WorldWideScience

Sample records for iron bioavailability electronic

  1. Higher iron bioavailability of a human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Yang, Fan; Fan, Daidi; Wang, Ya; Yu, Yuanyuan

    2017-07-01

    Iron deficiency remains a public health problem around the world due to low iron intake and/or bioavailability. FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, and ferrous glycinate chelate are rich in iron but have poor bioavailability. To solve the problem of iron deficiency, following previous research studies, a thiolated human-like collagen-ironcomplex supplement with a high iron content was prepared in an anaerobic workstation. In addition, cell viability tests were evaluated after conducting an MTT assay, and a quantitative analysis of the thiolated human-like collagen-iron digesta samples was performed using the SDS-PAGE method coupled with gel filtration chromatography. The iron bioavailability was assessed using Caco-2 cell monolayers and iron-deficiency anemia mice models. The results showed that (1) one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 35.34 moles of iron; (2) thiolated human-like collagen-iron did not exhibit cytotoxity and (3) thiolated human-like collagen- iron digesta samples had higher bioavailability than other iron supplements, including FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, ferrous glycine chelate and thiolated human-like collagen-Fe iron. Finally, the iron bioavailability was significantly enhanced by vitamin C. These results indicated that thiolated human-like collagen-iron is a promising iron supplement for use in the future.

  2. Prebiotics increase heme iron bioavailability and do not affect non-heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinborn, Valerie; Valenzuela, Carolina; Olivares, Manuel; Arredondo, Miguel; Weill, Ricardo; Pizarro, Fernando

    2017-05-24

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect of a prebiotic mix on heme and non-heme iron (Fe) bioavailability in humans. To this purpose, twenty-four healthy women were randomized into one of two study groups. One group ate one yogurt per day for 12 days with a prebiotic mix (prebiotic group) and the other group received the same yogurt but without the prebiotic mix (control group). Before and after the intake period, the subjects participated in Fe absorption studies. These studies used 55 Fe and 59 Fe radioactive isotopes as markers of heme Fe and non-heme Fe, respectively, and Fe absorption was measured by the incorporation of radioactive Fe into erythrocytes. The results showed that there were no significant differences in heme and non-heme Fe bioavailability in the control group. Heme Fe bioavailability of the prebiotic group increased significantly by 56% post-prebiotic intake. There were no significant differences in non-heme Fe bioavailability in this group. We concluded that daily consumption of a prebiotic mix increases heme Fe bioavailability and does not affect non-heme iron bioavailability.

  3. In Vitro Iron Bioavailability of Brazilian Food-Based by-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocchetti, Gabriela M; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A; Wawer, Anna A; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Christides, Tatiana

    2018-05-16

    Background : Iron deficiency is a public health problem in many low- and middle-income countries. Introduction of agro-industrial food by-products, as additional source of nutrients, could help alleviate this micronutrient deficiency, provide alternative sources of nutrients and calories in developed countries, and be a partial solution for disposal of agro-industry by-products. Methods : The aim of this study was to determine iron bioavailability of 5 by-products from Brazilian agro-industry (peels from cucumber, pumpkin, and jackfruit, cupuaçu seed peel, and rice bran), using the in vitro digestion/ Caco-2 cell model; with Caco-2 cell ferritin formation as a surrogate marker of iron bioavailability. Total and dialyzable Fe, macronutrients, the concentrations of iron-uptake inhibitors (phytic acid, tannins, fiber) and their correlation with iron bioavailability were also evaluated. Results : The iron content of all by-products was high, but the concentration of iron and predicted bioavailability were not related. Rice bran and cupuaçu seed peel had the highest amount of phytic acid and tannins, and lowest iron bioavailability. Cucumber peels alone, and with added extrinsic Fe, and pumpkin peels with extrinsic added iron, had the highest iron bioavailability. Conclusion : The results suggest that cucumber and pumpkin peel could be valuable alternative sources of bioavailable Fe to reduce iron deficiency in at-risk populations.

  4. Enhanced ferrihydrite dissolution by a unicellular, planktonic cyanobacterium: a biological contribution to particulate iron bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, Chana; Kessler, Nivi; Keren, Nir; Shaked, Yeala

    2016-12-01

    Iron (Fe) bioavailability, as determined by its sources, sinks, solubility and speciation, places severe environmental constraints on microorganisms in aquatic environments. Cyanobacteria are a widespread group of aquatic, photosynthetic microorganisms with especially high iron requirements. While iron exists predominantly in particulate form, little is known about its bioavailability to cyanobacteria. Some cyanobacteria secrete iron solubilizing ligands called siderophores, yet many environmentally relevant strains do not have this ability. This work explores the bioavailability of amorphous synthetic Fe-oxides (ferrihydrite) to the non-siderophore producing, unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp PCC 6803. Iron uptake assays with 55 ferrihydrite established dissolution as a critical prerequisite for iron transport. Dissolution assays with the iron binding ligand, desferrioxamine B, demonstrated that Synechocystis 6803 enhances ferrihydrite dissolution, exerting siderophore-independent biological influence on ferrihydrite bioavailability. Dissolution mechanisms were studied using a range of experimental conditions; both cell-particle physical proximity and cellular electron flow were shown to be important determinants of bio-dissolution by Synechocystis 6803. Finally, the effects of ferrihydrite stability on bio-dissolution rates and cell physiology were measured, integrating biological and chemical aspects of ferrihydrite bioavailability. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Synechocystis 6803 actively dissolves ferrihydrite, highlighting a significant biological component to mineral phase iron bioavailability in aquatic environments. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Iron bioavailability: UK Food Standards Agency workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta; Sanderson, Peter; Hurrell, Richard F; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Geissler, Catherine; Prentice, Ann; Beard, John L

    2006-11-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency convened a group of expert scientists to review current research investigating factors affecting iron status and the bioavailability of dietary iron. Results presented at the workshop show menstrual blood loss to be the major determinant of body iron stores in premenopausal women. In the presence of abundant and varied food supplies, the health consequences of lower iron bioavailability are unclear and require further investigation.

  6. Bioavailability of elemental iron powders to rats is less than bakery-grade ferrous sulfate and predicted by iron solubility and particle surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, James H; Newman, Samuel M; Hunt, Janet R

    2003-11-01

    Foods are fortified with elemental forms of iron to reduce iron deficiency. However, the nutritional efficacy of current, commercially produced elemental iron powders has not been verified. We determined the bioavailability of six commercial elemental iron powders and examined how physicochemistry influences bioavailability. Relative biological value (RBV) of the iron powders was determined using a hemoglobin repletion/slope ratio method, treating iron-deficient rats with repletion diets fortified with graded quantities of iron powders, bakery-grade ferrous sulfate or no added iron. Iron powders were assessed physicochemically by measuring iron solubility in hydrochloric acid at pH 1.0 and 1.7, surface area by nitrogen gas adsorption and surface microstructure by electron microscopy. Bioavailability from the iron powders, based on absolute iron intake, was significantly less than from FeSO4 (100%; P Electrolytic (54%; A-131, U.S.) > Electrolytic (46%; Electrolytic Iron, India) > H-Reduced (42%; AC-325, U.S.) > Reduced (24%; ATOMET 95SP, Canada) > CO-Reduced (21%; RSI-325, Sweden). Solubility testing of the iron powders resulted in different relative rankings and better RBV predictability with increasing time at pH 1.7 (R2 = 0.65 at 150 min). The prediction was improved with less time and lower pH (R2 = 0.82, pH 1.0 at 30 min). Surface area, ranging from 90 to 370 m2/kg, was also highly predictive of RBV (R2 = 0.80). Bioavailability of iron powders is less than bakery-grade ferrous sulfate and varies up to three times among different commercial forms. Solubility at pH 1.0 and surface area were predictive of iron bioavailability in rats.

  7. The influence of extracellular superoxide on iron redox chemistry and bioavailability to aquatic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eRose

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide, the one-electron reduced form of dioxygen, is produced in the extracellular milieu of aquatic microbes through a range of abiotic chemical processes and also by microbes themselves. Due to its ability to promote both oxidative and reductive reactions, superoxide may have a profound impact on the redox state of iron, potentially influencing iron solubility, complex speciation and bioavailability. The interplay between iron, superoxide and oxygen may also produce a cascade of other highly reactive transients in oxygenated natural waters. For microbes, the overall effect of reactions between superoxide and iron may be deleterious or beneficial, depending on the organism and its chemical environment. Here I critically discuss recent advances in understanding: (i sources of extracellular superoxide in natural waters, with a particular emphasis on microbial generation; (ii the chemistry of reactions between superoxide and iron; and (iii the influence of these processes on iron bioavailability and microbial iron nutrition.

  8. Saccharides enhance iron bioavailability to Southern Ocean phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, C.S.; Schoemann, V.; Nichols, C.M.; Butler, E.C.V.; Boyd, P.W.; Nichols, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Iron limits primary productivity in vast regions of the ocean. Given that marine phytoplankton contribute up to 40% of global biological carbon fixation, it is important to understand what parameters control the availability of iron (iron bioavailability) to these organisms. Most studies on iron

  9. Comparing soluble ferric pyrophosphate to common iron salts and chelates as sources of bioavailable iron in a Caco-2 cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Le; Glahn, Raymond P; Nelson, Deanna; Miller, Dennis D

    2009-06-10

    Iron bioavailability from supplements and fortificants varies depending upon the form of the iron and the presence or absence of iron absorption enhancers and inhibitors. Our objectives were to compare the effects of pH and selected enhancers and inhibitors and food matrices on the bioavailability of iron in soluble ferric pyrophosphate (SFP) to other iron fortificants using a Caco-2 cell culture model with or without the combination of in vitro digestion. Ferritin formation was the highest in cells treated with SFP compared to those treated with other iron compounds or chelates. Exposure to pH 2 followed by adjustment to pH 7 markedly decreased FeSO(4) bioavailability but had a smaller effect on bioavailabilities from SFP and sodium iron(III) ethylenediaminetetraacetate (NaFeEDTA), suggesting that chelating agents minimize the effects of pH on iron bioavailability. Adding ascorbic acid (AA) and cysteine to SFP in a 20:1 molar ratio increased ferritin formation by 3- and 2-fold, respectively, whereas adding citrate had no significant effect on the bioavailability of SFP. Adding phytic acid (10:1) and tannic acid (1:1) to iron decreased iron bioavailability from SFP by 91 and 99%, respectively. The addition of zinc had a marked inhibitory effect on iron bioavailability. Calcium and magnesium also inhibited iron bioavailability but to a lesser extent. Incorporating SFP in rice greatly reduced iron bioavailability from SFP, but this effect can be partially reversed with the addition of AA. SFP and FeSO(4) were taken up similarly when added to nonfat dry milk. Our results suggest that dietary factors known to enhance and inhibit iron bioavailability from various iron sources affect iron bioavailability from SFP in similar directions. However, the magnitude of the effects of iron absorption inhibitors on SFP iron appears to be smaller than on iron salts, such as FeSO(4) and FeCl(3). This supports the hypothesis that SFP is a promising iron source for food fortification

  10. Iron bioavailability of Lupinus rotundiflorus seeds and roots in low-iron-diet treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elia Herminia VALDÉS MIRAMONTES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate iron bioavailability of roots and cooked seeds of Lupinus rotundiflorus for human consumption using a low-iron-diet rat model. Methods A hemoglobin depletion–repletion test was performed using rats. A standard diet containing 8mg kg-1 of iron was used. Three experimental diets were prepared based on the standard diet: 2.3g of root flour added to D1, 21.5g cooked seed flour added to D2, and 0.03g of ferrous sulfate added to D3 (control diet, adjusting iron concentration of the diets to 24mg kg-1. Hemoglobin regeneration efficiency was used to measure iron bioavailability. Results Hemoglobin regeneration efficiency showed values of 13.80+2.49%, 13.70+1.60% and 18.38+1.56 in D1, D2 and D3 respectively, and biological relative values of 72.8, 75.08, and 100.00% (.<0.05. Conclusion Roots and cooked seeds of Lupinus rotundiflorus showed potential iron bioavailability, despite being a vegetal source, which could also encourage the study of other species of lupin as a source of iron.

  11. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin in a Caco-2 cell culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize is an important staple crop in many parts of the world but has low iron bioavailability, in part due to its high phytate content. Hemoglobin is a form of iron that is highly bioavailable and its bioavailability is not inhibited by phytate. We hypothesize that maize hemoglobin is a highly bioav...

  12. Higher bioavailability of iron from whole wheat bread compared with iron-fortified white breads in caco-2 cell model: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikooyeh, Bahareh; Neyestani, Tirang R

    2017-06-01

    Bread, as the staple food of Iranians, with average per capita consumption of 300 g d -1 , could potentially be a good vehicle for many fortificants, including iron. In this study, iron bioavailability from flat breads (three fortified and one whole wheat unfortified) was investigated using in vitro simulation of gastrointestinal digestion and absorption in a caco-2 cell model. Despite having a lower ferritin/protein ratio in comparison with fortified breads, whole wheat bread showed higher iron bioavailability than the other three types of bread. Assuming iron bioavailability from the ferrous sulfate supplement used as standard was about 10%, the estimated bioavailability of iron from the test breads was calculated as 5.0-8.0%. Whole wheat bread (∼8%), as compared with the fortified breads (∼5-6.5%), had higher iron bioavailability. Iron from unfortified whole wheat bread is more bioavailable than from three types of iron-fortified breads. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Heat-treated hull flour does not affect iron bioavailability in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Carvalho, Ariela Werneck de; Silva, Cassiano Oliveira da; Dantas, Maria Inês de Souza; Natal, Dorina Isabel Gomes; Ribeiro, Sônia Machado Rocha; Costa, Neuza Maria Brunoro

    2011-06-01

    In this study the chemical composition and iron bioavailability of hull and hull-less soybean flour from the new cultivar UFVTN 105AP was evaluated. The hemoglobin depletion-repletion method was used in Wistar rats. Soybean hull flour presented 37% more total dietary fiber and higher content of iron than hull-less soybean flour. The phytate:iron molar ratio, however, was 2-fold lower in the soybean hull flour in compared to the hull-less soybean flour. Animals fed soybean hull flour presented hemoglobin gains similar to those of the control diet group (p > 0.05). The Relative Biological Values of hull and hull-less soybean flour were 68.5% and 67.1%, respectively, compared to the control group. Heat-treated soybean hull flour (150 degrees C/30 minutes) showed high content of iron and low phytate, which favors the iron bioavailability. Thus, the soybean hull flour is a better source of dietary fiber and iron than hull-less soybean flour at comparable bioavailabilities.

  14. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  15. Bioavailable iron in the Southern Ocean: the significance of the iceberg conveyor belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Tranter, Martyn; Tulaczyk, Slawek

    2008-05-30

    Productivity in the Southern Oceans is iron-limited, and the supply of iron dissolved from aeolian dust is believed to be the main source from outside the marine reservoir. Glacial sediment sources of iron have rarely been considered, as the iron has been assumed to be inert and non-bioavailable. This study demonstrates the presence of potentially bioavailable Fe as ferrihydrite and goethite in nanoparticulate clusters, in sediments collected from icebergs in the Southern Ocean and glaciers on the Antarctic landmass. Nanoparticles in ice can be transported by icebergs away from coastal regions in the Southern Ocean, enabling melting to release bioavailable Fe to the open ocean. The abundance of nanoparticulate iron has been measured by an ascorbate extraction. This data indicates that the fluxes of bioavailable iron supplied to the Southern Ocean from aeolian dust (0.01-0.13 Tg yr(-1)) and icebergs (0.06-0.12 Tg yr(-1)) are comparable. Increases in iceberg production thus have the capacity to increase productivity and this newly identified negative feedback may help to mitigate fossil fuel emissions.

  16. Phytic acid concentration influences iron bioavailability from biofortified beans in Rwandese women with low iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Egli, Ines; Gahutu, Jean B; Tugirimana, Pierrot L; Boy, Erick; Hurrell, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The common bean is a staple crop in many African and Latin American countries and is the focus of biofortification initiatives. Bean iron concentration has been doubled by selective plant breeding, but the additional iron is reported to be of low bioavailability, most likely due to high phytic acid (PA) concentrations. The present study evaluated the impact of PA on iron bioavailability from iron-biofortified beans. Iron absorption, based on erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes, was measured in 22 Rwandese women who consumed multiple, composite bean meals with potatoes or rice in a crossover design. Iron absorption from meals containing biofortified beans (8.8 mg Fe, 1320 mg PA/100 g) and control beans (5.4 mg Fe, 980 mg PA/100 g) was measured with beans containing either their native PA concentration or with beans that were ∼50% dephytinized or >95% dephytinized. The iron concentration of the cooked composite meals with biofortified beans was 54% higher than in the same meals with control beans. With native PA concentrations, fractional iron absorption from the control bean meals was 9.2%, 30% higher than that from the biofortified bean meals (P bean meals (406 μg) was 19% higher (P bean meals. With ∼50% and >95% dephytinization, the quantity of iron absorbed from the biofortified bean meals increased to 599 and 746 μg, respectively, which was 37% (P bean meals. PA strongly decreases iron bioavailability from iron-biofortified beans, and a high PA concentration is an important impediment to the optimal effectiveness of bean iron biofortification. Plant breeders should focus on lowering the PA concentration of high-iron beans. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01521273. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  18. Chemical composition and effects of micronized corn bran on iron bioavailability in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Irineu de Oliveira Junior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The degermination of corn grains by dry milling generates 5% of a fibrous residue. After segregation and micronization, corn bran becomes a potential source of dietary fiber consumption. However, its effect on iron bioavailability has not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to determine the nutritional composition of corn bran and its effects on iron bioavailability using the hemoglobin depletion-repletion method in rats. The animals were divided into two groups: cellulose (control and corn bran (experimental. The bran had high content of total dietary fiber, especially the insoluble fraction, and low phytate content. Hemoglobin uptake did not differ between groups at the end of repletion period, and the iron relative bioavailability value of the corn bran diet was 104% in comparison to that of the control group. The product evaluated proved to be a potential source of dietary fiber and it showed no negative effects on iron bioavailability.

  19. Effect of dietary iron source and iron status on iron bioavailability tests in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Hendricks, D.G.; Mahoney, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Weanling male rats were made anemic in 7 days by feeding a low iron diet and bleeding. Healthy rats were fed the low iron diet supplemented with ferrous sulfate (29 ppm Fe). Each group was subdivided and fed for 10 days on test diets containing about 29 ppm iron that were formulated with meat:spinach mixtures or meat:soy mixtures to provided 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, or 0:100% of the dietary iron from these sources or from a ferrous sulfate diet. After 3 days on the diets all rats were dosed orally with 2 or 5 micro curries of 59 Fe after a 18 hour fast and refeeding for 1.5 hours. Iron status influenced liver iron, carcass iron, liver radio activity and percent of radioactive dose retained. Diet influenced fecal iron and apparent absorption of iron. In iron bioavailability studies assessment methodology and iron status of the test subject greatly influences the estimates of the value of dietary sources of iron

  20. Evaluation of iron bioavailability in a mixture of cereals, seeds, and grains ("Human Ration"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Nery Enes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron bioavailability was evaluated in three mixtures of cereals, seeds, and grains ("Human Ration": light, regular, and homemade provided to rats. The animals received an iron depletion diet for 21 days, followed by a repletion diet containing 12 mg·kg-1 of iron for 14 days. The hemoglobin regeneration efficiency and the relative biological value did not differ between the light mixture and control group. The iron bioavailability of the light mixture of cereals, seeds, and grains and the control group were 99.99±27.62 and 80.02±36.63, respectively, while the regular and homemade mixtures of cereals, seeds, and grains showed lower iron bioavailability, 50.12±35.53 and 66.66±15.44, respectively; the iron content of the diet with light cereal mixture light was statistically similar to that of the control (ferrous sulfate 99.99±27.62. The high content of tannin (202.81±19.53 mg·100-1 in the diet with the regular cereal mixture may have contributed to its low iron bioavailability. The higher intake of soluble fiber by the animals fed the light mixture (21.15±0.92 g was moderately correlated (r=0.5712, p=0.0018 with the concentration of propionate in the caecal bulk (65.49±11.08 µmol/g. The short chain fatty acids produced by soluble fiber fermentation, associated with the low-content of tannin may have improved iron solubility and absorption in the light cereal mixture diet. The iron bioavailability in the light mixture of cereals, seeds, and grains was similar to that of ferrous sulfate.

  1. Increased iron bioavailability from lactic-fermented vegetables is likely an effect of promoting the formation of ferric iron (Fe(3+)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheers, Nathalie; Rossander-Hulthen, Lena; Torsdottir, Inga; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2016-02-01

    Lactic fermentation of foods increases the availability of iron as shown in a number of studies throughout the years. Several explanations have been provided such as decreased content of inhibitory phytate, increased solubility of iron, and increased content of lactic acid in the fermented product. However, to our knowledge, there are no data to support that the bioavailability of iron is affected by lactic fermentation. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the bioavailability of iron from a vegetable mix was affected by lactic fermentation and to propose a mechanism for such an event, by conducting human and cell (Caco-2, HepG2) studies and iron speciation measurements (voltammetry). We also investigated whether the absorption of zinc was affected by the lactic fermentation. In human subjects, we observed that lactic-fermented vegetables served with both a high-phytate and low-phytate meal increased the absorption of iron, but not zinc. In vitro digested fermented vegetables were able to provoke a greater hepcidin response per ng Fe than fresh vegetables, indicating that Fe in the fermented mixes was more bioavailable, independent on the soluble Fe content. We measured that hydrated Fe(3+) species were increased after the lactic fermentation, while there was no significant change in hydrated Fe(2+). Furthermore, lactate addition to Caco-2 cells did not affect ferritin formation in response to Fe nor did lactate affect the hepcidin response in the Caco-2/HepG2 cell system. The mechanism for the increased bioavailability of iron from lactic-fermented vegetables is likely an effect of the increase in ferric iron (Fe(3+)) species caused by the lactic fermentation. No effect on zinc bioavailability was observed.

  2. Amyloid fibril systems reduce, stabilize and deliver bioavailable nanosized iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Posavec, Lidija; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Hilty, Florentine M.; Nyström, Gustav; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Hilbe, Monika; Rossi, Antonella; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2017-07-01

    Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a major global public health problem. A sustainable and cost-effective strategy to reduce IDA is iron fortification of foods, but the most bioavailable fortificants cause adverse organoleptic changes in foods. Iron nanoparticles are a promising solution in food matrices, although their tendency to oxidize and rapidly aggregate in solution severely limits their use in fortification. Amyloid fibrils are protein aggregates initially known for their association with neurodegenerative disorders, but recently described in the context of biological functions in living organisms and emerging as unique biomaterial building blocks. Here, we show an original application for these protein fibrils as efficient carriers for iron fortification. We use biodegradable amyloid fibrils from β-lactoglobulin, an inexpensive milk protein with natural reducing effects, as anti-oxidizing nanocarriers and colloidal stabilizers for iron nanoparticles. The resulting hybrid material forms a stable protein-iron colloidal dispersion that undergoes rapid dissolution and releases iron ions during acidic and enzymatic in vitro digestion. Importantly, this hybrid shows high in vivo iron bioavailability, equivalent to ferrous sulfate in haemoglobin-repletion and stable-isotope studies in rats, but with reduced organoleptic changes in foods. Feeding the rats with these hybrid materials did not result in abnormal iron accumulation in any organs, or changes in whole blood glutathione concentrations, inferring their primary safety. Therefore, these iron-amyloid fibril hybrids emerge as novel, highly effective delivery systems for iron in both solid and liquid matrices.

  3. Nicotianamine, a novel enhancer of rice iron bioavailability to humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqing Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polished rice is a staple food for over 50% of the world's population, but contains little bioavailable iron (Fe to meet human needs. Thus, biofortifying the rice grain with novel promoters or enhancers of Fe utilization would be one of the most effective strategies to prevent the high prevalence of Fe deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in the developing world. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We transformed an elite rice line cultivated in Southern China with the rice nicotianamine synthase gene (OsNAS1 fused to a rice glutelin promoter. Endosperm overexpression of OsNAS1 resulted in a significant increase in nicotianamine (NA concentrations in both unpolished and polished grain. Bioavailability of Fe from the high NA grain, as measured by ferritin synthesis in an in vitro Caco-2 cell model that simulates the human digestive system, was twice as much as that of the control line. When added at 1:1 molar ratio to ferrous Fe in the cell system, NA was twice as effective when compared to ascorbic acid (one of the most potent known enhancers of Fe bioavailability in promoting more ferritin synthesis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrated that NA is a novel and effective promoter of iron utilization. Biofortifying polished rice with this compound has great potential in combating global human iron deficiency in people dependent on rice for their sustenance.

  4. Iron bioavailability studies as assessed by intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Although soybeans are a rich source of iron and incorporation of soy protein into diets is increasing, the presence of phytate or fiber endogenous to the seeds may inhibit total iron absorption from diets including soy protein. Four studies on iron bioavailability as assessed by intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques in rats were completed. The effect of previous dietary protein on the absorption of intrinsically 59 Fe labeled defatted soy flour was determined in rats. The results indicated that the type of dietary protein (animal vs. plant) in pre-test diets would have little influence on iron absorption from a single soy protein test meal. Therefore, adaptation of soy protein does not improve bioavailability of iron. Soybean hulls were investigated as a source of iron fortification in bread. The results indicated that retention of 59 Fe from white bread baked with soy hulls did not differ from white bread fortified with bakery grade ferrous sulfate. The effect of endogenous soybean phytate on iron absorption in rats was measured using seeds of varying phytate content and intrinsically labeled with 59 Fe. Increasing concentration of phytate in whole soybean flour had no significant effect on iron absorption

  5. Relationship of dietary factors with dialyzable iron and in vitro iron bioavailability in the meals of farm women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anamika; Bains, Kiran; Kaur, Hapreet

    2016-04-01

    Sixty rural women with age varying between 25 and 35 were selected randomly to determine the role of dietary factors on bioavailability of iron in their diets. Food samples of selected subjects were collected for three major meals i.e. breakfast, lunch and dinner for three consecutive days. The samples were analyzed for meal constituents associated with iron absorption as well as for total and dialyzable iron. Based on dietary characteristics, the diets of the farm women were in the class of intermediate diets as per FAO/WHO classification with iron bioavailability of 8.11 %. The statistical analysis revealed that the meal constituents which were found to influence iron absorption positively were ascorbic acid and β-carotene in breakfast and only β-carotene in dinner. The meal constituents which affected iron absorption negatively were zinc and calcium in breakfast as well as lunch and phytates and NDF in dinner, however, polyphenols present in the meals of the subjects did not show any relationship with iron absorption.

  6. Relative Bioavailability of Iron in Bangladeshi Traditional Meals Prepared with Iron-Fortified Lentil Dal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Podder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to low Fe bioavailability and low consumption per meal, lentil must be fortified to contribute significant bioavailable Fe in the Bangladeshi diet. Moreover, since red lentil is dehulled prior to consumption, an opportunity exists at this point to fortify lentil with Fe. Thus, in the present study, lentil was Fe-fortified (using a fortificant Fe concentration of 2800 µg g−1 and used in 30 traditional Bangladeshi meals with broad differences in concentrations of iron, phytic acid (PA, and relative Fe bioavailability (RFeB%. Fortification with NaFeEDTA increased the iron concentration in lentil from 60 to 439 µg g−1 and resulted in a 79% increase in the amount of available Fe as estimated by Caco-2 cell ferritin formation. Phytic acid levels were reduced from 6.2 to 4.6 mg g−1 when fortified lentil was added, thereby reducing the PA:Fe molar ratio from 8.8 to 0.9. This effect was presumably due to dephytinization of fortified lentil during the fortification process. A significant (p ≤ 0.01 Pearson correlation was observed between Fe concentration and RFeB% and between RFeB% and PA:Fe molar ratio in meals with fortified lentil, but not for the meal with unfortified lentil. In conclusion, fortified lentil can contribute significant bioavailable Fe to populations at risk of Fe deficiency.

  7. Relative Bioavailability of Iron in Bangladeshi Traditional Meals Prepared with Iron-Fortified Lentil Dal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Rajib; M DellaValle, Diane; T Tyler, Robert; P Glahn, Raymond; Tako, Elad; Vandenberg, Albert

    2018-03-15

    Due to low Fe bioavailability and low consumption per meal, lentil must be fortified to contribute significant bioavailable Fe in the Bangladeshi diet. Moreover, since red lentil is dehulled prior to consumption, an opportunity exists at this point to fortify lentil with Fe. Thus, in the present study, lentil was Fe-fortified (using a fortificant Fe concentration of 2800 µg g -1 ) and used in 30 traditional Bangladeshi meals with broad differences in concentrations of iron, phytic acid (PA), and relative Fe bioavailability (RFeB%). Fortification with NaFeEDTA increased the iron concentration in lentil from 60 to 439 µg g -1 and resulted in a 79% increase in the amount of available Fe as estimated by Caco-2 cell ferritin formation. Phytic acid levels were reduced from 6.2 to 4.6 mg g -1 when fortified lentil was added, thereby reducing the PA:Fe molar ratio from 8.8 to 0.9. This effect was presumably due to dephytinization of fortified lentil during the fortification process. A significant ( p ≤ 0.01) Pearson correlation was observed between Fe concentration and RFeB% and between RFeB% and PA:Fe molar ratio in meals with fortified lentil, but not for the meal with unfortified lentil. In conclusion, fortified lentil can contribute significant bioavailable Fe to populations at risk of Fe deficiency.

  8. Isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from Myanmar diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin Maung Naing; Myo Khin

    1992-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional problem in Myanmar. The preliminary studies in this paper are to be used as a feasibility study for an iron fortification programme in Myanmar. This programme is now in the planning stages. This paper contains summaries of information gathered from a dietary survey, isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from the daily diet, and a work plan for fortifying table salt with iron. 6 refs, 6 tabs

  9. Bioavailability of iron to rats from processed soybean fractions determined by intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, C.M.; Nelson, N.; Elliott, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques were used to measure iron bioavailability from soybean fractions (isolated soy protein, defatted flour, soy hulls, insoluble material and whey) by iron-depleted and non-iron-depleted rats. As expected, absorption of iron was higher in the iron-depleted than in the non-iron-depleted rats. In the iron-depleted group, significantly more iron was absorbed from soy whey than from other fractions. No other significant difference in iron absorption associated with iron source was observed. The higher absorption rate of iron from whey by the iron-depleted rats probably was related to a lower quantity of food consumed during the test meal by this group. Intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques produced similar assessments of bioavailability of iron

  10. Isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from Myanmar diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin Maung Naing; Myo Khin

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the dietary intakes and serum levels of iron and zinc in twenty apparently healthy Myanmar adults (10 males and 10 females), using atomic absorption spetrophotometry. The mean iron intake of females was found to be lower than the FAO/WHO recommended allowance whereas for men it was found to be adequate. The mean serum iron concentration in females was found to be significantly lower than in males (p 4· 7H 2 O, and 5g of sodium-hexa-metaphosphate thoroughly and then the mixture was again mixed with 1 kg of salt. This was done in July 1992. The stability of iron-fortified salt (i.e. change in colour of salt) as well as ferrous and ferric iron content of iron-fortified salt, were determined at monthly intervals. The iron-fortified salt was found to be stable up to the time of report writing, i.e. 3rd week of October, 1992. The ferrous iron content of salt was found to range between 0.95 to 0.98 mg Fe/g salt. Bioavailability studies of iron from two types of standard meals, one containing staple rice, 32 g of fish, water cress, watery fish paste and cucumber, and another containing boiled peas in place of fish, were conducted on two groups of male subjects using 59 Fe as an extrinsic tag. Bioavailability studies of iron from the above two types of meals cooked with iron-fortified salt (1 mg/g salt) were also conducted on the same groups of subjects using 59 Fe as an extrinsic tag. Reference dose absorption of iron will be conducted. This work is in progress. (author). 6 refs, 4 tabs

  11. Induction of interleukin-6 by coal containing bioavailable iron is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coal mining causes health problems, such as pneumoconiosis. We have previously shown that prevalence of pneumoconiosis in workers from various coalmine regions positively correlates with levels of bioavailable iron (BAI) in the coals from that region. In the present study, the nature of reactive oxygen species formed ...

  12. Relationship of dietary factors with dialyzable iron and in vitro iron bioavailability in the meals of farm women

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Anamika; Bains, Kiran; Kaur, Hapreet

    2016-01-01

    Sixty rural women with age varying between 25 and 35 were selected randomly to determine the role of dietary factors on bioavailability of iron in their diets. Food samples of selected subjects were collected for three major meals i.e. breakfast, lunch and dinner for three consecutive days. The samples were analyzed for meal constituents associated with iron absorption as well as for total and dialyzable iron. Based on dietary characteristics, the diets of the farm women were in the class of ...

  13. Isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in Chile and Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertrampf, E.; Pizarro, F.; Olivares, M.; Fuenmayor, G.; Yepes, R.; Soria, A.; Walter, T.

    1994-01-01

    Currently it is accepted that iron absorbed from infant formulas is less than 10%. However, the composition of such formulas has changed considerably and there is no recent information on the effects of these modifications. Iron bioavailability from infant formulas with different levels of iron fortification (8 and 12 mg of iron/L) and from a standard meal based on a wheat cream (''farina'' flour) was measured by a double radioisotopic technique (Eakins and Brown) in 13 adult female volunteers. Iron bioavailability in infant formulas was very high. Eighteen and 20.6 percent of the iron was absorbed in the 8 and 12 mg iron/L fortified formulas respectively (geometric means corrected to 40% of reference dose absorption). The corresponding value for iron absorption from the standard meal was 6.7%. These high and non significant differences in iron bioavailability from the two formulas and the fact that daily consumption of 750 ml of formula supplies more iron than recommended would permit a lowering of the current iron fortification level of 12 mg/L. Iron availability of the Standard Meal measured with FLAIR modifications of Miller's in vitro technique was 4.42%. The percentage of dialyzable zinc was 2.04%. Research activities for next year will be based on the validation and application of the in vitro technique in Chilean and Ecuadorian foods. (author). 26 refs, 4 tabs

  14. Isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in Chile and Ecuador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertrampf, E; Pizarro, F; Olivares, M [Chile Univ., Santiago (Chile). Inst. de Nutricion y Tecnologia de los Alimentos (INTA); Fuenmayor, G; Yepes, R [Universidad Central del Ecuador, Quito (Ecuador). Lab. de Investigaciones en Metabolismo y Nutricion (LIMN); Soria, A [Carabobo Univ., Valencia (Venezuela). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud; Walter, T

    1994-12-31

    Currently it is accepted that iron absorbed from infant formulas is less than 10%. However, the composition of such formulas has changed considerably and there is no recent information on the effects of these modifications. Iron bioavailability from infant formulas with different levels of iron fortification (8 and 12 mg of iron/L) and from a standard meal based on a wheat cream (``farina`` flour) was measured by a double radioisotopic technique (Eakins and Brown) in 13 adult female volunteers. Iron bioavailability in infant formulas was very high. Eighteen and 20.6 percent of the iron was absorbed in the 8 and 12 mg iron/L fortified formulas respectively (geometric means corrected to 40% of reference dose absorption). The corresponding value for iron absorption from the standard meal was 6.7%. These high and non significant differences in iron bioavailability from the two formulas and the fact that daily consumption of 750 ml of formula supplies more iron than recommended would permit a lowering of the current iron fortification level of 12 mg/L. Iron availability of the Standard Meal measured with FLAIR modifications of Miller`s in vitro technique was 4.42%. The percentage of dialyzable zinc was 2.04%. Research activities for next year will be based on the validation and application of the in vitro technique in Chilean and Ecuadorian foods. (author). 26 refs, 4 tabs.

  15. Iron bioavailability in two commercial cultivars of wheat: comparison between wholegrain and white flour and the effects of nicotianamine and 2'-deoxymugineic acid on iron uptake into Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagling, Tristan; Wawer, Anna A; Shewry, Peter R; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-10-22

    Iron bioavailability in unleavened white and wholegrain bread made from two commercial wheat varieties was assessed by measuring ferritin production in Caco-2 cells. The breads were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion and the digests applied to the Caco-2 cells. Although Riband grain contained a lower iron concentration than Rialto, iron bioavailability was higher. No iron was taken up by the cells from white bread made from Rialto flour or from wholegrain bread from either variety, but Riband white bread produced a small ferritin response. The results probably relate to differences in phytate content of the breads, although iron in soluble monoferric phytate was demonstrated to be bioavailable in the cell model. Nicotianamine, an iron chelator in plants involved in iron transport, was a more potent enhancer of iron uptake into Caco-2 cells than ascorbic acid or 2'-deoxymugineic acid, another metal chelator present in plants.

  16. Isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from Myanmar diets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naing, Khin Maung [Department of Medical Research, Yangon (Myanmar). Nutrition Research Div.; Khin, Myo [Department of Medical Research, Yangon, (Myanmar). Nuclear Medicine Research Div.

    1994-12-31

    A study was conducted to determine the dietary intakes and serum levels of iron and zinc in twenty apparently healthy Myanmar adults (10 males and 10 females), using atomic absorption spetrophotometry. The mean iron intake of females was found to be lower than the FAO/WHO recommended allowance whereas for men it was found to be adequate. The mean serum iron concentration in females was found to be significantly lower than in males (p < 0.05). It was observed that zinc intakes of males was significantly higher than in females (p < 0.01) but there was no significant difference in serum zinc level between the two groups. Dietary zinc intakes of both groups were found to be low. There was a weak positive correlation between dietary intake and serum concentrations of these minerals. Laboratory scale production of iron-fortified salt containing 1 mg of Fe/g salt was conducted by mixing 5g of FeSO{sub 4{center_dot}}7H{sub 2}O, and 5g of sodium-hexa-metaphosphate thoroughly and then the mixture was again mixed with 1 kg of salt. This was done in July 1992. Stability of iron-fortified salt (i.e. change in colour of salt) as well as ferrous and ferric iron content of iron-fortified salt, were determined at monthly intervals. Iron-fortified salt was found to be stable up to the time of report writing, i.e. 3rd week of October, 1992. The ferrous iron content of salt was found to range between 0.95 to 0.98 mg Fe/g salt. Bioavailability studies of iron from two types of standard meals, one containing staple rice, 32 g of fish, water cress, watery fish paste and cucumber, and another containing boiled peas in place of fish, were conducted on two groups of male subjects using {sup 59}Fe as an extrinsic tag. Bioavailability studies of iron from the above two types of meals cooked with iron-fortified salt (1 mg/g salt) were also conducted on the same groups of subjects using {sup 59}Fe as an extrinsic tag. Reference dose absorption of iron will be conducted. This work is in progress.

  17. Bioavailability of iron and zinc in green leafy vegetables growing in river side and local areas of Allahabad district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Green Leafy Vegetables (GLVs are the treasure trove of many micronutrients.Objective: The aim of the study is to find out the commonly growing vegetables in river side and local areas of Allahabad district and to access the bioavailability of iron and zinc in selected green leafy vegetables of river side and local areas of Allahabad district.Methods: Five to four commonly grown green leafy vegetables were selected from the Arailghat, Baluaghat, Gaughat, Mahewa, Muirabad, Rajapur, Rasullabad for the study. Total iron and zinc in sample were estimated by AOAC (2005 and bioavailability of zinc and iron from various food samples was determined in vitro method described by Luten (1996. Appropriate statistical technique was adopted for analysis of study.Result: Soya leaves, Radish leaves, Amaranth, Spinach were grown in both the areas except Kulpha and Karamwa, which are commonly grown in river side area. There was a significant difference between the bioavailability of iron and zinc in GLV grown in local and river side area.Conclusion: Hence it can be concluded that there is a contamination of heavy metals which binds with the iron and zinc and make them less bioavailable in the selected GLV.

  18. Improvement of bioavailability for iron from vegetarian meals by ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sritongkul, N.; Tuntawiroon, M.; Pleehachinda, R.; Suwanik, R.

    1996-01-01

    There are two kinds of iron in the diet with respect to the mechanism of absorption, heme-iron which is present as haemoglobin or myoglobin in meat and blood products, and, non-heme iron which is the main source of dietary iron. The bioavailability of the non-heme food iron is much lower than heme-iron. Vegetarian diets contain only non-heme iron. Iron intake from vegetarian meals are generally satisfied with the requirements, however, the bioavailabilities for non-heme iron is determined not only by iron content byt also the balance between different dietary factors enhancing and inhibiting iron absorption. The main enhancing factor in vegetarian meals is ascorbic acid in fruits and vegetables, inhibitors are phytate in cereals and grains, and tannins in some spices and vegetables. It has been reported that iron deficiency is one of the common micronutrient problems associated with unplanned vegetarian diets. In the present study the absorption of non-heme iron was measured from 2 vegetarian meals containing considerable amounts of phytate and tannin. The extrinsic tay method ( 59 Fe/ 55 Fe) was used to labelled the non-heme iron. The mean percentage absorption of non-heme iron from both meals was slightly different due to differences in their dietary contents. Their initial percentages iron absorption were apparent low (3.5% and 4.1%), however, the absorption progressively increased with increase in the level of ascorbic acid, 2-3 times with 100 mg and 4-5 times with 200 mg of ascorbic acid. The average amount of iron absorbed per 2000 kcal increased from 0.37 mg to 0.86 mg and 1.45 mg with the addition of 100 mg and 200 mg ascorbic acid respectively (p < 0.001). Considering the limited caloric intakes and the iron content in the meals, the amount of iron absorbed from vegetarian meals without ascorbic acid was not able to meet certain requirements for children, adolescents and menstruating women. The minimal requirement for dietary iron needed to be absorbed is

  19. Improvement of bioavailability for iron from vegetarian meals by ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sritongkul, N; Tuntawiroon, M; Pleehachinda, R; Suwanik, R [Siriraj Hospital Medical School, Bangkok (Thailand). Section of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-12-01

    There are two kinds of iron in the diet with respect to the mechanism of absorption, heme-iron which is present as haemoglobin or myoglobin in meat and blood products, and, non-heme iron which is the main source of dietary iron. The bioavailability of the non-heme food iron is much lower than heme-iron. Vegetarian diets contain only non-heme iron. Iron intake from vegetarian meals are generally satisfied with the requirements, however, the bioavailabilities for non-heme iron is determined not only by iron content byt also the balance between different dietary factors enhancing and inhibiting iron absorption. The main enhancing factor in vegetarian meals is ascorbic acid in fruits and vegetables, inhibitors are phytate in cereals and grains, and tannins in some spices and vegetables. It has been reported that iron deficiency is one of the common micronutrient problems associated with unplanned vegetarian diets. In the present study the absorption of non-heme iron was measured from 2 vegetarian meals containing considerable amounts of phytate and tannin. The extrinsic tay method ({sup 59}Fe/ {sup 55}Fe) was used to labelled the non-heme iron. The mean percentage absorption of non-heme iron from both meals was slightly different due to differences in their dietary contents. Their initial percentages iron absorption were apparent low (3.5% and 4.1%), however, the absorption progressively increased with increase in the level of ascorbic acid, 2-3 times with 100 mg and 4-5 times with 200 mg of ascorbic acid. The average amount of iron absorbed per 2000 kcal increased from 0.37 mg to 0.86 mg and 1.45 mg with the addition of 100 mg and 200 mg ascorbic acid respectively (p < 0.001). Considering the limited caloric intakes and the iron content in the meals, the amount of iron absorbed from vegetarian meals without ascorbic acid was not able to meet certain requirements for children, adolescents and menstruating women. The minimal requirement for dietary iron needed to be

  20. Bioavailability of Iron, Zinc, Phytate and Phytase Activity during Soaking and Germination of White Sorghum Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, Abd El-Moneim M. R.; El-Beltagi, Hossam S.; Abd El-Salam, Samiha M.; Omran, Azza A.

    2011-01-01

    The changes in phytate, phytase activity and in vitro bioavailability of iron and zinc during soaking and germination of three white sorghum varieties (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench), named Dorado, Shandweel-6, and Giza-15 were investigated. Sorghum varieties were soaked for 20 h and germinated for 72 h after soaking for 20 h to reduce phytate content and increase iron and zinc in vitro bioavailability. The results revealed that iron and zinc content was significantly reduced from 28.16 to 32.16% and 13.78 to 26.69% for soaking treatment and 38.43 to 39.18% and 21.80 to 31.27% for germination treatments, respectively. Phytate content was significantly reduced from 23.59 to 32.40% for soaking treatment and 24.92 to 35.27% for germination treatments, respectively. Phytase enzymes will be activated during drying in equal form in all varieties. The results proved that the main distinct point is the change of phytase activity as well as specific activity during different treatment which showed no significant differences between the varieties used. The in vitro bioavailability of iron and zinc were significantly improved as a result of soaking and germination treatments. PMID:22003395

  1. Paving a Path to Understanding Metabolic Responses to Iron Bioavailability: Global Proteomic Analysis of Crocosphaera watsonii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauglitz, J.; McIlvin, M. R.; Moran, D. M.; Waterbury, J. B.; Saito, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Marine diazotrophic cyanobacteria provide a key source of new nitrogen into the oceans and are important contributors to primary production. The geographic distribution of these cyanobacteria is impacted by available iron and phosphorus as well as environmental conditions such as temperature, however available iron concentrations are thought to be particularly critical due to the high demand for iron in cellular processes. Iron bioavailability and microorganismal adaptations to low iron environments may thus play a key role in dictating community structure, however the mechanisms by which cyanobacteria acquire iron and regulate its uptake are not well defined. In this study, the unicellular diazotroph, Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501, was acclimated to a range of bioavailable iron concentrations (from 0.001nM to 8.13nM Fe') using trace metal clean culturing techniques and the proteomes were analyzed by LC/MS-MS. Physiological and proteomic data indicate three distinct phenotypic ranges: iron-replete, iron-limited, and iron-starved. Trends in photosynthetic, carbon fixation and iron storage proteins across the iron gradient indicate that the C. watsonii proteome responds directly to iron availability. Further analysis of relative protein expression, which describes the physiological state of the cell, will lead to insights into how C. watsonii is able to adapt to iron-limited conditions and the resulting biogeochemical implications will be discussed.

  2. Iron transport, deposition and bioavailability in the wheat and barley grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Søren; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Tauris, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    will briefly review existing knowledge on the distribution and transport pathways of iron in the two small grained cereals, barley and wheat, and focus on the efforts made to increase the iron content in cereals in general. However, mineral content is not the only factor of relevance for improving......). The nutritional impact of increasing mineral content accordingly has to be seen in the context of mineral bioavailability. Finally, we will briefly report on recent data from barley, where laser capture microdissection of the different grain tissues combined with gene expression profiling has provided some...

  3. Key Roles of Size and Crystallinity of Nanosized Iron Hydr(oxides) Stabilized by Humic Substances in Iron Bioavailability to Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia A; Polyakov, Alexander Yu; Lebedev, Vasily A; Abroskin, Dmitry P; Volkov, Dmitry S; Pankratov, Denis A; Klein, Olga I; Senik, Svetlana V; Sorkina, Tatiana A; Garshev, Alexey V; Veligzhanin, Alexey A; Garcia Mina, Jose M; Perminova, Irina V

    2017-12-27

    Availability of Fe in soil to plants is closely related to the presence of humic substances (HS). Still, the systematic data on applicability of iron-based nanomaterials stabilized with HS as a source for plant nutrition are missing. The goal of our study was to establish a connection between properties of iron-based materials stabilized by HS and their bioavailability to plants. We have prepared two samples of leonardite HS-stabilized iron-based materials with substantially different properties using the reported protocols and studied their physical chemical state in relation to iron uptake and other biological effects. We used Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, SAXS, and TEM to conclude on iron speciation, size, and crystallinity. One material (Fe-HA) consisted of polynuclear iron(III) (hydr)oxide complexes, so-called ferric polymers, distributed in HS matrix. These complexes are composed of predominantly amorphous small-size components (Bioavailability studies were conducted on wheat plants under conditions of iron deficiency. The uptake studies have shown that small and amorphous ferric polymers were readily translocated into the leaves on the level of Fe-EDTA, whereas relatively large and crystalline feroxyhyte NPs were mostly sorbed on the roots. The obtained data are consistent with the size exclusion limits of cell wall pores (5-20 nm). Both samples demonstrated distinct beneficial effects with respect to photosynthetic activity and lipid biosynthesis. The obtained results might be of use for production of iron-based nanomaterials stabilized by HS with the tailored iron availability to plants. They can be applied as the only source for iron nutrition as well as in combination with the other elements, for example, for industrial production of "nanofortified" macrofertilizers (NPK).

  4. Transgenic expression of phytase in wheat endosperm increases bioavailability of iron and zinc in grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Nabeela; Khatoon, Asia; Maqbool, Asma; Irfan, Muhammad; Bashir, Aftab; Asif, Irsa; Shahid, Muhammad; Saeed, Asma; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Malik, Kauser A

    2017-02-01

    Phytate is a major constituent of wheat seeds and chelates metal ions, thus reducing their bioavailability and so the nutritional value of grains. Transgenic plants expressing heterologous phytase are expected to enhance degradation of phytic acid stored in seeds and are proposed to increase the in vitro bioavailability of mineral nutrients. Wheat transgenic plants expressing Aspergillus japonicus phytase gene (phyA) in wheat endosperm were developed till T 3 generation. The transgenic lines exhibited 18-99 % increase in phytase activity and 12-76 % reduction of phytic acid content in seeds. The minimum phytic acid content was observed in chapatti (Asian bread) as compared to flour and dough. The transcript profiling of phyA mRNA indicated twofold to ninefold higher expression as compared to non transgenic controls. There was no significant difference in grain nutrient composition of transgenic and non-transgenic seeds. In vitro bioavailability assay for iron and zinc in dough and chapatti of transgenic lines revealed a significant increase in iron and zinc contents. The development of nutritionally enhanced cereals is a step forward to combat nutrition deficiency for iron and zinc in malnourished human population, especially women and children.

  5. Study on bioavailability of dietary iron of women by using activable isotopic tracer and neutron activation analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yangmei; Ni Bangfa; Tian Weizhi; Wang Pingsheng; Cao Lei

    2002-01-01

    The bioavailability of diet iron of 10 healthy young women in Beijing area is studied by using two enriched isotopes 54 Fe and 58 Fe, and neutron activation analysis techniques. The abundance of 54 Fe and 58 Fe is 61.4% and 23.4%, respectively. In additional, the atomic absorption spectrometry is employed to measure total iron in fecal samples. Dysprosium, rarely absorbed by human body, is used to monitor the residence time of tracer isotopes in order to collect the fecal samples completely. The results show that the bioavailability of dietary iron in young women is (14.9 +- 3.9)%

  6. Iron Bioavailability Studies of the First Generation of Iron-Biofortified Beans Released in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glahn, Raymond; Tako, Elad; Hart, Jonathan; Haas, Jere; Lung'aho, Mercy; Beebe, Steve

    2017-07-21

    This paper represents a series of in vitro iron (Fe) bioavailability experiments, Fe content analysis and polyphenolic profile of the first generation of Fe biofortified beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris ) selected for human trials in Rwanda and released to farmers of that region. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate how the Caco-2 cell bioassay for Fe bioavailability can be utilized to assess the nutritional quality of Fe in such varieties and how they may interact with diets and meal plans of experimental studies. Furthermore, experiments were also conducted to directly compare this in vitro approach with specific human absorption studies of these Fe biofortified beans. The results show that other foods consumed with beans, such as rice, can negatively affect Fe bioavailability whereas potato may enhance the Fe absorption when consumed with beans. The results also suggest that the extrinsic labelling approach to measuring human Fe absorption can be flawed and thus provide misleading information. Overall, the results provide evidence that the Caco-2 cell bioassay represents an effective approach to evaluate the nutritional quality of Fe-biofortified beans, both separate from and within a targeted diet or meal plan.

  7. Photoreduction of Terrigenous Fe-Humic Substances Leads to Bioavailable Iron in Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazevic, Amir; Orlowska, Ewelina; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Jirsa, Franz; Keppler, Bernhard K; Tafili-Kryeziu, Myrvete; Linert, Wolfgang; Krachler, Rudolf F; Krachler, Regina; Rompel, Annette

    2016-05-23

    Humic substances (HS) are important iron chelators responsible for the transport of iron from freshwater systems to the open sea, where iron is essential for marine organisms. Evidence suggests that iron complexed to HS comprises the bulk of the iron ligand pool in near-coastal waters and shelf seas. River-derived HS have been investigated to study their transport to, and dwell in oceanic waters. A library of iron model compounds and river-derived Fe-HS samples were probed in a combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (VtC-XES) study at the Fe K-edge. The analyses performed revealed that iron complexation in HS samples is only dependent on oxygen-containing HS functional groups, such as carboxyl and phenol. The photoreduction mechanism of Fe III -HS in oceanic conditions into bioavailable aquatic Fe II forms, highlights the importance of river-derived HS as an iron source for marine organisms. Consequently, such mechanisms are a vital component of the upper-ocean iron biogeochemistry cycle.

  8. Sphagnum-dominated bog systems are highly effective yet variable sources of bio-available iron to marine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krachler, Regina; Krachler, Rudolf F.; Wallner, Gabriele; Steier, Peter; El Abiead, Yasin; Wiesinger, Hubert; Jirsa, Franz; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a micronutrient of particular interest as low levels of iron limit primary production of phytoplankton and carbon fluxes in extended regions of the world's oceans. Sphagnum-peatland runoff is extraordinarily rich in dissolved humic-bound iron. Given that several of the world's largest wetlands are Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, this ecosystem type may serve as one of the major sources of iron to the ocean. Here, we studied five near-coastal creeks in North Scotland using freshwater/seawater mixing experiments of natural creek water and synthetic seawater based on a "5"9Fe radiotracer technique combined with isotopic characterization of dissolved organic carbon by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Three of the creeks meander through healthy Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs and the two others through modified peatlands which have been subject to artificial drainage for centuries. The results revealed that, at the time of sampling (August 16–24, 2014), the creeks that run through modified peatlands delivered 11–15 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater, whereas the creeks that run through intact peatlands delivered 350–470 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater. To find out whether this humic-bound iron is bio-available to marine algae, we performed algal growth tests using the unicellular flagellated marine prymnesiophyte Diacronema lutheri and the unicellular marine green alga Chlorella salina, respectively. In both cases, the riverine humic material provided a highly bio-available source of iron to the marine algae. These results add a new item to the list of ecosystem services of Sphagnum-peatlands. - Highlights: • We report that peat-bogs are sources of bio-available iron to marine algae. • This iron is effectively chelated with aquatic humic acids. • The radiocarbon age of the iron-carrying aquatic humic acids was up to 550 years. • Analysis was focused on mixing experiments of iron-rich creek water with seawater. • Drained peatlands with

  9. Sphagnum-dominated bog systems are highly effective yet variable sources of bio-available iron to marine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krachler, Regina, E-mail: regina.krachler@univie.ac.at [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Krachler, Rudolf F.; Wallner, Gabriele [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Steier, Peter [Isotope Research and Nuclear Physics, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); El Abiead, Yasin; Wiesinger, Hubert [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Jirsa, Franz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria); University of Johannesburg, Department of Zoology, P. O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Keppler, Bernhard K. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währingerstraße 42, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    Iron is a micronutrient of particular interest as low levels of iron limit primary production of phytoplankton and carbon fluxes in extended regions of the world's oceans. Sphagnum-peatland runoff is extraordinarily rich in dissolved humic-bound iron. Given that several of the world's largest wetlands are Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, this ecosystem type may serve as one of the major sources of iron to the ocean. Here, we studied five near-coastal creeks in North Scotland using freshwater/seawater mixing experiments of natural creek water and synthetic seawater based on a {sup 59}Fe radiotracer technique combined with isotopic characterization of dissolved organic carbon by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Three of the creeks meander through healthy Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs and the two others through modified peatlands which have been subject to artificial drainage for centuries. The results revealed that, at the time of sampling (August 16–24, 2014), the creeks that run through modified peatlands delivered 11–15 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater, whereas the creeks that run through intact peatlands delivered 350–470 μg iron per liter creek water to seawater. To find out whether this humic-bound iron is bio-available to marine algae, we performed algal growth tests using the unicellular flagellated marine prymnesiophyte Diacronema lutheri and the unicellular marine green alga Chlorella salina, respectively. In both cases, the riverine humic material provided a highly bio-available source of iron to the marine algae. These results add a new item to the list of ecosystem services of Sphagnum-peatlands. - Highlights: • We report that peat-bogs are sources of bio-available iron to marine algae. • This iron is effectively chelated with aquatic humic acids. • The radiocarbon age of the iron-carrying aquatic humic acids was up to 550 years. • Analysis was focused on mixing experiments of iron-rich creek water with seawater. • Drained

  10. Co-ordinated research programme on isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies of essential micronutrients (particularly of iron, but also of zinc and selenium) are known to affect hundreds of millions of people throughout the world, mainly in developing countries. Such deficiencies can lead to significant deficits in mental development, growth, work performance, immune competence and other biological parameters. In many of the population groups that are affected, the deficiencies are thought to be due not to an absolute lack of the element in the diet but rather to is poor bioavailability. Much work has already been done on this subject, particularly in some developed countries and particularly with respect to iron. However, there is still appears to be a need for more research on factors affecting bioavailability and the means to improve it by simple dietary modification and fortification using food products of the kind that may be locally available in developing countries. Isotope techniques potentially have a large role to play in studies of the bioavailability of iron and other trace elements. To support work in this area, the IAEA initiated a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) at the end of 1990 on ''Isotope-Aided Studies of the Bioavailability of Iron and Zinc from Human Diets''. The first Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) of participants in this CRP is the subject of the present report. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Review of the Evidence from Epidemiology, Toxicology, and Lung Bioavailability on the Carcinogenicity of Inhaled Iron Oxide Particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Camilla; Rücker, Thomas; Birk, Thomas

    2016-03-21

    Since the iron-age and throughout the industrial age, humans have been exposed to iron oxides. Here, we review the evidence from epidemiology, toxicology, and lung bioavailability as to whether iron oxides are likely to act as human lung carcinogens. Current evidence suggests that observed lung tumors in rats result from a generic particle overload effect and local inflammation that is rat-specific under the dosing conditions of intratracheal instillation. This mode of action therefore, is not relevant to human exposure. However, there are emerging differences seen in vitro, in cell uptake and cell bioavailability between "bulk" iron oxides and "nano" iron oxides. "Bulk" particulates, as defined here, are those where greater than 70% are >100 nm in diameter. Similarly, "nano" iron oxides are defined in this context as particulates where the majority, usually >95% for pure engineered forms of primary particulates (not agglomerates), fall in the range 1-100 nm in diameter. From the weight of scientific evidence, "bulk" iron oxides are not genotoxic/mutagenic. Recent evidence for "nano" iron oxide is conflicting regarding genotoxic potential, albeit genotoxicity was not observed in an in vivo acute oral dose study, and "nano" iron oxides are considered safe and are being investigated for biomedical uses; there is no specific in vivo genotoxicity study on "nano" iron oxides via inhalation. Some evidence is available that suggests, hypothetically due to the larger surface area of "nano" iron oxide particulates, that toxicity could be exerted via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell. However, the potential for ROS generation as a basis for explaining rodent tumorigenicity is only apparent if free iron from intracellular "nano" scale iron oxide becomes bioavailable at significant levels inside the cell. This would not be expected from "bulk" iron oxide particulates. Furthermore, human epidemiological evidence from a number of studies suggests that

  12. Iron from nanocompounds containing iron and zinc is highly bioavailable in rats without tissue accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Florentine M; Arnold, Myrtha; Hilbe, Monika; Teleki, Alexandra; Knijnenburg, Jesper T N; Ehrensperger, Felix; Hurrell, Richard F; Pratsinis, Sotiris E; Langhans, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2010-05-01

    Effective iron fortification of foods is difficult, because water-soluble compounds that are well absorbed, such as ferrous sulphate (FeSO(4)), often cause unacceptable changes in the colour or taste of foods. Poorly water-soluble compounds, on the other hand, cause fewer sensory changes, but are not well absorbed. Here, we show that poorly water-soluble nanosized Fe and Fe/Zn compounds (specific surface area approximately 190 m(2) g(-1)) made by scalable flame aerosol technology have in vivo iron bioavailability in rats comparable to FeSO(4) and cause less colour change in reactive food matrices than conventional iron fortificants. The addition of Zn to FePO(4) and Mg to Fe/Zn oxide increases Fe absorption from the compounds, and doping with Mg also improves their colour. After feeding rats with nanostructured iron-containing compounds, no stainable Fe was detected in their gut wall, gut-associated lymphatics or other tissues, suggesting no adverse effects. Nanosizing of poorly water-soluble Fe compounds sharply increases their absorption and nutritional value.

