, Sonja

    2017-07-01

    We present new trace element compositions of amphiboles, Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions of clinopyroxenes and mineral modes for spinel peridotite xenoliths that were entrained in a Miocene alkali basalt (Gundeweyn, northwestern Ethiopian plateau), in order to understand the geochemical evolution and variation occurring within the continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) in close proximity to the East African Rift system, and its dynamic implications. With the exception of a single amphibole-bearing sample that is depleted in LREE (La/YbN = 0.45 × Cl), amphiboles in lherzolites and in one harzburgite show variable degrees of LREE enrichment (La/YbN = 2.5-12.1 × Cl) with flat HREE (Dy/YbN = 1.5-2.1 × Cl). Lherzolitic clinoyroxenes have 87Sr/86Sr (0.70227 to 0.70357), 143Nd/144Nd (0.51285 to 0.51346), and 176Hf/177Hf (0.28297 to 0.28360) ranging between depleted lithosphere and enriched mantle. LREE-enriched clinopyroxenes generally have more enriched isotope compositions than depleted ones. While lherzolites with isotope compositions similar to those of the Afar plume result from the most recent metasomatic overprint, isotope compositions more depleted than present-day MORB can be explained by an older melt extraction and/or isotopic rehomogenisation event, possibly related to the Pan-African orogeny. Several generations of amphibole are recognized in accord with this multi-stage evolution. Texturally unequilibrated amphibole occurring within the peridotite matrix and in melt pockets attest to continued hydration and refertilization of the lithospheric mantle subsequent to Oligocene flood basalt magmatism, during which an earlier-emplaced inventory of amphibole was likely largely consumed. However, a single harzburgite contains amphibole with the highest Mg# and lowest TiO2 content, which is interpreted as sampling a volumetrically subordinate mantle region beneath the Ethiopian plateau that was not tapped during flood basalt magmatism. Strikingly, both trace

  20. A case-control study of mesothelioma in Minnesota iron ore (taconite) miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Christine S; Alexander, Bruce H; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; MacLehose, Richard F; Nelson, Heather H; Ryan, Andrew D; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2016-02-01

    An excess of mesothelioma has been observed in iron ore miners in Northeastern Minnesota. Mining and processing of taconite iron ore generate exposures that include elongate mineral particles (EMPs) of amphibole and non-amphibole origin. We conducted a nested case-control study of mesothelioma in a cohort of 68,737 iron ore miners (haematite and taconite ore miners) to evaluate the association between mesothelioma, employment and EMP exposures from taconite mining. Mesothelioma cases (N=80) were identified through the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System (MCSS) and death certificates. Four controls of similar age were selected for each case with 315 controls ultimately eligible for inclusion. Mesothelioma risk was evaluated by estimating rate ratios and 95% CIs with conditional logistic regression in relation to duration of taconite industry employment and cumulative EMP exposure [(EMP/cc)×years], defined by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) 7400 method. Models were adjusted for employment in haematite mining and potential exposure to commercial asbestos products used in the industry. All mesothelioma cases were male and 57 of the cases had work experience in the taconite industry. Mesothelioma was associated with the number of years employed in the taconite industry (RR=1.03, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.06) and cumulative EMP exposure (RR=1.10, 95% CI 0.97 to -1.24). No association was observed with employment in haematite mining. These results support an association between mesothelioma and employment duration and possibly EMP exposure in taconite mining and processing. The type of EMP was not determined. The potential role of commercial asbestos cannot be entirely ruled out. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. The role of amphibole in the evolution of arc magmas and crust: the case from the Jurassic Bonanza arc section, Vancouver Island, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Jeff; Canil, Dante

    2010-04-01

    The Jurassic Bonanza arc, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, represents an exhumed island arc crustal section of broadly diorite composition. We studied bodies of mafic and ultramafic cumulates within deeper levels of the arc to constrain the conditions and fractionation pathways leading from high-Mg basalt to andesite and dacite. Major element trends coupled with textural information show the intercumulus crystallization of amphibole, as large oikocrysts enclosing olivine in primitive cumulates controls the compositions of liquids until the onset of plagioclase crystallization. This process is cryptic, occurring only in the plutonic section, and explains the paucity of amphibole in mafic arc volcanics and the change in the Dy/Yb ratios in many arc suites with differentiation. The correlation of octahedral Al in hornblende with pressure in liquidus experiments on high-Mg basalts is applied as an empirical barometer to hornblendes from the Bonanza arc. It shows that crystallization took place at 470-880 MPa in H2O-saturated primitive basaltic magmas. There are no magmatic equivalents to bulk continental crust in the Bonanza arc; no amount of delamination of ultramafic cumulates will shift the bulk arc composition to the high-Mg# andesite composition of bulk continental crust. Garnet removal from wet magmas appears to be the key factor in producing continental crust, requiring high pressures and thick crust. Because oceanic island arcs are built on thinner crust, the long-term process generating the bulk continental crust is the accretion of island arcs to continental margins with attendant tectonic thickening.

  2. (2) H/(1) H measurements of amphiboles and nominally anhydrous minerals (clinopyroxene, garnetand diamond)usinghigh-temperatureCF-EA-PY-IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourel, François; Lécuyer, Christophe; Demeny, Attila; Boulvais, Philippe; Lange, Lutz; Jacob, Dorrit E; Kovacs, Istvan

    2017-09-20

    We have used ahigh-precision, high efficiency method for themeasurementof the(2) H/(1) H ratios of hydrous silicates (amphiboles) and nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) such as clinopyroxene, garnet and diamond, which are usually extremely resistant to pyrolysis. This opens up new fields of investigation to better understand the conditionsof formation fordeep-Earth minerals. The technique described hereinvolvesIsotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) online in continuous flow mode with an Elemental Analyzer (EA) using"purge and trap" technology rather than conventional packed column-GC gas separation. The system is equipped with a special high temperature furnace reaching 1500°C, with a longer hot zone and improved temperature stability. Emphasis is put on the efficiency of the system to reliably pyrolyserefractory minerals difficult to analyse with other conventional systems. While conventional systems usually fail to generate hydrogen suitable for isotopic analyses, with the technique presented here we were able to measure (2) H/(1) H ratios from 4diamond samples (δ(2) H= -60, -77, -84 and -79‰ V-SMOW; average SD =4.5‰; n=2),3 garnet samples (δ(2) Hfrom -70 to -63‰), and 9 clinopyroxenes (δ(2) H from -92 to -58‰) associated with7 amphiboles (δ(2) Hfrom -76 to -27‰) from single mantle rock. The possibility of using such a system to reliably measure (2) H/(1) H ratios from refractory minerals, which are usually extremely difficult to analyse, offers a new tool of investigation for giving us unrivaled clues to study the Earth's deep interiors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  4. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  5. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  6. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  7. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  8. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  9. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  10. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura,Ikuro

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  11. Ocean iron cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W.

    Interest in the biogeochemical cycle of iron has grown rapidly over the last two decades, due to the potential role of this element in modulating global climate in the geological past and ocean productivity in the present day. This trace metal has a disproportionately large effect (1 × 105 C:Fe) on photosynthetic carbon fixation by phytoplankton. In around one third of the open ocean, so-called high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the resident phytoplankton have low growth rates despite an abundance of plant nutrients. This is due to the low supply of iron. Iron is present in the ocean in three phases, dissolved, colloidal, and particulate (biogenic and lithogenic). However, iron chemistry is complex with interactions between chemistry and biology such as the production of iron-binding siderophores by oceanic bacteria. This results in the interplay of inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, and organic complexation. Sources of new iron include dust deposition, upwelling of iron-rich deep waters, and the resuspension and lateral transport of sediments. Sinks for iron are mainly biological as evidenced by the vertical nutrient-like profile for dissolved iron in the ocean. Iron is rapidly recycled by the upper ocean biota within a so-called "ferrous wheel." The fe ratio [(new iron)/(new + regenerated iron)] provides an index of the relative supply of iron to the biota by new versus recycled iron. Over the last 15 years, interest in the potential role of iron in shaping climate in the geological past resulted in some of the most ambitious experiments in oceanography: large-scale (i.e., 50-1000 km2) iron enrichment of HNLC waters. They have provided valuable insights into how iron supply influences the biogeochemical cycles of elements such as carbon, sulfur, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  13. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meat (especially beef) Oysters Poultry, dark red meat Salmon Tuna Whole grains Reasonable amounts of iron are ... iron up to three times. Foods rich in vitamin C ( such as citrus, strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This ... video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron ... can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the ... other complications. Infants and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ...

  20. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron ... can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin ...

  2. Chemistry, mineralogy, and petrology of amphibole in Mount St. Helens 2004-2006 dacite: Chapter 32 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornber, Carl R.; Pallister, John S.; Lowers, Heather; Rowe, Michael C.; Mandeville, Charles W.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Textural, compositional, and mineralogical data are reported and interpreted for a large population of clinoamphibole phenocrysts in 22 samples from the seven successive dacite spines erupted at Mount St. Helens between October 2004 and January 2006. Despite the uniformity in bulk composition of magma erupted since 2004, there is striking textural and compositional diversity among amphibole phenocrysts and crystal fragments that have grown from, partly dissolved in, or been accidentally incorporated in the new dacite. This study demonstrates that magma erupted throughout the current dome-building episode is the end product of small-scale, thorough mixing of multiple generations of crystal-laden magma. The mixed amphibole population provides important clues to magma conditions within the dacite magma reservoir prior to ascent and, to some extent, the dynamics of mixing and ascent.

  3. Iron age: novel targets for iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Carla; Rivella, Stefano

    2014-12-05

    Excess iron deposition in vital organs is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients affected by β-thalassemia and hereditary hemochromatosis. In both disorders, inappropriately low levels of the liver hormone hepcidin are responsible for the increased iron absorption, leading to toxic iron accumulation in many organs. Several studies have shown that targeting iron absorption could be beneficial in reducing or preventing iron overload in these 2 disorders, with promising preclinical data. New approaches target Tmprss6, the main suppressor of hepcidin expression, or use minihepcidins, small peptide hepcidin agonists. Additional strategies in β-thalassemia are showing beneficial effects in ameliorating ineffective erythropoiesis and anemia. Due to the suppressive nature of the erythropoiesis on hepcidin expression, these approaches are also showing beneficial effects on iron metabolism. The goal of this review is to discuss the major factors controlling iron metabolism and erythropoiesis and to discuss potential novel therapeutic approaches to reduce or prevent iron overload in these 2 disorders and ameliorate anemia in β-thalassemia.

  4. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  11. Chemistry of amphiboles and clinopyroxenes from Euganean (NE Italy) cumulitic enclaves: implications for the genesis of melts in an extensional setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, O.; Meli, S.; Sassi, R.; Magaraci, D.

    2009-04-01

    The magmatism of the Euganean Volcanic District (Veneto Volcanic Province, VVP) developed in the last phases of the Alpine orogenesis; the geochemical and geophysical data are consistent with an extensional geodynamic context (Milani et al., 1999). Cumulitic gabbroic enclaves occur within the Euganean trachytes, and Bartoli et al. (2008) pointed to their cogenetic origin with the Euganean host lavas. Sr isotopic data suggest that these cumulates derived from uncontaminated mantle-derived liquids. We analysed both cumulus and intercumulus amphiboles and clinopyroxenes by electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS. The cumulus-intercumulus Cpx are diopsides and augites. The Mg#Cpx varies in a wide range (Mg#cumulus-Cpx= 0.74-0.84 and Mg#intercumulus-Cpx= 0.67-0.68). They show a MREE enrichment relative to LREE and HREE (LaN/SmN= 0.46-0.68 and TbN/YbN= 2.18-4.77). No significant Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.78-1.23) was observed. On a chondrite-normalized spiderdiagram Cpx exhibits significant Pb and Co negative anomalies, and less evident negative anomalies for Sr and Zr. La, Sm and HREE increase, whereas Ba, Ti, Li and V decrease from core to rim. These Cpx exhibit high Cr contents (701-2958 ppm). Moreover, they display trace element differences when compared to Cpx from MORB gabbros. We analyzed also amphiboles: pargasites, edenites and kaersutites. In the cumulus Amph Mg# varies in the range 0.60-0.69, whereas in the intercumulus assemblage from 0.57 to 0.63. The high K2O and TiO2 contents are distinct from that of amphiboles in MORB gabbros. LREE are enriched relative to HREE (LaN/YbN = 5.07-7.56). Moreover, TbN/YbN = 2.50-4.02 indicates a HREE depletion relative to MREE. REE patterns lack a significant Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 1.06-1.19). From core to rim Th and U decrease in cumulus crystals, but they increase in the intercumulus Amph. Ba (258-282 ppm) is enriched relative to other LILE and Nb-Ta are enriched relative to LREE. Cr varies in the range 423-594 ppm. The similar REE

  12. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  13. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  14. New rat models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu'o'ng Lê, Bá; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Bach, Véronique; Gay-Quéheillard, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    The majority of murine models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload were carried out in adult subjects. This cannot reflect the high risk of iron overload in children who have an increased need for iron. In this study, we developed four experimental iron overload models in young rats using iron sucrose and evaluated different markers of iron overload, tissue oxidative stress and inflammation as its consequences. Iron overload was observed in all iron-treated rats, as evidenced by significant increases in serum iron indices, expression of liver hepcidin gene and total tissue iron content compared with control rats. We also showed that total tissue iron content was mainly associated with the dose of iron whereas serum iron indices depended essentially on the duration of iron administration. However, no differences in tissue inflammatory and antioxidant parameters from controls were observed. Furthermore, only rats exposed to daily iron injection at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight for one week revealed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation in iron-treated rats compared with their controls. The present results suggest a correlation between iron overload levels and the dose of iron, as well as the duration and frequency of iron injection and confirm that iron sucrose may not play a crucial role in inflammation and oxidative stress. This study provides important information about iron sucrose-induced iron overload in rats and may be useful for iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia as well as for the prevention and diagnosis of iron sucrose-induced iron overload in pediatric patients.

  15. The hexadentate hydroxypyridinonate TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO) is a more orally active iron chelator than its bidentate analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, R A; Fredenburg, A M; Durbin, P W; Xu, J; Rayens, M K; Raymond, K N

    2000-04-01

    Bidentate hydroxypyridinone chelators effectively complex and facilitate excretion of trivalent iron. To test the hypothesis that hexadentate chelators are more effective than bidentate chelators at low concentrations, urinary and biliary Fe excretions were determined in Fe-loaded rats before and after administration of a bidentate chelator, Pr-(Me-3,2-HOPO), or its hexadentate analogue, TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO). The bidentate chelator slightly increased biliary Fe excretion in Fe-loaded rats after IV (90 micromol/kg) and PO (90 or 270 micromol/kg) administration, but chelation efficiency did not exceed 1%. The hexadentate chelator markedly increased biliary Fe excretion, achieving overall chelation efficiencies of 14% after IV administration of 30 micromol/kg and 8 or 3% after PO (30 or 90 micromol/kg) administration. The hexadentate chelator was significantly more effective than the bidentate chelator after IV injection and oral dosing. In chelator-treated Fe-loaded or saline-injected rats, >90% of the excreted Fe was in the bile. Oral TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO), given to non-Fe-loaded rats, did not appreciably change Fe output, indicating that there was little Fe depletion in the absence of Fe overload. These results support the hypothesis that greater Fe chelation efficiency can be achieved with hexadentate than with bidentate chelators at lower, and presumably safer, concentrations. The results also demonstrate that TREN-(Me-3, 2-HOPO) is a promising, orally effective, Fe chelator.

  16. Malabsorption of iron in children with iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S J; Stuart, M J; Swender, P T; Oski, F A

    1976-05-01

    Inability to absorb oral iron is believed to be an extremely rare cause of therapeutic failure in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Six patients who had failed to respond to oral iron therapy were studied by a simple oral absorption test and contrasted with 25 patients with untreated iron deficiency anemia and 10 normal subjects. All six of the patients who were therapeutic failures demonstrated impaired iron absorption in the absence of other clinical evidence of gastrointestinal disease. In the 25 newly diagnosed patients with iron deficiency. 24 demonstrated elevated iron absorptions while 10 ironreplete normal subjects had minimal elevations in their serum iron values following the administration of the test dose of 1 mg of elemental iron per kilogram. When the therapeutic failures were treated with parenteral iron, all had a therapeutic response. In addition, after treatment the impaired absorption of iron improved transiently. All children who absorbed iron readily responded to oral iron therapy.

  17. Iron chelating agents for iron overload diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Crisponi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although iron is an essential element for life, an excessive amount may become extremely toxic both for its ability to generate reactive oxygen species, and for the lack in humans of regulatory mechanisms for iron excretion. Chelation therapy has been introduced in clinical practice in the seventies of last century to defend thalassemic patients from the effects of iron overload and, in spite of all its limitations, it has dramatically changed both life expectancy and quality of life of patients. It has to be considered that the drugs in clinical use present some disadvantages too, this makes urgent new more suitable chelating agents. The requirements of an iron chelator have been better and better defined over the years and in this paper they will be discussed in detail. As a final point the most interesting ligands studied in the last years will be presented.

  18. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  19. The ubiquity of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  20. The Late Cretaceous igneous rocks of Romania (Apuseni Mountains and Banat): the possible role of amphibole versus plagioclase deep fractionation in two different crustal terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Berza, Tudor; Gesels, Julie; Dupont, Alain

    2016-04-01

    We provide new whole-rock major and trace elements as well as 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic data of a suite of samples collected in the Late Cretaceous volcanic and plutonic bodies of the Apuseni Mts. (Romania) that belong to the Banatitic Magmatic and Metallogenic Belt, also called the Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie belt. The samples define a medium- to high-K calc-alkaline differentiation trend that can be predicted by a three-step fractional crystallization process which probably took place in upper crustal magma chambers. Published experimental data indicate that the parent magma (Mg# = 0.47) of the Apuseni Mts. trend could have been produced by the lower crustal differentiation of a primary (in equilibrium with a mantle source) magma. The Late Cretaceous magmatic rocks of the Apuseni Mts. and Banat display overlapping major and trace element trends except that Sr is slightly lower and Ga is higher in the Apuseni Mts. parent magma. This difference can be accounted for by fractionating plagioclase-bearing (Apuseni Mts.) or amphibole-bearing (Banat) cumulates during the lower crustal differentiation of the primary magma to the composition of the parent magma of both trends. This, together with results obtained on the Late Cretaceous igneous rocks from the Timok area in Eastern Serbia, further suggests variation of the water content of the primary magma along and across the belt. The Apuseni Mts. versus the Banat samples display different isotopic compositions that likely resulted from the assimilation of two distinct crustal contaminants, in agreement with their emplacement in two separate mega-units of Alpine Europe.

  1. Brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  2. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  3. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves.

  4. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important

  5. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅳ) 3.7 Segregation of SG iron The non-uniform distribution of solute elements during solidification results in the micro segregation of SG iron.As for the redistribution of elements in the phases of the solidification structure,there is no intrinsic difference between SG iron and grey iron[132].

  6. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  7. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  8. Iron and the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedekum, Natalie A; Dimeff, Robert J

    2005-08-01

    Iron is an important mineral necessary for many biologic pathways. Different levels of deficiency can occur in the athlete, resulting in symptoms that range from none to severe fatigue. Iron deficiency without anemia may adversely affect athletic performance. Causes of iron deficiency include poor intake, menstrual losses, gastrointestinal and genitourinary losses due to exercise-induced ischemia or organ movement, foot strike hemolysis, thermohemolysis, and sweat losses. A higher incidence of deficiency occurs in female athletes compared with males.

  9. Physics of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  10. Iron, Meat and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Geissler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a summary of the publication “Iron and Health” by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN to the U.K. Government (2010, which reviews the dietary intake of iron and the impact of different dietary patterns on the nutritional and health status of the U.K. population. It concludes that several uncertainties make it difficult to determine dose-response relationships or to confidently characterize the risks associated with iron deficiency or excess. The publication makes several recommendations concerning iron intakes from food, including meat, and from supplements, as well as recommendations for further research.

  11. Recalling the Iron Girls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The phrase "iron girl" is symbolic of an era. Widely used in the 1960s and the early 1970s, it was a term that described women who, in the spirit of sexual equality, found in themselves a physical strength that surpassed their psychologi cal expectations. With their might and power, they proved to society that women could do everything that men could. The title of "iron girl" was their pride.The well-known writer Fan Xiaoqing, was one such iron girl. She says the "iron girls" were nothing less than a quest for perfection.

  12. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  13. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  14. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  17. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the intestines not properly absorbing vitamin B12 ( pernicious anemia ) Sickle cell anemia Risks There is very little risk involved with ... test Hemoglobin Hemolytic anemia Iron deficiency anemia Pernicious anemia Serum iron test Sickle cell anemia Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ...

  18. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics Iron-Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, ...

  20. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  2. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don' ... from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers ...

  4. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries.

  5. Iron and the endurance athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2014-09-01

    Iron is a trace mineral that is highly significant to endurance athletes. Iron is critical to optimal athletic performance because of its role in energy metabolism, oxygen transport, and acid-base balance. Endurance athletes are at increased risk for suboptimal iron status, with potential negative consequences on performance, because of the combination of increased iron needs and inadequate dietary intake. This review paper summarizes the role of iron in maximal and submaximal exercise and describes the effects of iron deficiency on exercise performance. Mechanisms that explain the increased risk of iron deficiency in endurance athletes, including exercise-associated inflammation and hepcidin release on iron sequestration, are described. Information on screening athletes for iron deficiency is presented, and suggestions to increase iron intake through diet modification or supplemental iron are provided.

  6. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  7. From Iron Bowl to Iron Stomach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL; L.; O’NEAL

    2009-01-01

    A few decades ago, "Iron Bowl" referred to not having to go hungry in China if you were employed by the Agovernment. The government gave you a job that secured the filling of one’s rice bowl. This concept and practice did create loyalty, as the times were hard. China has moved far past those times to become the

  8. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ This book consists of five sections:Chapter 1 Introduction,Chapter 2 Grey Iron,Chapter 3 Ductile Iron,Chapter 4Vermicular Cast Iron,and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishs this book in several parts serially,starting from the first issue of 2009.

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Ph.D Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Note: This book consists of five sections: Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Grey Iron, Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, Chapter 4 Vermicular Cast Iron, and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishes this book in several parts serially, starting from the first issue of 2009.

  10. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  11. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Vermicular graphite cast iron(VG iron for short in the following sections)is a type of cast iron in which the graphite is intermediate in shape between flake and spheroidal.Compared with the normal flake graphite in grey iron, the graphite in VG iron is shorter and thicker and shows a curved, more rounded shape.Because its outer contour is exactly like a worm, hence it is called vermicular graphite.

  12. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  13. Ocean iron fertilization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    In 2009 and 2010, an Indo-German scientific expedition dusted the ocean with iron to stimulate the biological pump that captures atmosphereic carbon dioxide. Two onboard scientists tell the story of this controversial project. Besides raising...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ... to stop her monthly periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of breath, chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  7. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... red blood cell that carries oxygen from the lungs to the body. Iron gives hemoglobin the strength ... dried beans and peas dried fruits leafy dark green ... serving coffee or tea at mealtime — both contain tannins that reduce the ...

  8. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrous sulfate provides the iron needed by the body to produce red blood cells. It is used ... Ferrous sulfate comes as regular, coated, and extended-release (long-acting) tablets; regular and extended-release capsules; ...

  9. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...

  10. Microbes: Mini Iron Factories

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via con...

  11. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ebru Yılmaz Keskin; İdil Yenicesu

    2015-01-01

    Demir, oksijenin taşınması, DNA sentezi ve hücre çoğalması gibi çeşitli biyolojik reaksiyonlar için vazgeçilmez olduğundan, yaşam için zorunludur. Demir metabolizması ve bu elementin düzenlenmesiyle ilgili bilgilerimiz, son yıllarda belirgin şekilde değişmiştir. Demir metabolizması ile ilgili yeni bozukluklar tanımlanmış ve demirin başka bozuklukların kofaktörü olduğu anlaşılmaya başlamıştır. Hemokromatozis ve demir tedavisine dirençli demir eksikliği anemisi (IRIDA; “iron-refractory iron def...

  12. Intravenous Iron Sucrose for Children With Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneva, Kristiyana; Chow, Erika; Rosenfield, Cathy G; Kelly, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in children. Most children with IDA are treated with oral iron preparations. However, intravenous (IV) iron is an alternative for children with severe IDA who have difficulty in adhering to or absorbing oral iron. We sought to describe the safety and effectiveness of IV iron sucrose for treatment of IDA in children. Pharmacy records of children who received IV iron sucrose at a children's hospital between 2004 and 2014 were reviewed. Laboratory markers of anemia and iron studies were obtained and preinfusion and postinfusion values were compared. Records were also reviewed for adverse reactions. A total of 142 patients received IV iron sucrose over 10 years. The mean age was 11 years, 9 months. One patient of 142 developed cough and wheezing during the infusion. No other adverse events were found. IV iron sucrose resulted in a statistically significant and clinically meaningful increase in hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, serum iron, ferritin, and % iron saturation, with a corresponding decrease in total iron binding capacity. The use of IV iron sucrose in pediatric patients with IDA is safe and leads to a moderate increase in hemoglobin and substantial improvement in iron studies.

  13. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  14. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  15. Mixed-valence iron minerals on Venus: Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) oxides and oxy-silicates formed by surface-atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Roger G.; Straub, Darcy W.

    1992-01-01

    Inferences from these investigations are that Fe(3+)-bearing minerals such as hematite magnesioferrite, acmite, and epidote are thermodynamically unstable, and that magnetite is the predominant mixed-valence iron oxide mineral on venus. Recently, the Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) silicate mineral laihunite was proposed to be a reaction product of olivine with the venusian atmosphere. This possibility is discussed further here. We suggest that other mixed-valence Fe(2+)-Fe(3+)-Oz-OH(-) silicates could also result from surface-atmosphere interactions on Venus. Topics discussed include the following: (1) conversion of hematite to magnetite; (2) stability of laihunite; (3) the possible existence of oxy-amphiboles and oxy-micas on Venus; and (4) other mixed-valence Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) silicates likely to exist on Venus.

  16. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should be admini...... treatment, when to follow-up for relapse, which dosage and type of therapy should be recommended or not recommended, and if some patients should not be treated....... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  17. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  18. A randomized trial of iron isomaltoside versus iron sucrose in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Richard; Roman, Eloy; Modiano, Manuel R; Achebe, Maureen M; Thomsen, Lars L; Auerbach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in many chronic diseases, and intravenous (IV) iron offers a rapid and efficient iron correction. This trial compared the efficacy and safety of iron isomaltoside and iron sucrose in patients with IDA who were intolerant of, or unresponsive to, oral iron. The trial was an open-label, comparative, multi-center trial. Five hundred and eleven patients with IDA from different causes were randomized 2:1 to iron isomaltoside or iron sucrose and followed for 5 weeks. The cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was based on body weight and hemoglobin (Hb), administered as either a 1000 mg infusion over more than 15 minutes or 500 mg injection over 2 minutes. The cumulative dose of iron sucrose was calculated according to Ganzoni and administered as repeated 200 mg infusions over 30 minutes. The mean cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was 1640.2 (standard deviation (SD): 357.6) mg and of iron sucrose 1127.9 (SD: 343.3) mg. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from baseline at any time between weeks 1-5. Both non-inferiority and superiority were confirmed for the primary endpoint, and a shorter time to Hb increase ≥2 g/dL was observed with iron isomaltoside. For all biochemical efficacy parameters, faster and/or greater improvements were found with iron isomaltoside. Both treatments were well tolerated; 0.6% experienced a serious adverse drug reaction. Iron isomaltoside was more effective than iron sucrose in achieving a rapid improvement in Hb. Furthermore, iron isomaltoside has an advantage over iron sucrose in allowing higher cumulative dosing in fewer administrations. Both treatments were well tolerated in a broad population with IDA.

  19. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  20. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  1. Iron prophylaxis during pregnancy -- how much iron is needed? A randomized dose- response study of 20-80 mg ferrous iron daily in pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Bergholt, Thomas; Eriksen, Lisbeth

    2005-01-01

    To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.......To determine the lowest dose of iron preventative of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy....

  2. Prediction of reducible soil iron content from iron extraction data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Reeven, van J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Soils contain various iron compounds that differ in solubility, reducibility and extractability. Moreover, the contribution of the various iron compounds to total iron (Fe) and total Fe concentrations differs highly among soils. As a result, the total reducible Fe content can also differ among

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  4. Distribution profile of gadolinium in gadolinium chelate-treated renally-impaired rats: role of pharmaceutical formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretellier, Nathalie; Salhi, Mariem; Schroeder, Josef; Siegmund, Heiko; Chevalier, Thibaut; Bruneval, Patrick; Jestin-Mayer, Gaëlle; Delaloge, Francette; Factor, Cécile; Mayer, Jean-François; Fabicki, Jean-Michel; Robic, Caroline; Bonnemain, Bruno; Idée, Jean-Marc; Corot, Claire

    2015-05-25

    While not acutely toxic, chronic hepatic effect of certain gadolinium chelates (GC), used as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, might represent a risk in renally-impaired patients due to free gadolinium accumulation in the liver. To answer this question, this study investigated the consequences of the presence of small amounts of either a soluble gadolinium salt ("free" Gd) or low-stability chelating impurity in the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid, a macrocyclic GC with high thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities, were investigated in renally-impaired rats. Renal failure was induced by adding 0.75% adenine in the diet for three weeks. The pharmaceutical and commercial solution of gadoteric acid was administered (5 daily intravenous injections of 2.5 mmol Gd/kg) either alone or after being spiked with either "free" gadolinium (i.e., 0.04% w/v) or low-stability impurity (i.e., 0.06 w/v). Another GC, gadodiamide (low thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities) was given as its commercial solution at a similar dose. Non-chelated gadolinium was tested at two doses (0.005 and 0.01 mmol Gd/kg) as acetate salt. Gadodiamide induced systemic toxicity (mortality, severe epidermal and dermal lesions) and substantial tissue Gd retention. The addition of very low amounts of "free", non-chelated gadolinium or low thermodynamic stability impurity to the pharmaceutical solution of the thermodynamically stable GC gadoteric acid resulted in substantial capture of metal by the liver, similar to what was observed in "free" gadolinium salt-treated rats. Relaxometry studies strongly suggested the presence of free and soluble gadolinium in the liver. Electron microscopy examinations revealed the presence of free and insoluble gadolinium deposits in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells of rats treated with gadoteric acid solution spiked with low-stability impurity, free gadolinium and gadodiamide, but not in rats treated with the pharmaceutical solution of gadoteric acid. The presence of impurities in the GC pharmaceutical solution may have long-term biological consequences.

  5. Oral iron chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Janet L

    2010-02-01

    Effective chelation therapy can prevent or reverse organ toxicity related to iron overload, yet cardiac complications and premature death continue to occur, largely related to difficulties with compliance in patients who receive parenteral therapy. The use of oral chelators may be able to overcome these difficulties and improve patient outcomes. A chelator's efficacy at cardiac and liver iron removal and side-effect profile should be considered when tailoring individual chelation regimens. Broader options for chelation therapy, including possible combination therapy, should improve clinical efficacy and enhance patient care.

  6. Hepcidin Suppresses Brain Iron Accumulation by Downregulating Iron Transport Proteins in Iron-Overloaded Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Luo, Qianqian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2015-08-01

    Iron accumulates progressively in the brain with age, and iron-induced oxidative stress has been considered as one of the initial causes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Based on the role of hepcidin in peripheral organs and its expression in the brain, we hypothesized that this peptide has a role to reduce iron in the brain and hence has the potential to prevent or delay brain iron accumulation in iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of hepcidin expression adenovirus (ad-hepcidin) and hepcidin peptide on brain iron contents, iron transport across the brain-blood barrier, iron uptake and release, and also the expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons. We demonstrated that hepcidin significantly reduced brain iron in iron-overloaded rats and suppressed transport of transferrin-bound iron (Tf-Fe) from the periphery into the brain. Also, the peptide significantly inhibited expression of TfR1, DMT1, and Fpn1 as well as reduced Tf-Fe and non-transferrin-bound iron uptake and iron release in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons, while downregulation of hepcidin with hepcidin siRNA retrovirus generated opposite results. We concluded that, under iron-overload, hepcidin functions to reduce iron in the brain by downregulating iron transport proteins. Upregulation of brain hepcidin by ad-hepcidin emerges as a new pharmacological treatment and prevention for iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Grey Iron(Ⅲ) 2.5 Crystallization of the LTF during final stage of eutectic solidification of grey iron In the final stage of eutectic solidification, eutectic cells grow gradually into large sizes; the liquid iron between the cells enters the last stage of solidification. At this time, the region of the remaining liquid iron is called last to freeze volume, LTF in short, as shown in Fig.2-39.

  8. Phytases for improved iron absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Phytase enzymes present an alternative to iron supplements, because they have been shown to improve iron absorption by means of catalysing the degradation of a potent iron absorption inhibitor: phytic acid. Phytic acid is a hexaphosphate of inositol and is particularly prevalent in cereal grains...

  9. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pochinok, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.Key words: children, iron deficiency anemia, treatment.

  10. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of card

  11. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, B.; Thiele, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well.

  12. Iron dominated magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  13. State of the iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinisch, Walter; Staun, Michael; Bhandari, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) frequently occurs in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and negatively impacts their quality of life. Nevertheless, the condition appears to be both under-diagnosed and undertreated. Regular biochemical screening of patients with IBD for anemia...

  14. Development of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  15. The New Iron Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sinosteel wins a hard-fought victory in the marathon battle for Australia’s Midwest Sinosteel Corp.,one of China’s larg- est steelmakers,has finally clinched its AU$1.36 billion($1.31 billion) takeover of Midwest Corp.,a Perth (Australia)-based iron ore miner,after a

  16. Nutritional iron deficiency: the role of oral iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz, J I; Nurchi, V M; Fanni, D; Gerosa, C; Peana, M; Zoroddu, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency represents a relevant health problem mainly in developing countries. Children and pregnant women represent the main target of this disease, and the low amount of bio-available iron mostly depends on plant-based diets. Iron deficiency may have serious consequences, with severe impairment of the immune function leading to infectious diseases. The brain development in embryos and fetuses during gestation can be greatly affected by iron deficiency of the mother with heavy outcomes on the cognition status of children. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in iron absorption and metabolism are the basis for new strategies for developing a therapy for iron deficiency. Different therapeutic strategies are summarized, and iron fortification appears the best tool.

  17. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  18. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  19. Iron-fortified milk can improve iron status in young women with low iron stores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz-Ahrens, K.E.; Schaafsma, G.; Kip, P.; Elbers, F.; Boeing, H.; Schrezenmeir, J.

    2004-01-01

    A considerable proportion of the populations of developing and industrialised nations does not meet the recommended daily allowance for iron and are thus at risk of chronic iron-deficiency anaemia. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we investigated whether supplementation with iron-enriched

  20. Iron-fortified milk can improve iron status in young women with low iron stores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholz-Ahrens, K.E.; Schaafsma, G.; Kip, P.; Elbers, F.; Boeing, H.; Schrezenmeir, J.

    2004-01-01

    A considerable proportion of the populations of developing and industrialised nations does not meet the recommended daily allowance for iron and are thus at risk of chronic iron-deficiency anaemia. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we investigated whether supplementation with iron-enriched

  1. [Iron deficiency, thrombocytosis and thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstatiev, Rayko

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency, the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide, is often associated with reactive thrombocytosis. Although secondary thrombocytosis is commonly considered to be harmless, there is accumulating evidence that elevated platelet counts, especially in the setting of iron deficiency, can lead to an increased thromboembolic risk in both arterial and venous systems. Here we present the mechanisms of iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis and summarize its clinical consequences especially in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, chronic kidney disease or cancer. We hypothesize that iron deficiency is an underestimated thromboembolic risk factor, and that iron replacement therapy can become an effective preventive strategy in a variety of clinical settings.

  2. Genetic defects of iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, R M

    1976-09-01

    Five genetic traits in man and laboratory animals have major effects on iron transport. The heterogeneous condition, hemochromatosis, in some families appears to segregate as a Mendelian trait, and is associated with defective control of intestinal iron absorption. In the very rare human autosomal recessive trait, atransferrinemia, there is an almost total lack of transferrin and gross maldistribution of iron through the body. In mice, sex-linked anemia (an X-linked recessive trait) causes iron deficiency through defective iron absorption, at the "exit" step; a similar defect probably exists in placental iron transfer. In microcytic anemia of mice, an autosomal recessive trait, iron absorption is also impaired because of a defect of iron entry into cells, which is probably generalized. Belgrade rat anemia, less understood at present, also may involve a major disorder of iron metabolism. Study of these mutations has provided new knowledge of iron metabolism and its genetic control Their phenotypic interaction with nutritional factors, especially the form and quantity of iron in the diet, may provide new insights for the study of nutrition.

  3. Osmundiron, cleaved iron bars and slags (Osmundjern, kloder og kalotslagger)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchwald, Vagn Fabritius

    1996-01-01

    Investigation of so-called Osmund iron, iron bars and slags from iron production in the medieval ages.......Investigation of so-called Osmund iron, iron bars and slags from iron production in the medieval ages....

  4. High efficiency iron electrode and additives for use in rechargeable iron-based batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Aniszfeld, Robert; Manohar, Aswin; Malkhandi, Souradip; Yang, Bo

    2017-02-21

    An iron electrode and a method of manufacturing an iron electrode for use in an iron-based rechargeable battery are disclosed. In one embodiment, the iron electrode includes carbonyl iron powder and one of a metal sulfide additive or metal oxide additive selected from the group of metals consisting of bismuth, lead, mercury, indium, gallium, and tin for suppressing hydrogen evolution at the iron electrode during charging of the iron-based rechargeable battery. An iron-air rechargeable battery including an iron electrode comprising carbonyl iron is also disclosed, as is an iron-air battery wherein at least one of the iron electrode and the electrolyte includes an organosulfur additive.

  5. Combustion iron distribution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Mahowald, N.; Bond, T.; Chuang, P. Y.; Artaxo, P.; Siefert, R.; Chen, Y.; Schauer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Iron is hypothesized to be an important micronutrient for ocean biota, thus modulating carbon dioxide uptake by the ocean biological pump. Studies have assumed that atmospheric deposition of iron to the open ocean is predominantly from mineral aerosols. For the first time we model the source, transport, and deposition of iron from combustion sources. Iron is produced in small quantities during fossil fuel burning, incinerator use, and biomass burning. The sources of combustion iron are concentrated in the industrialized regions and biomass burning regions, largely in the tropics. Model results suggest that combustion iron can represent up to 50% of the total iron deposited, but over open ocean regions it is usually less than 5% of the total iron, with the highest values (ocean biogeochemistry the bioavailability of the iron is important, and this is often estimated by the fraction which is soluble (Fe(II)). Previous studies have argued that atmospheric processing of the relatively insoluble Fe(III) occurs to make it more soluble (Fe(II)). Modeled estimates of soluble iron amounts based solely on atmospheric processing as simulated here cannot match the variability in daily averaged in situ concentration measurements in Korea, which is located close to both combustion and dust sources. The best match to the observations is that there are substantial direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion processes. If we assume observed soluble Fe/black carbon ratios in Korea are representative of the whole globe, we obtain the result that deposition of soluble iron from combustion contributes 20-100% of the soluble iron deposition over many ocean regions. This implies that more work should be done refining the emissions and deposition of combustion sources of soluble iron globally.

  6. Studies on the pathogenesis in iron deficiency anemia Part 1. Urinary iron excretion in iron deficiency anemia patients and rats in various iron states

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    In the "iron excretion test" , urinary iron excretion after injection of saccharated iron oxide has been reported to be accelerated in relapsing idiopathic iron deficiency anemia. To determine the relevance of urinary iron excretion to clinical factors other than iron metabolism, 15 clinical parameters were evaluated. The serum creatinine level was positively and the serum albumin level was negatively correlated with urinary iron excretion, showing coefficients of r=0.97,-0.86 respectively, a...

  7. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body’s iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear ph...

  8. A risk assessment for exposure to grunerite asbestos (amosite) in an iron ore mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, R. P.; Langer, A. M.; Wilson, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The potential for health risks to humans exposed to the asbestos minerals continues to be a public health concern. Although the production and use of the commercial amphibole asbestos minerals—grunerite (amosite) and riebeckite (crocidolite)—have been almost completely eliminated from world commerce, special opportunities for potentially significant exposures remain. Commercially viable deposits of grunerite asbestos are very rare, but it can occur as a gangue mineral in a limited part of a mine otherwise thought asbestos-free. This report describes such a situation, in which a very localized seam of grunerite asbestos was identified in an iron ore mine. The geological occurrence of the seam in the ore body is described, as well as the mineralogical character of the grunerite asbestos. The most relevant epidemiological studies of workers exposed to grunerite asbestos are used to gauge the hazards associated with the inhalation of this fibrous mineral. Both analytical transmission electron microscopy and phase-contrast optical microscopy were used to quantify the fibers present in the air during mining in the area with outcroppings of grunerite asbestos. Analytical transmission electron microscopy and continuous-scan x-ray diffraction were used to determine the type of asbestos fiber present. Knowing the level of the miner’s exposures, we carried out a risk assessment by using a model developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:10097051

  9. Studying Irony Detection Beyond Ironic Criticism: Let's Include Ironic Praise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruntsch, Richard; Ruch, Willibald

    2017-01-01

    Studies of irony detection have commonly used ironic criticisms (i.e., mock positive evaluation of negative circumstances) as stimulus materials. Another basic type of verbal irony, ironic praise (i.e., mock negative evaluation of positive circumstances) is largely absent from studies on individuals' aptitude to detect verbal irony. However, it can be argued that ironic praise needs to be considered in order to investigate the detection of irony in the variety of its facets. To explore whether the detection ironic praise has a benefit beyond ironic criticism, three studies were conducted. In Study 1, an instrument (Test of Verbal Irony Detection Aptitude; TOVIDA) was constructed and its factorial structure was tested using N = 311 subjects. The TOVIDA contains 26 scenario-based items and contains two scales for the detection of ironic criticism vs. ironic praise. To validate the measurement method, the two scales of the TOVIDA were experimentally evaluated with N = 154 subjects in Study 2. In Study 3, N = 183 subjects were tested to explore personality and ability correlates of the two TOVIDA scales. Results indicate that the co-variance between the ironic TOVIDA items was organized by two inter-correlated but distinct factors: one representing ironic praise detection aptitude and one representing ironic criticism detection aptitude. Experimental validation showed that the TOVIDA items truly contain irony and that item scores reflect irony detection. Trait bad mood and benevolent humor (as a facet of the sense of humor) were found as joint correlates for both ironic criticism and ironic praise detection scores. In contrast, intelligence, trait cheerfulness, and corrective humor were found as unique correlates of ironic praise detection scores, even when statistically controlling for the aptitude to detect ironic criticism. Our results indicate that the aptitude to detect ironic praise can be seen as distinct from the aptitude to detect ironic criticism. Generating

  10. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, to avoid iron overload and T-cell activation, it seems that recipients of cardiac transplantations should not be treated with intravenous iron preparations.

  11. Iron Curtains ?

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Vlček

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the emotional and multi-sensorial dimensions of care within a transnational family separated by the Iron Curtain during the Cold War. It will argue that processes of supportive and compassionate engagement amongst transnational kin are not only shaped by long-distance communication, financial support and practical help within specific political and economic contexts, but also by personal desires and interpersonal conflict. The dialectics of proximity and distance are explo...

  12. Iron and Prochlorococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    some cyanobacteria has been investigated through culture-based and genomic approaches (Ferreira and Straus, 1994; Katoh et al, 2001; Kutzki, 1998...numerically abundant marine cyanobacterium, Prochlorococcus. With its minimal genome and ubiquity in the global ocean, Prochlorococcus represents a model...then examined the molecular basis for the ability of MIT9313 to grow at lower iron concentrations than MED4 by assessing whole- genome transcription

  13. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  14. Iron homeostasis: new players, newer insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Eunice S; Bajel, Ashish; Chandy, Mammen

    2008-12-01

    Although iron is a relatively abundant element in the universe, it is estimated that more than 2 billion people worldwide suffer from iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency results in impaired production of iron-containing proteins, the most prominent of which is hemoglobin. Cellular iron deficiency inhibits cell growth and subsequently leads to cell death. Hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder results in disproportionate absorption of iron and the extra iron builds up in tissues resulting in organ damage. As both iron deficiency and iron overload have adverse effects, cellular and systemic iron homeostasis is critically important. Recent advances in the field of iron metabolism have led to newer understanding of the pathways involved in iron homeostasis and the diseases which arise from alteration in the regulators. Although insight into this complex regulation of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis has been obtained mainly through animal studies, it is most likely that this knowledge can be directly extrapolated to humans.

  15. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  16. Iron deficiency in the young athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, T W

    1990-10-01

    Although overt anemia is uncommon, depletion of body iron stores is common among adolescent female athletes. Poor dietary iron intake, menstruation, and increased iron losses associated with physical training all appear to be important factors. Whether nonanemic iron deficiency can impair exercise performance is uncertain. Nonetheless, athletes with low ferritin levels are at risk for impaired erythropoiesis and should receive therapeutic iron supplementation.

  17. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  18. Diagnostic Accuracy of Serum Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) in Iron Deficiency State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Naveed; Ijaz, Aamir; Rafi, Tariq; Haroon, Zujaja Hina; Bashir, Saima; Ayyub, Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum iron and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) in detection of iron deficiency. Descriptive, analytical study. Department of Chemical Pathology and Endocrinology, from January 2013 to October 2015. Data of 1,815 patients with results of serum iron, TIBC and ferritin from January 2013 to October 2015 was retrieved from Laboratory information System (LIMS) of AFIP. Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (STARD) guidelines were followed. Subjects of either gender, aged 1 - 68 years were included. Cases with raised serum ferritin levels (male > 336 ng/ml, female > 307 ng/ml) were excluded. Serum Ferritin was taken as gold standard with specificity of 99% and sensitivity of 80% at concentration of 30 ng/ml. Transferrin saturation was determined by dividing serum iron by TIBC and multiplying by 100. Out of 1,815 subjects, 931 (51.29%) were males and 884 (48.71%) were females. The median age of the patients were 29.1 years (Inter-quartile range, IQR 19.1). Taking ferritin as gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of serum iron was 63.5% and 38.6%, respectively; while that of TIBC was 64.5 % and 42.8%, respectively. Ferritin showed poor correlation with iron, TIBC and transferrin saturation. Serum iron and TIBC give no additional information in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and these tests are redundant for the diagnosis of iron deficiency state, if serum ferritin is available.

  19. The irony of iron -- biogenic iron oxides as an iron source to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eEmerson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  20. Iron in Skin of Mice with Three Etiologies of Systemic Iron Overload

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    In human hemochromatosis, tissue toxicity is a function of tissue iron levels. Despite reports of skin toxicity in hemochromatosis, little is known about iron levels in skin of individuals with systemic iron overload. We measured skin iron and studied skin histology in three mouse models of systemic iron overload: mice with a deletion of the hemochromatosis (Hfe) gene, mice fed a high iron diet, and mice given parenteral injections of iron. In Hfe−/− mice, iron content in the epidermis and de...

  1. Pathogenic Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency and Iron Overload: New Insights for Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Kotze, MJ; van Velden, DP; van Rensburg, SJ; Erasmus, R

    2009-01-01

    Iron uptake, utilisation, release and storage occur at the gene level. Individuals with variant forms of genes involved in iron metabolism may have different requirements for iron and are likely to respond differently to the same amount of iron in the diet, a concept termed nutrigenetics. Iron deficiency, iron overload and the anemia of inflammation are the commonest iron-related disorders. While at least four types of hereditary iron overload have been identified to date, our knowledge of th...

  2. Iron and Ferritin Levels in Saliva of Patients with Thalassemia and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Canatan, Duran; Akdeniz, Sevgi Kosaci

    2012-01-01

    Most of the techniques for measuring iron stores such as serum iron concentration, iron binding capacity, serum ferritin level, liver biopsy can be troublesome or invasive for patients with thalassemia. The salivary iron measurement could be of potential advantage being an easy and non invasive approach for diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron overload . The aim of this study was to compare the levels of iron and ferritin in saliva and serum of patients affected by thalassemia or iron defici...

  3. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blo...

  4. Iron fortification and iron supplementation are cost-effective interventions to reduce iron deficiency in four subregions of the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Knai; M. Sharan; R.M.P.M. Baltussen (Rob)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIron deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional disorder in the world, affecting millions of people in both nonindustrialized and industrialized countries. We estimated the costs, effects, and cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and iron

  5. Iron fortification and iron supplementation are cost-effective interventions to reduce iron deficiency in four subregions of the world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Knai; M. Sharan; R.M.P.M. Baltussen (Rob)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIron deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional disorder in the world, affecting millions of people in both nonindustrialized and industrialized countries. We estimated the costs, effects, and cost-effectiveness of iron supplementation and iron fortificati

  6. 46 CFR 56.60-10 - Cast iron and malleable iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron and malleable iron. 56.60-10 Section 56.60-10... APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-10 Cast iron and malleable iron. (a) The low ductility of cast iron and malleable iron should be recognized and the use of these metals where shock loading may occur should...