  13. Rice and Bean Targets for Biofortification Combined with High Carotenoid Content Crops Regulate Transcriptional Mechanisms Increasing Iron Bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Desirrê Morais; de Castro Moreira, Maria Eliza; Gomes, Mariana Juste Contin; Lopes Toledo, Renata Celi; Nutti, Marilia Regini; Pinheiro Sant’Ana, Helena Maria; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects thousands of people worldwide. Biofortification of staple food crops aims to support the reduction of this deficiency. This study evaluates the effect of combinations of common beans and rice, targets for biofortification, with high carotenoid content crops on the iron bioavailability, protein gene expression, and antioxidant effect. Iron bioavailability was measured by the depletion/repletion method. Seven groups were tested (n = 7): Pontal bean (PB); rice + Pontal bean (R + BP); Pontal bean + sweet potato (PB + SP); Pontal bean + pumpkin (PB + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + P); Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + SP); positive control (Ferrous Sulfate). The evaluations included: hemoglobin gain, hemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), gene expression of divalente metal transporter 1 (DMT-1), duodenal citocromo B (DcytB), ferroportin, hephaestin, transferrin and ferritin and total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAC). The test groups, except the PB, showed higher HRE (p bioavailability and antioxidant capacity. PMID:26610564

  14. In Vitro Bioavailability of Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, and Copper from Gluten-Free Breads Supplemented with Natural Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regula, J; Cerba, A; Suliburska, J; Tinkov, A A

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the content of calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and copper and determine the bioavailability of these ingredients in gluten-free breads fortified with milk and selected seeds. Due to the increasing prevalence of celiac disease and mineral deficiencies, it has become necessary to produce food with higher nutritional values which maintains the appropriate product characteristics. This study was designed for gluten-free breads fortified with milk and seeds such as flax, poppy, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds or nuts, and flour with amaranth. Subsequently, digestion was performed in vitro and the potential bioavailability of the minerals was measured. In the case of calcium, magnesium, iron, and copper, higher bioavailability was observed in rice bread, and, in the case of copper and zinc, in buckwheat bread. This demonstrated a clear increase in bioavailability of all the minerals when the bread were enriched. However, satisfactory results are obtained only for the individual micronutrients.

  15. Isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from diets and fortified foods to be used in iron fortifications programmes in Chile and Ecuador: Validation of in vitro techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertrampf, E.; Pizarro, F.; Olivares, M.; Walter, T.; Fuenmayor, G.; Estevez, E.; Yepez, R.

    1992-01-01

    In selected typical Ecuatorian foods to be used in nutritional intervention programmes, we measured iron bioavailability in humans, with a double isotopic method. The interaction with some accompanied foods or beverages was also studied. Iron bioavailability from wheat flour foods was good (9%). When vermicelli soup was eaten together with lemonade sweetened with raw sugar cane, mean iron absorption was the highest (15%). Camomile infusion do not affect iron absorption from bread. At the same time, we will validate an in vitro iron availability technique comparing it with the results obtained in other laboratories involved in the present CRP and with the results obtained in the same foods with in vivo double isotopic. We will also start studies of in vitro zinc availability. (author). 26 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  16. Global transcriptional responses of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 to changes in iron bioavailability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutzke Michael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (DC3000 is a Gram-negative model plant pathogen that is found in a wide variety of environments. To survive in these diverse conditions it must sense and respond to various environmental cues. One micronutrient required for most forms of life is iron. Bioavailable iron has been shown to be an important global regulator for many bacteria where it not only regulates a wide variety of genes involved in general cell physiology but also virulence determinants. In this study we used microarrays to study differential gene regulation in DC3000 in response to changes in levels of cell-associated iron. Results DC3000 cultures were grown under highly controlled conditions and analyzed after the addition of iron citrate or sodium citrate to the media. In the cultures supplemented with iron, we found that cell-associated iron increased rapidly while culture densities were not significantly different over 4 hours when compared to cultures with sodium citrate added. Microarray analysis of samples taken from before and after the addition of either sodium citrate or iron citrate identified 386 differentially regulated genes with high statistical confidence. Differentially regulated genes were clustered based on expression patterns observed between comparison of samples taken at different time points and with different supplements. This analysis grouped genes associated with the same regulatory motifs and/or had similar putative or known function. Conclusion This study shows iron is rapidly taken up from the medium by iron-depleted DC3000 cultures and that bioavailable iron is a global cue for the expression of iron transport, storage, and known virulence factors in DC3000. Furthermore approximately 34% of the differentially regulated genes are associated with one of four regulatory motifs for Fur, PvdS, HrpL, or RpoD.

  17. Iron bioavailability in Wistar rats fed with fortified rice by Ultra Rice technology with or without addition of yacon flour (Smallanthus sonchifolius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Lucia, Ceres M; Vaz Tostes, Maria das Graças; Silveira, Carlos Mário M; Bordalo, Lívia A; Rodrigues, Fabiana C; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria; Martino, Hércia S D; Costa, Neuza Maria B

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate iron (Fe) bioavailability in Wistar rats fed with rice fortified with micronized ferric pyrophosphate (FP) by Ultra Rice (UR) technology with or without addition of yacon flour as a source of 7.5% of fructooligosaccharides (FOS). Diets were supplied with 12 mg iron/kg from the following sources: ferrous sulfate (FS - control diet), fortified rice with micronized ferric pyrophosphate (Ultra Rice) (UR diet), ferrous sulfate + yacon flour (FS + Y diet) or Ultra Rice + yacon flour (UR + Y diet). Blood samples were collected at the end of depletion and repletion stages for determination of hemoglobin concentration and calculation of the relative biological value (RBV). Also, the content of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) (acetic, propionic and butyric acids) from animals' stools and caecum weight were determined. The UR diet showed high iron bioavailability (RBV = 84.7%). However, the addition of yacon flour in the diet containing fortified rice (UR + Y diet) decreased RBV (63.1%) significantly below the other three groups (p flour showed higher acetic acid values compared to those who did not. In conclusion, fortified UR with micronized ferric pyrophosphate showed high iron bioavailability but the addition of yacon flour at 7.5% FOS reduced iron bioavailability despite increased caecum weight and SCFA concentration.

  18. Bioavailability of a new iron source used in the fortification of fluid cow milk. Importance of its use in children after their nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.; Zubillaga, M.; Lisionek, A.; Caro, R.

    1999-01-01

    In agreement with the original objective of our work, we evaluated the bioavailability of this new iron source used in the fortification of fluid cow's milk. With this purpose studies of absorption were carried out in mice, demonstrating that this new iron source has a high bioavailability when it is added to fluid milk. Afterwards, according to the objective of this CRP, we organized a study to determine the breast-milk intake and the amount of iron ingested to the baby, in order to evaluate the correlation between the iron intake and its nutritional status in children near the weaning period. (author)

  19. Rice and Bean Targets for Biofortification Combined with High Carotenoid Content Crops Regulate Transcriptional Mechanisms Increasing Iron Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirrê Morais Dias

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency affects thousands of people worldwide. Biofortification of staple food crops aims to support the reduction of this deficiency. This study evaluates the effect of combinations of common beans and rice, targets for biofortification, with high carotenoid content crops on the iron bioavailability, protein gene expression, and antioxidant effect. Iron bioavailability was measured by the depletion/repletion method. Seven groups were tested (n = 7: Pontal bean (PB; rice + Pontal bean (R + BP; Pontal bean + sweet potato (PB + SP; Pontal bean + pumpkin (PB + P; Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + P; Pontal bean + rice + sweet potato (PB + R + SP; positive control (Ferrous Sulfate. The evaluations included: hemoglobin gain, hemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE, gene expression of divalente metal transporter 1 (DMT-1, duodenal citocromo B (DcytB, ferroportin, hephaestin, transferrin and ferritin and total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAC. The test groups, except the PB, showed higher HRE (p < 0.05 than the control. Gene expression of DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin increased (p < 0.05 in the groups fed with high content carotenoid crops (sweet potato or pumpkin. The PB group presented lower (p < 0.05 TAC than the other groups. The combination of rice and common beans, and those with high carotenoid content crops increased protein gene expression, increasing the iron bioavailability and antioxidant capacity.

  20. Bioavailability of nanoparticulate hematite to Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusenko, Yevgeniy; Shipp, Jessie; Hamilton, George A.; Morgan, Jennifer L.L.; Keebaugh, Michael; Hill, Hansina; Dutta, Arnab; Zhuo, Xiaoding; Upadhyay, Nabin; Hutchings, James; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D.; Shock, Everett; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2013-01-01

    The environmental effects and bioavailability of nanoparticulate iron (Fe) to plants are currently unknown. Here, plant bioavailability of synthesized hematite Fe nanoparticles was evaluated using Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) as a model. Over 56-days of growing wild-type A. thaliana, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had lower plant biomass, lower chlorophyll concentrations, and lower internal Fe concentrations than the Fe-treatment. Results for the no-Fe and nanoparticle-Fe treatments were consistently similar throughout the experiment. These results suggest that nanoparticles (mean diameter 40.9 nm, range 22.3–67.0 nm) were not taken up and therefore not bioavailable to A. thaliana. Over 14-days growing wild-type and transgenic (Type I/II proton pump overexpression) A. thaliana, the Type I plant grew more than the wild-type in the nanoparticle-Fe treatment, suggesting Type I plants cope better with Fe limitation; however, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had similar growth for all plant types. -- Highlights: ► Iron nanoparticles were synthesized and assessed for bioavailability to Arabidopsis. ► Arabidopsis grew better in the presence of EDTA-bound iron than nanoparticulate iron. ► Arabidopsis grew the same in the presence of nanoparticulate iron compared to no iron. -- Synthesized iron nanoparticles were not bioavailable to Arabidopsis thaliana in agar nutrient media

  1. Iron colloids reduce the bioavailability of phosphorus to the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baken, Stijn; Nawara, Sophie; Van Moorleghem, Christoff; Smolders, Erik

    2014-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a limiting nutrient in many aquatic systems. The bioavailability of P in natural waters strongly depends on its speciation. In this study, structural properties of iron colloids were determined and related to their effect on P sorption and P bioavailability. The freshwater green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata was exposed to media spiked with radiolabelled (33)PO4, and the uptake of (33)P was monitored for 1 h. The media contained various concentrations of synthetic iron colloids with a size between 10 kDa and 0.45 μm. The iron colloids were stabilised by natural organic matter. EXAFS spectroscopy showed that these colloids predominantly consisted of ferrihydrite with small amounts of organically complexed Fe. In colloid-free treatments, the P uptake flux by the algae obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the presence of iron colloids at 9 or 90 μM Fe, corresponding to molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 0.17, the truly dissolved P (<10 kDa) was between 4 and 60% of the total dissolved P (<0.45 μm). These colloids reduced the P uptake flux by R. subcapitata compared to colloid-free treatments at the same total dissolved P concentration. However, the P uptake flux from colloid containing solutions equalled that from colloid-free ones when expressed as truly dissolved P. This demonstrates that colloidal P did not contribute to the P uptake flux. It is concluded that, on the short term, phosphate adsorbed to ferrihydrite colloids is not available to the green alga R. subcapitata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of intake of iron and nutrients that affect bioavailability of daily food rations of girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Broniecka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND AIM In a human body iron occurs at a level of 3 to 5 g, 60-70 % of which are in hemoglobin, ca. 10% in myoglobin, and ca. 3% are accumulated in enzymes of cellular respiration or enzymes degrading toxic hydrogen peroxide. The other part of iron is accumulated in liver, spleen, kidneys and bone marrow. The dietary deficiency of iron appears at its insufficient level in a diet and at impaired absorption of iron ions present in food products by a body. Groups at an especially high risk of iron deficiencies include, among others, menstruating girls in the pubescence period and women with heavy and irregular menstruations, as well as vegetarians and patients with chronic enteritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intake of iron and nutrients that affect its bioavailability from daily food rations of girls. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 159 girls aged 17-18, students of high schools in the city of Wroclaw. The study was conducted between November 2010 and ay 2011. Girls were divided into 3 subgroups according to the BMI score. Girls’ diets were analyzed with the method of a direct interview of the last 24 hours before the test and the interview was repeated seven times. RESULTS The present study demonstrated that the intake of iron from food rations of almost all the girls surveyed was below the requirements defined for this age group. Statistically significant differences were noted in the intake of energy and nutrients among the three distinguished subgroups of girls. CONCLUSIONS Food rations of the surveyed girls were characterized by a low, compared to dietary allowances, calorific value, which resulted in deficiencies of nutrients increasing iron bioavailability.

  3. Isotope - aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafalski, H.

    1992-01-01

    The main aims of the study were: 1) the evaluation of iron and zinc status in women of Lodz aged 18-45 years, 2) adaptation of the whole body counter to in vivo measurements absorption of iron given to the gastro-intestinal tract of volunteers and 3) in rat model estimation iron bioavailability from fortified wheat flour combined with products usually consumed in Poland. During five months investigations thirty seven women were examined each one twice in two months interval. Following variables were measured: iron and zinc in blood serum, in public and scalp hair and in food, taste acuity score, serum ferritin, hemoglobin, total iron binding capacity, red blood cells, mean corpuscular concentration and corpuscular volume. Prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficient anemia were assessed by two models in terms of the depression of serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations. 64 refs, 6 figs, 23 tabs

  4. Sphagnum-dominated bog systems are highly effective yet variable sources of bio-available iron to marine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, Regina; Krachler, Rudolf F; Wallner, Gabriele; Steier, Peter; El Abiead, Yasin; Wiesinger, Hubert; Jirsa, Franz; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-06-15

    Iron is a micronutrient of particular interest as low levels of iron limit primary production of phytoplankton and carbon fluxes in extended regions of the world's oceans. Sphagnum-peatland runoff is extraordinarily rich in dissolved humic-bound iron. Given that several of the world's largest wetlands are Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, this ecosystem type may serve as one of the major sources of iron to the ocean. Here, we studied five near-coastal creeks in North Scotland using freshwater/seawater mixing experiments of natural creek water and synthetic seawater based on a (59)Fe radiotracer technique combined with isotopic characterization of dissolved organic carbon by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Three of the creeks meander through healthy Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs and the two others through modified peatlands which have been subject to artificial drainage for centuries. The results revealed that, at the time of sampling (August 16-24, 2014), the creeks that run through modified peatlands delivered 11-15μg iron per liter creek water to seawater, whereas the creeks that run through intact peatlands delivered 350-470μg iron per liter creek water to seawater. To find out whether this humic-bound iron is bio-available to marine algae, we performed algal growth tests using the unicellular flagellated marine prymnesiophyte Diacronema lutheri and the unicellular marine green alga Chlorella salina, respectively. In both cases, the riverine humic material provided a highly bio-available source of iron to the marine algae. These results add a new item to the list of ecosystem services of Sphagnum-peatlands. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioavailable iron in typical Thai meals: Comparative studies between radioactive in vitro and in vivo food iron absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sritongkul, N.

    1989-03-01

    Presently available in vivo methods for assessing iron absorption in human subjects, although physiologically acceptable and accurate, are not practical for screening large numbers of food and diet samples. A simple in vitro method for determining the amount of iron available for absorption was therefore investigated. It is based on the common pool concept of food iron absorption using radioactive Fe-59 as a marker of the iron present in the bioavailable iron pool. The ionizable iron was measured after an initial peptic digestion by using pepsin/HCl at pH 1.35 followed by an increase of the pH to 6.0 to simulate duodenal alkalinity. The method was proved to be simple, reproducible and applicable either to single food items or whole meals of varying composition. It is able to detect known enhancers or inhibitors of food iron absorption. The percent ionizable iron among 5 different meals with the inclusion of inhibitor or enhancer was shown to correlate closely with the percentage of iron absorbed in human subjects (r=0.9197, p<0.001). A high correlation between the in vivo and in vitro methods was also observed when the results were expressed as absorption ratios and ionizable ratios (r=0.9192, p<0.001). The method is expected to be useful for improving diet composition to increase the iron availability of some typical meals in developing countries, including those which are known to contain considerable amounts of inhibitors of iron absorption. 39 refs, 1 fig., 13 tabs

  6. Stabilized-solubilized ferric pyrophosphate as a new iron source for food fortification. Bioavailability studies by means of the prophylactic-preventive method in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, M J; Arnoldi, S; Kaliski, M A; Torti, H; Messeri, E; Weill, R; Zubillaga, M; Boccio, J

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the iron bioavailability of a new ferric pyrophosphate salt stabilized and solubilized with glycine. The prophylactic-preventive test in rats, using ferrous sulfate as the reference standard, was applied as the evaluating methodology both using water and yogurt as vehicles. Fifty female Sprague-Dawley rats weaned were randomized into five different groups (group 1: FeSO(4); group 2: pyr; group 3: FeSO(4) + yogurt; group 4: pyr + yogurt and group 5: control). The iron bioavailability (BioFe) of each compound was calculated using the formula proposed by Dutra-de-Oliveira et al. where BioFe % = (HbFef - HbFei) x 100/ToFeIn. Finally, the iron bioavailability results of each iron source were also given as relative biological value (RBV) using ferrous sulfate as the reference standard. The results showed that both BioFe % and RBV % of the new iron source tested is similar to that of the reference standard independently of the vehicle employed for the fortification procedure (FeSO(4) 49.46 +/- 12.0% and 100%; Pyr 52.66 +/- 15.02% and 106%; FeSO(4) + yogurth 54.39 +/- 13.92% and 110%; Pyr + yogurt 61.97 +/- 13.54% and 125%; Control 25.30 +/- 6.60, p soluble ferric pyrophosphate may be considered as an optimal iron source for food fortification.

  7. Photoreductive dissolution of iron oxides trapped in ice and its environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong; Hoffmann, Michael R; Yoon, Ho-Il; Park, Byong-Kwon

    2010-06-01

    The availability of iron has been thought to be a main limiting factor for the productivity of phytoplankton and related with the uptake of atmospheric CO(2) and algal blooms in fresh and sea waters. In this work, the formation of bioavailable iron (Fe(II)(aq)) from the dissolution of iron oxide particles was investigated in the ice phase under both UV and visible light irradiation. The photoreductive dissolution of iron oxides proceeded slowly in aqueous solution (pH 3.5) but was significantly accelerated in polycrystalline ice, subsequently releasing more bioavailable ferrous iron upon thawing. The enhanced photogeneration of Fe(II)(aq) in ice was confirmed regardless of the type of iron oxides [hematite, maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), goethite (alpha-FeOOH)] and the kind of electron donors. The ice-enhanced dissolution of iron oxides was also observed under visible light irradiation, although the dissolution rate was much slower compared with the case of UV radiation. The iron oxide particles and organic electron donors (if any) in ice are concentrated and aggregated in the liquid-like grain boundary region (freeze concentration effect) where protons are also highly concentrated (lower pH). The enhanced photodissolution of iron oxides should occur in this confined boundary region. We hypothesized that electron hopping through the interconnected grain boundaries of iron oxide particles facilitates the separation of photoinduced charge pairs. The outdoor experiments carried out under ambient solar radiation of Ny-Alesund (Svalbard, 78 degrees 55'N) also showed that the generation of dissolved Fe(II)(aq) via photoreductive dissolution is enhanced when iron oxides are trapped in ice. Our results imply that the ice(snow)-covered surfaces and ice-cloud particles containing iron-rich mineral dusts in the polar and cold environments provide a source of bioavailable iron when they thaw.

  8. Assessment of iron bioavailability from different bread making processes using an in vitro intestinal cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ramiro, I; Brearley, C A; Bruggraber, S F A; Perfecto, A; Shewry, P; Fairweather-Tait, S

    2017-08-01

    Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6), is the main iron chelator in cereals and bread. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three commercial baking processes (sourdough, conventional yeast and Chorleywood Bread Making Process (CBP)) on the IP6 content of wholemeal bread, its impact on iron uptake in Caco-2 cells and the predicted bioavailability of iron from these breads with added iron, simulating a mixed-meal. The sourdough process fully degraded IP6 whilst the CBP and conventional processes reduced it by 75% compared with wholemeal flour. The iron released in solution after a simulated digestion was 8-fold higher in sourdough bread than with others but no difference in cellular iron uptake was observed. Additionally, when iron was added to the different breads digestions only sourdough bread elicited a significant ferritin response in Caco-2 cells (4.8-fold compared to the other breads) suggesting that sourdough bread could contribute towards improved iron nutrition. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Iron, zinc and phytic acid in rice from China: wet and dry processing towards improved mineral bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rice and rice products supply two thirds of Chinese people with their staple food. Mineral deficiencies, especially of iron and zinc, are prevalent in China, and are caused by insufficient intake and poor bioavailability. Rice and rice products contribute more than 50% of the antinutrient phytic

  10. Isotope aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from human diets consumed in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaleta, N.; Penny, M.; Berlanga, R.; Diaz, A.; Montoya, E.; Lonnerdal, B.

    1994-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is an important health problem in Peru, which affects approximately 25% of the population. The most vulnerable groups are children below 5 years of age and pregnant women, of whom 64% and 53% respectively are anemic. The main reason for this deficiency is inadequate iron intake. Heme iron consumption is very low, and non-heme iron is virtually the only source of iron in the diet. Despite regional differences in food consumption, wheat, salt and sugar are widely consumed in all areas. Wheat is likely to be the most suitable food vehicle for iron fortification due to the processing required. Based on the recent food consumption surveys conducted in Lima by the IIN, we selected examples of typical main meals and measured iron bioavailability in the diet using an extrinsic tag method with 1.5 μCi of 59 Fe and 5 μCi of 55 Fe as markers. Coffee with bread and butter for breakfast, noodle soup with vegetables, rice with seasoned tripe (cow), bread and lemonade for lunch; and noodle soup with vegetables and bread for dinner were used to measure iron absorption. Thirteen adults in apparent good health, 5 male and 8 female, with normal hemoglobin levels participated in the study. The mean iron absorption from breakfast was 4.2% ± 4.1; from lunch 14.65% ± 10/95, and from dinner 5.1% ± 2.84. The presence of heme iron from tripe and ascorbic acid from lemonade improved iron absorption. (author). 17 refs, 3 tabs

  11. The bioavailability of iron, zinc, protein and vitamin A is highly variable in French individual diets: Impact on nutrient inadequacy assessment and relation with the animal-to-plant ratio of diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perignon, Marlène; Barré, Tangui; Gazan, Rozenn; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Darmon, Nicole

    2018-01-01

    Nutritional adequacy depends on nutrient intakes and bioavailability which strongly varies with the plant- or animal-origin of foods. The aim was to estimate iron, zinc, protein and vitamin A bioavailability from individual diets, and investigate its relation with the animal-to-plant ratio (A/P) of diets. Bioavailability was estimated in 1899 French diets using diet-based algorithms or food-group specific conversion factors. Nutrient inadequacy was estimated based on i) bioavailability calculated in each individual diet and ii) average bioavailability assumed for Western-diets. Mean iron absorption, zinc absorption, protein quality and β-carotene conversion factor were 13%, 30%, 92%, and 17:1, respectively. Bioavailability displayed a high variability between individual diets, poorly explained by their A/P. Using individual bioavailability led to different inadequacy prevalence than with average factors assumed for Western-diets. In this population, the A/P does not seem sufficient to predict nutrient bioavailability and the corresponding recommended intakes. Nutritional adequacy should be assessed using bioavailability accounting for individual diets composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Does ascorbic acid supplementation affect iron bioavailability in rats fed micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate fortified fruit juice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro-Vicente, Juan Francisco; Pérez-Conesa, Darío; Rincón, Francisco; Ros, Gaspar; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Vidal, Maria Luisa

    2008-12-01

    Food iron (Fe) fortification is an adequate approach for preventing Fe-deficiency anemia. Poorly water-soluble Fe compounds have good sensory attributes but low bioavailability. The reduction of the particle size of Fe fortificants and the addition of ascorbic acid might increase the bioavailability of low-soluble compounds. The present work aims to compare the Fe absorption and bioavailability of micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate (MDFP) (poorly soluble) to ferrous sufate (FS) (highly soluble) added to a fruit juice in presence or absence of ascorbic acid (AA) by using the hemoglobin repletion assay in rats. After a hemoglobin depletion period, four fruit juices comprised of (1) FS, (2) MDFP, (3) FS + AA, (4) MDFP + AA were produced and administered to a different group of rats (n = 18) over 21 days. During the repletion period, Fe balance, hemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE), relative bioavailability (RBV) and Fe tissue content were determined in the short, medium and long term. Fe absorption and bioavailability showed no significant differences between fortifying the fruit juice with FS or MDFP. The addition of AA to the juice enhanced Fe absorption during the long-term balance study within the same Fe source. HRE and Fe utilization increased after AA addition in both FS and MDFP groups in every period. Fe absorption and bioavailability from MDFP were comparable to FS added to a fruit juice in rats. Further, the addition of AA enhanced Fe absorption in the long term, as well as Fe bioavailability throughout the repletion period regardless of the Fe source employed.

  13. Acute inhibition of iron bioavailability by zinc: studies in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Manuel; Pizarro, Fernando; Ruz, Manuel; de Romaña, Daniel López

    2012-08-01

    Iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) deficiencies constitute two of the most important nutritional and public health problems affecting developing countries. Combined supplementation or fortification with Zn and Fe are strategies that can be used to improve the Zn and Fe status of a population. However, there is concern about potential negative interactions between these two micronutrients due to a competitive binding to DMT1 and Zip14 transporter. Studies performed in humans have shown an inhibitory effect of Zn on Fe absorption when both minerals are given together as a solution in fasting conditions. We found that at low doses of iron (0.5 mg) the threshold for the inhibition of iron bioavailability was at a Zn:Fe wt/wt ratio ≥5.9:1, whereas at higher doses of Fe (10 mg) this inhibition occurred at 1:1 Zn:Fe wt/wt ratio. This differential response could be explained by the variation in the abundance of both cations as they compete for a limited number of shared transporters at the enterocyte. Conflicting results have been obtained when this interaction was studied in different food matrices. A negative interaction was not observed when Fe and Zn were provided in a composite hamburger meal, premature formula, human milk, or cow milk. A decrease on Fe absorption was observed in only 1 of 3 studies when Fe and Zn were supplied in wheat flour. The possibility of a negative interaction should be considered for supplementation or fortification programs with both microminerals.

  14. Bioavailability & absorption of Iron and Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Kapil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans derive iron from their everyday diet, predominantly from plant foods and the rest from foods of animal origin. Iron is found in food as either haem or non-haem iron.  Haem iron, which is about up to 40 per cent of the iron in meat, poultry, and fish, is well absorbed.  All the iron in plants (fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts is in the form of non-haem iron and is relatively poorly absorbed. Non-haem iron contributes about 90-95 per cent of total daily iron in vegan diets. In western countries,the intake of haem iron from meat and meat products accounts for bulk of the dietary iron. The haem iron consumption is minimal in developing countries with majority obtaining non-haem iron from cereals, pulses, vegetables and fruits'. The diets is plagued by low iron content and poor absorption. Major sources of non-haem iron are plant foods. The iron is chemically diverse, ranging from simple iron oxides and salts to more complex organic chelates such as hydroxyphosphates in phytoferritin(1.

  15. Bioavailability & absorption of Iron and Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Kapil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans derive iron from their everyday diet, predominantly from plant foods and the rest from foods of animal origin. Iron is found in food as either haem or non-haem iron.  Haem iron, which is about up to 40 per cent of the iron in meat, poultry, and fish, is well absorbed.  All the iron in plants (fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts is in the form of non-haem iron and is relatively poorly absorbed. Non-haem iron contributes about 90-95 per cent of total daily iron in vegan diets. In western countries,the intake of haem iron from meat and meat products accounts for bulk of the dietary iron. The haem iron consumption is minimal in developing countries with majority obtaining non-haem iron from cereals, pulses, vegetables and fruits'. The diets is plagued by low iron content and poor absorption. Major sources of non-haem iron are plant foods. The iron is chemically diverse, ranging from simple iron oxides and salts to more complex organic chelates such as hydroxyphosphates in phytoferritin(1.

  16. Diatom Transcriptional and Physiological Responses to Changes in Iron Bioavailability across Ocean Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R. Cohen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in iron (Fe bioavailability influence diatom physiology and community composition, and thus have a profound impact on primary productivity and ecosystem dynamics. Iron limitation of diatom growth rates has been demonstrated in both oceanic and coastal waters of the Northeast Pacific Ocean and is predicted to become more pervasive in future oceans. However, it is unclear how the strategies utilized by phytoplankton to cope with low Fe bioavailability and resupply differ across these ocean provinces. We investigated the response of diatom communities to variable Fe conditions through incubation experiments performed in the Fe mosaic of the California Upwelling Zone and along a natural Fe gradient in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Through coupling gene expression of two dominant diatom taxa (Pseudo-nitzschia and Thalassiosira with biological rate process measurements, we provide an in-depth examination of the physiological and molecular responses associated with varying Fe status. Following Fe enrichment, oceanic diatoms showed distinct differential expression of gene products involved in nitrogen assimilation, photosynthetic carbon fixation, and vitamin production compared to diatoms from low-Fe coastal sites, possibly driven by the chronic nature of Fe stress at the oceanic site. Genes of interest involved in Fe and N metabolism additionally exhibited divergent expression patterns between the two diatom taxa investigated, demonstrating that diverse diatoms may invoke alternative strategies when dealing with identical changes in their environment. We report here several mechanisms used distinctly by coastal or oceanic diatom communities as well as numerous taxa-specific strategies for coping with Fe stress and rearranging nutrient metabolism following Fe enrichment.

  17. A comparison of physical properties, screening procedures and a human efficacy trial for predicting the bioavailability of commercial elemental iron powders used for food fortification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Lynch, S.R.; Bothwell, T.

    2007-01-01

    Elemental iron powders are widely used to fortify staple foods. This paper summarizes physical and chemical measurements that were conducted to assess the bioavailability of these iron powders relative to ferrous sulfate, along with validation of these assessments from a study with human subjects.

  18. Cofortification of ferric pyrophosphate and citric acid/trisodium citrate into extruded rice grains doubles iron bioavailability through in situ generation of soluble ferric pyrophosphate citrate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Laura; Cercamondi, Colin I; Zeder, Christophe; Wild, Daniela; Adelmann, Horst; Zimmermann, Michael B; Moretti, Diego

    2016-05-01

    Iron fortification of rice is a promising strategy for improving iron nutrition. However, it is technically challenging because rice is consumed as intact grains, and ferric pyrophosphate (FePP), which is usually used for rice fortification, has low bioavailability. We investigated whether the addition of a citric acid/trisodium citrate (CA/TSC) mixture before extrusion increases iron absorption in humans from FePP-fortified extruded rice grains. We conducted an iron absorption study in iron-sufficient young women (n = 20), in which each participant consumed 4 different meals (4 mg Fe/meal): 1) extruded FePP-fortified rice (No CA/TSC); 2) extruded FePP-fortified rice with CA/TSC added before extrusion (CA/TSC extruded); 3) extruded FePP-fortified rice with CA/TSC solution added after cooking and before consumption (CA/TSC solution); and 4) nonextruded rice fortified with a FeSO4 solution added after cooking and before consumption (reference). Iron absorption was calculated from erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes 14 d after administration. In in vitro experiments, we assessed the soluble and dialyzable iron from rice meals in which CA/TSC was added at different preparation stages and from meals with different iron:CA:TSC ratios. Fractional iron absorption was significantly higher from CA/TSC-extruded meals (3.2%) than from No CA/TSC (1.7%) and CA/TSC solution (1.7%; all P solubility and dialyzability were higher in CA/TSC-extruded rice than in rice with No CA/TSC and CA/TSC solution, and solubility increased with higher amounts of added CA and TSC in extruded rice. Iron bioavailability nearly doubled when CA/TSC was extruded with FePP into fortified rice, resulting in iron bioavailability comparable to that of FeSO4 We attribute this effect to an in situ generation of soluble FePP citrate moieties during extrusion and/or cooking because of the close physical proximity of FePP and CA/TSC in the extruded rice matrix. This trial was registered at

  19. Relative bioavailability of micronized, dispersible ferric pyrophosphate added to an apple juice drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Mark A; Collings, Rachel; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-03-01

    Food iron fortification is a sustainable and relatively simple strategy to reduce/prevent iron deficiency but is a challenge for the food industry because of possible adverse organoleptic changes caused by the added iron. A micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate, trademarked as SunActive Fe, has recently been developed. SunActive Fe has a small particle size, is water soluble and may be suitable for fortifying liquid products. To determine the relative bioavailability of SunActive Fe and its suitability for addition to pure apple juice. Iron absorption from SunActive Fe added to pure apple juice (Minute Maid) was compared with absorption from ferrous sulphate, a highly bioavailable form of iron, in 15 women with relatively low iron stores. Both forms of iron were enriched with an iron stable isotope and iron absorption from the apple juice drinks was calculated from the isotopic enrichment of red blood cells 14 days after the last test meal. Although mean absorption of iron from SunActive Fe was significantly lower than from ferrous sulphate (5.5% compared with 9.1%), the mean bioavailability of SunActive Fe iron relative to ferrous sulphate was 0.6, indicating that it is a good source of bioavailable iron. Iron Absorption from SunActive Fe was positively correlated (r = 0.97, P = 0.01) with absorption from ferrous sulphate, and negatively correlated with serum ferritin concentration (ferrous sulphate r = -0.81, P apple juice and is a potentially useful fortificant for liquid food products.

  20. Evaluation of iron and zinc bioavailability of beans targeted for biofortification using in vitro and in vivo models and their effect on the nutritional status of preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Tostes, Maria das Graças; Verediano, Thaisa Agrizzi; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez; Brunoro Costa, Neuza Maria

    2016-03-15

    Biofortified beans have been produced with higher nutrient concentrations. The objective was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo iron and zinc bioavailability of common beans Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification, compared with conventional Perola (PE) and their effects on the iron and zinc nutritional status of preschool children. In Caco-2 cells, PO and PE beans did not show differences in ferritin (PO, 13.1 ± 1.4; PE, 13.6 ± 1.4 ng mg(-1) protein) or zinc uptake (PO, 15.9 ± 1.5; PE, 15.5 ± 3.5 µmol mg(-1) protein). In the rat, PO and PE beans presented high iron bioavailability (PO, 109.6 ± 29.5; PE, 110.7 ± 13.9%). In preschool children, no changes were observed in iron and zinc nutritional status comparing before and after PO consumption (ferritin, 41.2 ± 23.2 and 28.9 ± 40.4 µg L(-1) ; hemoglobin, 13.7 ± 2.2 and 13.1 ± 3.2 g dL(-1) ; plasma zinc, 119.2 ± 24.5 and 133.9 ± 57.7 µg dL(-1) ; erythrocyte zinc, 53.5 ± 13.8 and 59.4 ± 17.1 µg g(-1) hemoglobin). Iron and zinc bioavailability in PO and PE beans was not statistically different using either cell culture, animal or human models. Efforts should focus on increasing mineral bioavailability of beans targeted for biofortification. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Iron Bioavailability from Ferric Pyrophosphate in Extruded Rice Cofortified with Zinc Sulfate Is Greater than When Cofortified with Zinc Oxide in a Human Stable Isotope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Laura; Zimmermann, Michael B; Zeder, Christophe; Parker, Megan; Johns, Paul W; Hurrell, Richard F; Moretti, Diego

    2017-03-01

    Background: Extruded rice grains are often cofortified with iron and zinc. However, it is uncertain if the addition of zinc to iron-fortified rice affects iron absorption and whether this is zinc-compound specific. Objective: We investigated whether zinc, added as zinc oxide (ZnO) or zinc sulfate (ZnSO 4 ), affects human iron absorption from extruded rice fortified with ferric pyrophosphate (FePP). Methods: In 19 iron-depleted Swiss women (plasma ferritin ≤16.5 μ/L) aged between 20 and 39 y with a normal body mass index (in kg/m 2 ; 18.7-24.8), we compared iron absorption from 4 meals containing fortified extruded rice with 4 mg Fe and 3 mg Zn. Three of the meals contained extruded rice labeled with FePP ( 57 FePP): 1 ) 1 meal without added zinc ( 57 FePP-Zn), 2 ) 1 cofortified with ZnO ( 57 FePP+ZnO), and 3 ) 1 cofortified with ZnSO 4 ( 57 FePP+ZnSO 4 ). The fourth meal contained extruded rice without iron or zinc, extrinsically labeled with ferrous sulfate ( 58 FeSO 4 ) added as a solution after cooking. All 4 meals contained citric acid. Iron bioavailability was measured by isotopic iron ratios in red blood cells. We also measured relative in vitro iron solubility from 57 FePP-Zn, 57 FePP+ZnO, and 57 FePP+ZnSO 4 expressed as a fraction of FeSO 4 solubility. Results: Geometric mean fractional iron absorption (95% CI) from 57 FePP+ZnSO 4 was 4.5% (3.4%, 5.8%) and differed from 57 FePP+ZnO (2.7%; 1.8%, 4.1%) ( P iron bioavailabilities compared with 58 FeSO 4 were 62%, 57%, and 38% from 57 FePP+ZnSO 4 , 57 FePP-Zn, and 57 FePP+ZnO, respectively. In vitro solubility from 57 FePP+ZnSO 4 differed from that of 57 FePP-Zn (14.3%; P iron-depleted women, iron absorption from FePP-fortified extruded rice cofortified with ZnSO 4 was 1.6-fold (95% CI: 1.4-, 1.9-fold) that of rice cofortified with ZnO. These findings suggest that ZnSO 4 may be the preferable zinc cofortificant for optimal iron bioavailability of iron-fortified extruded rice. This trial was registered at

  2. Function and Regulation of Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase: Cell Cycle, Genotoxic Stress, and Iron Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Sanvisens

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs are essential enzymes that catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to desoxyribonucleotides, thereby providing the building blocks required for de novo DNA biosynthesis. The RNR function is tightly regulated because an unbalanced or excessive supply of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs dramatically increases the mutation rates during DNA replication and repair that can lead to cell death or genetic anomalies. In this review, we focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae class Ia RNR as a model to understand the different mechanisms controlling RNR function and regulation in eukaryotes. Many studies have contributed to our current understanding of RNR allosteric regulation and, more recently, to its link to RNR oligomerization. Cells have developed additional mechanisms that restrict RNR activity to particular periods when dNTPs are necessary, such as the S phase or upon genotoxic stress. These regulatory strategies include the transcriptional control of the RNR gene expression, inhibition of RNR catalytic activity, and the subcellular redistribution of RNR subunits. Despite class Ia RNRs requiring iron as an essential cofactor for catalysis, little is known about RNR function regulation depending on iron bioavailability. Recent studies into yeast have deciphered novel strategies for the delivery of iron to RNR and for its regulation in response to iron deficiency. Taken together, these studies open up new possibilities to explore in order to limit uncontrolled tumor cell proliferation via RNR.

  3. The Influence of Iron and Zinc Supplementation on the Bioavailability of Provitamin A Carotenoids from Papaya Following Consumption of a Vitamin A-Deficient Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana-Sop, Marie Modestine; Gouado, Inocent; Achu, Mercy Bih; Van Camp, John; Amvam Zollo, Paul Henri; Schweigert, Florian J; Oberleas, Donald; Ekoe, Tetanye

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies are serious public health problems in Cameroon, as in many developing countries. Local vegetables which are sources of provitamin A carotenoids (PACs) can be used to improve vitamin A intakes. However, traditional meals are often unable to cover zinc and iron needs. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability of 3 PACs (α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) in young men, who were fed with a vitamin A-free diet and received iron and zinc supplementation. Twelve healthy participants were divided into three groups and were supplemented with elemental iron (20 mg of iron fumarate), 20 mg of zinc sulfate or iron+zinc (20 mg of iron in the morning and 20 mg of zinc in the evening) for 11 d. They were given a vitamin A- and PAC-free diet from the 6th to the 11th day, followed by a test meal containing 0.55 kg of freshly peeled papaya as a source of PACs. Blood samples were collected four times successively on the 11th day (the test meal day), at T0 (just after the test meal), after 2 h (T2), after 4 h (T4) and after 7 h (T7). Ultracentrifugation was used to isolate serum chylomicrons. Retinol appearance and PAC postprandial concentrations were determined. The supplementation with zinc, iron and iron+zinc influenced the chylomicron appearance of retinol and PACs differently as reflected by retention times and maximum absorption peaks. Iron led to highest retinol levels in the chylomicron. Zinc and iron+zinc supplements were best for optimal intact appearance of α-carotene, β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin respectively. Supplementation with iron led to the greatest bioavailability of PACs from papaya and its conversion to retinol.

  4. Bioavailability of iron in cottonseed meal, ferric sulfate, and two ferrous sulfate by-products of the galvanizing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boling, S D; Edwards, H M; Emmert, J L; Biehl, R R; Baker, D H

    1998-09-01

    Iron depletion-repletion assays were carried out with young chicks to establish Fe bioavailability values for Fe2(SO4)3.7H2O (22.7% Fe), Fe-ZnSO4.H2O (20.2% Fe, 13.0% Zn), Zn-FeSO4.H2O (20.2% Zn, 14.2% Fe), and cottonseed meal (200 mg Fe/kg). Standard hemoglobin response curves were established using feed-grade FeSO4.H2O (28.8% Fe) or reagent-grade FeSO4.7H2O (20.1% Fe) as standards such that relative bioavailability (RBV) could be assessed for the experimental sources of Fe. Weight gain, hemoglobin, and hematocrit responded linearly (P 0.10) from the standard. However, evaluation of all criteria of response (hemoglobin, hematocrit, weight gain) suggested that neither Fe-ZnSO4.H2O nor Zn-FeSO4.H2O had different Fe RBV values than FeSO4.H2O. Standard-curve calculations were used for assessment of Fe RBV in Fe2(SO4)3.7H2O and cottonseed meal, as only a single level of Fe addition was studied for each of these products. Iron RBV in Fe2(SO4)3.7H2O was estimated to be 37%, whereas Fe RBV in cottonseed meal was found to be 56%. Both of these values were lower (P galvanizing industry, are excellent sources of bioavailable Fe, whereas ferric sulfate and cottonseed meal are relatively poor sources of usable Fe.

  5. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  6. Dephytinisation with Intrinsic Wheat Phytase and Iron Dephytinisation with Intrinsic Wheat Phytase and Iron Fonio (Digitaria exilis) Meals in West African Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koreissi, Y.; Fanou-Fogny, N.M.L.; Moretti, D.; Schuth, S.; Dossa, R.A.M.; Egli, I.; Zimmerman, M.B.; Brouwer, I.D.

    2013-01-01

    Low iron and high phytic acid content make fonio based meals a poor source of bioavailable iron. Phytic acid degradation in fonio porridge using whole grain cereals as phytase source and effect on iron bioavailability when added to iron fortified fonio meals were investigated. Grains, nuts and seeds

  7. Can sediments at hydrocarbon seep sites represent a source for marine bioavailable iron? — A case study from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, N.; Feng, D.; Chen, D.

    2017-12-01

    Niu Li1, Dong Feng1,2, and Duofu Chen2,31CAS Key Laboratory of Ocean and Marginal Sea Geology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510301, China. 2Laboratory for Marine Geology, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, China. 3Hadal Science and Technology Research Center, College of Marine Sciences, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306, China. Iron is an essential micronutrient and commonly considered to be one of the key-limiting factors for biological productivity in many ocean regions. Seafloor Fe supply should be most efficient in suboxic conditions. Recent studies shown that widely spread anoxic environments can develop in hydrocarbon seep sediment and local bottom water, owing to the occurrence of aerobic and/or anaerobic methane oxidation. Under this condition, the iron in sediment can be reduced to dissolved Fe2+ in the ocean. However, questions remain about whether the hydrocarbon seep sediment can represent a source for bioavailable iron to the ocean, and the control factor for the transformation of iron in the sediment remains largely unexplored. For a number of hydrocarbon seeps from the northern and southern South China Sea, the iron speciation, pyrite sulfur isotope, and iron isotope, as well as the major and trace elements are used to constrain the intensity of cold seep, and its impact on transformation of iron in sediment. Samples from both areas show sediment iron lost during the high methane flux conditions, owing to the suboxic conditions cause by aerobic methane oxidation. On the other hand, high sediment iron content accompanied by high sulfur content can be seen during the conditions of high methane flux without the occurrence of aerobic methane oxidation, which is possible ascribed to the anaerobic methane oxidation and the release of iron through seep activity. This study reveals the transformation of iron in the sediment is closely related to the

  8. Protein Hydrolysates as Promoters of Non-Haem Iron Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Jiang, Han; Huang, Guangrong

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for human growth and health. Organic iron is an excellent iron supplement due to its bioavailability. Both amino acids and peptides improve iron bioavailability and absorption and are therefore valuable components of iron supplements. This review focuses on protein hydrolysates as potential promoters of iron absorption. The ability of protein hydrolysates to chelate iron is thought to be a key attribute for the promotion of iron absorption. Iron-chelatable protein hydrolysates are categorized by their absorption forms: amino acids, di- and tri-peptides and polypeptides. Their structural characteristics, including their size and amino acid sequence, as well as the presence of special amino acids, influence their iron chelation abilities and bioavailabilities. Protein hydrolysates promote iron absorption by keeping iron soluble, reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron, and promoting transport across cell membranes into the gut. We also discuss the use and relative merits of protein hydrolysates as iron supplements. PMID:28617327

  9. Protein Hydrolysates as Promoters of Non-Haem Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential micronutrient for human growth and health. Organic iron is an excellent iron supplement due to its bioavailability. Both amino acids and peptides improve iron bioavailability and absorption and are therefore valuable components of iron supplements. This review focuses on protein hydrolysates as potential promoters of iron absorption. The ability of protein hydrolysates to chelate iron is thought to be a key attribute for the promotion of iron absorption. Iron-chelatable protein hydrolysates are categorized by their absorption forms: amino acids, di- and tri-peptides and polypeptides. Their structural characteristics, including their size and amino acid sequence, as well as the presence of special amino acids, influence their iron chelation abilities and bioavailabilities. Protein hydrolysates promote iron absorption by keeping iron soluble, reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron, and promoting transport across cell membranes into the gut. We also discuss the use and relative merits of protein hydrolysates as iron supplements.

  10. Role of Bioavailable Iron in Coal Dust-Induced Activation of Activator Protein-1 and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanshu; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) are two important transcription factors responsible for the regulation of cytokines, which are involved in cell proliferation and inflammation. Coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) is an occupational lung disease that may be related to chronic inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In the present study, we demonstrate that coal from the Pennsylvania (PA) coalmine region, which has a high prevalence of CWP, can activate both AP-1 and NFAT in JB6 mouse epidermal cells. In contrast, coal from the Utah (UT) coalmine region, which has a low prevalence of CWP, has no such effects. The PA coal stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p38 MAPK but not c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinases, as determined by the phosphorylation assay. The increase in AP-1 by the PA coal was completely eliminated by the pretreatment of cells with PD98059, a specific MAPK kinase inhibitor, and SB202190, a p38 kinase inhibitor, further confirming that the PA coal-induced AP-1 activation is mediated through ERKs and p38 MAPK pathways. Deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator, synergistically enhanced the PA coal-induced AP-1 activity, but inhibited NFAT activity. For comparison, cells were treated with ferrous sulfate and/or DFO. We have found that iron transactivated both AP-1 and NFAT, and DFO further enhanced iron-induced AP-1 activation but inhibited NFAT. These results indicate that activation of AP-1 and NFAT by the PA coal is through bioavailable iron present in the coal. These data are in agreement with our previous findings that the prevalence of CWP correlates well with levels of bioavailable iron in coals from various mining regions. PMID:12397016

  11. Isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafalski, H.; Switoniak, T.

    1994-01-01

    The bioavailability of food iron is affected by a number of physiological and dietary variables and it should be checked for the population living in natural conditions. The primary purpose of this study was to measure in volunteers iron absorption after oral administration of a wheat roll enriched with 15 mg of Fe as FeSO 4· 7H 2 O and 20 μCi of 59 Fe. For assessment of iron absorption whole body counting was used. The secondary purpose was to relate the available iron to iron stores, anthropometric indices, bleeding days and dietary variables. Thirteen female and 7 male healthy subjects aged between 19 and 47 years were observed. Hematological measurements on blood: serum ferritin (SF), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin (ST), transferrin saturation (TS), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), red blood cell (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were made. The subjects were examined by a specialist in internal medicine. Their 24-hour recall food intake was performed by questionnaire. The findings concerning the purposes of the study may be summarized as follows: 1) mean absorbed iron was 1.6 ± 1.2 mg for women, and 0.5±0.2 mg for men; 2) iron stores evaluated from SF were in women 2.6± 1.7 mg/kg body weight and in men 10.4±5.4 mg/kg; 3) blood indices proved iron deficiency anemia in 1 woman, Hb = 9.2 g/dL, SF = 1.8 μg/L, TS = 6%; in 4 women deficient iron stores were observed, Hb > 12g/dL, SF < 12 mg/L; 8 women and 7 men were normal; 4) in women the absorbed iron related inversely to SF (-0.61) and iron stores (-0.61); 5) the iron stores related to the sum of four skinfolds in women (0.55) and in men (0.80), in women it related to body weight (0.77) too; 6) in women the absorbed iron related to bleeding days (0.69); 7) in women ascorbic acid consumption related to iron store indices; SF, SI and TS. (author). 2 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Cytotoxicity, Intestinal Transport, and Bioavailability of Dispersible Iron and Zinc Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Min Oh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron or zinc deficiency is one of the most important nutritional disorders which causes health problem. However, food fortification with minerals often induces unacceptable organoleptic changes during preparation process and storage, has low bioavailability and solubility, and is expensive. Nanotechnology surface modification to obtain novel characteristics can be a useful tool to overcome these problems. In this study, the efficacy and potential toxicity of dispersible Fe or Zn supplement coated in dextrin and glycerides (SunActive FeTM and SunActive ZnTM were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity, intestinal transport, and bioavailability, as compared with each counterpart without coating, ferric pyrophosphate (FePP and zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles (NPs, respectively. The results demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of FePP was not significantly affected by surface modification (SunActive FeTM, while SunActive ZnTM was more cytotoxic than ZnO-NPs. Cellular uptake and intestinal transport efficiency of SunActive FeTM were significantly higher than those of its counterpart material, which was in good agreement with enhanced oral absorption efficacy after a single-dose oral administration to rats. These results seem to be related to dissolution, particle dispersibility, and coating stability of materials depending on suspending media. Both SunActiveTM products and their counterpart materials were determined to be primarily transported by microfold (M cells through the intestinal epithelium. It was, therefore, concluded that surface modification of food fortification will be a useful strategy to enhance oral absorption efficiency at safe levels.

  13. Dissolution behaviour of ferric pyrophosphate and its mixtures with soluble pyrophosphates: Potential strategy for increasing iron bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Blanco, Elena; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Velev, Orlin D; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2016-10-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate (FePP) is a widely used iron source in food fortification and in nutritional supplements, due to its white colour, that is very uncommon for insoluble Fe salts. Although its dissolution is an important determinant of Fe adsorption in human body, the solubility characteristics of FePP are complex and not well understood. This report is a study on the solubility of FePP as a function of pH and excess of pyrophosphate ions. FePP powder is sparingly soluble in the pH range of 3-6 but slightly soluble at pH8. In the presence of pyrophosphate ions the solubility of FePP strongly increases at pH 5-8.5 due to formation a soluble complex between Fe(III) and pyrophosphate ions, which leads to an 8-10-fold increase in the total ionic iron concentration. This finding is beneficial for enhancing iron bioavailability, which important for the design of fortified food, beverages, and nutraceutical products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electron uptake by iron-oxidizing phototrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, A; Gardel, EJ; Vidoudez, C; Parra, EA; Girguis, PR

    2014-02-26

    Oxidation-reduction reactions underlie energy generation in nearly all life forms. Although most organisms use soluble oxidants and reductants, some microbes can access solid-phase materials as electron-acceptors or -donors via extracellular electron transfer. Many studies have focused on the reduction of solid-phase oxidants. Far less is known about electron uptake via microbial extracellular electron transfer, and almost nothing is known about the associated mechanisms. Here we show that the iron-oxidizing photoautotroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 accepts electrons from a poised electrode, with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source/electron acceptor. Both electron uptake and ruBisCo form I expression are stimulated by light. Electron uptake also occurs in the dark, uncoupled from photosynthesis. Notably, the pioABC operon, which encodes a protein system essential for photoautotrophic growth by ferrous iron oxidation, influences electron uptake. These data reveal a previously unknown metabolic versatility of photoferrotrophs to use extracellular electron transfer for electron uptake.

  15. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin; Fiskal, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface...

  16. IRON BIOAVAILABILITY IN CAMEROON WEANING FOODS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dialyzable iron value were enhanced with lime juice and significantly reduced by legumes (beans, soy bean, and groundnut), egg and egg yolk. Irish potatoes based diets were the best sources of dialyzable iron. Iron intakes were sufficient for most balanced diets to cover the recommended daily intakes of iron for children ...

  17. Reconstructing the Mineralogy and Bioavailability of Dust-Borne Iron Deposited to the Southern Ocean through the Last Glacial Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoenfelt, E. M.; Winckler, G.; Lamy, F.; Bostick, B. C.

    2017-12-01

    The iron (Fe) in dust deposited to the Fe-limited Southern Ocean plays an important role in ocean biogeochemistry and global climate. For instance, increases in dust-borne Fe deposition in the subantarctic Southern Ocean have been linked to increases in productivity and part of the CO2 drawdown of the last glacial cycle [1]. Notably, bioavailable Fe impacts productivity rather than total Fe. While it has long been understood that Fe mineralogy impacts Fe bioavailability in general, our understanding of the mineralogy of Fe in dust in specific is limited to that in modern dust sources. Reduced mineral Fe in dust has been shown to be more bioavailable than oxidized mineral iron, as it is more readily dissolved [2], and it is more easily utilized directly by a model diatom [3]. Our previous work focusing on South American dust sources shows that glacial activity is associated with higher Fe(II) fractions in dust-borne minerals, due to the physical weathering of Fe(II)-rich silicates in bedrock [3]. Thus, we hypothesize that there were higher Fe(II) fractions in dust deposited during cold glacial periods where ice sheets were more widespread. Using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have reconstructed the mineralogy of Fe deposited to Southern Ocean sediment cores from the subantarctic South Atlantic (TN057-6/ODP Site 1090) and South Pacific (PS7/56-1) through the last glacial cycle, creating the first paleorecord of Fe mineralogy and its associated bioavailability. During cold glacial periods there is a higher fraction of reduced Fe - in the form of Fe(II) silicates - deposited to the sediments compared to warm interglacial periods. Thus, Fe(II) content is directly correlated with dust input. The presence of Fe(II) silicates rather than products of diagenesis such as pyrite suggests that these Fe(II) minerals are physically weathered from bedrock and preserved rather than produced in the sediment. This result suggests that not only was there more dust

  18. Mega fire emissions in Siberia: potential supply of bioavailable iron from forests to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ito

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant amounts of carbon and nutrients are released to the atmosphere due to large fires in forests. Characterization of the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the intense fire emissions is crucial for assessing the atmospheric loadings of trace gases and aerosols. This paper discusses issues of the representation of forest fires in the estimation of emissions and the application to an atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM. The potential contribution of forest fires to the deposition of bioavailable iron (Fe into the ocean is highlighted, with a focus on mega fires in eastern Siberia.

    Satellite products of burned area, active fire, and land cover are used to estimate biomass burning emissions in conjunction with a biogeochemical model. Satellite-derived plume height from MISR is used for the injection height of boreal forest fire emissions. This methodology is applied to quantify fire emission rates in each three-dimensional grid location in the high latitude Northern Hemisphere (>30° N latitude over a 5-yr period from 2001 to 2005. There is large interannual variation in forest burned area during 2001–2005 (13–49 × 103 km2 yr−1 which results in a corresponding variation in the annual emissions of carbon monoxide (CO (14–81 Tg CO y−1. Satellite observations of CO column from MOPITT are used to evaluate the model performance in simulating the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the fire emissions. The model results for CO enhancements due to eastern Siberian fires are in good agreement with MOPITT observations. These validation results suggest that the model using emission rates estimated in this work is able to describe the interannual changes in CO due to intense forest fires.