  7. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  8. Chemiluminescence of iron-chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Toshimasa; Ohno, Osamu; Kotake, Tomohiko; Igarashi, Shukuro

    2005-01-01

    The iron-chlorophyllin complex was found to be chemiluminescent (CL) in an acetonitrile (22%)/water mixed solvent. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, when iron-chlorophyllin was added to the mixed solvent, a sharp CL signal immediately appeared. Also, analysis of the absorption spectra revealed decomposition of iron-chlorophyllin (based on decrease in absorbance at 396 nm), hence iron-chlorophyllin is the CL substance. Moreover, the CL intensity decreased in the presence of potassium thiocyanate (KSCN), indicating that the axial coordinative position of iron-chlorophyllin acts as a point of catalytic activation. In addition, when fluorophores were present with iron-chlorophyllin CL, their CL intensity values were similar to or greater than that of the well-known trichlorophenylperoxalate ester (TCPO) CL. Thus, during the decomposition reaction of iron-chlorophyllin, the latter transfers its energy to the coexisting fluorophores. Moreover, since the decomposed compound in this CL reaction had a fluorescence, it was found that the iron-chlorophyllin also functions as an energy donor. Therefore, the iron-chlorophyllin complex acts not only as a CL substance, but also as a catalyst and energy donor in the reaction.

  9. Phytases for Improved Iron Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial phytases (EC 3.1.3.8) catalyse dephosphorylation of phytic acid, which is the primary storage compound for phosphorous in cereal kernels. The negatively charged phosphates in phytic acid chelate iron (Fe3+) and thus retards iron bioavailability in humans 1. Supplementation of microbial...... phytase can improve iron absorption from cereal-based diets 2. In order for phytase to catalyse iron release in vivo the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. Our work has compared the robustness of five different microbial phytases, evaluating thermal stability...

  10. Retinoic acid and iron metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Sayal, Kirtimaan

    2014-01-01

    tuberculosis controlling molecules in the days to come. Iron has proven to be essential for pathogenesis of tuberculosis and retinoic acid is known to influence the iron metabolism pathway. Retenoic acid is also known to exhibit antitubercular effect in in vivo system. Therefore there is every possibility...... that retinoic acid by affecting the iron metabolism pathway exhibits its antimycobacterial effect. These aspects are reviewed in the present manuscript for understanding the antimycobacterial role of retinoic acid in the context of iron metabolism and other immunological aspects....

  11. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  12. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yılmaz Keskin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Demir, oksijenin taşınması, DNA sentezi ve hücre çoğalması gibi çeşitli biyolojik reaksiyonlar için vazgeçilmez olduğundan, yaşam için zorunludur. Demir metabolizması ve bu elementin düzenlenmesiyle ilgili bilgilerimiz, son yıllarda belirgin şekilde değişmiştir. Demir metabolizması ile ilgili yeni bozukluklar tanımlanmış ve demirin başka bozuklukların kofaktörü olduğu anlaşılmaya başlamıştır. Hemokromatozis ve demir tedavisine dirençli demir eksikliği anemisi (IRIDA; “iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia” gibi genetik durumlar üzerinde yapılan çalışmalar, vücuttaki demir dengesini kontrol eden moleküler mekanizmalar ile ilgili önemli ipuçları sunmuştur. Bu ilerlemeler, gelecekte, hem genetik hem de kazanılmış demir bozukluklarının daha etkili şekilde tedavi edilmesi amacıyla kullanılabilir. IRIDA, demir eksikliği ile giden durumlarda, hepsidin üretimini baskılayan matriptaz-2’yi kodlayan TMPRSS6 genindeki mutasyonlardan kaynaklanmaktadır. Hastalığın tipik özellikleri, hipokrom, mikrositer anemi, çok düşük ortalama eritrosit hacmi, oral demir tedavisine yanıtsızlık (veya yetersiz yanıt ve parenteral demire kısmi yanıttır. Klasik demir eksikliği anemisinin aksine, serum ferritin değeri genellikle hafif düşük ya da normal aralıkta; serum ve idrar hepsidin değerleri ise, aneminin derecesi ile orantısız şekilde yüksek bulunur. Şimdiye kadar literatürde bildirilmiş olguların sayısı 100’ü geçmediği halde, IRIDA’nın, “atipik” mikrositik anemilerin en sık nedeni olduğu düşünülmektedir. Bu derlemenin amacı, IRIDA hakkındaki güncel bilgileri araştırıcılar ile paylaşmak ve bu alandaki farkındalıklarını arttırmaktır.

  13. Nanosized Iron Oxide Colloids Strongly Enhance Microbial Iron Reduction▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Julian; Heister, Katja; Hofmann, Thilo; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant subsurface process. The rate-limiting bioavailability of the insoluble iron oxyhydroxides, however, is a topic for debate. Surface area and mineral structure are recognized as crucial parameters for microbial reduction rates of bulk, macroaggregate iron minerals. However, a significant fraction of iron oxide minerals in the subsurface is supposed to be present as nanosized colloids. We therefore studied the role of colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. In batch growth experiments with Geobacter sulfurreducens, colloids of ferrihydrite (hydrodynamic diameter, 336 nm), hematite (123 nm), goethite (157 nm), and akaganeite (64 nm) were added as electron acceptors. The colloidal iron oxides were reduced up to 2 orders of magnitude more rapidly (up to 1,255 pmol h−1 cell−1) than bulk macroaggregates of the same iron phases (6 to 70 pmol h−1 cell−1). The increased reactivity was not only due to the large surface areas of the colloidal aggregates but also was due to a higher reactivity per unit surface. We hypothesize that this can be attributed to the high bioavailability of the nanosized aggregates and their colloidal suspension. Furthermore, a strong enhancement of reduction rates of bulk ferrihydrite was observed when nanosized ferrihydrite aggregates were added. PMID:19915036

  14. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  15. Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present studies of the magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. By combining Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to measure the change from a Fe3O4-like to a gamma-Fe2O3-like composition from the interface to the surface. Furthermore, we have...

  16. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  17. measurements of iron status and survival in african iron overload

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iron status to diagnose this form of iron overload has not been clarified. Methods. ..... U-test and categorical variables were compared with the Fisher exact or the Pearson ..... 5eftel He, Keeley Iq, lsaacson C, BothweU TH. Siderosis in the ...

  18. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  20. Iron Meteorites and Upwelling in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, B. S.; Behr, E.; Mardon, A.; Behr, E.

    2016-09-01

    In Antarctica, a meteorite stranding zone, stone meteorites are more common than iron. Dr. Evatt's team suggests that the heat conductivity of iron may be opposing the upwelling effects so iron meteorites sink under the ice unlike the stone ones.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia A A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  2. Iron-based superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Peter D; Yin, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents an in-depth review of experimental and theoretical studies on the newly discovered Fe-based superconductors.  Following the Introduction, which places iron-based superconductors in the context of other unconventional superconductors, the book is divided into three sections covering sample growth, experimental characterization, and theoretical understanding.  To understand the complex structure-property relationships of these materials, results from a wide range of experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are described that probe the electronic and magnetic proper

  3. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    exothermic than that of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This suggests that enthalpy of crystallization in carbonate systems is ionic-size controlled, which may have significant implications in a wide variety of conditions, including geological sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.......Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  4. Reducing iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children: calcium and iron combined versus iron supplementation alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Melissa; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of combined calcium and iron versus single iron supplementation on iron status in Bolivian schoolchildren. Children ages 6 to 10 y old (N = 195), were randomly assigned to receive either 700 mg Ca (as calcium carbonate) plus 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Ca + Fe group) or 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Fe group). The doses were administered daily, from Monday to Friday, between meals at school over 3 mo. Iron status was assessed at baseline and after intervention. Additionally, overall nutritional status was assessed by anthropometry and an estimation of dietary intake. At baseline, the prevalence of anemia in the Ca + Fe group and the Fe group were 15% and 21.5%, respectively. After 3 mo follow-up, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia dropped significantly (P Iron dietary intake was within recommended levels, but calcium intake only covered 39% of the Recommended Daily Intake. Combined calcium and iron supplementation is equally as effective as single iron supplementation in reducing the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  6. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of iron preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisser, Peter; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2011-01-04

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3-4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC) are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II) (ferrous) salts or iron(III) (ferric) complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  7. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(Ⅲ) 3.6 Solidification morphology of SG iron Solidification morphology refers to the description of change,distribution and interrelationship of the solidification structures such as graphite spheroids,austenite,eutectic cells,etc.[99

  8. Hunting for Iron Ore Bargains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One of China’s leading steel mills has turned to smaller mines for long-term, lowcost iron ore supplies china’s oldest steel producer is looking to South America to fulfill its iron ore needs in the face of rising prices from

  9. Adsorptive Iron Removal from Groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron is commonly present in groundwater worldwide. The presence of iron in drinking water is not harmful to human health, however it is undesirable because of the associated aesthetic and operational problems, namely: bad taste, colour, stains on laundry and plumbing fixtures, and aftergrowth in the

  10. Adsorptive iron removal from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron is commonly present in groundwater worldwide. The presence of iron in the water supply is not harmful to human health, however it is undesirable. Bad taste, discoloration, staining, deposition in the distribution system leading to aftergrowth, and incidences of high turbidity are some

  11. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  12. Iron deficiency in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Cortés

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Blood donation results in a substantial loss of iron (200 to 250 mg at each bleeding procedure (425 to 475 ml and subsequent mobilization of iron from body stores. Recent reports have shown that body iron reserves generally are small and iron depletion is more frequent in blood donors than in non-donors. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors and to establish the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors according to sex, whether they were first-time or multi-time donors. Design: From march 20 to April 5, 2004, three hundred potential blood donors from Hemocentro del Café y Tolima Grande were studied. Diagnostic tests: Using a combination of biochemical measurements of iron status: serum ferritin (RIA, ANNAR and the hemoglobin pre and post-donation (HEMOCUE Vital technology medical . Results: The frequency of iron deficiency in potential blood donors was 5%, and blood donors accepted was 5.1%; in blood donors rejected for low hemoglobin the frequency of iron deficiency was 3.7% and accepted blood donors was 1.7% in male and 12.6% in female. The frequency of iron deficiency was higher in multi-time blood donors than in first-time blood donors, but not stadistic significative. Increase nivel accepted hemoglobina in 1 g/dl no incidence in male; in female increase of 0.5 g/dl low in 25% blood donors accepted with iron deficiency, but increased rejected innecesary in 16.6% and increased is 1 g/dl low blood donors female accepted in 58% (7/12, but increased the rejected innecesary in 35.6%. Conclusions: We conclude that blood donation not is a important factor for iron deficiency in blood donors. The high frequency of blood donors with iron deficiency found in this study suggests a need for a more accurate laboratory trial, as hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement alone is not sufficient for detecting and excluding blood donors with iron deficiency without anemia, and ajustes hacia

  13. Responsiveness to parenteral iron therapy in children with oral iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Mehmet; Atay, Enver; Oztekin, Osman; Karadeniz, Cem; Karakus, Yasin Tugrul; Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdogan, Firat

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous (IV) ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are used for treating Fe deficiency in children with iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA). An optimal treatment has yet to be determined. There are relatively little publications on the responsiveness to IV iron therapy in children with IRIDA. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy given to 11 children, ranging in age from 2 to 13 years (mean 4.8 years), with iron-deficiency anemia who were unresponsive to oral iron therapy. The hemoglobin and ferritin values (mean) of the 11 children with IRIDA were 7.7 g/dL and 4.8 ng/mL at diagnosis. Both hemoglobin and ferritin levels increased to 9.5 g/dL, and 24 ng/mL, respectively, at 6 weeks after the first therapy. Although the level of hemoglobin was steady at 6 months after the first, and 6 weeks after the second therapy, the ferritin levels continued to increase up to 30 ng/mL and 47 ng/mL at 6 months after the first and 6 weeks after the second therapy, respectively. We recommend that IRIDA should be considered in patients presenting with iron-deficiency anemia of unknown cause that is unresponsive to oral iron therapy. Our results suggest that IV iron therapy should be administered only once in cases of IRIDA. Continued administration of IV iron would be of no benefit to increase hemoglobin levels. On the contrary, ferritin levels may continue to increase resulting in untoward effects of hyperferritinemia.

  14. Comparative study of oral iron and intravenous iron sucrose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Garg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of iron sucrose with oral iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia of pregnancy. Methods: An interventional comparative study was conducted at Jhalawar Medical College, Jhalawar involving 80 pregnant women with iron deficiency anemia from March 2016 to August 2016. Inclusion criteria were gestational age between 24-32 weeks with established iron deficiency anemia, with hemoglobin between 7-10g/dl. Target Hemoglobin was 11 g/dl. In intravenous iron sucrose group iron sucrose dose was calculated from following formula: total iron dose required (mg = 2.4 x body weight in Kg x (target Hb – Patient’s Hb g/dl + 500. In oral iron, group patient received ferrous-sulphate 335 mg daily BD. Hb level were reviewed at 2, 4, 6 weeks. Results: Change in Hemoglobin level from baseline significantly higher in IV iron group than oral iron group. In IV iron, group mean value of baseline Hb was 8.07±0.610 g/dl and in oral iron group was 8.48±0.741 g/dl. At the end of 6-week mean hemoglobin in IV iron sucrose was 10.66±0.743 g/dl and in oral iron group was 10.08±0.860 g/dl. Conclusions: Intravenous iron sucrose elevates more Hb than oral iron, with less adverse effects.

  15. Pathology of hepatic iron overload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yves Deugnier; Bruno Turlin

    2007-01-01

    Although progress in imaging and genetics allow for a noninvasive diagnosis of most cases of genetic iron overload, liver pathology remains often useful (1) to assess prognosis by grading fibrosis and seeking for associated lesions and (2) to guide the etiological diagnosis, especially when no molecular marker is available.Then, the type of liver siderosis (parenchymal, mesenchymal or mixed) and its distribution throughout the lobule and the liver are useful means for suggesting its etiology: HLA-linked hemochromatosis gene (HFE) hemochromatosis or other rare genetic hemochromatosis,nonhemochromatotic genetic iron overload (ferroportin disease, aceruloplasminemia), or iron overload secondary to excessive iron supply, inflammatory syndrome,noncirrhotic chronic liver diseases including dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome, cirrhosis, and blood disorders.

  16. Iron and Mechanisms of Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A. Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of transition metals (e.g., copper, zinc, and iron and the dysregulation of their metabolism are a hallmark in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. This paper will be focused on the mechanism of neurotoxicity mediated by iron. This metal progressively accumulates in the brain both during normal aging and neurodegenerative processes. High iron concentrations in the brain have been consistently observed in Alzheimer's (AD and Parkinson's (PD diseases. In this connection, metalloneurobiology has become extremely important in establishing the role of iron in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed several protective mechanisms against oxidative stress, among them, the activation of cellular signaling pathways. The final response will depend on the identity, intensity, and persistence of the oxidative insult. The characterization of the mechanisms mediating the effects of iron-induced increase in neuronal dysfunction and death is central to understanding the pathology of a number of neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Microbial acquisition of iron from ferric iron bearing minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, L.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sposito, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Iron is a universal requirement for all life forms. Although the fourth most abundant element in the geosphere, iron is virtually insoluble at physiological pH in oxidizing environments, existing mainly as very insoluble oxides and hydroxides. Currently it is not understood how iron is solubilized and made available for biological use. This research project addressed this topic by conducting a series of experiments that utilized techniques from both soil microbiology and mineral surface geochemistry. Microbiological analysis consisted of the examination of metabolic and physiological responses to mineral iron supplements. At the same time mineral surfaces were examined for structural changes brought about by microbially mediated dissolution. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (1) bacterial siderophores were able to promote the dissolution of iron oxides, (2) that strict aerobic microorganisms may use anaerobic processes to promote iron oxide dissolution, and (3) that it is possible to image the surface of iron oxides undergoing microbial dissolution.

  18. The Regulation of Iron Absorption and Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element in biology, required for numerous cellular processes. Either too much or too little iron can be detrimental, and organisms have developed mechanisms for balancing iron within safe limits. In mammals there are no controlled mechanisms for the excretion of excess iron, hence body iron homeostasis is regulated at the sites of absorption, utilisation and recycling. This review will discuss the discoveries that have been made in the past 20 years into advancing our understanding of iron homeostasis and its regulation. The study of iron-associated disorders, such as the iron overload condition hereditary haemochromatosis and various forms of anaemia have been instrumental in increasing our knowledge in this area, as have cellular and animal model studies. The liver has emerged as the major site of systemic iron regulation, being the location where the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin is produced. Hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron absorption and recycling, achieving this by binding to the only known cellular iron exporter ferroportin and causing its internalisation and degradation, thereby reducing iron efflux from target cells and reducing serum iron levels. Much of the research in the iron metabolism field has focussed on the regulation of hepcidin and its interaction with ferroportin. The advances in this area have greatly increased our knowledge of iron metabolism and its regulation and have led to the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for iron-associated disorders.

  19. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the

  20. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-07

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence.

  1. Iron Curtains ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vlček

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the emotional and multi-sensorial dimensions of care within a transnational family separated by the Iron Curtain during the Cold War. It will argue that processes of supportive and compassionate engagement amongst transnational kin are not only shaped by long-distance communication, financial support and practical help within specific political and economic contexts, but also by personal desires and interpersonal conflict. The dialectics of proximity and distance are explored through a focus on uses of communication technology, emotional interaction during visits, long-distance engagement through distinct sensorial experiences, and imaginary interaction through the dynamics of internalised presence. The auto/biographical analysis is mainly based on letters, faxes, diaries, interviews and personal memories.

  2. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  3. Iron bromide vapor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  4. Iron metabolism in burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, J A; Ibáñez, L; Ras, M R; Aulesa, C; Vinzo, J; Iglesias, J; Carol, J

    1999-07-01

    The administration of iron supplementation in children with burns has been a subject of controversy. Recent studies argue against its use in the acute phase of stress. To assess whether iron metabolism parameters show significant differences in the acute phase and the recovery phase of burn, 21 patients (age range: 17 months to 13 years) with burns of more than 10% of body surface who had not received blood transfusions or iron supplementation were studied. Sideraemia, ferritin, transferrin, transferrin saturation index (TSI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed both in the acute and the recovery phase after burn. Sideraemia, transferrin, and TSI were significantly lower in the acute than in the recovery phase (17.3 +/- 3 vs 53.8 +/- 6.6 microg/dL, 190.5 +/- 15 vs 287.9 +/- 14.3 mg/dL and 7.7 +/- 1.3 vs 15.4 +/- 1.6%, P 1.5 vs 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg/dL, P = 0.016 and P 2 years), the observed differences persisted. Hyposideraemia is a frequent finding in the acute phase of paediatric burns and is accompanied by increased ferritin levels and decreased transferrin concentrations. The low iron values tend to recover without the use of iron supplementation suggesting an endogenous block of iron release in the acute phase and indicates that iron therapy should be not recommended in the initial period of stress of the burned patient.

  5. Oxidative potential (OP) and mineralogy of iron ore particulate matter at the Gol-E-Gohar Mining and Industrial Facility (Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Naghmeh; Keshavarzi, Behnam; Sorooshian, Armin; Moore, Farid; Dunster, Christina; Dominguez, Ana Oliete; Kelly, Frank J; Dhakal, Prakash; Ahmadi, Mohamad Reza; Asadi, Sina

    2017-03-09

    Concentrations of total suspended particulate matter, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter iron ore PM. Accessory minerals are quartz, dolomite, hematite, actinolite, biotite, albite, nimite, laumontite, diopside, and muscovite. The scanning electron microscope structure of fibrous-elongated minerals revealed individual fibers in the range of 1.5 nm to 71.65 µm in length and 0.2 nm to 3.7 µm in diameter. The presence of minerals related to respiratory diseases, such as talc, crystalline silica, and needle-shaped minerals like amphibole asbestos (tremolite and actinolite), strongly suggests the need for detailed health-based studies in the region. The particulate samples show low to medium oxidative potential per unit of mass, in relation to an urban road side control, being more reactive with ascorbate than with glutathione or urate. However, the PM oxidative potential per volume of air is exceptionally high, confirming that the workers are exposed to a considerable oxidative environment. PM released by iron ore mining and processing activities should be considered a potential health risk to the mine workers and nearby employees, and strategies to combat the issue are suggested.

  6. Environmental association of iron minerals and iron concentrations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    Iron minerals namely hematite and goethite were found in soils from the study area but only ... The use of multivariate analyses in understanding different physical ..... Analyzing Plant Tissue Samples, In; Soil Testing and. Plant Analysis, 3rd Ed.

  7. Bioavailability of iron speciations and EDTA-iron complexes for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selin

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... extraction in 90% acetone and held at 4°C, 24 h in the dark. Parsons ..... Confirmation of iron limitation of phytoplankton photosynthesis in the equatorial .... determination of marine plant pigments, with revised equations for.

  8. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  9. Austempered ductile iron process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, C. D.; Keough, J. R.; Pramstaller, D. M.

    1986-11-01

    Pressure from imports and material substitution has severly affected demand for domestic iron industry products. It is estimated that the potential market for Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) is as large as the market for carburized and/or through hardened forgings. The primary interest in ADI is generated by the economics of process. Improved machinability and reduced processing costs as well as interesting physical properties has created an enormous interest in all metalworking industries towards ADI. The development of gas-fired austempering processes and resoluton of technical and economic uncertainities concerning the process will help improve the outlook for iron founderies.

  10. Technology of Iron Carbide Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bahgat

    2006-01-01

    Iron carbides are very promising metallurgical products and can be used for steelmaking process, where it plays as an alternative raw material with significant economic advantages. Also it has many other applications,e.g. catalysts, magnets, sensors. The present review investigates the different properties and uses of the iron carbides. The commercial production and the different varieties for the iron carbides synthesis (gaseous carburization, mechanochemical synthesis, laser pyrolysis, plasma pyrolysis, chemical vapor deposition and ion implantation) were reviewed. Also the effect of different factors on the carburization process like gas composition, raw material, temperature, reaction time, catalyst presence and sulfur addition was indicated.

  11. Magnetic study of iron sorbitol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, F.J. E-mail: osoro@posta.unizar.es; Larrea, A.; Abadia, A.R.; Romero, M.S

    2002-09-01

    A magnetic study of iron sorbitol, an iron-containing drug to treat the iron deficiency anemia is presented. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the system contains nanometric particles with an average diameter of 3 nm whose composition is close to two-line ferrihydrite. The characterisation by magnetisation and AC susceptibility measurements indicates superparamagnetic behaviour with progressive magnetic blocking starting at 8 K. The quantitative analysis of the magnetic results indicates that the system consists of an assembly of very small magnetic moments, presumably originated by spin uncompensation of the antiferromagnetic nanoparticles, with Arrhenius type magnetic dynamics.

  12. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... equivalent of: (1) 100 milligrams (mg) of elemental iron derived from: (i) Ferric hydroxide; (ii) Ferric oxide; or (iii) Elemental iron. (2) 200 mg of elemental iron derived from ferric hydroxide. (b) Sponsors... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron injection. 522.1182 Section 522.1182 Food...

  13. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the mag...

  14. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  15. Iron excess in recreational marathon runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettler, S.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Iron deficiency and anemia may impair athletic performance, and iron supplements are commonly consumed by athletes. However, iron overload should be avoided because of the possible long-term adverse health effects. Methods: We investigated the iron status of 170 male and

  16. Placental iron uptake and its regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bierings (Marc)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIron transport in pregnancy is an active one-way process, from mother to fetus. Early in gestation fetal iron needs are low, and so is trans-placental transport, but as erythropoiesis develops, rising fetal iron needs are met by trans-placental iron transport. Apparently, the fetus is pr

  17. Iron excess in recreational marathon runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettler, S.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Iron deficiency and anemia may impair athletic performance, and iron supplements are commonly consumed by athletes. However, iron overload should be avoided because of the possible long-term adverse health effects. Methods: We investigated the iron status of 170 male and femal

  18. Petrography, alteration and genesis of iron mineralization in Roshtkhar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Biabangard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Iron mineralization in Roshtkhar is located in 48 Km east of the city of Roshtkhar and south of the Khorasan Razavi province. It is geologically located in the north east of the Lut block and the Khaf-Bardeskan volcano-plutonic belt. The Khaf-Bardeskan belt is an important metallogenic province since it is a host of valuable ore deposits such as the Kuh-e-Zar Au-Spicularite, the Tanourcheh and the Khaf Iron ore deposits (Karimpour and Malekzadeh Shafaroudi, 2007. Iron and Copper mineralization in this belt are known as the hydrothermal, skarn and IOCG types (Karimpour and Malekzadeh Shafaroudi, 2007. IOCG deposits are a new type of magmatic to hydrothermal mineralization in the continental crust (Hitzman et al., 1992. Precambrian marble, Lower Paleozoic schist and metavolcanics are the oldest rocks of the area. The younger units are Oligocene conglomerate, shale and sandstone, Miocene marl and Quaternary deposits. Iron oxides and Cu sulfides are associated with igneous rocks. Fe and Cu mineralization in Roshtkhar has been subject of a few studies such as Yousefi Surani (2006. This study describes the petrography of the host rocks, ore paragenesis, alteration types, geochemistry, genesis and other features of the Fe and Cu mineralization in the Roshtkhar iron. Methods After detailed field studies and sampling, 30 thin sections and 20 polished sections that were prepared from host rocks and ores were studied by conventional petrographic and mineraloghraphic methods in the geology department of the University of Sistan and Baluchestan. 5 samples from the alteration zones were examined by XRD in the Yamagata University in Japan, and 8 samples from the less altered ones were analyzed by XRF and ICP-OES in the Kharazmi University and the Iranian mineral processing research center (IMPRC in Karaj, respectively. The XRF and ICP-OES data are presented in Table 1. Result and discussion The host rocks of the Roshtkhar Iron deposit are diorite

  19. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or Reductive Iron Assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies...

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  1. Directly observed iron supplementation for control of iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Bairwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is major public health problem affecting 1.6 billion people worldwide. The poor compliance of iron supplementation remains main contributor for high prevalence of anemia. The current paper reviewed the effectiveness of direct observation of oral iron supplementation on anemia. A systematic search was performed through electronic databases and local libraries. Search strategies used subject headings and key words “directly observed” and “iron supplementation.” Searches were sought through April 2014. A total of 14 articles were included in the study. Findings were presented in three categories. First, all of those reported an improvement in compliance of iron supplementation. Second, reduction in the prevalence of anemia was reported by all and third, all except one reported increased blood hemoglobin level. Directly observed an iron supplementation is an effective approach for prevention and management of anemia in vulnerable groups. However, larger trials are needed before concluding that scaling up directly observed iron supplementation through community health volunteers would be beneficial.

  2. Iron metabolism in the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weina Kong; Xianglin Duan; Zhenhua Shi; Yanzhong Chang

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of body iron homeostasis requires the coordination of multiple regulatory mechanisms of iron metabolism.The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS,composed of monocytes,macrophages,and their precursor cells) is crucial in the maintenance of iron homeostasis.Recycling of iron is carried out by specialized macrophages via engulfment of aged erythrocytes.The iron stores of macrophages depend on the levels of recovered and exported iron.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis in macrophages are poorly understood.Recent studies characterizing the function and regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nrampl),divalent metal transporter 1 (DMTI),HLA-linked hemechromatosis gene (HFE),ferroportin 1 (FPN1),and hepcidin are rapidly expanding our knowledge on the molecular level of MPS iron handling.These studies are deepening our understanding about the molecular mechanism of iron homeostasis and iron-related diseases.

  3. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  4. Hyperferritinaemia in the absence of iron overload

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, J.; Mumford, A.; Lindsay, J; Hegde, U; Hagan, M; Hawkins, J.

    1997-01-01

    Background—Serum ferritin is normally a marker of iron overload. Ferritin genes are sited at chromosomes 19 and 11. Regulation of ferritin synthesis involves an interaction between an iron regulatory protein (IRP) and part of the ferritin mRNA designated the iron regulatory element (IRE). A disorder of ferritin synthesis resulting in hyperferritinaemia in the absence of iron overload has been described recently. 
Patients and methods—Hyperferriti- naemia in the absence of iron ove...

  5. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF.

  6. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    OpenAIRE

    Susanna Burckhardt; Peter Geisser

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under...

  7. Iron pnictide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegel, Marcus Christian

    2011-03-22

    The scope of this dissertation therefore has not only been the synthesis of various new superconducting and non-superconducting iron pnictides of several structural families but also their in-depth crystallographic and physical characterisation. In Chapters 3 - 6, the family of the ZrCuSiAs-type (1111) compounds is subject of discussion. The solid solution series La(Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x})PO is analysed regarding magnetic and superconducting properties and the new compounds EuMnPF and REZnPO, as well as the new superconductor parent compound SrFeAsF are presented. Chapters 7 - 9 are dedicated to the new iron arsenide superconductors of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type (122 family). Therein, also the discovery of the first superconductor in this structural family, Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, is unveiled. A detailed examination of the complete solid solution series (Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is presented. Moreover, the crystallographic phase transitions of the closely related compounds SrFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are characterised and the superconductors Sr{sub 1-x}K{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and Ca{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are examined for magnetic and phononic excitations. In Chapter 10, the redetermined crystal structure of the superconductor Fe(Se{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}) (11-type) is presented from a chemist's point of view. Chapters 11 - 14 look into the superconducting and non-superconducting iron arsenides of more complex structural families (32522-type and 21311-type). Therein, crystallographic and magnetic details of Sr{sub 3}Sc{sub 2}O{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are presented and Ba{sub 2}ScO{sub 3}FeAs and Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs, the first two members of the new 21311-type are portrayed. Sr{sub 2}CrO{sub 3}FeAs is looked at in close detail with various methods, so e.g. the spin structure of the magnetically ordered compound is solved and a possible reason for the absence of superconductivity in this compound

  8. Streamlining Iron and Steel Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Eliminating unproductive iron and steel facilities is vital to environmental protection and sustainable development of this industry The Chinese Government is once again shutting down unproductive plants in tune with its green policy and the march toward sustainable development.This time it’s the iron and steel industry to feel the brunt of the Chinese Government’s stringent measures. The deafening buzz of factory floors have

  9. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  10. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  11. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  12. [Iron metabolism, overview and recent insights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, S; Feki, M; Kaabachi, N

    2006-01-01

    The paper is an up to date overview of knowledge on iron metabolism that integrate recent findings in this field. Significant advances were made in understanding the implication of protein factors (transporters, enzymes and regulation factors) in iron metabolism, as well as related genetic abnormalities. The research highlighted the complexity of mechanisms in charge of maintaining equilibrium of Fe in the body. The iron is vital to the life of cells, but its presence in excess is rather toxic. Iron is mostly required for hemoglobin synthesis. It is recycled between reticulo-endothelial macrophages and bone marrow that is the main user of iron. Intestinal absorption is a key step in determining iron capital in the body. Its rate is tightly controlled by several factors that act under influence of signals of unknown nature, which indicate iron needs and storage. The IRP/IRE (iron regulatory protein/iron responsive element) system controls cellular uptake, stores and exportation of iron, and heme synthesis. Mitochondrion is a dynamo of iron metabolism, being vital for heme synthesis and iron sulphur cluster genesis. The recent discovery of several mitochondrial proteins involved in iron metabolism resulted in better understanding mitochondrial iron movement, storage and exchange. Nevertheless, much remains to be known on the role of some actors such as HFE protein, hepcidin, hemojuvelin and transferrin receptor 2, and to determine the nature and mechanisms of signals regulating iron level in the body.

  13. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F W Giacobbe

    2003-03-01

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly different from a more typical Chandrasekhar mass limit approach. This technique produced a maximum stellar iron core mass value of 2.69 × 1030 kg (1.35 solar masses). This mass value is very near to the typical mass values found for neutron stars in a recent survey of actual neutron star masses. Although slightly lower and higher neutron star masses may also be found, lower mass neutron stars are believed to be formed as a result of enhanced iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large stars. And, higher mass neutron stars are likely to be formed as a result of fallback or accretion of additional matter after an initial collapse event involving an iron core having a mass no greater than 2.69 × 1030 kg.

  14. Ferritins: furnishing proteins with iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Justin M; Le Brun, Nick E; Moore, Geoffrey R

    2016-03-01

    Ferritins are a superfamily of iron oxidation, storage and mineralization proteins found throughout the animal, plant, and microbial kingdoms. The majority of ferritins consist of 24 subunits that individually fold into 4-α-helix bundles and assemble in a highly symmetric manner to form an approximately spherical protein coat around a central cavity into which an iron-containing mineral can be formed. Channels through the coat at inter-subunit contact points facilitate passage of iron ions to and from the central cavity, and intrasubunit catalytic sites, called ferroxidase centers, drive Fe(2+) oxidation and O2 reduction. Though the different members of the superfamily share a common structure, there is often little amino acid sequence identity between them. Even where there is a high degree of sequence identity between two ferritins there can be major differences in how the proteins handle iron. In this review we describe some of the important structural features of ferritins and their mineralized iron cores, consider how iron might be released from ferritins, and examine in detail how three selected ferritins oxidise Fe(2+) to explore the mechanistic variations that exist amongst ferritins. We suggest that the mechanistic differences reflect differing evolutionary pressures on amino acid sequences, and that these differing pressures are a consequence of different primary functions for different ferritins.

  15. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  16. [Genetics of hereditary iron overload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Fergelot, Patricia; Mosser, Jean; David, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    The classification of hereditary abnormalities of iron metabolism was recently expanded and diversified. Genetic hemochromatosis now corresponds to six diseases, namely classical hemochromatosis HFE 1; juvenile hemochromatosis HFE 2 due to mutations in an unidentified gene on chromosome 1; hemochromatosis HFE 3 due to mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2); hemochromatosis HFE 4 caused by a mutation in the H subunit of ferritin; and hemochromatosis HFE 6 whose gene is hepcidine (HAMP). Systemic iron overload is also associated with aceruloplasminemia, atransferrinemia and the "Gracile" syndrome caused by mutations in BCS1L. The genes responsible for neonatal and African forms of iron overload are unknown. Other genetic diseases are due to localized iron overload: Friedreich's ataxia results from the expansion of triple nucleotide repeats within the frataxin (FRDA) gene; two forms of X-linked sideroblastic anemia are due to mutations within the delta aminolevulinate synthetase (ALAS 2) or ABC-7 genes; Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is caused by a pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK-2) defect; neuroferritinopathies; and hyperferritinemia--cataract syndrome due to a mutation within the L-ferritin gene. In addition to this wide range of genetic abnormalities, two other features characterize these iron disorders: 1) most are transmitted by an autosomal recessive mechanism, but some, including hemochromatosis type 4, have dominant transmission; and 2) most correspond to cytosolic iron accumulation while some, like Friedreich's ataxia, are disorders of mitochondrial metabolism.

  17. In vitro bioavailability of iron from the heme analogue sodium iron chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret, Silvia; Tascioglu, Serpil; van der Burg, Monique; Frenken, Leon; Klaffke, Werner

    2010-01-27

    The use of heme analogues from vegetable origin could provide an alternative iron source of potentially high bioavailability. Sodium iron chlorophyllin is a water-soluble semisynthetic chlorophyll derivative where the magnesium in the porphyrin ring has been substituted by iron. We have used an in vitro model that combines gastric and intestinal digestion followed by intestinal iron uptake in Caco-2 cells to determine the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin. Our results demonstrate that sodium iron chlorophyllin is stable under simulated gastrointestinal conditions and is able to deliver bioavailable iron to Caco-2 cells. Similar to the heme, the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin is dependent on the food matrix, and it was inhibited by calcium. Potentially, sodium iron chlorophyllin could be used as an iron fortificant from vegetable origin with high bioavailability.

  18. Host iron status and iron supplementation mediate susceptibility to erythrocytic stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Martha A; Goheen, Morgan M; Fulford, Anthony; Prentice, Andrew M; Elnagheeb, Marwa A; Patel, Jaymin; Fisher, Nancy; Taylor, Steve M; Kasthuri, Raj S; Cerami, Carla

    2014-07-25

    Iron deficiency and malaria have similar global distributions, and frequently co-exist in pregnant women and young children. Where both conditions are prevalent, iron supplementation is complicated by observations that iron deficiency anaemia protects against falciparum malaria, and that iron supplements increase susceptibility to clinically significant malaria, but the mechanisms remain obscure. Here, using an in vitro parasite culture system with erythrocytes from iron-deficient and replete human donors, we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum infects iron-deficient erythrocytes less efficiently. In addition, owing to merozoite preference for young erythrocytes, iron supplementation of iron-deficient individuals reverses the protective effects of iron deficiency. Our results provide experimental validation of field observations reporting protective effects of iron deficiency and harmful effects of iron administration on human malaria susceptibility. Because recovery from anaemia requires transient reticulocytosis, our findings imply that in malarious regions iron supplementation should be accompanied by effective measures to prevent falciparum malaria.

  19. Iron deficiency and thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbro, A; Volken, T; Buser, A; Sigle, J P; Halter, J P; Passweg, J R; Tichelli, A; Infanti, L

    2017-01-01

    According to many textbooks, iron deficiency (ID) is associated with reactive thrombocytosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between serum ferritin levels and platelet counts in a large cohort of healthy blood donors. We included all whole blood and apheresis donors aged 18 years or older with at least one ferritin measurement and one platelet count performed at the same visit between 1996 and 2014. A total of 130 345 blood counts and ferritin measurements obtained from 22 046 healthy donors were analysed. Overall, no correlation between serum ferritin and platelet count was observed (r = -0.03, ρ = 0.04 for males, and r = 0.01, ρ = -0.02 for females, respectively). Associations remained clinically negligible after adjusting for age, time since previous blood donation, number of donations and restricting the analysis to ferritin deciles. In this large, retrospective single-centre study, correlations between low ferritin and platelet count in a large and homogeneous cohort of healthy donors were negligible. Further studies in patients with more severe anaemia and patients with inflammation are warranted. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Role of evaporitic sulfates in iron skarn mineralization: a fluid inclusion and sulfur isotope study from the Xishimen deposit, Handan-Xingtai district, North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guang; Bi, Shi-Jian; Li, Jian-Wei

    2017-04-01

    The Xishimen iron skarn deposit in the Handan-Xingtai district, North China Craton, contains 256 Mt @ 43 % Fe (up to 65 %). The mineralization is dominated by massive magnetite ore along the contact zone between the early Cretaceous Xishimen diorite stock and middle Ordovician dolomite and dolomitic limestones with numerous intercalations of evaporitic beds. Minor lenticular magnetite-dominated bodies also occur in the carbonate rocks proximal to the diorite stock. Hydrothermal alteration is characterized by extensive albitization within the diorite stock and extreme development of magnesian skarn along the contact zone consisting of diopside, forsterite, serpentine, tremolite, phlogopite, and talc. Magmatic quartz and amphibole from the diorite and hydrothermal diopside from the skarns contain abundant primary or pseudosecondary fluid inclusions, most of which have multiple daughter minerals dominated by halite, sylvite, and opaque phases. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser Raman spectrometry confirm that pyrrhotite is the predominant opaque phase in most fluid inclusions, in both the magmatic and skarn minerals. These fluid inclusions have total homogenization temperatures of 416-620 °C and calculated salinities of 42.4-74.5 wt% NaCl equiv. The fluid inclusion data thus document a high-temperature, high-salinity, ferrous iron-rich, reducing fluid exsolved from a cooling magma likely represented by the Xishimen diorite stock. Pyrite from the iron ore has δ34S values ranging from 14.0 to 18.6 ‰, which are significantly higher than typical magmatic values (δ34S = 0 ± 5 ‰). The sulfur isotope data thus indicate an external source for the sulfur, most likely from the evaporitic beds in the Ordovician carbonate sequences that have δ34S values of 24 to 29 ‰. We suggest that sulfates from the evaporitic beds have played a critically important role by oxidizing ferrous iron in the magmatic-hydrothermal fluid, leading to precipitation of massive

  1. Role of evaporitic sulfates in iron skarn mineralization: a fluid inclusion and sulfur isotope study from the Xishimen deposit, Handan-Xingtai district, North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guang; Bi, Shi-Jian; Li, Jian-Wei

    2016-08-01

    The Xishimen iron skarn deposit in the Handan-Xingtai district, North China Craton, contains 256 Mt @ 43 % Fe (up to 65 %). The mineralization is dominated by massive magnetite ore along the contact zone between the early Cretaceous Xishimen diorite stock and middle Ordovician dolomite and dolomitic limestones with numerous intercalations of evaporitic beds. Minor lenticular magnetite-dominated bodies also occur in the carbonate rocks proximal to the diorite stock. Hydrothermal alteration is characterized by extensive albitization within the diorite stock and extreme development of magnesian skarn along the contact zone consisting of diopside, forsterite, serpentine, tremolite, phlogopite, and talc. Magmatic quartz and amphibole from the diorite and hydrothermal diopside from the skarns contain abundant primary or pseudosecondary fluid inclusions, most of which have multiple daughter minerals dominated by halite, sylvite, and opaque phases. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser Raman spectrometry confirm that pyrrhotite is the predominant opaque phase in most fluid inclusions, in both the magmatic and skarn minerals. These fluid inclusions have total homogenization temperatures of 416-620 °C and calculated salinities of 42.4-74.5 wt% NaCl equiv. The fluid inclusion data thus document a high-temperature, high-salinity, ferrous iron-rich, reducing fluid exsolved from a cooling magma likely represented by the Xishimen diorite stock. Pyrite from the iron ore has δ34S values ranging from 14.0 to 18.6 ‰, which are significantly higher than typical magmatic values (δ34S = 0 ± 5 ‰). The sulfur isotope data thus indicate an external source for the sulfur, most likely from the evaporitic beds in the Ordovician carbonate sequences that have δ34S values of 24 to 29 ‰. We suggest that sulfates from the evaporitic beds have played a critically important role by oxidizing ferrous iron in the magmatic-hydrothermal fluid, leading to precipitation of massive

  2. Iron mineralization and associated skarn development around southern contact of the Eğrigöz pluton (northern Menderes Massif-Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uǧurcan, Okşan Gökçen; Oyman, Tolga

    2016-11-01

    The Eğrigöz pluton is located in the northern portion of the Menderes Massif, which is the largest known metamorphic core complex that is also characterized by large-scale extension. Kalkan and Karaağıl skarn deposits are located on the southern border of the Eğrigöz Pluton, whereas Katrandağ mineralization developed along the roof pendant. Skarnization in these three areas is associated with the peraluminous, I-type, calc-alkaline, high-K calc-alkaline Eğrigöz Pluton. Geochemical characteristics of the pluton indicate that it was generated in a continental arc setting. Kalkan, Karaağıl, and Katrandağ skarns are hosted in marble bands in two-mica gneiss of the Kalkan Formation, a locally dolomitic and clay-bearing limestone of the Arıkaya Formation and locally dolomitised limestone of the Balıkbaşı Formation, respectively. Skarn development occurred sequentially in two stages, prograde and retrograde. In Kalkan skarn, prograde stage is characterized by clinopyroxene (Di56-73 Hd26-43 Joh1-2), garnet (Adr45-69 Grs30-52 Alm0-1.4 Sps0.7-2.3), amphibole, and magnetite, whereas retrograde stage is dominated by epidote, amphibole, chlorite, quartz, and calcite. In Karaağıl, both calcic and magnesian skarn association occurred as a result of local variations in dolomite content in Arıkaya Formation. The prograde assemblage of magnesian skarn is composed chiefly of spinel, amphibole and olivine. These mineral assemblages were, partially or fully, altered to serpentine, talc, and chlorite during retrograde alteration. Mesh textures of the serpentine indicates that the serpentine was altered from olivine. Olivine was completely destroyed during retrograde alteration without relict grains remaining. Calcic skarn paragenesis include garnet (Grs36-80Adr20-62Alm0-2.2Sps0.2-2.6), clinopyroxene (Di81-92 Hd7-19 Jo0-1), and plagioclase, that belongs to the earlier stage, and amphibole of the retrograde stage. High grossular end member of the garnet probably

  3. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  4. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in l...

  5. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Mohammed M. Jan

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron def...

  6. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron def...

  7. Second international round robin for the quantification of serum non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron in patients with iron-overload disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, L. de; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Vorm, L.N. van der; Cabantchik, Z.I.; Evans, P.J.; Hod, E.A.; Brittenham, G.M.; Furman, Y.; Wojczyk, B.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Porter, J.B.; Mattijssen, V.E.; Biemond, B.J.; MacKenzie, M.A.; Origa, R.; Galanello, R.; Hider, R.C.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-transferrin-bound iron and its labile (redox active) plasma iron component are thought to be potentially toxic forms of iron originally identified in the serum of patients with iron overload. We compared ten worldwide leading assays (6 for non-transferrin-bound iron and 4 for labile plasma iron)

  8. Electrochemically fabricated zero-valent iron, iron-nickel, and iron-palladium nanowires for environmental remediation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, B Y; Hernandez, S C; Koo, B; Rheem, Y; Myung, N V

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse crystalline zero-valent iron, iron-nickel, iron-palladium nanowires were synthesised using template-directed electrodeposition methods. Prior to nanowire fabrication, alumina nanotemplates with controlled pore structure (e.g. pore diameter and porosity) were fabricated by anodising high purity aluminium foil in sulphuric acid. After fabrication of alumina nanotemplates, iron, iron-nickel and iron-palladium nanowires were electrodeposited within the pore structure. The dimensions of nanowires including diameter and length were precisely controlled by pore diameter of anodised alumina and deposition rate and time. The composition, crystal structure and orientation were controlled by adjusting electrodeposition parameters including applied current density and solution compositions.

  9. Investigation of the amount of dissolved iron in food cooked in Chinese iron pots and estimation of daily iron intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Y; Chen, Z G; Lei, H Q; Lu, M Q; Li, R; Li, L X

    1990-09-01

    The amount of dissolved iron in food cooked in Chinese iron pots and that in food cooked in aluminum, stainless steel, and clay pots were determined. It was found that the amount of dissolved iron in food cooked in Chinese iron pots was two to five times higher than that in food cooked in the other types of pots. According to the test results, the estimated increase in daily iron intake was about 14.5 mg for adults and 7.4 mg for children when Chinese iron pots were used.

  10. Iron deficiency and iron excess damage mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Patrick B; Knutson, Mitchell D; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Lee, Sonia; Xu, Yu; Viteri, Fernando E; Ames, Bruce N

    2002-02-19

    Approximately two billion people, mainly women and children, are iron deficient. Two studies examined the effects of iron deficiency and supplementation on rats. In study 1, mitochondrial functional parameters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage were assayed in iron-deficient (mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and increased levels of oxidants in polymorphonuclear-leukocytes, as assayed by dichlorofluorescein (P mitochondrial malfunction. Although excess iron has been known to cause oxidative damage, the observation of oxidant-induced damage to mitochondria from iron deficiency has been unrecognized previously. Untreated iron deficiency, as well as excessive-iron supplementation, are deleterious and emphasize the importance of maintaining optimal iron intake.

  11. Shigella Iron Acquisition Systems and their Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yahan; Murphy, Erin R

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Shigella within the host is strictly dependent on the ability of the pathogen to acquire essential nutrients, such as iron. As an innate immune defense against invading pathogens, the level of bio-available iron within the human host is maintained at exceeding low levels, by sequestration of the element within heme and other host iron-binding compounds. In response to sequestration mediated iron limitation, Shigella produce multiple iron-uptake systems that each function to facilitate the utilization of a specific host-associated source of nutrient iron. As a mechanism to balance the essential need for iron and the toxicity of the element when in excess, the production of bacterial iron acquisition systems is tightly regulated by a variety of molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the iron-uptake systems produced by Shigella species, their distribution within the genus, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their production.

  12. Hepcidin: regulation of the master iron regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Gautam; Wallace, Daniel F.; Subramaniam, V. Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient, is required for many diverse biological processes. The absence of a defined pathway to excrete excess iron makes it essential for the body to regulate the amount of iron absorbed; a deficiency could lead to iron deficiency and an excess to iron overload and associated disorders such as anaemia and haemochromatosis respectively. This regulation is mediated by the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin binds to the only known iron export protein, ferroportin (FPN), inducing its internalization and degradation, thus limiting the amount of iron released into the blood. The major factors that are implicated in hepcidin regulation include iron stores, hypoxia, inflammation and erythropoiesis. The present review summarizes our present knowledge about the molecular mechanisms and signalling pathways contributing to hepcidin regulation by these factors. PMID:26182354

  13. Fatal anaphylactic reaction to iron sucrose in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy can have serious deleterious effects for both mother and fetus. Parenteral iron therapy in iron-deficiency anemia is recommended in patients where oral iron therapy is ineffective due to malabsorption states and non-compliance. Compared to oral iron therapy, intravenous iron results in much more rapid resolution of iron-deficiency anemia with minimal adverse reactions. Iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile and is an alternative to other forms of parenteral iron therapy in correction of iron stores depletion. Immune mechanisms and iron agent releasing bioactive, partially unbound iron into the circulation, resulting in oxidative stress appears to cause severe adverse reactions. Although iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile in comparison to other parenteral iron preparations, this report highlights a fatal anaphylactic shock to iron sucrose in a pregnant woman with severe iron deficiency non-compliant to oral iron therapy.