    Bioavailable iron is derived from atmospheric processing of relatively insoluble iron from desert sources by anthropogenic pollutants (mainly sulfuric acid formed

  19. Bioavailability and the mechanisms of intestinal absorption of iron from ferrous ascorbate and ferric polymaltose in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; Jacobs, P.

    1990-01-01

    The comparative bioavailability from matching quantities of iron in the form of ferrous ascorbate or ferric polymaltose was defined in rats. Studies were carried out in the intact animals under basal conditions and also when requirements for this metal were either increased or decreased by manipulating stores or erythropoietic activity. No significant difference was found in the total quantity of iron absorbed from either salt or complex under any of these circumstances, suggesting that the mucosal mechanism regulating the overall process was common to both. However, the rate of transfer from the lumen into portal blood was distinctive, reaching a maximum with salt at 30 min compared to 24 h for the complex. To explore the possibility that iron from the two sources was initially handled by different subcellular pathways, the radiolabeled compounds were instilled into loops of bowel that had been isolated between ligatures in vivo. Enterocytes were harvested and fractionated, and incorporation into ferritin and transferrin was determined using RIA. From salt, iron appeared rapidly in duodenal but not ileal ferritin, whereas mucosal transferrin increased under conditions of stimulated absorption, suggesting that this protein may act as a shuttle for the metal. In contrast, iron from polymaltose showed a cumulative incorporation into duodenal ferritin over time that correlated with iron absorption, defined by the appearance of radiolabel in the serum and in the carcass; a similar pattern was demonstrable in ileal mucosal cells. Conversely, binding of iron to transferrin was minimal. No iron polymaltose was found within the mucosal cells. It is suggested that the low rate of iron transfer from this ferric complex may reflect its extracellular breakdown in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract

  20. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (pProteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Dietary Factors Modulate Iron Uptake in Caco-2 Cells from an Iron Ingot Used as a Home Fortificant to Prevent Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Rodriguez-Ramiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is a major public health concern and nutritional approaches are required to reduce its prevalence. The aim of this study was to examine the iron bioavailability of a novel home fortificant, the “Lucky Iron Fish™” (LIF (www.luckyironfish.com/shop, Guelph, Canada and the impact of dietary factors and a food matrix on iron uptake from LIF in Caco-2 cells. LIF released a substantial quantity of iron (about 1.2 mM at pH 2 but this iron was only slightly soluble at pH 7 and not taken up by cells. The addition of ascorbic acid (AA maintained the solubility of iron released from LIF (LIF-iron at pH 7 and facilitated iron uptake by the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In vitro digestion of LIF-iron in the presence of peas increased iron uptake 10-fold. However, the addition of tannic acid to the digestion reduced the cellular iron uptake 7.5-fold. Additionally, LIF-iron induced an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, similar to ferrous sulfate, but this effect was counteracted by the addition of AA. Overall, our data illustrate the major influence of dietary factors on iron solubility and bioavailability from LIF, and demonstrate that the addition of AA enhances iron uptake and reduces ROS in the intestinal lumen.

  2. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  3. Efficacy of iron-fortified whole maize flour on iron status of schoolchildren in Kenya: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andang'o, P.E.A.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Ayah, R.; West, C.E.; Mwaniki, D.; Wolf, de C.A.; Kraaijenhagen, R.; Kok, F.J.; Verhoef, H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Sodium iron edetic acid (NaFeEDTA) might be a more bioavailable source of iron than electrolytic iron, when added to maize flour. We aimed to assess the effect, on children's iron status, of consumption of whole maize flour fortified with iron as NaFeEDTA or electrolytic iron. Methods 516

  4. Iron, zinc and selenium status of urban and rural populations in Pakistan, their bioavailability in the diet and their dietary interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manser, W.W.T.; Zaki Hasan, K.; Iliyas, M.; Zaidi, Z.

    1992-01-01

    In spite of the diversity of diet for rural and urban populations of Pakistan, anemias are very common. This paper contains a discussion of deficiencies of iron, zinc, selenium and magnesium in the population. Included are discussions on the bioavailability of these elements from the local diet, the various dietary interactions with other elements, and several methods used for identifying the trace element in blood samples from a test group. 28 refs, 7 tabs

  5. Electron exchange between neutral and ionized impurity iron centers in vitreous arsenic selenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, A. V. [Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia (Russian Federation); Terukov, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Egorova, A. Yu. [St.-Petersburg Mining University (Russian Federation); Kiselev, V. S.; Seregin, P. P., E-mail: ppseregin@mail.ru [Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    Impurity iron atoms in vitreous arsenic-selenide As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films modified by iron form one-electron donor centers with an ionization energy of 0.24 (3) eV (the energy is counted from the conduction-band bottom). The Fermi level is shifted with an increase in the iron concentration from the mid-gap to the donorlevel position of iron due to the filling of one-electron states of the acceptor type lying below the Fermi level. At an iron concentration of ≥3 at %, the electron-exchange process is observed between neutral and ionized iron centers resulting in a change both in the electron density and in the tensor of the electric-field gradient at iron-atom nuclei with increasing temperature above 350 K.

  6. In Rwandese Women with Low Iron Status, Iron Absorption from Low-Phytic Acid Beans and Biofortified Beans Is Comparable, but Low-Phytic Acid Beans Cause Adverse Gastrointestinal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Rohner, Fabian; Gahutu, Jean Bosco; Campion, Bruno; Boy, Erick; Tugirimana, Pierrot L; Zimmerman, Michael Bruce; Zwahlen, Christian; Wirth, James P; Moretti, Diego

    2016-05-01

    Phytic acid (PA) is a major inhibitor of iron bioavailability from beans, and high PA concentrations might limit the positive effect of biofortified beans (BBs) on iron status. Low-phytic acid (lpa) bean varieties could increase iron bioavailability. We set out to test whether lpa beans provide more bioavailable iron than a BB variety when served as part of a composite meal in a bean-consuming population with low iron status. Dietary iron absorption from lpa, iron-biofortified, and control beans (CBs) (regular iron and PA concentrations) was compared in 25 nonpregnant young women with low iron status with the use of a multiple-meal crossover design. Iron absorption was measured with stable iron isotopes. PA concentration in lpa beans was ∼10% of BBs and CBs, and iron concentration in BBs was ∼2- and 1.5-fold compared with CBs and lpa beans, respectively. Fractional iron absorption from lpa beans [8.6% (95% CI: 4.8%, 15.5%)], BBs [7.3% (95% CI: 4.0%, 13.4%)], and CBs [8.0% (95% CI: 4.4%, 14.6%)] did not significantly differ. The total amount of iron absorbed from lpa beans and BBs was 421 μg (95% CI: 234, 756 μg) and 431 μg (95% CI: 237, 786 μg), respectively, and did not significantly differ, but was >50% higher (P beans were hard to cook, and their consumption caused transient adverse digestive side effects in ∼95% of participants. Gel electrophoresis analysis showed phytohemagglutinin L (PHA-L) residues in cooked lpa beans. BBs and lpa beans provided more bioavailable iron than control beans and could reduce dietary iron deficiency. Digestive side effects of lpa beans were likely caused by PHA-L, but it is unclear to what extent the associated digestive problems reduced iron bioavailability. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02215278. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Micronutrient bioavailability: Dietary Reference Intakes and a future perspective1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a review of how the challenge of bioavailability was approached in establishing the Dietary Reference Intakes, with a special focus on folic acid, vitamin B-12, β-carotene, iron, selenium, and zinc, the targeted micronutrients for this workshop. In a future perspective, the necessity of having a clear working definition of bioavailability is emphasized. The bioavailability of micronutrients should be considered, with advantage, under subheadings determined by the broad factors that affect bioavailability. Special emphasis is given to giving greater and specific attention to factors involved in the maintenance of homeostasis. These factors, it is argued, are best considered separately from even a broad definition of bioavailability and have the potential to provide new insights into some micronutrient requirements. PMID:20200261

  8. Comparison of food habits, iron intake and iron status in adolescents before and after the withdrawal of the general iron fortification in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, A; Hulthén, L

    2015-04-01

    Sifted flour was fortified with carbonyl iron for 50 years in Sweden. This study evaluates changes in food habits, intake of iron, factors affecting iron absorption and iron status after the discontinuation of the general iron fortification in adolescents with the highest requirements. A total of 2285 15- to 16-year-old students in 1994 (634 girls and 611 boys) and in 2000 (534 girls and 486 boys) in 13 schools in Gothenburg, Sweden, were included in two cross-sectional surveys assessing food habits with diet history interviews and iron deficiency defined with serum ferritin stores ⩽ 15 μg/l and no preceding infection. In girls, iron deficiency increased from 37 to 45%, while in boys, it was stable at 23%. Total iron intake decreased from 15.7 to 9.5 mg/day and 22.5 to 13.9 mg/day in girls and boys, respectively. Cereals were the main iron source. Among girls, the increase of fish and decrease of calcium intake may not counteract the effect of decreased intake of fortification iron. Among boys, more meat, less calcium and more vitamin C may have favoured the bioavailability of iron. The discontinuation of the general iron fortification resulted in a 39% decrease in total iron intake and iron deficiency increased substantially in girls. However, in boys no change in iron deficiency was observed. Whether this was a result of changed bioavailability of dietary iron or simultaneous changes of non-dietary factors remains to be explored.

  9. Fortifying pork liver mixture: Evaluation of protein quality and iron bioavailability – Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Mariana SREBERNICH

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the protein quality and iron bioavailability of a fortifying mixture based on pork liver. Methods Determinations of protein efficiency ratio, net protein utilization, true digestibility and hemoglobin regeneration efficiency by depletion and repletion were performed. In the depletion phase, the animals (male Wistar rats received an iron-free AIN–93G diet and in the repletion phase they received the following diets: standard AIN–93G diet, fortifying mixture and standard diet containing heptahydrated ferrous sulfate for comparison. Results For standard AIN–93G diet and fortifying mixture the results were 3.75 and 4.04 for protein efficiency ratio and 3.53 and 3.63 for net protein retention, showing that the presence of pork liver in the diet promoted an increase in protein efficiency ratio and net protein retention (not statistically significant. True digestibility results obtained with the fortifying mixture (97.16% were higher than those obtained with the standard AIN–93G diet (casein, but without significant difference. The hemoglobin regeneration efficiency values obtained for standard AIN–93G diet, fortifying mixture and standard diet containing heptahydrated ferrous sulfate were 50.69, 31.96 and 29.96%, respectively, showing a statistically significant difference between the control (standard AIN–93G diet and test (fortifying mixture and standard diet containing heptahydrated ferrous sulfate samples, but not between the test samples. Conclusion The fortifying mixture showed a high protein efficiency ratio value of 4.04 and a high relative biological value (108% and it can be added to soups, creams and meats in day-care centers for the prevention of iron-deficiency in children of school age.

  10. Simple educational intervention will improve the efficacy of routine antenatal iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Hemantha M; Premaratne, Samanthi P; Palihawadana, Thilina; Wijeratne, Sumeda

    2010-06-01

    Sri Lanka has a policy of free provision of iron supplements to pregnant women. However, iron deficiency anemia remains common in pregnancy. We tested the hypothesis that educating women regarding improving bioavailability could improve the efficacy of iron supplementation. The education focused on how best supplements could be taken and on how they should be stored. We carried out a study using a quasi-experimental design on a group of women attending for antenatal care at a suburban University Obstetric Unit in Sri Lanka. The control group had care free of charge including iron supplementation and antihelminthic therapy. In addition, the study group received an education in small groups regarding maximizing bioavailability of iron. Hemoglobin and iron status of the women were compared between the groups at recruitment and at 34 weeks of gestation. The two groups were equally matched in demographic data, and hemoglobin and iron status. There were significant differences between the two groups at 34 weeks in the hemoglobin levels, serum ferritin levels, anemia rates and the number with low ferritin (P tablets in ways that improved their bioavailability. A simple health education improved the efficacy of iron supplementation in this population. Such interventions should be an integral part of iron supplementation programs, especially in populations whose habits tend to reduce the bioavailability of iron.

  11. In Vitro Iron Availability from Insects and Sirloin Beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Yang, Wenge; Vera Aviles, Mayra

    2016-11-09

    Interest in the consumption of insects (entomophagy) as an alternative environmentally sustainable source of protein in the diet of humans has recently witnessed a surge. Knowledge of the nutrient composition and, in particular, the bioavailability of minerals from insects is currently sparse. This study evaluated the availability of Fe, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, and Zn from four commonly eaten insects and compared these to sirloin beef. Soluble iron from the samples was measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Iron bioavailability was determined using an in vitro simulated peptic-pancreatic digestion, followed by measurement of ferritin (a surrogate marker for iron absorption) in Caco-2 cells. Cricket and sirloin beef had comparably higher levels of Fe, Ca, and Mn than grasshopper, meal, and buffalo worms. However, iron solubility was significantly higher from the insect samples than from beef. The complementation of whole-wheat flour with insect or beef protein resulted in overall decreases in mineral content and iron solubility in the composite mixtures. Collectively, the data show that grasshopper, cricket, and mealworms contain significantly higher chemically available Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, and Zn than sirloin. However, buffalo worms and sirloin exhibited higher iron bioavailability comparable to that of FeSO 4 . Commonly consumed insect species could be excellent sources of bioavailable iron and could provide the platform for an alternative strategy for increased mineral intake in the diets of humans.

  12. Biodisponibilidade de ferro do açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart. e da farinha de mandioca fortificada com ferro em ratos Iron bioavailability of the açaí(Euterpe oleracea Mart. and the iron-fortified manioc flour in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirlene Duarte Alves Toaiari

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a biodisponibilidade do ferro do açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart. e da farinha de mandioca fortificada com ferro, utilizando o método de depleção e repleção de hemoglobina em ratos. MÉTODOS: No período de depleção, durante a lactação, as ratas (Rattus novergicus e seus filhotes receberam ração à base de caseína (American Institute of Nutrition - 93G, sem adição de ferro na mistura salina, sendo que os filhotes, quando desmamados, continuaram a receber a mesma ração por mais sete dias. Paralelamente, houve um grupo controle no qual ratas e filhotes receberam ração comercial. No período de repleção de catorze dias, os ratos machos (n=40 foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em cinco grupos de oito ratos cada um, os quais receberam rações experimentais (açaí e farinha de mandioca fortificada com ferro e controles (do açaí e American Institute of Nutrition 93. A concentração de hemoglobina foi determinada semanalmente e a biodisponibilidade de ferro das rações foi determinada por meio de cálculos do ferro ingerido e do ferro hemoglobínico dos ratos dos diferentes grupos. RESULTADOS: Ao final do período de depleção, a concentração de hemoglobina dos ratos, de 4,7 ± 0,5g/dL, demonstrou a efetividade do método utilizado. A maior biodisponibilidade de ferro foi constatada na farinha de mandioca fortificada (44,6±3,6%, em contraste com a baixa biodisponibilidade do ferro do açaí (12,1±5,5%. CONCLUSÃO: O ferro presente no açaí não foi eficaz na recuperação da concentração de hemoglobina dos ratos. Portanto sugere-se cautela ao recomendar a utilização do açaí como fonte de ferro.OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the bioavailability of iron derived from açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart. and from iron-fortified manioc flour, using the hemoglobin iron-depletion-recovery method in rats. METHODS: A casein-based diet (American Institute of Nutrition - 93G, without

  13. Aspergillus niger Secretes Citrate to Increase Iron Bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoni, Dorett I.; van Gaal, Merlijn P.; Schonewille, Tom; Tamayo-Ramos, Juan A.; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Schaap, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus niger has an innate ability to secrete various organic acids, including citrate. The conditions required for A. niger citrate overproduction are well described, but the physiological reasons underlying extracellular citrate accumulation are not yet fully understood. One of the less understood culture conditions is the requirement of growth-limiting iron concentrations. While this has been attributed to iron-dependent citrate metabolizing enzymes, this straightforward relationship does not always hold true. Here, we show that an increase in citrate secretion under iron limited conditions is a physiological response consistent with a role of citrate as A. niger iron siderophore. We found that A. niger citrate secretion increases with decreasing amounts of iron added to the culture medium and, in contrast to previous findings, this response is independent of the nitrogen source. Differential transcriptomics analyses of the two A. niger mutants NW305 (gluconate non-producer) and NW186 (gluconate and oxalate non-producer) revealed up-regulation of the citrate biosynthesis gene citA under iron limited conditions compared to iron replete conditions. In addition, we show that A. niger can utilize Fe(III) citrate as iron source. Finally, we discuss our findings in the general context of the pH-dependency of A. niger organic acid production, offering an explanation, besides competition, for why A. niger organic acid production is a sequential process influenced by the external pH of the culture medium. PMID:28824560

  14. Arsenic mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under iron compound amendments at different growth stages of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Wang, Xiangqin; Li, Fangbai; Li, Bin; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Iron (Fe)-based solids can reduce arsenic (As) mobility and bioavailability in soils, which has been well recognized. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies on As uptake at different growth stages of rice under Fe compound amendments. In addition, the formation of Fe plaques at different growth stages of rice has also been rarely reported. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate As mobility and bioavailability in paddy soil under Fe compound amendments throughout the whole growth stage of rice plants. Amendments of poorly crystalline Fe oxides (PC-Fe), FeCl 2 +NaNO 3 and FeCl 2 reduced grain As by 54% ± 3.0%, 52% ± 3.0% and 46% ± 17%, respectively, compared with that of the non-amended control. The filling stage was suggested to be the key stage to take measures to reduce As uptake. At this stage, all soil amendments significantly reduced As accumulation in rice plants. At the maturation stage, PC-Fe amendment significantly reduced mobile pools and increased immobile pools of soil As. Besides, PC-Fe treatment promoted the transformation of Fe fractions from dissolved Fe to adsorbed, poorly crystalline and free Fe oxides. Moreover, significant positive correlations between soil Fe fractions and As fractions were found. Accordingly, we hypothesized that Fe compound amendments might affect the concentration distribution of Fe fractions first and then affect As fractionation in soil and its bioavailability to rice plants indirectly. The formation of Fe plaques varied with growth stages and different treatments. Significantly negative correlations between mobile pools of As and Fe or As in Fe plaques indicated that Fe plaques could immobilize mobile As in soils and thus affect As bioavailability. Overall, the effect of the soil amendments on reduction of As uptake varied with growth stages and different treatments, and further research on the key stage for reducing As uptake is still required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Ferrous ammonium phosphate (FeNH₄PO₄) as a new food fortificant: iron bioavailability compared to ferrous sulfate and ferric pyrophosphate from an instant milk drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczyk, Thomas; Kastenmayer, Peter; Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann, Stefan; Zeder, Christophe; Grathwohl, Dominik; Hurrell, Richard F

    2013-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to establish bioavailability data in humans for the new (Fe) fortification compound ferrous ammonium phosphate (FAP), which was specially developed for fortification of difficult-to-fortify foods where soluble Fe compounds cannot be used due to their negative impact on product stability. A double-blind, randomized clinical trial with cross-over design was conducted to obtain bioavailability data for FAP in humans. In this trial, Fe absorption from FAP-fortified full-cream milk powder was compared to that from ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) and ferrous sulfate. Fe absorption was determined in 38 young women using the erythrocyte incorporation dual stable isotope technique (⁵⁷Fe, ⁵⁸Fe). Geometric mean Fe absorption from ferrous sulfate, FAP and FPP was 10.4, 7.4 and 3.3 %, respectively. Fe from FAP was significantly better absorbed from milk than Fe from FPP (p soluble reference compound (p = 0.0002). Absorption ratios of FAP and FPP relative to ferrous sulfate as a measure of relative bioavailability were 0.71 and 0.32, respectively. The results of the present studies show that replacing FPP with FAP in full-cream milk could significantly improve iron bioavailability.

  16. Bioavailability of a new iron source used in the fortification of fluid cow's milk. Importance of its use in children after their nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.; Zubillaga, M.; Lysionek, A.; Caro, R.; Weill, R.

    2000-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency in Argentina, particularly among infants under 2 years old. At this age the most efficient way to prevent it is through the daily intake of bioavailable iron in weaning foods. Fluid cow's milk is the most popular weaning food in our country. Nowadays, it is possible to fortify this kind of food with 15 mg of iron per liter by a new technological procedure in which ferrous sulfate is microencapsulated with phospholipids. Therefore at the beginning we studied the absorption of this novel iron fortification compound called SFE-171 in fluid cow's milk in animal models as well as human beings. In both cases we found that the absorption values obtained for iron from SFE-171 were 2 folds higher with regard to the values obtained in the case of ferrous sulfate in cow's milk. In order to determine the importance that this fortified milk has in children iron balance after their nursing, we have to evaluate the iron intake by children near the weaning period. In this way we standardized the methodology to determine the iron content in breast milk and the method to determine the breast milk intake. The first part was performed and the iron concentration in breast milk was 0.56±0.08 μg/mL, the second part was started but the experimental phase has to be done. After that we have to determine the effect of iron-fortified cow's milk has on children iron status. Preliminary results suggest that the iron fortified fluid cow's milk with this source of iron produce an adequate iron balance in weaning children. (author)

  17. Bioavailability of a new iron source used in the fortification of fluid cow's milk. Importance of its use in children after their nursing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccio, J; Zubillaga, M; Lysionek, A; Caro, R [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Weill, R [Departamento de Industrias Agrarias, Universidad de Moron, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency in Argentina, particularly among infants under 2 years old. At this age the most efficient way to prevent it is through the daily intake of bioavailable iron in weaning foods. Fluid cow's milk is the most popular weaning food in our country. Nowadays, it is possible to fortify this kind of food with 15 mg of iron per liter by a new technological procedure in which ferrous sulfate is microencapsulated with phospholipids. Therefore at the beginning we studied the absorption of this novel iron fortification compound called SFE-171 in fluid cow's milk in animal models as well as human beings. In both cases we found that the absorption values obtained for iron from SFE-171 were 2 folds higher with regard to the values obtained in the case of ferrous sulfate in cow's milk. In order to determine the importance that this fortified milk has in children iron balance after their nursing, we have to evaluate the iron intake by children near the weaning period. In this way we standardized the methodology to determine the iron content in breast milk and the method to determine the breast milk intake. The first part was performed and the iron concentration in breast milk was 0.56{+-}0.08 {mu}g/mL, the second part was started but the experimental phase has to be done. After that we have to determine the effect of iron-fortified cow's milk has on children iron status. Preliminary results suggest that the iron fortified fluid cow's milk with this source of iron produce an adequate iron balance in weaning children. (author)

  18. Bioavailability of organically bound Fe to model phytoplankton of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Hassler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is known to be mostly bound to organic ligands and to limit primary productivity in the Southern Ocean. It is thus important to investigate the bioavailability of organically bound Fe. In this study, we used four phytoplankton species of the Southern Ocean (Phaeocystis sp., Chaetoceros sp., Fragilariopsis kerguelensis and Thalassiosira antarctica Comber to measure the influence of various organic ligands on Fe solubility and bioavailability. Short-term uptake Fe:C ratios were inversely related to the surface area to volume ratios of the phytoplankton. The ratio of extracellular to intracellular Fe is used to discuss the relative importance of diffusive supply and uptake to control Fe bioavailability. The effect of excess organic ligands on Fe bioavailability cannot be solely explained by their effect on Fe solubility. For most strains studied, the bioavailability of Fe can be enhanced relative to inorganic Fe in the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides whereas it was decreased in presence of hydroxamate siderophore and organic amine. For Thalassiosira, iron bioavailability was not affected by the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides. The enhancement of Fe bioavailability in presence of saccharides is presented as the result from both the formation of bioavailable (or chemically labile organic form of Fe and the stabilisation of Fe within the dissolved phase. Given the ubiquitous presence of saccharides in the ocean, these compounds might represent an important factor to control the basal level of soluble and bioavailable Fe. Results show that the use of model phytoplankton is promising to improve mechanistic understanding of Fe bioavailability and primary productivity in HNLC regions of the ocean.

  19. Electron Spectroscopy Studies of Iron, Iron Sulfides and Supported Iron Surfaces: Chemisorption of Simple Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yiu Chung

    EELS was used to investigate the chemisorption of oxygen and carbon on iron. The EELS spectra of oxidized iron show characteristic features with strong enhancement of the interband transitions involving the Fe 3d band (4.6 and 7.5 eV) and moderate enhancement of the M(,2,3) transition doublet (54.4 and 58.2 eV). The changes in the electron energy loss structures with an overlayer of graphitic or carbidic carbon were investigated. The adsorption and growth of iron on Ni(100) has been studied using the combined techniques of LEED and EELS. Initially iron grows by a layer-by-layer mechanism for the first few layers. High iron coverages result in the observation of complex LEED patterns with satellites around the main (1 x 1) diffraction sports. This is due to the formation of b.c.c. Fe(110) crystallites arranged in domains with different orientations. EELS studies show the presence of three stages in the growth of iron on Ni(100): low-coverage, film-like and bulk-like. Auger and EELS were used to study the iron sulfide (FeS(,2), Fe(,7)S(,8) and FeS) surfaces. A characteristic M(,2,3) VV Auger doublet with a separation of 5.0 eV was observed on the sulfides. An assignment of the electron energy loss peaks was made based on the energy dependence of the loss peaks and previous photoemission results. The effect of argon ion bombardment was studied. Peaks with strong iron and sulfur character were observed. Heating the damaged sulfides results in reconstruction of the sulfide surfaces. The reactions of the sulfides with simple gases, such as H(,2), CO, CH(,4), C(,2)H(,4), NH(,3) and O(,2) were also studied. Using XPS, the chemisorption of SO(,2) on CaO(100) has been studied. The chemical state of sulfur has been identified as that of sulfate. The kinetics of SO(,2) chemisorption on CaO are discussed. The binding states of Fe and Na on CaO were determined to be Fe('2+) and Na('+) respectively. At low Fe or Na coverages (< 0.5 ML), there is a large increase in the rate of

  20. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosny KM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Mohamed Hosny,1,2 Zainy Mohammed Banjar,3 Amani H Hariri,4 Ali Habiballah Hassan5 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni Suef University, Beni Suef, Egypt; 3Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Consultant Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hera Genaral Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world’s children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In

  1. Calculated electronic structure of chromium surfaces and chromium monolayers on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victora, R.H.; Falicov, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the magnetic and electronic properties of the chromium (100) and (110) surfaces and of a chromium monolayer on the (100) and (110) iron surfaces is presented. It is found that (i) the (100) chromium surface is ferromagnetic with a greatly enhanced spin polarization (3.00 electrons); (ii) a substantial enhancement of the spin imbalance exists several (>5) layers into the bulk; (iii) the (110) chromium surface is antiferromagnetic with a large (2.31) spin imbalance; (iv) the (100) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is ferromagnetic, with a huge spin imbalance (3.63), and aligned antiferromagnetically with respect to the bulk iron; (v) the (110) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is also ferromagnetic, with a spin imbalance of 2.25 and antiferromagnetically aligned to the iron. The spin imbalance of chromium on iron (100) is possibly the largest of any transition-metal system

  2. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pizarro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers´ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001. The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers´ requirements of this micronutrient.

  3. Nanoparticulate iron(III) oxo-hydroxide delivers safe iron that is well absorbed and utilised in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Dora I.A.; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F.A.; Faria, Nuno; Poots, Lynsey K.; Tagmount, Mani A.; Aslam, Mohamad F.; Frazer, David M.; Vulpe, Chris D.; Anderson, Gregory J.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder worldwide with substantial impact on health and economy. Current treatments predominantly rely on soluble iron which adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. We have developed organic acid-modified Fe(III) oxo-hydroxide nanomaterials, here termed nano Fe(III), as alternative safe iron delivery agents. Nano Fe(III) absorption in humans correlated with serum iron increase (P solubility. The most promising preparation (iron hydroxide adipate tartrate: IHAT) showed ~80% relative bioavailability to Fe(II) sulfate in humans and, in a rodent model, IHAT was equivalent to Fe(II) sulfate at repleting haemoglobin. Furthermore, IHAT did not accumulate in the intestinal mucosa and, unlike Fe(II) sulfate, promoted a beneficial microbiota. In cellular models, IHAT was 14-fold less toxic than Fe(II) sulfate/ascorbate. Nano Fe(III) manifests minimal acute intestinal toxicity in cellular and murine models and shows efficacy at treating iron deficiency anaemia. From the Clinical Editor This paper reports the development of novel nano-Fe(III) formulations, with the goal of achieving a magnitude less intestinal toxicity and excellent bioavailability in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Out of the tested preparations, iron hydroxide adipate tartrate met the above criteria, and may become an important tool in addressing this common condition. PMID:24983890

  4. Bioavailable Ferric Iron (BAFelll) Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    citrate dithionite bicarbonate CDBFe citrate dithionite bicarbonate extractable iron cDCE cis-Dichloroethene CDM Camp Dresser & McKee Inc...Defense (DoD) installations. Camp Dresser & McKee Inc. (CDM), in cooperation with the Naval Facilities Engineering Services Center (NFESC), was the...several upgradient and/or cross - gradient background soil samples. Duplicate analysis of samples is recommended. While these recommendations are not

  5. Extractability and bioavailability of Pb and As in historically contaminated orchard soil: Effects of compost amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Margaret; Tai, Yiping; Zhuang, Ping; McBride, Murray B.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of Pb and As in an historically contaminated orchard soil, after amendment with compost and aging in the field, was determined by single-step chemical extraction with 1.0 M ammonium acetate at pH 4.8, sequential extraction using the modified BCR test, and a redworm bioassay in the laboratory. The efficiency of soil Pb extraction by ammonium acetate was greater at higher total soil Pb but was reduced by compost amendment. Conversely, the extraction efficiency of total soil As increased with compost amendment, but was not sensitive to total soil As. The redworm bioassay indicated Pb (but not As) bioavailability to be reduced by soil amendment with compost, a result consistent with the ammonium acetate extraction test but not reflected in modified BCR test. Electron microprobe studies of the orchard soil revealed Pb and As to be spatially associated in discrete particles along with phosphorus and iron. -- Highlights: ► Soil Pb and As in an old orchard were concentrated in discrete particles. ► Compost amendment of contaminated soil reduced Pb bioavailability. ► Compost amendment of contaminated soil did not reduce As bioavailability. ► Ammonium acetate extraction test reflected bioavailability of soil Pb and As. -- Remediating metal-contaminated orchard soils with compost reduced lead bioavailability but had little effect on arsenic

  6. Role of bioavailable iron in coal dust-induced activation of activator protein-1 and nuclear factor of activated T cells: difference between Pennsylvania and Utah coal dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanshu; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Xi

    2002-11-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) are two important transcription factors responsible for the regulation of cytokines, which are involved in cell proliferation and inflammation. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is an occupational lung disease that may be related to chronic inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In the present study, we demonstrate that coal from the Pennsylvania (PA) coalmine region, which has a high prevalence of CWP, can activate both AP-1 and NFAT in JB6 mouse epidermal cells. In contrast, coal from the Utah (UT) coalmine region, which has a low prevalence of CWP, has no such effects. The PA coal stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p38 MAPK but not c-Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinases, as determined by the phosphorylation assay. The increase in AP-1 by the PA coal was completely eliminated by the pretreatment of cells with PD98059, a specific MAPK kinase inhibitor, and SB202190, a p38 kinase inhibitor, further confirming that the PA coal-induced AP-1 activation is mediated through ERKs and p38 MAPK pathways. Deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator, synergistically enhanced the PA coal-induced AP-1 activity, but inhibited NFAT activity. For comparison, cells were treated with ferrous sulfate and/or DFO. We have found that iron transactivated both AP-1 and NFAT, and DFO further enhanced iron-induced AP-1 activation but inhibited NFAT. These results indicate that activation of AP-1 and NFAT by the PA coal is through bioavailable iron present in the coal. These data are in agreement with our previous findings that the prevalence of CWP correlates well with levels of bioavailable iron in coals from various mining regions.

  7. Salivary proline-rich protein may reduce tannin-iron chelation: a systematic narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Delimont, Nicole M.; Rosenkranz, Sara K.; Haub, Mark D.; Lindshield, Brian L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Tannins are often cited for antinutritional effects, including chelation of non-heme iron. Despite this, studies exploring non-heme iron bioavailability inhibition with long-term consumption have reported mixed results. Salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) may mediate tannin-antinutritional effects on non-heme iron bioavailability. Aim To review evidence regarding biochemical binding mechanisms and affinity states between PRPs and tannins, as well as effects of PRPs on non-heme ir...

  8. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported....... We addressed this topic by performing femtosecond transient absorption (TA) measurements of aqueous suspensions of uncoated and DCF-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles, and an aqueous iron(iii)–dye complex. Following light absorption, excited state relaxation times of the dye of 115...... a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer...

  9. Electron small polarons and their mobility in iron (oxyhydr)oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Jordan E; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Attenkofer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Electron mobility within iron (oxyhydr)oxides enables charge transfer between widely separated surface sites. There is increasing evidence that this internal conduction influences the rates of interfacial reactions and the outcomes of redox-driven phase transformations of environmental interest....... To determine the links between crystal structure and charge-transport efficiency, we used pump-probe spectroscopy to study the dynamics of electrons introduced into iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide nanoparticles via ultrafast interfacial electron transfer. Using time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio...

  10. Effect of iron status on iron absorption in different habitual meals in young south Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeta Kalasuramath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Iron deficiency (ID affects a large number of women in India. An inverse relationship exists between iron (Fe status and Fe absorption. Dietary inhibitory and enhancing factors exert a profound influence on bioavailability of Fe. Although the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA for Fe is based on 8 per cent bioavailability, it is not clear if this holds good for the usual highly inhibitory Indian diet matrix. This study was aimed to determine Fe absorption from several habitually consumed south Indian food and to evaluate the interaction of Fe status with absorption. Methods: Four Fe absorption studies were performed on 60 apparently healthy young women, aged 18-35 years. Based on blood biochemistry, 45 of them were ID and 15 were iron replete (IR. The habitual meals assessed were rice, millet and wheat based meals in the ID subjects and rice based meal alone in the IR subjects. Each subject received the test meal labelled with 3 mg of [57] Fe and Fe absorption was measured based on erythrocyte incorporation of isotope label 14 days following administration. Results: Mean fractional Fe absorption from the rice, wheat and millet based meals in the ID subjects were 8.3, 11.2 and 4.6 per cent, respectively. Fe absorption from the rice-based meals was 2.5 per cent in IR subjects. Interpretation & conclusions: Fe absorption is dictated by Fe status from low bioavailability meals. Millet based meals have the lowest bioavailability, while the rice and wheat based meals had moderate to good bioavailability. In millet based meals, it is prudent to consider ways to improve Fe absorption.

  11. Electronic properties of iron impurity in hcp metals from Moessbauer studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janot, C.; Delcroix, P.

    1975-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in quantitative investigating the electronic properties of iron impurities in hexagonal close-packed metals. Beryllium of the highest commercially obtainable purity containing about 300 ppm residual impurities was used as a host element. Experimental evidence is given for the existence of localized electronic states which have non-spherical distribution and obviously contribute especially to the electric field gradient. Iron impurity seems to retain the same electronic behaviour as long as the host hcp metal is a normal one (Mg, Cd, Zn), but the localized electronic states seem to disappear when the host is a transition hcp metal (Co, Ti, Sc, Zr, etc.). (Z.S.)

  12. Iron bioavailability studies of the first generation of iron-biofortified beans released in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper represents a series of in vitro Fe bioavailability experiments, Fe content analysis and polyphenolic profile of the first generation of Fe biofortified beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) selected for human trials in Rwanda and released to farmers of that region. The objective of the present stud...

  13. Obesity Promotes Alterations in Iron Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Citelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a key hormone that induces the degradation of ferroportin (FPN, a protein that exports iron from reticuloendothelial macrophages and enterocytes. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate if the obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD modifies the expression of FPN in macrophages and enterocytes, thus altering the iron bioavailability. In order to directly examine changes associated with iron metabolism in vivo, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or a HFD. Serum leptin levels were evaluated. The hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1, FPN and ferritin genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of iron present in both the liver and spleen was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ferroportin localization within reticuloendothelial macrophages was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Obese animals were found to exhibit increased hepcidin gene expression, while iron accumulated in the spleen and liver. They also exhibited changes in the sublocation of splenic cellular FPN and a reduction in the FPN expression in the liver and the spleen, while no changes were observed in enterocytes. Possible explanations for the increased hepcidin expression observed in HFD animals may include: increased leptin levels, the liver iron accumulation or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Together, the results indicated that obesity promotes changes in iron bioavailability, since it altered the iron recycling function.

  14. Electron-beam-induced reduction of Fe3+ in iron phosphate dihydrate, ferrihydrite, haemosiderin and ferritin as revealed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ying-Hsi; Vaughan, Gareth; Brydson, Rik; Bleloch, Andrew; Gass, Mhairi; Sader, Kasim; Brown, Andy

    2010-01-01

    The effect of high-energy electron irradiation on ferritin/haemosiderin cores (in an iron-overloaded human liver biopsy), its mineral analogue; six-line ferrihydrite (6LFh), and iron phosphate dihydrate (which has similar octahedral ferric iron to oxygen coordination to that in ferrihydrite and ferritin/haemosiderin cores) has been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Fe L 2,3 -ionisation edges were recorded on two types of electron microscope: a 200 keV transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a 100 keV scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), in order to investigate the damage mechanisms in operation and to establish a methodology for minimum specimen alteration during analytical electron microscopic characterisation. A specimen damage mechanism dominated by radiolysis that results in the preferential loss of iron co-ordinating ligands (O, OH and H 2 O) is discussed. The net result of irradiation is structural re-organisation and reduction of iron within the iron hydroxides. At sufficiently low electron fluence and particularly in the lower incident energy, finer probe diameter STEM, the alteration is shown to be minimal. All the materials examined exhibit damage which as a function of cumulative fluence is best fitted by an inverse power-law, implying that several chemical and structural changes occur in response to the electron beam and we suggest that these are governed by secondary processes arising from the primary ionisation event. This work affirms that electron fluence and current density should be considered when measuring mixed valence ratios with EELS.

  15. Phytases for Improved Iron Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial phytases (EC 3.1.3.8) catalyse dephosphorylation of phytic acid, which is the primary storage compound for phosphorous in cereal kernels. The negatively charged phosphates in phytic acid chelate iron (Fe3+) and thus retards iron bioavailability in humans 1. Supplementation of microbial...... phytase can improve iron absorption from cereal-based diets 2. In order for phytase to catalyse iron release in vivo the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. Our work has compared the robustness of five different microbial phytases, evaluating thermal stability...

  16. Food synergies for improving bioavailability of micronutrients from plant foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K Madhavan; Augustine, Little Flower

    2018-01-01

    Plant foods are endowed with micronutrients but an understanding of bioavailability is essential in countries primarily dependent on plant based foods. Bioavailability depends majorly on food synergies. This review examines the nature of certain food synergies and methods to screen and establish it as a strategy to control micronutrient deficiency in the populations. Strong evidence on the synergistic effect of inclusion of vitamin C rich fruits and non-vegetarian foods in enhancing the bioavailability of iron has been demonstrated. Fat is found to be synergistic for vitamin A absorption. Red wine and protein have been explored for zinc absorption and effect of fat has been studied for vitamin D. Methods for screening of bioavailability, and biomarkers to demonstrate the synergistic effects of foods are required. Translation of food synergy as a strategy requires adaptation to the context and popularization of intelligent food synergies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  18. Effect of three Electron Shuttles on Bioreduction of Ferric Iron in two Acidic and Calcareous soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Sharifi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iron cycle is one of the most important biogeochemical processes which affect the availability of iron in soils. Ferric iron oxides are the most abundant forms of iron in soils and sediments. Ferric iron is highly insoluble at circumneutral pH. Present investigations have shown that the structural ferric iron bound in clay minerals is reduced by some microorganisms. Anaerobic bacteria reduce ferric iron which bound to soil clay minerals under anaerobic conditions. They have the ability to use ferric iron as a terminal electron acceptor. Many studies presented that dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB mediate the transfer of electrons from small organic molecules like acetate and glucose to various humic materials (electron shuttles which then pass electrons abiotically to ferric iron oxyhydroxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Electron shuttles like AQDS, a tricyclic quinone, increase the rate of iron reduction by iron reducing bacteria on sites of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides. By increasing the rate of bioreduction of ferric iron, the solubility and availability of iron enhanced meaningfully. Royer et al. (2002 showed that bioreduction of hematite (common iron mineral in soils increased more than three times in the presence of AQDS and Shewanella putrefaciens comparedto control treatments. Previous works have mostly used synthetic minerals as electron acceptor in bioreduction process. Furthermore, the effect of quinones as electron acceptor for microorganisms were studied with poorly crystalline ferric iron oxides . The main objective of this study was to study the effect of AQS, humic acid and fulvic acid (as electron shuttle and Shewanella sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, on bioreduction of native ferric iron in two acidic and calcareous soils. Materials and Methods: An experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement and three replications in vitro condition. The soil samples collected

  19. Using electron irradiation to probe iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyuil; Kończykowski, M.; Teknowijoyo, S.; Tanatar, M. A.; Prozorov, R.

    2018-06-01

    High-energy electron irradiation at low temperatures is an efficient and controlled way to create vacancy–interstitial Frenkel pairs in a crystal lattice, thereby inducing nonmagnetic point-like scattering centers. In combination with London penetration depth and resistivity measurements, the electron irradiation was used as a phase-sensitive probe to study the superconducting order parameter in iron-based superconductors (FeSCs), lending strong support to sign-changing s ± pairing. Here, we review the key results of the effect of electron irradiation in FeSCs.

  20. Global Modeling Study of the Bioavailable Atmospheric Iron Supply to the Global Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myriokefalitakis, S.; Krol, M. C.; van Noije, T.; Le Sager, P.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of trace constituents acts as a nutrient source to the open ocean and affect marine ecosystem. Dust is known as a major source of nutrients to the global ocean, but only a fraction of these nutrients is released in a bioavailable form that can be assimilated by the marine biota. Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient that significantly modulates gross primary production in the High-Nutrient-Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) oceans, where macronutrients like nitrate are abundant, but primary production is limited by Fe scarcity. The global atmospheric Fe cycle is here parameterized in the state-of-the-art global Earth System Model EC-Earth. The model takes into account the primary emissions of both insoluble and soluble Fe forms, associated with mineral dust and combustion aerosols. The impact of atmospheric acidity and organic ligands on mineral dissolution processes, is parameterized based on updated experimental and theoretical findings. Model results are also evaluated against available observations. Overall, the link between the labile Fe atmospheric deposition and atmospheric composition changes is here demonstrated and quantified. This work has been financed by the Marie-Curie H2020-MSCA-IF-2015 grant (ID 705652) ODEON (Online DEposition over OceaNs; modeling the effect of air pollution on ocean bio-geochemistry in an Earth System Model).

  1. Biofortified red mottled beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in a maize and bean diet provide more bioavailable iron than standard red mottled beans: Studies in poultry (Gallus gallus and an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glahn Raymond P

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to compare the capacities of biofortified and standard colored beans to deliver iron (Fe for hemoglobin synthesis. Two isolines of large-seeded, red mottled Andean beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., one standard ("Low Fe" and the other biofortified ("High Fe" in Fe (49 and 71 μg Fe/g, respectively were used. This commercial class of red mottled beans is the preferred varietal type for most of the Caribbean and Eastern and Southern Africa where almost three quarters of a million hectares are grown. Therefore it is important to know the affect of biofortification of these beans on diets that simulate human feeding studies. Methods Maize-based diets containing the beans were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements for broiler except for Fe (Fe concentrations in the 2 diets were 42.9 ± 1.2 and 54.6 ± 0.9 mg/kg. One day old chicks (Gallus gallus were allocated to the experimental diets (n = 12. For 4 wk, hemoglobin, feed-consumption and body-weights were measured. Results Hemoglobin maintenance efficiencies (HME (means ± SEM were different between groups on days 14 and 21 of the experiment (P In-vitro analysis showed lower iron bioavailability in cells exposed to standard ("Low Fe" bean based diet. Conclusions We conclude that the in-vivo results support the in-vitro observations; biofortified colored beans contain more bioavailable-iron than standard colored beans. In addition, biofortified beans seems to be a promising vehicle for increasing intakes of bioavailable Fe in human populations that consume these beans as a dietary staple. This justifies further work on the large-seeded Andean beans which are the staple of a large-region of Africa where iron-deficiency anemia is a primary cause of infant death and poor health status.

  2. Antiferroic electronic structure in the nonmagnetic superconducting state of the iron-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojima, Takahiro; Malaeb, Walid; Nakamura, Asuka; Kondo, Takeshi; Kihou, Kunihiro; Lee, Chul-Ho; Iyo, Akira; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Ishida, Shigeyuki; Nakajima, Masamichi; Uchida, Shin-Ichi; Ohgushi, Kenya; Ishizaka, Kyoko; Shin, Shik

    2017-08-01

    A major problem in the field of high-transition temperature ( T c ) superconductivity is the identification of the electronic instabilities near superconductivity. It is known that the iron-based superconductors exhibit antiferromagnetic order, which competes with the superconductivity. However, in the nonmagnetic state, there are many aspects of the electronic instabilities that remain unclarified, as represented by the orbital instability and several in-plane anisotropic physical properties. We report a new aspect of the electronic state of the optimally doped iron-based superconductors by using high-energy resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find spectral evidence for the folded electronic structure suggestive of an antiferroic electronic instability, coexisting with the superconductivity in the nonmagnetic state of Ba 1- x K x Fe 2 As 2 . We further establish a phase diagram showing that the antiferroic electronic structure persists in a large portion of the nonmagnetic phase covering the superconducting dome. These results motivate consideration of a key unknown electronic instability, which is necessary for the achievement of high- T c superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors.

  3. Electron-beam-induced reduction of Fe{sup 3+} in iron phosphate dihydrate, ferrihydrite, haemosiderin and ferritin as revealed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ying-Hsi; Vaughan, Gareth; Brydson, Rik [Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Bleloch, Andrew; Gass, Mhairi [SuperSTEM, Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Sader, Kasim [Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); SuperSTEM, Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy, E-mail: a.p.brown@leeds.ac.uk [Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The effect of high-energy electron irradiation on ferritin/haemosiderin cores (in an iron-overloaded human liver biopsy), its mineral analogue; six-line ferrihydrite (6LFh), and iron phosphate dihydrate (which has similar octahedral ferric iron to oxygen coordination to that in ferrihydrite and ferritin/haemosiderin cores) has been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Fe L{sub 2,3}-ionisation edges were recorded on two types of electron microscope: a 200 keV transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a 100 keV scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), in order to investigate the damage mechanisms in operation and to establish a methodology for minimum specimen alteration during analytical electron microscopic characterisation. A specimen damage mechanism dominated by radiolysis that results in the preferential loss of iron co-ordinating ligands (O, OH and H{sub 2}O) is discussed. The net result of irradiation is structural re-organisation and reduction of iron within the iron hydroxides. At sufficiently low electron fluence and particularly in the lower incident energy, finer probe diameter STEM, the alteration is shown to be minimal. All the materials examined exhibit damage which as a function of cumulative fluence is best fitted by an inverse power-law, implying that several chemical and structural changes occur in response to the electron beam and we suggest that these are governed by secondary processes arising from the primary ionisation event. This work affirms that electron fluence and current density should be considered when measuring mixed valence ratios with EELS.

  4. Densidade do ferro biodisponível em uma dieta habitual no Estado de São Paulo Bioavailable iron density in a customary diet in S. Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Cornbluth Szarfarc

    1983-08-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento do potencial de biodisponibilidade de ferro da dieta de uma população é imprescindível na implantação de um programa de fortificação com esse mineral. A quantificação da capacidade de absorção do ferro dietético foi efetuada em três refeições, habituais entre os paulistas: desjejum (pão, margarina, café com açúcar, almoço (arroz, feijão, carne e café com açúcar e jantar (arroz, feijão, ovo frito, café com açúcar, servidas a 28 indivíduos adultos, de ambos os sexos, aparentemente sadios. As densidades do ferro biodisponível (dFeB nas refeições estudadas foram: desjejum dFeB = 0,23; almoço dFeB = 0,73 e jantar dFeB = 0,28. Os valores encontrados, bastante inferiores aos adequados para suprir o requerimento de ferro da mulher, sugerem que a fortificação não é estratégia efetiva no controle da anemia ferropriva, quando aplicada às refeições de composição igual àquelas estudadas.A knowledge of the bioavailability of dietary iron is indispensable to the promotion of an iron fortification program. The quantification of that property was determined for three common meals, breakfast (bread, margarine, coffee with sugar, lunch (rice, beans, meat, coffee with sugar and dinner (rice, beans, fried egg, coffee with sugar served to 28 apparently healthy adults of both sexes. The bioavailable iron density (dFe B found was: breakfast - dFe B = 0,23; lunch - dFe B = 0,73 and dinner - dFe B = 0,28. These results, insufficient to supply the iron required by women, suggest that fortification is not an effective strategy for control of iron deficiency anemia if applied to meals like those studied.

  5. Changing of the electron structure of dispersed iron oxide during interaction with amines and borofluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobert, H.; Arnold, D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of chemisorption on the surface of iron oxide was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy performed on samples of iron oxide finely dispersed in SiO 2 . It was found from Moessbauer spectra that the interaction of the oxide with amines resulted in a reversible electron transition from the amine to the adsorbent. The interaction with BF 3 brought about an irreversible electron transition from iron to boron. (A.K.)

  6. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake ......The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron...

  7. Maize porridge enriched with a micronutrient powder containing low-dose iron as NaFeEDTA but not Amaranth grain flour reduces anemia and iron deficiency in Kenyan preschool children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macharia-Mutie, C.W.; Moretti, D.; Briel, van den N.; Omusundi, A.M.; Mwangi, A.M.; Kok, F.J.; Zimmerman, J.B.; Brouwer, I.D.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of fortification with iron-rich foods such as amaranth grain and multi-micronutrient powder (MNP) containing low doses of highly bioavailable iron to control iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. We assessed the efficacy of maize porridge enriched with

  8. Acceptability and solubility of iron and zinc contents of modified Moringa oleifera sauces consumed in the Far-north region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawouma, Saliou; Ponka, Roger; Mbofung, Carl Moses

    2017-03-01

    Consumption of Moringa oleifera leaves is a local and inexpensive solution to iron and zinc deficiencies in the Far-north region of Cameroon. However, traditional household's cooking techniques result in sauces with high pH levels and low leaves incorporation rates that compromise the bioavailability of iron and zinc. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of modifying a standard Moringa sauce on consumer acceptability and the solubility of iron and zinc, which is an indicator of their bioavailability. Lime juice or tamarind pulp was added to a standard recipe in order to reduce the pH by about one unit, and Moringa leaf powder was incorporated in each acidulated sauce at three levels (1, 2, and 4 g/100 g of sauce). All the formulations were evaluated for their acceptability by 30 housewives using a five-point hedonic scale. The pH was measured by a digital electronic pH-meter. Moisture and ash were determined by AOAC methods. Total iron and zinc contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and soluble iron and zinc by HCl-extractability. The lime juice-acidulated sauce and the tamarind pulp-acidulated sauce enriched with 1 g of Moringa leaf powder were the most acceptable formulations with scores of 3.4 and 3.6, respectively. Their chemical analysis showed a reduced pH (6.4 and 6.1, respectively), compared to the Control (7.2). Lime juice-acidulated sauce improved iron and zinc solubility from 42.19 to 66.38% and 54.03 to 82.03%, respectively. Tamarind pulp-acidulated sauce enriched with 1 g of Moringa leaf powder showed a decrease in iron solubility from 42.19 to 38.26% and an increase in zinc solubility from 54.03 to 72.86%. These results confirm the beneficial effect of lime juice in improving iron and zinc bioavailability.

  9. Effect of sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on the absorption of various trace elements in anemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Kaori; Sasaki, Ayako; Yoda, Yoko; Inage, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yukiko; Kimura, Shuichi; Yanagiya, Takahiro; Hirunuma, Rieko; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2001-01-01

    Iron deficiency in developing countries is attributed to the bioavailability of iron derived from staple food such as grains, vegetables and legumes. Sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA), a strong metal chelator, is one of the food additives for iron fortification and it has been for improvement of iron deficiency in the world. However, the effect of NaFeEDTA on the absorption of trace elements other than Fe has been poorly understood. In the present study, to investigate the effect of NaFeEDTA on the absorption of trace elements, we determined the uptake rate of various metals using a multitracer technique. The uptake rates of Zn, Co, and Na in rats fed with NaFeEDTA diet were significantly lower than those in rats fed with ferrous sulfate (FS) diet, suggesting that iron fortification by NaFeEDTA lowers the bioavailability of various elements compared with FS. On the other hand, iron fortification using the FS diet in the presence of tannic acid decreased the bioavailability of Zn and Rb. However, no effect of tannic acid on the uptake rate of metal was observed in NaFeEDTA diet, suggesting that iron fortification using NaFeEDTA is less affected by tannic acid than that using the FS diet. These results indicate that iron fortification using NaFeEDTA is an effective method for improving iron deficiency. (author)

  10. Iron absorption from beans with different contents of iron, evaluated by stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira-Franco, Márcia Varella Morandi; Dutra de Oliveira, José Eduardo; Nutti, Marilia Regini; Pereira, Helton Santos; Carvalho, José Luiz Vianna de; Abrams, Steven A; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Cunha; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio

    2018-06-01

    The introduction of biofortified foods such as beans with higher iron content may be a useful tool in preventing iron deficiency. The biofortification aims to reach the root of the problem of malnutrition, targets the neediest population, uses embedded distribution mechanisms, is scientifically feasible and effective in terms of cost, and complements other ongoing interventions to control micronutrient deficiency. However, to ensure effectiveness, measurement of the absorption of minerals is essential. The objective of this study was to evaluate the iron bioavailability of common bean BRS Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification, compared with common bean BRS Estilo in man through reliable techniques that have not been previously used in Brazil. The study included 29 young adult volunteers divided into 2 groups: Group CB (13 subjects) received 100 g of common beans (BRS-Estilo) cooked labeled with iron-58 ( 58 Fe) and Group TBB (16 patients) received 100 g common bean target for iron biofortification (BRS-Pontal), cooked and labeled with iron58 ( 58 Fe). The next day they received the reference dose of ferrous sulfate enriched iron-57 ( 57 Fe). Isotopic evaluation of iron for measurement of iron incorporation into erythrocytes was performed 14 days after consumption. The beans used, were produced, through conventional breeding program, by EMBRAPA/Rice and Beans. The iron absorption was evaluated by assessing the isotopic enrichment of the stable isotope. Mean iron absorption from the meal with common beans was 0.409% (±0.040%) and mean iron incorporation from the meal with target beans for biofortification 0.407% (±0.038%) and did not differ between the groups. This study tested the iron absorption from a single bean meal in healthy volunteers or non anemics, In the present study the iron absorption ratio from common bean Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification and compared with common bean BRS Estilo was not significantly different. The iron concentration

  11. In vitro evaluation of iron solubility and dialyzability of various iron fortificants and of iron-fortified milk products targeted for infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokefalou, Maria; Alexandropoulou, Isidora; Komaitis, Michail; Politis, Ioannis

    2005-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were: to compare the solubility and dialyzability of various iron fortificants (iron pyrophosphate, ferrous bis-glycinate, ferrous gluconate, ferrous lactate, ferrous sulfate) added, in the presence of ascorbic acid, to pasteurized milk samples produced under laboratory conditions; and to compare the solubility and dialyzability of iron in commercial pasteurized, UHT and condensed milk products available in the Greek market fortified with various vitamins and minerals including iron and targeted towards infants (6-12 months old) and toddlers. Iron solubility and dialyzability were determined using a simulated gastrointestinal digestive system. Ferrous dialyzable iron (molecular weight lower than 8000) was used as an index for prediction of iron bioavailability. Ferrous dialyzable iron in pasteurized milk samples fortified with iron pyrophosphate, ferrous lactate and ferrous bis-glycinate was higher (P iron in products fortified with ferrous lactate was not different (P > 0.05) from those fortified with ferrous sulfate. Ferrous dialyzable iron in four condensed commercial milk products was higher (P iron was higher (P iron source, milk processing and the overall product composition affect formation of ferrous dialyzable iron and may determine the success and effectiveness of iron fortification of milk.

  12. Assessing arsenic bioavailability through the use of bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel, E.; Nadimpalli, M.; Hull, M.; Schreiber, M. E.; Vikesland, P.

    2009-12-01

    Various methods have been used to characterize the bioavailability of a contaminant, including chemical extractions from soils, toxicity tests, bioaccumulation measurements, estimation from soil properties, in vitro/in vivo tests, and microbial biossays. Unfortunately, these tests are all unique (i.e. they measure bioavailability through different mechanisms) and it is difficult to compare measurements collected using one method to those collected from another. Additionally, there are fundamental aspects of bioavailability research that require further study. In particular, changes in bioavailability over time are not well understood, as well as what the geochemical controls are on changes in bioavailability. In addition, there are no studies aimed at the integration of bioavailability measurements and potential geochemical controls. This research project seeks to find a standard set of assays and sensors that can be used to assess arsenic bioavailability at any field site, as well as to use these tools and techniques to better understand changes in, and controls on, arsenic bioavailability. The bioassays to be utilized in this research are a bioluminescent E. coli assay and a Corbicula fluminea (Asian clam) assay. Preliminary experiments to determine the suitability of the E. coli and C. fluminea assays have been completed. The E. coli assay can be utilized to analyze As(III) and As(V) with a linear standard curve between 5 and 200 ppb for As(III) and 100 ppb and 5 ppm for As(V); no bioluminescent response above background was elicited in the presence of Roxarsone, an organoarsenical. The C. fluminea assay is capable of bioaccumulating As(III), As(V), Roxarsone, and MSMA, with As(III) being the most readily accumulated, followed by As(V), Roxarsone and MSMA, respectively. Additional research will include assessing bioavailability of various arsenic species adsorbed to natural colloidal materials (i.e. clays, iron oxides, NOM) to the E. coli and C. fluminea assays

  13. Factors for the bioavailability of heme iron preparation in female rats

    OpenAIRE

    村上, 亜由美; 岸本, 三香子; 川口, 真規子; 松浦, 寿喜; 市川, 富夫; Ayumi, Murakami; Mikako, Kishimoto; Makiko, Kawaguchi; Toshiki, Matsuura; Tomio, Ichikawa

    1998-01-01

    Factors for iron absorption in small intestine using heme iron preparation (HIP) and ferric citrate (FC) were investigated. We measured the solubility of iron of experimental diets (FC-normal, FC-overload, HIP-normal, HIP-overload) in water (adjusted pH6.8) and the diffusibility of dietary iron after digestion in vitro. The results did not show significantly differences between FC and HIP. Also, we measured microsomal heme oxygenase (HO) activity in intestinal mucosa of female rats fed experi...

  14. Iron enriched Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains its fermenting power and bakery properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Gaensly

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient in the metabolism of almost all living organisms; however, its deficiency is well documented especially in pregnant women and in children. Iron salts as a dietary supplement have low bioavailability and can cause gastrointestinal discomforts. Iron enriched yeasts can provide a supplementation of this micronutrient to the diet because this mineral has a better bioavailability when bonded to yeast cell macromolecules. These yeasts can be used as feed supplement for human and animals and also as baker's yeast. Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated in a reactor employing yeast media supplemented with 497 mg ferrous sulfate.L-1, and the resultant biomass incorporated 8 mg Fe.g-1 dry matter. This biomass maintained its fermenting power regarding both water displace measurement through carbonic dioxide production and bakery characteristics. The bread produced using the yeast obtained by cultivation in yeast media supplemented with iron presented six times more iron than the bread produced using the yeast obtained by cultivation without iron supplementation.

  15. Galvanomagnetic properties and electronic structure of iron-doped PbTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skipetrov, E. P., E-mail: skip@mig.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Faculty of Materials Science, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kruleveckaya, O. V.; Skipetrova, L. A. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Knotko, A. V. [Faculty of Materials Science, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E. [Institute of Materials Science Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Chernivtsy 58001 (Ukraine)

    2015-11-21

    We synthesize an iron-doped PbTe single-crystal ingot and investigate the phase composition and distribution of the iron impurity along the ingot as well as galvanomagnetic properties in weak magnetic fields (4.2 K ≤ T ≤ 300 K, B ≤ 0.07 T) of Pb{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}Te alloys. We find microscopic inclusions enriched with iron and regions with a chemical composition close to FeTe in the heavily doped samples, while the iron impurity content in the main phase rises only slightly along the length of the ingot reaching the impurity solubility limit at approximately 0.6 mol. %. Samples from the initial and the middle parts of the ingot are characterized by p-type metal conductivity. An increase of the iron impurity content leads to a decrease in the free hole concentration and to a stabilization of galvanomagnetic parameters due to the pinning of the Fermi level by the iron resonant impurity level E{sub Fe} lying under the bottom of the valence band (E{sub v} − E{sub Fe} ≈ 16 meV). In the samples from the end of the ingot, a p-n inversion of the conductivity type and an increase of the free electron concentration along the ingot are revealed despite the impurity solubility limit being reached. The kinetics of changes of charge carrier concentration and of the Fermi energy along the ingot is analyzed in the framework of the six-band Dimmock dispersion relation. A model is proposed for the electronic structure rearrangement of Pb{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}Te with doping, which may also be used for PbTe doped with other transition metals.

  16. Ice sheets as a significant source of highly reactive nanoparticulate iron to the oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkings, Jon R; Wadham, Jemma L; Tranter, Martyn; Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Statham, Peter J; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Lee, Katherine; Telling, Jon

    2014-05-21

    The Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets cover ~ 10% of global land surface, but are rarely considered as active components of the global iron cycle. The ocean waters around both ice sheets harbour highly productive coastal ecosystems, many of which are iron limited. Measurements of iron concentrations in subglacial runoff from a large Greenland Ice Sheet catchment reveal the potential for globally significant export of labile iron fractions to the near-coastal euphotic zone. We estimate that the flux of bioavailable iron associated with glacial runoff is 0.40-2.54 Tg per year in Greenland and 0.06-0.17 Tg per year in Antarctica. Iron fluxes are dominated by a highly reactive and potentially bioavailable nanoparticulate suspended sediment fraction, similar to that identified in Antarctic icebergs. Estimates of labile iron fluxes in meltwater are comparable with aeolian dust fluxes to the oceans surrounding Greenland and Antarctica, and are similarly expected to increase in a warming climate with enhanced melting.

  17. Substituent effects on geometric and electronic properties of iron tetraphenylporphyrin: a DFT investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; She, Yuanbin; Yu, Yanmin; Yao, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Suojiang

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the effects of the substituents, substituent positions and axial chloride ligand on the geometric and electronic properties of the iron tetraphenylporphyrin (FeTPP), a series of the substituented iron tetraphenylporphyrins and their chlorides, FeT(o/p-R)PP and FeT(o/p-R)PPCl (R = -H, -Cl, -NO(2), -OH, -OCH(3)), were systematically calculated without any symmetry constraint by using DFT method. For geometric structure, the substituent position and axial Cl ligand change the configuration of the iron porphyrin obviously. The ortho-substituents prefer making the phenyls perpendicular to the porphyrin ring; the axial chloride draws the central Fe ion ~0.500 Å out of the porphyrin plane toward the ligand. With regard to electronic properties, it is found that E(LUMO) could be related to the catalytic activity. The electron-withdrawing group always lowers the energies of both frontier orbitals, while the electron-donating one heightens them simultaneously, but they affect the E(HOMO) and E(LUMO) in the same sequence, -NO(2) < -Cl < -H < -OH < -OCH(3). The substituent effects on the central Fe ion were explored by calculating NBO charge distribution, spin density and natural electron configuration.

  18. Long distance electron transmission couples sulphur, iron, calcium and oxygen cycling in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    sulfide oxidation leads to electric field formation, sulfide depletion and acidification of the upper centimeters of the sediment. This promoted ion migration and dissolution of carbonates and iron sulfides. Sulfide released from iron sulfides was the major e-donor in the system. Ferrous iron released...... from iron sulfides was to a large extend deposited in the oxic zone as iron oxides and Ca2+ eventually precipitates at the surface as due to high pH caused by cathodic oxygen reduction. The result show how long distance electron transmission allows oxygen to drive the allocation of important minerals...... geochemical alterations in the upper centimetres of the anoxic sediment: Sulphides were oxidized to sulphate in anoxic sediment layers. Electrons from this half-reaction were passed to the oxic layers cm above. In this way the domain of oxygen was extended far beyond it’s physically presence. Bioelectrical...

  19. Dephytinisation with Intrinsic Wheat Phytase and Iron Fortification Significantly Increase Iron Absorption from Fonio (Digitaria exilis) Meals in West African Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Diego; Schuth, Stephan; Egli, Ines; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2013-01-01

    Low iron and high phytic acid content make fonio based meals a poor source of bioavailable iron. Phytic acid degradation in fonio porridge using whole grain cereals as phytase source and effect on iron bioavailability when added to iron fortified fonio meals were investigated. Grains, nuts and seeds collected in Mali markets were screened for phytic acid and phytase activity. We performed an iron absorption study in Beninese women (n = 16), using non-dephytinised fonio porridge (FFP) and dephytinised fonio porridge (FWFP; 75% fonio-25% wheat), each fortified with 57Fe or 58Fe labeled FeSO4. Iron absorption was quantified by measuring the erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Phytic acid varied from 0.39 (bambara nut) to 4.26 g/100 g DM (pumpkin seed), with oilseeds values higher than grains and nuts. Phytase activity ranged from 0.17±1.61 (fonio) to 2.9±1.3 phytase unit (PU) per g (whole wheat). Phytic acid was almost completely degraded in FWFP after 60 min of incubation (pH≈5.0, 50°C). Phytate∶iron molar ratios decreased from 23.7∶1 in FFP to 2.7∶1 in FWFP. Iron fortification further reduced phytate∶iron molar ratio to 1.9∶1 in FFP and 0.3∶1 in FWFP, respectively. Geometric mean (95% CI) iron absorption significantly increased from 2.6% (0.8–7.8) in FFP to 8.3% (3.8–17.9) in FWFP (Pphytase increased fractional iron absorption 3.2 times, suggesting it could be a possible strategy to decrease PA in cereal-based porridges. PMID:24124445

  20. Iron oxide minerals in dust-source sediments from the Bodélé Depression, Chad: Implications for radiative properties and Fe bioavailability of dust plumes from the Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Bruce M; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Beroquo, Thelma; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Bristow, Charlie S

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust can influence climate and biogeochemical cycles. An important component of mineral dust is ferric oxide minerals (hematite and goethite) which have been shown to influence strongly the optical properties of dust plumes and thus affect the radiative forcing of global dust. Here we report on the iron mineralogy of dust-source samples from the Bodélé Depression (Chad, north-central Africa), which is estimated to be Earth’s most prolific dust producer and may be a key contributor to the global radiative budget of the atmosphere as well as to long-range nutrient transport to the Amazon Basin. By using a combination of magnetic property measurements, Mössbauer spectroscopy, reflectance spectroscopy, chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy, we document the abundance and relative amounts of goethite, hematite, and magnetite in dust-source samples from the Bodélé Depression. The partition between hematite and goethite is important to know to improve models for the radiative effects of ferric oxide minerals in mineral dust aerosols. The combination of methods shows (1) the dominance of goethite over hematite in the source sediments, (2) the abundance and occurrences of their nanosize components, and (3) the ubiquity of magnetite, albeit in small amounts. Dominant goethite and subordinate hematite together compose about 2% of yellow-reddish dust-source sediments from the Bodélé Depression and contribute strongly to diminution of reflectance in bulk samples. These observations imply that dust plumes from the Bodélé Depression that are derived from goethite-dominated sediments strongly absorb solar radiation. The presence of ubiquitous magnetite (0.002–0.57 wt%) is also noteworthy for its potentially higher solubility relative to ferric oxide and for its small sizes, including PM iron apportionment is estimated at about 33% in ferric oxide minerals, 1.4% in magnetite, and 65% in ferric silicates. Structural iron in clay

  1. Systematic ab initio study of the electronic and magnetic properties of different pure and mixed iron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, J.; Vega, A.; Balbas, L. C.; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Junquera, Javier; Artacho, Emilio; Soler, Jose M.; Ordejon, Pablo

    2000-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of iron systems in different environments: pure iron systems [dimer, bcc bulk, (100) surface, and free-standing iron monolayer], and low-dimensional iron systems deposited on Ag (100) surface (monoatomic linear wires, iron monolayer, planar, and three-dimensional clusters). Electronic and magnetic properties have been calculated using a recently developed total-energy first-principles method based on density-functional theory with numerical atomic orbitals as a basis set for the description of valence electrons and nonlocal pseudopotentials for the atomic core. The Kohn-Sham equations are solved self-consistently within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Tests on the pseudopotential, the basis set, grid spacing, and k sampling are carefully performed. This technique, which has been proved to be very efficient for large nonmagnetic systems, is applied in this paper to calculate electronic and magnetic properties of different iron nanostructures. The results compare well with previous ab initio all-electron calculations and with experimental data. The method predicts the correct trends in the magnetic moments of Fe systems for a great variety of environments and requires a smaller computational effort than other ab initio methods. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  2. Systematic ab initio study of the electronic and magnetic properties of different pure and mixed iron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid, (Spain); Vega, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid, (Spain); Balbas, L. C. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid, (Spain); Sanchez-Portal, Daniel [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Junquera, Javier [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-III, and Institut Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, (Spain); Artacho, Emilio [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, C-III, and Institut Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, (Spain); Soler, Jose M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Ordejon, Pablo [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus de la U.A.B., Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona, (Spain)

    2000-05-15

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of iron systems in different environments: pure iron systems [dimer, bcc bulk, (100) surface, and free-standing iron monolayer], and low-dimensional iron systems deposited on Ag (100) surface (monoatomic linear wires, iron monolayer, planar, and three-dimensional clusters). Electronic and magnetic properties have been calculated using a recently developed total-energy first-principles method based on density-functional theory with numerical atomic orbitals as a basis set for the description of valence electrons and nonlocal pseudopotentials for the atomic core. The Kohn-Sham equations are solved self-consistently within the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Tests on the pseudopotential, the basis set, grid spacing, and k sampling are carefully performed. This technique, which has been proved to be very efficient for large nonmagnetic systems, is applied in this paper to calculate electronic and magnetic properties of different iron nanostructures. The results compare well with previous ab initio all-electron calculations and with experimental data. The method predicts the correct trends in the magnetic moments of Fe systems for a great variety of environments and requires a smaller computational effort than other ab initio methods. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy characterization and microwave absorption of iron-filled carbon-nitrogen nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Renchao; Liang Chongyun; Shi Honglong; Zhou Xingui; Yang Xinan

    2007-01-01

    Iron-filled carbon-nitrogen (Fe/CN x ) nanotubes and iron-filled carbon (Fe/C) nanotubes were synthesized at 900 deg. C through a pyrolysis reaction of ferrocene/acetonitrile and ferrocene/xylene, respectively. The differences of structure and composition between the Fe/CN x nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was found that the morphology of Fe/CN x nanotubes is more corrugated than that of the Fe/C nanotubes due to the incorporation of nitrogen. By comparing the Fe L 2,3 electron energy-loss spectra of Fe/CN x nanotubes to those of the Fe/C nanotubes, the electron states at the interface between Fe and the tubular wall of both Fe/CN x nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated. At the boundary between Fe and the wall of a CN x nanotube, the additional electrons contributed from the doped 'pyridinic-like' nitrogen might transfer to the empty 3d orbital of the encapsulated iron, therefore leading to an intensity suppression of the iron L 2,3 edge and an intensity enhancement of the carbon K edge. However, such an effect could not be found in Fe/C nanotubes. Microwave absorption properties of both Fe/CN x and Fe/C nanocomposites at 2-18 GHz band were studied

  4. Iron Mobilization from Particles as a Function of pH and Particle Source

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohrbough, James

    2000-01-01

    .... The work presented here shows the role pH can play in iron mobilization from particles. At low pH, bioavailability of iron can be greatly increased, and can be significantly decreased at higher pH...

  5. Detection of the electronic structure of iron-(iii)-oxo oligomers forming in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Robert; Kraffert, Katrin; Kabelitz, Anke; Pohl, Marvin N; Kraehnert, Ralph; Emmerling, Franziska; Winter, Bernd

    2017-12-13

    The nature of the small iron-oxo oligomers in iron-(iii) aqueous solutions has a determining effect on the chemical processes that govern the formation of nanoparticles in aqueous phase. Here we report on a liquid-jet photoelectron-spectroscopy experiment for the investigation of the electronic structure of the occurring iron-oxo oligomers in FeCl 3 aqueous solutions. The only iron species in the as-prepared 0.75 M solution are Fe 3+ monomers. Addition of NaOH initiates Fe 3+ hydrolysis which is followed by the formation of iron-oxo oligomers. At small enough NaOH concentrations, corresponding to approximately [OH]/[Fe] = 0.2-0.25 ratio, the iron oligomers can be stabilized for several hours without engaging in further aggregation. Here, we apply a combination of non-resonant as well as iron 2p and oxygen 1s resonant photoelectron spectroscopy from a liquid microjet to detect the electronic structure of the occurring species. Specifically, the oxygen 1s partial electron yield X-ray absorption (PEY-XA) spectra are found to exhibit a peak well below the onset of liquid water and OH - (aq) absorption. The iron 2p absorption gives rise to signal centered between the main absorption bands typical for aqueous Fe 3+ . Absorption bands in both PEY-XA spectra are found to correlate with an enhanced photoelectron peak near 20 eV binding energy, which demonstrates the sensitivity of resonant photoelectron (RPE) spectroscopy to mixing between iron and ligand orbitals. These various signals from the iron-oxo oligomers exhibit maximum intensity at [OH]/[Fe] = 0.25 ratio. For the same ratio, we observe changes in the pH as well as in complementary Raman spectra, which can be assigned to the transition from monomeric to oligomeric species. At approximately [OH]/[Fe] = 0.3 we begin to observe particles larger than 1 nm in radius, detected by small-angle X-ray scattering.

  6. Preparation, physical characterization, and stability of Ferrous-Chitosan microcapsules using different iron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, Noer Abyor; Luthfansyah, M.; Krisanti, Elsa; Kartohardjono, Sutrasno; Mulia, Kamarza

    2017-11-01

    Dietary modification, supplementation and food fortification are common strategies to alleviate iron deficiencies. Fortification of food is an effective long-term approach to improve iron status of populations. Fortification by adding iron directly to food will cause sensory problems and decrease its bioavailability. The purpose of iron encapsulation is: (1) to improve iron bioavailability, by preventing oxidation and contact with inhibitors and competitors; and (2) to disguise the rancid aroma and flavor of iron. A microcapsule formulation of two suitable iron compounds (iron II fumarate and iron II gluconate) using chitosan as a biodegradable polymer will be very important. Freeze dryer was also used for completing the iron microencapsulation process. The main objective of the present study was to prepare and characterize the iron-chitosan microcapsules. Physical characterization, i.e. encapsulation efficiency, iron loading capacity, and SEM, were also discussed in this paper. The stability of microencapsulated iron under simulated gastrointestinal conditions was also investigated, as well. Both iron sources were highly encapsulated, ranging from 71.5% to 98.5%. Furthermore, the highest ferrous fumarate and ferrous gluconate loaded were 1.9% and 4.8%, respectively. About 1.04% to 9.17% and 45.17% to 75.19% of Fe II and total Fe, were released in simulated gastric fluid for two hours and in simulated intestinal fluid for six hours, respectively.

  7. Stability, electrochemical behaviors and electronic structures of iron hydroxyl-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongli; Sun Shaorui; Li Fan; Chen Ge; Xia Dingguo; Zhao Ting; Chu Wangsheng; Wu Ziyu

    2010-01-01

    Iron hydroxyl-phosphate with a uniform spherical particle size of around 1 μm, a compound of the type Fe 2-y □ y (PO 4 )(OH) 3-3y (H 2 O) 3y-2 (where □ represents a vacancy), has been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The particles are composed of spheres of diameter -1 and 120 mAh g -1 at current densities of 170 mA g -1 and 680 mA g -1 , respectively. The stability of crystal structure of this material was studied by TGA and XRD which show that the material remains stable at least up to the temperature 200 deg. C. Investigation of the electronic structure of the iron hydroxyl-phosphate by GGA + U calculation has indicated that it has a better electronic conductivity than LiFePO 4 .

  8. [Ferrous sulfate in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia: The positions continue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoretsky, L I

    The paper discusses treatment strategy and tactics for iron deficiency anemia. It gives data on the comparative efficacy of different iron sulfate drugs, their bioavailability, effects on peroxidation processes, and side effects. The paper also considers the clinical significance of a dosage form of iron-containing drugs with a sustained iron release, as well as ways to reduce the frequency and magnitude of side effects when ferrous sulfate is used.

  9. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium ( 47 Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO 3 . In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the 47 Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison

  10. Dietary inulin supplementation does not promote colonic iron absorption in a porcine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebiotics may enhance iron bioavailability by increasing iron absorption in the colon. Anemic pigs fitted with cecal cannulas were fed a low-iron diet with or without 4% inulin. Over 7 days, pigs were administered 1 mg 54 Fe in the morning feed followed by cannula infusion of 0.5 mg 58 Fe to measu...

  11. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  12. Organic iron (III) complexing ligands during an iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Takeda, Shigenobu; Nishioka, Jun; Obata, Hajime; Furuya, Ken; Johnson, William Keith; Wong, C. S.

    2008-06-01

    Complexation of iron (III) with natural organic ligands was investigated during a mesoscale iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific (SEEDS II). After the iron infusions, ligand concentrations increased rapidly with subsequent decreases. While the increases of ligands might have been partly influenced by amorphous iron colloids formation (12-29%), most in-situ increases were attributable to the Dilution of the fertilized patch may have contributed to the rapid decreases of the ligands. During the bloom decline, ligand concentration increased again, and the high concentrations persisted for 10 days. The conditional stability constant was not different between inside and outside of the fertilized patch. These results suggest that the chemical speciation of the released iron was strongly affected by formation of the ligands; the production of ligands observed during the bloom decline will strongly impact the iron cycle and bioavailability in the surface water.

  13. The effect of electron irradiation on the structure and iron speciation in sodium aluminum (iron) phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovsky, S.V., E-mail: serge.stefanovsky@yandex.ru [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS (Russian Federation); Presniakov, I.A.; Sobolev, A.V.; Glazkova, I.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kadyko, M.I.; Stefanovsky, O.I. [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-01

    The effect of 8 MeV electron irradiation on the structure of glasses in the series 40 Na{sub 2}O, (20-x) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, x Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 40 P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (mol.%) and on the iron speciation in these samples was studied by FTIR and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Irradiation up to a dose of 1.0 MGy has no appreciable effects on the character of the bonds within anionic motif of the glass network. Electron irradiation increases the fraction of aluminum in octahedral coordination. Iron in both unirradiated and irradiated glasses is present mainly as Fe(III) (60–75% of the total amount) in the glasses and partly as Fe(II) and the ratio of two forms remains constant up to a dose of 1.0 MGy.

  14. Cooking Chicken Breast Reduces Dialyzable Iron Resulting from Digestion of Muscle Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gokhale, Aditya S.; Mahoney, Raymond R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of cooking chicken breast on the production of dialyzable iron (an in vitro indicator of bioavailable iron) from added ferric iron. Chicken breast muscle was cooked by boiling, baking, sautéing, or deep-frying. Cooked samples were mixed with ferric iron and either extracted with acid or digested with pepsin and pancreatin. Total and ferrous dialyzable iron was measured after extraction or digestion and compared to raw chicken samples. For u...

  15. Bioaccessibility, bioavailability and toxicity of commercially relevant iron- and chromium-based particles: in vitro studies with an inhalation perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedberg Yolanda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production of ferrochromium alloys (FeCr, master alloys for stainless steel manufacture, involves casting and crushing processes where particles inevitably become airborne and potentially inhaled. The aim of this study was to assess potential health hazards induced by inhalation of different well-characterized iron- and chromium-based particles, i.e. ferrochromium (FeCr, ferrosiliconchromium (FeSiCr, stainless steel (316L, iron (Fe, chromium (Cr, and chromium(IIIoxide (Cr2O3, in different size fractions using in vitro methods. This was done by assessing the extent and speciation of released metals in synthetic biological medium and by analyzing particle reactivity and toxicity towards cultured human lung cells (A549. Results The amount of released metals normalized to the particle surface area increased with decreasing particle size for all alloy particles, whereas the opposite situation was valid for particles of the pure metals. These effects were evident in artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF of pH 4.5 containing complexing agents, but not in neutral or weakly alkaline biological media. Chromium, iron and nickel were released to very low extent from all alloy particles, and from particles of Cr due to the presence of a Cr(III-rich protective surface oxide. Released elements were neither proportional to the bulk nor to the surface composition after the investigated 168 hours of exposure. Due to a surface oxide with less protective properties, significantly more iron was released from pure iron particles compared with the alloys. Cr was predominantly released as Cr(III from all particles investigated and was strongly complexed by organic species of ALF. Cr2O3 particles showed hemolytic activity, but none of the alloy particles did. Fine-sized particles of stainless steel caused however DNA damage, measured with the comet assay after 4 h exposure. None of the particles revealed any significant cytotoxicity in terms of cell death

  16. Iron fortification of food: a strategy for control of iron deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.; BILAL, R.

    2001-01-01

    Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) is prevalent in the low socio-economic strata of population of developing countries. Most of the developed countries have well established programs of food fortification with iron. Many developing countries are initiating such programs and Pakistan is one of them. In the ninth 5 year plan of Pakistan, fortification of wheat flour with appropriate level and form of iron will be done to combat the IDA problem. The current paper summarizes the information regarding various fortificants that are being used for the control of IDA world over, along with some information on their effectiveness and bioavailability, where nuclear techniques have proven to be very useful. This will help in the initial planning of the National Program of wheat flour fortification trial in Pakistan. (author)

  17. Partial electron beam hardening of cast iron camshafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csizmazia, A.; Reti, T. [Szechenyi Istvan Univ., Gyoer (Hungary); Horvath, M.; Olah, I. [Audi Hungaria Motor Kft., Gyoer (Hungary)

    2005-07-01

    In order to improve the local surface properties (hardness, wear and contact fatigue resistance) of cast iron camshafts, detailed experiments with partial electron beam hardening have been performed. It was found that the required case depth of 0.3-0.5 mm and surface hardness of 600-700 HV can be achieved by using appropriately selected, computer-controlled processing parameters (angular speed, specific energy input, beam deflection). (orig.)

  18. Shigella Iron Acquisition Systems and their Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yahan; Murphy, Erin R

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Shigella within the host is strictly dependent on the ability of the pathogen to acquire essential nutrients, such as iron. As an innate immune defense against invading pathogens, the level of bio-available iron within the human host is maintained at exceeding low levels, by sequestration of the element within heme and other host iron-binding compounds. In response to sequestration mediated iron limitation, Shigella produce multiple iron-uptake systems that each function to facilitate the utilization of a specific host-associated source of nutrient iron. As a mechanism to balance the essential need for iron and the toxicity of the element when in excess, the production of bacterial iron acquisition systems is tightly regulated by a variety of molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the iron-uptake systems produced by Shigella species, their distribution within the genus, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their production.

  19. Transmission electron microscope study of fusion-environment radiation damage in iron and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, L.L.S.

    1982-07-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of radiation damage microstructures in iron and iron-chromium alloys has been performed. This study consisted of both qualitative and quantitative characterization of the dislocation and cavity microstructures, including determination of vacancy/interstitial character and Burgers vectors for dislocation loops and analysis of the cavity morphology. The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence, helium implantation, and chromium content were investigated. Neutron irradiation (iron specimens, 1 dpa, 455 to 1000 K) and triple-beam ion irradiation (Fe-10% Cr specimens, 10 dpa, 725 to 950 K; Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 0.3 to 100 dpa; and Fe, Fe-5% Cr, Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 10 dpa) were employed. In the triple-beam ion irradiation procedure, simultaneous bombardment with 4 MeV Fe ++ ions and energetic He + and D 2 + ions was used to simulate the fusion environment (10 at. ppM He/dpa and 41 at. ppM D/dpa). In addition, single-beam 4 MeV Fe ++ ion irradiations of Fe-10% Cr both with and without pre-injection of helium and deuterium were performed

  20. Isotope aided studies on the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuramulu, N.

    1992-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a major public health problem in many developing countries including India. Recent multicentric studies indicated that in rural population of India, 60% of preschool children and 40-60 % of women of child bearing age may suffer from anaemia. Studies by Sood et al indicated that iron stores are generally lower in the population as compared to populations in other countries. It is therefore possible that prelatent iron deficiency may be even higher who look otherwise healthy and adequately nourished. Iron absorption from habitual diets of Indians has been determined in the past by the chemical balance methods. Iron absorption determined by this method may be a gross over estimate. A more reliable estimate of iron absorption from composite meals can be obtained by the radio isotopic methods in which foods are extrinsically or intrinsically tagged with radio iron ( 55 Fe or 59 Fe). Using these methods iron absorption from a few habitual diets was studied. 15 refs

  1. Stability, electrochemical behaviors and electronic structures of iron hydroxyl-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhongli; Sun Shaorui; Li Fan; Chen Ge [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Pingleyuan 100, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022 (China); Xia Dingguo, E-mail: dgxia@bjut.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Pingleyuan 100, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100022 (China); Zhao Ting; Chu Wangsheng [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2010-09-01

    Iron hydroxyl-phosphate with a uniform spherical particle size of around 1 {mu}m, a compound of the type Fe{sub 2-y}{open_square}{sub y}(PO{sub 4})(OH){sub 3-3y}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3y-2} (where {open_square} represents a vacancy), has been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The particles are composed of spheres of diameter <100 nm. The compound exhibits good electrochemical performance, with reversible capacities of around 150 mAh g{sup -1} and 120 mAh g{sup -1} at current densities of 170 mA g{sup -1} and 680 mA g{sup -1}, respectively. The stability of crystal structure of this material was studied by TGA and XRD which show that the material remains stable at least up to the temperature 200 deg. C. Investigation of the electronic structure of the iron hydroxyl-phosphate by GGA + U calculation has indicated that it has a better electronic conductivity than LiFePO{sub 4}.

  2. High bioavailablilty iron maize (Zea mays L.) developed through molecular breeding provides more absorbable iron in vitro (Caco-2 model) and in vivo (Gallus gallus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron (Fe) deficiency is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Iron biofortification is a preventative strategy that alleviates Fe deficiency by improving the amount of absorbable Fe in crops. In the present study, we used an in vitro digestion/Caco 2 cell culture model as the guiding tool for breeding and development of two maize (Zea mays L.) lines with contrasting Fe bioavailability (ie. Low and High). Our objective was to confirm and validate the in vitro results and approach. Also, to compare the capacities of our two maize hybrid varieties to deliver Fe for hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis and to improve the Fe status of Fe deficient broiler chickens. Methods We compared the Fe-bioavailability between these two maize varieties with the presence or absence of added Fe in the maize based-diets. Diets were made with 75% (w/w) maize of either low or high Fe-bioavailability maize, with or without Fe (ferric citrate). Chicks (Gallus gallus) were fed the diets for 6 wk. Hb, liver ferritin and Fe related transporter/enzyme gene-expression were measured. Hemoglobin maintenance efficiency (HME) and total body Hb Fe values were used to estimate Fe bioavailability from the diets. Results DMT-1, DcytB and ferroportin expressions were higher (P < 0.05) in the "Low Fe" group than in the "High Fe" group (no added Fe), indicating lower Fe status and adaptation to less Fe-bioavailability. At times, Hb concentrations (d 21,28,35), HME (d 21), Hb-Fe (as from d 14) and liver ferritin were higher in the "High Fe" than in the "Low Fe" groups (P < 0.05), indicating greater Fe absorption from the diet and improved Fe status. Conclusions We conclude that the High Fe-bioavailability maize contains more bioavailable Fe than the Low Fe-bioavailability maize, presumably due to a more favorable matrix for absorption. Maize shows promise for Fe biofortification; therefore, human trials should be conducted to determine the efficacy of consuming the high bioavailable

  3. Isotope aided studies of the bioavailability of iron from common diets from Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaleta, N.; Diaz, A.; Bedregal, P.; Montoya R, E.

    1993-01-01

    The nutritional iron absorption from a typical peruvian diet was studied by the Eakins and Brown method. the food were breakfast: coffee and bread with butter; lunch: vegetable soup rice with cow tripe stew and lemonade; dinner: vegetable soup and bread. The results show that despite low iron content in the meals, which is not enough to meet daily iron requirements absorption was good in lunch possibly by the action of the promoters ascorbic acid (lemonade) and heme iron (cow tripe). Iron absorption in lunch was good and different from dinner and breakfast. We cannot conclude if the low iron absorption from bread is affected by coffee. (authors). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Iron bioavailibity from a tropical leafy vegetable in anaemic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latunde-Dada Gladys O

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Telfairia occidentalis is a vegetable food crop that is indigenous to West Africa. The leaves and seeds are the edible parts of the plant and are used in everyday meals by incorporation into soups and stews. Previous studies have attributed improved haematological indices to the vegetable and have advocated the use of T. occidentalis in the treatment of anemia. This study investigates the ameliorative effects of T. occidentalis when compared to FeSO4 as a reference salt in anaemic mice. It also compares the bioavailability of test iron and hepatic hepcidin expression for the estimation of iron absorption in the mice. Non-haem iron was determined in the liver of mice after the experimental feeding treatments. Hepcidin mRNA expression was carried out by quantitative RT-PCR. Administration of T. occidentalis leaves led to a modest increase in haemoglobin (Hb levels in anaemic mice that were comparable to the Hb repletion in anaemic mice given FeSO4. Hepatic iron increase in the mice given either T. occidentalis or FeSO4 led to a corresponding enhancement of hepcidin mRNA expression. Induced hepcidin mRNA expression was enhanced by the addition of ascorbic acid to the test dose of iron. Hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression was found to be responsive to increase in the relative bioavailability of iron from test diets.

  5. Synergistic effects of pCO2 and iron availability on nutrient consumption ratio of the Bering Sea phytoplankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known concerning the effect of CO2 on phytoplankton ecophysiological processes under nutrient and trace element-limited conditions, because most CO2 manipulation experiments have been conducted under elements-replete conditions. To investigate the effects of CO2 and iron availability on phytoplankton ecophysiology, we conducted an experiment in September 2009 using a phytoplankton community in the iron limited, high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC region of the Bering Sea basin . Carbonate chemistry was controlled by the bubbling of the several levels of CO2 concentration (180, 380, 600, and 1000 ppm controlled air, and two iron conditions were established, one with and one without the addition of inorganic iron. We demonstrated that in the iron-limited control conditions, the specific growth rate and the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm of photosystem (PS II decreased with increasing CO2 levels, suggesting a further decrease in iron bioavailability under the high-CO2 conditions. In addition, biogenic silica to particulate nitrogen and biogenic silica to particulate organic carbon ratios increased from 2.65 to 3.75 and 0.39 to 0.50, respectively, with an increase in the CO2 level in the iron-limited controls. By contrast, the specific growth rate, Fv/Fm values and elemental compositions in the iron-added treatments did not change in response to the CO2 variations, indicating that the addition of iron canceled out the effect of the modulation of iron bioavailability due to the change in carbonate chemistry. Our results suggest that high-CO2 conditions can alter the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients through decreasing iron bioavailability in the iron-limited HNLC regions in the future.

  6. Microbial Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions, Alternative Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Autotrophic Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium named A6 (A6), part of the Actinobacteria phylum have been linked to anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron reducing conditions. These organisms obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, the TEAs are iron oxides [Fe(III)], which are reduced to Fe(II), this process is known as Feammox. Our studies indicate that alternative forms of TEAs can be used by A6, e.g. iron rich clays (i.e. nontronite) and electrodes in bioelectrochemical systems such as Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs), which can sustain NH4+removal and A6 biomass production. Our results show that nontronite can support Feammox and promote bacterial cell production. A6 biomass increased from 4.7 x 104 to 3.9 x 105 cells/ml in 10 days. Incubations of A6 in nontronite resulted in up to 10 times more NH4+ removal and 3 times more biomass production than when ferrihydrite is used as the Fe(III) source. Additionally, Fe in nontronite can be reoxidized by aeration and A6 can reutilize it; however, Fe is still finite in the clay. In contrast, in MECs, A6 harvest electrons from NH4+ and use an anode as an unlimited TEA, as a result current is produced. We operated multiple MECs in parallel using a single external power source, as described by Call & Logan (2011). MECs were run with an applied voltage of 0.7V and different growing mediums always containing initial 5mM NH4+. Results show that current production is favored when anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttled, is present in the medium as it facilitates the transfer of electrons from the bacterial cell to the anode. Additionally, A6 biomass increased from 1 x 104 to 9.77 x 105cells/ml in 14 days of operation. Due to Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6's ability to use various TEAs, MECs represent an alternative, iron-free form, for optimized biomass production of A6 and its application in NH4

  7. Bioavailability of metals-trace in sediments: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Rafaela E. de A.V.; Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Lima, Vanessa Lemos de; Hazin, Clovis Abrahao

    2014-01-01

    The chemical association of metals in sediments provides an indication of its release by physical, chemical and biological processes, with toxic effects under certain environmental conditions. Knowing about their chemical bonds in sediments, can recognize specific sources of pollution, and speciation of trace metals is important for bioavailability and toxicity to animals and plants. The accumulation of these particles in the sediment occur by the following mechanisms: a) adsorption to the finest particles; b) precipitating of the element in the form of compounds; c) co-precipitating of the element with iron and manganese oxides; d) complexation with organic matter; e) incorporation into the crystal lattice of minerals. Currently, five phases are considered when studying the bioavailability of trace elements in sediments: a) the exchangeable phase, MgCl 2 (causes saltiness change); b) leachable phase, (acetic acid causes pH change); c) reducible phase (hydroxylamine hydrochloride causes release of the bound metals linked to Fe and Mn oxides); d) oxidized phase, the peroxide hydrogen (cause the degradation of organic matter); e) the residual pseudo-phase, the aqua regia (cause release of metals associated to minerals). The first three phases are considered the most bioavailable. In the last two fractions, the metals are linked to sediment constituents and not bioavailable. The organic phase is relatively stable and the metal present therein are removed under oxidative conditions. Metals present in the pseudo-phase residual measure the degree of environmental pollution, since great amount of metals at this stage indicates a lower degree of pollution

  8. Transmission electron microscope study of fusion-environment radiation damage in iron and iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, L.L.S.

    1982-07-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of radiation damage microstructures in iron and iron-chromium alloys has been performed. This study consisted of both qualitative and quantitative characterization of the dislocation and cavity microstructures, including determination of vacancy/interstitial character and Burgers vectors for dislocation loops and analysis of the cavity morphology. The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence, helium implantation, and chromium content were investigated. Neutron irradiation (iron specimens, 1 dpa, 455 to 1000 K) and triple-beam ion irradiation (Fe-10% Cr specimens, 10 dpa, 725 to 950 K; Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 0.3 to 100 dpa; and Fe, Fe-5% Cr, Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 10 dpa) were employed. In the triple-beam ion irradiation procedure, simultaneous bombardment with 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ions and energetic He/sup +/ and D/sub 2//sup +/ ions was used to simulate the fusion environment (10 at. ppM He/dpa and 41 at. ppM D/dpa). In addition, single-beam 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ion irradiations of Fe-10% Cr both with and without pre-injection of helium and deuterium were performed.

  9. Sodium pyrophosphate enhances iron bioavailability from bouillon cubes fortified with ferric pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercamondi, Colin I; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Harika, Rajwinder K; van den Berg, Robin; Murray, Peter; Koppenol, Wieneke P; Zeder, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael B; Moretti, Diego

    2016-08-01

    Fe fortification of centrally manufactured and frequently consumed condiments such as bouillon cubes could help prevent Fe deficiency in developing countries. However, Fe compounds that do not cause sensory changes in the fortified product, such as ferric pyrophosphate (FePP), exhibit low absorption in humans. Tetra sodium pyrophosphate (NaPP) can form soluble complexes with Fe, which could increase Fe bioavailability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate Fe bioavailability from bouillon cubes fortified with either FePP only, FePP+NaPP, ferrous sulphate (FeSO4) only, or FeSO4+NaPP. We first conducted in vitro studies using a protocol of simulated digestion to assess the dialysable and ionic Fe, and the cellular ferritin response in a Caco-2 cell model. Second, Fe absorption from bouillon prepared from intrinsically labelled cubes (2·5 mg stable Fe isotopes/cube) was assessed in twenty-four Fe-deficient women, by measuring Fe incorporation into erythrocytes 2 weeks after consumption. Fe bioavailability in humans increased by 46 % (P<0·005) when comparing bouillons fortified with FePP only (4·4 %) and bouillons fortified with FePP+NaPP (6·4 %). Fe absorption from bouillons fortified with FeSO4 only and with FeSO4+NaPP was 33·8 and 27·8 %, respectively (NS). The outcome from the human study is in agreement with the dialysable Fe from the in vitro experiments. Our findings suggest that the addition of NaPP could be a promising strategy to increase Fe absorption from FePP-fortified bouillon cubes, and if confirmed by further research, for other fortified foods with complex food matrices as well.

  10. IRON CONTENT OF FOOD COOKED IN IRON UTENSILS: A TRADITIONAL INDIAN WAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibifatima Bawakhan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Since most of the Indian population depends on vegetarian diet, prevalence of iron deficiency status is higher in India compared to other developing countries. In spite of many national programs and treatment options available in correcting this, the incidence is increasing due to poor patient compliance and intolerance to treatment. This study was an effort to show how iron content of Indian food can be increased just by following the traditional way of cooking. OBJECTIVE To compare the iron levels in the Jowar roti cooked in iron and non-iron utensils. METHODOLOGY A cross-sectional study was conducted at KIMS, Hubli. Jowar rotis were prepared from equal quantity of jowar flour in iron and non-iron tawa. Another sample of roti was prepared in iron tawa after treating with lemon juice. Six samples were homogenised and filtered. The filtrates were replicated and analysed for iron levels by FerroZine method. RESULTS In the present study, we found no change in iron levels in the roti prepared in non-iron utensil, 1.45 and 1.94 fold increase in the roti prepared in new iron tawa without water boiled in it and with water boiled in it for dough preparation respectively when compared with iron levels of plain jowar flour. There was 5.77 fold rise in iron levels in lemon juice treated roti which signifies the bioavailability of iron in food. The study showed statistical significance at ‘p’- value < 0.05. CONCLUSION Several studies have shown the similar results and this was done to strengthen the findings in our staple food. Hence, the daily iron requirement can be met easily and effectively by taking the food cooked with lemon juice in iron utensils.

  11. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our...... the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters....

  13. Isolation of acetogenic bacteria that induce biocorrosion by utilizing metallic iron as the sole electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Assessment of zerovalent iron for stabilization of chromium, copper, and arsenic in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpiene, Jurate; Ore, Solvita; Renella, Giancarlo; Mench, Michel; Lagerkvist, Anders; Maurice, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Stabilization of soil contaminated with trace elements is a remediation practice that does not reduce the total content of contaminants, but lowers the amounts of mobile and bioavailable fractions. This study evaluated the efficiency of Fe to reduce the mobility and bioavailability of Cr, Cu, As and Zn in a chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-contaminated soil using chemical, biochemical and biotoxicity tests. Contaminated soil was stabilized with 1% iron grit. This treatment decreased As and Cr concentrations in leachates (by 98% and 45%, respectively), in soil pore water (by 99% and 94%, respectively) and in plant shoots (by 84% and 95%, respectively). The stabilization technique also restored most of analyzed soil enzyme activities and reduced microbial toxicity, as evaluated by the BioTox TM test. After stabilization, exchangeable and bioaccessible fractions of Cu remained high, causing some residual toxicity in the treated soil. - Zerovalent iron effectively reduces mobility and bioavailability of As and Cr, but does not adequately stabilize Cu

  15. Iron deficiency anaemia in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liyanage, K.D.C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The commonest cause of nutritional anaemia in the Sri Lankan population is iron deficiency. The diets of the population belonging to the lower socio-economic groups contain little food of animal origin. Thus, their diets are deficient in easily absorbable (haem) iron; and are also heavily cereal-based. Therefore interference in the absorption of dietary iron also occurs. Iron-deficiency anaemia is not restricted to the so-called ''vulnerable groups'' in Sri Lanka, however, their greater demands make the problem not only commoner but also more severe. Among pregnant and lactating women anaemia is often associated with folate deficiency. It must also be noted that the low availability of dietary iron is compounded in large population groups. Malaria, presently raging on an epidemic scale is also a major contributory factor to the incidence of anaemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the iron status of pre-school children and pregnant women; to establish normal levels of biochemical indices at different trimesters; to record the effect of iron supplementation during pregnancy; and to record the bioavailability of iron from weaning foods and common adult diets. 6 figs, 14 tabs

  16. Effect of spin fluctuations on the electronic structure in iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimes, Andreas; Grein, Roland; Eschrig, Matthias

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic inelastic neutron scattering studies of iron-based superconductors reveal a strongly temperature-dependent spin-fluctuation spectrum in the normal conducting state, which develops a prominent low-energy resonance feature when entering the superconducting state. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) allow us to study the fingerprints of fluctuation modes via their interactions with electronic quasiparticles. We calculate such fingerprints in 122 iron pnictides using an experimentally motivated spin-fluctuation spectrum and make a number of predictions that can be tested in ARPES and STS experiments. This includes discussions of the quasiparticle scattering rate and the superconducting order parameter. In quantitative agreement with experiment we reproduce the quasiparticle dispersions obtained from momentum distribution curves as well as energy distribution curves. We discuss the relevance of the coupling between spin fluctuations and electronic excitations for the superconducting mechanism.

  17. The effect of vegetarian diets on iron status in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lisa M; Schwingshackl, Lukas; Hoffmann, Georg; Ekmekcioglu, Cem

    2018-05-24

    Vegetarian diets exclude meat, seafood, and products containing these foods. Although the vegetarian lifestyle could lead to a better health status in adults, it may also bear risks for certain nutritional deficiencies. Cross-sectional studies and narrative reviews have shown that the iron status of vegetarians is compromised by the absence of highly bioavailable haem-iron in meatless diets and the inhibiting effect of certain components present in plant foods on non-haem iron bioavailability. The databases Pubmed, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane CentralRegister of Controlled Trials were searched for studies comparing serum ferritin, as the major laboratory parameter for iron status of adult vegetarians with non-vegetarian control groups. A qualitative review was conducted as well as an inverse-variance random-effects meta-analysis to pool available data. In addition the effect of vegetarian diets according to gender was investigated with a subgroup analysis. The results were validated using a sensitivity analysis. A total of 27 cross-sectional studies and three interventional studies were selected for the systematic review. The meta-analysis which combined data of 24 cross-sectional studies showed that adult vegetarians have significantly lower serum ferritin levels than their non-vegetarian controls (-29.71 µg/L, 95% CI [-39.69, -19.73], p vegetarian diets did not change the results considerably (-23.27 µg/L, 95% CI [-29.77, -16.76], p vegetarians are more likely to have lower iron stores compared with non-vegetarians. However, since high iron stores are also a risk factor for certain non-communicable diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, it is recommended that not only vegetarians but also non-vegetarians should regularly control their iron status and improve their diet regarding the content and bioavailability of iron by consuming more plants and less meat.

  18. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  19. Iron fortification of flour with a complex ferric orthophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallberg, L.; Rossander-Hulthen, L.; Gramatkovski, E.

    1989-01-01

    The unexpectedly low bioavailability in humans of elemental iron powder prompted us to search for other Fe compounds suitable for Fe fortification of flour that fulfill the two requirements of insolubility in water (due to high water content of flour) and good bioavailability in humans. Systematic studies of compatibility, solubility, and bioavailability led to this study of a microcrystalline complex ferric orthophosphate (CFOP), Fe 3 H 8 (NH 4 )-(PO 4 )6.6H 2 O, a well-defined compound. This compound was labeled with 59 Fe, and the native Fe in meals was labeled with 55 FeCl3. The ratio of absorbed 59 Fe to absorbed 55 Fe is a direct measure of the fraction of CFOP that joins the nonheme Fe pool and that is made potentially available for absorption. The relative bioavailability of CFOP varied from 30% to 60% when labeled wheat rolls were served with different meals. The CFOP meets practical requirements of an Fe fortificant for flour well, with regard to both compatibility and bioavailability in humans

  20. The Effects of Cereals and Legumes on Iron Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    glu- stance in the intestinal mucosa. J. Clin. Invest. 47:531-539, ten, soy isolate, zein , albumen, and casein . J. Food Sci. 1968. 44:104, 1979...source about 1.4 mg daily (Hallberg et al., 1966), and the and the presence of ascorbate. Ferric sodium EDTA percentage of iron absorbed is substantially...e.g., ponding fashion, but the amount of dietary iron and wheat gluten, soy isolate, and casein complexes) was its bioavailability ultimately place a

  1. Bioavailability of Trace Elements in Beans and Zinc-Biofortified Wheat in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Torun, B

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to study bioavailability of trace elements in beans and wheat containing different levels of zinc and to study how the water solubility of trace elements was related to the bioavailability in pigs. Three wheat and two bean types were used: wheat of Danish...... origin as a control (CtrlW), two Turkish wheat types low (LZnW) and high (HZnW) in zinc, a common bean (Com), and a faba bean (Faba). Two diets were composed by combining 81 % CtrlW and 19 % Com or Faba beans. Solubility was measured as the trace element concentration in the supernatant of feedstuffs......, and diets incubated in distilled water at pH 4 and 38°C for 3 h. The bioavailability of zinc and copper of the three wheat types and the two bean-containing diets were evaluated in the pigs by collection of urine and feces for 7 days. The solubility of zinc was 34–63 %, copper 18–42 %, and iron 3...

  2. Mutually Exclusive Alterations in Secondary Metabolism Are Critical for the Uptake of Insoluble Iron Compounds by Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Celma, Jorge; Lin, Wen-Dar; Fu, Guin-Mau; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The generally low bioavailability of iron in aerobic soil systems forced plants to evolve sophisticated genetic strategies to improve the acquisition of iron from sparingly soluble and immobile iron pools. To distinguish between conserved and species-dependent components of such strategies, we analyzed iron deficiency-induced changes in the transcriptome of two model species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Medicago truncatula. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing revealed a massive up-regulation of genes coding for enzymes involved in riboflavin biosynthesis in M. truncatula and phenylpropanoid synthesis in Arabidopsis upon iron deficiency. Coexpression and promoter analysis indicated that the synthesis of flavins and phenylpropanoids is tightly linked to and putatively coregulated with other genes encoding proteins involved in iron uptake. We further provide evidence that the production and secretion of phenolic compounds is critical for the uptake of iron from sources with low bioavailability but dispensable under conditions where iron is readily available. In Arabidopsis, homozygous mutations in the Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family gene F6′H1 and defects in the expression of PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE9, encoding a putative efflux transporter for products from the phenylpropanoid pathway, compromised iron uptake from an iron source of low bioavailability. Both mutants were partially rescued when grown alongside wild-type Arabidopsis or M. truncatula seedlings, presumably by secreted phenolics and flavins. We concluded that production and secretion of compounds that facilitate the uptake of iron is an essential but poorly understood aspect of the reduction-based iron acquisition strategy, which is likely to contribute substantially to the efficiency of iron uptake in natural conditions. PMID:23735511

  3. Atmospheric processing of combustion aerosols as a source of soluble iron to the open ocean

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 彰記; ITO, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    The majority of bioavailable iron (Fe) from the atmosphere is delivered from arid and semiarid regions to the oceans because the global deposition of iron from combustion sources is small compared with that from mineral dust. Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by inorganic and organic acids from anthropogenic and natural sources has been shown to increase the iron solubility of soils (initially < 0.5%) up to about 10%. On the other hand, atmospheric observations have shown that iron i...

  4. Co-ordinated research programme on isotope-aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets. Report of the second research co-ordination meeting, Hyderabad, India, 16-20 November 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Isotope-Aided Studies on the Bioavailability of Iron and Zinc from Human Diets'' was initiated by the IAEA in 1990, and presently encompasses participating institutes in 11 countries. A summary of the discussions that took place during thr second Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Hyderabad, India, between 16-20 November 1992, is given in this report together with 12 working papers (progress reports) presented by individual participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Oral sucrosomial iron versus intravenous iron in anemic cancer patients without iron deficiency receiving darbepoetin alfa: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafodda, Antonino; Giuffrida, D; Prestifilippo, A; Azzarello, D; Giannicola, R; Mare, M; Maisano, R

    2017-09-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are often used in treatment of patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia. Many studies have demonstrated an improved hemoglobin (Hb) response when ESA is combined with intravenous iron supplementation and a higher effectiveness of intravenous iron over traditional oral iron formulations. A new formulation of oral sucrosomial iron featuring an increased bioavailability compared to traditional oral formulations has recently become available and could provide a valid alternative to those by intravenous (IV) route. Our study evaluated the performance of sucrosomial iron versus intravenous iron in increasing hemoglobin in anemic cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and darbepoetin alfa, as well as safety, need of transfusion, and quality of life (QoL). The present study considered a cohort of 64 patients with chemotherapy-related anemia (Hb >8 g/dL iron deficiency, scheduled to receive chemotherapy and darbepoetin. All patients received darbepoetin alfa 500 mcg once every 3 weeks and were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of IV ferric gluconate 125 mg weekly or oral sucrosomial iron 30 mg daily. The primary endpoint was to demonstrate the performance of oral sucrosomial iron in improving Hb response, compared to intravenous iron. The Hb response was defined as the Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from baseline or the attainment Hb ≥ 12 g/dL. There was no difference in the Hb response rate between the two treatment arms. Seventy one percent of patients treated with IV iron achieved an erythropoietic response, compared to 70% of patients treated with oral iron. By conventional criteria, this difference is considered to be not statistically significant. There were also no differences in the proportion of patients requiring red blood cell transfusions and changes in QoL. Sucrosomial oral iron was better tolerated. In cancer patients with chemotherapy-related anemia receiving darbepoetin alfa, sucrosomial oral iron provides

  6. Final Project Report, DE-SC0001280, Characterizing the Combined Roles of Iron and Transverse Mixing on Uranium Bioremediation in Groundwater using Microfluidic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finneran, Kevin [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Werth, Charles [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Strathmann, Timothy [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-10

    In situ bioremediation of U(VI) involves amending groundwater with an appropriate electron donor and limiting nutrients to promote biological reduction to the less soluble and mobile U(IV) oxidation state. Groundwater flow is laminar; mixing is controlled by hydrodynamic dispersion. Recent studies indicate that transverse dispersion along plume margins can limit mixing of the amended electron donor and accepter (such as U(VI) in remediation applications). As a result, microbial growth, and subsequently contaminant reaction, may be limited to these transverse mixing zones during bioremediation. The primary objective of this work was to characterize the combined effects of hydrology, geochemistry, and biology on the (bio)remediation of U(VI). Our underlying hypothesis was that U(VI) reaction in groundwater is controlled by transverse mixing with an electron donor along plume margins, and that iron bioavailability in these zones affects U(VI) reduction kinetics and U(IV) re-oxidation. Our specific objectives were to a) quantify reaction kinetics mediated by biological versus geochemical reactions leading to U(VI) reduction and U(IV) re-oxidation, b) understand the influence of bioavailable iron on U(VI) reduction and U(IV) re-oxidation along the transverse mixing zones, c) determine how transverse mixing limitations and the presence of biomass in pores affects these reactions, and d) identify how microbial populations that develop along transverse mixing zones are influenced by the presence of iron and the concentration of electron donor. In the completed work, transverse mixing zones along plume margins were re-created in microfluidic pore networks, referred to as micromodels. We conducted a series of experiments that allowed us to distinguish among the hydraulic, biological, and geochemical mechanisms that contribute to U(VI) reduction, U(IV) re-oxidation, and U(VI) abiotic reaction with the limiting biological nutrient HP042-. This systematic approach may lead to a

  7. Roentgenoelectronic investigation into oxidation of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, A.G.; Rozenfel'd, I.L.; Kazanskij, L.P.; Machavariani, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetics of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloy oxidation (of the Kh13 and Kh18N10T steels) in oxygen was investigated using X-ray electron spectroscopy. It was found that according to X-ray electron spectra chromium oxidation kinetics in the iron-chromium alloy differs significantly from oxidation kinetics of chromium pattern. Layer by layer X-ray electron analysis showed that chromium is subjected to a deeper oxidation as compared to iron, and accordingly, Cr 2 O 3 layer with pure iron impregnations is placed between the layer of mixed oxide (Fe 3 O 4 +Cr 2 O 3 ) and metal. A model of the iron-chromium alloy surface is suggested. The mixed oxide composition on the steel surface is presented as spinel Fesub(2+x)Crsub(1-x)Osub(y)

  8. Iron fertilization with FeEDDHA : the fate and effectiveness of FeEDDHA chelates in soil-plant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenkeveld, W.D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency chlorosis is a nutritional disorder in plants which reduces crop yields both quantitatively and qualitatively, and causes large economic losses. It occurs world-wide, predominantly in plants grown on calcareous soils, as a result of a limited bioavailability of iron related to the

  9. Soluble and colloidal iron in the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Boyle, E; Sunda, W; Wen, L S

    2001-08-03

    In the oligotrophic North Atlantic and North Pacific, ultrafiltration studies show that concentrations of soluble iron and soluble iron-binding organic ligands are much lower than previously presumed "dissolved" concentrations, which were operationally defined as that passing through a 0.4-micrometer pore filter. Our studies indicate that substantial portions of the previously presumed "dissolved" iron (and probably also iron-binding ligands) are present in colloidal size range. The soluble iron and iron-binding organic ligands are depleted at the surface and enriched at depth, similar to distributions of major nutrients. By contrast, colloidal iron shows a maximum at the surface and a minimum in the upper nutricline. Our results suggest that "dissolved" iron may be less bioavailable to phytoplankton than previously thought and that iron removal through colloid aggregation and settling should be considered in models of the oceanic iron cycle.

  10. Effect of microscale ZVI/magnetite on methane production and bioavailability of heavy metals during anaerobic digestion of diluted pig manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yue-Gan; Li, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Li-Gan; Cheng, Beijiu

    2017-05-01

    Low methane production and high levels of heavy metal in pig slurries limit the feasibility of anaerobic digestion of pig manure. In this study, changes in the methane production and bioavailability of heavy metals in the anaerobic digestion of diluted pig manure were evaluated using single and combined action of microscale zero-valence iron (ZVI) and magnetite. After 30 days of anaerobic digestion, the methane yield ranged from 246.9 to 334.5 mL/g VS added, which increased by 20-26% in the group added with microscale ZVI and/or magnetite relative to that in the control group. Results of the first-order kinetic model revealed that addition of microscale ZVI and/or magnetite increased the biogas production potential, rather than the biogas production rate constant. These treatments also changed the distribution of chemical fractions for heavy metal. The addition of ZVI decreased the bioavailability of Cu and Zn in the solid digested residues. Moreover, a better performance was observed in the combined action of microscale ZVI and magnetite, and the ZVI anaerobic corrosion end-product, magnetite, might help enhance methane production through direct interspecies electron transfer in ZVI-anaerobic digestion process.

  11. Iron fertilization with FeEDDHA : the fate and effectiveness of FeEDDHA chelates in soil-plant systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schenkeveld, W.D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency chlorosis is a nutritional disorder in plants which reduces crop yields both quantitatively and qualitatively, and causes large economic losses. It occurs world-wide, predominantly in plants grown on calcareous soils, as a result of a limited bioavailability of iron related to the poor solubility of iron at high soil-pH (7.5-8.5). Iron fertilizers based on FeEDDHA (iron ethylene diamine-N,N'-bis(hydroxy phenyl acetic acid)) chelates are among the most efficient in preventing a...

  12. Dietary hemoglobin rescues young piglets from severe iron deficiency anemia: Duodenal expression profile of genes involved in heme iron absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Staroń

    Full Text Available Heme is an efficient source of iron in the diet, and heme preparations are used to prevent and cure iron deficiency anemia in humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for heme absorption remain only partially characterized. Here, we employed young iron-deficient piglets as a convenient animal model to determine the efficacy of oral heme iron supplementation and investigate the pathways of heme iron absorption. The use of bovine hemoglobin as a dietary source of heme iron was found to efficiently counteract the development of iron deficiency anemia in piglets, although it did not fully rebalance their iron status. Our results revealed a concerted increase in the expression of genes responsible for apical and basolateral heme transport in the duodenum of piglets fed a heme-enriched diet. In these animals the catalytic activity of heme oxygenase 1 contributed to the release of elemental iron from the protoporphyrin ring of heme within enterocytes, which may then be transported by the strongly expressed ferroportin across the basolateral membrane to the circulation. We hypothesize that the well-recognized high bioavailability of heme iron may depend on a split pathway mediating the transport of heme-derived elemental iron and intact heme from the interior of duodenal enterocytes to the bloodstream.