  14. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delu eSong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich’s ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD.

  15. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    By Zhou Jiyang; Professor

    2011-01-01

    5.5 Eutectic crystallisation of white iron When undercooled below the eutectic line ECF in the Fe-C phase diagram,liquid iron will start eutectic transformation (crystallization):eutectic liquid → cementite + austenite.Eutectic crystallisation is an important stage during the crystallization of white iron.At this stage,the nucleation and growth of eutectic cells (consisting of carbide or cementite + austenite) occur.The carbide in eutectic cells (or eutectic carbide) is the main hard and brittle phase structure which has an important effect on the properties of white iron.If there is no primary carbide in the structure,the effect of eutectic carbide is more prominent.5.5.1 Thermodynamics and kinetics of eutectic crystallisationWhether a eutectic melt follows the meta-stable system to crystallise as carbide + austenite,or follows the stable system to crystallise as graphite + austenite eutectic,is dependent on the nucleation and growth of the two high carbon phases (carbide and graphite),namely,on thermodynamic and kinetic conditions.Figure 5-23 shows the comparison of thermodynamic driving forces of the two eutectics.The two lines in the lower section of the figure represent the free energy of the two eutectics respectively and GL is the free energy of the undercooled iron melt.It is easy to see that the iron melt has the highest free energy and the graphiteaustenite has the lowest free energy;so,following a stable system,the thermodynamic condition favours the crystallisation of graphite-austenite eutectic from the iron melt.

  16. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a~new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the type of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid-like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 °C to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  17. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  18. A cascade of iron-containing proteins governs the genetic iron starvation response to promote iron uptake and inhibit iron storage in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Encinar del Dedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor, but it is also toxic at high levels. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sensor glutaredoxin Grx4 guides the activity of the repressors Php4 and Fep1 to mediate a complex transcriptional response to iron deprivation: activation of Php4 and inactivation of Fep1 leads to inhibition of iron usage/storage, and to promotion of iron import, respectively. However, the molecular events ruling the activity of this double-branched pathway remained elusive. We show here that Grx4 incorporates a glutathione-containing iron-sulfur cluster, alone or forming a heterodimer with the BolA-like protein Fra2. Our genetic study demonstrates that Grx4-Fra2, but not Fep1 nor Php4, participates not only in iron starvation signaling but also in iron-related aerobic metabolism. Iron-containing Grx4 binds and inactivates the Php4 repressor; upon iron deprivation, the cluster in Grx4 is probably disassembled, the proteins dissociate, and Php4 accumulates at the nucleus and represses iron consumption genes. Fep1 is also an iron-containing protein, and the tightly bound iron is required for transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that the cluster-containing Grx4-Fra2 heterodimer constitutively binds to Fep1, and upon iron deprivation the disassembly of the iron cluster between Grx4 and Fra2 promotes reverse metal transfer from Fep1 to Grx4-Fra2, and de-repression of iron-import genes. Our genetic and biochemical study demonstrates that the glutaredoxin Grx4 independently governs the Php4 and Fep1 repressors through metal transfer. Whereas iron loss from Grx4 seems to be sufficient to release Php4 and allow its nuclear accumulation, total or partial disassembly of the Grx4-Fra2 cluster actively participates in iron-containing Fep1 activation by sequestering its iron and decreasing its interaction with promoters.

  19. BESITY AND IRON DEFICIENCY. ONE MORE COMORBIDITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. L.I. Dvoretsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron defi ciency is one of comorbidity in patients with obesity, which allows you to select a particular phenotype (“iron defi ciency” obesity. There is strong evidence of the pathogenetic link between iron defi ciency and the presence of systemic infl ammation associated with obesity. Data on the frequency and pathogenic form of anemia ( iron defi ciency or anemia of chronic disease , obesity are not unique. Further research of iron status in obese patients is needed to decide on the feasibility and methods of correction of disorders of iron metabolism , in particular in the preparation of patients for bariatric surgery.

  20. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  1. What´s cheapest, intravenous iron sucrose- or intravenous iron carboxymaltose treatment in IBD patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

    for a total of iron-dose was to 233€ to reduce the numbers of infusion from 7 till 2.    Conclusion: The cost of choosing iron carboxymaltose rather than iron sucrose in treatment of iron deficiency in IBD differs depending of the economic perspective chosen. Only the Budget Impact Analysis showed iron......  What´s cheapest, intravenous iron sucrose- or intravenous iron carboxymaltose treatment in IBD patients? It dependent on the economic evaluation perspective!   Aim: To evaluate the health care cost for intravenous iron sucrose (Venofer®, Vifor) and intravenous iron carboxymaltose (Ferinject......®, Vifor) treatment to IBD patients in an outpatient setting.   Background: Intravenous iron sucrose can be given as a maximum of 200 mg Fe++ per infusion vs. intravenous iron carboxymaltose that can be given as a maximum of 1000 mg Fe++ in a single infusion leading to fewer infusions and visits. The drug...

  2. Iron isotope composition of some Archean and Proterozoic iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Little, Crispin T. S.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-03-01

    Fe isotopes can provide new insight into redox-dependent biogeochemical processes. Precambrian iron formations (IF) are deserving targets for Fe isotope studies because they are composed predominantly of authigenic Fe phases and record a period of unprecedented iron deposition in Earth's history. We present Fe isotope data for bulk samples from 24 Archean and Proterozoic IF and eight Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich deposits. These data reveal that many Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formations were a sink for isotopically heavy Fe, in contrast to later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich rocks. The positive δ56Fe values in IF are best explained by delivery of particulate ferric oxides formed in the water column to the sediment-water interface. Because IF are a net sink for isotopically heavy Fe, there must be a corresponding pool of isotopically light Fe in the sedimentary record. Earlier work suggested that Archean pyritic black shales were an important part of this light sink before 2.35 billion years ago (Ga). It is therefore likely that the persistently and anomalously low δ56Fe values in shales are linked with the deposition of isotopically heavy Fe in IF in the deeper parts of basins. IF deposition produced a residual isotopically light dissolved Fe pool that was captured by pyritic Fe in shales. Local dissimilatory Fe reduction in porewater and associated diagenetic reactions resulting in pyrite and carbonate precipitation may have further enhanced Fe isotope heterogeneity in marine sediments, and an 'iron shuttle' may have transported isotopically light Fe from shelf sediments to the basin. Nevertheless, water-column processing of hydrothermally delivered Fe likely had the strongest influence on the bulk iron isotope composition of Archean and Paleoproterozoic iron formations and other marine sediments.

  3. Combination therapies in iron chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Origa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The availability of oral iron chelators and new non-invasive methods for early detection and treatment of iron overload, have significantly improved the life expectancy and quality of life of patients with b thalassemia major. However, monotherapy is not effective in all patients for a variety of reasons. We analyzed the most relevant reports recently published on alternating or combined chelation therapies in thalassemia major with special attention to safety aspects and to their effects in terms of reduction of iron overload in different organs, improvement of complications, and survival. When adverse effects, such as gastrointestinal upset with deferasirox or infusional site reactions with deferoxamine are not tolerable and organ iron is in an acceptable range, alternating use of two chelators (drugs taken sequentially on different days, but not taken on the same day together may be a winning choice. The association deferiprone and deferoxamine should be the first choice in case of heart failure and when dangerously high levels of cardiac iron exist. Further research regarding the safety and efficacy of the most appealing combination treatment, deferiprone and deferasirox, is needed before recommendations for routine clinical practice can be made.

  4. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  5. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Horniblow

    Full Text Available Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05 and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease.

  6. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  7. Iron acquisition and allocation in stramenopile algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A

    2013-05-01

    The essential element iron has a low biological availability in the surface ocean where photosynthetic organisms live. Recent advances in our understanding of iron acquisition mechanisms in brown algae and diatoms (stramenopile algae) show the importance of the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron prior to, or during, transport in the uptake process. The uses of iron in photosynthetic stramenopiles resembles that in other oxygenic organisms, although (with the exception of the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica from an iron-deficient part of the ocean) they lack plastocyanin, instead using cytochrome c 6, This same diatom further economizes genotypically on the use of iron in photosynthesis by decreasing the expression of photosystem I, cytochrome c 6, and the cytochrome b 6 f complex per cell and per photosystem II relative to the coastal Thalassiosira pseudonana; similar changes occur phenotypically in response to iron deficiency in other diatoms such as Phaeodactylum tricornutum. In some diatoms grown under iron-limiting conditions, essentially all of the iron in the cells can be accounted for by the iron occurring in catalytic proteins. However, stramenopiles can store iron. Genomic studies show that pennate, but not centric, diatoms have the iron storage protein ferritin. While Mössbauer and X-ray analysis of (57)Fe-labelled Ectocarpus siliculosus shows iron in an amorphous mineral phase resembling the core of ferritin, the genome shows no protein with significant sequence similarity to ferritin.

  8. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2016-01-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the ISM have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles posses magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. Fe_nH_m nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and Fe_nH_m in the ISM.

  9. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilalbegović, G.; Maksimović, A.; Mohaček-Grošev, V.

    2017-03-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the interstellar medium (ISM) have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles possess magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. FenHm nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and FenHm in the ISM.

  10. Estimation of dietary iron bioavailability from food iron intake and iron status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack R Dainty

    Full Text Available Currently there are no satisfactory methods for estimating dietary iron absorption (bioavailability at a population level, but this is essential for deriving dietary reference values using the factorial approach. The aim of this work was to develop a novel approach for estimating dietary iron absorption using a population sample from a sub-section of the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS. Data were analyzed in 873 subjects from the 2000-2001 adult cohort of the NDNS, for whom both dietary intake data and hematological measures (hemoglobin and serum ferritin (SF concentrations were available. There were 495 men aged 19-64 y (mean age 42.7±12.1 y and 378 pre-menopausal women (mean age 35.7±8.2 y. Individual dietary iron requirements were estimated using the Institute of Medicine calculations. A full probability approach was then applied to estimate the prevalence of dietary intakes that were insufficient to meet the needs of the men and women separately, based on their estimated daily iron intake and a series of absorption values ranging from 1-40%. The prevalence of SF concentrations below selected cut-off values (indicating that absorption was not high enough to maintain iron stores was derived from individual SF concentrations. An estimate of dietary iron absorption required to maintain specified SF values was then calculated by matching the observed prevalence of insufficiency with the prevalence predicted for the series of absorption estimates. Mean daily dietary iron intakes were 13.5 mg for men and 9.8 mg for women. Mean calculated dietary absorption was 8% in men (50th percentile for SF 85 µg/L and 17% in women (50th percentile for SF 38 µg/L. At a ferritin level of 45 µg/L estimated absorption was similar in men (14% and women (13%. This new method can be used to calculate dietary iron absorption at a population level using data describing total iron intake and SF concentration.

  11. Iron Chelation and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey J. Weigel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen.

  12. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeala eShaked

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically-bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as spectrum rather than an absolute all or nothing. We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe compounds and environments, and for gauging the contribution of various Fe substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  13. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO(2) drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute "all or nothing." We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  14. [Iron concentration and acceptation of yoghurt prepared in casting iron pots (iron migration and acceptation of yogurt)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintaes, Késia Diego; Almeyda Haj-Isa, Niurka M; Morgano, Marcelo Antônio

    2005-12-01

    Food fortification is an interesting strategy to treat and prevent iron anemia. This study aims to quantify the iron in yoghurt, with gelatin and sugar and without, prepared in iron and glass containers. Sensorial test was use to evaluate the acceptance and preference of the both products. The yoghurt was prepared in containers of iron and glass with UHT milk, powder milk and natural industrialized yoghurt. After fermentation, half of the product received addition of sugar and strawberry flavor gelatin. The collected samples get the total iron quantified by ICP OES. Sensorial analysis involving 105 consumers was use to determine the acceptance and preference of the products. 0,018 and 0,882mg of iron per 100g added in the natural yoghurt prepared in the glass and in the iron pots, respectively. The yoghurt with gelatin presented 0,037 and 1,302mg of iron per 100g when prepared in the glass and in the iron pots, respectively. The preference was low for the yoghurt prepared in the iron pot (29,5%), but when added strawberry gelatin it was about 51,5%. The yoghurt prepared in iron pots, is easily home made and adds important amount of iron. Add gelatin and sugar can favored its consumption.

  15. Characterization of iron in airborne particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, F. V. F.; Ardisson, J. D.; Rodrigues, P. C. H.; Brito, W.; Macedo, W. A. A.; Jacomino, V. M. F.

    2014-01-01

    In this work soil samples, iron ore and airborne atmospheric particulate matter (PM) in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (MRBH), State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, are investigated with the aim of identifying if the sources of the particulate matter are of natural origin, such as, resuspension of particles from soil, or due to anthropogenic origins from mining and processing of iron ore. Samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy. The results showed that soil samples studied are rich in quartz and have low contents of iron mainly iron oxide with low crystallinity. The samples of iron ore and PM have high concentration of iron, predominantly well crystallized hematite. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed the presence of similar iron oxides in samples of PM and in the samples of iron ore, indicating the anthropogenic origin in the material present in atmosphere of the study area.

  16. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of ≃4.5 Å, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges, particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If ≳10% of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  17. Iron: a pathological mediator of Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Glenda M; Robinson, Stephen R; Liu, Quan; Perry, George; Atwood, Craig S; Smith, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    Brains from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) show a disruption in the metabolism of iron, such that there is an accumulation of iron in senile plaques, and an altered distribution of iron transport and storage proteins. One of the earliest events in AD is the generation of oxidative stress, which may be related to the generation of free radicals by the excess iron that is observed in the disease. Iron has also been shown to mediate the in vitro toxicity of amyloid-beta peptide, and the presence of iron in most in vitro systems could underlie the toxicity that is normally attributed to amyloid-beta in these studies. In contrast, several recent studies have suggested that amyloid-beta may decrease oxidative stress and decrease the toxicity of iron. Continued examination of the complex interactions that occur between iron and amyloid-beta may assist in the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegeneration that leads to dementia in AD.

  18. Fatal overdose of iron tablets in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, Kundavaram P P; Arul, J Jonathan; Bala, Divya

    2013-09-01

    Acute iron toxicity is usually seen in children with accidental ingestion of iron-containing syrups. However, the literature on acute iron toxicity with suicidal intent in adults is scant. We report, the first instance of two adults with fatal ingestion of a single drug overdose with iron tablets from India. Two young adults developed severe gastro-intestinal bleeding and fulminant hepatic failure 48 h after deliberate consumption of large doses of iron tablets. Serum iron levels measured 36 h after ingestion were normal presumably due to the redistribution of iron to the intracellular compartment. Despite aggressive supportive management in medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, the patients succumbed to the toxic doses of iron.

  19. Iron deficiency--facts and fallacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oski, F A

    1985-04-01

    Iron deficiency occurs in all strata of society, is primarily a result of postnatal feeding practices and not due to congenital deficiencies of iron, can be prevented by appropriate dietary guidance, and, when present, produces important nonhematologic manifestations.

  20. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of $\\simeq 4.5\\,$\\AA, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If $\\gtrsim 10\\%$ of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  1. IRON DEFICIENCY IN RURAL GHANAIAN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-05-05

    May 5, 2001 ... School of Medical Sciences, University of Science and Technology, ... as controls and newly diagnosed iron-deficient children entering as in-patients. ..... WalterT., Kovacisky J. and Stekel A. Effect of mild iron deficiency.

  2. Iron status and the female athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, James P

    2012-06-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency disorder in the world. In the developed world, the greatest prevalence of ID and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs in premenopausal women. Premenopausal women experience ID and IDA due to inadequate consumption of dietary iron coupled with iron losses through physiologic processes such as menstruation. Further, female athletes may experience an elevated risk of ID and IDA, as hepcidin, a peptide hormone that inhibits iron absorption and sequesters iron in the macrophage, may rise in response to physical activity. Declines in physical and cognitive performance have been demonstrated in female athletes with ID and IDA. Performance decrements are attenuated as iron status improves. This review will focus on iron status in female athletes, and will include a review of nutritional countermeasures to prevent ID and IDA.

  3. Too Much Iron Linked to Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_161946.html Too Much Iron Linked to Gestational Diabetes Supplements should only be given to pregnant women ... an increased risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), begging the question whether routine recommendations of iron ...

  4. Iron, hepcidin and the metal connection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eLoréal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of new players in iron metabolism, such as hepcidin, which regulates ferroportin and divalent metal transporter 1 expression, has improved our knowledge of iron metabolism and iron-related diseases. However, from both experimental data and clinical findings, iron-related proteins appear to also be involved in the metabolism of other metals, especially divalent cations. Reports have demonstrated that some metals may affect, directly or indirectly, the expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism. Throughout their lives, individuals are exposed to various metals during personal and/or occupational activities. Therefore, better knowledge of the connections between iron and other metals could improve our understanding of iron-related diseases, especially the variability in phenotypic expression, as well as a variety of diseases in which iron metabolism is secondarily affected. Controlling the metabolism of other metals could represent a promising innovative therapeutic approach.

  5. Complexed iron removal from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munter, R.; Ojaste, H.; Sutt, J. [Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia). Dept. of Environmental & Chemical Technology

    2005-07-01

    The paper demonstrates an intensive work carried out and results obtained on the pilot plant of the City of Kogalym Water Treatment Station (Tjumen, Siberia, Russian Federation) to elaborate on a contemporary nonreagent treatment technology for the local iron-rich groundwater. Several filter materials (Birm, Pyrolox, hydroanthracite, Everzit, granulated activated carbon) and chemical oxidants (ozone, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and potassium permanganate) were tested to solve the problem with complexed iron removal from groundwater. The final elaborated technology consists of raw water intensive aeration in the gas-degas treatment unit followed by sequential filtration through hydroanthracite and the special anthracite Everzit.

  6. The 'iron salute' in haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romas, Evange

    2009-03-01

    The presentation of haemochromatosis is typified by abdominal pain, arthralgia and fatigue or weakness. Arthropathy may be the major presenting feature. The detection of an osteoarthritis-like process involving the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints in middle aged men should signal the possibility of under lying haemochromatosis. Other joints such as the shoulder, hip,knee or ankle may be affected. However, the preferential involvement of the second and third MCP joints is striking and may provide the opportunity for early identification of iron overload disease. The "iron salut" can be an efficient screening tool for this MCP joint arthropathy but it is not well known by clinicians.

  7. Development of a clothing iron safety device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Ryan; Anthamatten, Mitchell; Reid, Dixie; Kahn, Steven A; Lentz, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    Contact burns from clothing irons are a common injury seen in children. These injuries occur when an unattended iron is within reach of toddlers in its upright position. In a previous study, the authors have shown that the surface of an iron takes 90 minutes to cool below the epidermal injury threshold of 49 degrees C. The authors have constructed an "iron shoe" to shield the iron surface from young hands during cooling. The device is intended to set the cooling iron in its down position providing additional protection. The device will insulate the iron surface to avoid the fire hazard when positioned in this manner. A silicone polymer was used to create an "iron shoe." This polymer is stable at temperatures up to 370 degrees C. The device included sidewalls to shield the edges from contact. Thermal analysis of the device was conducted using an inexpensive and expensive iron. Thermocouples were placed on the iron surface and below the iron shoe. The irons were heated to its maximum temperature, placed in the shoe and then unplugged. Temperature cooling curves were obtained from the thermocouples. The experiment was repeated by measuring the temperature difference between the iron edge and the shoe sidewalls. The surface of both expensive and inexpensive irons reached a maximum of 205 degrees C. The temperature below the iron shoe reached a maximum of 49 degrees C (inexpensive) and 60 degrees C (expensive). The iron edge temperature reached a maximum of 188 degrees C (inexpensive) and 154 degrees C (expensive). The shoe sidewall temperature achieved a maximum of 52 degrees C (inexpensive) and 49 degrees C (expensive). Both expensive and inexpensive irons reach temperatures over 200 degrees C. The silicone "iron shoe" effectively shielded the surface and edge of both irons and approached the epidermal injury threshold of 49 degrees C. The temperature beneath the expensive iron did exceed 49 degrees C, but because the intention of the device is to place the iron in

  8. The Iron-Iron Carbide Phase Diagram: A Practical Guide to Some Descriptive Solid State Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gary J.; Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the solid state chemistry of iron and steel in terms of the iron-iron carbide phase diagram. Suggests that this is an excellent way of introducing the phase diagram (equilibrium diagram) to undergraduate students while at the same time introducing the descriptive solid state chemistry of iron and steel. (Author/JN)

  9. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear.

  10. Iron supplementation and the female soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anthony E

    2006-04-01

    Twenty-two percent of women in the United States are iron deficient. Iron deficiency adversely affects immune function as well as physical and cognitive performance. Although the risk of developing iron deficiency is high for female soldiers, this risk can be minimized with proper nutritional guidance. Recommended dietary modifications include (1) heme iron consumption, (2) ingestion of vitamin C and protein with meals, and (3) discontinued tea and coffee consumption with meals.

  11. Development of Sintered Iron Driving Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Khanna

    1974-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation reports some detailed studies carried out on the development testing and proving of sintered Iron Driving Bands. Sintering studies on two different types of iron powders together with a few Fe-Cu compositions have been made and based on the results there of, parameters for development iron driving bands have been standardised. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that substitution of copper by sintered iron is highly practicable alternative.

  12. Sedimentary particulate iron: the missing micronutrients ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghoura, Houda; Gorgues, Thomas; Aumont, Olivier; Planquette, Hélène

    2017-04-01

    Iron is known to regulate the marine primary production and to impact the structure of ecosystems. Indeed, iron is the limiting nutrient for the phytoplankton growth over about 30% of the global ocean. However, the nature of the external sources of iron to the ocean and their quantification remain uncertain. Among these external sources, the sediment sources have been recently shown to be underestimated. Besides, since the operationally defined dissolved iron (which is the sum of truly dissolved and colloidal iron) was traditionally assumed to be the only form available to phytoplankton and bacteria, most studies have focused on the supply of dissolved iron to the ocean, the role of the particulate fraction of iron being largely ignored. This traditional view has been recently challenged, noticeably, by observational evidences. Indeed, in situ observations have shown that large amounts of particulate iron are being resuspended from continental margins to the open ocean thanks to fine grained particles' transport over long distances. A fraction of this particulate iron may dissolve and thereby fuel the phytoplankton growth. The magnitude of the sedimentary sources of particulate iron and the releasing processes affecting this iron phase are not yet well constrained or quantified. As a consequence, the role of sedimentary particulate iron in the biogeochemical cycles is still unclear despite its potentially major widespread importance. Here, we propose a modeling exercise to assess the first order impacts of this newly considered particulate sedimentary iron on global ocean biogeochemistry. We designed global experiments with a coupled dynamical-biogeochemical model (NEMO-PISCES). First, a control simulation that includes only a sediment source of iron in the dissolved phase has been run. Then, this control simulation is being compared with simulations, in which we include a sediment source of iron in both phases (dissolved as well as particulate). Those latter

  13. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    iron status indicators, as Hb concentration and serum ferritin were higher in women reporting amenorrhea as compared to those without...associated with diminished iron status. In female volunteers, menstruation affected iron status indicators, as Hb concentration and serum ferritin were...Participants were categorized as ID if they presented with >2 of the following 3 indicators of abnormal iron status: serum ferritin < 12 ng/mL,

  14. Pumping iron in the '90s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, W A; Gabathuler, R; Rothenberger, S; Food, M; Kennard, M L

    1996-06-01

    The role o f iron in cell division, cell death and human disease has recently gained increased attention. The best studied process for iron uptake into mammalian cells involves traps ferrin and its receptor. This review discusses evidence supporting the existence of other routes by which iron can enter mammalian cells. Specifically, iron uptake by the cell-surface GPI-linked traps ferrin homologue, melanotransferrin or p97, is described and possible functions of this traps ferrin-independent pathway are proposed.

  15. The role of ceruloplasmin in iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, H P; Lee, G R; Nacht, S; Cartwright, G E

    1970-12-01

    The importance of ceruloplasmin in iron metabolism was studied in swine made hypoceruloplasminemic by copper deprivation. When the plasma ceruloplasmin level fell below 1% of normal, cell-to-plasma iron flow became sufficiently impaired to cause hypoferremia, even though total body iron stores were normal. When ceruloplasmin was administered to such animals, plasma iron increased immediately and continued to rise at a rate proportional to the logarithm of the ceruloplasmin dose. The administration of inorganic copper induced increases in plasma iron only after ceruloplasmin appeared in the circulation. Thus, ceruloplasmin appeared to be essential to the normal movement of iron from cells to plasma. Studies designed to define the mechanism of action of ceruloplasmin were based on the in vitro observation that ceruloplasmin behaves as an enzyme (ferroxidase) that catalyzes oxidation of ferrous iron. Retention of injected ferrous iron in the plasma of ceruloplasmin-deficient swine was significantly less than that of ferric iron, reflecting impaired transferrin iron binding. Rat ceruloplasmin, which has little ferroxidase activity, was much less effective than porcine or human ceruloplasmin in inducing increases in plasma iron. These observations suggest that ceruloplasmin acts by virtue of its ferroxidase activity. Eight patients with Wilson's disease were evaluated in order to investigate iron metabolism in a disorder characterized by reduced ceruloplasmin levels. Evidence of iron deficiency was found in six of these, and in five of the six, plasma ceruloplasmin was less than 5% of normal. In comparison, the two patients without evidence of iron deficiency had ceruloplasmin levels of 11 and 18% of normal. It is suggested that iron deficiency tends to occur in those patients with Wilson's disease who have the severest degrees of hypoceruloplasminemia, possibly because of defective transfer of iron from intestinal mucosal cells to plasma.

  16. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Almeida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatusmycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L−1 and glucose at 28.45 g L−1. The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L−1 or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg−1 produced with iron addition of 300 mg L−1. The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L−1 of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron.

  17. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: African iron overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about the gene associated with African iron overload SLC40A1 Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation and how do mutations occur? How can gene mutations affect health and development? More about ... Pattern African iron overload seems to run in families, and high iron ...

  19. The Luster of Iron Ore Prices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China battles its way out of an iron ore stalemate by finding alternative supplier After months of seesawing, China’s iron ore negotiators appear to be breaking through the tight encirclement of suppliers. On August 17, the China Iron and Steel Association (CISA) announced that Fortescue

  20. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  1. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sandra M; Umeo, Suzana H; Marcante, Rafael C; Yokota, Meire E; Valle, Juliana S; Dragunski, Douglas C; Colauto, Nelson B; Linde, Giani A

    2015-03-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L (-1) and glucose at 28.45 g L (-1) . The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L (-1) or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg (-1) produced with iron addition of 300 mg L (-1) . The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L (-1) of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron.

  2. Iron requirements of infants and toddlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domellöf, Magnus; Braegger, Christian; Campoy, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide and young children are a special risk group since their rapid growth leads to high iron requirements. Risk factors associated with a higher prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include low birth weight, high cow's milk...

  3. Intravenous iron supplementation in children on hemodialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijn, E.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) are often absolute or functional iron deficient. There is little experience in treating these children with intravenous (i.v.) iron-sucrose. In this prospective study, different i.v. iron-sucrose doses were tested in child

  4. Intravenous iron supplementation in children on hemodialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijn, E.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) are often absolute or functional iron deficient. There is little experience in treating these children with intravenous (i.v.) iron-sucrose. In this prospective study, different i.v. iron-sucrose doses were tested in

  5. Iron mobilization using chelation and phlebotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flaten, T. P.; Aaseth, J.; Andersen, Ole;

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the basic mechanisms involved in iron metabolism has increased greatly in recent years, improving our ability to deal with the huge global public health problems of iron deficiency and overload. Several million people worldwide suffer iron overload with serious clinical implications....

  6. [Iron and performance in elite athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Elisa; Cristani, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    The negative relationship between performance and iron deficiency anemia is well known. There is still debate in the literature on the exercise-induced iron loss and if low iron store, even in the absence of frank anemia, can adversely affected performance of elite athletes. We analyse the physiologic changes induced by strong exercise, the diagnostic problems and therapeutic supplementation.

  7. Micromilling enhances iron bioaccessibility from wholegrain wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, G O; Li, X; Parodi, A; Edwards, C H; Ellis, P R; Sharp, P A

    2014-11-19

    Cereals constitute important sources of iron in human diet; however, much of the iron in wheat is lost during processing for the production of white flour. This study employed novel food processing techniques to increase the bioaccessibility of naturally occurring iron in wheat. Iron was localized in wheat by Perl's Prussian blue staining. Soluble iron from digested wheat flour was measured by a ferrozine spectrophotometric assay. Iron bioaccessibility was determined using an in vitro simulated peptic-pancreatic digestion, followed by measurement of ferritin (a surrogate marker for iron absorption) in Caco-2 cells. Light microscopy revealed that iron in wheat was encapsulated in cells of the aleurone layer and remained intact after in vivo digestion and passage through the gastrointestinal tract. The solubility of iron in wholegrain wheat and in purified wheat aleurone increased significantly after enzymatic digestion with Driselase, and following mechanical disruption using micromilling. Furthermore, following in vitro simulated peptic-pancreatic digestion, iron bioaccessibility, measured as ferritin formation in Caco-2 cells, from micromilled aleurone flour was significantly higher (52%) than from whole aleurone flour. Taken together our data show that disruption of aleurone cell walls could increase iron bioaccessibility. Micromilled aleurone could provide an alternative strategy for iron fortification of cereal products.

  8. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Joshua D.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar FeII is oxidized to FeIII. The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin FeII ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such “dual sensing” probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol. PMID:26306041

  9. Effect of intravenous iron supplementation on iron stores in non-anemic iron-deficient patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjörn Karlsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, frequent episodes of nasal and gastrointestinal bleeding commonly lead to irondeficiency with or without anemia. In the retrospective study presented here we assessed the iron stores, as determined by analysis of plasma ferritin, during oral and intravenous iron supplementation, respectively, in a population of iron-deficient non-anemic HHT patients who were inadequately iron-repleted by oral supplementation. A switch from oral to intravenous iron supplementation was associated with a significant increase in ferritin in this patient population.

  10. Iron isotope biogeochemistry of Neoproterozoic marine shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Marcus; Gibson, Timothy M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Bui, Thi Hao; Carozza, David A.; Sperling, Erik A.; Poirier, André; Cox, Grant M.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2017-07-01

    Iron isotopes have been widely applied to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. However, it is still unclear whether iron cycling in the water column or during diagenesis represents the major control on the iron isotope composition of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Interpretation of isotopic data in terms of oceanic redox conditions is only possible if water column processes dominate the isotopic composition, whereas redox interpretations are less straightforward if diagenetic iron cycling controls the isotopic composition. In the latter scenario, iron isotope data is more directly related to microbial processes such as dissimilatory iron reduction. Here we present bulk rock iron isotope data from late Proterozoic marine shales from Svalbard, northwestern Canada, and Siberia, to better understand the controls on iron isotope fractionation in late Proterozoic marine environments. Bulk shales span a δ 56Fe range from -0.45 ‰ to +1.04 ‰ . Although δ 56Fe values show significant variation within individual stratigraphic units, their mean value is closer to that of bulk crust and hydrothermal iron in samples post-dating the ca. 717-660 Ma Sturtian glaciation compared to older samples. After correcting for the highly reactive iron content in our samples based on iron speciation data, more than 90% of the calculated δ 56Fe compositions of highly reactive iron falls in the range from ca. -0.8 ‰ to +3 ‰ . An isotope mass-balance model indicates that diagenetic iron cycling can only change the isotopic composition of highly reactive iron by oxygen levels. Alternatively, increasing oxygen levels would have led to a higher proportion of Fe(II) being oxidized, without decreasing the initial size of the ferrous seawater iron pool. We consider the latter explanation as the most likely. According to this hypothesis, the δ 56Fe record reflects the redox evolution of Earth's surface environments. δ 56Fe values in pre-Sturtian samples

  11. Atmospheric iron deposition: global distribution, variability, and human perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, Natalie M; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; Luo, Chao; Sealy, Andrea; Artaxo, Paulo; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Bonnet, Sophie; Chen, Ying; Chuang, Patrick Y; Cohen, David D; Dulac, Francois; Herut, Barak; Johansen, Anne M; Kubilay, Nilgun; Losno, Remi; Maenhaut, Willy; Paytan, Adina; Prospero, Joseph M; Shank, Lindsey M; Siefert, Ronald L

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric inputs of iron to the open ocean are hypothesized to modulate ocean biogeochemistry. This review presents an integration of available observations of atmospheric iron and iron deposition, and also covers bioavailable iron distributions. Methods for estimating temporal variability in ocean deposition over the recent past are reviewed. Desert dust iron is estimated to represent 95% of the global atmospheric iron cycle, and combustion sources of iron are responsible for the remaining 5%. Humans may be significantly perturbing desert dust (up to 50%). The sources of bioavailable iron are less well understood than those of iron, partly because we do not know what speciation of the iron is bioavailable. Bioavailable iron can derive from atmospheric processing of relatively insoluble desert dust iron or from direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion sources. These results imply that humans could be substantially impacting iron and bioavailable iron deposition to ocean regions, but there are large uncertainties in our understanding.

  12. Protein Hydrolysates as Promoters of Non-Haem Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential micronutrient for human growth and health. Organic iron is an excellent iron supplement due to its bioavailability. Both amino acids and peptides improve iron bioavailability and absorption and are therefore valuable components of iron supplements. This review focuses on protein hydrolysates as potential promoters of iron absorption. The ability of protein hydrolysates to chelate iron is thought to be a key attribute for the promotion of iron absorption. Iron-chelatable protein hydrolysates are categorized by their absorption forms: amino acids, di- and tri-peptides and polypeptides. Their structural characteristics, including their size and amino acid sequence, as well as the presence of special amino acids, influence their iron chelation abilities and bioavailabilities. Protein hydrolysates promote iron absorption by keeping iron soluble, reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron, and promoting transport across cell membranes into the gut. We also discuss the use and relative merits of protein hydrolysates as iron supplements.

  13. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Zuguo Mei; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  14. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Zuguo Mei; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  15. Effects of digoxin on cardiac iron content in rat model of iron overload

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri, Hamid Reza; Shahouzehi, Beydolah; Masoumi-Ardakani, Yaser; Iranpour, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Plasma iron excess can lead to iron accumulation in heart, kidney and liver. Heart failure is a clinical widespread syndrome. In thalassemia, iron overload cardiomyopathy is caused by iron accumulation in the heart that leads to cardiac damage and heart failure. Digoxin increases the intracellular sodium concentration by inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase that affects Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX), which raises intracellular calcium and thus attenuates heart failure. The mechanism of iron upta...

  16. Efficacy of iron-fortified whole maize flour on iron status of schoolchildren in Kenya: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andang'o, P.E.A.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Ayah, R.; West, C.E.; Mwaniki, D.; Wolf, de C.A.; Kraaijenhagen, R.; Kok, F.J.; Verhoef, H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Sodium iron edetic acid (NaFeEDTA) might be a more bioavailable source of iron than electrolytic iron, when added to maize flour. We aimed to assess the effect, on children's iron status, of consumption of whole maize flour fortified with iron as NaFeEDTA or electrolytic iron. Methods 516

  17. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores.

  18. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization.

  19. Dynamic transition in supercritical iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Tsiok, E N; Brazhkin, V V; Trachenko, K

    2014-11-26

    Recent advance in understanding the supercritical state posits the existence of a new line above the critical point separating two physically distinct states of matter: rigid liquid and non-rigid gas-like fluid. The location of this line, the Frenkel line, remains unknown for important real systems. Here, we map the Frenkel line on the phase diagram of supercritical iron using molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of our data, we propose a general recipe to locate the Frenkel line for any system, the recipe that importantly does not involve system-specific detailed calculations and relies on the knowledge of the melting line only. We further discuss the relationship between the Frenkel line and the metal-insulator transition in supercritical liquid metals. Our results enable predicting the state of supercritical iron in several conditions of interest. In particular, we predict that liquid iron in the Jupiter core is in the "rigid liquid" state and is highly conducting. We finally analyse the evolution of iron conductivity in the core of smaller planets such as Earth and Venus as well as exoplanets: as planets cool off, the supercritical core undergoes the transition to the rigid-liquid conducting state at the Frenkel line.

  20. Working with the "Iron Hammer"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    CUTTING short her education and abandoning an annual income of several hundred thousand US dollars, Lang Ping, known to fans as the "Iron Hammer", returned from the United States to coach China’s National Women’s Volleyball Team. This news caused an enormous sensation comparable to the stir she used to raise when she won, together with her teammates, championship for

  1. Iron-binding haemerythrin RING ubiquitin ligases regulate plant iron responses and accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Nagasaka, Seiji; Senoura, Takeshi; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms. Plants transcriptionally induce genes involved in iron acquisition under conditions of low iron availability, but the nature of the deficiency signal and its sensors are unknown. Here we report the identification of new iron regulators in rice, designated Oryza sativa Haemerythrin motif-containing Really Interesting New Gene (RING)- and Zinc-finger protein 1 (OsHRZ1) and OsHRZ2. OsHRZ1, OsHRZ2 and their Arabidopsis homologue BRUTUS bind iron and zinc, and possess ubiquitination activity. OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are susceptible to degradation in roots irrespective of iron conditions. OsHRZ-knockdown plants exhibit substantial tolerance to iron deficiency, and accumulate more iron in their shoots and grains irrespective of soil iron conditions. The expression of iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron utilization is enhanced in OsHRZ-knockdown plants, mostly under iron-sufficient conditions. These results suggest that OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are iron-binding sensors that negatively regulate iron acquisition under conditions of iron sufficiency. PMID:24253678

  2. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  3. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha eSpottiswoode

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to coinfections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world.

  4. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Yorka; Carrasco, Carlos M; Campos, Joaquín D; Aguirre, Pabla; Núñez, Marco T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences-mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage-generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation-by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways-is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle.

  5. Cancer cells with irons in the fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Laura M; Rivella, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and proliferation of cells, as well as for many biological processes that are important for the maintenance and survival of the human body. However, excess iron is associated with the development of cancer and other pathological conditions, due in part to the pro-oxidative nature of iron and its damaging effects on DNA. Current studies suggest that iron depletion may be beneficial for patients that have diseases associated with iron overload or other iron metabolism disorders that may increase the risk for cancer. On the other hand, studies suggest that cancer cells are more vulnerable to the effects of iron depletion and oxidative stress in comparison to normal cells. Therefore, cancer patients might benefit from treatments that alter both iron metabolism and oxidative stress. This review highlights the pro-oxidant effects of iron, the relationship between iron and cancer development, the vulnerabilities of the iron-dependent cancer phenotype, and how these characteristics may be exploited to prevent or treat cancer.

  6. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Iron Chelation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Urru, Silvana Anna Maria; Pilo, Federica; Piperno, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Over recent decades we have been fortunate to witness the advent of new technologies and of an expanded knowledge and application of chelation therapies to the benefit of patients with iron overload. However, extrapolation of learnings from thalassemia to the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has resulted in a fragmented and uncoordinated clinical evidence base. We’re therefore forced to change our understanding of MDS, looking with other eyes to observational studies that inform us about the relationship between iron and tissue damage in these subjects. The available evidence suggests that iron accumulation is prognostically significant in MDS, but levels of accumulation historically associated with organ damage (based on data generated in the thalassemias) are infrequent. Emerging experimental data have provided some insight into this paradox, as our understanding of iron-induced tissue damage has evolved from a process of progressive bulking of organs through high-volumes iron deposition, to one of ‘toxic’ damage inflicted through multiple cellular pathways. Damage from iron may, therefore, occur prior to reaching reference thresholds, and similarly, chelation may be of benefit before overt iron overload is seen. In this review, we revisit the scientific and clinical evidence for iron overload in MDS to better characterize the iron overload phenotype in these patients, which differs from the classical transfusional and non-transfusional iron overload syndrome. We hope this will provide a conceptual framework to better understand the complex associations between anemia, iron and clinical outcomes, to accelerate progress in this area. PMID:28293409

  7. The liver in regulation of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Gautam; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2017-09-01

    The liver is one of the largest and most functionally diverse organs in the human body. In addition to roles in detoxification of xenobiotics, digestion, synthesis of important plasma proteins, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, and storage, the liver also plays a significant role in iron homeostasis. Apart from being the storage site for excess body iron, it also plays a vital role in regulating the amount of iron released into the blood by enterocytes and macrophages. Since iron is essential for many important physiological and molecular processes, it increases the importance of liver in the proper functioning of the body's metabolism. This hepatic iron-regulatory function can be attributed to the expression of many liver-specific or liver-enriched proteins, all of which play an important role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review focuses on these proteins and their known roles in the regulation of body iron metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, C.; Grant, C.; Taua, N; Wilson, C.; Thompson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To compare iron fortified follow-on milk (iron follow-on), iron fortified partially modified cows' milk (iron milk), and iron medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in hospitalised infants.

  9. Radiation stability of iron nanoparticles irradiated with accelerated iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uglov, V.V., E-mail: uglov@bsu.by [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Remnev, G.E., E-mail: remnev06@mail.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Kvasov, N.T.; Safronov, I.V.; Shymanski, V.I. [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic processes in nanoparticles after ion irradiation were studied. • The mechanism of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was showed. • The criteria of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was proposed. - Abstract: In the present work the dynamic processes occurring in a nanoscale iron particle exposed to irradiation with iron ions of different energies are studied in detailed. It is shown that the elastic and thermoelastic crystal lattice responses to irradiation form force factors affecting the evolution of defect-impurity system, which, in turn, leads to a decrease in the number of structural defects. Quantitative estimations of the spatial distribution of defects resulting in their migration to the surface were obtained. Such self-organization of nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation can be used as a basis for the production of radiation-resistant nanostructured materials capable of sustaining a long-term radiation influence.

  10. Iron in haemoglobinopathies and rare anaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Porter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload in haemoglobinopathies and rare anaemias may develop from increased iron absorption secondary to hepcidin suppression, and/or from repeated blood transfusions. While the accumulation of body iron load from blood transfusion is inevitable and predictable from the variable rates of transfusion in the different conditions, there are some important differences in the distribution of iron overload and its consequences between these. Transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (TDT is the best described condition in which transfusional overload occurs. Initially iron loads into macrophages, subsquently hepatocytes, and then the endocrine system including the anterior pituiatry and finally the myocardium. The propensity to extrahepatic iron spread increases with rapid transfusion and with inadequate chelation therapy but there is considerable interpatient and interpopulation variability in this tendency. The conduits though which iron is delivered to tissues is through non transferrin iron species (NTBI which are taken into liver, endocrine tissues and myocardium through L-type calcium channells and possibly through other channells. Recent work by the MSCIO group1 suggests that levels of NTBI are determined by three mechanisms: i increasing with iron overload; ii increasing with ineffective erythropoieis; iii and decreasing when level of transferrin iron utilisation is high. In TDT all three mechanisms increase NTBI levels because transferrin iron utilisation is suppressed by hypertransfusion. It is hypothesized that the transfusion regimen and target mean Hb may have a key impact on NTBI levels because high transfusion regimes may suppress the ‘sink’ effect of the erythron though decreased clearance of transferrin iron. In sickle cell disease (SCD without blood transfusion the anaemia results mainly from haemolysis rather than from ineffective erythropoiesis.2 Thus there is a tendency to iron depletion because of urinary iron loss from

  11. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  12. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  13. Oily fish increases iron bioavailability of a phytate rich meal in young iron deficient women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Sarriá, Beatriz; Carbajal, Angeles; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Roe, Mark A; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2008-02-01

    Iron deficiency is a major health problem worldwide, and is associated with diets of low iron bioavailability. Non-heme iron absorption is modulated by dietary constituents, one of which is the so-called "meat factor", present in meat, fish (oily and lean) and poultry, which is an important enhancer of iron absorption in humans. Food processing also affects iron bioavailability. To evaluate the effect of consuming sous vide cooked salmon fish on non-heme iron bioavailability from a bean meal, rich in phytate, in iron-deficient women. Randomized crossover trial in 21 young women with low iron stores (ferritin Sous vide cooked salmon fish increases iron absorption from a high phytate bean meal in humans.

  14. Iron supplementation for female athletes: effects on iron status and performance outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Diane M

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient involved in oxidative metabolism and critical to exercise performance. The prevalence of iron deficiency (ID) is much higher in active women for a variety of reasons, and poor iron status has been shown to be detrimental to overall health as well as physical performance. Iron status can be assessed using a number of indicators; however clinical cut-offs for active populations remain controversial. Randomized, placebo-controlled supplementation trials of iron-depleted female athletes have shown that oral iron supplementation in doses of 100-mg FeSO4·d (approximately 20 mg elemental iron) improves iron status and may improve measures of physical performance. It is recommended that female athletes most at risk of ID be screened at the beginning of and during the training season using hemoglobin and serum ferritin, and appropriate dietary and/or supplementation recommendations be made to those with compromised iron status.

  15. Effects of heme iron enriched peptide on iron deficiency anemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Chen, Le-qun; Zhuang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate whether a daily intake of heme iron enriched peptide obtained from bovine hemoglobin is effective in alleviating iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: a control group, an anemic group not treated, and anemic groups treated with FeSO4 or with the heme iron enriched peptide at low, moderate or high doses. The rats in the anemic groups were fed on a low-iron diet to establish the iron deficiency anemia model. After the model had been established, different doses of heme iron enriched peptide were given to the rats once a day via intragastric administration. After the iron supplement administration, it was observed that heme iron enriched peptide had effective restorative action returning the hemoglobin, red blood cells, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and serum iron in IDA animals to normal values or better. In addition, compared with FeSO4, higher Fe bioavailability and fewer side effects were observed. The rats in the moderate dose group had the highest apparent Fe absorption. Moreover, in vivo antioxidant activity was also observed, enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and reduced malondialdehyde levels in IDA rats. Furthermore, the heme iron enriched peptide also exhibited strong in vitro antioxidant activities. In conclusion, heme iron enriched peptide significantly alleviated iron deficiency anemia, and exhibited strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. This suggests that heme iron enriched peptide might be exploited as a safe, efficient new iron supplement.

  16. Dietary Iron Intake and Serum Interleukin-6 Levels of Obese Children With and Without Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanang Sidiartha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron deficiency is more common in obese children. Low dietary iron intake and inflammation are suspected as the cause. This study investigates the dietary iron intake and serum IL-6 levels relationship with the obese children iron status. Methods: Seventy obese children were recruited. Dietary iron intake was calculated using three days’ food record. Serum IL-6 was measured using sandwich ELISA. Iron deficiency was confirmed if iron serum <60 mcg/dl and/or saturation of transferrin <20%. Independent t-test was used to analyze the mean difference of the dietary iron intake between the with and without iron deficiency groups, α=0.05. And, Mann-Whitney for the median difference of the serum IL-6 between the two groups. Results: Forty-six subjects (65.7% had iron deficiency. Dietary iron intake of the with and without iron deficiency groups were 6.8 mg (SD 3.3 and 6.6 mg (SD 3.8, respectively (p>0.05. The interleukin-6 was 2.7 pg/ml (0.3-16.8 and 1.7 pg/ml (0.8-4.9, respectively (p<0.05. Conclusion: Iron deficiency in obese children was high. It was not associated with low dietary iron intake, but associated with inflammation.

  17. Fluor-ferro-leakeite, NaNa2(FC2+2Fe3+2Li)Si8O22F2, a new alkali amphibole from the Canada Pinabete pluton, Questa, New Mexico, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, F.C.; Oberti, R.; Ungaretti, L.; Ottolini, L.; Grice, Joel D.; Czamanske, G.K.