  13. Chemically and geographically distinct solid-phase iron pools in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Heyden, B P; Roychoudhury, A N; Mtshali, T N; Tyliszczak, T; Myneni, S C B

    2012-11-30

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in many parts of the oceans, including the unproductive regions of the Southern Ocean. Although the dominant fraction of the marine iron pool occurs in the form of solid-phase particles, its chemical speciation and mineralogy are challenging to characterize on a regional scale. We describe a diverse array of iron particles, ranging from 20 to 700 nanometers in diameter, in the waters of the Southern Ocean euphotic zone. Distinct variations in the oxidation state and composition of these iron particles exist between the coasts of South Africa and Antarctica, with different iron pools occurring in different frontal zones. These speciation variations can result in solubility differences that may affect the production of bioavailable dissolved iron.

  14. Iron Fortification of Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) to Address Iron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Rajib; Tar'an, Bunyamin; Tyler, Robert T; Henry, Carol J; DellaValle, Diane M; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-08-11

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a major human health concern in areas of the world in which diets are often Fe deficient. In the current study, we aimed to identify appropriate methods and optimal dosage for Fe fortification of lentil ( Lens culinaris Medik.) dal with FeSO₄·7H₂O (ferrous sulphate hepta-hydrate), NaFeEDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid iron (III) sodium salt) and FeSO₄·H₂O (ferrous sulphate mono-hydrate). We used a colorimetric method to determine the appearance of the dal fortified with fortificants at different Fe concentrations and under different storage conditions. Relative Fe bioavailability was assessed using an in vitro cell culture bioassay. We found that NaFeEDTA was the most suitable fortificant for red lentil dal, and at 1600 ppm, NaFeEDTA provides 13-14 mg of additional Fe per 100 g of dal. Lentil dal sprayed with fortificant solutions, followed by shaking and drying at 75 °C, performed best with respect to drying time and color change. Total Fe and phytic acid concentrations differed significantly between cooked unfortified and fortified lentil, ranging from 68.7 to 238.5 ppm and 7.2 to 8.0 mg g -1 , respectively. The relative Fe bioavailability of cooked fortified lentil was increased by 32.2-36.6% compared to unfortified cooked lentil. We conclude that fortification of lentil dal is effective and could provide significant health benefits to dal-consuming populations vulnerable to Fe deficiency.

  15. Iron and ferritin accumulate in separate cellular locations in Phaseolus seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J; Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

    2010-01-01

    and will assist in the production of staples with increased bioavailable iron. Results Here we reveal the distribution of iron in seeds of three Phaseolus species including thirteen genotypes of P. vulgaris, P. coccineus, and P. lunatus. We showed that high concentrations of iron accumulate in cells surrounding...... the provascular tissue of P. vulgaris and P. coccineus seeds. Using the Perls' Prussian blue method, we were able to detect iron in the cytoplasm of epidermal cells, cells near the epidermis, and cells surrounding the provascular tissue. In contrast, the protein ferritin that has been suggested as the major iron...... to P. vulgaris and P. coccineus, we did not observe iron accumulation in the cells surrounding the provascular tissues of P. lunatus cotyledons. A novel iron-rich genotype, NUA35, with a high concentration of iron both in the seed coat and cotyledons was bred from a cross between an Andean...

  16. Effect of addition of sewage sludge and coal sludge on bioavailability of selected metals in the waste from the zinc and lead industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta; Wystalska, Katarzyna; Grobelak, Anna

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated the content of bioavailable forms of selected heavy metals present in the waste from Zn and Pb processing that can potentially have an effect on the observed difficulties in reclamation of landfills with this waste. The particular focus of the study was on iron because its potential excess or deficiency may be one of the causes of the failure in biological reclamation. The study confirmed that despite high content of total iron in waste (mean value of 200.975gkg -1 ), this metal is present in the forms not available to plants (mean: 0.00009gkg -1 ). The study attempted to increase its potential bioavailability through preparation of the mixtures of this waste with additions in the form of sewage sludge and coal sludge in different proportions. Combination of waste with 10% of coal sludge and sewage sludge using the contents of 10%, 20% and 30% increased the amounts of bioavailable iron forms to the level defined as sufficient for adequate plant growth. The Lepidum sativum test was used to evaluate phytotoxicity of waste and the mixtures prepared based on this waste. The results did not show unambiguously that the presence of heavy metals in the waste had a negative effect on the growth of test plant roots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T; Tortell, Philippe D

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETR(RCII), mol e- mol RCII(-1) s(-1)) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal--oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETR(RCII): CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements.

  18. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Schuback

    Full Text Available Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETR(RCII, mol e- mol RCII(-1 s(-1 increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal--oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETR(RCII: CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements.

  19. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETRRCII, mol e- mol RCII-1 s-1) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal – oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETRRCII: CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements. PMID:26171963

  20. Efeito da suplementação com ferro na biodisponibilidade de zinco em uma dieta regional do nordeste do Brasil Effects of supplementation with iron on the bioavailability of zinc in the regional diet of northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia F. C. Pedrosa

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram investigados os efeitos da suplementação com ferro na biodisponibilidade de zinco de uma dieta "regional" do Nordeste (DRNE, em ratos albinos Wistar, consumindo rações à base da referida dieta (DRNE e rações controle. As rações DRNE, continham 16 mg de Zn/kg e níveis de 35 mg, 70 mg e 140mg Fe/kg. As rações controle foram elaboradas segundo o "Committee on Laboratory Animal Diets", contendo níveis de proteína, ferro e zinco ajustados aos das rações experimentais DRNE. Os parâmetros utilizados para medir a biodisponibilidade do zinco foram: Índice de Absorção Aparente do Zn e nível total de Zn nos fêmures. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que a suplementação com ferro diminuiu a biodisponibilidade do Zn, e os efeitos dessa interferência foram influenciados pela qualidade da dieta e pelas proporções Fe:Zn. Tal fato deve ser considerado nas práticas que envolvem fortificação de alimentos e/ou suplementos medicamentosos, comuns nas populações com carências nutricionais.The effects of supplementation with iron on the zinc bioavailability of the regional diet of northeastern Brazil (RDN, were investigated. One assay with Wistar rats, feed on RDN and control diets was carried out. The RDN diets contained 16 mg Zn/kg and levels of 35 mg, 70 mg and 140 mg Fe/kg, respectively. The control diets were prepared according to the standards of the Committee on Laboratory Animal Diets, with levels of protein, iron and zinc identical to those of RDN diets. Index of apparent absorption and zinc retained in the femur of the animals were the parameters utilized to measure zinc bioavailability. The results demonstrated that the supplementation with iron decreased the zinc bioavailability, and the effects were seen to affect diet quality and the Fe:Zn ratio. This fact must be taken into consideration in practices such as the fortying of foodstuffs and the administration of vitamin-mineral supplements to populations with

  1. Particle Size, Surface Area, and Amorphous Content as Predictors of Solubility and Bioavailability for Five Commercial Sources of Ferric Orthophosphate in Ready-To-Eat Cereal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Robin S; Strasburg, Gale M; Romsos, Dale R; Wilson, Lori A; Lai, Grace H; Huang, Hsimin

    2016-03-01

    Ferric orthophosphate (FePO₄) has had limited use as an iron fortificant in ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal because of its variable bioavailability, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. Even though FePO₄ has desirable sensory properties as compared to other affordable iron fortificants, few published studies have well-characterized its physicochemical properties. Semi-crystalline materials such as FePO₄ have varying degrees of molecular disorder, referred to as amorphous content, which is hypothesized to be an important factor in bioavailability. The objective of this study was to systematically measure the physicochemical factors of particle size, surface area, amorphous content, and solubility underlying the variation in FePO₄ bioavailability. Five commercial FePO₄ sources and ferrous sulfate were added to individual batches of RTE cereal. The relative bioavailability value (RBV) of each iron source, determined using the AOAC Rat Hemoglobin Repletion Bioassay, ranged from 51% to 99% (p Solubility in dilute HCl accurately predicted RBV (R² = 0.93, p = 0.008). Amorphous content measured by Dynamic Vapor Sorption ranged from 1.7% to 23.8% and was a better determinant of solubility (R² = 0.91; p = 0.0002) than surface area (R² = 0.83; p = 0.002) and median particle size (R² = 0.59; p = 0.12). The results indicate that while solubility of FePO₄ is highly predictive of RBV, solubility, in turn, is strongly linked to amorphous content and surface area. This information may prove useful for the production of FePO₄ with the desired RBV.

  2. A mesoscale iron enrichment in the western subarctic Pacific induces a large centric diatom bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Atsushi; Takeda, Shigenobu; Saito, Hiroaki; Nishioka, Jun; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Kudo, Isao; Kiyosawa, Hiroshi; Shiomoto, Akihiro; Imai, Keiri; Ono, Tsuneo; Shimamoto, Akifumi; Tsumune, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Aono, Tatsuo; Hinuma, Akira; Kinugasa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Koji; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Noiri, Yoshifumi; Tani, Heihachiro; Deguchi, Yuji; Tsurushima, Nobuo; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Fukami, Kimio; Kuma, Kenshi; Saino, Toshiro

    2003-05-09

    We have performed an in situ test of the iron limitation hypothesis in the subarctic North Pacific Ocean. A single enrichment of dissolved iron caused a large increase in phytoplankton standing stock and decreases in macronutrients and dissolved carbon dioxide. The dominant phytoplankton species shifted after the iron addition from pennate diatoms to a centric diatom, Chaetoceros debilis, that showed a very high growth rate, 2.6 doublings per day. We conclude that the bioavailability of iron regulates the magnitude of the phytoplankton biomass and the key phytoplankton species that determine the biogeochemical sensitivity to iron supply of high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll waters.

  3. Solidification of cast iron - A study on the effect of microalloy elements on cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham

    The present thesis deals with the heat transfer and solidification of ductile and microalloyed grey cast iron. Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. A series of ductile iron samples with two different...... of the austenite, in the last region to solidify. The superfine graphite which forms in this type of irons is short (10-20µm) and stubby. The microstructure of this kind of graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. The methods to prepare samples of cast iron...... for comprehensive transmission electron microscopy of graphite and the surrounding iron matrix have been developed and explained. Dual beam microscopes are used for sample preparation. A TEM study has been carried out on graphite flakes in grey cast iron using selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Based...

  4. Flavonoid Bioavailability and Attempts for Bioavailability Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilakarathna, Surangi H.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of phytochemicals that have shown numerous health effects and have therefore been studied extensively. Of the six common food flavonoid classes, flavonols are distributed ubiquitously among different plant foods whereas appreciable amounts of isoflavones are found in leguminous plant-based foods. Flavonoids have shown promising health promoting effects in human cell culture, experimental animal and human clinical studies. They have shown antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory effects as well as ability to modulate cell signaling and gene expression related disease development. Low bioavailability of flavonoids has been a concern as it can limit or even hinder their health effects. Therefore, attempts to improve their bioavailability in order to improve the efficacy of flavonoids are being studied. Further investigations on bioavailability are warranted as it is a determining factor for flavonoid biological activity. PMID:23989753

  5. Demonstration of tools for evaluating the durability of natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemoets, J.; Ceuster, T. de; Vandervelpen, B.; Gutschoven, K.

    2005-01-01

    The dominant process for natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons such as BTEX or alkanes in groundwater is microbial oxidation. In many instances demonstration of natural attenuation is limited to historic trend analysis of pollutant concentrations and analyses of electron acceptors and their reduced forms as secondary evidence for NA. By doing so one can demonstrate that biodegradation processes are occurring naturally. However, this approach does not ensure that natural attenuation processes will continue to occur to the extent that is required to sustain control of the complete pollutant mass over a long time. A sufficient supply of naturally occurring oxidants (electron acceptors) is required to enable adequate microbial oxidation of hydrocarbons. Naturally occurring oxidants for microbial oxidation are oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron, manganese(IV), sulfate and carbon dioxide. At many sites iron(III) may be the most abundant electron acceptor, as it may be present in large quantities in the solid aquifer materials. However, only a fraction of it may be available for micro-organisms. Thus far this parameter is rarely analyzed during site investigation programs for MNA. Bio-available iron may also play an important role in the feasibility of complete microbial dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents. We will present results of a research project in which we have evaluated three methods for determining the quantity of bio-available ferric iron in solid aquifer material samples. These were mild acid extraction followed by spectrophotometry, redox titration with titanium(III)-EDTA and a commercially available enzymatic test kit (BAFeIII assay). The results will be compared, considering implications for practical implementation. The program is being carried out for two petrol station sites for which MNA has been applied as the groundwater remediation method. At each site three soil boring are performed across a depth trajectory below the groundwater table

  6. Bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [National Environmental Research Inst., Silkeborg (Denmark). Dept. of Terrestrial Ecology

    2003-07-01

    Although commonly discussed and debated the scientific basis for adequately using bioavailability in ecological risk assessment is still relatively weak. One of the first obstacles to solve is to define the term properly. It must be recognised that bioavailability is dynamic processes comprising several distinct phases. One is the adsorption/desorption process (chemical availability) controlled by parameters like pH, clay, CEC and organic matter. Another one is a physiological driven uptake process (biological availability) controlled by species-specific parameters like anatomy, feeding strategy, preferences in micro-habitat etc. The last one is an internal allocation process (toxicological availability) controlled by species specific parameters like metabolism, detoxification, storage, excretion, energy resources etc. The complexity of bioavailability means that there seems no straight way forward how to handle bioavailability in the risk assessment procedure. Nevertheless, what almost all people - from scientists to problem holders and responsible authorities - agree upon is that there is a need for alternatives to the common use of the 'total concentration approach'. From an ecological perspective, biological tools would be preferred when assessing risk to ecosystems. However, due to the lower cost and higher reproducibility chemical tools may often be the best suitable solutions. The outcome of mild extraction procedures like CaCl{sub 2} have for example been shown to correlated relatively well to ecotoxicological effects of heavy metals. Bioavailability of organic pollutants has less frequently been correlated to ecological effects of organisms within the soil compartment and adjacent water systems. It has nevertheless been documented that mild extractors like n-butanol, propanol, ethyl acetate and acetonitrile are useful in predicting the uptake of PAHs in earthworms and plants as well as microbial toxicity. (orig.)

  7. Physicochemical characterization of mineral (iron/zinc) bound caseinate and their mineral uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Kapila, Suman; Sharma, Vivek

    2018-08-15

    Milk proteins (especially caseins) are widely accepted as good vehicle for the delivery of various bioactive compounds including minerals. Succinylation is one of the most acceptable chemical modification techniques to enhance the mineral binding ability of caseins. Addition of minerals to succinylated proteins may alter their physicochemical and biochemical properties. Physicochemical characteristics of succinylated sodium caseinate (S.NaCN)-mineral (iron/zinc) complexes were elucidated. Chromatographic behaviour and fluorescence intensity confirmed the structural modification of S.NaCN upon binding with minerals. The bound mineral from protein complexes showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) in vitro bioavailability (mineral uptake) than mineral salts in Caco-2 cells. Also, iron bound S.NaCN showed higher cellular ferritin formation than iron in its free form. These mineral bound protein complexes with improved bioavailability could safely replace inorganic fortificants in various functional food formulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral iron therapy in human subjects, comparative absorption between ferrous salts and iron polymaltose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, P.; Johnson, G.; Wood, L.

    1984-01-01

    Iron absorption was directly compared between equivalent doses of ferrous salts and a polymaltose complex using a twin-isotope technique in which each individual acts as his own control. In the first study, bioavailability of iron from ferrous sulfate and the complex was defined at physiologic doses of 5 mg (Group 1: n = 14) and therapeutic doses of 50 mg (Group 2: n = 13). In Group 1, mean absorption from salt was 47.77% (SD 14.58%) and from polymaltose, 46.56% SD 17.07%). In Group 2, mean absorption from salt was 32.92% (SD 13.42%) and from polymaltose, 27.07% (SD 6.50%). In a second study, 100 mg of iron in a chewable formulation was used to compare absorption between equal doses of ferrous fumarate and the polymaltose complex. Mean absorption from salt was 10.25% (SD 6.89%) and from polymaltose 10.68% (SD 4.68%). At all three dosage levels, iron is equally available from salt or polymaltose for hemoglobin synthesis (p greater than 0.20), and absorption negatively correlated with plasma ferritin (p less than 0.01). These two materials may be used interchangeably in the treatment of patients with absolute iron deficiency

  9. Anomalous Behavior of Electronic Heat Capacity of Strongly Correlated Iron Monosilicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povzner, A. A.; Volkov, A. G.; Nogovitsyna, T. A.

    2018-04-01

    The paper deals with the electronic heat capacity of iron monosilicide FeSi subjected to semiconductor-metal thermal transition during which the formation of its spintronic properties is observed. The proposed model which considers pd-hybridization of strongly correlated d-electrons with non-correlated p-electrons, demonstrates a connection of their contribution to heat capacity in the insulator phase with paramagnon effects and fluctuations of occupation numbers for p- and d-states. In a slitless state, the temperature curve of heat capacity is characterized by a maximum appeared due to normalization of the electron density of states using fluctuating exchange fields. At higher temperatures, a linear growth in heat capacity occurs due to paramagnon effects. The correlation between the model parameters and the first-principles calculation provides the electron contribution to heat capacity, which is obtained from the experimental results on phonon heat capacity. Anharmonicity of phonons is connected merely with the thermal expansion of the crystal lattice.

  10. Factors influencing the dissolved iron input by river water to the open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, R.; Jirsa, F.; Ayromlou, S.

    2005-05-01

    The influence of natural metal chelators on the bio-available iron input to the ocean by river water was studied. Ferrous and ferric ions present as suspended colloidal particles maintaining the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater at the continental boundary. However, we might argue that different iron-binding colloids become sequentially destabilized in meeting progressively increasing salinities. By use of a 59Fe tracer method, the partitioning of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured with high accuracy in mixtures of natural river water with artificial sea water. The results show a characteristic sequence of sedimentation. Various colloids of different stability are removed from a water of increasing salinity, such as it is the case in the transition from a river water to the open sea. However, the iron transport capacities of the investigated river waters differed greatly. A mountainous river in the Austrian Alps would add only about 5% of its dissolved Fe load, that is about 2.0 µg L-1 Fe, to coastal waters. A small tributary draining a sphagnum peat-bog, which acts as a source of refractory low-molecular-weight fulvic acids to the river water, would add approximately 20% of its original Fe load, that is up to 480 µg L-1 Fe to the ocean's bio-available iron pool. This points to a natural mechanism of ocean iron fertilization by terrigenous fulvic-iron complexes originating from weathering processes occurring in the soils upstream.

  11. Biogeochemical impact of a model western iron source in the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent

    OpenAIRE

    Slemons, L.; Gorgues, T.; Aumont, Olivier; Menkès, Christophe; Murray, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    Trace element distributions in the source waters of the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) show the existence of elevated total acid-soluble iron concentrations. This region has been suggested to contribute enough bioavailable iron to regulate interannual and interglacial variability in biological productivity downstream in the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll upwelling zone of the eastern equatorial Pacific. We investigated the advection and first-order biogeochemical impact of an imposed, da...

  12. Iron and zinc deficiencies in China: existing problems and possible solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guansheng Ma,

    2007-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies affect the health and development of the population of China as well as its socia] and economic development. Iron and zinc deficiencies are quite prevalent, while insufficient intake and poor bioavailability are the major causes. Phytate is be!ieved to bc a potent

  13. Proton and Electron Additions to Iron (II) Dinitrogen Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiden, Zachariah M.; Chen, Shentan; Labios, Liezel AN; Bullock, R. Morris; Walter, Eric D.; Tyson, Elizabeth L.; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-03-10

    We describe a single site cis-(H)FeII-N2 complex, generated by the protonation of an iron-carbon bond of a "reduced" iron complex, that models key aspects of proposed protonated intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase. The influence on N2 binding from the addition of protons to the pendant amine sites in the second coordination sphere is described. Furthermore, the addition of electrons to the protonated complexes results in H2 loss. The mechanism of H2 loss is explored to draw a parallel to the origin of H2 loss (homolytic or heterolytic) and the nature of N2 coordination in intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase.

  14. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  15. A higher proportion of Iron-Rich leafy vegatables in a typical burkinabe maize meal does not increase the amount of iron absorbed in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cercamondi, C.I.; Icard-Verniere, C.; Egli, I.; Vernay, M.; Hama, F.; Brouwer, I.D.

    2014-01-01

    Food-to-food fortification can be a promising approach to improve the low dietary iron intake and bioavailability from monotonous diets based on a small number of staple plant foods. In Burkina Faso, the common diet consists of a thick, cereal-based paste consumed with sauces composed of mainly

  16. The Nutraceutical Bioavailability Classification Scheme: Classifying Nutraceuticals According to Factors Limiting their Oral Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClements, David Julian; Li, Fang; Xiao, Hang

    2015-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of a health-promoting dietary component (nutraceutical) may be limited by various physicochemical and physiological phenomena: liberation from food matrices, solubility in gastrointestinal fluids, interaction with gastrointestinal components, chemical degradation or metabolism, and epithelium cell permeability. Nutraceutical bioavailability can therefore be improved by designing food matrices that control their bioaccessibility (B*), absorption (A*), and transformation (T*) within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This article reviews the major factors influencing the gastrointestinal fate of nutraceuticals, and then uses this information to develop a new scheme to classify the major factors limiting nutraceutical bioavailability: the nutraceutical bioavailability classification scheme (NuBACS). This new scheme is analogous to the biopharmaceutical classification scheme (BCS) used by the pharmaceutical industry to classify drug bioavailability, but it contains additional factors important for understanding nutraceutical bioavailability in foods. The article also highlights potential strategies for increasing the oral bioavailability of nutraceuticals based on their NuBACS designation (B*A*T*).

  17. Oxidative stability of a heme iron-fortified bakery product: Effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Tres, Alba; Polo, Javier; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Fortification of food products with iron is a common strategy to prevent or overcome iron deficiency. However, any form of iron is a pro-oxidant and its addition will cause off-flavours and reduce a product's shelf life. A highly bioavailable heme iron ingredient was selected to fortify a chocolate cream used to fill sandwich-type cookies. Two different strategies were assessed for avoiding the heme iron catalytic effect on lipid oxidation: ascorbyl palmitate addition and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate. Oxidation development and sensory acceptability were monitored in the cookies over one-year of storage at room temperature in the dark. The addition of ascorbyl palmitate provided protection against oxidation and loss of tocopherols and tocotrienols during the preparation of cookies. In general, ascorbyl palmitate, either alone or in combination with the co-spray-dried heme iron, prevented primary oxidation and hexanal formation during storage. The combination of both strategies resulted in cookies that were acceptable from a sensory point of view after 1year of storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioavailability of magnetic nanoparticles to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, B.-R.; Chen, P.-Y.; Huang, C.-Y.; Jung, S.-M.; Ma, Y.-H.; Wu, Tony; Chen, J.-P.; Wei, K.-C.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the bioavailability of carboxymethyl dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMD-MNP) to the brain. The cytotoxicity of CMD-MNP was assessed by co-culture with C6, a rat glioma cell line. To investigate the effects of an external magnetic field on the biodistribution of nanoparticles in a rat model, a magnet of 0.3 Tesla was applied externally over the cranium and the particles injected via the external jugular vein. Nanoparticles were also injected into rats implanted with C6 tumor cells. Staining of histological samples with Prussian blue to detect iron particles revealed that the external magnetic field enhanced the aggregation of nanoparticles in the rat brain; this enhancement was even more pronounced in the tumor region.

  19. Bioavailability of magnetic nanoparticles to the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.-R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, P.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang-Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jung, S.-M. [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Y.-H. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tony [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-P. [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Wei, K.-C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuochenwei@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2009-05-15

    This study investigates the bioavailability of carboxymethyl dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMD-MNP) to the brain. The cytotoxicity of CMD-MNP was assessed by co-culture with C6, a rat glioma cell line. To investigate the effects of an external magnetic field on the biodistribution of nanoparticles in a rat model, a magnet of 0.3 Tesla was applied externally over the cranium and the particles injected via the external jugular vein. Nanoparticles were also injected into rats implanted with C6 tumor cells. Staining of histological samples with Prussian blue to detect iron particles revealed that the external magnetic field enhanced the aggregation of nanoparticles in the rat brain; this enhancement was even more pronounced in the tumor region.

  20. Study of radiation-thermal effect of electron beam on steel and cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machurin, E.S.; Lonchin, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Studied is the influence of radiation-heat treatment by high energy (3-4.5 MeV) electron beam on the structure and properties of carbon steels (65G, 90KhF) and cast iron. Metallography and electron microscopy methods are used to study microstructure. It is shown that after the treatment by the electron beam there is observed noticeable structure grinding, sample fracture viscosity (even in a quenched state), increase of hardness and impact strength. The mechanism of metal heating process by electron beam is calculated and temperature field is defined in a heating region accounting for electron beam characteristics, medium and geometric factor. Theoretical data are close to experimental ones obtained in a course of determining the microhardness of irradiated samples for the cases of electron treatment duration up to 10 s

  1. Heme Iron Content in Lamb Meat Is Differentially Altered upon Boiling, Grilling, or Frying as Assessed by Four Distinct Analytical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Pourkhalili, Azin; Mirlohi, Maryam; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron) in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC) were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experi...

  2. Particle Size, Surface Area, and Amorphous Content as Predictors of Solubility and Bioavailability for Five Commercial Sources of Ferric Orthophosphate in Ready-To-Eat Cereal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin S. Dickmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferric orthophosphate (FePO4 has had limited use as an iron fortificant in ready-to-eat (RTE cereal because of its variable bioavailability, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. Even though FePO4 has desirable sensory properties as compared to other affordable iron fortificants, few published studies have well-characterized its physicochemical properties. Semi-crystalline materials such as FePO4 have varying degrees of molecular disorder, referred to as amorphous content, which is hypothesized to be an important factor in bioavailability. The objective of this study was to systematically measure the physicochemical factors of particle size, surface area, amorphous content, and solubility underlying the variation in FePO4 bioavailability. Five commercial FePO4 sources and ferrous sulfate were added to individual batches of RTE cereal. The relative bioavailability value (RBV of each iron source, determined using the AOAC Rat Hemoglobin Repletion Bioassay, ranged from 51% to 99% (p < 0.05, which is higher than typically reported. Solubility in dilute HCl accurately predicted RBV (R2 = 0.93, p = 0.008. Amorphous content measured by Dynamic Vapor Sorption ranged from 1.7% to 23.8% and was a better determinant of solubility (R2 = 0.91; p = 0.0002 than surface area (R2 = 0.83; p = 0.002 and median particle size (R2 = 0.59; p = 0.12. The results indicate that while solubility of FePO4 is highly predictive of RBV, solubility, in turn, is strongly linked to amorphous content and surface area. This information may prove useful for the production of FePO4 with the desired RBV.

  3. The Iron-Sulfur Cluster of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is the Electron Acceptor for Electron Transfer Flavoprotein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael A.; Usselman, Robert J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the ubiquinone-pool. It contains one [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and one FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. In the porcine protein, threonine 367 is hydrogen bonded to N1 and O2 of the flavin ring of the FAD. The analogous site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO is asparagine 338. Mutations N338T and N338A were introduced into the R. sphaeroides protein by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the impact of hydrogen bonding at this site on redox potentials and activity. The mutations did not alter the optical spectra, EPR g-values, spin-lattice relaxation rates, or the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ to FAD point-dipole interspin distances. The mutations had no impact on the reduction potential for the iron-sulfur cluster, which was monitored by changes in the continuous wave EPR signals of the [4Fe-4S]+ at 15 K. For the FAD semiquinone, significantly different potentials were obtained by monitoring the titration at 100 or 293 K. Based on spectra at 293 K the N338T mutation shifted the first and second midpoint potentials for the FAD from +47 mV and −30 mV for wild type to −11 mV and −19 mV, respectively. The N338A mutation decreased the potentials to −37 mV and −49 mV. Lowering the midpoint potentials resulted in a decrease in the quinone reductase activity and negligible impact on disproportionation of ETF1e− catalyzed by ETF-QO. These observations indicate that the FAD is involved in electron transfer to ubiquinone, but not in electron transfer from ETF to ETF-QO. Therefore the iron-sulfur cluster is the immediate acceptor from ETF. PMID:18672901

  4. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julia G.; Friedman, Jennifer F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed. PMID:21738863

  5. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia G. Shaw

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed.

  6. Isotope aided studies on the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuramulu, N.; Das, P.; Prasad, P.

    1994-01-01

    Total iron, and zinc, in-vitro ionizable iron and soluble zinc were estimated by the chemical and extrinsic isotope tag methods for comparison in various foodstuffs as such, and after processing, and also in diets. It has been observed that the values got were more or less similar by both the procedures. The in-vitro ionizable iron in groundnut was low with low total iron as well. Total iron and ionizable iron were also estimated in commonly consumed breakfast preparations. The effect of tea on ionizable iron when taken along with breakfast was also investigated. It was found that different breakfast preparations varied narrowly with regards to total iron (4.6-7.2 mg) and percent ionizable iron (25%-33%). However, tea had a pronounced effect on ionizable iron resulting in inhibition to various extents. Total and soluble zinc were analyzed in green leafy vegetables and groundnut. Though the total zinc was low and similar in both foodstuffs, the percent soluble Zn was found to be high in green leafy vegetables as compared to groundnut. Tannin and ascorbic acid contents were estimated in a few foodstuffs. Tannin content in green leafy vegetables was found to be about 150 mg. Ascorbic acid concentration was high in cereals (except in rice) and whole pulses. The split pulses (dals) were found to be poor sources of ascorbic acid. Ionizable iron and soluble zinc were found to increase to various extents on processing. Germination was found to increase ascorbic acid, whereas it had no effect on tannin. (author). 4 figs, 8 tabs

  7. Factors influencing the dissolved iron input by river water to the open ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krachler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of natural metal chelators on the bio-available iron input to the ocean by river water was studied. Ferrous and ferric ions present as suspended colloidal particles maintaining the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater at the continental boundary. However, we might argue that different iron-binding colloids become sequentially destabilized in meeting progressively increasing salinities. By use of a 59Fe tracer method, the partitioning of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured with high accuracy in mixtures of natural river water with artificial sea water. The results show a characteristic sequence of sedimentation. Various colloids of different stability are removed from a water of increasing salinity, such as it is the case in the transition from a river water to the open sea. However, the iron transport capacities of the investigated river waters differed greatly. A mountainous river in the Austrian Alps would add only about 5% of its dissolved Fe load, that is about 2.0 µg L-1 Fe, to coastal waters. A small tributary draining a sphagnum peat-bog, which acts as a source of refractory low-molecular-weight fulvic acids to the river water, would add approximately 20% of its original Fe load, that is up to 480 µg L-1 Fe to the ocean's bio-available iron pool. This points to a natural mechanism of ocean iron fertilization by terrigenous fulvic-iron complexes originating from weathering processes occurring in the soils upstream.

  8. Phytic Acid-to-Iron Molar Ratio Rather than Polyphenol Concentration Determines Iron Bioavailability in Whole-Cowpea Meal among Young Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abizari, A.R.; Moretti, D.; Zimmerman, M.B.; Armar-Klemesu, M.; Brouwer, I.D.

    2012-01-01

    Limited data exist on iron absorption from NaFeEDTA and FeSO(4) in legume-based flours. The current study compared iron absorption from NaFeEDTA and FeSO(4) as fortificants within and between red and white varieties of cowpea with different concentrations of polyphenols (PP) but similar phytic acid

  9. Valence electron structure of cast iron and graphltization behaviour criterion of elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志林; 李志林; 孙振国; 杨晓平; 陈敏

    1995-01-01

    The valence electron structure of common alloy elements in phases of cast iron is calculated- The relationship between the electron structure of alloy elements and equilibrium, non-equilibrium solidification and graphitization is revealed by defining the bond energy of the strongest bond in a phase as structure formation factor S. A criterion of graphitization behaviour of elements is advanced with the critical value of the structure formation factor of graphite and the n of the strongest covalent bond in cementite. It is found that this theory conforms to practice very well when the criterion is applied to the common alloy elements.

  10. Electronic Raman spectra in iron-based superconductors with two-orbital model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongyan; Wang Da; Chen San; Wang Wei; Gong Pifeng

    2011-01-01

    Electronic Raman spectra were calculated in orbital space in a microscopic theory. Both Raman spectra and spectra weight were presented. Raman spectra for the gap symmetries are different from each other. The results can help decide the gap symmetry by comparing with experiments. Electronic Raman spectra in iron-based superconductors with two-orbital model is discussed. In the orbital space, some possible pairing symmetries of the gap are selected. To further discriminate them, electronic Raman spectra and spectra weight at Fermi surface (FS) which helps understand the Raman spectra are calculated in each case. From the low energy threshold, the number of Raman peaks, and the low frequency power law behavior, we can judge whether it is full gap or nodal gap, and even one gap or multi-gaps. The results provide useful predictions for comparison with experiments.

  11. Detection of fatigue fracture in pearlitic flake graphite cast iron with the help of scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunger, B.; Hunger, J.

    1976-01-01

    To prove the existence of the characteristic features of fatigue fracture in a pearlitic flake graphite cast iron, its fracture surface topography revealed by scanning electron microscopy has been compared with that of a pearlitic steel, the fractures having been caused by static tensile and by cyclic bending tests. The characteristic features of fatigue fracture were visible in the pearlitic matrix of the steel and of the flake graphite cast iron as well. These features differ characteristically from the lamellar structure of the pearlite, particularly after etching the surface area of the fractures. The graphite structures as viewed on the electron scanning and the electron transmission microscope are described. (orig.) [de

  12. Reactivity of Uranium and Ferrous Iron with Natural Iron Oxyhydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brandy D; Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Peyton, Brent M; Nico, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    Determining key reaction pathways involving uranium and iron oxyhydroxides under oxic and anoxic conditions is essential for understanding uranium mobility as well as other iron oxyhydroxide mediated processes, particularly near redox boundaries where redox conditions change rapidly in time and space. Here we examine the reactivity of a ferrihydrite-rich sediment from a surface seep adjacent to a redox boundary at the Rifle, Colorado field site. Iron(II)-sediment incubation experiments indicate that the natural ferrihydrite fraction of the sediment is not susceptible to reductive transformation under conditions that trigger significant mineralogical transformations of synthetic ferrihydrite. No measurable Fe(II)-promoted transformation was observed when the Rifle sediment was exposed to 30 mM Fe(II) for up to 2 weeks. Incubation of the Rifle sediment with 3 mM Fe(II) and 0.2 mM U(VI) for 15 days shows no measurable incorporation of U(VI) into the mineral structure or reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Results indicate a significantly decreased reactivity of naturally occurring Fe oxyhydroxides as compared to synthetic minerals, likely due to the association of impurities (e.g., Si, organic matter), with implications for the mobility and bioavailability of uranium and other associated species in field environments.

  13. Coal fly ash as a source of iron in atmospheric dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M; Grassian, Vicki H

    2012-02-21

    Anthropogenic coal fly ash (FA) aerosol may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made that compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report here an investigation of iron dissolution for three FA samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust (AZTD), a reference material for mineral dust. The effects of pH, simulated cloud processing, and solar radiation on iron solubility have been explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provides the predominant component of dissolved iron. Iron solubility of FA is substantially higher than of the crystalline minerals comprising AZTD. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in FA particles. Iron is continuously released into the aqueous solution as FA particles break up into smaller fragments. These results suggest that the assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes and their effect on the biogeochemistry at the ocean surface should be constrained by the source, environmental pH, iron speciation, and solar radiation.

  14. Isotope aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layrisse, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies on Venezuelan diets provided information on food consumed in each diet and their nutritional contents. It also showed the comparison of the iron absorption from these diets when given in the morning after over-night fast and when given at the customary time of the day. It was observed that the iron absorption from the lunch given at noon was slightly higher (although not significant) in Zulia and Sucre diets. There were no significant differences between the Zulia lunch given in the morning after over-night fast at noon. Similar results were observed in the Sucre diet lunch repeated twice. From these results we can state that iron absorption from meals is not affected by the time it is administered with the condition that the subjects tested have had a previous fast of three hours before the meal is administered. The significant difference in iron absorption in the first study could be due to a marked physiological daily variation in iron absorption. The results from these studies provide credit to previous reports in which meals were given in the morning after an over-night fast. The iron absorption studies from 11 diets consumed by the Venezuelan population, provided the basic information for the establishment of a programme on iron fortification. The Government of Venezuela, according to the recommendation of the National Nutrition Institute, approved a national programme of iron fortification by enriching precooked maize flour with ferrous fumarate in the proportion of 5 mg Fe/100 g flour, and the enrichment of flour used to produce paste with the same iron compound in the proportion of 3 mg Fe/100 g flour. This year, the Chemical Centre of the Venezuela Scientific Institute of Research discovered an iron compound, now called FERROIVIC. It is an insoluble white powder that, when given as iron fortification, forms part of the nonhaeme iron pool and it is absorbed to the same extent as ferrous sulphate; it is stable for several months. 15 refs, 8

  15. Iron Acquisition in Bacillus cereus: The Roles of IlsA and Bacillibactin in Exogenous Ferritin Iron Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Christophe; Daou, Nadine; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Arosio, Paolo; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Nielsen Le Roux, Christina

    2014-01-01

    In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A) binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24550730

  16. Iron acquisition in Bacillus cereus: the roles of IlsA and bacillibactin in exogenous ferritin iron mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Segond

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis.

  17. Demonstration of tools for evaluating the durability of natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemoets, J.; Ceuster, T. de; Vandervelpen, B.; Gutschoven, K. [Haskoning Belgium (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    The dominant process for natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons such as BTEX or alkanes in groundwater is microbial oxidation. In many instances demonstration of natural attenuation is limited to historic trend analysis of pollutant concentrations and analyses of electron acceptors and their reduced forms as secondary evidence for NA. By doing so one can demonstrate that biodegradation processes are occurring naturally. However, this approach does not ensure that natural attenuation processes will continue to occur to the extent that is required to sustain control of the complete pollutant mass over a long time. A sufficient supply of naturally occurring oxidants (electron acceptors) is required to enable adequate microbial oxidation of hydrocarbons. Naturally occurring oxidants for microbial oxidation are oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron, manganese(IV), sulfate and carbon dioxide. At many sites iron(III) may be the most abundant electron acceptor, as it may be present in large quantities in the solid aquifer materials. However, only a fraction of it may be available for micro-organisms. Thus far this parameter is rarely analyzed during site investigation programs for MNA. Bio-available iron may also play an important role in the feasibility of complete microbial dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents. We will present results of a research project in which we have evaluated three methods for determining the quantity of bio-available ferric iron in solid aquifer material samples. These were mild acid extraction followed by spectrophotometry, redox titration with titanium(III)-EDTA and a commercially available enzymatic test kit (BAFeIII assay). The results will be compared, considering implications for practical implementation. The program is being carried out for two petrol station sites for which MNA has been applied as the groundwater remediation method. At each site three soil boring are performed across a depth trajectory below the groundwater table

  18. One step paired electrochemical synthesis of iron and iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ordoukhanian Juliet

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new one step paired electrochemical method is developed for simultaneous synthesis of iron and iron oxide nanoparticles. iron and iron oxide are prepared as cathodic and anodic products from iron (ii sulfate aqueous solution in a membrane divided electrolytic cell by the pulsed current electrosynthesis. Because of organic solvent-free and electrochemical nature of the synthesis, the process could be considered as green and environmentally friendly. The reduction of energy consumption and low cost are the other significant advantages of this new method that would have a great application potential in the chemical industry. The nanostructure of prepared samples was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VsM.

  19. Soil parameters are key factors to predict metal bioavailability to snails based on chemical extractant data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauget, B.; Gimbert, F.; Scheifler, R.; Coeurdassier, M.; Vaufleury, A. de

    2012-01-01

    Although soil characteristics modulate metal mobility and bioavailability to organisms, they are often ignored in the risk assessment of metal transfer. This paper aims to determine the ability of chemical methods to assess and predict cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) environmental bioavailability to the land snail Cantareus aspersus. Snails were exposed in the laboratory for 28 days to 17 soils from around a former smelter. The soils were selected for their range of pH, organic matter, clay content, and Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The influence of soil properties on environmental availability (estimated using HF-HClO 4 , EDTA, CaCl 2 , NH 4 NO 3 , NaNO 3 , free ion activity and total dissolved metal concentration in soil solution) and on environmental bioavailability (modelled using accumulation kinetics) was identified. Among the seven chemical methods, only the EDTA and the total soil concentration can be used to assess Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability to snails (r² adj = 0.67 and 0.77, respectively). For Zn, none of the chemical methods were suitable. Taking into account the influence of the soil characteristics (pH and CEC) allows a better prediction of Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability (r² adj = 0.82 and 0.83, respectively). Even though alone none of the chemical methods tested could assess Zn environmental bioavailability to snails, the addition of pH, iron and aluminium oxides allowed the variation of assimilation fluxes to be predicted. A conceptual and practical method to use soil characteristics for risk assessment is proposed based on these results. We conclude that as yet there is no universal chemical method to predict metal environmental bioavailability to snails, and that the soil factors having the greatest impact depend on the metal considered. - Highlights: ► New approach to identify chemical methods able to predict metal bioavailability to snails. ► Bioavailability of cadmium, lead and zinc to snails was determined by

  20. Soil parameters are key factors to predict metal bioavailability to snails based on chemical extractant data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauget, B.; Gimbert, F., E-mail: frederic.gimbert@univ-fcomte.fr; Scheifler, R.; Coeurdassier, M.; Vaufleury, A. de

    2012-08-01

    Although soil characteristics modulate metal mobility and bioavailability to organisms, they are often ignored in the risk assessment of metal transfer. This paper aims to determine the ability of chemical methods to assess and predict cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) environmental bioavailability to the land snail Cantareus aspersus. Snails were exposed in the laboratory for 28 days to 17 soils from around a former smelter. The soils were selected for their range of pH, organic matter, clay content, and Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The influence of soil properties on environmental availability (estimated using HF-HClO{sub 4}, EDTA, CaCl{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, free ion activity and total dissolved metal concentration in soil solution) and on environmental bioavailability (modelled using accumulation kinetics) was identified. Among the seven chemical methods, only the EDTA and the total soil concentration can be used to assess Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability to snails (r Superscript-Two {sub adj} = 0.67 and 0.77, respectively). For Zn, none of the chemical methods were suitable. Taking into account the influence of the soil characteristics (pH and CEC) allows a better prediction of Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability (r Superscript-Two {sub adj} = 0.82 and 0.83, respectively). Even though alone none of the chemical methods tested could assess Zn environmental bioavailability to snails, the addition of pH, iron and aluminium oxides allowed the variation of assimilation fluxes to be predicted. A conceptual and practical method to use soil characteristics for risk assessment is proposed based on these results. We conclude that as yet there is no universal chemical method to predict metal environmental bioavailability to snails, and that the soil factors having the greatest impact depend on the metal considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New approach to identify chemical methods able to predict metal bioavailability

  1. Towards a Mechanistic Understanding of Anaerobic Nitrate Dependent Iron Oxidation: Balancing Electron Uptake and Detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Karl Carlson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II by subsurface microorganisms is an important part of biogeochemical cycling in the environment, but the biochemical mechanisms used to couple iron oxidation to nitrate respiration are not well understood. Based on our own work and the evidence available in the literature, we propose a mechanistic model for anaerobic nitrate dependent iron oxidation. We suggest that anaerobic iron oxidizing microorganisms likely exist along a continuum including: 1 bacteria that inadvertently oxidize Fe(II by abiotic or biotic reactions with enzymes or chemical intermediates in their metabolic pathways (e.g. denitrification and suffer from toxicity or energetic penalty, 2 Fe(II tolerant bacteria that gain little or no growth benefit from iron oxidation but can manage the toxic reactions, and 3 bacteria that efficiently accept electrons from Fe(II to gain a growth advantage while preventing or mitigating the toxic reactions. Predictions of the proposed model are highlighted and experimental approaches are discussed.

  2. Present and Past Impact of Glacially Sourced Dust on Iron Fertilization of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoenfelt, E. M.; Winckler, G.; Kaplan, M. R.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    An increase in iron-containing dust flux and a more efficient biological pump in the Southern Ocean have been associated with the CO2 drawdown and global cooling of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). While iron (Fe) mineralogy is known to affect Fe bioavailability through its impact on Fe solubility, there are limited studies investigating the importance of Fe mineralogy in dust fluxes to the Southern Ocean, and no previous studies investigating interactions between eukaryotic phytoplankton and particulate-phase Fe in natural dusts applicable to Southern Ocean environments. Since physically weathered bedrock becomes less soluble as it becomes weathered and oxidized, we hypothesized that glacially sourced dusts would contain more Fe(II)-rich primary minerals and would be more bioavailable than dusts from areas not impacted by glaciers. We used a series of natural dusts from Patagonia as the sole Fe source in incubation experiments with the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and evaluated Fe bioavailability using culture growth rates, cell density, and variable fluorescence. Monod curves were also used to evaluate the efficiency of the different particulates as sources of nutrient Fe. Using these Monod curves fit to growth rates plotted against particulate Fe concentrations, we observed that 1) Fe(II)-rich primary silicates were significantly more effective as an Fe source to diatoms than Fe(III)-rich oxides, that 2) Fe(II) content itself was responsible for the difference in Fe bioavailability/efficiency of the Fe nutrient source, and that 3) surface interactions with the particulates were important. In an effort to explore the possibility that Fe mineralogy impacted Fe bioavailability in past oceans, we will present our hypotheses regarding productivity and Fe mineralogy/bioavailability through the last glacial cycle.

  3. An analytical electron microscopy characterization of melt-spun iron/rare-earth/boron magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickenson, R.C.; Lawless, K.R.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Iron/rare-earth/boron permanent magnet materials have recently been developed to reduce the need for the strategic element cobalt, which was previously the primary component of high-energy magnets. These materials are generally produced by annealing rapidly solidified ribbons or by conventional powder metallurgy techniques. This paper reports results from an analytical electron microscopy characterization undertaken to establish the relationship between the magnetic properties and the microstructure of two iron/rare-earth/boron (Fe/RE/B) alloys. Ribbons of Fe 75 Pr 15 B 10 and Fe 77 Tb 15 B 8 were produced by melt-spinning. To obtain optimum magnetic properties, both alloys were then annealed at 700 0 C, the FePrB ribbons for 6 minutes and the FeTbB ribbons for 90 minutes. Foils for transmission electron microscopy were prepared by ion-milling the ribbons on a cold stage and examined using a Philips 400T TEM/STEM equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray unit

  4. Improvement of the intrinsic time resolving power of the Cologne iron-free orange type electron spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regis, J.-M.; Materna, Th.; Pascovici, G.; Christen, S.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Petkov, P.; Zell, K. O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik (IKP), Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Conversion electron spectroscopy represents an important tool for nuclear structure analysis of medium and heavy nuclei. Two iron-free magnetic electron spectrometers of the orange type have been installed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the University of Cologne. The very large transmission of 15% and the very good energy resolution of 1% makes the iron-free orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. By means of fast timing techniques, lifetimes of nuclear excited states can be measured with an accuracy better than 20 ps. For the first time, the energy dependent centroid position of prompt events yielding the time-walk characteristics (the prompt curve) of the orange spectrometer fast timing setup has been measured using prompt secondary {delta}-electrons generated in a pulsed beam experiment. The prompt curve calibrated as a function of energy allows precise lifetime determination down to a few tens of picoseconds by the use of the centroid shift method.

  5. Nonheme-iron absorption from a phytate-rich meal is increased by the addition of small amounts of pork meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boech, S.B.; Hansen, M.; Bukhave, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    of small amounts of meat on nonheme-iron absorption from a meal presumed to have low iron bioavailability. Design: Forty-five healthy women with a mean (+/-SD) age of 24 +/- 3 y were randomly assigned to I of 3 groups, each of which was served (A) a basic meal (rice, tomato sauce, pea puree, and a wheat...

  6. Biodisponibilidade do ferro como fator de proteção contra anemia entre crianças de 12 a 16 meses Iron bioavailability as a protective factor against anemia among children aged 12 to 16 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Vitolo

    2007-02-01

    iron intake according to recommendations. METHODS: The study included 369 children from a cohort of inhabitants of São Leopoldo, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, who were randomized at birth into an intervention group and into a control group. The intervention group had nutritional guidance in the first year of life, with monthly follow-up home visits, whereas the control group was visited at 6 and 12 months, without nutritional intervention. At the end of the first year of life, a 24-hour recall was used. Anemia was diagnosed based on a hemoglobin level less than 11 g/dL. The children's diets were classified according to iron bioavailability. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia amounted to 63.7% in this study. The proportion of children with adequate iron intake relative to the recommendations was statistically higher in the nonanemic group (26.8% than in the anemic one (17.7%. Nonanemic children had a greater intake of iron (p = 0.019, vitamin C (p = 0.001, energy density at dinner (p = 0.006, iron density per 1,000 calories (p = 0.045; and 16.3% of them had a diet with high iron bioavailability (p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: A diet with high iron bioavailability protects children from anemia and can be used as an intervention measure by basic health services and by the municipal departments of children's education.

  7. Effect of other metals on iron bioavailability in presence of a selective chelator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, F.S.

    1995-01-01

    Iron (III) is generally very easily chelated by a number of chelators in the biological environment, either supplied by food or already present there. One of the these chelator is gallic acid. The stability constants of the complexes formed between gallic acid and other trace metals have been determined by a potentiometric method. The data obtained was computed with the help of computer program B est . The resulted Beta values were compared with already known values of iron gallic acid complexes. (author)

  8. Folate bioavailability

    OpenAIRE

    Öhrvik, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    An inadequate folate status is associated with increased risk of anaemia and neural tube defects. In many countries a folate intake below recommendations has been reported for women in childbearing age. However, data on folate intake and status are not always associated, since factors other than intake, e.g. bioavailability, affect folate status. This thesis studied the bioavailability of folate using in vivo and in vitro models. The effect of two pieces of Swedish nutritional advice on folat...

  9. Chemodynamics of chromium reduction in soils: Implications to bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choppala, Girish [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia); Bolan, Nanthi, E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia); Seshadri, Balaji [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Building-X, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia 5106 (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Examined the effects of sorption, pH and C sources on Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity. • The rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and pH. • The proton dynamics in Cr(VI) reduction was assessed in relation to remediation. • A novel black carbon showed the highest reduction rate of Cr(VI) in soils. • Black carbon decreased the bioavailability and phytotoxicity of Cr(VI) in soils. -- Abstract: Chromium toxicity in soils can be mitigated by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) which is influenced by the presence of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution, and the supply of protons and electrons. In this study, the effects of Cr(VI) adsorption (i.e. availability of free Cr(VI) species in soil solution), soil pH (i.e. supply of protons) and three electron donor carbon sources [black carbon (BC), chicken manure biochar (CMB) and cow manure (CM)] on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in soils were investigated. The results indicated that the rate of Cr(VI) reduction decreased with an increase in Cr(VI) adsorption and soil pH, which is attributed to decreased supply of free Cr(VI) ions and protons, respectively. Among the three different amendments tested, BC showed the highest rate of Cr(VI) reduction followed by CM and CMB. Furthermore, addition of BC, CM and CMB decreased the bioavailability of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils. The high efficiency of BC on Cr(VI) reduction was due to the electron donor's functional groups such as phenolic, hydroxyl, carbonyl and amides. The study demonstrated that free form of Cr(VI) ions in soil solution and carbon amendments enriched with acidic functional groups favored the reduction of Cr(VI), thereby mitigating its bioavailability and toxicity in contaminated soils.

  10. Biodisponibilidade de ferro em diferentes compostos para leitões desmamados aos 21 dias de idade Bioavailability of iron in different compounds for piglets weaned at 21 days old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Cocato

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a biodisponibilidade de ferro de diferentes compostos visando sua utilização em dietas para leitões desmamados. Utilizaram-se 44 leitões (7 não-anêmicos e 37 anêmicos desmamados aos 21 dias de idade (7,3 ± 1,8 kg e distribuídos em dois grupos: grupo não-anêmico e grupo anêmico. Durante sete dias, os animais do grupo não-anêmico receberam dieta com FeSO4.7H2O (sulfato ferroso hepta-hidratado na dose de 100 mg/kg e os do grupo anêmico, dieta sem ferro (Iron bioavailability from different compounds was evaluated to be used in diets for weaned piglets. Forty four piglets (7 non-anemic and 37 anemic weaned at 21 days old (7.3 ± 1.8 kg were distributed into two groups: non-anemic group and anemic group. During seven days, the animals from non-anemic group were fed diet with ferrous sulfate hepthydrate (FeSO4.7H2O in the dose of 100 mg/kg and of the anemic group, diet without iron (<15 mg/kg diet. On the seventh day, after the determination blood hemoglobin concentration and diagnosed with anemia, piglets were grouped according to product of the weight (kg × hemoglobin (g/dL and individually housed, for 13 days in cages for digestibility studies, where they were fed with six diets based on corn and powdered milk: three standard diets with FeSO4.7H2O in equivalent amount of 80, 150 and 200 mg Fe/kg diet; two experimental diets, one with iron (150 mg/kg in form of FeSO4 microencapsulated with carboxymethylcellulose and other chelated with methionine, and a control diet with iron (100 mg/kg. In the days 0, 3, 6, 9 and 13 of the repletion period, the animals were weighed for performance evaluation and blood was collected to determine the hemoglobin concentration. At the end, the animals were slaughtered and liver was collected for determination of total iron concentrations, Fe-heme and Fe non-heme. Liver concentrations of Fe-heme, Fe non-heme and Fe-total did not differ among animals, however, the control group showed excess of

  11. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamorro, Susana; Vaquero, María Pilar; Brenes, Agustín; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Verdoy, Dolores; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses. (paper)

  12. Isotope aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaleta, N.; Penny, M.; Berlanga, R.; Espinoza, R.; Lonnerdal, B.

    1992-01-01

    Iron deficiency can produce disturbances in physical and mental health, the most common sign of severe iron deficiency being anaemia. Iron deficiency anaemia can impair work capacity; learning capacity and result in changes in behaviour as well as compromise immunocompetence and causing less resistance to infections. In pregnancy, there is evidence that severe anaemia increases the risk of maternal morbidity and mortality as well as premature delivery. There is thus ample justification for attempting to implement programmes to combat iron deficiency in developing countries such as Peru. In order to determine the most appropriate intervention it is necessary to have data on the prevalence and severity of iron deficiency. The purpose of this study is to develop the necessary steps to implement a fortification programme to combat iron deficiency anaemia in Peru, targeted to pre-school children and pregnant women, who are the risk groups due to their increased requirements of this nutrient. 11 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  13. Cooking Chicken Breast Reduces Dialyzable Iron Resulting from Digestion of Muscle Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya S. Gokhale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the effect of cooking chicken breast on the production of dialyzable iron (an in vitro indicator of bioavailable iron from added ferric iron. Chicken breast muscle was cooked by boiling, baking, sautéing, or deep-frying. Cooked samples were mixed with ferric iron and either extracted with acid or digested with pepsin and pancreatin. Total and ferrous dialyzable iron was measured after extraction or digestion and compared to raw chicken samples. For uncooked samples, dialyzable iron was significantly enhanced after both extraction and digestion. All cooking methods led to markedly reduced levels of dialyzable iron both by extraction and digestion. In most cooked, digested samples dialyzable iron was no greater than the iron-only (no sample control. Cooked samples showed lower levels of histidine and sulfhydryls but protein digestibility was not reduced, except for the sautéed sample. The results showed that, after cooking, little if any dialyzable iron results from digestion of muscle proteins. Our research indicates that, in cooked chicken, residual acid-extractable components are the most important source of dialyzable iron.

  14. Cooking Chicken Breast Reduces Dialyzable Iron Resulting from Digestion of Muscle Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Aditya S; Mahoney, Raymond R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of cooking chicken breast on the production of dialyzable iron (an in vitro indicator of bioavailable iron) from added ferric iron. Chicken breast muscle was cooked by boiling, baking, sautéing, or deep-frying. Cooked samples were mixed with ferric iron and either extracted with acid or digested with pepsin and pancreatin. Total and ferrous dialyzable iron was measured after extraction or digestion and compared to raw chicken samples. For uncooked samples, dialyzable iron was significantly enhanced after both extraction and digestion. All cooking methods led to markedly reduced levels of dialyzable iron both by extraction and digestion. In most cooked, digested samples dialyzable iron was no greater than the iron-only (no sample) control. Cooked samples showed lower levels of histidine and sulfhydryls but protein digestibility was not reduced, except for the sautéed sample. The results showed that, after cooking, little if any dialyzable iron results from digestion of muscle proteins. Our research indicates that, in cooked chicken, residual acid-extractable components are the most important source of dialyzable iron.

  15. An Electron Microscopy Study of Graphite Growth in Nodular Cast Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffont, L.; Jday, R.; Lacaze, J.

    2018-04-01

    Growth of graphite during solidification and high-temperature solid-state transformation has been investigated in samples cut out from a thin-wall casting which solidified partly in the stable (iron-graphite) and partly in the metastable (iron-cementite) systems. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize graphite nodules in as-cast state and in samples having been fully graphitized at various temperatures in the austenite field. Nodules in the as-cast material show a twofold structure characterized by an inner zone where graphite is disoriented and an outer zone where it is well crystallized. In heat-treated samples, graphite nodules consist of well-crystallized sectors radiating from the nucleus. These observations suggest that the disoriented zone appears because of mechanical deformation when the liquid contracts during its solidification in the metastable system. During heat-treatment, the graphite in this zone recrystallizes. In turn, it can be concluded that nodular graphite growth mechanism is the same during solidification and solid-state transformation.