    1996-01-01

    Fluor-ferro-leakeite is a new amphibole species from the Canada Pinabete pluton, Questa, New Mexico, U.S.A.; it occurs in association with quartz, alkali feldspar, acmite, ilmenite, and zircon. It forms as anhedral bluish black crystals elongated along c and up to 1 mm long. It is brittle, H = 6, Dmeas = 3.37 g/cm3, Dcalc = 3.34 g/cm3. In plane-polarized light, it is strongly pleochroic, X = very dark indigo blue, Y = gray blue, Z = yellow green; X ??? c = 10?? (in ??obtuse), Y = b, Z ??? a = 4?? (in ?? obtuse), with absorption X > Y > Z. Fluor-ferro-leakeite is biaxial positive, ?? = 1.675(2), ??= 1.683(2), ?? = 1.694(1); 2V = 87(2)??; dispersion is not visible because of the strong absorption. Fluor-ferro-leakeite is monoclinic, space group C2/m, a = 9.792(1), b = 17.938(1), c = 5.3133(4) A??, ??= 103.87(7)??, V = 906.0(1) A??3, Z = 2. The ten strongest X-ray diffraction lines in the powder pattern are [d(I,hkl)]: 2.710(100,151), 2.536(92,202), 3.404(57,131), 4.481(54,040), 8.426(45,110), 2.985(38,241), 2.585(38,061), 3.122(29,310), 2.165(26,261), and 1.586(25,403). Analysis by a combination of electron microprobe, ion microprobe, and crystal-structure refinement (Hawthorne et al. 1993) gives SiO2 51.12, Al2O3 1.13, TiO2 0.68, Fe2O3 16.73, FeO 8.87, MgO 2.02, MnO 4.51, ZnO 0.57, CaO 0.15, Na2O 9.22, K2O 1.19, Li2O 0.99, F 2.87, H2Ocalc 0.60, sum 99.44 wt%. The formula unit, calculated on the basis of 23 O atoms, is (K0.23Na0.76)(Na1.97Ca0.03)(Mg 0.46Fe2+1.4Mn2+0.59Zn0.07Fe3+1.93-Ti 0.08Al0.02Li0.61])(Si7.81Al 0.19)O22(F1.39OH0.61). A previous crystal-structure refinement (Hawthorne et al. 1993) shows Li to be completely ordered at the M3 site. Fluor-ferro-leakeite, ideally NaNa2(Fe2+2Fe3+2Li)Si8O22F2, is related to leakeite, NaNa2(Mg2Fe3+3Li)Si 8O22(OH)2, by the substitutions Fe2+ ??? Mg and F ??? OH.

  18. Reductive denitrification using zero-valent iron and bimetallic iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Hak; Shinb, Won Sik; Choi, Sang June; Kim, Young-Hun

    2009-08-01

    A study of reductive denitrification of nitrate was conducted. Microscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) and palladium-coated iron (Pd/Fe) were used in the reduction of nitrate with variable pH. The solution pH was controlled by an auto controlling system instead of chemical buffers. Higher reduction rates were achieved with lower pH and lower pH gave the pseudo-first-order kinetics while it was close to the zero-order reaction when the pH of the solution was becoming high and nitrate concentration was higher. As it took several hours to convert intermediates to ammonia completely, the assumption, under which mass loss calculated from the measured ammonia concentration right after the reaction was the mass of nitrogen evolved, could lead to overestimation of the nitrogen selectivity. The current study confirmed that the palladium coating on the iron could increase the nitrogen selectivity, and the Pd/Fe system could also achieve the advantages of coupling of electron source and catalyst with regard to the engineering aspects.

  19. Inevitable iron loss by human adolescents, with calculations of the requirement for absorbed iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomon, Samuel J; Drulis, Jean M; Nelson, Steven E; Serfass, Robert E; Woodhead, Jerold C; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2003-01-01

    In growing individuals, the requirement for absorbed iron consists of iron needed for growth and iron needed to replace inevitable iron loss. We were able to estimate inevitable iron loss by adolescents because total body iron of the adolescents had been enriched with the stable isotope, (58)Fe, as the result of earlier studies of iron absorption. During an interval beginning at least 1.56 y after isotope administration (a time sufficient for complete mixing of the isotope with total body iron) and extending for no less than 3.29 y, we determined the isotopic enrichment of circulating iron. On the basis of several assumptions, we calculated total body (58)Fe and total body iron at the beginning and end of the interval. Because of complete mixing of the isotope with total body iron, fractional total (58)Fe loss was the same as fractional loss of total iron. In males, the fractional loss of iron was 9.70%/y and the quantitative loss was 256 mg/y or 0.70 mg/d. In females, the fractional loss of iron was 14.60%/y and the quantitative loss was 306 mg/y or 0.84 mg/d. Using several assumptions, we then calculated that the iron requirement for growth during this interval was 0.76 mg/d for males and 0.31 mg/d for females. Adding the iron loss to the iron requirement for growth, the requirement for absorbed iron was estimated to be 1.46 mg/d for males and 1.15 mg/d for females.

  20. Atmospheric iron deposition: global distribution, variability, and human perturbations

    OpenAIRE

    N. Mahowald; S. Engelstaedter; Luo, C; Sealy, A.; Artaxo, P.; Benitez-Nelson, C.R.; Bonnet, S.; Chen, Y.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cohen, D.; Dulac, F.; B. Herut; Johansen, A.M.; N. Kubilay; Losno, R.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric inputs of iron to the open ocean are hypothesized to modulate ocean biogeochemistry. This review presents an integration of available observations of atmospheric iron and iron deposition, and also covers bioavailable iron distributions. Methods for estimating temporal variability in ocean deposition over the recent past are reviewed. Desert dust iron is estimated to represent 95% of the global atmospheric iron cycle, and combustion sources of iron are responsible for the remaining...

  1. Iron deficiency in sports - definition, influence on performance and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Clénin, German; Cordes, Mareike; Huber, Andreas; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Noack, Patrick; Scales, John; Kriemler, Susi

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is frequent among athletes. All types of iron deficiency may affect physical performance and should be treated. The main mechanisms by which sport leads to iron deficiency are increased iron demand, elevated iron loss and blockage of iron absorption due to hepcidin bursts. As a baseline set of blood tests, haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean cellular volume, mean cellular haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels help monitor iron deficiency. In healthy male and female athletes >15 yea...

  2. Adiposity in women and children from transition countries predicts decreased iron absorption, iron deficiency and a reduced response to iron fortification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Zeder, C.; Muthayya, S.; Winichagoon, P.; Chaouki, N.; Aeberli, I.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Overweight is increasing in transition countries, while iron deficiency remains common. In industrialized countries, greater adiposity increases risk of iron deficiency. Higher hepcidin levels in obesity may reduce dietary iron absorption. Therefore, we investigated the association betwe

  3. Adiposity in women and children from transition countries predicts decreased iron absorption, iron deficiency and a reduced response to iron fortification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Zeder, C.; Muthayya, S.; Winichagoon, P.; Chaouki, N.; Aeberli, I.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Overweight is increasing in transition countries, while iron deficiency remains common. In industrialized countries, greater adiposity increases risk of iron deficiency. Higher hepcidin levels in obesity may reduce dietary iron absorption. Therefore, we investigated the association

  4. Iron sufficiency in breast-fed infants and the availability of iron from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, J A; Landaw, S A; Oski, F A

    1976-11-01

    Four infants were studied who had been exclusively breast-fed for periods varying from 8 to 18 months. All had grown sufficiently to have exhausted their prenatally acquired iron endowment with respect to meeting current needs for maintaining normal hemoglobin levels. All infants had normal hemoglobin values and normal serum iron values. Studies of iron absorption from breast milk and cow's milk were performed in ten normal adults. The absorption of iron from the human milk was significantly higher. These findings suggest that the iron present in human milk is sufficient to meet the iron requirements of the exclusively breast-fed infant until he approximately triples his birthweight.

  5. Iron-tolerant Cyanobacteria as a Tool to Study Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Iron Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Cooksey, K. E.; McKay, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    We are investigating biological mechanisms of terrestrial iron deposition as analogs for Martian hematite recently confirmed by. Possible terrestrial analogs include iron oxide hydrothermal deposits, rock varnish, iron-rich laterites, ferricrete soils, moki balls, and banded iron formations (BIFs). With the discovery of recent volcanic activity in the summit craters of five Martian volcanoes, renewed interest in the iron dynamics of terrestrial hydrothermal environments and associated microorganisms is warranted. In this study we describe a new genus and species of CB exhibiting elevated dissolved iron tolerance and the ability to precipitate hematite on the surface of their exopolymeric sheathes.

  6. [Control of iron deficiency in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jacques; Dillon, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder worldwide, especially in developing countries. It occurs when iron absorption cannot compensate iron requirements and losses. Requirements are especially high in pregnant women, infants, young children and adolescents who run a higher risk of being iron-deficient. In developing countries, the main cause of iron deficiency is the low iron bioavailability of the diet. The consequences of iron deficiency are many and serious, affecting not only individuals' health but also the development of societies and countries. The prevention and the control of iron deficiency and anemia in all groups of a population with different iron requirements imply to coordinate different interventions. Iron fortification of staple foods or condiments directed to the whole population is a sustainable and low cost-effective approach. However, at some periods of life, especially during pregnancy and in children from the age of 6 months, iron requirements are high. For pregnant women, the current approach favours the daily iron-folate supplementation during pregnancy but the results in terms of public health are disappointing. The preventive weekly iron-folate supplementation of women during their reproductive life, whose efficacy is recognized, offers a promising alternative; its impact in terms of public health is under current evaluation. For infants and young children, iron fortification of complementary food is effective but this food is generally imported and economically inaccessible to populations with limited resources. The production, by small private units from local products, of complementary foods of low viscosity, good nutritional quality, fortified with vitamins and minerals, and of low cost is at hand in several countries. When complementary foods are not available, the preventive iron supplementation from 6 to 18 months of age has to be advised. This approach should be strengthened by the advantages of the weekly

  7. A new layered iron fluorophosphate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Choudhury

    2002-04-01

    A new iron fluorophosphate of the composition, [C6N4H21] [Fe2F2(HPO4)3][H2PO4]·2H2O, I has been prepared by the hydrothermal route. This compound contains iron fluorophosphate layers and the H2PO$_{4}^{-}$ anions are present in the interlayer space along with the protonated amine and water molecules. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group 21/. ( = 13.4422(10) Å, = 9.7320(10) Å, = 18.3123(3) Å, = 92.1480 °, = 2393.92(5) Å3, = 4, = 719.92, calc = 1.997 g cm-3, 1 = 0.03 and 2 = 0.09).

  8. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease. Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient.

  9. Disassembling Iron Availability to Phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdow...

  10. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown...

  11. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to engineer this system are likely to

  12. Extending hydraulic lifetime of iron walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, P.D. [General Electric Corp. Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.

    1997-12-31

    Iron walls for control of groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated solvents and reducible metals are becoming much more widely used and field studies of this technology have proven successful to date. However, there is still much uncertainty in predicting long-term performance. This work focuses on two factors affecting the lifetime of the iron media: plugging at the treatment zone entrance and precipitation in the bulk iron media. Plugging at the system entrance is due principally to dissolved oxygen in the incoming water and is an issue in aerobic aquifers or in ex-situ canister tests. In an in-situ treatment system, plugging would result in a dramatic reduction in flow through the iron zone. Designs to minimize plugging in field applications include use of larger iron particles and admixing sand of comparable size with the iron particles. Mineral precipitation in the bulk iron media can lead to porosity losses in the media, again reducing flow through the treatment zone. Decreases in reactivity of the iron media may also occur. The nature of the mineral precipitation and the factors that affect extent of mineral precipitation are examined by a variety of tools, including tracer tests, aqueous inorganic profiles, and surface analysis techniques. At short treatment times, measured porosity losses are due mainly to entrapment of a film of H{sub 2} gas on the iron surfaces and also to Fe(OH){sub 2} precipitation. Over longer treatment times precipitation of Fe(OH){sub 2} and FeCO{sub 3} in low carbonate waters and of Fe(OH){sub 2}, FeCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in higher carbonate waters will begin to dominate porosity losses. Preliminary results of an on-going study to control pH in an iron zone by admixing iron sulfide with iron show no difference in extent of carbonate precipitation versus a 100% iron system, suggesting that these systems are supersaturated with respect to carbonate precipitation.

  13. Iron-Tolerant Cyanobacteria: Ecophysiology and Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Lindsey, J.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Although the iron-dependent physiology of marine and freshwater cyanobacterial strains has been the focus of extensive study, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs have been conducted. One of the few studies that have been conducted [B. Pierson, 1999] found that cyanobacterial members of iron depositing bacterial mat communities might increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ and that ferrous iron concentrations up to 1 mM significantly stimulated light dependent consumption of bicarbonate, suggesting a specific role for elevated iron in photosynthesis of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs. Our recent studies pertaining to the diversity and physiology of cyanobacteria populating iron-depositing hot springs in Great Yellowstone area (Western USA) indicated a number of different isolates exhibiting elevated tolerance to Fe(3+) (up to 1 mM). Moreover, stimulation of growth was observed with increased Fe(3+) (0.02-0.4 mM). Molecular fingerprinting of unialgal isolates revealed a new cyanobacterial genus and species Chroogloeocystis siderophila, an unicellular cyanobacterium with significant EPS sheath harboring colloidal Fe(3+) from iron enriched media. Our preliminary data suggest that some filamentous species of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria are capable of exocytosis of iron precipitated in cytoplasm. Prior to 2.4 Ga global oceans were likely significantly enriched in soluble iron [Lindsay et al, 2003], conditions which are not conducive to growth of most contemporary oxygenic cyanobacteria. Thus, iron-tolerant CB may have played important physiological and evolutionary roles in Earths history.

  14. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor P Doherty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the magnitude and duration of these effects are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the red blood cell incorporation of oral administered stable isotopes of iron and compared incorporation between age matched 18 to 36 months old children with either anaemia post-malaria (n = 37 or presumed iron deficiency anaemia alone (n = 36. All children were supplemented for 30 days with 2 mg/kg elemental iron as liquid iron sulphate and administered (57Fe and (58Fe on days 1 and 15 of supplementation respectively. (57Fe and(58Fe incorporation were significantly reduced (8% vs. 28%: p<0.001 and 14% vs. 26%: p = 0.045 in the malaria vs. non-malaria groups. There was a significantly greater haemoglobin response in the malaria group at both day 15 (p = 0.001 and 30 (p<0.000 with a regression analysis estimated greater change in haemoglobin of 7.2 g/l (s.e. 2.0 and 10.1 g/l (s.e. 2.5 respectively. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Post-malaria anaemia is associated with a better haemoglobin recovery despite a significant depressant effect on oral iron incorporation which may indicate that early erythropoetic iron need is met by iron recycling rather than oral iron. Supplemental iron administration is of questionable utility within 2 weeks of clinical malaria in children with mild or moderate anaemia.

  15. Siderophores: More than Stealing Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Behnsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Siderophores are small molecular iron chelators that are produced by microbes and whose most notable function is to sequester iron from the host and provide this essential metal nutrient to microbes. Recent studies have proposed additional, noncanonical roles for siderophores, including the acquisition of noniron metals and modulation of host functions. Recently, Holden et al. (V. I. Holden, P. Breen, S. Houle, C. M. Dozois, and M. A. Bachman, mBio 7:e01397-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01397-16 showed that siderophores secreted by Klebsiella pneumoniae during lung infection induce stabilization of the transcription factor HIF-1α, increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the lung, and promote dissemination of K. pneumoniae to the spleen. Thus, their study demonstrated novel roles for siderophores in vivo, beyond iron sequestration. The interaction of siderophores with host cells further promotes the pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae and is likely relevant for other pathogens that also secrete siderophores in the host.

  16. IRON CONTENT OF FOOD COOKED IN IRON UTENSILS: A TRADITIONAL INDIAN WAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibifatima Bawakhan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Since most of the Indian population depends on vegetarian diet, prevalence of iron deficiency status is higher in India compared to other developing countries. In spite of many national programs and treatment options available in correcting this, the incidence is increasing due to poor patient compliance and intolerance to treatment. This study was an effort to show how iron content of Indian food can be increased just by following the traditional way of cooking. OBJECTIVE To compare the iron levels in the Jowar roti cooked in iron and non-iron utensils. METHODOLOGY A cross-sectional study was conducted at KIMS, Hubli. Jowar rotis were prepared from equal quantity of jowar flour in iron and non-iron tawa. Another sample of roti was prepared in iron tawa after treating with lemon juice. Six samples were homogenised and filtered. The filtrates were replicated and analysed for iron levels by FerroZine method. RESULTS In the present study, we found no change in iron levels in the roti prepared in non-iron utensil, 1.45 and 1.94 fold increase in the roti prepared in new iron tawa without water boiled in it and with water boiled in it for dough preparation respectively when compared with iron levels of plain jowar flour. There was 5.77 fold rise in iron levels in lemon juice treated roti which signifies the bioavailability of iron in food. The study showed statistical significance at ‘p’- value < 0.05. CONCLUSION Several studies have shown the similar results and this was done to strengthen the findings in our staple food. Hence, the daily iron requirement can be met easily and effectively by taking the food cooked with lemon juice in iron utensils.

  17. Deferasirox and deferiprone remove cardiac iron in the iron-overloaded gerbil

    Science.gov (United States)

    WOOD, JOHN C.; OTTO-DUESSEL, MAYA; GONZALEZ, IGNACIO; AGUILAR, MICHELLE I.; SHIMADA, HIRO; NICK, HANSPETER; NELSON, MARVIN; MOATS, REX

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Deferasirox effectively controls liver iron concentration; however, little is known regarding its ability to remove stored cardiac iron. Deferiprone seems to have increased cardiac efficacy compared with traditional deferoxamine therapy. Therefore, the relative efficacy of deferasirox and deferiprone were compared in removing cardiac iron from iron-loaded gerbils. Methods Twenty-nine 8- to 10-week-old female gerbils underwent 10 weekly iron dextran injections of 200 mg/kg/week. Prechelation iron levels were assessed in 5 animals, and the remainder received deferasirox 100 mg/kg/D po QD (n = 8), deferiprone 375 mg/kg/D po divided TID (n = 8), or sham chelation (n = 8), 5 days/week for 12 weeks. Results Deferasirox reduced cardiac iron content 20.5%. No changes occurred in cardiac weight, myocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, or weight-to-dry weight ratio. Deferasirox treatment reduced liver iron content 51%. Deferiprone produced comparable reductions in cardiac iron content (18.6% reduction). Deferiprone-treated hearts had greater mass (16.5% increase) and increased myocyte hypertrophy. Deferiprone decreased liver iron content 24.9% but was associated with an increase in liver weight and water content. Conclusion Deferasirox and deferiprone were equally effective in removing stored cardiac iron in a gerbil animal model, but deferasirox removed more hepatic iron for a given cardiac iron burden. PMID:17145573

  18. Malabsorption of iron as a cause of iron deficiency anemia in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Khansa; Saboor, Muhammad; Qudsia, Fatima; Khosa, Shafi Muhammad; Moinuddin; Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Malabsorption is one of the causes of iron deficiency anemia in postmenopausal women. The main objective of this study was to access the frequency of malabsorption in iron deficient anemic postmenopausal women. Methods: A total of 123 postmenopausal women were enrolled in the study. Of these 123 women, 50 were included as ‘control group’ and 73 patients with comparable severity of anemia were the ‘patient group’. Two tablets of ferrous sulfate (200 mg/tablet) along with one tablet of vitamin C (500 mg) were given to all participants. Serum iron levels were determined on samples collected from all participants before and after the administration of ferrous sulfate. Difference between before and after serum iron levels of normal and patients were compared. Results: No change in serum iron between sample one and sample two represented malabsorption. Out of 73, 5 postmenopausal anemic patients showed no change in their serum iron level after the administration of ferrous sulfate. This study shows that frequency of malabsorption of iron in postmenopausal women is 6.8%. Conclusion: Malabsorption should be considered as a prevalent cause of iron deficiency anemia in postmenopausal women. It should be properly diagnosed and iron response should be monitored properly in postmenopausal women with IDA after oral iron therapy. If a postmenopausal woman does not show any response to oral iron therapy, she should be evaluated for iron loss (blood loss and/or malabsorption). Intravenous route should be used for the administration of iron in these patients. PMID:26101480

  19. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  20. Iron overload thalassemic cardiomyopathy: Iron status assessment and mechanisms of mechanical and electrical disturbance due to iron toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Lekawanvijit, Suree; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2009-01-01

    Patients with thalassemia major have inevitably suffered from complications of the disease, due to iron overload. Among such complications, cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality (63.6% to 71%). The major causes of death in this group of patients are congestive heart failure and fatal cardiac tachyarrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death. The free radical-mediated pathway is the principal mechanism of iron toxicity. The consequent series of events caused by iron ove...

  1. Iron deficiency and overload in relation to nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg MQI; Jansen EHJM; LEO

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional iron intake in the Netherlands has been reviewed with respect to both iron deficiency and iron overload. In general, iron intake and iron status in the Netherlands are adequate and therefore no change in nutrition policy is required. The following aspects and developments, however, need

  2. Role of iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    Currently, we still lack effective measures to modify disease progression in neurodegenerative diseases. Iron-containing proteins play an essential role in many fundamental biological processes in the central nervous system. In addition, iron is a redox-active ion and can induce oxidative stress in the cell. Although the causes and pathology hallmarks of different neurodegenerative diseases vary, iron dyshomeostasis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial injury constitute a common pathway to cell death in several neurodegenerative diseases. MRI is capable of depicting iron content in the brain, and serves as a potential biomarker for early and differential diagnosis, tracking disease progression and evaluating the effectiveness of neuroprotective therapy. Iron chelators have shown their efficacy against neurodegeneration in a series of animal models, and been applied in several clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent developments on iron dyshomeostasis in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Friedreich ataxia, and Huntington's disease.

  3. Solid iron compressed up to 560 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Y; Coppari, F; Hicks, D G; Yaakobi, B; Fratanduono, D E; Hamel, S; Eggert, J H; Rygg, J R; Smith, R F; Swift, D C; Braun, D G; Boehly, T R; Collins, G W

    2013-08-09

    Dynamic compression by multiple shocks is used to compress iron up to 560 GPa (5.6 Mbar), the highest solid-state pressure yet attained for iron in the laboratory. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy offers simultaneous density, temperature, and local-structure measurements for the compressed iron. The data show that the close-packed structure of iron is stable up to 560 GPa, the temperature at peak compression is significantly higher than expected from pure compressive work, and the dynamic strength of iron is many times greater than the static strength based on lower pressure data. The results provide the first constraint on the melting line of iron above 400 GPa.

  4. Dextran-modified iron oxide nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji(r)í Hradil; Alexander Pisarev; Michal Babi(c); Daniel Horák

    2007-01-01

    Dextran-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by precipitation of Fe(Ⅱ) and Fe(Ⅲ) salts with ammonium hydroxide by two methods.Iron oxide was precipitated either in the presence of dextran solution, or the dextran solution was added after precipitation. In the second method,the iron oxide particle size and size distribution could be controlled depending on the concentration of dextran in the solution. The nanoparticles were characterized by size-exclusion chromatography, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Optimal conditions for preparation of stable iron oxide colloid particles were determined. The dextran/iron oxide ratio 0-0.16 used in precipitation of iron salts can be recommended for synthesis of nanoparticles suitable for biomedical applications, as the colloid does not contain excess dextran and does not coagulate.

  5. Iron supplementation studies among pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuizon, M D; Platon, T P; Ancheta, L P; Angeles, J C; Nunez, C B; Macapinlac, M P

    1979-12-01

    The effect of iron supplementation alone or in combination with ascorbic acid as a preventive and or corrective measure against anemia were tested using pregnant women seeking pre-natal consultation at various health centers in Greater Manila Area. One tablet containing 65 mg iron alone or in combination with ascorbic acid per day during a supplementation period which varied from 16.5 to 17.8 weeks maintained initial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in non-anemic women. Three tablets of the same iron preparation (total of 195 mg iron) daily resulted in significant increases in hemoglobin and hematocrit in anemic women. Ascorbic acid had no apparent beneficial effect. Considering the positive response to iron treatment, it is recommended that a nationwide program of iron supplementation of pregnant Filipinos be undertaken.

  6. The iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eSheldon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipoproteins fulfill diverse roles in antibiotic resistance, adhesion, protein secretion, signaling and sensing, and many also serve as the substrate binding protein (SBP partner to ABC transporters for the acquisition of a diverse array of nutrients including peptides, sugars, and scarcely abundant metals. In the staphylococci, the iron-regulated SBPs are significantly upregulated during iron starvation and function to sequester and deliver iron into the bacterial cell, enabling staphylococci to circumvent iron restriction imposed by the host environment. Accordingly, this subset of lipoproteins has been implicated in staphylococcal pathogenesis and virulence. Lipoproteins also activate the host innate immune response, triggered through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 and, notably, the iron-regulated subset of lipoproteins are particularly immunogenic. In this review, we discuss the iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins with regard to their biogenesis, substrate specificity, and impact on the host innate immune response.

  7. Phosphorus in antique iron music wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodway, M

    1987-05-22

    Harpsichords and other wire-strung musical instruments were made with longer strings about the beginning of the 17th century. This change required stronger music wire. Although these changes coincided with the introduction of the first mass-produced steel (iron alloyed with carbon), carbon was not found in samples of antique iron harpsichord wire. The wire contained an amount of phosphorus sufficient to have impeded its conversion to steel, and may have been drawn from iron rejected for this purpose. The method used to select pig iron for wire drawing ensured the highest possible phosphorus content at a time when its presence in iron was unsuspected. Phosphorus as an alloying element has had the reputation for making steel brittle when worked cold. Nevertheless, in replicating the antique wire, it was found that lowcarbon iron that contained 0.16 percent phosphorus was easily drawn to appropriate gauges and strengths for restringing antique harpsichords.