  16. Importance of boreal rivers in providing iron to marine waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma S Kritzberg

    Full Text Available This study reports increasing iron concentrations in rivers draining into the Baltic Sea. Given the decisive role of iron to the structure and biogeochemical function of aquatic ecosystems, this trend is likely one with far reaching consequences to the receiving system. What those consequences may be depends on the fate of the iron in estuarine mixing. We here assess the stability of riverine iron by mixing water from seven boreal rivers with artificial sea salts. The results show a gradual loss of iron from suspension with increasing salinity. However, the capacity of the different river waters to maintain iron in suspension varied greatly, i.e. between 1 and 54% of iron was in suspension at a salinity of 30. The variability was best explained by iron:organic carbon ratios in the riverine waters--the lower the ratio the more iron remained in suspension. Water with an initially low iron:organic carbon ratio could keep even higher than ambient concentrations of Fe in suspension across the salinity gradient, as shown in experiments with iron amendments. Moreover, there was a positive relationship between the molecular size of the riverine organic matter and the amount of iron in suspension. In all, the results point towards a remarkably high transport capacity of iron from boreal rivers, suggesting that increasing concentrations of iron in river mouths may result in higher concentrations of potentially bioavailable iron in the marine system.

  17. Optical Analysis of Iron-Doped Lead Sulfide Thin Films for Opto-Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambara Kumar, K. N.; Khadeer Pasha, S. K.; Deshmukh, Kalim; Chidambaram, K.; Shakil Muhammad, G.

    Iron-doped lead sulfide thin films were deposited on glass substrates using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method (SILAR) at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the film shows a well formed crystalline thin film with face-centered cubic structure along the preferential orientation (1 1 1). The lattice constant is determined using Nelson Riley plots. Using X-ray broadening, the crystallite size is determined by Scherrer formula. Morphology of the thin film was studied using a scanning electron microscope. The optical properties of the film were investigated using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. We observed an increase in the optical band gap from 2.45 to 3.03eV after doping iron in the lead sulfide thin film. The cutoff wavelength lies in the visible region, and hence the grown thin films can be used for optoelectronic and sensor applications. The results from the photoluminescence study show the emission at 500-720nm. The vibrating sample magnetometer measurements confirmed that the lead sulfide thin film becomes weakly ferromagnetic material after doping with iron.

  18. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  19. Effect of a nutrition education program and diet modification in Beninese adolescent girls suffering from mild iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaofé, Halimatou; Zee, John; Dossa, Romain; O'Brien, Huguette Turgeon

    2009-01-01

    A 26-week nutrition intervention, including 4 weeks of nutrition education, combined with an increase in the content and bioavailability of dietary iron for 22 weeks was carried out in 34 intervention and 34 control adolescent girls suffering from mild iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In post-intervention, hemoglobin and serum ferritin were significantly higher in the intervention group, whereas the incidence of IDA was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to the control group. Nutrition knowledge scores were significantly higher in intervention girls compared to control girls. Dietary changes to improve available dietary iron can reduce iron deficiency anemia.

  20. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  1. Electronic properties and surface reactivity of SrO-terminated SrTiO3 and SrO-terminated iron-doped SrTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staykov, Aleksandar; Tellez, Helena; Druce, John; Wu, Ji; Ishihara, Tatsumi; Kilner, John

    2018-01-01

    Surface reactivity and near-surface electronic properties of SrO-terminated SrTiO 3 and iron doped SrTiO 3 were studied with first principle methods. We have investigated the density of states (DOS) of bulk SrTiO 3 and compared it to DOS of iron-doped SrTiO 3 with different oxidation states of iron corresponding to varying oxygen vacancy content within the bulk material. The obtained bulk DOS was compared to near-surface DOS, i.e. surface states, for both SrO-terminated surface of SrTiO 3 and iron-doped SrTiO 3 . Electron density plots and electron density distribution through the entire slab models were investigated in order to understand the origin of surface electrons that can participate in oxygen reduction reaction. Furthermore, we have compared oxygen reduction reactions at elevated temperatures for SrO surfaces with and without oxygen vacancies. Our calculations demonstrate that the conduction band, which is formed mainly by the d-states of Ti, and Fe-induced states within the band gap of SrTiO 3 , are accessible only on TiO 2 terminated SrTiO 3 surface while the SrO-terminated surface introduces a tunneling barrier for the electrons populating the conductance band. First principle molecular dynamics demonstrated that at elevated temperatures the surface oxygen vacancies are essential for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  2. Iron Mineralogy and Speciation in Clay-Sized Fractions of Chinese Desert Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wanyi; Zhao, Wancang; Balsam, William; Lu, Huayu; Liu, Pan; Lu, Zunli; Ji, Junfeng

    2017-12-01

    Iron released from Asian desert dust may be an important source of bioavailable iron for the North Pacific Ocean and thereby may stimulate primary productivity. However, the Fe species of the fine dusts from this source region are poorly characterized. Here we investigate iron species and mineralogy in the clay-sized fractions (iron phases (ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite) and reducible iron oxides (dominated by goethite) are 0.81 wt % and 2.39 wt %, respectively, and Fe dissolved from phyllosilicates extracted by boiling HCl (dominated by chlorite) is 3.15 wt %. Dusts originating from deserts in northwestern China, particularly the Taklimakan desert, are relatively enriched in easily reducible Fe phases, probably due to abundant Fe contained in fresh weathering products resulting from the rapid erosion associated with active uplift of mountains to the west. Data about Fe speciation and mineralogy in Asian dust sources will be useful for improving the quantification of soluble Fe supplied to the oceans, especially in dust models.

  3. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  4. Mechanisms of iron sensing and regulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Perea-García, Ana; Puig, Sergi

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a redox active element that functions as an essential cofactor in multiple metabolic pathways, including respiration, DNA synthesis and translation. While indispensable for eukaryotic life, excess iron can lead to oxidative damage of macromolecules. Therefore, living organisms have developed sophisticated strategies to optimally regulate iron acquisition, storage and utilization in response to fluctuations in environmental iron bioavailability. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription factors Aft1/Aft2 and Yap5 regulate iron metabolism in response to low and high iron levels, respectively. In addition to producing and assembling iron cofactors, mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster biogenesis has emerged as a central player in iron sensing. A mitochondrial signal derived from Fe/S synthesis is exported and converted into an Fe/S cluster that interacts directly with Aft1/Aft2 and Yap5 proteins to regulate their transcriptional function. Various conserved proteins, such as ABC mitochondrial transporter Atm1 and, for Aft1/Aft2, monothiol glutaredoxins Grx3 and Grx4 are implicated in this iron-signaling pathway. The analysis of a wide range of S. cerevisiae strains of different geographical origins and sources has shown that yeast strains adapted to high iron display growth defects under iron-deficient conditions, and highlighted connections that exist in the response to both opposite conditions. Changes in iron accumulation and gene expression profiles suggest differences in the regulation of iron homeostasis genes.

  5. Environmental selection pressures related to iron utilization are involved in the loss of the flavodoxin gene from the plant genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierella Karlusich, Juan J; Ceccoli, Romina D; Graña, Martín; Romero, Héctor; Carrillo, Néstor

    2015-02-16

    Oxidative stress and iron limitation represent the grim side of life in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. The versatile electron transfer shuttle ferredoxin, an iron-sulfur protein, is particularly sensitive to these hardships, and its downregulation under adverse conditions severely compromises survival of phototrophs. Replacement of ferredoxin by a stress-resistant isofunctional carrier, flavin-containing flavodoxin, is a widespread strategy employed by photosynthetic microorganisms to overcome environmental adversities. The flavodoxin gene was lost in the course of plant evolution, but its reintroduction in transgenic plants confers increased tolerance to environmental stress and iron starvation, raising the question as to why a genetic asset with obvious adaptive value was not kept by natural selection. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the evolutionary history of flavodoxin is intricate, with several horizontal gene transfer events between distant organisms, including Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. The flavodoxin gene is unevenly distributed in most algal lineages, with flavodoxin-containing species being overrepresented in iron-limited regions and scarce or absent in iron-rich environments. Evaluation of cyanobacterial genomic and metagenomic data yielded essentially the same results, indicating that there was little selection pressure to retain flavodoxin in iron-rich coastal/freshwater phototrophs. Our results show a highly dynamic evolution pattern of flavodoxin tightly connected to the bioavailability of iron. Evidence presented here also indicates that the high concentration of iron in coastal and freshwater habitats may have facilitated the loss of flavodoxin in the freshwater ancestor of modern plants during the transition of photosynthetic organisms from the open oceans to the firm land. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Change of iron species and iron solubility in Asian dust during the long-range transport from western China to Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Takahashi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the North Pacific, transport and deposition of mineral dust from Asia appear to be one of major sources of iron which can regulate growth of phytoplankton in the ocean. In this process, it is essential to identify chemical species of iron contained in Asian dust, because bioavailability of iron in the ocean is strongly influenced by the solubility of iron, which in turn is dependent on iron species in the dust. Here, we report that clay minerals (illite and chlorite in the dusts near the source collected at Aksu (western China can be transformed into ferrihydrite by atmospheric chemical processes during their long-range transport to eastern China (Qingdao and Japan (Tsukuba based on the speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS and other methods such as X-ray diffraction and chemical extraction. As a result, Fe molar ratio in Aksu (illite : chlorite : ferrihydrite = 70 : 25 : 5 was changed to that in Tsukuba (illite : chlorite : ferrihydrite = 65 : 10 : 25. Moreover, leaching experiments were conducted to study the change of iron solubility. It was found that the iron solubility for the dust in Tsukuba (soluble iron fraction: 11.8 % and 1.10 % for synthetic rain water and seawater, respectively was larger than that in Aksu (4.1 % and 0.28 %, respectively, showing that iron in the dust after the transport becomes more soluble possibly due to the formation of ferrihydrite in the atmosphere. Our findings suggested that secondary formation of ferrihydrite during the transport should be considered as one of important processes in evaluating the supply of soluble iron to seawater.

  7. Enhancing the bioavailability of magnolol in rabbits using melting solid dispersion with polyvinylpyrrolidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shiuan-Pey; Hou, Yu-Chi; Liao, Tzu-Yun; Tsai, Shang-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Preparation of magnolol-loaded amorphous solid dispersion was investigated for improving the bioavailability. A solid dispersion of magnolol was prepared with polyvinylpyrrolidone K-30 (PVP) by melting method, and the physical properties were characterized by using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry, Fourier transformation-infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. In addition, dissolution test was also performed. Subsequently, the bioavailability of magnolol pure compound, its physical mixture and solid dispersion were compared in rabbits. The blood samples withdrawn via marginal ear vein at specific time points were assayed by HPLC method. Oral administration of the solid dispersion of magnolol with PVP significantly increased the systemic exposures of magnolol and magnolol sulfates/glucuronides by 80.1% and 142.8%, respectively, compared to those given with magnolol pure compound. Magnolol-loaded amorphous solid dispersion with PVP has demonstrated enhanced bioavailability of magnolol in rabbits.

  8. In a Randomized Controlled Trial of Iron Fortification, Anthelmintic Treatment, and Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria for Anemia Control in Ivorian Children, only Anthelmintic Treatment Shows Modest Benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohner, F.; Zimmermann, M.B.; Amon, R.J.; Vounatsou, P.; Tschannen, A.B.; N'goran, E.K.; Nindjin, C.; Cacou, M.C.; Té-Bonlé, D.; Aka, H.; Sess, D.E.; Utzinger, J.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is common among children in sub-Saharan Africa and its etiology is multifactorial. Likely causes of anemia are low bioavailability of dietary iron, malaria, and helminth infection. In this study, we aimed to assess the effect of iron fortification, intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) of

  9. Direct voltammetric determination of redox-active iron in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Wei Zhe; Pumera, Martin

    2014-12-01

    With the advances in nanotechnology over the past decade, consumer products are increasingly being incorporated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). As the harmful effects of CNTs are suggested to be primarily due to the bioavailable amounts of metallic impurities, it is vital to detect and quantify these species using sensitive and facile methods. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the possibility of quantifying the amount of redox-available iron-containing impurities in CNTs with voltammetric techniques such as cyclic voltammetry. We examined the electrochemistry of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles in phosphate buffer solution and discovered that its electrochemical behavior could be affected by pH of the electrolyte. By utilizing the unique redox reaction between the iron and phosphate species, the redox available iron content in CNTs was determined successfully using voltammetry. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. [Bioavailability and factors influencing its rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vraníková, Barbora; Gajdziok, Jan

    Bioavailability can be defined as the rate and range of active ingredient absorption, when it becomes available in the systemic circulation or at the desired site of drug action, respectively. Drug bioavailability after oral administration is affected by anumber of different factors, including physicochemical properties of the drug, physiological aspects, the type of dosage form, food intake, biorhythms, and intra- and interindividual variability of the human population. This article is the first from the series dealing with the bioavailability and methods leading to its improvement. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of aspects influencing the rate of bioavailability after oral administration of the active ingredient. Subsequentarticles will provide detailed descriptions of methods used for dug bioavailability improvement, which are here only summarized.

  11. Relative Bioavailability and Bioaccessability and Speciation of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Assessment of soil arsenic (As) bioavailability may profoundly affect the extent of remediation required at contaminated sites by improving human exposure estimates. Because small adjustments in soil As bioavailability estimates can significantly alter risk assessments and remediation goals, convenient, rapid, reliable, and inexpensive tools are needed to determine soil As bioavailability. Objectives: We evaluated inexpensive methods for assessing As bioavailability in soil as a means to improve human exposure estimates and potentially reduce remediation costs. Methods: Nine soils from residential sites affected by mining or smelting activity and two National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials were evaluated for As bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and speciation. Arsenic bioavailability was determined using an in vivo mouse model, and As bioaccessibility was determined using the Solubility/Bioavailability Research Consortium in vitro assay. Arsenic speciation in soil and selected soil physicochemical properties were also evaluated to determine whether these parameters could be used as predictors of As bio¬availability and bioaccessibility. Results: In the mouse assay, we compared bioavailabilities of As in soils with that for sodium arsenate. Relative bioavailabilities (RBAs) of soil As ranged from 11% to 53% (mean, 33%). In vitro soil As bioaccessibility values were strongly correlated with soil As RBAs (R

  12. Electronic excitation induced modifications in elongated iron nanoparticle encapsulated multiwalled carbon nanotubes under ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikiran, V.; Bazylewski, P.; Sameera, I.; Bhatia, Ravi; Pathak, A. P.; Prasad, V.; Chang, G. S.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) filled with Fe nanorods were shown to have contracted and deformed under heavy ion irradiation. In this study, 120 MeV Ag and 80 MeV Ni ion irradiation was performed to study the deformation and defects induced in iron filled MWCNT under heavy ion irradiation. The structural modifications induced due to electronic excitation by ion irradiation were investigated employing high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman scattering experiments, and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. We understand that the ion irradiation causes modifications in the Fe nanorods which result in compressions and expansions of the nanotubes, and in turn leads to the buckling of MWCNT. The G band of the Raman spectra shifts slightly towards higher wavenumber and the shoulder G‧ band enhances with the increase of ion irradiation fluence, where the buckling wavelength depends on the radius 'r' of the nanotubes as exp[(r)0.5]. The intensity ratio of the D to G Raman modes initially decreases at the lowest fluence, and then it increases with the increase in ion fluence. The electron diffraction pattern and the high resolution images clearly show the presence of ion induced defects on the walls of the tube and encapsulated iron nanorods.

  13. Iron and Zinc Nutrition in the Economically-Developed World: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison O. Booth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This review compares iron and zinc food sources, dietary intakes, dietary recommendations, nutritional status, bioavailability and interactions, with a focus on adults in economically-developed countries. The main sources of iron and zinc are cereals and meat, with fortificant iron and zinc potentially making an important contribution. Current fortification practices are concerning as there is little regulation or monitoring of intakes. In the countries included in this review, the proportion of individuals with iron intakes below recommendations was similar to the proportion of individuals with suboptimal iron status. Due to a lack of population zinc status information, similar comparisons cannot be made for zinc intakes and status. Significant data indicate that inhibitors of iron absorption include phytate, polyphenols, soy protein and calcium, and enhancers include animal tissue and ascorbic acid. It appears that of these, only phytate and soy protein also inhibit zinc absorption. Most data are derived from single-meal studies, which tend to amplify impacts on iron absorption in contrast to studies that utilize a realistic food matrix. These interactions need to be substantiated by studies that account for whole diets, however in the interim, it may be prudent for those at risk of iron deficiency to maximize absorption by reducing consumption of inhibitors and including enhancers at mealtimes.

  14. Atomic-scale Visualization of Electronic Nematicity and Cooper Pairing in Iron-based Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Milan P.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in the relatively novel iron-based high-Tc superconductors is unresolved, both in terms of how the phases evolve with doping, and in terms of the actual Cooper pairing process. To explore these issues, we used spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy to study the electronic structure of CaFe2As2 in the antiferromagnetic-orthorhombic `parent' state from which the superconductivity emerges. We discovered and visualized the now widely studied electronic `nematicity' of this phase, whose suppression is associated with the emergence of superconductivity (Science 327, 181, 2010). As subsequent transport experiments discovered a related anisotropic conductance which increases with dopant concentration, the interplay between the electronic structure surrounding each dopant atom, quasiparticle scattering therefrom, and the transport nematicity has become a pivotal focus of research. We find that substituting Co for Fe atoms in underdoped Ca(Fe1-xCox)2As2 generates a dense population of identical and strongly anisotropic impurity states that are distributed randomly but aligned with the antiferromagnetic a-axis. We also demonstrate, by imaging their surrounding interference patterns, that these impurity states scatter quasiparticles and thus influence transport in a highly anisotropic manner (M.P. Allan et al., 2013). Next, we studied the momentum dependence of the energy gaps of iron-based superconductivity, now focusing on LiFeAs. If strong electron-electron interactions mediate the Cooper pairing, then momentum-space anisotropic superconducting energy gaps Δi (k) were predicted by multiple techniques to appear on the different electronic bands i. We introduced intraband Bogoliubov quasiparticle scattering interference (QPI) techniques for the determination of anisotropic energy gaps to test these hypotheses and discovered the anisotropy, magnitude, and relative orientations of the energy gaps on multiple

  15. Zinc bioavailability in the chick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempe, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for assessing zinc bioavailability were evaluated in the chick. A low-zinc chick diet was developed using rehydrated, spray-dried egg white autoclaved at 121 C for 30 min as the primary protein source. The relative bioavailability of zinc from soy flour and beef was determined by whole-body retention of extrinsic 65 Zn, and in slope ratio assays for growth rate and tissue zinc. Compared to zinc carbonate added to an egg white-based diet, all methods gave similar estimates of approximately 100% zinc bioavailability for beef but estimates for soy flour varied widely. The slope ratio assay for growth rate gave the best estimate of zinc bioavailability for soy flour. True absorption, as measured by percent isotope retention from extrinsically labeled soy flour, was 47%

  16. Electron impact ionisation cross sections of iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stefan E.; Mauracher, Andreas; Sukuba, Ivan; Urban, Jan; Maihom, Thana; Probst, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We report electron impact ionisation cross sections (EICSs) of iron oxide molecules, FexOx and FexOx+1 with x = 1, 2, 3, from the ionisation threshold to 10 keV, obtained with the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) methods. The maxima of the EICSs range from 3.10 to 9 . 96 × 10-16 cm2 located at 59-72 eV and 5.06 to 14.32 × 10-16 cm2 located at 85-108 eV for the DM and BEB approaches, respectively. The orbital and kinetic energies required for the BEB method are obtained by employing effective core potentials for the inner core electrons in the quantum chemical calculations. The BEB cross sections are 1.4-1.7 times larger than the DM cross sections which can be related to the decreasing population of the Fe 4s orbitals upon addition of oxygen atoms, together with the different methodological foundations of the two methods. Both the DM and BEB cross sections can be fitted excellently to a simple analytical expression used in modelling and simulation codes employed in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80308-2.

  17. Production, Characterization and Evaluation of Kaempferol Nanosuspension for Improving Oral Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yew S; Ramamurthy, Srinivasan; Candasamy, Mayuren; Shadab, Md; Kumar, Ravindran H; Meka, Venkata S

    2016-01-01

    Kaempferol has a large particle size and poor water solubility, leading to poor oral bioavailability. The present work aimed to develop a kaempferol nanosuspension (KNS) to improve pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability. A nanosuspension was prepared using high pressure homogenization (HPH) techniques. The physico-chemical properties of the kaempferol nanosuspension (KNS) were characterized using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD). A reversephase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for the analysis of the drug in rat plasma was developed and validated as per ICH guidelines. In vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of oral pure kaempferol solution, oral kaempferol nanosuspension and intravenous pure kaempferol were assessed in rats. The kaempferol nanosuspension had a greatly reduced particle size (426.3 ± 5.8 nm), compared to that of pure kaempferol (1737 ± 129 nm). The nanosuspension was stable under refrigerated conditions. No changes in physico-chemical characteristics were observed. In comparison to pure kaempferol, kaempferol nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (Pkaempferol. These results demonstrate enhanced oral bioavailability of kaempferol when formulated as a nanosuspension.

  18. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Ramon M.; Schaider, Laurel A.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Shine, James P.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals ( 65 Zn. We assessed geoavailability using sequential extractions and bioaccessibility using in vitro extraction tests simulating various pH and biological conditions. Zn in vivo bioavailability and in vitro bioaccessibility decreased as follows: mine waste > hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite >> sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gavage and post-IN was significantly correlated with bioaccessibility in simulated phagolysosomal fluid and gastric fluid. These data indicate that solid phase speciation influences biological uptake of Zn and that in vitro tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability in exposure assessment and effective remediation design. Highlights: •Zinc particle mineralogy influences bioaccessibility and bioavailability. •Zn bioavailability via gavage was 1.2–1.6 times higher than via intranasal route. •Zn particle geoavailability correlates with bioaccessibility. •In vitro bioaccessibility tests can predict in vivo Zn bioavailability. •Metal speciation and geochemical alterations can impact Zn bioavailability. -- Zinc mineralogy influences in vitro bioaccessibility and in vivo bioavailability and in vitro extraction tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability from particles

  19. Determination of anisotropy constants of protein encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Klem, Michael T.; Sebby, Karl B.; Singel, David J.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2009-01-01

    Angle-dependent electron magnetic resonance was performed on 4.9, 8.0, and 19 nm iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within protein capsids and suspended in water. Measurements were taken at liquid nitrogen temperature after cooling in a 1 T field to partially align the particles. The angle dependence of the shifts in the resonance field for the iron oxide nanoparticles (synthesized within Listeria-Dps, horse spleen ferritin, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus) all show evidence of a uniaxial anisotropy. Using a Boltzmann distribution for the particles' easy-axis direction, we are able to use the resonance field shifts to extract a value for the anisotropy energy, showing that the anisotropy energy density increases with decreasing particle size. This suggests that surface anisotropy plays a significant role in magnetic nanoparticles of this size

  20. Determination of anisotropy constants of protein encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongyan [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Klem, Michael T.; Sebby, Karl B.; Singel, David J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Young, Mark [Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Douglas, Trevor [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Idzerda, Yves U. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)], E-mail: Idzerda@montana.edu

    2009-02-15

    Angle-dependent electron magnetic resonance was performed on 4.9, 8.0, and 19 nm iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within protein capsids and suspended in water. Measurements were taken at liquid nitrogen temperature after cooling in a 1 T field to partially align the particles. The angle dependence of the shifts in the resonance field for the iron oxide nanoparticles (synthesized within Listeria-Dps, horse spleen ferritin, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus) all show evidence of a uniaxial anisotropy. Using a Boltzmann distribution for the particles' easy-axis direction, we are able to use the resonance field shifts to extract a value for the anisotropy energy, showing that the anisotropy energy density increases with decreasing particle size. This suggests that surface anisotropy plays a significant role in magnetic nanoparticles of this size.

  1. The bioavailability of chemicals in soil for earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanno, R.; Wells, J.; Conder, Jason M.; Bradham, K.; Basta, N.

    2004-01-01

    The bioavailability of chemicals to earthworms can be modified dramatically by soil physical/chemical characteristics, yet expressing exposure as total chemical concentrations does not address this problem. In order to understand the effects of modifying factors on bioavailability, one must measure and express chemical bioavailability to earthworms in a consistent, logical manner. This can be accomplished by direct biological measures of bioavailability (e.g., bioaccumulation, critical body residues), indirect biological measures of bioavailability (e.g., biomarkers, reproduction), or indirect chemical measures of bioavailability (e.g., chemical or solid-phase extracts of soil). If indirect chemical measures of bioavailability are to be used, they must be correlated with some biological response. Bioavailability can be incorporated into ecological risk assessment during risk analysis, primarily in the estimation of exposure. However, in order to be used in the site-specific ecological risk assessment of chemicals, effects concentrations must be developed from laboratory toxicity tests based on exposure estimates utilizing techniques that measure the bioavailable fraction of chemicals in soil, not total chemical concentrations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Phenazopyridine-phthalimide nano-cocrystal: Release rate and oral bioavailability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Li, Jin-Mei; Lai, Zhi-Hui; Wu, Jun; Lu, Tong-Bu; Chen, Jia-Mei

    2017-11-15

    Both cocrystal and nanocrystal technologies have been widely used in the pharmaceutical development for poorly soluble drugs. However, the synergistic effects due to the integration of these two technologies have not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to develop a nano-sized cocrystal of phenazopyridine (PAP) with phthalimide (PI) to enhance the release rate and oral bioavailability of PAP. A PAP-PI nano-cocrystal with particle diameter of 21.4±0.1nm was successfully prepared via a sonochemical approach and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis. An in vitro release study revealed a significant release rate enhancement for PAP-PI nano-cocrystal as compared to PAP-PI cocrystal and PAP hydrochloride salt. Further, a comparative oral bioavailability study in rats indicated significant improvement in C max and oral bioavailability (AUC 0-∞ ) by 1.39- and 2.44-fold, respectively. This study demonstrated that this novel nano-cocrystal technology can be a new promising option to improve release rate and absorption of poorly soluble compounds in the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioavailability enhancement of coenzyme Q10: an extensive review of patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Sarwar; Javed, Shamama; Kohli, Kanchan

    2010-11-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a major antioxidant principle found in human body which plays a vital role in maintaining several biochemical pathways of body. It acts as a potential mediator in transferring electrons in oxidoreductive reactions of electron transport chain. Chemically, it is a basic quinone containing moiety having a large and high molecular weight structure. Deficiency of this in body leads to several potential disorders like dysfunctions in cellular energetics, neurological degeneration, higher oxidative stress induced damage, breast cancer etc. The high molecular weight and lipophilicity of CoQ10 makes it poorly water soluble and consequently leads to low systemic availability. Several advancements have been made to enhance the bioavailability of CoQ10 using various approaches like size reduction, solubility enhancement (by solid dispersion, prodrug, complexation, ionization) and use of novel drug carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions and self-emulsifying system. The primary objective of the present review is to assemble patents representing the various approaches used for enhancement of CoQ10 bioavailability.

  4. 21 CFR 320.38 - Retention of bioavailability samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention of bioavailability samples. 320.38... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOEQUIVALENCE REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Determining the Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.38 Retention of bioavailability samples...

  5. Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Lipiński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways – heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S] – is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  6. [Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiński, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał R; Styś, Agnieszka; Gajowiak, Anna; Staroń, Robert

    2014-01-02

    Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways--heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S])--is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis) as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  7. Determination of natural organic matter and iron binding capacity in fen samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Stefan; Cooper, Rebecca E.; Frieder Mohr, Jan; Wichard, Thomas; Küsel, Kirsten

    2017-04-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) plays an important role in ecosystem processes such as soil carbon stabilization, nutrient availability and metal complexation. Iron-NOM-complexes, for example, are known to increase the solubility and, as a result, the bioavailability of iron in natural environments leading to several effects on the microbial community. Due to the various functions of NOM in natural environments, there is a high level of interest in the characterization of the molecular composition. The complexity of NOM presents a significant challenge in the elucidation of its composition. However, the development and utilization of high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) as a tool to detect single compounds in complex samples has spearheaded the effort to elucidate the composition of NOM. Over the past years, the accuracy of ion cyclotron- or Orbitrap mass spectrometers has increased dramatically resulting in the possibility to obtain a mass differentiation of the large number of compounds in NOM. Together these tools provide significant and powerful insight into the molecular composition of NOM. In the current study, we aim to understand abiotic and biotic interactions between NOM and metals, such as iron, found in the Schlöppnerbrunnen fen (Fichtelgebirge, Germany) and how these interactions impact the microbial consortia. We characterized the dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as basic chemical parameters in the iron-rich (up to 20 mg (g wt peat)-1), slightly acidic (pH 4.8) fen to gain more information about DOM-metal interactions. This minerotrophic peatland connected to the groundwater has received Fe(II) released from the surrounding soils in the Lehstenbach catchment. Absorption spectroscopy (AAS), differential pulse polarography (DPP) and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-Orbitrap-MS) was applied to characterize the molecular composition of DOM in the peat water extract (PWE). We identified typical patterns for DOM

  8. Evaluation of trace metals bioavailability in Japanese river waters using DGT and a chemical equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuping; Naito, Wataru; Hanai, Yoshimichi; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2013-09-15

    To develop efficient and effective methods of assessing and managing the risk posed by metals to aquatic life, it is important to determine the effects of water chemistry on the bioavailability of metals in surface water. In this study, we employed the diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) to determine the bioavailability of metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb) in Japanese water systems. The DGT results were compared with a chemical equilibrium model (WHAM 7.0) calculation to examine its robustness and utility to predict dynamic metal speciation. The DGT measurements showed that biologically available fractions of metals in the rivers impacted by mine drainage and metal industries were relatively high compared with those in urban rivers. Comparison between the DGT results and the model calculation indicated good agreement for Zn. The model calculation concentrations for Ni and Cu were higher than the DGT concentrations at most sites. As for Pb, the model calculation depended on whether the precipitated iron(III) hydroxide or precipitated aluminum(III) hydroxide was assumed to have an active surface. Our results suggest that the use of WHAM 7.0 combined with the DGT method can predict bioavailable concentrations of most metals (except for Pb) with reasonable accuracy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Sequential Proton Loss Electron Transfer in Deactivation of Iron(IV) Binding Protein by Tyrosine Based Food Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    The iron(IV) binding protein ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)=O, was found to be reduced by tyrosine based food components in aqueous solution through a sequential proton loss electron transfer reaction mechanism without binding to the protein as confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Dopamine a...

  10. Assessing the relative bioavailability of DOC in regional groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; McMahon, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the degree to which a hyperbolic relationship exists between concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) in groundwater may indicate the relative bioavailability of DOC. This hypothesis was examined for 73 different regional aquifers of the United States using 7745 analyses of groundwater compiled by the National Water Assessment (NAWQA) program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The relative reaction quotient (RRQ), a measure of the curvature of DOC concentrations plotted versus DO concentrations and regressed to a decaying hyperbolic equation, was used to assess the relative bioavailability of DOC. For the basalt aquifer of Oahu, Hawaii, RRQ values were low (0.0013 mM−2), reflecting a nearly random relationship between DOC and DO concentrations. In contrast, on the island of Maui, treated sewage effluent injected into a portion of the basalt aquifer resulted in pronounced hyperbolic DOC-DO behavior and a higher RRQ (142 mM−2). RRQ values for the 73 aquifers correlated positively with mean concentrations of ammonia, dissolved iron, and manganese, and correlated negatively with mean pH. This indicates that greater RRQ values are associated with greater concentrations of the final products of microbial reduction reactions. RRQ values and DOC concentrations were negatively correlated with the thickness of the unsaturated zone (UNST) and depth to the top of the screened interval. Finally, RRQ values were positively correlated with mean annual precipitation (MAP), and the highest observed RRQ values were associated with aquifers receiving MAP rates ranging between 900 and 1300 mm/year. These results are uniformly consistent with the hypothesis that the hyperbolic behavior of DOC-DO plots, as quantified by the RRQ metric, can be an indicator of relative DOC bioavailability in groundwater systems.

  11. Assessing the relative bioavailability of DOC in regional groundwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H; Bradley, Paul M; Journey, Celeste A; McMahon, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the degree to which a hyperbolic relationship exists between concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) in groundwater may indicate the relative bioavailability of DOC. This hypothesis was examined for 73 different regional aquifers of the United States using 7745 analyses of groundwater compiled by the National Water Assessment (NAWQA) program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The relative reaction quotient (RRQ), a measure of the curvature of DOC concentrations plotted versus DO concentrations and regressed to a decaying hyperbolic equation, was used to assess the relative bioavailability of DOC. For the basalt aquifer of Oahu, Hawaii, RRQ values were low (0.0013 mM(-2)), reflecting a nearly random relationship between DOC and DO concentrations. In contrast, on the island of Maui, treated sewage effluent injected into a portion of the basalt aquifer resulted in pronounced hyperbolic DOC-DO behavior and a higher RRQ (142 mM(-2)). RRQ values for the 73 aquifers correlated positively with mean concentrations of ammonia, dissolved iron, and manganese, and correlated negatively with mean pH. This indicates that greater RRQ values are associated with greater concentrations of the final products of microbial reduction reactions. RRQ values and DOC concentrations were negatively correlated with the thickness of the unsaturated zone (UNST) and depth to the top of the screened interval. Finally, RRQ values were positively correlated with mean annual precipitation (MAP), and the highest observed RRQ values were associated with aquifers receiving MAP rates ranging between 900 and 1300 mm/year. These results are uniformly consistent with the hypothesis that the hyperbolic behavior of DOC-DO plots, as quantified by the RRQ metric, can be an indicator of relative DOC bioavailability in groundwater systems. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Mende, Daniel R.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Saito, Mak A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-12-01

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1-2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle.

  13. Electronic and spatial structures of water-soluble dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands underlying their ability to act as nitric oxide and nitrosonium ion donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, Anatoly F; Burbaev, Dosymzhan Sh

    2011-01-01

    The ability of mononuclear dinitrosyl iron commplexes (M-DNICs) with thiolate ligands to act as NO donors and to trigger S-nitrosation of thiols can be explain only in the paradigm of the model of the [Fe(+)(NO(+))(2)] core ({Fe(NO)(2)}(7) according to the Enemark-Feltham classification). Similarly, the {(RS(-))(2)Fe(+)(NO(+))(2)}(+) structure describing the distribution of unpaired electron density in M-DNIC corresponds to the low-spin (S = 1/2) state with a d(7) electron configuration of the iron atom and predominant localization of the unpaired electron on MO(d(z2)) and the square planar structure of M-DNIC. On the other side, the formation of molecular orbitals of M-DNIC including orbitals of the iron atom, thiolate and nitrosyl ligands results in a transfer of electron density from sulfur atoms to the iron atom and nitrosyl ligands. Under these conditions, the positive charge on the nitrosyl ligands diminishes appreciably, the interaction of the ligands with hydroxyl ions or with thiols slows down and the hydrolysis of nitrosyl ligands and the S-nitrosating effect of the latter are not manifested. Most probably, the S-nitrosating effect of nitrosyl ligands is a result of weak binding of thiolate ligands to the iron atom under conditions favoring destabilization of M-DNIC.

  14. Soluble iron nutrients in Saharan dust over the central Amazon rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Joana A.; Barbosa, Cybelli G. G.; Borillo, Guilherme C.; Godoi, Ana F. L.; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Andreoli, Rita V.; Manzi, Antônio O.; Sá, Marta O.; Alves, Eliane G.; Pöhlker, Christopher; Angelis, Isabella H.; Ditas, Florian; Saturno, Jorge; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Rosário, Nilton E.; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Santos, Rosa M. N.; Yamamoto, Carlos I.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Artaxo, Paulo; Taylor, Philip E.; Godoi, Ricardo H. M.

    2017-02-01

    The intercontinental transport of aerosols from the Sahara desert plays a significant role in nutrient cycles in the Amazon rainforest, since it carries many types of minerals to these otherwise low-fertility lands. Iron is one of the micronutrients essential for plant growth, and its long-range transport might be an important source for the iron-limited Amazon rainforest. This study assesses the bioavailability of iron Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the particulate matter over the Amazon forest, which was transported from the Sahara desert (for the sake of our discussion, this term also includes the Sahel region). The sampling campaign was carried out above and below the forest canopy at the ATTO site (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), a near-pristine area in the central Amazon Basin, from March to April 2015. Measurements reached peak concentrations for soluble Fe(III) (48 ng m-3), Fe(II) (16 ng m-3), Na (470 ng m-3), Ca (194 ng m-3), K (65 ng m-3), and Mg (89 ng m-3) during a time period of dust transport from the Sahara, as confirmed by ground-based and satellite remote sensing data and air mass backward trajectories. Dust sampled above the Amazon canopy included primary biological aerosols and other coarse particles up to 12 µm in diameter. Atmospheric transport of weathered Saharan dust, followed by surface deposition, resulted in substantial iron bioavailability across the rainforest canopy. The seasonal deposition of dust, rich in soluble iron, and other minerals is likely to assist both bacteria and fungi within the topsoil and on canopy surfaces, and especially benefit highly bioabsorbent species. In this scenario, Saharan dust can provide essential macronutrients and micronutrients to plant roots, and also directly to plant leaves. The influence of this input on the ecology of the forest canopy and topsoil is discussed, and we argue that this influence would likely be different from that of nutrients from the weathered Amazon bedrock, which otherwise provides the

  15. Bioavailability in the boris assessment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norden, M.; Avila, R.; Gonze, M.A.; Tamponnet, C.

    2004-01-01

    The fifth framework EU project BORIS (Bioavailability Of Radionuclides In Soils: role of biological components and resulting improvement of prediction models) has three scientific objectives. The first is to improve understanding of the mechanisms governing the transfer of radionuclides to plants. The second is to improve existing predictive models of radionuclide interaction with soils by incorporating the knowledge acquired from the experimental results. The last and third objective is to extract from the experimental results some scientific basis for the development of bioremediation methods of radionuclides contaminated soils and to apprehend the role of additional non-radioactive pollutants on radionuclide bio-availability. This paper is focused on the second objective. The purpose of the BORIS assessment model is to describe the behaviour of radionuclides in the soil-plant system with the aim of making predictions of the time dynamics of the bioavailability of radionuclides in soil and the radionuclides concentrations in plants. To be useful the assessment model should be rather simple and use only a few parameters, which are commonly available or possible to measure for different sites. The model shall take into account, as much as possible, the results of the experimental studies and the mechanistic models developed in the BORIS project. One possible approach is to introduce in the assessment model a quantitative relationship between bioavailability of the radionuclides in soil and the soil properties. To do this an operational definition of bioavailability is needed. Here operational means experimentally measurable, directly or indirectly, and that the bioavailability can be translated into a mathematical expression. This paper describes the reasoning behind the chosen definition of bioavailability for the assessment model, how to derive operational expressions for the bioavailability and how to use them in the assessment model. (author)

  16. Bioavailability of intranasal metoclopramide.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, M J; Buss, D C; Ellershaw, J; Nash, A; Routledge, P A

    1989-01-01

    After intranasal administration of metoclopramide, (5 mg in 0.5 ml sterile water) the maximum plasma concentration of 13.5 +/- 7.3 (mean +/- s.d.) ng ml-1 was achieved. Absolute bioavailability was 50.5 +/- 29.5%, 110 +/- 41 min later. We conclude that the intranasal route does not allow rapid absorption of the drug and is not associated with greater bioavailability than the oral route.

  17. Is iron a limiting factor of Nodularia spumigena blooms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Paczuska

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a deficiency of iron, a trace element essential to every living organism, limits the growth of algae and cyanobacteria. Nodularia spumigena Mertens is a blue-green algae species inhabiting the Baltic region that often forms toxic blooms.     The aim of the study was to assess the growth of the toxic cyanobacteria with respect to iron bioavailability. The measured growth parameters were the numbers of cells (optical density, chlorophyll a and pheopigment a concentrations. The iron concentrations used ranged from 10-7 to 10-4 mol dm-3. Under iron stress conditions (<5 × 10-7 mol dm-3, growth inhibition, gradual pigment decay and cell mortality were observed. However, enriching the medium with complexing factors like citric acid and EDTA significantly stimulated the growth rate and chlorophyll a production. The citric acid - EDTA - Fe (5 × 10-7 mol dm-3 complex was demonstrably effective in stimulating the rate of cell division. Starting with 10-6 mol dm-3, the higher the iron(III concentration used in the media, the more intensive the growth of the cyanobacteria populations. This was most rapid in the presence of high iron concentrations (10-4 mol dm-3, regardless of the presence of complexing agents.     It appears that the growth of toxic cyanobacteria N. spumigena, and thus also its ability to form blooms, may well depend on iron availability in the environment.

  18. Bioavailability of metals-trace in sediments: a review; Biodisponibilidade de metais-traco em sedimentos: uma revisao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Rafaela E. de A.V.; Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Lima, Vanessa Lemos de; Hazin, Clovis Abrahao, E-mail: rafaelarodriguesss@hotmail.com, E-mail: vlsouza@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: lemos.nessa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The chemical association of metals in sediments provides an indication of its release by physical, chemical and biological processes, with toxic effects under certain environmental conditions. Knowing about their chemical bonds in sediments, can recognize specific sources of pollution, and speciation of trace metals is important for bioavailability and toxicity to animals and plants. The accumulation of these particles in the sediment occur by the following mechanisms: a) adsorption to the finest particles; b) precipitating of the element in the form of compounds; c) co-precipitating of the element with iron and manganese oxides; d) complexation with organic matter; e) incorporation into the crystal lattice of minerals. Currently, five phases are considered when studying the bioavailability of trace elements in sediments: a) the exchangeable phase, MgCl{sub 2} (causes saltiness change); b) leachable phase, (acetic acid causes pH change); c) reducible phase (hydroxylamine hydrochloride causes release of the bound metals linked to Fe and Mn oxides); d) oxidized phase, the peroxide hydrogen (cause the degradation of organic matter); e) the residual pseudo-phase, the aqua regia (cause release of metals associated to minerals). The first three phases are considered the most bioavailable. In the last two fractions, the metals are linked to sediment constituents and not bioavailable. The organic phase is relatively stable and the metal present therein are removed under oxidative conditions. Metals present in the pseudo-phase residual measure the degree of environmental pollution, since great amount of metals at this stage indicates a lower degree of pollution.

  19. Inflammation and ER Stress Downregulate BDH2 Expression and Dysregulate Intracellular Iron in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu M. Zughaier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play a very important role in host defense and in iron homeostasis by engulfing senescent red blood cells and recycling iron. Hepcidin is the master iron regulating hormone that limits dietary iron absorption from the gut and limits iron egress from macrophages. Upon infection macrophages retain iron to limit its bioavailability which limits bacterial growth. Recently, a short chain butyrate dehydrogenase type 2 (BDH2 protein was reported to contain an iron responsive element and to mediate cellular iron trafficking by catalyzing the synthesis of the mammalian siderophore that binds labile iron; therefore, BDH2 plays a crucial role in intracellular iron homeostasis. However, BDH2 expression and regulation in macrophages have not yet been described. Here we show that LPS-induced inflammation combined with ER stress led to massive BDH2 downregulation, increased the expression of ER stress markers, upregulated hepcidin expression, downregulated ferroportin expression, caused iron retention in macrophages, and dysregulated cytokine release from macrophages. We also show that ER stress combined with inflammation synergistically upregulated the expression of the iron carrier protein NGAL and the stress-inducible heme degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 leading to iron liberation. This is the first report to show that inflammation and ER stress downregulate the expression of BDH2 in human THP-1 macrophages.

  20. Egg Yolk Protein Delays Recovery while Ovalbumin Is Useful in Recovery from Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Kobayashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein is a main nutrient involved in overall iron metabolism in vivo. In order to assess the prevention of iron deficiency anemia (IDA by diet, it is necessary to confirm the influence of dietary protein, which coexists with iron, on iron bioavailability. We investigated the usefulness of the egg structural protein in recovery from IDA. Thirty-one female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a control group (n = 6 fed a casein diet (4.0 mg Fe/100 g for 42 days and an IDA model group (n = 25 created by feeding a low-iron casein diet (LI, 0.4 mg Fe/100 g for 21 days and these IDA rats were fed normal iron diet with different proteins from eggs for another 21 days. The IDA rats were further divided into four subgroups depending on the proteins fed during the last 21 days, which were those with an egg white diet (LI-W, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6, those with an ovalbumin diet (LI-A, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 7, those with an egg yolk-supplemented diet (LI-Y, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6, and the rest with a casein diet (LI-C, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6. In the LI-Y group, recovery of the hematocrit, hemoglobin, transferrin saturation level and the hepatic iron content were delayed compared to the other groups (p < 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively, resulting in no recovery from IDA at the end of the experimental period. There were no significant differences in blood parameters in the LI-W and LI-A groups compared to the control group. The hepatic iron content of the LI-W and LI-A groups was higher than that of the LI-C group (p < 0.05. We found that egg white protein was useful for recovery from IDA and one of the efficacious components was ovalbumin, while egg yolk protein delayed recovery of IDA. This study demonstrates, therefore, that bioavailability of dietary iron varies depending on the source of dietary protein.

  1. Carboxylated mesoporous carbon microparticles as new approach to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble carvedilol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhi, Zhizhuang; Li, Xue; Gao, Jian; Song, Yaling

    2013-09-15

    The main objective of this study was to develop carboxylated ordered mesoporous carbon microparticles (c-MCMs) loaded with a poorly water-soluble drug, intended to be orally administered, able to enhance the drug loading capacity and improve the oral bioavailability. A model drug, carvedilol (CAR), was loaded onto c-MCMs via a procedure involving a combination of adsorption equilibrium and solvent evaporation. The physicochemical properties of the drug-loaded composites were systematically studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and HPLC. It was found that c-MCM has a high drug loading level up to 41.6%, and higher than that of the mesoporous silica template. Incorporation of CAR in both drug carriers enhanced the solubility and dissolution rate of the drug, compared to the pure crystalline drug. After loading CAR into c-MCMs, its oral bioavailability was compared with the marketed product in dogs. The results showed that the bioavailability of CAR was improved 179.3% compared with that of the commercial product when c-MCM was used as the drug carrier. We believe that the present study will help in the design of oral drug delivery systems for enhanced oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electron beam test of an iron/gas calorimeter based on ceramic parallel plate chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefiev, A.; Bencze, Gy.L.; Bizzeti, A.; Choumilov, E.; Civinini, C; Dalla Santa, F.; D'Alessandro, R.; Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M.C.; Herve, A.; Iglesias, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Josa, M.I.; Maggi, F.; Malinin, A.; Meschini, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Radermacher, E.; Salicio, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The baseline option for the very forward calorimetry in the CMS experiment is an iron/gas calorimeter based on parallel plate chambers. A small prototype module of such a calorimeter, has been tested using electrons of 5 to 100 GeV/c momentum with various high voltages and two gases: CO2 (100%) and CF4/CO2 (80/20), at atmospheric pressure. The collected charge has been measured as a function of the high voltage and of the electron energy. The energy resolution has also been measured. Comparisons have been made with Monte-Carlo predictions. Agreement between data an simulation allows to make and estimation of the expected performance of a full size calorimeter. (Author) 23 refs

  3. Electron beam test of an iron/gas calorimeter based on ceramic parallel plate chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefiev, A.; Bencze, G.L.; Bizzeti, A.; choumilov, E.; Civinini, C.; Dalla Santa, F.; D'Alessandro, R.; Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M.C.; Herve, A.; Iglesias, A.; Ivochkin, V.; Josa, M.I.; Maggi, F.; Malininin, A.; Meschini, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Radermacher, E.; Salicio, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    The baseline option for the very forward calorimetry in the CMS experiment is an iron/gas calorimeter based on parallel plate chambers. A small prototype module of such a calorimeter, has been tested using electrons of 5 to 100 GeV/c momentum with various high voltages and two gases: CO 2 (100%) and CF 4 /CO 2 (80/20), at atmospheric pressure. The collected charge has been measured as a function of the high voltage and of the electron energy. The energy resolution has also been measured. Comparisons have been made with Monte-Carlo predictions. Agreement between data an simulation allows to make and estimation of the expected performance of a full size calorimeter. (Author)

  4. Iron oxide minerals in dust-source sediments from the Bodélé Depression, Chad: Implications for radiative properties and Fe bioavailability of dust plumes from the Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Bruce M; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Beroquo, Thelma; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Bristow, Charlie S

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust can influence climate and biogeochemical cycles. An important component of mineral dust is ferric oxide minerals (hematite and goethite) which have been shown to influence strongly the optical properties of dust plumes and thus affect the radiative forcing of global dust. Here we report on the iron mineralogy of dust-source samples from the Bodélé Depression (Chad, north-central Africa), which is estimated to be Earth’s most prolific dust producer and may be a key contributor to the global radiative budget of the atmosphere as well as to long-range nutrient transport to the Amazon Basin. By using a combination of magnetic property measurements, Mössbauer spectroscopy, reflectance spectroscopy, chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy, we document the abundance and relative amounts of goethite, hematite, and magnetite in dust-source samples from the Bodélé Depression. The partition between hematite and goethite is important to know to improve models for the radiative effects of ferric oxide minerals in mineral dust aerosols. The combination of methods shows (1) the dominance of goethite over hematite in the source sediments, (2) the abundance and occurrences of their nanosize components, and (3) the ubiquity of magnetite, albeit in small amounts. Dominant goethite and subordinate hematite together compose about 2% of yellow-reddish dust-source sediments from the Bodélé Depression and contribute strongly to diminution of reflectance in bulk samples. These observations imply that dust plumes from the Bodélé Depression that are derived from goethite-dominated sediments strongly absorb solar radiation. The presence of ubiquitous magnetite (0.002–0.57 wt%) is also noteworthy for its potentially higher solubility relative to ferric oxide and for its small sizes, including PM bioavailability to marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

  5. Freezing-Enhanced Dissolution of Iron Oxides: Effects of Inorganic Acid Anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daun; Kim, Kitae; Min, Dae Wi; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-11-03

    Dissolution of iron from mineral dust particles greatly depends upon the type and amount of copresent inorganic anions. In this study, we investigated the roles of sulfate, chloride, nitrate, and perchlorate on the dissolution of maghemite and lepidocrocite in ice under both dark and UV irradiation and compared the results with those of their aqueous counterparts. After 96 h of reaction, the total dissolved iron in ice (pH 3 before freezing) was higher than that in the aqueous phase (pH 3) by 6-28 times and 10-20 times under dark and UV irradiation, respectively. Sulfuric acid was the most efficient in producing labile iron under dark condition, whereas hydrochloric acid induced the most dissolution of the total and ferrous iron in the presence of light. This ice-induced dissolution result was also confirmed with Arizona Test Dust (AZTD). In the freeze-thaw cycling test, the iron oxide samples containing chloride, nitrate, or perchlorate showed a similar extent of total dissolved iron after each cycling while the sulfate-containing sample rapidly lost its dissolution activity with repeating the cycle. This unique phenomenon observed in ice might be related to the freeze concentration of protons, iron oxides, and inorganic anions in the liquid-like ice grain boundary region. These results suggest that the ice-enhanced dissolution of iron oxides can be a potential source of bioavailable iron, and the acid anions critically influence this process.

  6. Heat capacity and solid solubility of iron in scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, T.-W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The maximum solid solubility of iron in scandium was determined to be between 50 and 85 at.ppm in the as-cast condition. As the concentration of iron increases, it segregates along the grain boundary, as is evident from optical metallography and electron microprobe examinations. Annealing also causes the iron dissolved in scandium to separate out and cluster along the grain boundary. Heat capacity measurements show an anomaly in the C/T versus T 2 plots for iron concentrations of 19 at.ppm or greater. For iron dissolved in solid scandium the excess entropy due to the iron impurity is in agreement with the theoretical prediction of ck ln(2S + 1) for an impurity-conduction electron (Kondo) interaction, but is 4 - 8 times larger than the theoretical prediction when iron segregates along the grain boundary. Furthermore, our results suggest that most of the previously reported low temperature physical properties of scandium are probably in error because of either iron impurity-conduction electron interactions or Fe-Fe interactions in the precipitated second-phase Sc-Fe compound. (Auth.)

  7. Effect of taste masking technology on fast dissolving oral film: dissolution rate and bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; You, Xinru; Huang, Keqing; Raza, Faisal; Lu, Xin; Chen, Yuejian; Dhinakar, Arvind; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Yang; Wu, Jun; Ge, Liang

    2018-07-01

    Fast dissolving oral film is a stamp-style, drug-loaded polymer film with rapid disintegration and dissolution. This new kind of drug delivery system requires effective taste masking technology. Suspension intermediate and liposome intermediate were prepared, respectively, for the formulation of two kinds of fast dissolving oral films with the aim of studying the effect of taste masking technology on the bioavailability of oral films. Loratadine was selected as the model drug. The surface pH of the films was close to neutral, avoiding oral mucosal irritation or side effects. The thickness of a 2 cm × 2 cm suspension oral film containing 10 mg of loratadine was 100 μm. Electron microscope analysis showed that liposomes were spherical before and after re-dissolution, and drugs with obvious bitterness could be masked by the encapsulation of liposomes. Dissolution of the two films was superior to that of the commercial tablets. Rat pharmacokinetic experiments showed that the oral bioavailability of the suspension film was significantly higher than that of the commercial tablets, and the relative bioavailability of the suspension film was 175%. Liposomal film produced a certain amount of improvement in bioavailability, but lower than that of the suspension film.

  8. Beta transmutations in apatites with ferric iron as an electron acceptor - implication for nuclear waste form development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ge; Zhang, Zelong; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-09-27

    Apatite-structured materials have been considered for the immobilization of a number of fission products from reprocessing nuclear fuel because of their chemical durability as well as compositional and structural flexibility. It is hypothesized that the effect of beta decay on the stability can be mitigated by introducing an appropriate electron acceptor at the neighboring sites in the structure. The decay series 137 Cs → 137 Ba and 90 Sr → 90 Y → 90 Zr were investigated using a spin-polarized DFT approach to test the hypothesis. Apatites with compositions of Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 F 2 and Ca 4 Y 6 (SiO 4 ) 6 F 2 were selected as model systems for the incorporation of radionuclides Cs and Sr, respectively. Ferric iron was introduced in the structure as an electron acceptor. Electron density of states, crystal and defect structures, and energies before and after beta decay were calculated. The calculated electron density of states suggests that the extra electron is localized at the ferric iron, which changes its oxidation state and becomes ferrous iron. The crystal and defect structures were analyzed based on the volume, lattice parameters, radial distribution functions, metal cation to coordinating oxygen distances, and the metaprism twist angle of the apatite crystal structure. The results show that there are minor changes in the crystal and defect structures of CsFeCa 8 (PO 4 ) 6 F 2 with Cs + and Fe 3+ substitutions undergoing the Cs → Ba transmutation, and of Ca 3 SrY 4 Fe 2 (SiO 4 ) 6 F 2 with Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ substitutions undergoing the Sr → Y → Zr transmutations. The last decay change, from Y 3+ → Zr 4+ , causes relatively larger changes in the local defect structure around Zr involving the coordination environment but the change is not significant to the crystal structure. The results on calculated cohesive energy suggest that the transmutations Cs + → Ba 2+ and Sr 2+ → Y 3+ → Zr 4+ in both apatite compositions are energetically favorable

  9. The bioavailability of oxalate from Oca (Oxalis tuberosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albihn, P B; Savage, G P

    2001-08-01

    It is believed that soluble oxalate has higher bioavailability than insoluble oxalate. Oca (Oxalis tuberosa) is moderately high in oxalate and contains oxalate in soluble form only. We estimated the bioavailability of oxalate in oca based on the urinary excretion of oxalate after oxalate loading with oca to estimate the bioavailability of oxalate in oca. We also clarified whether bioavailability differs in various oxalate loads from the same food source and studied the effect of an additional calcium source on the bioavailability of oxalate from oca. Four men and 4 women ingested 50, 100 and 150 gm. oca as well as 100 gm. oca with 100 gm. sour cream. Oxalate was measured in a 6-hour urine sample from each volunteer. The mean bioavailability of oxalate from oca plus or minus standard deviation was 1.44% +/- 1.31% during the 6-hour period after intake. There was no significant difference in oxalate bioavailability among oxalate intake levels in this study, although oca consumption with sour cream significantly decreased the uptake of oxalate (p oca appears to be similar to that in spinach. However, bioavailability varies among individuals and depends on other constituents of a combined meal.

  10. Iron phosphate nanoparticles for food fortification: Biological effects in rats and human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Moos, Lea M; Schneider, Mirjam; Hilty, Florentine M; Hilbe, Monika; Arnold, Myrtha; Ziegler, Nathalie; Mato, Diogo Sales; Winkler, Hans; Tarik, Mohamed; Ludwig, Christian; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Langhans, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Michael B; Sturla, Shana J; Trantakis, Ioannis A

    2017-05-01

    Nanotechnology offers new opportunities for providing health benefits in foods. Food fortification with iron phosphate nanoparticles (FePO 4 NPs) is a promising new approach to reducing iron deficiency because FePO 4 NPs combine high bioavailability with superior sensory performance in difficult to fortify foods. However, their safety remains largely untested. We fed rats for 90 days diets containing FePO 4 NPs at doses at which iron sulfate (FeSO 4 ), a commonly used food fortificant, has been shown to induce adverse effects. Feeding did not result in signs of toxicity, including oxidative stress, organ damage, excess iron accumulation in organs or histological changes. These safety data were corroborated by evidence that NPs were taken up by human gastrointestinal cell lines without reducing cell viability or inducing oxidative stress. Our findings suggest FePO 4 NPs appear to be as safe for ingestion as FeSO 4 .

  11. Curcumin-loaded self-nanomicellizing solid dispersion system: part I: development, optimization, characterization, and oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Ankit; Kathawala, Krishna; Song, Yunmei; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Garg, Sanjay

    2018-05-29

    Curcumin (CUR) is considered as one of the most bioactive molecules ever discovered from nature due to its proven anti-inflammatory and antioxidant in both preclinical and clinical studies. Despite its proven safety and efficacy, the clinical translation of CUR into a useful therapeutic agent is still limited due to its poor oral bioavailability. To overcome its limitation and enhance oral bioavailability by improving its aqueous solubility, stability, and intestinal permeability, a novel CUR formulation (NCF) was developed using the self-nanomicellizing solid dispersion strategy. From the initial screening of polymers for their potential to improve the solubility and stability, Soluplus (SOL) was selected. The optimized NCF demonstrated over 20,000-fold improvement in aqueous solubility as a result of amorphization, hydrogen bonding interaction, and micellization determined using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the greater stabilizing effect in alkaline pH and light was observed. Furthermore, significant enhancement of dissolution and permeability of CUR across everted sacs of rat small intestine were noticed. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the oral bioavailability of CUR was increased 117 and 17-fold in case of NCF and physical mixture of CUR and SOL compared to CUR suspension. These results suggest NCF identified as a promising new approach for repositioning of CUR for pharmaceutical application by enhancing the oral bioavailability of CUR. The findings herein stimulate further in vivo evaluations and clinical tests of NCF.