  8. Iron absorption from typical Latin American diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, A; Amar, M; Cornbluth-Szarfarc, S C; Dillman, E; Fosil, M; Biachi, R G; Grebe, G; Hertrampf, E; Kremenchuzky, S; Layrisse, M

    1984-06-01

    The availability and daily absorption of iron was determined by the extrinsic label method in typical lower middle to lower class diets consumed in regions of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela. Differences in iron absorption from meals up to 7-fold, could be attributed to the varying contents of absorption enhancers, eg, in meat, and of inhibitors in tea, vegetables, and wheat or maize bread. The total iron available in the diets from four countries did not meet the physiological requirements for normal subjects but deficient subjects fulfilled their requirements absorbing from 1.0 to 2.1 mg/day. In five diets heme iron (6 to 24% of the total) provided 34 to 73% of the iron absorbed. These data suggest that such absorption and utilization studies may be used to correlate the prevalence of iron deficiency in a population with certain diets and to guide fortification programs.

  9. Molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal iron absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul Sharp; Surjit Kaila Srai

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace metal in the human diet due to its obligate role in a number of metabolic processes.In the diet, iron is present in a number of different forms, generally described as haem (from haemoglobin and myoglobin in animal tissue) and non-haem iron (including ferric oxides and salts, ferritin and lactoferrin).This review describes the molecular mechanisms that co-ordinate the absorption of iron from the diet and its release into the circulation. While many components of the iron transport pathway have been elucidated, a number of key issues still remain to be resolved. Future work in this area will provide a clearer picture regarding the transcellular flux of iron and its regulation by dietary and humoral factors.

  10. [Is iron important in heart failure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murín, Ján; Pernický, Miroslav

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency is a frequent comorbidity in a patient with chronic heart failure, and it associates with a worse prognosis of that patient. Mainly worse quality of life and more rehospitalizations are in these iron deficient patients. Iron metabolism is rather complex and there is some new information concerning this complexity in heart failure. We distinquish an absolute and a functional iron deficiency in heart failure. It is this deficit which is important and not as much is anemia important here. Prevalence of anaemia in heart failure is about 30-50%, higher it is in patients suffering more frequently heart failure decompensations. Treatment of iron deficiency is important and it improves prognosis of these patients. Most experiences there are with i.v. iron treatment (FERRIC HF, FAIR HF and CONFIRM HF studies), less so with per oral treatment. There are no clinical trials which analysed mortality influences.

  11. Iron status in Danish women, 1984-1994: a cohort comparison of changes in iron stores and the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron overload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N.; Byg, K.E.; Ovesen, Lars;

    2003-01-01

    Background and objectives: From 1954 to 1986, flour in Denmark was fortified with 30 mg carbonyl iron per kilogram. This mandatory enrichment of cereal products was abolished in 1987. The aim was to evaluate iron status in the Danish female population before and after abolishment of iron...... fortification. Methods: Iron status, serum ferritin and haemoglobin, was assessed in population surveys in 1983-1984 comprising 1221 Caucasian women (1089 non-blood-donors, 130 donors) and in 1993-1994 comprising 1261 women (1155 non-blood-donors, 104 donors) equally distributed in age cohorts of 40, 50, 60......, postmenopausal women had median ferritin of 75 mug/L and in 1994 of 93 mug/L (P iron stores (ferritin iron stores (ferritin less...

  12. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of chlorinated solvents by reduction at the surface of zero-valent metals and bimetallic systems has emerged as an important approach to the in-situ remediation of ground water. Reduction by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long term performance in field applications.

  13. Direct Iron Coating onto Nd-Fe-B Powder by Thermal Decomposition of Iron Pentacarbonyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamuro, S; Okano, M; Tanaka, T [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Sumiyama, K [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nozawa, N; Nishiuchi, T; Hirosawa, S [Magnetic Materials Research Laboratory, NEOMAX Company, Hitachi Metals, Ltd., Osaka 618-0013 (Japan); Ohkubo, T, E-mail: yamamuro@eng.ehime-u.ac.jp [Magnetic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Iron-coated Nd-Fe-B composite powder was prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl in an inert organic solvent in the presence of alkylamine. Though this method is based on a modified solution-phase process to synthesize highly size-controlled iron nanoparticles, it is in turn featured by a suppressed formation of iron nanoparticles to achieve an efficient iron coating solely onto the surfaces of rare-earth magnet powder. The Nd-Fe-B magnetic powder was successfully coated by iron shells whose thicknesses were of the order of submicrometer to micrometer, being tuneable by the amount of initially loaded iron pentacarbonyl in a reaction flask. The amount of the coated iron reached to more than 10 wt.% of the initial Nd-Fe-B magnetic powder, which is practically sufficient to fabricate Nd-Fe-B/{alpha}-Fe nanocomposite permanent magnets.

  14. Effects of Iron Supplementation and Activity on Serum Iron Depletion and Hemoglobin Levels in Female Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooter, G. Rankin; Mowbray, Kathy W.

    1978-01-01

    Research revealed that a four-month basketball training program did not significantly alter serum iron, total iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, and percent saturation levels in female basketball athletes. (JD)

  15. Time to pump iron: iron-deficiency-signaling mechanisms of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elsbeth L; Connolly, Erin L

    2008-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, yet it often limits plant growth. On the contrary, overaccumulation of iron within plant cells leads to oxidative stress. As a consequence, iron-uptake systems are carefully regulated to ensure that iron homeostasis is maintained. In response to iron limitation, plants induce expression of sets of activities that function at the root-soil interface to solubilize iron and subsequently transfer it across the plasma membrane of root cells. Recent advances have revealed key players in the signaling pathways that function to induce these iron-uptake responses. Transcription factors belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix, ABI3/VP1(B3), and NAC families appear to function either directly or indirectly in the upregulation of iron deficiency responses.

  16. Ferrous versus Ferric Oral Iron Formulations for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency: A Clinical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release, and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form. The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies.

  17. Solidification of cast iron - A study on the effect of microalloy elements on cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham

    The present thesis deals with the heat transfer and solidification of ductile and microalloyed grey cast iron. Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. A series of ductile iron samples with two different...... of the austenite, in the last region to solidify. The superfine graphite which forms in this type of irons is short (10-20µm) and stubby. The microstructure of this kind of graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. The methods to prepare samples of cast iron...... for comprehensive transmission electron microscopy of graphite and the surrounding iron matrix have been developed and explained. Dual beam microscopes are used for sample preparation. A TEM study has been carried out on graphite flakes in grey cast iron using selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Based...

  18. Ferrous versus ferric oral iron formulations for the treatment of iron deficiency: a clinical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Palacios

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release), and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form). The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies.

  19. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-03-26

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients' therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  20. High toughness-high strength iron alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An iron alloy is provided which exhibits strength and toughness characteristics at cryogenic temperatures. The alloy consists essentially of about 10 to 16 percent by weight nickel, about 0.1 to 1.0 percent by weight aluminum, and 0 to about 3 percent by weight copper, with the balance being essentially iron. The iron alloy is produced by a process which includes cold rolling at room temperature and subsequent heat treatment.

  1. Current status of iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamihara, Yoichi, E-mail: kamihara_yoichi@appi.keio.ac.jp [Keio University, Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Current status of iron-based superconductors is summarized. Although short range magnetic ordering and magnetic phase separation of Fe are controversial, (long range) magnetic and electronic phase diagrams of iron based superconductors can be classified into two-type. Antiferromagnetic ordering of itinerant Fe does not coexist with superconducting phase of SmFeAsO{sub 1 - x}F{sub x}. The very large H{sub c2} of iron-based superconductors attract us to attempts at applications.

  2. Current status of iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamihara, Yoichi

    2012-03-01

    Current status of iron-based superconductors is summarized. Although short range magnetic ordering and magnetic phase separation of Fe are controversial, (long range) magnetic and electronic phase diagrams of iron based superconductors can be classified into two-type. Antiferromagnetic ordering of itinerant Fe does not coexist with superconducting phase of SmFeAsO1 - xFx. The very large H c2 of iron-based superconductors attract us to attempts at applications.

  3. Outstanding Lobelia dortmanna in iron armor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Sand; Møller, Claus Lindskov; Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl

    2008-01-01

    .4%) of degradable organic matter. Coatings of oxidized iron on roots in organically enriched sediments reduce radial oxygen loss and, thereby, increase internal concentrations and supply of oxygen to root tips. Oxidized iron is also a redox buffers which may prevent the ingress of sulfides and other reduced toxic...... solutes during nights. Controlled experiments are under way to test if iron enrichment can help survival of rosette species threatened by lake pollution or whether removal of organic surface sediments is required....

  4. Ferroxidase-Mediated Iron Oxide Biomineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeth, Kornelius; Hoiczyk, E.; Okuda, M.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide biomineralization occurs in all living organisms and typically involves protein compartments ranging from 5 to 100nm in size. The smallest iron-oxo particles are formed inside dodecameric Dps protein cages, while the structurally related ferritin compartments consist of twice as many......, translocation, oxidation, nucleation, and storage, that are mediated by ferroxidase centers. Thus, compartmentalized iron oxide biomineralization yields uniform nanoparticles strictly determined by the sizes of the compartments, allowing customization for highly diverse nanotechnological applications....

  5. Properties investigation of austempered ductile iron

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhanshu Detwal; Deivanathan R

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns microstructural and mechanical properties of an austempered ductile cast iron (ADI). The ductile iron material was produced by the sand mould casting technique. Afterwards, austempering heat treatment was applied to the specimens at two different temperatures of 250°C and 350°C. Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs) were produced successfully by different two-stage heat treatments, to obtain favorable microstructure and hardness. The microstructure and hardness obtained by such ...

  6. Iron stores assessment in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Matos, Luís; Batista, Paulo; Monteiro, Nuno; Ribeiro, João; Cipriano, Maria A; Henriques, Pedro; Girão, Fernando; Carvalho, Armando

    2013-06-01

    The relation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and iron overload is well known. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for assessing iron stores. MRI is also validated for liver iron concentration (LIC) assessment. We aimed to assess the effect of active drinking in liver iron stores and the practicability of measuring LIC by MRI in ALD patients. We measured LIC by MRI in 58 ALD patients. We divided patients into two groups - with and without active alcoholism - and we compared several variables between them. We evaluated MRI-LIC, liver iron stores grade, ferritin and necroinflammatory activity grade for significant correlations. Significant necroinflammation (40.0% vs. 4.3%), LIC (40.1 vs. 24.3 µmol/g), and ferritin (1259.7 vs. 568.7 pmol/L) were significantly higher in drinkers. LIC values had a strong association with iron stores grade (r s = 0.706). Ferritin correlated with LIC (r s = 0.615), iron stores grade (r s = 0.546), and necroinflammation (r s = 0.313). The odds ratio for elevated serum ferritin when actively drinking was 7.32. Active alcoholism is associated with increased ALD activity. It is also the key factor in iron overload. Scheuers' semiquantitative score with Perls' staining gives a fairly accurate picture of liver iron overload. Serum ferritin also shows a good correlation with LIC values and biopsy iron stores grade. As most patients present only with mild iron overload, serum ferritin measurement and semiquantitative evaluation of iron stores are adequate, considering MRI high cost. However, if MRI is required to evaluate liver structure, LIC assessment could be performed without added cost.

  7. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Silva, Sebastião William da; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos de [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo César [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel, E-mail: jafeli@iq.unesp.br [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g{sup −1} and 131 emu g{sup −1}, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  8. Dissolved iron and iron isotopes in the southeastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Conway, Tim M.; Lee, Jong-Mi; Kayser, Richard; Thyng, Kristen M.; John, Seth G.; Boyle, Edward A.

    2016-10-01

    The Southeast Pacific Ocean is a severely understudied yet dynamic region for trace metals such as iron, since it experiences steep redox and productivity gradients in upper waters and strong hydrothermal iron inputs to deep waters. In this study, we report the dissolved iron (dFe) distribution from seven stations and Fe isotope ratios (δ56Fe) from three of these stations across a near-zonal transect from 20 to 27°S. We found elevated dFe concentrations associated with the oxygen-deficient zone (ODZ), with light δ56Fe implicating porewater fluxes of reduced Fe. However, temporal dFe variability and rapid δ56Fe shifts with depth suggest gradients in ODZ Fe source and/or redox processes vary over short-depth/spatial scales. The dFe concentrations decreased rapidly offshore, and in the upper ocean dFe was controlled by biological processes, resulting in an Fe:C ratio of 4.2 µmol/mol. Calculated vertical diffusive Fe fluxes were greater than published dust inputs to surface waters, but both were orders of magnitude lower than horizontal diffusive fluxes, which dominate dFe delivery to the gyre. The δ56Fe data in the deep sea showed evidence for a -0.2‰ Antarctic Intermediate Water end-member and a heavy δ56Fe of +0.55‰ for distally transported hydrothermal dissolved Fe from the East Pacific Rise. These heavy δ56Fe values were contrasted with the near-crustal δ56Fe recorded in the hydrothermal plume reaching Station ALOHA in the North Pacific. The heavy hydrothermal δ56Fe precludes a nanopyrite composition of hydrothermal dFe and instead suggests the presence of oxides or, more likely, binding of hydrothermal dFe by organic ligands in the distal plume.

  9. Voronoi analysis of the short-range atomic structure in iron and iron-carbon melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Andrey; Mirzoev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we simulated the atomic structure of liquid iron and iron-carbon alloys by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. Voronoi analysis was used to highlight changes in the close environments of Fe atoms as carbon concentration in the melt increases. We have found, that even high concentrations of carbon do not affect short-range atomic order of iron atoms — it remains effectively the same as in pure iron melts.

  10. Intestinal HIF2α promotes tissue-iron accumulation in disorders of iron overload with anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erik R; Taylor, Matthew; Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Martin, Angelical; Xie, Liwei; Bredell, Bryce X; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2013-12-10

    Several distinct congenital disorders can lead to tissue-iron overload with anemia. Repeated blood transfusions are one of the major causes of iron overload in several of these disorders, including β-thalassemia major, which is characterized by a defective β-globin gene. In this state, hyperabsorption of iron is also observed and can significantly contribute to iron overload. In β-thalassemia intermedia, which does not require blood transfusion for survival, hyperabsorption of iron is the leading cause of iron overload. The mechanism of increased iron absorption in β-thalassemia is unclear. We definitively demonstrate, using genetic mouse models, that intestinal hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF2α) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) are activated early in the pathogenesis of β-thalassemia and are essential for excess iron accumulation in mouse models of β-thalassemia. Moreover, thalassemic mice with established iron overload had significant improvement in tissue-iron levels and anemia following disruption of intestinal HIF2α. In addition to repeated blood transfusions and increased iron absorption, chronic hemolysis is the major cause of tissue-iron accumulation in anemic iron-overload disorders caused by hemolytic anemia. Mechanistic studies in a hemolytic anemia mouse model demonstrated that loss of intestinal HIF2α/DMT1 signaling led to decreased tissue-iron accumulation in the liver without worsening the anemia. These data demonstrate that dysregulation of intestinal hypoxia and HIF2α signaling is critical for progressive iron overload in β-thalassemia and may be a novel therapeutic target in several anemic iron-overload disorders.

  11. The “Iron Screen”: Progressive Development of an Interpretative Analysis of Body Iron Status

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, J. Robert; Turpin, Edward H.; Rawnsley, Howard M

    1982-01-01

    The Iron Screen, a sequential Bayesian decision-making model for the assessment of body iron stores in man, is a special example of the blending of computer support, decision analysis, and multivariate statistical techniques in medicine. This model, originally developed and tested in patients with chronic diseases and a question of iron deficiency anemia, has recently been broadened to include all pateints for whom body iron stores must be determined. In this report we describe operational ex...

  12. Efficacy of iron fortification compared to iron supplementation among Vietnamese schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Khan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of iron fortification is generally assumed to be less than iron supplementation; however, the magnitude of difference in effects is not known. The present study aims to compare the efficacy of these two strategies on anaemia and iron status. After screening on low Hb, 425 anaemic children in six primary schools in Tam Nong district of Phu Tho province were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing two groups receiving iron fortified instant noodles or iron supplementation for 6 months and a control group, with children in all groups having been dewormed. Blood samples were collected before and after intervention for haemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF, serum transferrin receptor (TfR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and haemoglobinopathies analysis. Regression analysis was used to assess the effect of iron fortification and iron supplementation on haemoglobin concentration, SF, TfR, body iron, and anaemic status as outcome variables. The improvement of haemoglobin, SF, and body iron level in the group receiving iron fortification was 42% (2.6 g/L versus 6.2 g/L, 20% (23.5 μg/L versus 117.3 μg/L, and 31.3% (1.4 mg/kg versus 4.4 mg/kg of that in the iron supplementation group. The prevalence of anaemia dropped to 15.1% in the control group, with an additional reduction of anaemia of 8.5% in the iron supplementation group. The additional reduction due to iron fortification was 5.4%, which amounts to well over 50% of the impact of supplementation. In conclusion, the efficacy of iron fortification based on reduction of prevalence of anaemia, and on the change in haemoglobin level, is about half of the maximum impact of supplementation in case of optimal compliance. Thus, in a population of anaemic children with mild iron deficiency, iron fortification should be the preferred strategy to combat anaemia.

  13. Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia and iron deficiency in a pediatric population with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, FS; de Medeiros, IA; Antunes, H.

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia in children with inflammatory bowel disease, although the real prevalence is unknown. Intravenous iron is suggested as the first line treatment. This study aims to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in children with inflammatory bowel disease followed in a Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit of a tertiary center and to evaluate this unit's experience with intravenous iron. info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

  14. Efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose in treating adults with iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Delfini Cançado

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency is the most common disorder in the world, affecting approximately 25% of the world`s population and the most common cause of anemia. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose (IS in the treatment of adults with iron deficiency anemia METHODS: Eighty-six adult patients with iron deficiency anemia, who had intolerance or showed no effect with oral iron therapy, received a weekly dose of 200 mg of intravenous iron sucrose until the hemoglobin level was corrected or until receiving the total dose of intravenous iron calculated for each patient RESULTS: The mean hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 8.54 g/dL and 7.63 ng/mL (pre-treatment and 12.1 g/dL and 99.0 ng/mL (post-treatment (p-value < 0.0001, respectively. The average increases in hemoglobin levels were 3.29 g/dL for women and 4.58 g/dL for men; 94% of male and 84% of female patients responded (hemoglobin increased by at least 2 g/dL to intravenous iron therapy. Correction of anemia was obtained in 47 of 69 (68.1% female patients and in 12 of 17 male (70.6% patients. A total of 515 intravenous infusions of iron sucrose were administered and iron sucrose was generally well tolerated with no moderate or serious adverse drug reactions recorded by the investigators. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirm that the use of intravenous iron sucrose is a safe and effective option in the treatment of adult patients with iron deficiency anemia who lack satisfactory response to oral iron therapy. Intravenous iron sucrose is well tolerated and with a clinically manageable safety profile when using appropriate dosing and monitoring. The availability of intravenous iron sucrose would potentially improve compliance and thereby reduce morbidities from iron deficiency.

  15. Efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose in treating adults with iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; de Figueiredo, Pedro Otavio Novis; Olivato, Maria Cristina Albe; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is the most common disorder in the world, affecting approximately 25% of the world`s population and the most common cause of anemia. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose (IS) in the treatment of adults with iron deficiency anemia Methods Eighty-six adult patients with iron deficiency anemia, who had intolerance or showed no effect with oral iron therapy, received a weekly dose of 200 mg of intravenous iron sucrose until the hemoglobin level was corrected or until receiving the total dose of intravenous iron calculated for each patient Results The mean hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 8.54 g/dL and 7.63 ng/mL (pre-treatment) and 12.1 g/dL and 99.0 ng/mL (post-treatment) (p-value < 0.0001), respectively. The average increases in hemoglobin levels were 3.29 g/dL for women and 4.58 g/dL for men; 94% of male and 84% of female patients responded (hemoglobin increased by at least 2 g/dL) to intravenous iron therapy. Correction of anemia was obtained in 47 of 69 (68.1%) female patients and in 12 of 17 male (70.6%) patients. A total of 515 intravenous infusions of iron sucrose were administered and iron sucrose was generally well tolerated with no moderate or serious adverse drug reactions recorded by the investigators. Conclusions Our data confirm that the use of intravenous iron sucrose is a safe and effective option in the treatment of adult patients with iron deficiency anemia who lack satisfactory response to oral iron therapy. Intravenous iron sucrose is well tolerated and with a clinically manageable safety profile when using appropriate dosing and monitoring. The availability of intravenous iron sucrose would potentially improve compliance and thereby reduce morbidities from iron deficiency. PMID:23049360

  16. Efficacy of iron fortification compared to iron supplementation among Vietnamese schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Le, Huong; Brouwer, Inge D; Burema, Jan; Nguyen, Khan Cong; Kok, Frans J

    2006-12-05

    The effect of iron fortification is generally assumed to be less than iron supplementation; however, the magnitude of difference in effects is not known. The present study aims to compare the efficacy of these two strategies on anaemia and iron status. After screening on low Hb, 425 anaemic children in six primary schools in Tam Nong district of Phu Tho province were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing two groups receiving iron fortified instant noodles or iron supplementation for 6 months and a control group, with children in all groups having been dewormed. Blood samples were collected before and after intervention for haemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), serum transferrin receptor (TfR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and haemoglobinopathies analysis. Regression analysis was used to assess the effect of iron fortification and iron supplementation on haemoglobin concentration, SF, TfR, body iron, and anaemic status as outcome variables. The improvement of haemoglobin, SF, and body iron level in the group receiving iron fortification was 42% (2.6 g/L versus 6.2 g/L), 20% (23.5 microg/L versus 117.3 microg/L), and 31.3% (1.4 mg/kg versus 4.4 mg/kg) of that in the iron supplementation group. The prevalence of anaemia dropped to 15.1% in the control group, with an additional reduction of anaemia of 8.5% in the iron supplementation group. The additional reduction due to iron fortification was 5.4%, which amounts to well over 50% of the impact of supplementation. In conclusion, the efficacy of iron fortification based on reduction of prevalence of anaemia, and on the change in haemoglobin level, is about half of the maximum impact of supplementation in case of optimal compliance. Thus, in a population of anaemic children with mild iron deficiency, iron fortification should be the preferred strategy to combat anaemia.

  17. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; da Silva, Sebastião William; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; de Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90-120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe3O4) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron-iron oxide were 145 emu g-1 and 131 emu g-1, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  18. Thermomagnetic evidence of native iron in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.; Sharonova, Z. V.

    2012-04-01

    The paper summarizes the results of thermomagnetic analysis concerning the distribution of metallic iron in the sediments ranging in age from Miocene to Early Cretaceous sampled from the following sections: Gams (Austria); Verkhorech'e and Sel'bukhra (the Crimea); Kvirinaki and Tetritskaro (Georgia); Aimaki, Dzhengutai, Madzhalis, and Gergebil (Ciscaucasia, Russia); Klyuchi and Teplovka (Volga region, Russia); Koshak (Kazakhstan); and Khalats and Kara-Kala (Turkmenia). Small amounts of native iron (from 10-5% to 0.05%) are identified in 521 samples of 921 studied; i.e., iron particles are almost pervasive. This fact traces the origin of these particles to cosmic dust. Some established features point to the heterogeneous character of the cosmic dust: (a) the samples clearly fall into two groups. One group comprises the rocks that contain iron particles; the rocks of the other group are iron-free. In the first group, four intervals are distinguished where the sediments are globally enriched with iron with constant nickel content (5-6%); (b) in terms of composition, the iron particles are divided into three groups. The first group contains pure iron; the particles pertaining to the second group contain iron with a minor amount of nickel typical for kamacite; and the third group comprises the particles of Fe-Ni alloy with more than 20% nickel. The first and the second groups are ubiquitous; the particles of the third group are spread locally. They bear no relation to cosmic dust and are probably associated with the meteoritic impacts.

  19. Research on the Iron-Nitrogen System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    Boundaries in the Iron-Nitrogen System 71 X Solubility of Nitrogen in Alpha Iron at One Atmosphere Pressure 74 XI The Composition of the Alpha and...compound Fe2 He reported that the maximum I , -. ,* solubility of nitrogen in alpha iron was about 0.02 percent, since no evidence of nitride needles...and Fe8N. The alpha iron at this temperature contained a maximum of 0.108 percent nitrogen. Sawyer also observed a second arrest point at 7000 C

  20. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....