  12. [Assessment of nutritional education and iron supplement impact on prevention of pregnancy anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Beatriz Elena; Manjarrés, Luz Mariela; Gómez, Alba Lucía; Alzate, Dora María; Jaramillo, María Clemencia

    2005-06-01

    Iron and folic acid deficiencies are the major causes of health problems among pregnant women and children, with a significant negative impact on economic and social development. From April 2002 to April 2003 at the Gilberto Mejía Mejía Hospital (Rionegro, Antioquia), the prenatal program was assessed for its impact on a cohort of pregnant women concerning knowledge of the following nutritional parameters: iron and folic acid functions, their source foods and bioavailability, supplement intake and tolerance, and globular indexes. A sample of 42 pregnant women was subjected to a nutritional education program along with the administration of a supplement consisting of 60 mg elemental iron, 400 microg folic acid, and 70 mg vitamin C. This formulation was prepared specifically for the study by Laboratorio Profesional Farmacéutico, LAPROFF. The effect of the educational program was measured by knowledge changes about how patient behaviours affect nutrient bioavailability via source foods intake, as well as recognition of the tolerance limits of supplements and potential effect of non-adherance. The physiological status of each patient was measured by three hematologic variables--hemoglobin, hematocrit, and ferritin. A positive understanding of how to improve nutritional practices was observed. With the supplements, 94.4% of women did not show anaemia at the end of pregnancy. These results agree with those in other, similar populations and indicate that implementation of prenatal control programs by educational and supplement administration is worthwhile.

  13. Bioavailability of mineral-bound iron to a snow algae-bacteria co-culture and implications for albedo-altering snow algae blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Z R; Hausrath, E M; Garcia, A H; Murray, A E; Tschauner, O; Raymond, J; Huang, S

    2018-01-26

    Snow algae can form large-scale blooms across the snowpack surface and near-surface environments. These pigmented blooms can decrease snow albedo, increase local melt rates, and may impact the global heat budget and water cycle. Yet, underlying causes for the geospatial occurrence of these blooms remain unconstrained. One possible factor contributing to snow algae blooms is the presence of mineral dust as a micronutrient source. We investigated the bioavailability of iron (Fe) -bearing minerals, including forsterite (Fo 90 , Mg 1.8 Fe 0.2 SiO 4 ), goethite, smectite and pyrite as Fe sources for a Chloromonas brevispina - bacteria co-culture through laboratory-based experimentation. Fo 90 was capable of stimulating snow algal growth and increased the algal growth rate in otherwise Fe-depleted co-cultures. Fo 90 -bearing systems also exhibited a decrease in bacteria:algae ratios compared to Fe-depleted conditions, suggesting a shift in microbial community structure. The C. brevispina co-culture also increased the rate of Fo 90 dissolution relative to an abiotic control. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes in the co-culture identified Gammaproteobacteria , Betaprotoeobacteria and Sphingobacteria , all of which are commonly found in snow and ice environments. Archaea were not detected. Collimonas and Pseudomonas , which are known to enhance mineral weathering rates, comprised two of the top eight (> 1 %) OTUs. These data provide unequivocal evidence that mineral dust can support elevated snow algae growth under otherwise Fe-depleted growth conditions, and that snow algae can enhance mineral dissolution under these conditions. IMPORTANCE Fe, a key micronutrient for photosynthetic growth, is necessary to support the formation of high-density snow algae blooms. The laboratory experiments described herein allow for a systematic investigation of snow algae-bacteria-mineral interactions and their ability to mobilize and uptake mineral-bound Fe. Results provide unequivocal and

  14. Avaliação por métodos in vitro e in vivo da biodisponibilidade de sulfato ferroso microencapsulado In vitro and in vivo evaluation of iron bioavailability from microencapsulated ferrous sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia Cocato

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar, por métodos in vitro e in vivo, a biodisponibilidade de uma nova forma de sulfato ferroso microencapsulado (genericamente denominado Ferlim, desenvolvido para a fortificação de alimentos, comparando-a com a de ferro eletrolítico (Fe0. MÉTODOS: A avaliação da dialisabilidade in vitro utilizou como matriz leite em pó reconstituído. A avaliação in vivo, utilizando o método de recuperação de hemoglobina em leitões anêmicos, teve duração de 13 dias e os animais (n=23 foram agrupados de acordo com o produto do peso (kg x hemoglobina (g/dL. Como controle foi utilizado FeSO4.7H2O. RESULTADOS: As porcentagens médias de ferro dialisado foram 2,2 (desvio-padrão=0,1%, 3,4 (desvio-padrão=0,1% e 3,6 (desvio-padrão=0,0% para FeSO4.7H2O, Ferlim e Fe0, respectivamente (p0,05. As porcentagens de absorção do valor biológico relativo do FeSO4.7H2O foram de 94,2 (desvio-padrão=23,8% para o grupo Ferlim e de 79,7 (desvio-padrão=26,6% para o grupo Fe0, sem diferenças significantes (p>0,05. Em valores numéricos (p>0,05, o grupo Fe0 apresentou menor média de absorção (% valor biológico relativo de concentração de ferro total, de ferro heme e não-heme no fígado. CONCLUSÃO: A microencapsulação do sulfato ferroso com alginato mantém sua biodisponibilidade, caracterizando-se como boa alternativa para a fortificação de misturas sólidas.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, by in vitro and in vivo methods, the bioavailability of a new microencapsulated ferrous sulfate (Ferlim developed for food fortification, and compare it with electrolytic iron (Fe0. METHODS: In vitro dialyzability assessment used reconstituted milk powder as matrix. In vivo assessment using the hemoglobin regeneration method in anemic piglets lasted for 13 days and the animals (n=23 were grouped according to the product of weight (kg x hemoglobin (g/dL. FeSO4.7H2O was used as control. RESULTS: The percentages of dialyzed iron were 2.2 (standard deviation=0

  15. The nanosphere iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these 'Mars-soil analogs' were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxyl mineral such as 'green rust', or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable meaghemite (gamma-Fe203) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (aplha-Fe203) by extensive heat treatment. Their chemical reactivity offers a plausible mechanism for the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxide and silicate phase surfaces. The mode of formation of these (nanophase) iron oxides on Mars is still unknown.

  16. Enhancement of dissolution and oral bioavailability of lacidipine via pluronic P123/F127 mixed polymeric micelles: formulation, optimization using central composite design and in vivo bioavailability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Ahmed R; ElMeshad, Aliaa N; Kassem, Mohamed A A

    2018-11-01

    This study aims at preparing and optimizing lacidipine (LCDP) polymeric micelles using thin film hydration technique in order to overcome LCDP solubility-limited oral bioavailability. A two-factor three-level central composite face-centered design (CCFD) was employed to optimize the formulation variables to obtain LCDP polymeric micelles of high entrapment efficiency and small and uniform particle size (PS). Formulation variables were: Pluronic to drug ratio (A) and Pluronic P123 percentage (B). LCDP polymeric micelles were assessed for entrapment efficiency (EE%), PS and polydispersity index (PDI). The formula with the highest desirability (0.959) was chosen as the optimized formula. The values of the formulation variables (A and B) in the optimized polymeric micelles formula were 45% and 80%, respectively. Optimum LCDP polymeric micelles had entrapment efficiency of 99.23%, PS of 21.08 nm and PDI of 0.11. Optimum LCDP polymeric micelles formula was physically characterized using transmission electron microscopy. LCDP polymeric micelles showed saturation solubility approximately 450 times that of raw LCDP in addition to significantly enhanced dissolution rate. Bioavailability study of optimum LCDP polymeric micelles formula in rabbits revealed a 6.85-fold increase in LCDP bioavailability compared to LCDP oral suspension.

  17. Atmospheric delivery of anthropogenic bioavailable iron from mineral dust to the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 彰記; 時, 宗波; ITO, Akinori; SHI, Zongbo

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic soluble iron (Fe) to the ocean has been suggested to modulate primary ocean productivity and thus indirectly affect the climate. A key process contributing to anthropogenic sources of soluble Fe is associated with air pollution, which acidifies Fe-containing mineral aerosols during their transport and leads to Fe transformation from insoluble to soluble forms. However, there is large uncertainty in our estimate of this anthropogenic soluble Fe. Here, we...

  18. Electronic and magnetic coupling of iron and copper phthalocyanine to ferromagnetic Co(100) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Felix; Sauther, Jens; Lach, Stefan; Ziegler, Christiane [Department of Physics, University of Kaiserslautern, Erwin Schroedinger Str. 56, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Ali, Ehesan; Oppeneer, Peter [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Box 530, Uppsala University, S-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Metallo-phthalocyanines are organic semiconductors which show in certain cases promising magnetic properties, advertising them for use in organic spintronics. Here, copper (CuPc) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) were grown on ultra thin layers of Co(100) substrates with well known highly spin-polarized electron injection capability. Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals different interactions between the pyrolytic nitrogen atoms and the cobalt surface for the two phthalocyanines. The analysis of the different multiplet structures appearing for the nitrogen core levels in the submonolayer regime and UPS investigations of the valence band electronic structure of the Co dominated region near the Fermi level indicates a particularly electronic coupling and a rehybridisation of the molecular orbitals with the cobalt orbitals. In order to clarify the influence of the two different central atoms on the electronic- and subsequently the magnetic coupling to the Co substrate, theoretical calculations using the GGA and GGA+U methodologies on a structure of Fe/Cu-phthalocyanine adsorbed on a 3-layered cobalt surface were performed indicating a ferromagnetic coupling between FePc and Co.

  19. Performance of Iron Plaque of Wetland Plants for Regulating Iron, Manganese, and Phosphorus from Agricultural Drainage Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural drainage water continues to impact watersheds and their receiving water bodies. One approach to mitigate this problem is to use surrounding natural wetlands. Our objectives were to determine the effect of iron (Fe-rich groundwater on phosphorus (P removal and nutrient absorption by the utilization of the iron plaque on the root surface of Glyceria spiculosa (Fr. Schmidt. Rosh. The experiment was comprised of two main factors with three regimes: Fe2+ (0, 1, 20, 100, 500 mg·L−1 and P (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 mg·L−1. The deposition and structure of iron plaque was examined through a scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. Iron could, however, also impose toxic effects on the biota. We therefore provide the scanning electron microscopy (SEM on iron plaques, showing the essential elements were iron (Fe, oxygen (O, aluminum (Al, manganese (Mn, P, and sulphur (S. Results showed that (1 Iron plaque increased with increasing Fe2+ supply, and P-deficiency promoted its formation; (2 Depending on the amount of iron plaque on roots, nutrient uptake was enhanced at low levels, but at higher levels, it inhibited element accumulation and translocation; (3 The absorption of manganese was particularly affected by iron plague, which also enhanced phosphorus uptake until the external iron concentration exceeded 100 mg·L−1. Therefore, the presence of iron plaque on the root surface would increase the uptake of P, which depends on the concentration of iron-rich groundwater.

  20. Bioavailability of voriconazole in hospitalised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veringa, Anette; Geling, Sanne; Span, Lambert F R; Vermeulen, Karin M; Zijlstra, Jan G; van der Werf, Tjip S; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    An important element in antimicrobial stewardship programmes is early switch from intravenous (i.v.) to oral antimicrobial treatment, especially for highly bioavailable drugs. The antifungal agent voriconazole is available both in i.v. and oral formulations and bioavailability is estimated to be

  1. Effect of taste masking technology on fast dissolving oral film: dissolution rate and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; You, Xinru; Huang, Keqing; Raza, Faisal; Lu, Xin; Chen, Yuejian; Dhinakar, Arvind; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Yang; Wu, Jun; Ge, Liang

    2018-07-27

    Fast dissolving oral film is a stamp-style, drug-loaded polymer film with rapid disintegration and dissolution. This new kind of drug delivery system requires effective taste masking technology. Suspension intermediate and liposome intermediate were prepared, respectively, for the formulation of two kinds of fast dissolving oral films with the aim of studying the effect of taste masking technology on the bioavailability of oral films. Loratadine was selected as the model drug. The surface pH of the films was close to neutral, avoiding oral mucosal irritation or side effects. The thickness of a 2 cm × 2 cm suspension oral film containing 10 mg of loratadine was 100 μm. Electron microscope analysis showed that liposomes were spherical before and after re-dissolution, and drugs with obvious bitterness could be masked by the encapsulation of liposomes. Dissolution of the two films was superior to that of the commercial tablets. Rat pharmacokinetic experiments showed that the oral bioavailability of the suspension film was significantly higher than that of the commercial tablets, and the relative bioavailability of the suspension film was 175%. Liposomal film produced a certain amount of improvement in bioavailability, but lower than that of the suspension film.

  2. The effects of iron fortification and supplementation on the gut microbiome and diarrhea in infants and children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Daniela; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2017-12-01

    In infants and young children in Sub-Saharan Africa, iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is common, and many complementary foods are low in bioavailable iron. In-home fortification of complementary foods using iron-containing micronutrient powders (MNPs) and oral iron supplementation are both effective strategies to increase iron intakes and reduce IDA at this age. However, these interventions produce large increases in colonic iron because the absorption of their high iron dose (≥12.5 mg) is typically iron supplements and iron fortification with MNPs on the gut microbiome and diarrhea. Iron-containing MNPs and iron supplements can modestly increase diarrhea risk, and in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that this occurs because increases in colonic iron adversely affect the gut microbiome in that they decrease abundances of beneficial barrier commensal gut bacteria (e.g., bifidobacteria and lactobacilli) and increase the abundance of enterobacteria including entropathogenic Escherichia coli These changes are associated with increased gut inflammation. Therefore, safer formulations of iron-containing supplements and MNPs are needed. To improve MNP safety, the iron dose of these formulations should be reduced while maximizing absorption to retain efficacy. Also, the addition of prebiotics to MNPs is a promising approach to mitigate the adverse effects of iron on the infant gut. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Bioavailability in ecological risk. Assessment for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Gilbin, R.; Della-Vedova, C.; Adam, C.; Simon, O.; Denison, F.; Beaugelin, K.

    2005-01-01

    The guidance for performing Ecological Risk Assessments (ERA) in Europe has been published in 2003 in the EC's Technical Guidance Document. This document constitutes the official reference in which current water quality standards and risk assessment approach for metals/metalloids are still mainly based on total or dissolved concentrations. However, it has been recognized that accurate assessment of the bio-available metal fraction is crucial, even if the way to incorporate bioavailability into these procedures is still under discussion. The speciation of a pollutant in the exposure medium is the first factor that regulates its bioavailability and consequently its bioaccumulation and the induced biological effects. Therefore, within any ecological risk assessment, bioavailability has obvious implications: firstly in exposure analysis which aim is to determine Predicted Exposure Concentration (PEC); secondly in effect analysis while deriving the so-called Predicted No-Effect Concentrations (PNEC) as toxicity is often linked to the amount of the contaminant incorporated into the tissues of biota. Similarities between metals/metalloids and radionuclides are limited to the biogeochemical behaviour of the element considered and to the need to use bioavailability models. In addition, for radionuclides, emitted ionising radiations (type and energy) need to be taken into account for both exposure and effect analyses whilst performing dosimetric calculations appropriate to the exposure scenarios. A methodology for properly implementing bioavailability models is explained and illustrated for aqueous U(VI), starting from a comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to environmentally-realistic physico-chemical conditions. Then, the use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of U(VI) is presented. Using a systematic approach, different bioavailability models of increasing complexity were tested to model U bio

  4. Publisher Correction: Recycled iron fuels new production in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Patrick A; Sigman, Daniel M; Mackey, Katherine R M

    2017-12-05

    The original version of this Article contained errors in Fig. 2b and Table 2. In Fig. 2b, the white circle labels were incorrectly positioned as they referred to scenarios that were used in an earlier version of the Article. In Table 2, the following three sentences were removed from the legend 'The last two calculations are discussed in the "Methods". The first assumes that all dissolved plus the ≈0.3 nmol kg -1 of particulate iron (measured in the eastern equatorial Pacific 30 ) is bioavailable. The last calculation assumes EUC dissolved iron concentrations from 140° W'. These errors have now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.

  5. A 1-h time interval between a meal containing iron and consumption of tea attenuates the inhibitory effects on iron absorption: a controlled trial in a cohort of healthy UK women using a stable iron isotope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Fuzi, Salma F; Koller, Dagmar; Bruggraber, Sylvaine; Pereira, Dora Ia; Dainty, Jack R; Mushtaq, Sohail

    2017-12-01

    Background: Tea has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of nonheme iron absorption, but it remains unclear whether the timing of tea consumption relative to a meal influences iron bioavailability. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a 1-h time interval of tea consumption on nonheme iron absorption in an iron-containing meal in a cohort of iron-replete, nonanemic female subjects with the use of a stable isotope ( 57 Fe). Design: Twelve women (mean ± SD age: 24.8 ± 6.9 y) were administered a standardized porridge meal extrinsically labeled with 4 mg 57 Fe as FeSO 4 on 3 separate occasions, with a 14-d time interval between each test meal (TM). The TM was administered with water (TM-1), with tea administered simultaneously (TM-2), and with tea administered 1 h postmeal (TM-3). Fasted venous blood samples were collected for iron isotopic analysis and measurement of iron status biomarkers. Fractional iron absorption was estimated by the erythrocyte iron incorporation method. Results: Iron absorption was 5.7% ± 8.5% (TM-1), 3.6% ± 4.2% (TM-2), and 5.7% ± 5.4% (TM-3). Mean fractional iron absorption was found to be significantly higher (2.2%) when tea was administered 1 h postmeal (TM-3) than when tea was administered simultaneously with the meal (TM-2) ( P = 0.046). An ∼50% reduction in the inhibitory effect of tea (relative to water) was observed, from 37.2% (TM-2) to 18.1% (TM-3). Conclusions: This study shows that tea consumed simultaneously with an iron-containing porridge meal leads to decreased nonheme iron absorption and that a 1-h time interval between a meal and tea consumption attenuates the inhibitory effect, resulting in increased nonheme iron absorption. These findings are not only important in relation to the management of iron deficiency but should also inform dietary advice, especially that given to those at risk of deficiency. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02365103. © 2017 American Society for

  6. Nanoparticulation improves bioavailability of Erlotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyung Mi; Shin, In Chul; Park, Joo Won; Kim, Kab-Sig; Kim, Dae Kyong; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Kunhong

    2017-09-01

    Nanoparticulation using fat and supercritical fluid (NUFS TM ) is a drug delivery platform technology enabling efficient and effective formulation of poorly soluble drugs. We performed experiments to examine whether NUFS™ could improve poor bioavailability and reduce fed-fasted bioavailability variances of erlotinib (Ert). NUFS-Ert was prepared using NUFS™ technology; its physical properties were characterized, and drug release was measured. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo efficacy tests and pharmacokinetic analysis were performed. NUFS-Ert nanoparticles had an average size of 250 nm and were stable for 2 months at 40 °C, 4 °C, and room temperature. The dissolution rate of NUFS-Ert increased in bio-relevant dissolution media. NUFS-Ert was more potent in inhibiting EGF signaling and in suppressing the proliferation of A549, a human non-small cell lung cancer cell line. Furthermore, A549 xenografts in BALB/c nude mice treated with NUFS-Ert regressed more efficiently than those in the mice treated with vehicle or Tarceva ® . In addition, experimental lung metastasis was more efficiently inhibited by NUFS-Ert than by Tarceva ® . The relative bioavailability of NUFS-Ert compared with that of Tarceva ® was 550% and the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of fed state to the AUC of fasted state was 1.8 for NUFS-Ert and 5.8 for Tarceva ® . NUFS-Ert could improve poor bioavailability and reduce fed-fasted bioavailability variances of Ert. NUFS-Ert was more efficacious than Tarceva ® .

  7. Bioavailability as an issue in risk assessment and management of food cadmium: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Philip G. [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58203 (United States)], E-mail: philip.reeves@ars.usda.gov; Chaney, Rufus L. [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Environmental Management and Byproduct Utilization Lab, Animal and Natural Resources Institute, Henry A. Wallace Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) from food is an important determinant of the potential risk of this toxic element. This review summarizes the effects of marginal deficiencies of the essential nutrients zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), and calcium (Ca) on the enhancement of absorption and organ accumulation and retention of dietary Cd in laboratory animals. These marginal deficiencies enhanced Cd absorption as much as ten-fold from diets containing low Cd concentrations similar to that consumed by some human populations, indicating that people who are nutritionally marginal with respect to Zn, Fe, and Ca are at higher risk of Cd disease than those who are nutritionally adequate. Results from these studies also suggest that the bioavailability of Cd is different for different food sources. This has implications for the design of food safety rules for Cd in that if the dietary source plays such a significant role in the risk of Cd, then different foods would require different Cd limits. Lastly, the importance of food-level exposures of Cd and other potentially toxic elements in the study of risk assessment are emphasized. Most foods contain low concentrations of Cd that are poorly absorbed, and it is neither relevant nor practical to use toxic doses of Cd in experimental diets to study food Cd risks. A more comprehensive understanding of the biochemistry involved in the bioavailability of Cd from foods would help resolve food safety questions and provide the support for a badly needed advance in international policies regarding Cd in crops and foods.

  8. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  9. Incorporation of Heavy metals bioavailability into risk characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Hyerim; Chung, Jae Shik; Nam, Taekwoo; Nam, Kyoungphile [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hee Sun [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The bioavailability of field-aged Cd and Cu was calculated, and compared to the total concentrations determined by acid digestion. Only 0.60-4.15% for Cd and 0.59-9.43% for Cu were found to be bioavailable when determined by stomach-phase extraction. The incorporation of bioavailability reduced more than 90% of the calculated risk of the metals at the site of study. It should be noted that such a reduction may not be generalized and the site-specific bioavailability needs to be determined case by case. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Bioavailability of indomethacin-saccharin cocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Sook; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Min-Soo; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Cho, Wonkyung; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Velaga, Sitaram P

    2010-11-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are new solid forms with physicochemical properties that appear promising for drug product development. However, the in-vivo bioavailability of cocrystals has rarely been addressed. The cocrystal of indomethacin (IND), a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II drug, with saccharin (SAC) has been shown to have higher solubility than IND at all pH. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the in-vitro dissolution and in-vivo bioavailability of IND-SAC cocrystals in comparison with IND in a physical mixture and the marketed product Indomee. Scale-up of the cocrystals was undertaken using cooling batch crystallisation without seeding. The chemical and physical purity of the up-scaled material was verified using high-performance liquid chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. The IND-SAC cocrystals and IND plus SAC were mixed with lactose and the formulations were placed into gelatin capsules. In-vitro dissolution studies were then performed using the rotating basket dissolution method. The intrinsic dissolution rate of IND and IND-SAC cocrystals was also determined. Finally, a bioavailability study for the formulations was conducted in beagle dogs. The plasma samples were analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography and the pharmacokinetic data were analysed using standard methodologies.   The bulk cocrystals (i.e. scaled-up material) were chemically and physically pure. The in-vitro dissolution rate of the cocrystals was higher than that of IND and similar to that of Indomee at pH 7.4 and pH 1.2. The in-vivo bioavailability of the IND-SAC cocrystals in dogs was significantly higher (ANOVA, P0.05). The study indicates that the improved aqueous solubility of the cocrystals leads to improved bioavailability of IND. Thus, the cocrystals are a viable alternative solid form that can improve the dissolution rate and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. © 2010 The Authors. JPP © 2010 Royal

  11. Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal-contaminated ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human health risk assessment. Physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants. Within a single sample, contamination may arise from multiple sources of toxic elements that may exist as different forms (species) which impact bioavailability. In turn, the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants has a direct impact on human health risk assessment and risk management practices. Novel research efforts focusing on development and application of in vitro and in vivo methods to measure the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metal contaminated soils have advanced in the past few years. The objective of this workshop was to focus on recent developments in assessing the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of arsenic contaminated soils, metal contamination in urban residences in Canada and potential children’s exposures to toxic elements in house dust, a community-based study known as the West Oakland Residential Lead Assessment , studies of the bioavailability of soil cadmium, chromium, nickel and mercury and human exposures to contaminated Brownfield soils. These presentations covered issues related to human health and bioavailability along with the most recent studies on community participation in assessing metal contamination, studies of exposures to residential contamination, and

  12. Heme iron content in lamb meat is differentially altered upon boiling, grilling, or frying as assessed by four distinct analytical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourkhalili, Azin; Mirlohi, Maryam; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron) in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC) were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experimental methods were compared regarding their compliance to Ferrozine method which was used for the determination of nonheme iron. Among three cooking methods, the lowest total iron and heme iron were found in boiling method. The heme iron proportions to the total iron in raw, boiled lamb meat and grilled, were counted as 65.70%, 67.75%, and 76.01%, receptively. Measuring the heme iron, the comparison of the methods in use showed that the method in which heme extraction solution was composed of 90% acetone, 18% water, and 2% hydrochloric acid was more appropriate and more correlated with the heme iron content calculated by the difference between total iron and nonheme iron.

  13. Heme Iron Content in Lamb Meat Is Differentially Altered upon Boiling, Grilling, or Frying as Assessed by Four Distinct Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Pourkhalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experimental methods were compared regarding their compliance to Ferrozine method which was used for the determination of nonheme iron. Among three cooking methods, the lowest total iron and heme iron were found in boiling method. The heme iron proportions to the total iron in raw, boiled lamb meat and grilled, were counted as 65.70%, 67.75%, and 76.01%, receptively. Measuring the heme iron, the comparison of the methods in use showed that the method in which heme extraction solution was composed of 90% acetone, 18% water, and 2% hydrochloric acid was more appropriate and more correlated with the heme iron content calculated by the difference between total iron and nonheme iron.

  14. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein ...

  15. Pharmaceutical and pharmacological approaches for bioavailability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much research has been done to determine drug–drug and herb–drug interactions for improving the bioavailability of etoposide. The present article gives insight on pharmaceutical and pharmacological attempts made from time to time to overcome the erratic inter- and intra-patient variability for improving the bioavailability ...

  16. Determination of metallic iron in sponge-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.S.

    1974-01-01

    The amount of metallic iron in sponge-iron is a parameter of major interest in the evaluation of the performance of the ore-reduction process and in the determination of the composition of the load of the electric furnace used to produce the steel. Moessbauer effect offers the promise of a simple and elegant analysis method, capable of competing directly with the usually time-consuming chemical procedures. The applicability of the method is considered and the possible sources of error are analyzed, resulting in the design of an instrument that is reasonably accurate and simple to use. Detailed electronic circuity required to produce a direct-reading digital instrument is shown [pt

  17. Trend overtime of total haemoglobin, iron metabolism and trace minerals in veal calves fed high amounts of two different solid feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lisa Stefani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty Polish Friesian veal calves were administrated high amounts of two different solid feeds (maize grain and a mix diet containing 10% of straw and 8% of soy in addition to the traditional milk replacer diet. Compared to the mix diet, maize grain had a lower content of iron, copper and zinc and a minor fibre level. Effects of the two diets on calves’ blood haemoglobin, iron, iron metabolism parameters, copper and zinc concentrations were studied. Haemoglobin concentration resulted higher at the end of the fattening for calves fed the mix diet, as expected. Values remained, however, within ranges that allowed acceptable carcass paleness. Haematic iron, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC and total iron binding capacity (TIBC levels were not significantly different between the two solid feeds. Lower copper and zinc blood concentrations resulted for calves fed the mix diet were likely due to the feed fibre interfering with the bioavailability of the two minerals, according to what happens for iron.

  18. Unraveling the electronic structures of low-valent naphthalene and anthracene iron complexes: X-ray, spectroscopic, and density functional theory studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnoeckelborg, E.M.; Khusniyarov, M.M.; de Bruin, B.; Hartl, F.; Langer, T.; Eul, M.; Schulz, S.; Poettgen, R.; Wolf, R.

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene and anthracene transition metalates are potent reagents, but their electronic structures have remained poorly explored. A study of four Cp*-substituted iron complexes (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) now gives rare insight into the bonding features of such species. The highly oxygen-

  19. Correlation effects in the iron pnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si Qimiao; Abrahams, Elihu; Dai Jianhui; Zhu Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here, we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, the single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared with the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V 2 O 3 or Se-doped NiS 2 , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analysis, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part of the excitation spectrum. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multiband matrix t-J 1 -J 2 model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

  20. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M. [Materials and Devices Group, Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism.

  1. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism

  2. When Density Functional Approximations Meet Iron Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yu; Liu, Xing-Wu; Huo, Chun-Fang; Guo, Wen-Ping; Cao, Dong-Bo; Peng, Qing; Dearden, Albert; Gonze, Xavier; Yang, Yong; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun; Li, Yongwang; Wen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-11

    Three density functional approximations (DFAs), PBE, PBE+U, and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid functional (HSE), were employed to investigate the geometric, electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of four iron oxides, namely, α-FeOOH, α-Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 , and FeO. Comparing our calculated results with available experimental data, we found that HSE (a = 0.15) (containing 15% "screened" Hartree-Fock exchange) can provide reliable values of lattice constants, Fe magnetic moments, band gaps, and formation energies of all four iron oxides, while standard HSE (a = 0.25) seriously overestimates the band gaps and formation energies. For PBE+U, a suitable U value can give quite good results for the electronic properties of each iron oxide, but it is challenging to accurately get other properties of the four iron oxides using the same U value. Subsequently, we calculated the Gibbs free energies of transformation reactions among iron oxides using the HSE (a = 0.15) functional and plotted the equilibrium phase diagrams of the iron oxide system under various conditions, which provide reliable theoretical insight into the phase transformations of iron oxides.

  3. Distribution and characterization of iron in implanted silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, J.; Romana, L.J.; Horton, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy-ion channeling (RBS-C) have been used to characterize single crystal α-silicon carbide implanted at room temperature with 160 keV 57 Fe ions to fluences of 1, 3, and 6 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Best correlations among AEM, RBS, and TRIM calculations were obtained assuming a density of the amorphized implanted regions equal to that of crystalline SiC. No iron-rich precipitates or clusters were detected by AEM. Inspection of the electron energy loss fine structure for iron in the implanted specimens suggests that the iron is not metallically-bonded, supporting conclusions from earlier conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) studies. In-situ annealing surprisingly resulted in crystallization at 600 degrees C with some redistribution of the implanted iron

  4. Aluminum bioavailability from tea infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, Robert A; Florence, Rebecca L

    2008-12-01

    The objective was to estimate oral Al bioavailability from tea infusion in the rat, using the tracer (26)Al. (26)Al citrate was injected into tea leaves. An infusion was prepared from the dried leaves and given intra-gastrically to rats which received concurrent intravenous (27)Al infusion. Oral Al bioavailability (F) was calculated from the area under the (26)Al, compared to (27)Al, serum concentration x time curves. Bioavailability from tea averaged 0.37%; not significantly different from water (F=0.3%), or basic sodium aluminum phosphate (SALP) in cheese (F=0.1-0.3%), but greater than acidic SALP in a biscuit (F=0.1%). Time to maximum serum (26)Al concentration was 1.25, 1.5, 8 and 4.8h, respectively. These results of oral Al bioavailability x daily consumption by the human suggest tea can provide a significant amount of the Al that reaches systemic circulation. This can allow distribution to its target organs of toxicity, the central nervous, skeletal and hematopoietic systems. Further testing of the hypothesis that Al contributes to Alzheimer's disease may be more warranted with studies focusing on total average daily food intake, including tea and other foods containing appreciable Al, than drinking water.

  5. Ultrafine ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Facile synthesis by low temperature decomposition of iron glycerolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartůněk, Vilém, E-mail: vilem.bartunek@vscht.cz [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Průcha, David [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Švecová, Marie [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, Pavel [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Huber, Štěpán; Sedmidubský, David; Jankovský, Ondřej [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-01

    We synthesized dark colored ultrafine – sub 10 nm iron oxide nanoparticles by a facile and low temperature process based on thermal decomposition of an affordable precursor – iron glycerolate. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) was used to study the thermal behaviour during the decomposition. The iron glycerolate was thoroughly analysed by various methods. The size of the iron nanoparticles was determined from XRD patterns and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their composition has been confirmed by XPS. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared single phase material exhibiting ferromagnetic properties is usable in a wide range of applications and may be suitable even for large scale industrial applications. - Highlights: • Iron glycerolate prepared and characterised. • Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by thermal decomposition of iron glycerolate. • STA used to study the decomposition. • Products characterised by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM and TEM. • Magnetic behaviour of monophasic samples determined.

  6. Interactions between iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex and commonly used medications / laboratory studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Felix; Canclini, Camillo; Geisser, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Simple iron salts, such as iron sulphate, often interact with food and other medications reducing bioavailability and tolerability. Iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex (IPC, Maltofer) provides a soluble form of non-ionic iron, making it an ideal form of oral iron supplementation. The physicochemical properties of IPC predict a low potential for interactions. The effects of co-administration with aluminium hydroxide (CAS 21645-51-2), acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2), bromazepam (CAS 1812-30-2), calcium acetate (CAS 62-54-4), calcium carbonate (CAS 471-34-1), auranofin (CAS 34031-32-8), magnesium-L-aspartate hydrochloride (CAS 28184-71-6), methyldopa sesquihydrate (CAS 41372-08-1), paracetamol (CAS 103-90-2), penicillamine (CAS 52-67-5), sulfasalazine (CAS 599-79-1), tetracycline hydrochloride (CAS 64-75-5), calcium phosphate (CAS 7757-93-9) in combination with vitamin D3 (CAS 67-97-0), and a multi-vitamin preparation were tested in rats fed an iron-deficient diet. Uptake of iron from radiolabelled IPC with and without concomitant medications was compared. None of the medicines tested had a significant effect on iron uptake. Iron-59 retrieval from blood and major storage organs was 64-76% for IPC alone compared with 59-85% following co-administration with other medications. It is concluded that, under normal clinical conditions, IPC does not interact with these medications.

  7. Methotrexate bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, E. N.; van de Laar, M. A. F. J.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical relevance of the concept of bioavailability rests on two main principles. First, that measurement of the active component at the site of action is generally not possible and, secondly, that a relationship exists between on the one hand efficacy and/or safely and on the other hand

  8. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy for immunoassay using iron oxide nanoparticles as probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jia; Tian, Sizhu; Wang, Kun; Wang, Yang; Zang, Shuang; Yu, Aimin; Zhang, Ziwei

    2018-02-01

    With the help of iron oxide nanoparticles, electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was applied to immunoassay. Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as the ESR probe in order to achieve an amplification of the signal resulting from the large amount of Fe 3+ ion enclosed in each nanoparticle. Rabbit IgG was used as antigen to test this method. Polyclonal antibody of rabbit IgG was used as antibody to detect the antigen. Iron oxide nanoparticle with a diameter of either 10 or 30 nm was labeled to the antibody, and Fe 3+ in the nanoparticle was probed for ESR signal. The sepharose beads were used as solid phase to which rabbit IgG was conjugated. The nanoparticle-labeled antibody was first added in the sample containing antigen, and the antigen-conjugated sepharose beads were then added into the sample. The nanoparticle-labeled antibody bound to the antigen on sepharose beads was separated from the sample by centrifugation and measured. We found that the detection ranges of the antigen obtained with nanoparticles of different sizes were different because the amount of antibody on nanoparticles of 10 nm was about one order of magnitude higher than that on nanoparticles of 30 nm. When 10 nm nanoparticle was used as probe, the upper limit of detection was 40.00 μg mL -1 , and the analytical sensitivity was 1.81 μg mL -1 . When 30 nm nanoparticle was used, the upper limit of detection was 3.00 μg mL -1 , and the sensitivity was 0.014 and 0.13 μg mL -1 depending on the ratio of nanoparticle to antibody. Graphical abstract Schematic diagram of procedure and ESR spectra.

  9. Mechanism of redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse in solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, A.; Szoeke, J.; Wojnarovits, L.

    1991-01-01

    Redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse have been studied in aqueous solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides. The short lived intermediates have been identified by time resolved specroscopy, the results of detailed kinetic analysis have been discussed. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. [Iron absorption of the habitual diet in a population of low socioeconomic level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, C; Kremenchuzky, S; Passamai, M I; D'Andrea de Rivero, S; Pérez de Galíndez, G; Gerschcovich, C

    1985-06-01

    Iron absorption using the extrinsic double-tag method was determined in the habitual diet consumed by a group of 32 volunteers of both sexes, pertaining to the low socioeconomic strata. The diet was made up of bread, spaghetti, vegetables and meat, totalling 2,022 kcal, 65.0 g protein, 17.57 mg iron, and 28.75 mg ascorbic acid. According to our findings, men were found to be neither anemic nor iron-deficient. Among the women, however, 4.8% had anemia and 57.1% suffered from iron deficiency. The non-heme iron absorption was very low: 1.35% at breakfast, 3.29% at lunch, and 3.82% at dinner. Among those subjects found to be normal, the absorption was half the above figures, whereas among those with iron deficiency it was threefold, the differences being highly significant. The absorption of heme-iron for lunch and dinner was 17.53%. The iron deficient group had an absorption value four times greater than the normal group, the differences also being highly significant. The daily availability of non-heme, heme and total iron was 0.44, 1.13 and 1.57 mg, respectively. In the subjects who formed the normal group, total iron available was 1.14 mg, barely covering a man's daily requirements, but not those of a woman. In the iron-deficient group, it was 4.31 mg, that is, four times greater than in the normal group; while this value improves the balance, it does not prevent deficiency in women, with great blood losses. Bearing these results in mind, it is suggested that measures tending to improve dietary iron content and bio-availability, be enforced.

  11. Electronic and Spatial Structures of Water-Soluble Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-Containing Ligands Underlying Their Ability to Act as Nitric Oxide and Nitrosonium Ion Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Vanin, Anatoly F.; Burbaev, Dosymzhan Sh.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of mononuclear dinitrosyl iron commplexes (M-DNICs) with thiolate ligands to act as NO donors and to trigger S-nitrosation of thiols can be explain only in the paradigm of the model of the [Fe+(NO+)2] core ({Fe(NO)2}7 according to the Enemark-Feltham classification). Similarly, the {(RS−)2Fe+(NO+)2}+ structure describing the distribution of unpaired electron density in M-DNIC corresponds to the low-spin (S = 1/2) state with a d7 electron configuration of the iron atom and predomin...

  12. Improving the Representation of Soluble Iron in Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-13

    Mineral dust produced in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world is the dominant source of iron (Fe) in atmospheric aerosol inputs to the open ocean. The bioavailable Fe fraction of atmospheric dust is thought to regulate and occasionally limit the primary productivity in large oceanic regions, which influences the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere affecting the Earth’s climate. Because Fe bioavailability cannot be directly measured, it is assumed that the dissolved Fe or highly reactive Fe in the dust is bioavailable. The fraction of soluble Fe in dust is mainly controlled by: (1) the mineral composition of the soils and the emitted dust from the source areas; (2) the atmospheric processing that converts the Fe in Fe-bearing minerals into highly soluble forms of Fe. The project has mainly focused on constraining the mineral composition of dust aerosols (1), a previously neglected, yet a key issue to constrain the deposition of soluble iron. Deriving aerosol mineral composition requires global knowledge of the soil mineral content, which is available from poorly constrained global atlases. In addition, the mineral content of the emitted aerosol differs from that of the parent soil. Measurements of soil mineral fractions are based upon wet sedimentation (or ’wet sieving’) techniques that disturb the soil sample, breaking aggregates that are found in the original, undispersed soil that is subject to wind erosion. Wet sieving alters the soil size distribution, replacing aggregates that are potentially mobilized as aerosols with a collection of smaller particles. A major challenge is to derive the size-distributed mineral fractions of the emitted dust based upon their fractions measured from wet-sieved soils. Finally, representations of dust mineral composition need to account for mixtures of minerals. Examination of individual particles shows that iron, an element that is central to many climate processes, is often found as trace impurities of iron oxide

  13. Bioavailability of essential trace elements in the presence of phytate, fiber and calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, A.G.; Mohseni, S.G.; Gharib, M.

    2006-01-01

    Bioavailability and/or homeostasis of some essential trace elements such as zinc, iron, etc., in the presence of phytate, fiber and calcium are subject to alteration. These factors were measured in this study for Iranian diets in a frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP). However, the most prominent dietary factor in this regard is phytate. The phytate effect on zinc homeostasis is a chemical phenomenon dependent physiologically on pH in the gastrointestinal tract at or near the sites of absorption. Calcium is a synergistic coprecipitating factor in the complexation of zinc by phytate. Fiber has also a tendency to absorb insoluble compounds in gastrointestinal tract including zinc, iron and many other trace elements. One of the most known clinical observations regarding zinc deficiency was found in the rural area of the Fars province of Iran in the late 1950s at Shiraz University. However, the molar ratio of [phytate] : [zinc] and [calcium] [phytate] : [zinc] in Iranian Diets in a recent study are 7-17 and 150-800, respectively. The critical ratios of [phytate] : [zinc] of 10 or less will provide adequate zinc to sustain homeostasis. (author)

  14. Iron plaque formation and morphoanatomy of roots from species of restinga subjected to excess iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; Azevedo, Aristéa Alves; Oliva, Marco Antonio

    2012-04-01

    The restingas, a sandy coastal plain ecosystem of Brazil, have received an additional amount of iron due to the activity of mining industries. The present study aims to characterize morphoanatomically and histochemically the iron plaque formation on roots of Ipomoea pes-caprae L. and Canavalia rosea DC, cultivated in hydroponic solution with and without excess iron. The iron plaque formation as well as changes in the external morphology of the lateral roots of both species were observed after the subjection to excess iron. Changes in the nutrient uptake, and in the organization and form of the pericycle and cortex cells were observed for both species. Scanning electron microscopy showed evident iron plaques on the whole surface of the root. The iron was histolocalized in all root tissues of both species. The species of restinga studied here formed iron plaque in their roots when exposed to excess of this element, which may compromise their development in environments polluted by particulated iron. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Tolerability of iron preparation Actiferol Fe® in children treated for iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowska, Teresa; Sapała-Smoczyńska, Alicja; Kamińska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Iron de„ciency anemia is the most frequently occurring anemia during the childhood period. Supplementation with adequate doses of iron remains a basic method of prevention and treatment. The various available products containing iron are characterized by a different degree of patient tolerability. Actiferol Fe® is a micronized, dispersible ferric pyrophosphate which improves its water solubility, and therefore it has better absorption and bioavailability. The assessment of tolerability of Actiferol Fe® in children who were administered this product to treat or prevent of iron de„ciency anemia. The methods of administration and the incidence of adverse effects were analyzed. Eighty children (64 boys and 16 girls) aged from one month to 6 years who met the criteria of an indication to be treated with iron were included into the study. The assessment of selected parameters was based on the questionnaire which included questions about tolerability, method of administration, convenience of usage and adverse e#ects. The questionnaire was „lled in by parents (usually by the mother). The study indicated that Actiferol Fe® has very good or good tolerability in 87.5% (70/80) of patients - 46.3% (37/80) and 41.2% (33/80), respectively. The most frequent method of administration was in liquid form after dissolving: in water - 31,3% (25/80), in orange juice - 18.8% (15/80) or in milk formulas - in 17.5% (14/80) of patients. The method of administration was assessed as convenient or very convenient by 84% (67/80) of participants. Out of the adverse effects reported, the most frequent were change in the stool consistency into harder, abdominal pain and constipation - in 20% (16/80), 11.25% (9/80), 10% (8/80) cases, respectively. Diarrhea, pain during defecation occurred occasionally. A dark color of the stool was reported by 55% (44/80) of patients. In only one case (1.25%) the parents resigned from the product administration and replaced it with another iron product (no

  16. Effect of capping ligands on the optical properties and electronic energies of iron pyrite FeS2 nanocrystals and solid thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Guangmei; Xie, Rongwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jitao; Yang, Yongzhen; Wang, Hua; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the optical and electronic properties of iron pyrite FeS 2 nanocrystals and solid thin films with various capping ligands were systematically investigated by UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and current density–voltage characteristic measurements. The iron pyrite nanocrystals with various ligands have an indirect band gap of around 1.05 eV and broad absorption spanning into the near-infrared region, exhibiting favorable optical properties for their photovoltaic applications. The electron affinities and ionization potentials of FeS 2 nanocrystals determined through cyclic voltammetry measurements show strong ligand dependence. An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained among the pyrite nanocrystals capped with the ligands employed in this work. The iron pyrite nanocrystal films capped with iodide and 1,2-ethanedithiol exhibit the largest band edge energy shift and conductivity, respectively. Our results not only provide several useful optical and electronic parameters of pyrite nanocrystals for their further use in optoelectronic devices as active layers and/or infrared optical absorption materials, but also highlight the relationship between their surface chemistry and electronic energies. - Highlights: • The energy levels of FeS 2 nanocrystals with various ligands were determined via electrochemical measurements. • The energy levels of FeS 2 nanocrystals showed strong ligand-dependence. • An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained for the pyrite nanocrystals studied in the work. • The conductivities of FeS 2 nanocrystals with different ligands were obtained by current density–voltage measurements.

  17. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  18. Friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winiczenko, Radoslaw; Kaczorowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The results of the study of the friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers are presented. → The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. → In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. → The process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the interface. -- Abstract: In this paper, ductile cast iron-austenitic stainless steel, ductile cast iron-pure Armco iron and ductile cast iron-low carbon steel interlayers were welded, using the friction welding method. The tensile strength of the joints was determined, using a conventional tensile test machine. Moreover, the hardness across the interface of materials was measured on metallographic specimens. The fracture surface and microstructure of the joints was examined using either light stereoscope microscopy as well as electron microscopy. In this case, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied. The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. It was concluded that the process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the ductile cast iron-stainless steel interface. This leads to increase in carbon concentration in stainless steel where chromium carbides were formed, the size and distribution of which was dependent on the distance from the interface.

  19. Ferric reductase activity of low molecular weight human milk fraction is associated with enhanced iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, Madhavan Krishnapillai; Kasula, Sunanda; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Thippande, Tippeswamy Gowda

    2008-09-19

    It is known that the fractional absorption of extrinsic iron from human milk is higher in infants and adults. A low molecular weight milk fraction has been proposed to increase the bioavailability of iron from human milk. Nevertheless, the mechanisms remained elusive. Here in we demonstrate ferric reductase activity (Km7.73x10(-6)M) in low molecular weight human milk fraction (10kF, filtrate derived from ultra filtration of milk whey through 10kDa cutoff membrane), which increased ferric iron solubility and iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. The 10kF fraction was as effective as ascorbic acid (1:20 iron to ascorbic acid) in increasing the ferric iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Further, gel filtration chromatography on peptide column led to co-elution of ferric reductase and iron solubilization activities at an apparent molecular mass of iron in Caco-2 cells. Thus, it is concluded that human milk possesses ferric reductase activity and is associated with ferric iron solubilization and enhanced absorption.

  20. Physics of coal methane: decisive role of iron compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V. G., E-mail: gavr@imp.kiev.ua; Skoblik, A. P. [G.V. Kurdyumov Institute for Metal Physics (Ukraine); Shanina, B. D.; Konchits, A. A. [V. Ye. Lashkarev Institute for Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2016-12-15

    The role of iron in formation of the coal methane is clarified based on the studies performed on the coal samples taken from different mines in Donetsk coal basin. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy, a correlation is found between the iron content and methane capacity of coal seams. By means of electron paramagnetic resonance, it is found that iron increases the concentration of non-compensated electron spins, i.e. dangled bonds at the carbon atoms. These bonds can be occupied by hydrogen atoms as a prerequisite of methane formation. The two-valence iron is shown to be the most effective in the increase of spin concentration. By using the ion mass spectrometry, the modelling of methane formation is carried out on the mechanical mixture of the iron-free reactor graphite, iron compounds and diluted sulphuric acid as a source of hydrogen atoms. The proposed mechanism is also confirmed by methane formation in the mixture of iron compounds and the coal from the mine where the iron and methane are practically absent.

  1. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna N. Nadagouda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS, selected area diffraction pattern (SAED, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. The size of the iron oxide/iron nanoparticle-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were found to be in the nano range (50–400 nm. The iron oxide/iron nanoparticles mostly crystallized into cubic symmetry which was confirmed by SAED. The XRD pattern indicated that iron oxide/iron nano particles existed in four major phases. That is, γ-Fe2O3, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe. These iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were tested for arsenic adsorption through batch experiments, revealing that few samples had significant arsenic adsorption.

  2. The role of the iron catalyst in the toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visalli, Giuseppa; Facciolà, Alessio; Iannazzo, Daniela; Piperno, Anna; Pistone, Alessandro; Di Pietro, Angela

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of iron, used as a catalyst, in the biological response to pristine and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p/fMWCNTs) with an iron content of 2.5-2.8%. Preliminarily, we assessed the pro-oxidant activity of MWCNTs-associated iron by an abiotic test. To evaluate iron bioavailability, we measured intracellular redox-active iron in A549 cells exposed to both MWCNT suspensions and to the cell medium preconditioned by MWCNTs, in order to assess the iron dissolution rate under physiological conditions. Moreover, in exposed cells, we detected ROS levels, 8-oxo-dG and mitochondrial function. The results clearly highlighted that MWCNTs- associated iron was not redox-active and that iron leakage did not occur under physiological conditions, including the oxidative burst of specialized cells. Despite this, in MWCNTs exposed cells, higher level of intracellular redox-active iron was measured in comparison to control and a significant time-dependent ROS increase was observed (P<0.01). Higher levels of 8-oxo-dG, a marker of oxidative DNA damage, and decreased mitochondrial function, confirmed the oxidative stress induced by MWCNTs. Based on the results we believe that oxidative damage could be attributable to the release of endogenous redox-active iron. This was due to the damage of acidic vacuolar compartment caused by endocytosis-mediated MWCNT internalization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Coupled Effect of Ferrous Ion and Oxygen on the Electron Selectivity of Zerovalent Iron for Selenate Sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hejie; Li, Jinxiang; Yang, Hongyi; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weiming; Guan, Xiaohong

    2017-05-02

    Although the electron selectivity (ES) of zerovalent iron (ZVI) for target contaminant and its utilization ratio (UR) decide the removal capacity of ZVI, little effort has been made to improve them. Taking selenate [Se(VI)] as a target contaminant, this study investigated the coupled influence of aeration gas and Fe(II) on the ES and UR of ZVI. Oxygen was necessary for effective removal of Se(VI) by ZVI without Fe(II) addition. Due to the application of 1.0 mM Fe(II), the ES of ZVI was increased from 3.2-3.6% to 6.2-6.8% and the UR of ZVI was improved by 5.0-19.4% under aerobic conditions, which resulted in a 100-180% increase in the Se(VI) removal capacity by ZVI. Se(VI) reduction by Fe 0 was a heterogeneous redox reaction, and the enrichment of Se(VI) on ZVI surface was the first step of electron transfer from Fe 0 core to Se(VI). Oxygen promoted the generation of iron (hydr)oxides, which facilitated the enrichment of Se(VI) on the ZVI particle surface. Therefore, the high oxygen fraction (25-50%) in the purging gas resulted in only a slight decrease in the ES of ZVI. Fe(II) addition resulted in a pH drop and promoted the generation of lepidocrocite and magnetite, which benefited Se(VI) adsorption and the following electron transfer from underlying Fe 0 to surface-located Se(VI).

  4. Molecular Computational Investigation of Electron Transfer Kinetics across Cytochrome-Iron Oxide Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Valiev, Marat

    2007-01-01

    The interface between electron transfer proteins such as cytochromes and solid phase mineral oxides is central to the activity of dissimilatory-metal reducing bacteria. A combination of potential-based molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic structure calculations are used in the framework of Marcus' electron transfer theory to compute elementary electron transfer rates from a well-defined cytochrome model, namely the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) from Shewanella oneidensis, to surfaces of the iron oxide mineral hematite (a-Fe2O3). Room temperature molecular dynamics simulations show that an isolated STC molecule favors surface attachment via direct contact of hemes I and IV at the poles of the elongated axis, with electron transfer distances as small as 9 Angstroms. The cytochrome remains attached to the mineral surface in the presence of water and shows limited surface diffusion at the interface. Ab initio electronic coupling matrix element (VAB) calculations of configurations excised from the molecular dynamics simulations reveal VAB values ranging from 1 to 20 cm-1, consistent with nonadiabaticity. Using these results, together with experimental data on the redox potential of hematite and hemes in relevant cytochromes and calculations of the reorganization energy from cluster models, we estimate the rate of electron transfer across this model interface to range from 1 to 1000 s-1 for the most exothermic driving force considered in this work, and from 0.01 to 20 s-1 for the most endothermic. This fairly large range of electron transfer rates highlights the sensitivity of the rate upon the electronic coupling matrix element, which is in turn dependent on the fluctuations of the heme configuration at the interface. We characterize this dependence using an idealized bis-imidazole heme to compute from first principles the VAB variation due to porphyrin ring orientation, electron transfer distance, and mineral surface termination. The electronic

  5. Ab-initio simulations of pressure effects on structural and electronic properties of iron based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomic, Milan

    2013-01-01

    The ab-initio molecular dynamics framework has been the cornerstone of computational solid state physics in the last few decades. Although it is already a mature field it is still rapidly developing to accommodate the growth in solid state research as well as to efficiently utilize the increase in computing power. Starting from the first principles, the ab-initio molecular dynamics provides essential information about structural and electronic properties of matter under various external conditions. In this thesis we use the ab-initio molecular dynamics to study the behavior of BaFe 2 As 2 and CaFe 2 As 2 under the application of external pressure. BaFe 2 As 2 and CaFe 2 As 2 belong to the family of iron based superconductors which are a novel and promising superconducting materials. The application of pressure is one of two key methods by which electronic and structural properties of iron based superconductors can be modified, the other one being doping (or chemical pressure). In particular, it has been noted that pressure conditions have an important effect, but their exact role is not fully understood. To better understand the effect of different pressure conditions we have performed a series of ab-initio simulations of pressure application. In order to apply the pressure with arbitrary stress tensor we have developed a method based on the Fast Inertial Relaxation Engine, whereby the unit cell and the atomic positions are evolved according to the metadynamical equations of motion. We have found that the application of hydrostatic and c axis uniaxial pressure induces a phase transition from the magnetically ordered orthorhombic phase to the non-magnetic collapsed tetragonal phase in both BaFe 2 As 2 and CaFe 2 As 2 . In the case of BaFe 2 As 2 , an intermediate tetragonal non-magnetic tetragonal phase is observed in addition. Application of the uniaxial pressure parallel to the c axis reduces the critical pressure of the phase transition by an order of magnitude

  6. Synthesis and characterization of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predescu, Andra Mihaela; Matei, Ecaterina; Berbecaru, Andrei Constantin; Pantilimon, Cristian; Drăgan, Claudia; Vidu, Ruxandra; Predescu, Cristian; Kuncser, Victor

    2018-03-01

    Synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a large molar weight dextran for environmental applications are reported. The first experiments involved the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles which were coated with dextran at different concentrations. The synthesis was performed by a co-precipitation technique, while the coating of iron oxide nanoparticles was carried out in solution. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The results demonstrated a successful coating of iron oxide nanoparticles with large molar weight dextran, of which agglomeration tendency depended on the amount of dextran in the coating solution. SEM and TEM observations have shown that the iron oxide nanoparticles are of about 7 nm in size.

  7. Bioavailability of zinc, copper, and manganese from infant diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A series of trace element absorption experiments were performed using the Sprague-Dawley suckling rat put and infant rhesis monkey (Macaca mulatta) with extrinsic radiolabeling to assess the bioavailability of Zn, Cu, and Mn from infant diets and to examine specific factors that affect absorption of these essential nutrients. Bioavailability of Cu as assessed by 6 h liver uptake (% of 64 Cu dose) was highest from human milk and cow milk based formula and significantly lower from cow milk and soy based formula. Copper bioavailability from infant cereal products as assessed by whole body uptake (% of 64 Cu dose) in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was low compared to the bioavailability from cow milk or human milk alone. 65 Zn uptake in d 20 rats, 9 h postintubation, was significantly lower from cereals fed alone or in combination with cow or human milk as compared to the uptake from the milks fed alone. Zn bioavailability varied among cereal diets, (lowest from cereals containing phytate and highest from cereal/fruit products). Mn bioavailability from infant diets was assessed using a modified suckling rat pup model. Bioavailability (24 h whole body retention of 54 Mn) was high from all milks and commercial formulas tested

  8. Bioavailability as a tool in site management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, J.; Naidu, R.

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability can form the basis for describing potential risks that contaminants pose to the environment and human health, and for determining remedial options to reduce risks of contaminant dispersal and toxicity. In assessments of polluted sites, methods to measure bioavailability can lead to a

  9. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds. PMID:23620848

  10. Phosphorous bioavailability along a soil chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, K.; Vokhshoori, N. L.; Rosenthanl, A.; Turner, B. L.; Condron, L.; Paytan, A.

    2011-12-01

    In humid environments, as soils age nutrient loss through leaching and chemical trasformations affect the succession and composition of the biological communities. In particular phosphorus (P), often a limiting nutrient in terrestrial systems, tends to evolve into less bio-available forms over time, compounding loss through leaching. Thus P availability has the potential to strongly affect community productivity and structure. Low standing stock of P may not necessarily imply P limitation as the bio-available P pool is continuously recycled and re-utilized. Thus extensive recycling can reduce to varying extents the effect of P limitation. The bio-availability and recycling rates of P are difficult to measure; multiple sequential extraction processes have been developed to try to define and quantify the bio-availability of both inorganic and organic forms of P. In this preliminary study, we will present results of P concentrations in different soil fractions and oxygen isotopes in phosphate. These data together increase our understanding of P dynamics as soils age. The work is being done with a well characterized and dated chronosequence from the west coast of the South Island of New Zealand near the Haast River.

  11. Bioavailability of curcumin: problems and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Preetha; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B; Newman, Robert A; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound derived from dietary spice turmeric, possesses diverse pharmacologic effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities. Phase I clinical trials have shown that curcumin is safe even at high doses (12 g/day) in humans but exhibit poor bioavailability. Major reasons contributing to the low plasma and tissue levels of curcumin appear to be due to poor absorption, rapid metabolism, and rapid systemic elimination. To improve the bioavailability of curcumin, numerous approaches have been undertaken. These approaches involve, first, the use of adjuvant like piperine that interferes with glucuronidation; second, the use of liposomal curcumin; third, curcumin nanoparticles; fourth, the use of curcumin phospholipid complex; and fifth, the use of structural analogues of curcumin (e.g., EF-24). The latter has been reported to have a rapid absorption with a peak plasma half-life. Despite the lower bioavailability, therapeutic efficacy of curcumin against various human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, arthritis, neurological diseases and Crohn's disease, has been documented. Enhanced bioavailability of curcumin in the near future is likely to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of therapeutic agents for treatment of human disease.

  12. Iron bioavailability from cereal products enriched with Pleurotus ostreatus mushrooms in rats with induced anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julita Reguła

    2016-06-01

    Product may be a valuable source of iron in the nutrition of individuals with a deficiency of this element, first of all patients with absorption and metabolism disorders, but also may add variety to the traditional daily diet.

  13. Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolan, S.; Naidu, R.; Kunhikrishnan, A.; Seshadri, B.; Ok, Y.S.; Palanisami, T.; Dong, M.; Clark, I.

    2016-01-01

    Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six herbal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation. - Highlights: • Pb species in complementary medicines was

  14. Factors influencing zinc bioavailability in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahalko, J.R.; Johnson, P.E.; Swan, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    The amount of Zn fed, its source, and the Zn status of experimental animals may affect Zn bioavailability. To test this, rats were fed doses of Zn from ZnCl 2 or from various foods labeled extrinsically. Three weeks before and after the test meal, rats were fed an AIN diet modified in Zn content. Absorption was calculated by monitoring whole body retention and extrapolating to zero time. In rats fed 12 ppm Zn and test doses of 6 to 275 μg, absorption decreased from 80 to 50%, and the amount absorbed increased quadratically (r 2 = 0.998), but turnover was unaffected. Rats fed 38 or 77 ppm Zn absorbed less of test doses of 290, 613, or 1700 μg Zn than did those fed 12 ppm, and their Zn turnover rate was higher. In two 2 x 7 factorial experiments, rats fed 12 or 38 ppm Zn were given 16 or 98 μg Zn from 7 Zn sources. Bioavailability from some foods was higher than from ZnCl 2 except in rats eating only 12 ppm Zn and receiving the small dose. There were greater differences in bioavailability among foods when tested at the higher Zn status or dose. This may explain inconsistencies seen in comparing Zn bioavailability by traditional growth assay with that seen in 65 Zn tracer studies. The authors conclude that Zn status of the experimental animal, as well as the amount of Zn and its source, will affect Zn bioavailability

  15. Iron speciation of airborne subway particles by the combined use of energy dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and Raman microspectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Sobanska, Sophie; Chung, Sang-Gwi; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Sunwoo, Young; Ro, Chul-Un

    2013-11-05

    Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), known as low-Z particle EPMA, and Raman microspectrometry (RMS) were applied in combination for an analysis of the iron species in airborne PM10 particles collected in underground subway tunnels. Iron species have been reported to be a major chemical species in underground subway particles generated mainly from mechanical wear and friction processes. In particular, iron-containing particles in subway tunnels are expected to be generated with minimal outdoor influence on the particle composition. Because iron-containing particles have different toxicity and magnetic properties depending on their oxidation states, it is important to determine the iron species of underground subway particles in the context of both indoor public health and control measures. A recently developed analytical methodology, i.e., the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and RMS, was used to identify the chemical species of the same individual subway particles on a single particle basis, and the bulk iron compositions of airborne subway particles were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The majority of airborne subway particles collected in the underground tunnels were found to be magnetite, hematite, and iron metal. All the particles collected in the tunnels of underground subway stations were attracted to permanent magnets due mainly to the almost ubiquitous ferrimagnetic magnetite, indicating that airborne subway particles can be removed using magnets as a control measure.

  16. Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds: a challenging journey to bioefficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Maarit J.; Renouf, Mathieu; Cruz‐Hernandez, Cristina; Actis‐Goretta, Lucas; Thakkar, Sagar K.; da Silva Pinto, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is a key step in ensuring bioefficacy of bioactive food compounds or oral drugs. Bioavailability is a complex process involving several different stages: liberation, absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination phases (LADME). Bioactive food compounds, whether derived from various plant or animal sources, need to be bioavailable in order to exert any beneficial effects. Through a better understanding of the digestive fate of bioactive food compounds we can impact the promotion of health and improvement of performance. Many varying factors affect bioavailability, such as bioaccessibility, food matrix effect, transporters, molecular structures and metabolizing enzymes. Bioefficacy may be improved through enhanced bioavailability. Therefore, several technologies have been developed to improve the bioavailability of xenobiotics, including structural modifications, nanotechnology and colloidal systems. Due to the complex nature of food bioactive compounds and also to the different mechanisms of absorption of hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactive compounds, unravelling the bioavailability of food constituents is challenging. Among the food sources discussed during this review, coffee, tea, citrus fruit and fish oil were included as sources of food bioactive compounds (e.g. (poly)phenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)) since they are examples of important ingredients for the food industry. Although there are many studies reporting on bioavailability and bioefficacy of these bioactive food components, understanding their interactions, metabolism and mechanism of action still requires extensive work. This review focuses on some of the major factors affecting the bioavailability of the aforementioned bioactive food compounds. PMID:22897361

  17. Computational modeling of human oral bioavailability: what will be next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Pham-The, Hai

    2018-06-01

    The oral route is the most convenient way of administrating drugs. Therefore, accurate determination of oral bioavailability is paramount during drug discovery and development. Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR), rule-of-thumb (RoT) and physiologically based-pharmacokinetic (PBPK) approaches are promising alternatives to the early oral bioavailability prediction. Areas covered: The authors give insight into the factors affecting bioavailability, the fundamental theoretical framework and the practical aspects of computational methods for predicting this property. They also give their perspectives on future computational models for estimating oral bioavailability. Expert opinion: Oral bioavailability is a multi-factorial pharmacokinetic property with its accurate prediction challenging. For RoT and QSPR modeling, the reliability of datasets, the significance of molecular descriptor families and the diversity of chemometric tools used are important factors that define model predictability and interpretability. Likewise, for PBPK modeling the integrity of the pharmacokinetic data, the number of input parameters, the complexity of statistical analysis and the software packages used are relevant factors in bioavailability prediction. Although these approaches have been utilized independently, the tendency to use hybrid QSPR-PBPK approaches together with the exploration of ensemble and deep-learning systems for QSPR modeling of oral bioavailability has opened new avenues for development promising tools for oral bioavailability prediction.

  18. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilty, F M; Hurrell, R F; Zimmermann, M B [Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Teleki, A; Buechel, R; Pratsinis, S E [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Krumeich, F, E-mail: michael.zimmermann@ilw.agrl.ethz.c [Electron Microscopy Center (EMEZ), ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-11-25

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  19. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilty, F M; Hurrell, R F; Zimmermann, M B; Teleki, A; Buechel, R; Pratsinis, S E; Krumeich, F

    2009-01-01

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe 2 O 4 ) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  20. Development and optimization of iron- and zinc-containing nanostructured powders for nutritional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, F M; Teleki, A; Krumeich, F; Büchel, R; Hurrell, R F; Pratsinis, S E; Zimmermann, M B

    2009-11-25

    Reducing the size of low-solubility iron (Fe)-containing compounds to nanoscale has the potential to improve their bioavailability. Because Fe and zinc (Zn) deficiencies often coexist in populations, combined Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured compounds may be useful for nutritional applications. Such compounds are developed here and their solubility in dilute acid, a reliable indicator of iron bioavailability in humans, and sensory qualities in sensitive food matrices are investigated. Phosphates and oxides of Fe and atomically mixed Fe/Zn-containing (primarily ZnFe2O4) nanostructured powders were produced by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP). Chemical composition and surface area were systematically controlled by varying precursor concentration and feed rate during powder synthesis to increase solubility to the level of ferrous sulfate at maximum Fe and Zn content. Solubility of the nanostructured compounds was dependent on their particle size and crystallinity. The new nanostructured powders produced minimal color changes when added to dairy products containing chocolate or fruit compared to the changes produced when ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate were added to these foods. Flame-made Fe- and Fe/Zn-containing nanostructured powders have solubilities comparable to ferrous and Zn sulfate but may produce fewer color changes when added to difficult-to-fortify foods. Thus, these powders are promising for food fortification and other nutritional applications.

  1. Quantitative determination of iron, copper, lead, chromium and nickel in electronic waste samples using total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaseer, A. S.; Musbah, A. S; Ammar, M. M. G.; Salah, M. A.; Aisha, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy in conjunction with microwave assisted extraction technique was used for the analysis of twenty electronic waste samples. The analysis was limited to the printed circuit boards of electronic devices. Iron, copper, lead, chromium and nickel were quantitatively determined in the samples. The samples were carefully milled to fine powder and 50mg was digested by acid using microwave digestion procedure. The digested samples solution was spread together with gallium as internal standard on the reflection disk and analyzed. The results showed that the cassette recorder boards contain the highest concentration of iron, lead and nickel. The average concentrations of these metals were 78, 73 and 71g/Kg respectively. Computer boards contained the highest copper average concentration 39g/Kg. the highest chromium average concentration 3.6 g/Kg was in mobile phone boards. Measurements were made using PicoTAX portable x-ray device. the instrument was used for quantitative multi-element analysis. An air cooled x-ray tube (40KV, 1 mA) with Mo target and Be window was used as x-ray source. The optics of the device was a multilayer Ni/C, 17.5 keV, 80% reflectivity provides analysis of elements from Si to Zr (K series) and Rh to U (L series). A Si PIN-diode detector (7mm"2, 195eV) was used for the elements detection. In this study heavy metals average concentration in electronic circuit boards in the in the order of iron (35.25g/kg), copper (21.14g/Kg), lead (16.59g/Kg), nickel (16.01g/Kg) and chromium (1.07g/Kg).(author)

  2. Bioavailability of Promethazine during Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Wang, Zuwei; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Promethazine (PMZ) is the choice anti-motion sickness medication for treating space motion sickness (SMS) during flight. The side effects associated with PMZ include dizziness, drowsiness, sedation, and impaired psychomotor performance which could impact crew performance and mission operations. Early anecdotal reports from crewmembers indicate that these central nervous system side effects of PMZ are absent or greatly attenuated in microgravity, potentially due to changes in pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics in microgravity. These changes could also affect the therapeutic effectiveness of drugs in general and PMZ, in particular. In this investigation, we examined bioavailability and associated pharmacokinetics of PMZ in astronauts during and after space flight. Methods. Nine astronauts received, per their preference, PMZ (25 or 50 mg as intramuscular injection, oral tablet, or rectal suppository) on flight day one for the treatment of SMS and subsequently collected saliva samples and completed sleepiness scores for 72 h post dose. Thirty days after the astronauts returned to Earth, they repeated the protocol. Bioavailability and PK parameters were calculated and compared between flight and ground. Results. Maximum concentration (Cmax) was lower and time to reach Cmax (tmax) was longer in flight than on the ground. Area under the curve (AUC), a measure of bioavailability, was lower and biological half-life (t1/2) was longer in flight than on the ground. Conclusion. Results indicate that bioavailability of PMZ is reduced during spaceflight. Number of samples, sampling method, and sampling schedule significantly affected PK parameter estimates.

  3. Effect of capping ligands on the optical properties and electronic energies of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Guangmei, E-mail: zhaiguangmei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Solar Cell Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Xie, Rongwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Jitao; Yang, Yongzhen; Wang, Hua; Li, Xuemin [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China); Xu, Bingshe [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Research Centre of Advanced Materials Science and Technology of Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030024 (China)

    2016-07-25

    In this work, the optical and electronic properties of iron pyrite FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals and solid thin films with various capping ligands were systematically investigated by UV–Vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and current density–voltage characteristic measurements. The iron pyrite nanocrystals with various ligands have an indirect band gap of around 1.05 eV and broad absorption spanning into the near-infrared region, exhibiting favorable optical properties for their photovoltaic applications. The electron affinities and ionization potentials of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals determined through cyclic voltammetry measurements show strong ligand dependence. An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained among the pyrite nanocrystals capped with the ligands employed in this work. The iron pyrite nanocrystal films capped with iodide and 1,2-ethanedithiol exhibit the largest band edge energy shift and conductivity, respectively. Our results not only provide several useful optical and electronic parameters of pyrite nanocrystals for their further use in optoelectronic devices as active layers and/or infrared optical absorption materials, but also highlight the relationship between their surface chemistry and electronic energies. - Highlights: • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with various ligands were determined via electrochemical measurements. • The energy levels of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals showed strong ligand-dependence. • An energy level shift of up to 190 meV was obtained for the pyrite nanocrystals studied in the work. • The conductivities of FeS{sub 2} nanocrystals with different ligands were obtained by current density–voltage measurements.

  4. The influence of dissolved phosphorus molecular form on recalcitrance and bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Brett, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown Soluble Reactive Phosphorus (SRP) analyses provide a poor index of dissolved phosphorus (P) bioavailability in natural systems. We tested 21 inorganic and organic P containing compounds with series of nutrient uptake and bioavailability bioassay experiments and chemical characterizations. Our results show that in 81% of cases, these compounds did not fit the classic assumption that SRP approximately equals Bioavailable P (BAP). Many organic compounds were classified as non-reactive, but had very rapid uptake kinetics and were nearly entirely bioavailable (e.g., several nucleic acids, ATP, RNA, DNA and phosphatidylcholine). Several inorganic compounds also classified as non-reactive but had high bioavailability (i.e., sodium tripolyphosphate and phosphorus pentoxide). Conversely, apatite was operationally classified as reactive, but had low bioavailability. Due to their tendency to alias as SRP, but recalcitrance and very low bioavailability, humic-(Al/Fe)-phosphorus complexes may play an especially important role in the dissolved phosphorus dynamics of natural systems. Highlights: •We tested 21 P containing compounds with bioassay and chemical speciation. •The acid molybdate method does not consistently predict the bioavailability of P compounds. •The P in humic substances was bounded with Al/Fe and could not be taken up by algal. •A new classification scheme divided P species based on bioavailability and chemical speciation. -- SRP is a poor indicator of the bioavailability of many of P containing compounds and much of what is classified as SRP in nature could be associated with humic-metal complexes with low bioavailability

  5. Iron-based microbial ecosystem on and below the seafloor: a case study of hydrothermal fields of the southern mariana trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shingo; Nakamura, Kentaro; Toki, Tomohiro; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Tsunogai, Urumu; Hirota, Akinori; Ohkuma, Moriya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structures in deep-sea hydrothermal vents fields are constrained by available energy yields provided by inorganic redox reactions, which are in turn controlled by chemical composition of hydrothermal fluids. In the past two decades, geochemical and microbiological studies have been conducted in deep-sea hydrothermal vents at three geographically different areas of the Southern Mariana Trough (SMT). A variety of geochemical data of hydrothermal fluids and an unparalleled microbiological dataset of various samples (i.e., sulfide structures of active vents, iron-rich mats, borehole fluids, and ambient seawater) are available for comparative analyses. Here, we summarize the geochemical and microbiological characteristics in the SMT and assess the relationship between the microbial community structures and the fluid geochemistry in the SMT by thermodynamic modeling. In the high temperature vent fluids, aerobic sulfide-oxidation has the potential to yield large amounts of bioavailable energy in the vent fluids, which is consistent with the detection of species related to sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (such as Thiomicrospira in the Gammaproteobacteria and Sulfurimonas in the Epsilonproteobacteria). Conversely, the bioavailable energy yield from aerobic iron-oxidation reactions in the low-temperature fluids collected from man-made boreholes and several natural vents were comparable to or higher than those from sulfide-oxidation. This is also consistent with the detection of species related to iron-oxidizing bacteria (Mariprofundus in the Zetaproteobacteria) in such low-temperature samples. The results of combination of microbiological, geochemical, and thermodynamic analyses in the SMT provide novel insights into the presence and significance of iron-based microbial ecosystems in deep-sea hydrothermal fields.

  6. Effects of iron-ore mining and processing on metal bioavailability in a tropical coastal lagoon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, A.A.; van Hattum, A.G.M.; Brouwer, A.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Rezende, C.E.; Salomons, W.

    2008-01-01

    In water systems, water quality and geochemical properties of sediments determine the speciation of trace metals, metal transport, and sediment-water exchange, influencing metal availability and its potential effects on biota. Studies from temperate climates have shown that iron-ore mining and

  7. Arsenic mobilization and speciation during iron plaque decomposition in a paddy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai; Chen, Zheng; Sun, Guoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences; Zhu, Yongguan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Urban Environment and Health; Yin, Xixiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Urban Environment and Health; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences

    2012-03-15

    Little information is available concerning the mobilization and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils during iron plaque decomposition. It is important to investigate these processes since they affect As bioavailability and contaminate surface and ground water systems. A microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the reductive dissolution of iron plaque and subsequent As mobilization under NaN{sub 3} sterilized (abiotic treatments) and non-sterilized (biotic treatments) paddy soil conditions. In the biotic treatment, As and iron (Fe) were quickly released into the soil solution, with more than 76.1% of total arsenic (T{sub As}) on the roots lost in 27 days. In the abiotic treatment, both iron plaque decomposition and As release were significantly slower, with only 39.4% of T{sub As} on the roots lost in 85 days. A part of arsenate reduction reaction occurred before and may also occur after release from roots in both abiotic and biotic treatments. Bacterial abundance, quantified by real-time PCR, varied significantly between treatments. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that microbial community structures were also different between treatments. The changes in microbial factors (bacterial abundance and microbial diversity and activities) significantly affected iron plaque decomposition, As mobilization, and speciation processes. Iron plaque reductive dissolution was likely the major factor leading to As release. Most As released was trapped in the solid phase during the incubation period. (orig.)

  8. Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds: a challenging journey to bioefficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Maarit J; Renouf, Mathieu; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Thakkar, Sagar K; da Silva Pinto, Marcia

    2013-03-01

    Bioavailability is a key step in ensuring bioefficacy of bioactive food compounds or oral drugs. Bioavailability is a complex process involving several different stages: liberation, absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination phases (LADME). Bioactive food compounds, whether derived from various plant or animal sources, need to be bioavailable in order to exert any beneficial effects. Through a better understanding of the digestive fate of bioactive food compounds we can impact the promotion of health and improvement of performance. Many varying factors affect bioavailability, such as bioaccessibility, food matrix effect, transporters, molecular structures and metabolizing enzymes. Bioefficacy may be improved through enhanced bioavailability. Therefore, several technologies have been developed to improve the bioavailability of xenobiotics, including structural modifications, nanotechnology and colloidal systems. Due to the complex nature of food bioactive compounds and also to the different mechanisms of absorption of hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactive compounds, unravelling the bioavailability of food constituents is challenging. Among the food sources discussed during this review, coffee, tea, citrus fruit and fish oil were included as sources of food bioactive compounds (e.g. (poly)phenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)) since they are examples of important ingredients for the food industry. Although there are many studies reporting on bioavailability and bioefficacy of these bioactive food components, understanding their interactions, metabolism and mechanism of action still requires extensive work. This review focuses on some of the major factors affecting the bioavailability of the aforementioned bioactive food compounds. © 2012 Nestec S. A.. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron oxide/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these "Mars-soil analogs" were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging, specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The clay acted as an effective matrix, both chemically and sterically, preventing the major part of the synthesized iron oxides from ripening, i.e., growing and developing larger crystals. The precipitated iron oxides appear as isodiametric or slightly elongated particles in the size range 1-10 nm, having large specific surface area. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxy mineral such as "green rust," or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) by extensive heat treatment. After mild heating, the iron-enriched clay became slightly magnetic, to the extent that it adheres to a hand-held magnet, as was observed with Mars soil. The chemical reactivity of the iron-enriched clays strongly resembles, and offers a plausible mechanism

  10. Improved Chromatographic Bioavailability Estimations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dorsey, John

    1996-01-01

    .... Since the inception of reversed phase liquid chromatography there have been many attempts to correlate chromatographic retention with bioavailability and the most often used bulk measure, the octanol...

  11. Iron filled carbon nanostructures from different precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, S.; Borowiak-Palen, E.; Bachmatiuk, A.; Ruemmeli, M.H.; Gemming, T.; Kalenczuk, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present a study on the synthesis of different nanostructures with one single-step in situ filling (encapsulation) via carbon vapor deposition (CVD). Ferrocene, acetylferrocene and iron (II) nitrate as iron precursors were explored. The application of each of these compounds resulted in different carbon nanomaterials such as: iron filled multiwalled carbon nanotubes with a low filling ratio (Fe-MWCNT), iron filled nanocapsules and unfilled MWCNT. The as-produced samples were purified by high temperature annealing and acid treatment. The purified materials were characterised using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy

  12. The role of mitochondria in cellular iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Roland; Hoffmann, Bastian; Molik, Sabine; Pierik, Antonio J; Rietzschel, Nicole; Stehling, Oliver; Uzarska, Marta A; Webert, Holger; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in iron metabolism in that they synthesize heme, assemble iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, and participate in cellular iron regulation. Here, we review the latter two topics and their intimate connection. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery consists of 17 proteins that operate in three major steps of the maturation process. First, the cysteine desulfurase complex Nfs1-Isd11 as the sulfur donor cooperates with ferredoxin-ferredoxin reductase acting as an electron transfer chain, and frataxin to synthesize an [2Fe-2S] cluster on the scaffold protein Isu1. Second, the cluster is released from Isu1 and transferred toward apoproteins with the help of a dedicated Hsp70 chaperone system and the glutaredoxin Grx5. Finally, various specialized ISC components assist in the generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters and cluster insertion into specific target apoproteins. Functional defects of the core ISC assembly machinery are signaled to cytosolic or nuclear iron regulatory systems resulting in increased cellular iron acquisition and mitochondrial iron accumulation. In fungi, regulation is achieved by iron-responsive transcription factors controlling the expression of genes involved in iron uptake and intracellular distribution. They are assisted by cytosolic multidomain glutaredoxins which use a bound Fe/S cluster as iron sensor and additionally perform an essential role in intracellular iron delivery to target metalloproteins. In mammalian cells, the iron regulatory proteins IRP1, an Fe/S protein, and IRP2 act in a post-transcriptional fashion to adjust the cellular needs for iron. Thus, Fe/S protein biogenesis and cellular iron metabolism are tightly linked to coordinate iron supply and utilization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological and chemical characterization of metal bioavailability in sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Columbia River, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Moran, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the bioavailability and toxicity of copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and lead in sediments from Lake Roosevelt (LR), a reservoir on the Columbia River in Washington, USA that receives inputs of metals from an upstream smelter facility. We characterized chronic sediment toxicity, metal bioaccumulation, and metal concentrations in sediment and pore water from eight study sites: one site upstream in the Columbia River, six sites in the reservoir, and a reference site in an uncontaminated tributary. Total recoverable metal concentrations in LR sediments generally decreased from upstream to downstream in the study area, but sediments from two sites in the reservoir had metal concentrations much lower than adjacent reservoir sites and similar to the reference site, apparently due to erosion of uncontaminated bank soils. Concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in LR sediments were too low to provide strong controls on metal bioavailability, and selective sediment extractions indicated that metals in most LR sediments were primarily associated with iron and manganese oxides. Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) accumulated greatest concentrations of copper from the river sediment, and greatest concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and lead from reservoir sediments. Chronic toxic effects on amphipods (Hyalella azteca; reduced survival) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus; reduced growth) in whole-sediment exposures were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity based on empirical and equilibrium partitioning-based sediment quality guidelines. Elevated metal concentrations in pore waters of some LR sediments suggested that metals released from iron and manganese oxides under anoxic conditions contributed to metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. Results of both chemical and biological assays indicate that metals in sediments from both riverine and reservoir habitats of Lake Roosevelt are available to benthic invertebrates. These findings will be used as

  14. Spatial distribution of bremsstrahlung in water and water-iron by 22-MeV electron bombardment measured with activation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Nishimoto, Takanao; Hirayama, Hideo.

    1977-01-01

    The spatial distributions of bremsstrahlung in water (1 m thick) and water (60 cm thick)-iron (6.3 cm thick) bombarded by 22-MeV electrons were measured by using a new activation method which we developed. These informations are useful for studying shielding, residual activity and radiation damage of accelerator and target materials. From the measured activities, the bremsstrahlung spectra in water were evaluated with the LYRA and the SAND-II unfolding codes. The evaluated spectra were in good agreement with the analytical calculation by the DIBRE code, except for the higher energy ends. The longitudinal and the lateral distributions of bremsstrahlung flux in water were obtained by integrating the evaluated spectra above 8 MeV. The agreement of the experimental and the calculated flux distributions was very good except for a large angle to beam direction. The total photon number crossing a plane normal to the beam axis attenuates exponentially along the axial depth. The iso-flux contour of bremsstrahlung flux was given by interpolating the flux distribution curves. Only the saturated activities of gold detectors were obtained for water-iron in good experimental accuracy. The spatial distribution of gold saturated activities in water-iron clearly shows the attenuating effect due to strong absorption in iron. (auth.)

  15. Magnetic study of iron sorbitol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, F.J. E-mail: osoro@posta.unizar.es; Larrea, A.; Abadia, A.R.; Romero, M.S

    2002-09-01

    A magnetic study of iron sorbitol, an iron-containing drug to treat the iron deficiency anemia is presented. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the system contains nanometric particles with an average diameter of 3 nm whose composition is close to two-line ferrihydrite. The characterisation by magnetisation and AC susceptibility measurements indicates superparamagnetic behaviour with progressive magnetic blocking starting at 8 K. The quantitative analysis of the magnetic results indicates that the system consists of an assembly of very small magnetic moments, presumably originated by spin uncompensation of the antiferromagnetic nanoparticles, with Arrhenius type magnetic dynamics.

  16. Evaluation of Iodine Bioavailability in Seaweed Using in Vitro Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-González, M Raquel; Chiocchetti, Gabriela M; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Vélez, Dinoraz; Devesa, Vicenta; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2017-09-27

    Due to the high levels of iodine present in seaweed, the ingestion of a large amount of this type of food can produce excessive intake of iodine. However, the food after ingestion undergoes different chemistry and physical processes that can modify the amount of iodine that reaches the systemic circulation (bioavailability). Studies on the bioavailability of iodine from food are scarce and indicate that the bioavailable amount is generally lower than ingested. Iodine in vitro bioavailability estimation from different commercialized seaweed has been studied using different in vitro approaches (solubility, dialyzability, and transport and uptake by intestinal cells). Results indicate that iodine is available after gastrointestinal digestion for absorption (bioaccessibility: 49-82%), kombu being the seaweed with the highest bioaccessibility. The incorporation of dialysis cell cultures to elucidate bioavailability modifies the estimation of the amount of iodine that may reach the systemic circulation (dialysis, 5-28%; cell culture, ≤3%). The paper discusses advantages and drawbacks of these methodologies for iodine bioavailability in seaweed.

  17. Iron Coordination and Halogen-Bonding Assisted Iodosylbenzene Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Poulsen de Sousa, David; McKenzie, Christine

    catalytic mixtures using soluble terminal oxygen transfer agents. Isolation of a reactive iron-terminal oxidant adduct, an unique Fe(III)-OIPh complex, is facilitated by strong stabilizing supramolecular halogen-bonding. L3-edge XANES suggests +1.6 for the average oxidation state for the iodine atom3......The iron complex of the hexadentate ligand N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylendiamine-N'-acetate (tpena) efficiently catalyzes selective oxidations of electron-rich olefins and sulfides by insoluble iodosylbenzene (PhIO). Surprisingly, these reactions are faster and more selective than homogenous...... in the iron(III)-coordinated PhIO. This represents a reduction of iodine relative to the original “hypervalent” (+3) PhIO. The equivalent of electron density must be removed from the {(tpena)Fe(III)O} moiety, however Mössbauer spectroscopy shows that the iron atom is not high valent....

  18. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of laser-clad iron-based alloy on Al-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Z.; Wang, W.Y.; Wang, A.H.

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure characterization is important for controlling the quality of laser cladding. In the present work, a detailed microstructure characterization by transmission electron microscopy was carried out on the iron-based alloy laser-clad on Al-Si alloy and an unambiguous identification of phases in the coating was accomplished. It was found that there is austenite, Cr 7 C 3 and Cr 23 C 6 in the clad region; α-Al, NiAl 3 , Fe 2 Al 5 and FeAl 2 in the interface region; and α-Al and silicon in the heat-affected region. A brief discussion was given for their existence based on both kinetic and thermodynamic principles

  19. Serobactins-mediated iron acquisition systems optimize competitive fitness of Herbaspirillum seropedicae inside rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosconi, Federico; Trovero, María F; de Souza, Emanuel M; Fabiano, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z67 is a diazotrophic endophyte able to colonize the interior of many economically relevant crops such as rice, wheat, corn and sorghum. Under iron-deficient conditions, this organism secretes serobactins, a suite of lipopetide siderophores. The role of siderophores in the interaction between endophytes and their plant hosts are not well understood. In this work, we aimed to determine the importance of serobactins-mediated iron acquisition systems in the interaction of H. seropedicae with rice plants. First we provide evidence, by using a combination of genome analysis, proteomic and genetic studies, that the Hsero_2345 gene encodes a TonB-dependent receptor involved in iron-serobactin complex internalization when iron bioavailability is low. Our results show that survival of the Hsero_2345 mutant inside rice plants was not significantly different from that of the wild-type strain. However, when plants were co-inoculated at equal ratios with the wild-type strain and with a double mutant defective in serobactins synthesis and internalization, recovery of mutant was significantly impaired after 8 days post-inoculation. These results demonstrate that serobactins-mediated iron acquisition contributes to competitive fitness of H. seropedicae inside host plants. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. On definition and use of the term bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescigno, A; Thakur, A K; Marzo, A

    1994-10-01

    In common usage, the rate of absorption of an active ingredient or its therapeutic moiety is generally not mentioned in the context of bioavailability. In this communication it is shown that exclusion of the rate of absorption may have serious consequence on the interpretation of bioavailability depending on the underlying model for the system under study. In the case of endogenous substances, the term "bioavailability" is ambiguous unless one specifies whether it refers to availability of the exogenous substance only or the sum total of the exogenous and endogenous substances.

  1. The effect of dietary factors on strawberry anthocyanins oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Sandhu, Amandeep; Huang, Yancui; Park, Eunyoung; Edirisinghe, Indika; Burton-Freeman, Britt M

    2017-11-15

    Strawberries are a dietary source of anthocyanins, particularly pelargonidin glycosides. Dietary anthocyanins have received increasing attention among researchers and consumers due to their health benefits. The oral bioavailability of anthocyanins is reported to be low and various dietary factors may influence their oral bioavailability further. Milk is suggested to reduce (poly)phenols' oral bioavailability. However, the effect of milk on anthocyanin oral bioavailability remains uncertain. Likewise, mixed nutrient meals may influence the oral bioavailability of anthocyanins. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of milk on the oral bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic (PK) variables of strawberry anthocyanins consumed with and without a meal. Nine healthy participants consumed a strawberry beverage prepared in milk or water with a standard meal on two occasions. On two additional occasions, the beverages were given to a subset (n = 4) of participants to determine the impact of the meal on anthocyanin PK variables, including oral bioavailability. Independent of the meal, beverages prepared in milk significantly reduced the peak plasma concentrations (C max ) of pelargonidin-3-O-glucoside (P-3-G), pelargonidin-glucuronide (PG) and pelargonidin-3-O-rutinoside (P-3-R), as well as the PG and P-3-R area under the curve (AUC) (p bioavailability of pelargonidin anthocyanins under meal conditions; however, the oral relative bioavailability of pelargonidin anthocyanins was reduced by ∼50% by milk under without meal conditions (p < 0.05). Consuming strawberry beverages made with milk and consuming those made with water with and without a meal influenced different aspects of strawberry anthocyanin PKs. The significance of this effect on clinical efficacy requires additional research.

  2. Bioavailability of syrup and tablet formulations of cefetamet pivoxil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, M P; Edwards, D J; McNamara, P J; Stoeckel, K

    1993-12-01

    Two studies examining the bioavailability of cefetamet pivoxil in healthy male subjects were conducted. In the first, the bioavailabilities of the 250-mg (M250) and M500 tablet formulations of cefetamet pivoxil to be marketed were compared with that of a tablet used in clinical trials. All products were given with food at a dose of 500 mg. In the second study, the bioavailability of the syrup formulation was evaluated under both fasting and nonfasting conditions and compared with that of the M500 tablet formulation given with food. The absolute bioavailabilities of the M500 and M250 tablets (55.0% +/- 8.0% and 55.7% +/- 7.0%, respectively) were not significantly different from that of the clinical-trial formulation (49.8% +/- 8.5%). The newer tablet formulations exhibited faster absorption as evidenced by higher peak concentrations (3.8 [M500] and 3.9 [M250] mg/liter compared with 3.2 mg/liter for the clinical-trial formulation), a shorter time to peak concentration, and a shorter mean absorption time. The syrup formulation was found to have significantly lower absolute bioavailability (37.9% +/- 6.0%) compared with that of the M500 tablet (58.4% +/- 9.0%) when both were given with food. Food had no significant effect on the bioavailability of the syrup, which averaged 34.0% +/- 8.6% under fasting conditions, although absorption was delayed by food (mean absorption time increased from 2.2 to 3.9 h). This contrasts with the results of previous studies documenting significant increases in tablet bioavailability with food. Despite the lower bioavailability of the syrup, unbound-cefetamet concentrations are expected to remain above the MICs for 90% of the strains tested for susceptible organisms for approximately 10 h of the usual 12-h dosing interval with both syrup and tablet formulations of cefetamet pivoxil given with food.

  3. Bioaccessibility tests accurately estimate bioavailability of lead to quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Basta, Nicholas T; Chaney, Rufus L.; Henry, Paula F.; Mosby, David; Rattner, Barnett A.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Sprague, Dan; Weber, John

    2016-01-01

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with phosphorus significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. Bioaccessibility of Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter (24%), or present as Pb sulfate (18%). Additional Pb was associated with P (chloropyromorphite, hydroxypyromorphite and tertiary Pb phosphate), and with Pb carbonates, leadhillite (a lead sulfate carbonate hydroxide), and Pb sulfide. The formation of chloropyromorphite reduced the bioavailability of Pb and the amendment of Pb-contaminated soils with P may be a thermodynamically favored means to sequester Pb.

  4. Making oxidation potentials predictable: Coordination of additives applied to the electronic fine tuning of an iron(II) complex

    KAUST Repository

    Haslinger, Stefan

    2014-11-03

    This work examines the impact of axially coordinating additives on the electronic structure of a bioinspired octahedral low-spin iron(II) N-heterocyclic carbene (Fe-NHC) complex. Bearing two labile trans-acetonitrile ligands, the Fe-NHC complex, which is also an excellent oxidation catalyst, is prone to axial ligand exchange. Phosphine- and pyridine-based additives are used for substitution of the acetonitrile ligands. On the basis of the resulting defined complexes, predictability of the oxidation potentials is demonstrated, based on a correlation between cyclic voltammetry experiments and density functional theory calculated molecular orbital energies. Fundamental insights into changes of the electronic properties upon axial ligand exchange and the impact on related attributes will finally lead to target-oriented manipulation of the electronic properties and consequently to the effective tuning of the reactivity of bioinspired systems.

  5. Making oxidation potentials predictable: Coordination of additives applied to the electronic fine tuning of an iron(II) complex

    KAUST Repository

    Haslinger, Stefan; Kü ck, Jens W.; Hahn, Eva M.; Cokoja, Mirza; Pö thig, Alexander; Basset, Jean-Marie; Kü hn, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the impact of axially coordinating additives on the electronic structure of a bioinspired octahedral low-spin iron(II) N-heterocyclic carbene (Fe-NHC) complex. Bearing two labile trans-acetonitrile ligands, the Fe-NHC complex, which is also an excellent oxidation catalyst, is prone to axial ligand exchange. Phosphine- and pyridine-based additives are used for substitution of the acetonitrile ligands. On the basis of the resulting defined complexes, predictability of the oxidation potentials is demonstrated, based on a correlation between cyclic voltammetry experiments and density functional theory calculated molecular orbital energies. Fundamental insights into changes of the electronic properties upon axial ligand exchange and the impact on related attributes will finally lead to target-oriented manipulation of the electronic properties and consequently to the effective tuning of the reactivity of bioinspired systems.

  6. Electrochemistry of Simple Organometallic Models of Iron-Iron Hydrogenases in Organic Solvent and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloaguen, Frederic

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic models of the active site of iron-iron hydrogenases are currently the subjects of numerous studies aimed at developing H2-production catalysts based on cheap and abundant materials. In this context, the present report offers an electrochemist's view of the catalysis of proton reduction by simple binuclear iron(I) thiolate complexes. Although these complexes probably do not follow a biocatalytic pathway, we analyze and discuss the interplay between the reduction potential and basicity and how these antagonist properties impact the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer to the metal centers. This question is central to any consideration of the activity at the molecular level of hydrogenases and related enzymes. In a second part, special attention is paid to iron thiolate complexes holding rigid and unsaturated bridging ligands. The complexes that enjoy mild reduction potentials and stabilized reduced forms are promising iron-based catalysts for the photodriven evolution of H2 in organic solvents and, more importantly, in water.

  7. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  8. Helium, iron and electron particle transport and energy transport studies on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor

  9. Iron and zinc absorption from weaning foods prepared from germinated cereals and legumes using isotope tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez, D H; Kuizon, M D; Marero, L M; Mallillin, A C; Cruz, E M; Madriaga, J R [Department of Science and Technology, Manila (Philippines). Food and Nutrition Research Inst.

    1994-12-31

    Iron bioavailability from weaning foods prepared from 70:30 combination of germinated rice:mungbean (GRM); germinated rice: cowpea (GRC) and germinated corn:mungbean (GCM) was determined by radioisotopic measurements of iron absorption in human subjects. The gruels were prepared as plain with sugar and flavoring labeled by the extrinsic tag method, and served as hot porridge. It was estimated that iron-deficient infants would absorb 3.5% from GRM, 4.9% from GRC and 5.6% from GCM. Differences between absorption among the weaning foods were not statistically significant. Planning of diets for these age group should include other sources of iron especially heme. Zinc absorption from the weaning food formulations will be studied by the in vitro and in vivo methods. For the in vivo method on human subjects, the absorption of zinc will be determined from the measurement of the whole body retention of the isotope 14 days after intake of the labeled mean. Serum zinc level will be determined to assess the zinc status of the subjects. (author). 23 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Iron and zinc absorption from weaning foods prepared from germinated cereals and legumes using isotope tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, D.H.; Kuizon, M.D.; Marero, L.M.; Mallillin, A.C.; Cruz, E.M.; Madriaga, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Iron bioavailability from weaning foods prepared from 70:30 combination of germinated rice:mungbean (GRM); germinated rice: cowpea (GRC) and germinated corn:mungbean (GCM) was determined by radioisotopic measurements of iron absorption in human subjects. The gruels were prepared as plain with sugar and flavoring labeled by the extrinsic tag method, and served as hot porridge. It was estimated that iron-deficient infants would absorb 3.5% from GRM, 4.9% from GRC and 5.6% from GCM. Differences between absorption among the weaning foods were not statistically significant. Planning of diets for these age group should include other sources of iron especially heme. Zinc absorption from the weaning food formulations will be studied by the in vitro and in vivo methods. For the in vivo method on human subjects, the absorption of zinc will be determined from the measurement of the whole body retention of the isotope 14 days after intake of the labeled mean. Serum zinc level will be determined to assess the zinc status of the subjects. (author). 23 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  11. Estimating Lead (Pb) Bioavailability In A Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children are exposed to Pb through ingestion of Pb-contaminated soil. Soil Pb bioavailability is estimated using animal models or with chemically defined in vitro assays that measure bioaccessibility. However, bioavailability estimates in a large animal model (e.g., swine) can be...

  12. Microstructural characteristics of Al-alloyed austempered ductile irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani-Rashid, A.R.; Edmonds, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    Microstructural development after austempering ductile irons containing 0.48% and 4.88%Al has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental irons were made by green sand casting and gravity die casting. After austenitising at 920 deg. C for 90 min, an austempering treatment at 400 deg. C for times up to 100 min resulted in microstructures consisting of carbide-free bainitic ferrite with considerable amounts of high carbon retained austenite.

  13. Limited solubility of iron in the Sun's interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.L.; Alder, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    Stripped iron nuclei in a hydrogen plasma under central solar conditions, according to the classical Debye-Huckel model, would undergo phase separation for concentrations well below the cosmic abundance value. The higher concentration corrections, needed to characterise the iron-rich phase, lead to enhanced solubility for a simplified model where the electrons form a uniform background. Support for an iron-rich phase coalescing in the solar interior requires more accurate treatment of bound and partially bound electrons in such a mixture. The results of the Debye-Huckel model where the electrons are treated discretely and as a continuum, are reported here and support the possibility of phase separation. The physical cause of that phase separation is simply that the potential energy is lower in the separated phase than in the mixture because the local charge neutralisation is much better satisfied in the two separated phases. (author)

  14. Enhanced bioavailable contaminant stripping (EBCS): metal bioavailability for evaluation of phytoextraction success

    OpenAIRE

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca; Gorini, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice; Tassi, Eliana; Barbafieri, Meri

    2013-01-01

    Phytoextraction may be applied at field scale when the removal of bioavailable metals is the specific target of the technology. Residual metals in soil can be considered substantially inert or to be evaluated by site specific risk analysis.

  15. Morphology and electronic structure of the oxide shell on the surface of iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chongmin; Baer, Donald R; Amonette, James E; Engelhard, Mark H; Antony, Jiji; Qiang, You

    2009-07-01

    An iron (Fe) nanoparticle exposed to air at room temperature will be instantly covered by an oxide shell that is typically approximately 3 nm thick. The nature of this native oxide shell, in combination with the underlying Fe(0) core, determines the physical and chemical behavior of the core-shell nanoparticle. One of the challenges of characterizing core-shell nanoparticles is determining the structure of the oxide shell, that is, whether it is FeO, Fe(3)O(4), gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), or something else. The results of prior characterization efforts, which have mostly used X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopic imaging, have been framed in terms of one of the known Fe-oxide structures, although it is not necessarily true that the thin layer of Fe oxide is a known Fe oxide. In this Article, we probe the structure of the oxide shell on Fe nanoparticles using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) at the oxygen (O) K-edge with a spatial resolution of several nanometers (i.e., less than that of an individual particle). We studied two types of representative particles: small particles that are fully oxidized (no Fe(0) core) and larger core-shell particles that possess an Fe core. We found that O K-edge spectra collected for the oxide shell in nanoparticles show distinct differences from those of known Fe oxides. Typically, the prepeak of the spectra collected on both the core-shell and the fully oxidized particles is weaker than that collected on standard Fe(3)O(4). Given the fact that the origin of this prepeak corresponds to the transition of the O 1s electron to the unoccupied state of O 2p hybridized with Fe 3d, a weak pre-edge peak indicates a combination of the following four factors: a higher degree of occupancy of the Fe 3d orbital; a longer Fe-O bond length; a decreased covalency of the Fe-O bond; and a measure of cation vacancies. These results suggest that the coordination configuration in

  16. Systems biological approach of molecular descriptors connectivity: optimal descriptors for oral bioavailability prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shiek S S J; Ramakrishnan, V

    2012-01-01

    Poor oral bioavailability is an important parameter accounting for the failure of the drug candidates. Approximately, 50% of developing drugs fail because of unfavorable oral bioavailability. In silico prediction of oral bioavailability (%F) based on physiochemical properties are highly needed. Although many computational models have been developed to predict oral bioavailability, their accuracy remains low with a significant number of false positives. In this study, we present an oral bioavailability model based on systems biological approach, using a machine learning algorithm coupled with an optimal discriminative set of physiochemical properties. The models were developed based on computationally derived 247 physicochemical descriptors from 2279 molecules, among which 969, 605 and 705 molecules were corresponds to oral bioavailability, intestinal absorption (HIA) and caco-2 permeability data set, respectively. The partial least squares discriminate analysis showed 49 descriptors of HIA and 50 descriptors of caco-2 are the major contributing descriptors in classifying into groups. Of these descriptors, 47 descriptors were commonly associated to HIA and caco-2, which suggests to play a vital role in classifying oral bioavailability. To determine the best machine learning algorithm, 21 classifiers were compared using a bioavailability data set of 969 molecules with 47 descriptors. Each molecule in the data set was represented by a set of 47 physiochemical properties with the functional relevance labeled as (+bioavailability/-bioavailability) to indicate good-bioavailability/poor-bioavailability molecules. The best-performing algorithm was the logistic algorithm. The correlation based feature selection (CFS) algorithm was implemented, which confirms that these 47 descriptors are the fundamental descriptors for oral bioavailability prediction. The logistic algorithm with 47 selected descriptors correctly predicted the oral bioavailability, with a predictive accuracy

  17. Moessbauer effect studies of magnetic interactions in iron and dilute iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woude, F. van der; Schurer, P.J.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A temperature-dependent Moessbauer study was conducted in FeX alloys, where X = Al, Si, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni, aimed at solving the problem of 'what is localized and what is itinerant in iron ferromagnetism'. The experimental results are interpreted using a phenomenological model based on a modified Zener-Vonsovskij theory. Absorption spectra of FeX alloys were measured as a function of temperature. It was found that the 3d magnetic moments in iron were mainly localized while exchange coupling was provided by partly itinerant 3d electrons. (L.D.)

  18. Biosynthesis and characterization of layered iron phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weijia; He Wen; Wang Meiting; Zhang Xudong; Yan Shunpu; Tian Xiuying; Sun Xianan; Han Xiuxiu; Li Peng

    2008-01-01

    Layered iron phosphate with uniform morphology has been synthesized by a precipitation method with yeast cells as a biosurfactant. The yeast cells are used to regulate the nucleation and growth of layered iron phosphate. The uniform layered structure is characterized by small-angle x-ray diffraction (SAXD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is used to analyze the chemical bond linkages in organic–inorganic hybrid iron phosphate. The likely synthetic mechanism of nucleation and oriented growth is discussed. The electrical conductivity of hybrid iron phosphate heat-treated at different temperatures is presented

  19. Bioaccumulation and bioavailability of polybrominated diphynel ethers (PBDEs) in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xianwei; Zhu Shuzhen; Chen Peng; Zhu Lingyan

    2010-01-01

    Earthworms were exposed to artificially contaminated soils of DE-71 and DE-79 to investigate the bioaccumulation and bioavailability of PBDEs in soil. All major congeners were bioavailable to earthworms. The uptake and elimination rate coefficients of PBDEs decreased with their logK ow s. The biota soil accumulation factors of PBDEs also declined with logK ow . These may be due to the large molecular size and the high affinity of PBDEs to soil particles. The concentrations extracted by Tenax for 6 h correlated very well with those found in earthworms, suggesting that the bioavailability of PBDEs in soil is related to the fraction of rapid desorption from soil. This also indicates that 6 h Tenax extraction is a good proxy for the bioavailability of PBDEs to earthworms in soil. The BSAFs of PBDEs in aged soil decreased 22-84% compared to freshly spiked soil, indicating that aging may diminish the bioavailability of PBDEs in soil significantly. - PBDEs are bioavailable to earthworms in soil and the uptake and elimination rate coefficients and BSAFs declined with their logK ow s.

  20. ASSESSING SOIL ARSENIC BIOAVAILABILITY IN THE LABORATORY MOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variation among soils in the bioavailability of arsenic can be a critical determinant of the risk posed by exposure to these soils. Although in vitro techniques can provide vital data on aspects of bioavailability of metals and metalloids from soils, these results must be valida...

  1. The DFT-DVM theoretical study of the differences of quadrupole splitting and the iron electronic structure for the rough heme models for {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits in deoxyhemoglobin and for deoxymyoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuryeva, E. I. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-15

    Quantum chemical calculations of the iron electron structure and {sup 57}Fe quadrupole splitting were made by density functional theory and X{alpha} discrete variation method for the rough heme models for {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits in deoxyhemoglobin and for deoxymyoglobin accounting stereochemical differences of the active sites in native proteins. The calculations revealed differences of quadrupole splitting temperature dependences for three models indicating sensitivity of quadrupole splitting and Fe(II) electronic structure to small variations of iron stereochemistry.

  2. Conductive iron oxide minerals accelerate syntrophic cooperation in methanogenic benzoate degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Li; Tang, Jia; Wang, Yueqiang; Hu, Min; Zhou, Shungui, E-mail: sgzhou@soil.gd.cn

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Paddy soil contaminated with benzoate incubated with hematite and magnetite. • Iron oxides addition enhanced methanogenic benzoate degradation by 25–53%. • The facilitated syntrophy might involve direct interspecies electron transfer. • Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that conductive iron oxide minerals can facilitate syntrophic metabolism of the methanogenic degradation of organic matter, such as ethanol, propionate and butyrate, in natural and engineered microbial ecosystems. This enhanced syntrophy involves direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) powered by microorganisms exchanging metabolic electrons through electrically conductive minerals. Here, we evaluated the possibility that conductive iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) can stimulate the methanogenic degradation of benzoate, which is a common intermediate in the anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds. The results showed that 89–94% of the electrons released from benzoate oxidation were recovered in CH{sub 4} production, and acetate was identified as the only carbon-bearing intermediate during benzoate degradation. Compared with the iron-free controls, the rates of methanogenic benzoate degradation were enhanced by 25% and 53% in the presence of hematite and magnetite, respectively. This stimulatory effect probably resulted from DIET-mediated methanogenesis in which electrons transfer between syntrophic partners via conductive iron minerals. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved in the functioning of syntrophic DIET. Considering the ubiquitous presence of iron minerals within soils and sediments, the findings of this study will increase the current understanding of the natural biological attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic environments.

  3. Bioavailability assessment of toxic metals using the technique "acid-volatile sulfide (AVS)-simultaneously extracted metals (SEM)" in marine sediments collected in Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jucelino B; Nascimento, Rodrigo A; de Oliva, Sergio T; de Oliveira, Olívia M C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the bioavailability of the metals (cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel) in sediment samples collected in seven stations from the São Paulo Estuary, Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil. The bioavailability was determined by employing the technique "acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metal (SEM)". The elements cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc were determined using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV), while nickel was quantified utilizing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The accuracy of these methods was confirmed using a certified reference material of estuarine sediment (NIST 1646). The sulfide was quantified using potentiometry with selective electrode and the organic matter determination employing an indirect volumetric method using potassium dichromate and iron(II) sulfate solutions. The bioavailability of the metals was estimated by relationship between the concentration of AVS and the sum of the concentrations of the simultaneously extracted metals (ΣSEM), considering a significant toxicity when (ΣSEM)/(AVS) is higher than 1. The bioavailability values in the seven stations studied varied from 0.93 to 1.31 (June, 2014) and from 0.34 to 0.58 (September, 2014). These results demonstrated a critical condition of toxicity (bioavailability >1) in six of the seven sediment samples collected during the rainy season (June, 2014). In the other period (September, 2014), the bioavailability was always lower than 1 for all sediment samples collected in the seven stations. The individual values of the concentrations of the five metals were compared with the parameters PEL (probable effects level) and TEL (threshold effects level), which are commonly employed for characterization of ecological risk in environmental systems. This comparison revealed that all metals have concentrations lower than the PEL and only zinc and lead in some stations have contents higher than the TEL. The

  4. Candesartan cilexetil loaded nanodelivery systems for improved oral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhipala, Narendar; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2017-02-01

    Candesartan cilexetil (CC), an antihypertensive drug, has low oral bioavailability due to poor solubility and hepatic first-pass metabolism. These are major limitations in oral delivery of CC. Several approaches are known to reduce the problems of solubility and improve the bioavailability of CC. Among various approaches, nanotechnology-based delivery of CC has potential to overcome the challenges associated with the oral administration. This review focuses on various nano-based delivery systems available and tried for improving the aqueous solubility, dissolution and consequently bioavailability of CC upon oral administration. Of all, solid lipid nanoparticles appear to be promising delivery system, based on current reported results, for delivery of CC, as this system improved the oral bioavailability and possessed prolonged pharmacodynamic effect.

  5. Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles via sonochemical method and their characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amir Hassanjani-Roshan; Mohammad Reza Vaezi; Ali Shokuhfar; Zohreh Rajabali

    2011-01-01

    Preparation of iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles was carried out via a sonochemical process. The process parameters such as temperature,sonication time and power of ultrasonication play important roles in the size and morphology of the final products. The iron oxide nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy,X-ray powder diffraction,and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. From transmission electron microscopy observations,the size of the iron oxide nanoparticles is estimated to be significantly smaller than 19 nm. X-ray diffraction data of the powder after annealing provide direct evidence that the iron oxide was formed during the sonochemical process.

  6. Effect of dose increase or cimetidine co-administration on albendazole bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H. G.; Koopmans, R. P.; Nagy, J.; Butter, J. J.; Kager, P. A.; van Boxtel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    The low bioavailability of albendazole affects the therapeutic response in patients with echinococcosis. Cimetidine co-administration is reported to improve bioavailability. To analyze the assumed dose-dependent bioavailability of albendazole, we administered 5 to 30 mg/kg albendazole to 6 male

  7. Ab-initio simulations of pressure effects on structural and electronic properties of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomic, Milan

    2013-07-01

    The ab-initio molecular dynamics framework has been the cornerstone of computational solid state physics in the last few decades. Although it is already a mature field it is still rapidly developing to accommodate the growth in solid state research as well as to efficiently utilize the increase in computing power. Starting from the first principles, the ab-initio molecular dynamics provides essential information about structural and electronic properties of matter under various external conditions. In this thesis we use the ab-initio molecular dynamics to study the behavior of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} under the application of external pressure. BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} belong to the family of iron based superconductors which are a novel and promising superconducting materials. The application of pressure is one of two key methods by which electronic and structural properties of iron based superconductors can be modified, the other one being doping (or chemical pressure). In particular, it has been noted that pressure conditions have an important effect, but their exact role is not fully understood. To better understand the effect of different pressure conditions we have performed a series of ab-initio simulations of pressure application. In order to apply the pressure with arbitrary stress tensor we have developed a method based on the Fast Inertial Relaxation Engine, whereby the unit cell and the atomic positions are evolved according to the metadynamical equations of motion. We have found that the application of hydrostatic and c axis uniaxial pressure induces a phase transition from the magnetically ordered orthorhombic phase to the non-magnetic collapsed tetragonal phase in both BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. In the case of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, an intermediate tetragonal non-magnetic tetragonal phase is observed in addition. Application of the uniaxial pressure parallel to the c axis reduces the

  8. Delivery of anthropogenic bioavailable iron from mineral dust and combustion aerosols to the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 彰記; 時, 宗波; ITO, Akinori; SHI, Zongbo

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic soluble iron (Fe) to the ocean has been suggested to modulate primary ocean productivity and thus indirectly affect the climate. A key process contributing to anthropogenic sources of soluble Fe is associated with air pollution, which acidifies Fe-containing mineral aerosols during their transport and leads to Fe transformation from insoluble to soluble forms. However, there is large uncertainty in our estimate of this anthropogenic soluble Fe. In this ...

  9. Enhanced Bioavailable Contaminant Stripping (EBCS: metal bioavailability for evaluation of phytoextraction success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petruzzelli G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoextraction may be applied at field scale when the removal of bioavailable metals is the specific target of the technology. Residual metals in soil can be considered substantially inert or to be evaluated by site specific risk analysis.

  10. Nitric oxide bioavailability dysfunction involves in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Ye, Zi-Xin; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Chang, Jian; Yang, Mei-Wen; Zhong, Hua-Hua; Hong, Fen-Fang; Yang, Shu-Long

    2018-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of atherosclerosis (AS) include lipid accumulation, fibrosis formation and atherosclerotic plaque produced in artery intima, which leads to vascular sclerosis, lumen stenosis and irritates the ischemic changes of corresponding organs. Endothelial dysfunction was closely associated with AS. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. NO is also a potent endogenous vasodilator and enters for the key processes that suppresses the formation vascular lesion even AS. NO bioavailability indicates the production and utilization of endothelial NO in organisms, its decrease is related to oxidative stress, lipid infiltration, the expressions of some inflammatory factors and the alteration of vascular tone, which plays an important role in endothelial dysfunction. The enhancement of arginase activity and the increase in asymmetric dimethylarginine and hyperhomocysteinemia levels all contribute to AS by intervening NO bioavailability in human beings. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, chronic kidney disease and smoking, etc., also participate in AS by influencing NO bioavailability and NO level. Here, we reviewed the relationship between NO bioavailability and AS according the newest literatures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Iron-Mediated Oxidation of Methoxyhydroquinone under Dark Conditions: Kinetic and Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiu; Davis, James A; Nico, Peter S

    2016-02-16

    Despite the biogeochemical significance of the interactions between natural organic matter (NOM) and iron species, considerable uncertainty still remains as to the exact processes contributing to the rates and extents of complexation and redox reactions between these important and complex environmental components. Investigations on the reactivity of low-molecular-weight quinones, which are believed to be key redox active compounds within NOM, toward iron species, could provide considerable insight into the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving NOM and iron. In this study, the oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone (MH2Q) by ferric iron (Fe(III)) under dark conditions in the absence and presence of oxygen was investigated within a pH range of 4-6. Although Fe(III) was capable of stoichiometrically oxidizing MH2Q under anaerobic conditions, catalytic oxidation of MH2Q was observed in the presence of O2 due to further cycling between oxygen, semiquinone radicals, and iron species. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the predominant mechanisms, which indicated that both the undissociated and monodissociated anions of MH2Q were kinetically active species toward Fe(III) reduction, with the monodissociated anion being the key species accounting for the pH dependence of the oxidation. The generated radical intermediates, namely semiquinone and superoxide, are of great importance in reaction-chain propagation. The kinetic model may provide critical insight into the underlying mechanisms of the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of metal-organic interactions and assist in understanding and predicting the factors controlling iron and organic matter transformation and bioavailability in aquatic systems.

  12. Characterization and structural properties of iron in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewanamuni, Udya; Dehipawala, Sunil; Gafney, Harry

    Iron is one of the most abundant metals in the soil and occurs in a wide range of chemical forms. Humans receive iron through either meat products or plants. Non meat eaters depend on plant product for their daily iron requirement. The iron absorption by plants depends on other minerals present in the soil and soil pH value. The amount of iron present in plants grown with different soil compositions were investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Based on the X-ray absorption data, the amount of iron in plants vary significantly with soil pH value. The Mossbauer spectroscopy reveals that iron present in the samples has the form